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Sample records for affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies

  1. Therapeutic effects of antigen affinity-purified polyclonal anti-receptor of advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) antibodies on cholestasis-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Deng, Qing; Gao, Jin; Yu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Yang; Li, Jingjing; Guan, Wen; Hu, Jianjun; Tan, Quanhui; Zhou, Liang; Han, Wei; Yuan, Yunsheng; Yu, Yan

    2016-05-15

    Cholestasis leads to acute hepatic injury, fibrosis/cirrhosis, inflammation, and duct proliferation. We investigated whether blocking receptor of advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) with polyclonal anti-RAGE antibodies (anti-RAGE) could regulate acute liver injury and fibrosis in a rat bile duct ligation (BDL) model. Male Wister rats received 0.5mg/kg rabbit anti-RAGE or an equal amount of rabbit IgG by subcutaneous injection twice a week after BDL. Samples of liver tissue and peripheral blood were collected at 14 days after BDL. Serum biochemistry and histology were used to analyze the degree of liver injury. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunohistochemical staining were used to further analyze liver injury. Anti-RAGE improved the gross appearance of the liver and the rat survival rate. Liver tissue histology and relevant serum biochemistry indicated that anti-RAGE attenuated liver necrosis, inflammation, liver fibrosis, and duct proliferation in the BDL model. qPCR and western blotting showed significant reductions in interleukin-1β expression levels in the liver by treatment with anti-RAGE. Anti-RAGE also significantly reduced the mRNA levels of α1(1) collagen (Col1α1) and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, and the ratio of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 to matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the liver. In addition, anti-RAGE regulated the transcriptional level of Col1α1 and MMP-9 in transforming growth factor-β-induced activated LX-2 cells in vitro. Anti-RAGE was found to inhibit hepatic stellate cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, anti-RAGE can protect the liver from injury induced by BDL in rats. PMID:26970185

  2. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  3. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  4. Identification and subcellular localization of a 21-kilodalton molecule using affinity-purified antibodies against. cap alpha. -transforming growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hazarika, P.; Pardue, R.L.; Earls, R.; Dedman, J.R.

    1987-04-07

    Monospecific antibodies were generated against each of six different peptide sequences derived from rat and human ..cap alpha..-transforming growth factor (..cap alpha..-TGF). The affinity-purified antibody to the 17 amino acid carboxyl-terminal portion of the molecule proved most useful in detecting ..cap alpha..-TGF. When used in a peptide-based radioimmunoassay, it was possible to measure nanogram quantities of native ..cap alpha..-TGF in conditioned cell culture media. When used to analyze cell lysate, these antibodies specifically recognized a 21-kilodalton protein species. Indirect immunofluorescence localization procedures revealed a high concentration of ..cap alpha..-TCF in a perinuclear ring with a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. These results suggest that a precursor form of ..cap alpha..-TGF has a cellular role beyond that of an autocrine growth factor.

  5. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic. PMID:24037837

  6. Polyclonal antibody to soman-tyrosine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Duysen, Ellen G.; Froment, Marie-Thérèse; Masson, Patrick; Nachon, Florian; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Klassen, Lynell W.; Cashman, John; Williams, Gareth R.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Soman forms a stable, covalent bond with tyrosine 411 of human albumin, with tyrosines 257 and 593 in human transferrin, and with tyrosine in many other proteins. The pinacolyl group of soman is retained, suggesting that pinacolyl methylphosphonate bound to tyrosine could generate specific antibodies. Tyrosine in the pentapeptide RYGRK was covalently modified with soman simply by adding soman to the peptide. The phosphonylated-peptide was linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and the conjugate was injected into rabbits. The polyclonal antiserum recognized soman-labeled human albumin, soman-mouse albumin, and soman human transferrin, but not non-phosphonylated control proteins. The soman-labeled tyrosines in these proteins are surrounded by different amino acid sequences, suggesting that the polyclonal recognizes soman-tyrosine independent of the amino acid sequence. Antiserum obtained after 4 antigen injections over a period of 18 weeks was tested in a competition ELISA where it had an IC50 of 10−11 M. The limit of detection on Western blots was 0.01 μg (15 picomoles) of soman-labeled albumin. In conclusion, a high-affinity, polyclonal antibody that specifically recognizes soman adducts on tyrosine in a variety of proteins has been produced. Such an antibody could be useful for identifying secondary targets of soman toxicity. PMID:23469927

  7. ETRAP (efficient trapping and purification) of target protein polyclonal antibodies from GST-protein immune sera.

    PubMed

    Crimmins, Dan L; Brada, Nancy A; Lockwood, Christina M; Griest, Terry A; Waldemer, Rachel J; Cervinski, Mark A; Ohlendorf, Matthew F; McQuillan, Jay J; Ladenson, Jack H

    2010-12-01

    Recombinant GST (glutathione transferase) proteins are widely used as immunogens to generate polyclonal antibodies. Advantages of using GST proteins include: commercially available cloning vectors, vast literature for protein expression in Escherichia coli, the ease of protein purification, immunogen can be used as an ELISA standard and GST can be removed in some systems. However, there are disadvantages: GST oligomerization, inclusion body formation and target protein insolubility after GST removal. Perhaps the most detrimental is the significant generation of anti-GST antibodies by the host animal. A two-column procedure using a glutathione-GST column and a glutathione-(GST-protein) column can yield affinity-purified anti-(GST-protein) polyclonal antibody. Several passes over the first column are often required, though, to completely extract the anti-GST antibodies from the immune sera. We reasoned that knowledge of the target protein linear epitope(s) would allow construction of a peptide affinity resin for a single-pass 'one and done' purification termed ETRAP (efficient trapping and purification). In the present paper, we describe our efforts and present data on rabbits and sheep immunized with GST proteins having target protein molecular masses of ~8, 21 and 33 kDa. The titre and purity of the target antibodies using the ETRAP protocol were comparable to the more laborious multi-column purifications but with a considerable saving in time. PMID:21054278

  8. Induction of antihemagglutinin antibodies by polyclonal antiidiotype antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dinca, L; Neuwirth, S; Schulman, J; Bona, C

    1993-01-01

    Antiidiotypic antibodies can be envisioned as an alternative approach in the development of vaccines against influenza virus, which exhibits natural antigenic variations. In our work, we obtained two polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies against PY102, VM113, and VM202 mAbs, which in turn are specific respectively for PR8 virus and laboratory-induced virus variants (PY102-V1 and VM113-V1). With these cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies, we were able to elicit anti-HA antibodies in mice. In comparing the anti-HA antibody response in animals injected with anti-Id antibodies to those immunized with PR8 influenza virus, we demonstrated that the HI titer was higher after virus immunization and that the PR8 virus boost was more efficient in this group. Our results showed that the polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies were more efficient than the individual anti-Ids at eliciting responses. At the same time, we demonstrated that PR8-primed T cells, cultured with B cells from animals immunized with anti-Id antibodies, were able to produce anti-PR8 antibodies subsequent to stimulation with influenza virus. PMID:8476510

  9. Purification of polyclonal anti-conformational antibodies for use in affinity selection from random peptide phage display libraries: A study using the hydatid vaccine EG95

    PubMed Central

    Read, A.J.; Gauci, C.G.; Lightowlers, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of polyclonal antibodies to screen random peptide phage display libraries often results in the recognition of a large number of peptides that mimic linear epitopes on various proteins. There appears to be a bias in the use of this technology toward the selection of peptides that mimic linear epitopes. In many circumstances the correct folding of a protein immunogen is required for conferring protection. The use of random peptide phage display libraries to identify peptide mimics of conformational epitopes in these cases requires a strategy for overcoming this bias. Conformational epitopes on the hydatid vaccine EG95 have been shown to result in protective immunity in sheep, whereas linear epitopes are not protective. In this paper we describe a strategy that results in the purification of polyclonal antibodies directed against conformational epitopes while eliminating antibodies directed against linear epitopes. These affinity purified antibodies were then used to select a peptide from a random peptide phage display library that has the capacity to mimic conformational epitopes on EG95. This peptide was subsequently used to affinity purify monospecific antibodies against EG95. PMID:19349218

  10. Heparin binding domain of antithrombin III: Characterization using a synthetic peptide directed polyclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.W.; Dey, B.; Knauer, D.J. )

    1990-09-25

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a plasma-borne serine protease inhibitor that apparently forms covalent complexes with thrombin. The interaction between ATIII and thrombin is enhanced several thousandfold by the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. The authors have previously proposed that the heparin binding site of ATIII residues within a region extending from amino acid residues 114-156. Computer-assisted analysis of this region revealed the presence of a 22 amino acid domain (residues 124-145), part of which shows a strong potential for the formation of an amphipathic helix: hydrophobic on one face and highly positively charged on the other. In the presence studies, polyclonal antisera were generated against a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 124-145 in native human ATIII. Affinity-purified IgG from these antisera, as well as monovalent Fab's derived from them, specifically blocked the binding of heparin to ATIII. Additionally, occupancy of the heparin binding site by these same monovalent and bivalent IgG's at least partially substituted for heparin, accelerating linkage formation between ATIII and thrombin. These results provide the first immunological evidence that region 124-145 is directly involved in the binding of heparin to ATIII and that an antibody-induced conformational change within this region can mediate ATIII activation.

  11. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-zhe; Coljee, Vincent W.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  12. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Zhe; Coljee, Vincent W; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2013-11-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  13. Pathogen-specific recombinant human polyclonal antibodies: biodefence applications.

    PubMed

    Bregenholt, Søren; Haurum, John

    2004-03-01

    The potential use of biological agents such as viruses, bacteria or bacterial toxins as weapons of mass destruction has fuelled significant national and international research and development in novel prophylactic or therapeutic countermeasures. Such measures need to be fast-acting and broadly specific, a hallmark of target-specific polyclonal antibodies (pAbs). As reviewed here, pathogen-specific antibodies in the form of human or animal serum have long been recognised as effective therapies in a number of infectious diseases. This review focuses in particular on the potential biowarfare agents prioritised by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), referred to as the category A organisms. Furthermore, it is propose that the last decade of development in recombinant antibody technologies offers the possibility for developing highly specific human monoclonal or polyclonal pathogen-specific antibodies. In particular, pathogen-specific polyclonal human antibodies offer certain advantages over existing hyperimmune serum products, monoclonal antibodies, small molecule drugs and vaccines. Here, the rationale for designing pAb-based therapeutics against the CDC category A microbial agents causing anthrax, botulism, plague, smallpox, tularaemia and viral haemorrhagic fevers, as well as the overall design of such therapeutics, are discussed. PMID:15006732

  14. Characterization of rabbit cells by monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ponsard, D C; Cinader, B; Chou, C T; Dubiski, S

    1986-01-01

    Reagents for the identification of rabbit cell markers have been developed at a relatively slow rate. In this paper, rabbit cells are being characterized by polyclonal antibodies against a T-cell antigen (RTLA), a B-cell antigen (RABELA) and an analogue of murine Ia antigen. A number of monoclonal antibodies, specific for lymphocytes and/or bone marrow and/or polymorphonuclear leucocytes, have been used for the analysis of cells with identifiable membrane antigens. Populations that have cells with two of the above antigens in the membranes were identified. To these ends, complement-mediated cell kill by antisera alone and in mixtures was employed. PMID:3489667

  15. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibody therapy for experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, J E; Small, G J; Lostrom, M E; Pier, G B

    1986-01-01

    A human immunoglobulin G preparation, enriched in antibodies to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigens (PA-IGIV) and murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) to P. aeruginosa Fisher immunotype-1 (IT-1) LPS antigen and outer membrane protein F (porin), were evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in a guinea pig model of P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The concentration of antibodies to IT-1 LPS was 7.6 micrograms/ml in PA-IGIV and 478 micrograms/ml in the IT-1 MAb preparation. No antibody to IT-1 was detected in MAb to porin. For study, animals were infected by intratracheal instillation of IT-1 P. aeruginosa and then treated 2 h later with intravenous infusions of PA-IGIV, IT-1 MAb, or porin MAb. Control groups received intravenous albumin, and routinely died from pneumonia. Both PA-IGIV (500 mg/kg) and IT-1 MAb (greater than or equal to 2.5 mg/kg) treatment resulted in increased survival (P less than 0.01 to 0.001), and also improved intrapulmonary killing of bacteria. Porin MAb failed to protect from fatal pneumonia. IT-1 MAb treatment produced more survivals than did PA-IGIV treatment but only at dosages of MAb resulting in serum antibody concentrations greater than those achieved with PA-IGIV. PA-IGIV and IT-1 MAb demonstrated in vitro and in vivo (posttreatment guinea pig serum) opsonophagocytic activity for the IT-1 challenge strain. However, the polyclonal preparation required complement, whereas the MAb did not. We conclude that passive immunization with polyclonal hyperimmune P. aeruginosa globulin or with MAb to LPS antigens may be useful in the treatment of acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The relative efficacies of such preparations may be limited, however, by their type-specific LPS antibody concentrations. PMID:3093385

  16. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium using polyclonal antibody immobilized magnetostrictive biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guntupalli, R.; Hu, Jing; Lakshmanan, Ramji S.; Wan, Jiehui; Huang, Shichu; Yang, Hong; Barbaree, James M.; Huang, T. S.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2006-05-01

    Novel mass-sensitive, magnetostrictive sensors have a characteristic resonant frequency that can be determined by monitoring the magnetic flux emitted by the sensor in response to an applied, time varying, magnetic field. This magnetostrictive platform has a unique advantage over conventional sensor platforms in that measurement is wireless or remote. These biosensors can thus be used in-situ for detecting pathogens and biological threat agents. In this work, we have used a magnetostrictive platform immobilized with a polyclonal antibody (the bio-molecular recognition element) to form a biosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium. Upon exposure to solutions containing Salmonella typhimurium bacteria, the bacteria were bound to the sensor and the additional mass of the bound bacteria caused a shift in the sensor's resonant frequency. Responses of the sensors to different concentrations of S. typhimurium were recorded and the results correlated with those obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of samples. Good agreement between the measured number of bound bacterial cells (attached mass) and frequency shifts were obtained. The longevity and specificity of the selected polyclonal antibody were also investigated and are reported.

  17. Immunoreactivity of polyclonal antibodies generated against the carboxy terminus of the predicted amino acid sequence of the Huntington disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Alkatib, G.; Graham, R.; Pelmear-Telenius, A.

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA fragment spanning the 3{prime}-end of the Huntington disease gene (from 8052 to 9252) was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector containing the E. Coli lac promoter and a portion of the coding sequence for {beta}-galactosidase. The truncated {beta}-galactosidase gene was cleaved with BamHl and fused in frame to the BamHl fragment of the Huntington disease gene 3{prime}-end. Expression analysis of proteins made in E. Coli revealed that 20-30% of the total cellular proteins was represented by the {beta}-galactosidase-huntingtin fusion protein. The identity of the Huntington disease protein amino acid sequences was confirmed by protein sequence analysis. Affinity chromatography was used to purify large quantities of the fusion protein from bacterial cell lysates. Affinity-purified proteins were used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits for antibody production. The generated polyclonal antibodies were used to immunoprecipitate the Huntington disease gene product expressed in a neuroblastoma cell line. In this cell line the antibodies precipitated two protein bands of apparent gel migrations of 200 and 150 kd which together, correspond to the calculated molecular weight of the Huntington disease gene product (350 kd). Immunoblotting experiments revealed the presence of a large precursor protein in the range of 350-750 kd which is in agreement with the predicted molecular weight of the protein without post-translational modifications. These results indicate that the huntingtin protein is cleaved into two subunits in this neuroblastoma cell line and implicate that cleavage of a large precursor protein may contribute to its biological activity. Experiments are ongoing to determine the precursor-product relationship and to examine the synthesis of the huntingtin protein in freshly isolated rat brains, and to determine cellular and subcellular distribution of the gene product.

  18. Conjugation of R-Phycoerythrin to a Polyclonal Antibody and F (ab')2 Fragment of a Polyclonal Antibody by Two Different Methods.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Goli, Leila Balaei; Babaei, Mahdokht; Ghods, Roya

    2010-04-01

    R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE), a fluorescent protein from phycobiliprotein family, is isolated from red algae. Conjugation of antibodies to R-PE facilitates multiple fluorescent staining methods. In the present study polyclonal antibodies and polyclonal F(ab')2 fragment antibodies were conjugated to R-PE by two different methods. The efficiency of the methods was evaluated using Immunocytochemistry (ICC) and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In the first conjugation method, PE was attached to SMCC linker followed by conjugation of antibody to PE-SMCC. In the second method, SH groups were added onto R-PE molecule, while the antibody was attached to SPDP linker. Then, the antibody-SPDP molecule was conjugated to R-PE. Our results showed that the two conjugation methods did not have any abrogative effects on the antibody binding activity. PMID:23407609

  19. Preparation of Specific Polyclonal Antibody Against the Recombinant Mutacin Produced by sfGFP Fusion Protein Technology

    PubMed Central

    Al-Homsi, Lamis; Al-Okla, Souad; Abbady, Abdul Q.

    2015-01-01

    Mutacin I, a bacteriocin produced by streptococcus mutans, displays an antimicrobial activity against many gram positive and some gram negative bacteria. Because of its medical importance, production of this short peptide in large scale for future applications is a significant challenge. This work described the improvement of a novel system to produce the recombinant mutacin using fusion protein technology. The short peptide was expressed directly as a fusion protein with a superfolder form of the green florescent protein (sfGFP), resulting in a high yield expression of soluble sfGFP-mutacin fusion protein (30 kDa) in the cytoplasm of E. coli. Mutacin was released from the fusion by enzymatic cleavage at the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease recognition site and separated from the carrier sfGFP by nickel affinity and gel filtration chromatography. An additional advantage of this fusion system was tested in the generation of mutacin-specific polyclonal antibodies. Specific anti-mutacin IgGs were affinity purified, and were able to recognize the mutacin-sfGFP fusion protein or the cleaved forms of mutacin. Even though it was efficiently produced (25 mg/L) by this method, pure mutacin was devoid of antibiotic activity. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis revealed the absence of thioether bonds in the purified mutacin, which are critical for final structure and function of this antibiotic. Determining whether the activity of pure mutacin could be recovered by the reformation of such structures by chemical reaction needs more investigations. The development of this system will provide large quantities of mutacin for future studies and applications as broad spectrum antibacterial peptide. PMID:26668664

  20. Artificial antigen synthesis and the development of polyclonal antibody-based immunoassay for citreoviridin determination.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Zhen Hong; Que, Shan Jin; Gao, Yue Ming; Yuan, Jun; Ye, Zhou; Du, Min; Lin, Guang Mei; Liu, Li Cai; Wang, Shi Hua

    2014-01-01

    Citreoviridin, a mycotoxin produced by Penicillium citreonigrum is a common contaminant of wide range of agri-products and detrimental to human and animal health. Therefore it is important to develop a rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay for citreoviridin detection. In this study, polyclonal antibody against citreoviridin was developed. For the preparation of citreoviridin-bovine serum albumin conjugate (CIT-BSA), hydroxyl groups on adjacent carbon atoms were oxidized by sodium periodate, so the product with reactive aldehyde residues was suitable for coupling with amine. Anti-citreoviridin polyclonal antibody was prepared by immunizing mice with CIT-BSA conjugate. The specificity and sensitivity of the polyclonal antibody was determined by indirect competitive ELISA. Results showed that the IC50 value of the polyclonal antibody was 0.56 μg/mL and no cross-reactivity was found between antiserum and other mycotoxins used in the experiment. The citreoviridin recovery rates by this polyclonal antibody were calculated through rice powder spiked by artificial citreoviridin. The recovery rates ranged were found from 70.5 ± 0.08 % to 94.7 ± 0.09% for inter-assay, and from 77.5 ± 0.04% to 95.4 ± 0.18% for intra-assay, which indicated that this polyclonal antibody could detect trace amount of CIT from the tested samples. Consequently, this study provided a specific and sensitive anti-citreoviridin polyclonal antibody, which made the determination of citreoviridin easier, quicker, and more accurate. PMID:23900904

  1. Effect of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies on surface properties of Streptococcus sobrinus.

    PubMed Central

    van Raamsdonk, M; van der Mei, H C; de Soet, J J; Busscher, H J; de Graaff, J

    1995-01-01

    In this study, the effect of antibody adsorption on physicochemical properties of Streptococcus sobrinus was studied. Bacteria were preincubated with polyclonal antibodies or with OMVU10, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) reactive with S. sobrinus. The zeta potentials and the hydrophobicity as determined by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons were measured in potassium phosphate buffer with a pH ranging from 2 to 9. S. sobrinus preincubated with polyclonal antibodies was positively charged at pH 2, 3, and 4 and had an isoelectric point at pH 4.8. Untreated S. sobrinus cells or cells preincubated with MAbs were negatively charged over the whole pH range. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a decrease in O/C and P/C ratios for bacteria preincubated with polyclonal antibodies. A combination of the pH-dependent zeta potential and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data of the overall chemical composition of the cell surface suggests that polyclonal antibody adsorption occurs through blocking of surface phosphate. The measurement of hydrophobicity by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons revealed that S. sobrinus preincubated with polyclonal antibodies was hydrophobic (90% of the bacteria bound to hexadecane), whereas the controls were relatively hydrophilic. S. sobrinus preincubated with OMVU10 was found to be more hydrophobic than the controls at pH 5 and 7. Hydrophobicity as measured by water contact angles showed an increase in hydrophobicity when S. sobrinus was preincubated with polyclonal antibodies. The epitopes to which the antibodies are directed were visualized by immunogold labeling and electron microscopy. The results suggested that OMVU10 is reactive with only a few epitopes of the cell surface, whereas polyclonal antibodies were found to be reactive with many epitopes. In conclusion, adsorption of polyclonal antibodies was found to influence the overall physicochemical surface properties of the organism, probably by forming a coating over the whole cell

  2. Preserved antiviral adaptive immunity following polyclonal antibody immunotherapy for severe murine influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Natalie E.; Hatjopolous, Antoinette; Fraser, Cara K.; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Hayball, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy may have particular benefits for the treatment of severe influenza infection in at-risk populations, however little is known of the impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation of memory responses to the virus. Ideally, passive immunotherapy should attenuate the severity of infection while still allowing the formation of adaptive responses to confer protection from future exposure. In this study, we sought to determine if administration of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies could inhibit adaptive immune responses in a murine model of lethal influenza infection. Ovine polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant PR8 (H1N1) hemagglutinin exhibited potent prophylactic capacity and reduced lethality in an established influenza infection, particularly when administered intranasally. Surviving mice were also protected against reinfection and generated normal antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to the virus. The longevity of ovine polyclonal antibodies was explored with a half-life of over two weeks following a single antibody administration. These findings support the development of an ovine passive polyclonal antibody therapy for treatment of severe influenza infection which does not affect the formation of subsequent acquired immunity to the virus. PMID:27380890

  3. Preserved antiviral adaptive immunity following polyclonal antibody immunotherapy for severe murine influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Natalie E; Hatjopolous, Antoinette; Fraser, Cara K; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Hayball, John D

    2016-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy may have particular benefits for the treatment of severe influenza infection in at-risk populations, however little is known of the impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation of memory responses to the virus. Ideally, passive immunotherapy should attenuate the severity of infection while still allowing the formation of adaptive responses to confer protection from future exposure. In this study, we sought to determine if administration of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies could inhibit adaptive immune responses in a murine model of lethal influenza infection. Ovine polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant PR8 (H1N1) hemagglutinin exhibited potent prophylactic capacity and reduced lethality in an established influenza infection, particularly when administered intranasally. Surviving mice were also protected against reinfection and generated normal antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to the virus. The longevity of ovine polyclonal antibodies was explored with a half-life of over two weeks following a single antibody administration. These findings support the development of an ovine passive polyclonal antibody therapy for treatment of severe influenza infection which does not affect the formation of subsequent acquired immunity to the virus. PMID:27380890

  4. Generation of polyclonal antibodies against nisin: immunization strategies and immunoassay development.

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, A M; Rodríguez, J M; Hernández, P E; Azcona-Olivera, J I

    1996-01-01

    Murine polyclonal antibodies reactive to the lantibiotic bacteriocin nisin A (nisA) have been produced by immunization with nisA-cholera toxin and nisA-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (nisA-KLH) conjugates. Mice immunized with nisA-cholera toxin developed nisA-specific antibodies with low relative affinities and poor sensitivities, while the immunization of mice with nisA-KLH conjugates resulted in the production of nisA-specific antibodies with high relative affinities and much-increased sensitivities. nisA antibodies could also be readily mass produced in less than 8 weeks in ascites fluid by using the nisA-KLH conjugate. A competitive direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) whereby nisA-horseradish peroxidase and free nisA competed for antibody binding was devised. The detection limit for nisA in the competitive direct ELISA with the nisA-KLH-generated antibodies was from 5 to 100 ng/ml, while the amount of free nisA required for 50% antibody binding inhibition ranged from 0.3 to 5 micrograms /ml. Both antisera and ascites polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with nisZ either in the supernatant of a producer strain or with the pure lantibiotic but did not cross-react at all with non-lantibiotic-type bacteriocins. These polyclonal antibodies should find a wide usage from nisA ELISA analysis in foods and other matrices. PMID:8787409

  5. [Preparation and identification of the polyclonal antibody against mouse IL-23p19].

    PubMed

    Men, Yingli; Wang, Xiaolong; Ding, Cong; Wang, Xiaodong; Ji, Zhenyu; Wang, Ting; Kang, Qiaozhen; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To prepare the polyclonal antibody against mouse interleukine-23 p19 (IL-23p19). Methods The murine full-length IL-23p19 gene was subcloned into pET16 expression vector to construct the recombinant plasmid pET-16b-IL-23p19. The plasmid was transformed into E.coli BL 21 (DE3) and IL-23p19 protein expression was induced by IPTG and identified with SDS-PAGE analysis and Western blotting. After purified by Ni(+) affinity column chromatography, the IL-23p19 protein was used as the antigen to immunize New Zealand rabbit to prepare the antiserum. The polyclonal antibody against the mouse IL-23p19 was isolated from antiserum by affinity chromatography. Antibody titer was detected by ELISA. Antibody specificity was evaluated by Western blotting. Results The pET-16b-IL-23p19 recombinant plasmid was successfully constructed and the IL-23p19 protein was effectively expressed in E.coli BL 21 (DE3). The antibody was successfully prepared by immunizing New Zealand rabbit with the IL-23p19 protein four times. ELISA showed that the titer of the anti-mouse IL-23p19 polyclonal antibody was about 1:256 000. Western blotting confirmed that anti-mouse IL-23p19 polyclonal antibody could specifically recognize the IL-23p19 protein. Conclusion We have successfully prepared the anti-IL-23p19 polyclonal antibody with the high titer and specificity. PMID:27126950

  6. Polyclonal Antibody Production for Membrane Proteins via Genetic Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Debra T.; Robida, Mark D.; Craciunescu, Felicia M.; Loskutov, Andrey V.; Dörner, Katerina; Rodenberry, John-Charles; Wang, Xiao; Olson, Tien L.; Patel, Hetal; Fromme, Petra; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are essential for structural determinations and functional studies of membrane proteins, but antibody generation is limited by the availability of properly-folded and purified antigen. We describe the first application of genetic immunization to a structurally diverse set of membrane proteins to show that immunization of mice with DNA alone produced antibodies against 71% (n = 17) of the bacterial and viral targets. Antibody production correlated with prior reports of target immunogenicity in host organisms, underscoring the efficiency of this DNA-gold micronanoplex approach. To generate each antigen for antibody characterization, we also developed a simple in vitro membrane protein expression and capture method. Antibody specificity was demonstrated upon identifying, for the first time, membrane-directed heterologous expression of the native sequences of the FopA and FTT1525 virulence determinants from the select agent Francisella tularensis SCHU S4. These approaches will accelerate future structural and functional investigations of therapeutically-relevant membrane proteins. PMID:26908053

  7. Generation and characterization of polyclonal antibody against part of immunoglobulin constant heavy υ chain of goose.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Yongli; Ma, Bo; Xing, Mingwei; Wang, Junwei

    2014-08-01

    Immunoglobulin Y (abbreviated as IgY) is a type of immunoglobulin that is the major antibody in bird, reptile, and lungfish blood. IgY consists of two light (λ) and two heavy (υ) chains. In the present study, polyclonal antibody against IgYFc was generated and evaluated. rIgYCυ3/Cυ4 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and utilized to raise polyclonal antibody in rabbit. High affinity antisera were obtained, which successfully detected the antigen at a dilution of 1:204,800 for ELISA assay. The antibody can specifically recognize both rIgYCυ3/Cυ4 and native IgY by Western bolt analysis. Furthermore, the serum of Grus japonensis or immunoglobulin of chicken, duck, turkey, and silkie samples and dynamic changes of serum GoIgY after immunogenicity with GPV-VP3-virus-like particles (GPV-VP3-VLPs) can be detected with the anti-GoIgYFc polyclonal antibody. These results suggested that the antibody is valuable for the investigation of biochemical properties and biological functions of GoIgY. PMID:25171010

  8. Evaluation of Nosema ceranae spore-specific polyclonal antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nosema is an intracellular parasite that causes infection in adult honey bees. In contrast with Nosema apis, Nosema ceranae (N. ceranae) does not produce readily detectable symptoms and often goes unnoticed for long periods of time. Here we describe production of a new genomic antibody (Ab) develope...

  9. An enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay using polyclonal antibodies against bacopaside I.

    PubMed

    Phrompittayarat, Watoo; Putalun, Waraporn; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Wittaya-Areekul, Sakchai; Jetiyanon, Kanchalee; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok

    2007-02-12

    Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wettst. (Brahmi) is a medicinal plant used as a memory enhancer in Ayurvedic medicines. Its active components are triterpenoid glycosides namely pseudojujubogenin and jujubogenin glycosides. In order to analyze these saponin glycosides, an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) was developed using polyclonal antibodies against bacopaside I, one of the pseudojujubogenin glycosides found in the plant. Bacopaside I was conjugated with a bovine albumin serum (BSA) to prepare an immunogen. The bacopaside I-BSA conjugate was immunized to a rabbit for producing polyclonal antibodies (PAbs). The results showed that the antibodies were raised specifically against pseudojujubogenin glycosides. An ELISA using anti-bacopaside I PAbs was performed in the range of 1.95-62.5 ng mL(-1) of bacopaside I and the limit of detection was 0.1 ng mL(-1). The method was validated and the applicability of the ELISA for analyzing saponin glycosides from Brahmi was demonstrated. PMID:17386577

  10. Development of Enantioselective Polyclonal Antibodies to Detect Styrene Oxide Protein Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shuijie; Zhang, Fan; Zeng, Su; Tian, Ye; Chai, Xiaojuan; Gee, Shirley; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zheng, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Styrene has been reported to be pneumotoxic and hepatotoxic in humans and animals. Styrene oxide, a major reactive metabolite of styrene, has been found to form covalent binding with proteins, such as albumin and hemoglobin. Styrene oxide has two optical isomers and it was reported that the (R)-enantiomer was more toxic than the (S)-enantiomer. The purpose of this study was to develop polyclonal antibodies that can stereoselectively recognize proteins modified by styrene oxide enantiomers at cysteine residues. Immunogens were prepared by alkylation of thiolated keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) with styrene oxide enantiomers. Polyclonal antibodies were raised by immunization of rabbits with the chiral immunogens. Titration tests showed all six rabbits generated high titers of antisera that recognize (R)- or (S)-coating antigens accordingly. No cross-reaction was observed toward the carrier protein (BSA). All three rabbits immunized with (R)-immunogen produced antibodies that show enantioselectivity to the corresponding antigen, while only one among the three rabbits immunized with (S)-immunogen generated antibodies with enantioselectivity of the recognition. The enantioselectivity was also observed in competitive ELISA and immunoblot analysis. Additionally, competitive ELISA tests showed that the immunorecognition required the hydroxyl group of the haptens. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the immunorecognition depended on the amount of protein adducts blotted and hapten loading in protein adducts. In summary, we successfully developed polyclonal antibodies to stereoselectively detect protein adducts modified by styrene oxide enantiomers. PMID:19245253

  11. [Polyclonal antibodies, labeling radial nerve cells of the starfish Asterias amurensis].

    PubMed

    Eliseĭkina, M G; Lamash, N E; Bulgakov, A A; Dolmatov, I Iu

    2000-01-01

    The results of preliminary studies suggest that the cytoskeletal fraction of the radial nerve of the starfish Asterias amurensis contained a 32 kDa protein, which is tissue specific. This protein was isolated from the radial nerve by preparative electrophoresis and used as an antigen for raising polyclonal antibodies. When testing these antibodies on sections of the starfish tissues, it was shown that they interact only with the proteins present in the radial nerve cells. A conclusion was drawn that the raised antibodies may be used as a cell marker when studying regeneration of the nervous system in starfish. PMID:10780105

  12. DETECTION OF ROTAVIRUS WITH A NEW POLYCLONAL ANTIBODY ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY (ROTAZYME 2) AND A COMMERCIAL LATEX AGGLUTINATION TEXT (ROTALEX): COMPARISON WITH A MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total of 176 human fecal specimens were examined for the presence of rotavirus using four different assays: a monoclonal antibody enzyme immunoassay; the original polyclonal antibody enzyme immunoassay marketed by Abbott Laboratories, Chicago, IL (Rotazyme I); a modification of...

  13. Preparation of polyclonal antibodies against pig trachea apomucin

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.H.; Carlson, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    Purified procine tracheal mucin (PTM) was deglycosylated by treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS). A preferrential release of fucose, galactose > GlcNAc > GalNAc was observed during the deglycosylation. After five hours of TFMS treatment at 5C, over 90% of the carbohydrate was released leaving mainly Ga1NAc attached to the core protein. The residual Ga1NAc was further removed by three series of the Smith Degradation. The resulting apomucin consisted mainly of (mol %) Thr, 14; Ser, 12; Gly, 12; Glx, 10; Ala, 9; Pro, 8; Val, 7; Asx, 7. Sugars were not detected by gas chromatography. Antibodies obtained by immunizing rabbits with the apomucin recognized only the apomucin and not the holomucin in a double-sandwich ELISA assay. The ELISA is highly specific and has detection limits in the ng range. This antibody preparation was used in precipitation assays of cell-free translation products of pig trachea epithelium RNAs. Translocation products labeled with (TH)Ser and (TH)Thr showed significantly higher counts than with control serum.

  14. [Expression and purification of GST-CML28 fusion protein and preparation of its polyclonal antibody].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xia; Zhang, Bing; Bai, Xue-Ling; Liu, Long-Long; Zhang, Dong-Hua

    2012-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression of GST-CML28 in Escherichia Coli and to prepare its antibody. The constructed recombinant expression vectors CML28-pGEX-3X were transformed into Escherichia Coli BL21 under IPTG induction. The protein was abstracted from the transformers, and purified by a GSTrap FF column. The rabbits were immunized by the purified fusion protein to produce serum with anti-CML28 antibody. The serum was purified by chromatographic column stuffed with glutathione Sephamse 4B to get the antibody. The specific antibody against CML28 was further identified by ELISA, Western blot, immunohistochemistry and quantum dot luminescence. The results indicated that GST-CML28 fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and its specific polyclonal antibody was obtained. It is concluded that the anti-CML28 polyclonal antibodies with high titer and specificity are successfully prepared. These antibodies provide an useful experimental tool to profoundly research the physiological significance and biological function of the CML28 gene. PMID:23257421

  15. Development, characterization, and use of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the myxosporean, Ceratomyxa shasta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Rohovec, J.S.; Fryer, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Both monoclonal and polyclonal antisera were produced against Ceratomyxa shasta. Ascites containing trophozoites of the parasite was collected from infected fish and used as antigen for immunization of mice. The resulting monoclonal antibodies reacted specifically with trophozoite and sporoblast stages but did not react with C. shasta spores by either indirect fluorescent antibody techniques or in Western blots. This indicates that some C. shasta antigens are specific to certain life stages of the parasite. Polyclonal antiserum was produced in a rabbit by injecting a spore protein electro-eluted from an SDS-polyacrylamide gel. This antiserum reacted with both trophozoites and spores by indirect fluorescent antibody techniques and in Western blots. All antisera were tested for cross-reactivity to trout white blood cells, a contaminant of the ascites, and to other myxosporea. Two monoclonal antibodies reacted with white blood cells and myxosporea of the genera Sphaerospora and Myxobilatus. One hybridoma produced antibodies of high specificity for C. shasta pre-spore stages. This is the first report of a monoclonal antibody produced against a myxosporean parasite.

  16. Comparison of three adjuvants used to produce polyclonal antibodies to veterinary drugs.

    PubMed

    Fodey, Terence L; Delahaut, Philippe; Charlier, Caroline; Elliott, Christopher T

    2008-03-15

    Two commercially available adjuvants, Gerbu LQ 3000 and Montanide ISA 50V, were assessed as potential replacements for Freund's adjuvant by evaluating their efficacy in the production of polyclonal antibodies to veterinary drugs in rabbits. The aim was to find an adjuvant that could produce a similar (or enhanced) immune response in the host animal without the undesirable side effects associated with Freund's complete and incomplete adjuvant. The assessment involved the examination of each injection site and the characterisation of the resultant antibodies with regards to antibody titre and sensitivity. It was found that the rabbits immunised with Gerbu adjuvant produced some of the most sensitive antibodies. However, titres were relatively low and adverse effects at injection sites were relatively common. Montanide adjuvant produced no adverse effects and the related antibodies were found to be of adequate sensitivity when compared to those from rabbits immunised with Freund's. It was concluded that Montanide ISA 50V could be considered as a suitable replacement to Freund's for the production of polyclonal antibodies, to low molecular weight compounds in rabbits. PMID:18063100

  17. Preparation of Polyclonal Antibody and Expression Analysis of GR in Tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuanhong; Zhu, Benzhong; Luo, Yunbo; Chen, Xiangning; Zhang, Hongxing

    The fruit ripening of Green-ripe (Gr) mutant tomato was inhibited dramatically. To determine the expression patterns of Gr in tomato, we first produced the polyclonal antibody of Gr protein. RT-PCR was used to amplify the Gr gene from green ripe tomato fruit. And the PCR product was subcloned into prokaryotic protein expression vectors pET-30a to generate recombinant plasmid. The Gr protein was induced by IPTG in BL21 (DE3) and purified by Ni-NTA agarose column. The anti-Gr serum was produced by immunizing rabbits, and the titer of the anti-Gr serum was above 5000 by ELISA analysis. Purified by the DEAE-52 ion-column, the high purification level of anti-Gr polyclonal antibody was obtained. Furthermore, RT-CPR was used in the RNA level to demonstrate that the expression of Gr gene was specialized in some cultures of tomato. For example, the expressions of Gr were higher in seed, flower and green ripe fruit than others, and the expression level were reduced by exogenous ethylene treatment in the flower and green ripe fruit. Moreover, Polyclonal antibody of Gr was used to investigate the expression pattern of Gr in protein level by the Western blotting. Our results show that the expression level of Gr in protein level was complied with the expressions in RNA. So, we suggested that the regulation of Gr was transcriptional.

  18. An exact procedure for the analysis of heterogeneous kinetics in polyclonal antibody populations.

    PubMed

    Herron, J N; Voss, E W

    1983-11-01

    Antibody populations with heterogeneous binding properties exhibit complex first-order dissociation kinetics. An analytical method has been developed to determine the average dissociation rate constant and the heterogeneity index of a specific antibody population. This procedure was based on Laplace transformation of the gamma distribution function, which yielded an exact, macroscopic rate law for the entire antibody population. Linearization of the macroscopic rate law is achieved by plotting data points versus their numerical derivatives using log-log axes. Linear regression of such plots yields the average dissociation rate constant from the Y-intercept, and heterogeneity index from the slope. This analytic method is transparent to the antibody system and kinetic assay employed, requiring only a programmable calculator to perform the necessary calculations. The usefulness of this analytic method was demonstrated by the evaluation of dissociation kinetics in murine monoclonal and rabbit polyclonal anti-fluorescyl-IgG antibody populations. PMID:6606661

  19. Polyclonal antibody against conserved sequences of mce1A protein blocks MTB infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Sasikala; Namasivayam, Nalini; Chellam, Rajamanickam

    2012-03-01

    The pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is largely due to its ability to enter and survive within human macrophages. It is suggested that a specific protein namely mammalian cell entry protein is involved in the pathogenesis and the specific gene for this protein mce1A has been identified in several pathogenic organisms such as Rickettsia, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Helicobacter, Streptomyces, Klebsiella, Vibrio, Neisseria, Rhodococcus, Nocardioides, Saccharopolyspora erthyrae, and Pseudomonas. Analysis of mce1 operons in the above mentioned organisms through bioinformatics tools has revealed the presence of unique sequences (conserved regions) suggesting that these sequences may be involved in the process of infection. Presently, the mce1A full-length (1,365 bp) region from Mycobacterium bovis and its conserved regions (303 bp) were cloned in to an expression vector and the purified expressed proteins of molecular weight ~47 and ~11 kDa, respectively, were injected to rabbits to raise the polyclonal antibodies. The purified polyclonal antibodies were checked for their ability to inhibit the Mycobacterium infection in cultured human macrophages. In macrophage invasion assay, when antibody added at high concentration, decrease in viable counts was observed in all cell cultures within the first 5 days after infection, where the intracellular bacterial CFU obtained from the infected MTB increased by the 3rd day at low concentration of antibody. The macrophage invasion assay has indicated that the purified antibodies of mce1A conserved region can inhibit the infection of Mycobacterium. PMID:22159737

  20. Production of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against prostate-specific antigen, a prostate cancer serum marker.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shu-Fen; Chen, Chien-Yuan

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to produce monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a prostate cancer serum marker. Hyperimmune ICR mice produced polyclonal antibodies (PoAbs) after injection with 0.5 mL of pristane, and were injected with NS-1 myeloma cells 2 weeks later. Hyperimmune Balb/c mice were used for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Mice were immunized four times and given a final boost, and their spleen cells were collected and fused with NS-1 myeloma cells under the presence of PEG 1500. The fused cells were then selected in the HAT-RPMIX medium. Anti-PSA antibody-secreting hybridoma cell lines with high titer were cloned by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then subcloned by limiting dilution in 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS) HT-RPMIX medium. Twelve murine hybridoma producing anti-PSA MAbs were obtained and designated C3m1G11, B3m1E5, C3m1E8, C3m1C5, C3m2F4, C3m1F8, C3m2B3, C3m2E6, B3m2B11, B3m2F2, C3m2C7, and C3m2D9. Isotypes of these MAbs were identified as IgG2a heavy chain and kappa light chain. Hitrap Protein A column was used for the purification of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. The purity analysis of MAb was performed by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:15000852

  1. Exploring the antigenic relatedness of influenza virus haemagglutinins with strain-specific polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    García-Barreno, Blanca; Delgado, Teresa; Benito, Sonia; Casas, Inmaculada; Pozo, Francisco; Melero, José A

    2014-10-01

    Alternative methods to the standard haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization tests to probe the antigenic properties of the influenza virus haemagglutinin (HA) were developed in this study. Vaccinia virus recombinants expressing reference HAs were used to immunize rabbits from which polyclonal antibodies were obtained. These antibodies were subtype specific but showed limited intra-subtype strain specificity in ELISA. The discriminatory capacity of these antibodies was, however, markedly increased after adsorption to cells infected with heterologous influenza viruses, revealing antigenic differences that were otherwise undistinguishable by standard HI and neutralization tests. Furthermore, the unadsorbed antibodies could be used to select escape mutants of the reference strain, which after sequencing unveiled amino acid changes responsible of the noted antigenic differences. These procedures therefore provide alternative methods for the antigenic characterization of influenza HA and might be useful in studies of HA antigenic evolution. PMID:25000959

  2. Correlation of monoclonal and polyclonal somatostatin receptor 5 antibodies in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Lupp, Amelie; Peter, Luisa; Fischer, Elke; Schulz, Stefan; Klöppel, Günter; Hommann, Merten

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the frequency of somatostatin-receptor 5 (SSTR 5) in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors by using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Material and Method: we analyzed 66 proven pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors immunohistochemically with monoclonal (clone UMB-4) and polyclonal SSTR 5-antibodies. Immunoreactive score (IRS) and DAKO-score Her2/neu were evaluated. Results: Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated for the IRS a significant higher staining of all specimen using the monoclonal antibodies ( IRS SSTR5 poly vs IRS SSTR 5 mono; 20.0% vs 30.3% p < 0.001) by a correlation of 0.21; p = 0.04. For the HER2 score there was also a significant higher staining in the monoclonal group (Her2 SSTR 5 poly vs Her2 SSTR 5 mono; 21.5% vs 28.8% p < 0.001) by a correlation of 0.20; p = 0.08. Conclusion: Both antibodies are useful in staining of SSTR, although UMB-4 demonstrated a 10% higher SSTR 5 staining. Due to the previous underestimated expression rate of SSTR 5, current standards in diagnostics and therapy should be reconsidered. The increasing usage of long-acting pansomatostatin receptor analogues will rise the adverse effects connected to SSTR5 binding. PMID:23236542

  3. Bacillus anthracis Capsular Conjugates Elicit Chimpanzee Polyclonal Antibodies That Protect Mice from Pulmonary Anthrax.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaochun; Schneerson, Rachel; Lovchik, Julie A; Dai, Zhongdong; Kubler-Kielb, Joanna; Agulto, Liane; Leppla, Stephen H; Purcell, Robert H

    2015-08-01

    The immunogenicity of Bacillus anthracis capsule (poly-γ-D-glutamic acid [PGA]) conjugated to recombinant B. anthracis protective antigen (rPA) or to tetanus toxoid (TT) was evaluated in two anthrax-naive juvenile chimpanzees. In a previous study of these conjugates, highly protective monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against PGA were generated. This study examines the polyclonal antibody response of the same animals. Preimmune antibodies to PGA with titers of >10(3) were detected in the chimpanzees. The maximal titer of anti-PGA was induced within 1 to 2 weeks following the 1st immunization, with no booster effects following the 2nd and 3rd immunizations. Thus, the anti-PGA response in the chimpanzees resembled a secondary immune response. Screening of sera from nine unimmunized chimpanzees and six humans revealed antibodies to PGA in all samples, with an average titer of 10(3). An anti-PA response was also observed following immunization with PGA-rPA conjugate, similar to that seen following immunization with rPA alone. However, in contrast to anti-PGA, preimmune anti-PA antibody titers and those following the 1st immunization were ≤300, with the antibodies peaking above 10(4) following the 2nd immunization. The polyclonal anti-PGA shared the MAb 11D epitope and, similar to the MAbs, exerted opsonophagocytic killing of B. anthracis. Most important, the PGA-TT-induced antibodies protected mice from a lethal challenge with virulent B. anthracis spores. Our data support the use of PGA conjugates, especially PGA-rPA targeting both toxin and capsule, as expanded-spectrum anthrax vaccines. PMID:26041039

  4. Production and characterization of polyclonal antibody against a synthetic peptide from β-actin protein

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Nazila; Vishteh, Mohadeseh Naghi; Zarei, Omid; Hadavi, Reza; Ahmadvand, Negah; Rabbani, Hodjattallah; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Antibodies against actin, as one of the most widely studied structural and multifunctional housekeeping proteins in eukaryotic cells, are used as internal loading controls in western blot analyses. The aim of this study was to produce polyclonal antibody against a synthetic peptide derived from N-terminal region of β-actin protein to be used as a protein loading control in western blot and other assay systems. Materials and Methods: A synthetic peptide derived from β-actin protein was designed and conjugated to Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and used to immunize a white New Zealand rabbit. The antibody was purified from serum by affinity chromatography column. The purity of the antibody was determined by SDS-PAGE and its ability to recognize the immunizing peptide was measured by ELISA. The reactivity of the antibody with β-actin protein in a panel of different cell lysates was then evaluated by western blot. In addition, the reactivity of the antibody with the corresponding protein was also evaluated by Immunocytochemistry and Immunohistochemistry in different samples. Results: The antibody could recognize the immunizing peptide in ELISA. It could also recognize β-actin protein in western blot as well as in immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Conclusion: Our data suggest that this antibody may be used as an internal control in western blot analyses as well as in other immunological applications such as ELISA, immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry. PMID:25140199

  5. [Preparation and detection of anti-influenza A virus polymerase basic protein 1 polyclonal antibody].

    PubMed

    Qin, Yujie; Zhang, Tinghong; Ye, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is an enveloped virus that belongs to the Orthomyxoviridae family. It has 8 negative RNA segments that encode 16 viral proteins. The viral polymerase consists of 3 proteins (PB 1, PB2 and PA) which plays an important role in the transcription and replication of the influenza A virus. Polymerase basic protein 1 (PB 1) is a critical member of viral polymerase complex. In order to further study the function of PB1, we need to prepare the PB1 antibody with good quality. Therefore, we amplified PB1 conserved region (nt1648-2265) by PCR and cloned it into pET-30a vector, and transformed into Escherichia coli BL2 1. The expression of His tagged PB 1 protein was induced by IPTG, and His-PB 1 proteins were purified by Ni-NTA resin. For preparation of PB 1 protein antiserum, rabbits were immunized with His-PB 1 fusion protein 3 times. Then the titer of PB 1 polyclonal antibody was measured by indirect ELISA. The antibody was purified by membrane affinity purification and subjected to immunoblotting analysis. Data showed that PB1 antibody can recognize PB 1 protein from WSN virus infected or pCMV FLAG-PB 1 transfected cells. Meanwhile, PB 1 antibody can also recognize specifically other subtype strains of influenza A virus such as H9N2 and H3N2. PB 1 polyclonal antibody we generated will be a useful tool to study the biological function of PB1. PMID:27363203

  6. Production of Potent Fully Human Polyclonal Antibodies against Ebola Zaire Virus in Transchromosomal Cattle.

    PubMed

    Dye, John M; Wu, Hua; Hooper, Jay W; Khurana, Surender; Kuehne, Ana I; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Ortiz, Ramon A; Fuentes, Sandra; Herbert, Andrew S; Golding, Hana; Bakken, Russell A; Brannan, Jennifer M; Kwilas, Steve A; Sullivan, Eddie J; Luke, Thomas C; Smith, Gale; Glenn, Gregory; Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Yang, Chinglai; Compans, Richard W; Tripp, Ralph A; Jiao, Jin-An

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies, derived from humans or hyperimmunized animals, have been used prophylactically or therapeutically as countermeasures for a variety of infectious diseases. SAB Biotherapeutics has successfully developed a transchromosomic (Tc) bovine platform technology that can produce fully human immunoglobulins rapidly, and in substantial quantities, against a variety of disease targets. In this study, two Tc bovines expressing high levels of fully human IgG were hyperimmunized with a recombinant glycoprotein (GP) vaccine consisting of the 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) Makona isolate. Serum collected from these hyperimmunized Tc bovines contained high titers of human IgG against EBOV GP as determined by GP specific ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and virus neutralization assays. Fully human polyclonal antibodies against EBOV were purified and evaluated in a mouse challenge model using mouse adapted Ebola virus (maEBOV). Intraperitoneal administration of the purified anti-EBOV IgG (100 mg/kg) to BALB/c mice one day after lethal challenge with maEBOV resulted in 90% protection; whereas 100% of the control animals succumbed. The results show that hyperimmunization of Tc bovines with EBOV GP can elicit protective and potent neutralizing fully human IgG antibodies rapidly and in commercially viable quantities. PMID:27109916

  7. Production of Potent Fully Human Polyclonal Antibodies against Ebola Zaire Virus in Transchromosomal Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Dye, John M.; Wu, Hua; Hooper, Jay W.; Khurana, Surender; Kuehne, Ana I.; Coyle, Elizabeth M.; Ortiz, Ramon A.; Fuentes, Sandra; Herbert, Andrew S.; Golding, Hana; Bakken, Russell A.; Brannan, Jennifer M.; Kwilas, Steve A.; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Luke, Thomas C.; Smith, Gale; Glenn, Gregory; Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Yang, Chinglai; Compans, Richard W.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Jiao, Jin-an

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies, derived from humans or hyperimmunized animals, have been used prophylactically or therapeutically as countermeasures for a variety of infectious diseases. SAB Biotherapeutics has successfully developed a transchromosomic (Tc) bovine platform technology that can produce fully human immunoglobulins rapidly, and in substantial quantities, against a variety of disease targets. In this study, two Tc bovines expressing high levels of fully human IgG were hyperimmunized with a recombinant glycoprotein (GP) vaccine consisting of the 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) Makona isolate. Serum collected from these hyperimmunized Tc bovines contained high titers of human IgG against EBOV GP as determined by GP specific ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and virus neutralization assays. Fully human polyclonal antibodies against EBOV were purified and evaluated in a mouse challenge model using mouse adapted Ebola virus (maEBOV). Intraperitoneal administration of the purified anti-EBOV IgG (100 mg/kg) to BALB/c mice one day after lethal challenge with maEBOV resulted in 90% protection; whereas 100% of the control animals succumbed. The results show that hyperimmunization of Tc bovines with EBOV GP can elicit protective and potent neutralizing fully human IgG antibodies rapidly and in commercially viable quantities. PMID:27109916

  8. Characterization and Epitope Mapping of the Polyclonal Antibody Repertoire Elicited by Ricin Holotoxin-Based Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ofer; Mechaly, Adva; Sabo, Tamar; Alcalay, Ron; Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Seliger, Nehama; Kronman, Chanoch

    2014-01-01

    Ricin, one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, is classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a select agent. Currently, there is no available antidote against ricin exposure, and the most promising therapy is based on neutralizing antibodies elicited by active vaccination or that are given passively. The aim of this study was to characterize the repertoire of anti-ricin antibodies generated in rabbits immunized with ricin toxoid. These anti-ricin antibodies exhibit an exceptionally high avidity (thiocyanate-based avidity index, 9 M) toward ricin and an apparent affinity of 1 nM. Utilizing a novel tissue culture-based assay that enables the determination of ricin activity within a short time period, we found that the anti-ricin antibodies also possess a very high neutralizing titer. In line with these findings, these antibodies conferred mice with full protection against pulmonary ricinosis when administered as a passive vaccination. Epitope mapping analysis using phage display random peptide libraries revealed that the polyclonal serum contains four immunodominant epitopes, three of which are located on the A subunit and one on the B subunit of ricin. Only two of the four epitopes were found to have a significant role in ricin neutralization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that characterizes these immunological aspects of the polyclonal response to ricin holotoxin-based vaccination. These findings provide useful information and a possible strategy for the development and design of an improved ricin holotoxin-based vaccine. PMID:25209559

  9. Cross-reactive polyclonal antibodies to the inner core of lipopolysaccharide from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Svein Rune; Guthrie, Terry; Guile, Geoffrey R; Kolberg, Jan; Hou, Sam; Hyland, Lisa; Wong, Simon Y C

    2002-03-01

    Sera from mice immunized with native or detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles derived from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant 44/76(Mu-4) of Neisseria meningitidis were analyzed for antibodies to LPS. The carbohydrate portion of 44/76(Mu-4) LPS consists of the complete inner core, Glc beta 1-->4[GlcNAc alpha 1-->2Hep alpha 1-->3]Hep alpha 1-->5KDO[4-->2 alpha KDO]. Immunoblot analysis revealed that some sera contained antibodies to wild-type LPS which has a fully extended carbohydrate chain of immunotype L3,7, as well as to the homologous LPS. Sera reacted only weakly to LPS from 44/76(Mu-3), which lacks the terminal glucose of the inner core. No binding to more truncated LPS was observed. Consequently, the cross-reactive epitopes are expressed mainly by the complete inner core. Dephosphorylation of wild-type LPS abolished antibody binding to LPS in all but one serum. Thus, at least two specificities of cross-reactive antibodies exist: one is dependent on phosphoethanolamine groups in LPS, and one is not. Detection of these cross-reactive antibodies strongly supports the notion that epitopes expressed by meningococcal LPS inner core are also accessible to antibodies when the carbohydrate chain is fully extended. Also, these inner core epitopes are sufficiently immunogenic to induce antibody levels detectable in polyclonal antibody responses. Meningococci can escape being killed by antibodies to LPS that bind only to a specific LPS variant, by altering the carbohydrate chain length. Cross-reactive antibodies may prevent such escape. Therefore, inner core LPS structures may be important antigens in future vaccines against meningococcal disease. PMID:11854213

  10. A Polyclonal Antibody Against Recombinant Bovine Haptoglobin Expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhang, Hong; Li, Chunqiu

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the predicted immunodominant region of bovine haptoglobin (pirBoHp), without the signal peptide sequence, was synthesized based on the codon usage bias of Escherichia coli. The synthesized pirBoHp gene was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-32a (+), which contains a His-tag. The recombinant pirBoHp protein was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells. Western blot analysis showed that the purified recombinant pirBoHp protein could be recognized by an anti-His-tag monoclonal antibody. Further investigations indicated that a polyclonal antibody against the recombinant pirBoHp protein could recognize the α and β chains of native bovine haptoglobin in a pooled plasma sample from dairy cattle suffering from foot rot. PMID:24328747

  11. Aspergillus fumigatus-specific antibodies in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and aspergilloma: evidence for a polyclonal antibody response.

    PubMed Central

    Brummund, W; Resnick, A; Fink, J N; Kurup, V P

    1987-01-01

    Patients with the Aspergillus-induced diseases allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), aspergilloma (fungus ball), and Aspergillus skin test-positive asthma were differentiated immunologically by radioimmunoassay based on their total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Aspergillus fumigatus-specific IgE levels. In this study, a new, highly sensitive biotin-avidin-linked immunosorbent assay was used to evaluate A. fumigatus-specific antibodies of all immunoglobulin classes. Studied populations included 13 patients with ABPA, 12 with aspergilloma, 9 with Aspergillus skin test-positive asthma, and 9 normal individuals without asthma. A. fumigatus-specific antibodies of all classes were elevated in patients with ABPA, variably elevated in those with aspergilloma, and lowest in the other two groups. This assay demonstrated significantly higher specific IgE antibody levels in the ABPA group over those of the other groups, even with 1:1,000 dilutions of the sera. This study demonstrated that ABPA is a disease characterized by a polyclonal antibody response to Aspergillus antigen and not just a response to IgE and IgG antibody classes. The measurement of other antibody classes, particularly IgD and IgA, could enhance the immunodiagnosis of ABPA. The biotin-avidin-linked immunosorbent assay was found to be a highly sensitive assay that can be a clinically useful alternative to radioimmunoassay in the measurement of A. fumigatus-specific antibodies. PMID:3539998

  12. Use of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to study hCG-receptor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Milius, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Although the glycoprotein hormones lutropin (LH), follitropin (FSH), and thyrotropin (TSH) bind to different receptors, each contains an identical alpha subunit. Specificity is somehow endowed by theta subunits which are distinct for each hormone. Human choriogonadotropin (hCG) is a natural LH analog that contains a beta subunit nearly identical to that of LH. The roles of these subunits in the recognition and high affinity binding of hCG to receptor was examined. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the individual subunits of hCG were used to probe the hormone-receptor interaction. Conformation-specific and sequence-specific antibodies were examined for their abilities to bind Triton X-100-solubilized /sup 125/I-hCG-receptor complex and to inhibit hormone binding to crude rat ovarian membranes containing receptor. Even though the immunoreactive sites are not located on the receptor binding surface of the beta subunit, most, but not all, of these polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were able to inhibit /sup 125/I-hCG binding to receptor. Although the inhibition of binding may be due to steric interference due to the size of the antibody molecules, a two-step model for hCG binding to receptor is presented that also explains these results. In this model, the beta subunit initially binds with the receptor with a highly specific but low affinity interaction. This activates a site for the high affinity binding of the alpha subunit and stabilization of the complex. This is an attractive model as it may be applied to other glycoprotein hormones sharing an alpha subunit.

  13. Rapid detection of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Llames, L; Goyache, J; Domenech, A; de Avila, A; Suarez, G; Gomez-Lucia, E

    1999-10-01

    ELISA and Western blot have been used for detecting specific antibodies or antigens for routine diagnostic laboratory tests and experimental protocols, as well as for screening hybridomas secreting antibodies. Although these techniques are sensitive, some slow growing hybridomas are identified as positive only when they are grown slowly long time. We standardized the dot-ELISA, a more sensitive technique, for the detection of antibodies against BLV. The main advantages of the dot-ELISA described in this study are (a) its sensitivity, detecting hybridomas which would otherwise be considered negative and discarded from the results of indirect ELISA and/or Western blot; and (b) the possibility of economizing reagents using as little as 1 microl of the antigen and 0.5 microl of antibody and conjugate. Different BLV-antigen preparations were bound to nitrocellulose membranes (NC), including cells lysed chemically (LYS) or by sonication (SOC), semi-purified virus (PV), and supernatant from infected cultures, either without treatment (SUP) or sonicated (SOS). The antigen preparations most adequate for detecting monoclonal antibodies against BLV and polyclonal antibodies in cattle sera were undiluted cell lysates (LYS) and semi-purified BLV (PV). When testing bovine sera, the supernatant (SUP) and sonicated supernatant (SOS) antigens gave a high background due to the presence of FCS which reacted with the anti-bovine labeled antibodies. In this study, 59 BLV specific antibody secreting hybridomas were identified using the dot-ELISA, compared to only 20 detected using iELISA, and doubtful reactions due to nonspecific binding to fetal calf serum (FCS) and cellular components were measured. The results of the improved dot-ELISA described may be stored at room temperature for future reference. Results were consistently reproducible in coated nitrocellulose membranes kept at different storage temperatures (-20 degrees C, 4 degrees C, and 25-30 degrees C) 48 h, 1 week and 5

  14. Expression, purification of IL-38 in Escherichia coli and production of polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhonglan; Chen, Zhenyu; Huang, Nongyu; Teng, Xiu; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Wei, Xiaoqiong; Qin, Ke; Liu, Xiao; Wu, Xueping; Tang, Huan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Cui, Kaijun; Li, Jiong

    2015-03-01

    Members of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family play important roles in inflammation and host defense against pathogens. Here, we describe a novel member of the IL-1 family, interleukin-38 (IL-38, IL-1F10, or IL-1HY2), which was discovered in 2001. Although the functional role of IL-38 remains unclear, recent reports show that IL-38 binds to the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) which is also targeted by the IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra). Consequently, these two molecules have similar effects on immune cells. Here, we describe the expression of soluble and active recombinant IL-38 in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The IL-38 gene sequence was optimized for expression in E. coli and then cloned into a pEHISTEV expression vector, which has an N-terminal 6-His affinity tag under control of the T7 lac strong promoter. Optimization of culture conditions allowed induction of the recombinant fusion protein with 0.1 mM isopropyl β-D-1-thio galactoside (IPTG) at 37°C for 4h. The recombinant fusion protein was purified using an Ni affinity column and was further digested with TEV protease; the cleaved protein was purified by molecular-exclusion chromatography. Next, we measured IL-38 binding ability using functional ELISA. The purified proteins were used to immunize a New Zealand white rabbit four times to enable the production of polyclonal antibodies. The specificity of the prepared polyclonal antibodies was determined using Western blot, and the results showed they have high specificity against IL-38. Here, we describe the development of an effective and reliable method to express and purify IL-38 and anti-IL-38 antibodies. This will enable the function and structure of IL-38 to be determined. PMID:25448591

  15. Anti-miroestrol polyclonal antibodies: a comparison of immunogen preparations used to obtain desired antibody properties.

    PubMed

    Kitisripanya, Tharita; Jutathis, Kamonthip; Inyai, Chadathorn; Komaikul, Jukrapun; Udomsin, Orapin; Yusakul, Gorawit; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Putalun, Waraporn

    2016-04-01

    Immunogen quality is one important factor that contributes to desirable antibody characteristics. Highly specific antibodies against miroestrol can be used to develop a quality control immunoassay for Pueraria candollei products. In this study, we investigated how various immunogen preparations affect antibody properties. The results show that immunogen prepared using the Mannich reaction provides antibodies with higher specificity and sensitivity against miroestrol than immunogen prepared with the periodate reaction. The results suggest the Mannich reaction maintains the original structure of miroestrol and generates useful antibodies for developing immunoassays. PMID:26563142

  16. Unexpected lack of specificity of a rabbit polyclonal TAP-L (ABCB9) antibody

    PubMed Central

    van Endert, Peter; Lawand, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we describe the surprising non-specific reactivity in immunoblots of a rabbit polyclonal antibody (ref. Abcam 86222) expected to recognize the transporter associated with antigen processing like (TAP-L, ABCB9) protein. Although this antibody, according to company documentation, recognizes a band with the expected molecular weight of 84 kDa in HeLa, 293T and mouse NIH3T3 whole-cell lysates, we found that this band is also present in immunoblots of TAP-L deficient bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (BMDC) whole-cell lysates in three independent replicates. We performed extensive verification by multiple PCR tests to confirm the complete absence of the ABCB9 gene in our TAP-L deficient mice. We conclude that the antibody tested cross-reacts with an unidentified protein present in TAP-L knockout cells, which coincidentally runs at the same molecular weight as TAP-L. These findings underline the pitfalls of antibody specificity testing in the absence of cells lacking expression of the target protein.

  17. Preparation and Affinity-Purification of Supervillin Isoform 4 (SV4) Specific Polyclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueran; Li, Hao; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Haoran; Ye, Fang; Liang, Chaozhao; Fang, Zhiyou

    2016-04-01

    Human Supervillin isoform 4 (SV4), a bigger splicing isoform of Supervillin, contains extra coding exons 3, 4 and 5 (E345), compared to Supervillin isoform 1. Although previous studies have shown that SV4 associated with membrane and cytoskeleton, regulated cell migration and cell survival, its functions are still largely unknown. To broaden our understanding, SV4 specific antibody is important for further study in signaling pathway. The His-SV4 (E345) and GST-SV4 (E345) fusion proteins, which contained SV4 specific domain E345, were purified from bacteria. The His-SV4 (E345) proteins were injected in rabbits as immunogen to produce anti-SV4 serum, and SV4 antibodies were purified by GST-SV4 (E345) proteins cross-linked to affinity resins. SV4 antibodies exclusively recognized SV4 protein both in vitro and in vivo through multi-step testing by ELISA, western blot, immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel SV4-specific polyclonal antibody which will provide a useful tool for further characterization of SV4 function. PMID:27015936

  18. Production of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against group A, B, and C capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis and preparation of latex reagents.

    PubMed

    Nato, F; Mazie, J C; Fournier, J M; Slizewicz, B; Sagot, N; Guibourdenche, M; Postic, D; Riou, J Y

    1991-07-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, B, and C were produced in order to develop immunological reagents allowing both the detection of soluble antigens during meningococcal meningitis and antigenic serogrouping of N. meningitidis cultures. The performance characteristics of monoclonal and polyclonal antibody latex reagents were compared. For the detection of soluble polysaccharide antigen, polyclonal antibody latex reagent was selected for N. meningitidis A and C. The latex reagent prepared with polyclonal antibodies against N. meningitidis B could not detect capsular polysaccharide even at 1 mg/ml. The monoclonal antibody B latex reagent which detected 100 ng of polysaccharide per ml was therefore chosen. For the serogroup identification of N. meningitidis, the use of a confirmatory test results in an overall specificity of 100% with polyclonal or monoclonal antibody latex reagents. PMID:1909346

  19. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N.; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D.; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P.; Dixit, Vishva M.; Zarrin, Ali A.

    2013-01-01

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  20. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P; Dixit, Vishva M; Zarrin, Ali A

    2013-09-24

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  1. Antigen capture ELISA system for henipaviruses using polyclonal antibodies obtained by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Marsh, Glenn A; Barr, Jennifer A; Okutani, Akiko; Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Broder, Christopher C; Yamada, Akio; Inoue, Satoshi; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-08-01

    A novel antigen-capture sandwich ELISA system targeting the glycoproteins of the henipaviruses Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) was developed. Utilizing purified polyclonal antibodies derived from NiV glycoprotein-encoding DNA-immunized rabbits, we established a system that can detect the native antigenic structures of the henipavirus surface glycoproteins using simplified and inexpensive methods. The lowest detection limit against live viruses was achieved for NiV Bangladesh strain, 2.5 × 10(4) TCID(50). Considering the recent emergence of genetic variants of henipaviruses and the resultant problems that arise for PCR-based detection, this system could serve as an alternative rapid diagnostic and detection assay. PMID:22585045

  2. The Production of Polyclonal Antibodies in Laboratory Animals. The Report and Recommendations of ECVAM Workshop 35.

    PubMed

    Leenaars, P P; Hendriksen, C F; de Leeuw, W A; Carat, F; Delahaut, P; Fischer, R; Halder, M; Hanly, W C; Hartinger, J; Hau, J; Lindblad, E B; Nicklas, W; Outschoorn, I M; Stewart-Tull, D E

    1999-01-01

    This is the report of the thirty-fifth of a series of workshops organised by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM). ECVAM's main goal, as defined in 1993 by its Scientific Advisory Committee, is to promote the scientific and regulatory acceptance of alternative methods which are of importance to the biosciences and which reduce, refine or replace the use of laboratory animals. One of the first priorities set by ECVAM was the implementation of procedures which would enable it to become well informed about the state-of-the-art of non-animal test development and validation, and the potential for the possible incorporation of alternative tests into regulatory procedures. It was decided that this would be best achieved by the organisation of ECVAM workshops on specific topics, at which small groups of invited experts would review the current status of various types of in vitro tests and their potential uses, and make recommendations about the best ways forward (1). This joint ECVAM/FELASA (Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations) workshop on The Immunisation of Laboratory Animals for the Production of Polyclonal Antibodies was held in Utrecht (The Netherlands), on 20-22 March 1998, under the co-chairmanship of Coenraad Hendriksen (RIVM, Bilthoven, The Netherlands) and Wim de Leeuw (Inspectorate for Health Protection, The Netherlands). The participants, all experts in the fields of immunology, laboratory animal science, or regulation, came from universities, industry and regulatory bodies. The aims of the workshop were: a) to discuss and evaluate current immunisation procedures for the production of polyclonal antibodies (including route of injection, animal species and adjuvant ); and b) to draft recommendations and guidelines to improve the immunisation procedures, with regard both to animal welfare and to the optimisation of immunisation protocols. This report summarises the outcome of the discussions and includes

  3. Production and application of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against Spiroplasma eriocheiris

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Bao, Haixun; Miao, Fengqin; Peng, Yaqin; Shen, Yuqing; Gu, Wei; Meng, Qingguo; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-01-01

    A new species of spiroplasma, Spiroplasma eriocheiris (S. eriocheiris), was identified as a lethal pathogen of tremor disease (TD) in Chinese mitten crab recently. In order to acquire appropriate biological and diagnostic tools for characterizing this newly discovered pathogen, 5 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a polyclonal antibody (pAb) against S. eriocheiris were produced. Among the mAbs, 6F5, 7C8 and 12H5 lead to the deformation of S. eriocheiris. A peptide sequence, YMRDMQSGLPRY was identified as a mimic motif of MreB that is the cell shape determining protein of S. eriocheiris interacting with 3 mAbs. Furthermore, a double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) for detection of S. eriocheiris was established using the mAb and pAb we prepared. It detected as low as 0.1 μg/mL of S. eriocheiris. No cross-reaction was observed with three other common bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis) and the hemolymph samples of healthy Eriocheir sinensis. Collectively, our results indicated that the mAbs and pAb we prepared could be used in the analysis of S. eriocheiris membrane proteins mimotope and development of a diagnostic kit for S. eriocheiris infections. PMID:26639364

  4. Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to bacterial infection using next generation phage display.

    PubMed

    Naqid, Ibrahim A; Owen, Jonathan P; Maddison, Ben C; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D; Warry, Andrew; Tchórzewska, Monika A; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J; Davies, Robert H; La Ragione, Roberto M; Gough, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to infectious diseases to identify individual epitopes has the potential to underpin the development of novel serological assays and vaccines. Here, phage-peptide library panning coupled with screening using next generation sequencing was used to map antibody responses to bacterial infections. In the first instance, pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was investigated. IgG samples from twelve infected pigs were probed in parallel and phage binding compared to that with equivalent IgG from pre-infected animals. Seventy-seven peptide mimotopes were enriched specifically against sera from multiple infected animals. Twenty-seven of these peptides were tested in ELISA and twenty-two were highly discriminatory for sera taken from pigs post-infection (P < 0.05) indicating that these peptides are mimicking epitopes from the bacteria. In order to further test this methodology, it was applied to differentiate antibody responses in poultry to infections with distinct serovars of Salmonella enterica. Twenty-seven peptides were identified as being enriched specifically against IgY from multiple animals infected with S. Enteritidis compared to those infected with S. Hadar. Nine of fifteen peptides tested in ELISA were highly discriminatory for IgY following S. Enteritidis infection (p < 0.05) compared to infections with S. Hadar or S. Typhimurium. PMID:27072017

  5. Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to bacterial infection using next generation phage display

    PubMed Central

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D.; Warry, Andrew; Tchórzewska, Monika A.; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J.; Davies, Robert H.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to infectious diseases to identify individual epitopes has the potential to underpin the development of novel serological assays and vaccines. Here, phage-peptide library panning coupled with screening using next generation sequencing was used to map antibody responses to bacterial infections. In the first instance, pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was investigated. IgG samples from twelve infected pigs were probed in parallel and phage binding compared to that with equivalent IgG from pre-infected animals. Seventy-seven peptide mimotopes were enriched specifically against sera from multiple infected animals. Twenty-seven of these peptides were tested in ELISA and twenty-two were highly discriminatory for sera taken from pigs post-infection (P < 0.05) indicating that these peptides are mimicking epitopes from the bacteria. In order to further test this methodology, it was applied to differentiate antibody responses in poultry to infections with distinct serovars of Salmonella enterica. Twenty-seven peptides were identified as being enriched specifically against IgY from multiple animals infected with S. Enteritidis compared to those infected with S. Hadar. Nine of fifteen peptides tested in ELISA were highly discriminatory for IgY following S. Enteritidis infection (p < 0.05) compared to infections with S. Hadar or S. Typhimurium. PMID:27072017

  6. Production of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against human alphafetoprotein, a hepatocellular tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Wen-Lin; Hwang, Jing-Min; Chen, Chien-Yuan

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this study is to produce and purify monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) against human alphafetoprotein (AFP). Hyperimmune ICR mice produced PAbs after injection with 0.5 mL pristane, and were injected with NS-1 myeloma cells 2 weeks later. Hyperimmune Balb/c mice were used for the production of MAbs. Mice were immunized four times, given a final boost, and their spleen cells were collected and fused with NS-1 myeloma cells under the presence of PEG 1500. The fused cells were then selected in the hypoxanthine, aminopterine, and thymidine (HAT)-RPMIX medium. Anti-AFP antibody-secreting hybridoma cell lines with high titer were cloned by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then subcloned by limiting dilution in 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS), hypoxanthine, thymidine (HT)-RPMIX medium. Twelve murine hybridoma producing anti-AFP MAbs were obtained and designated as A73F3, A73E8, B73C5, A73G3, A73F8, 67B3, B73C2, B73E1, A73G2, B73G7, B73D7, and B73F4. Isotypes of these MAbs were identified as IgG(1) heavy chain and kappa light chain. The MAbs with high purity were obtained by affinity chromatography. The purity analysis of AFP and the MAbs was performed by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:12193284

  7. Investigation of a panel of monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal sera against anthrax toxins resulted in identification of an anti-lethal factor antibody with disease-enhancing characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Parul; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Priyanka; Joon, Shikha; Sinha, Subrata; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-12-01

    Hybridomas were created using spleen of mice that were actively immunized with rLFn (recombinant N-terminal domain of lethal factor). Later on, separate group of mice were immunized with rLFn to obtain a polyclonal control for passive immunization studies of monoclonal antibodies. This led to the identification of one cohort of rLFn-immnized mice that harboured disease-enhancing polyclonal antibodies. At the same time, the monoclonal antibodies secreted by all the hybridomas were being tested. Two hybridomas secreted monoclonal antibodies (H10 and H8) that were cross-reactive with EF (edema factor) and LF (lethal factor), while the other two hybridomas secreted LF-specific antibodies (H7 and H11). Single chain variable fragment (LETscFv) was derived from H10 hybridoma. H11 was found to have disease-enhancing property. Combination of H11 with protective monoclonal antibodies (H8 and H10) reduced its disease enhancing nature. This in vitro abrogation of disease-enhancement provides the proof of concept that in polyclonal sera the disease enhancing character of a fraction of antibodies is overshadowed by the protective nature of the rest of the antibodies generated on active immunization. PMID:26364143

  8. Prokaryotic overexpression of TEV-rhGH and characterization of its polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Murad, Hossam; Ali, Bouthina; Makeya, Rima; Abbady, Abdul Qader

    2014-05-25

    Recombinant protein technology represents one of the best solutions to achieve rapid, efficient, and cost-effective protein expression and purification of therapeutic proteins. Growth hormone (GH) is an excellent example of these proteins used in the therapy of hormone deficiencies. In this work, a plasmid, pRSET-TEV-rhGH, has been constructed to overexpress recombinant human GH (rhGH) by cloning its gene downstream of an N-terminal 6 × His-tagged polypeptide (43 aa) in the T7 promoter-plasmid pRSET. This polypeptide was cleavable by means of the integrated recognition site for the tobaccos etch virus (TEV) protease, resulting in an rhGH protein at an exact length and sequence. After IPTG induction, this plasmid effectively expressed TEV-rhGH protein (27 kDa) in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, which accumulated in the form of inclusion bodies. The 6 × His-tagged protein, with a yield of ~150 mg/L of culture, was purified from the cell extract using metal affinity chromatography, as shown after SDS-PAGE blue staining, and was confirmed by immunoblotting using specific commercial monoclonal antibodies. In order to detect TEV-rhGH, in ELISA and immunoblotting, specific polyclonal antibody, with high titer (~10⁻⁵ fold dilution), was produced in a rabbit and purified using affinity chromatography. Preliminary tests have proved that TEV-rhGH protein and its specific purified IgG antibody could provide valuable tools for rhGH productive and diagnostic purposes. PMID:24534464

  9. Production and characterization of a broad-specificity polyclonal antibody for O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides and a quantitative structure-activity relationship study of antibody recognition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyclonal antibody (PAb) with broad-specificity for O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) against a generic hapten, 4-(diethoxyphosphoro thioyloxy) benzoic acid, was produced. The obtained PAb showed high sensitivity to seven commonly used O,O-diethyl OPs in a competitive indirect enzyme-l...

  10. Detection of influenza antigenic variants directly from clinical samples using polyclonal antibody based proximity ligation assays

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Brigitte E.; Jia, Kun; Sun, Hailiang; Ye, Jianqiang; Hall, Crystal; Ware, Daphne; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Identification of antigenic variants is the key to a successful influenza vaccination program. The empirical serological methods to determine influenza antigenic properties require viral propagation. Here a novel quantitative PCR-based antigenic characterization method using polyclonal antibody and proximity ligation assays, or so-called polyPLA, was developed and validated. This method can detect a viral titer that is less than 1000 TCID50/mL. Not only can this method differentiate between different HA subtypes of influenza viruses but also effectively identify antigenic drift events within the same HA subtype of influenza viruses. Applications in H3N2 seasonal influenza data showed that the results from this novel method are consistent with those from the conventional serological assays. This method is not limited to the detection of antigenic variants in influenza but also other pathogens. It has the potential to be applied through a large-scale platform in disease surveillance requiring minimal biosafety and directly using clinical samples. PMID:25546251

  11. Immunohistologic identification of Aspergillus spp. and other hyaline fungi by using polyclonal fluorescent antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, L; Standard, P G; Jalbert, M; Kraft, D E

    1997-01-01

    Isolation and identification of pathogenic Aspergillus and Fusarium spp. from clinical materials provide the most accurate means for establishing a diagnosis of infections by these molds. Such efforts, however, are not always successful. Histologic diagnosis also has its limitations. In vivo the hyphae of Aspergillus and Fusarium spp. are very similar and their in situ manifestations are not pathognomonic. To improve the histologic diagnosis of infections by Aspergillus and Fusarium species, we developed polyclonal fluorescent-antibody reagents to Aspergillus fumigatus and Fusarium solani and evaluated their diagnostic utilities. Our studies revealed that A. fumigatus and F. solani share epitopes not only with one another but also with other Aspergillus and Fusarium spp. as well as with Paecilomyces lilacinus and Pseudallescheria boydii. Adsorption of the A. fumigatus conjugate with cells of Fusarium proliferatum and F. solani and F. solani antiserum with cells of Aspergillus flavus resulted in reagents that distinguished Aspergillus spp. from Fusarium spp. but that still cross-stained P. lilacinus and P. boydii. Adjunctive use of a specific P. boydii conjugate enabled the identification of Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp., P. lilacinus, and P. boydii in formalin-fixed tissue sections from 19 humans with culture-proven cases of mycotic infection. PMID:9276388

  12. Production of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against the Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa16.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamadou-Charfi, Dorra; Sauer, Annette Juliane; Abdelkafi-Mesrati, Lobna; Jaoua, Samir; Stephan, Dietrich

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to establish a quantitative determination of the vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3A from the culture supernatant of Bacillus thuringiensis either by ELISA or by the conventional quantification method of the Western blot band. The Vip3A protein was produced by fermentation of the B. thuringiensis reference strain BUPM95 in 3 L. By Western blot, the Vip3Aa16 toxin was detected in the culture supernatant during the exponential growth phase of B. thuringiensis BUPM95. However, the detection of Vip3Aa16 on Western blot showed in addition to the toxin two other strips (62 and 180 kDa) recognized by the anti-Vip3Aa16 polyclonal antibodies prepared at the Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax Tunisia. For that reason and in order to develop a technique for reliable quantification of the toxin, we have considered the production of polyclonal antibodies at the Julius Kühn Institute, Germany. These antibodies were the basis for the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against the protein produced by the Vip3Aa16 recombinant strain Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). These monoclonal antibodies were tested by plate-trapped antigen (PTA) and triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA). The selection of hybridoma supernatants gave us four positive clones producing monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25492687

  13. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against dendrotoxin: Their effects on its convulsive activity and interaction with neuronal acceptors.

    PubMed

    Mehraban, F; Haines, A; Dolly, J O

    1986-01-01

    Three stable hybrid cell lines have been established that secrete monoclonal antibodies of G(1) sub-class to dendrotoxin, a convulsant polypeptide (M(r) = 7000). Using [(125)I]labelled dendrotoxin the resultant ascitic fluids were found to show no cross-reactivity with homologous toxins (toxins 1, B and E from Dendroaspis polylepis, toxin Dv-14 from Dendroaspis viridis and ?-bungarotoxin from Bungarus multicinctus). In contrast, polyclonal antibodies raised against dendrotoxin cross-reacted to varying degrees with its congeners; most importantly, the rank order of cross-reactivities was in accordance with their potencies in eliciting convulsions when injected intracerebroventricularly into rat brain. All the antibodies prevented significantly the binding of dendrotoxin to its protein acceptor in brain synaptic membranes. Moreover, when they were injected into rat brain together with lethal doses of dendrotoxin they delayed, or in some cases prevented, the onset of convulsive symptoms. Ultracentrifugation of the complexes formed by [(125)I]labelled dendrotoxin and one or more of the monoclonal antibodies showed only a single peak of radioactivity with an S(20.w) of 7S, indicating that all these mono-specific antibodies are directed to the same or overlapping epitope(s). Conversely, polyclonal antisera produced larger complexes with the antigen, revealing the presence of at least two determinants on this molecule. Such antibodies are proving helpful in identifying regions of the toxin responsible for the neurotoxicity and associated interaction with its acceptor, a putative constituent of A-current K(+)-channels. PMID:20493095

  14. Preparation and Preliminary Application of MAdCAM-1 Polyclonal Antibody in Dairy Cows with Subclinical Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chang, Qiaocheng; Xia, Cheng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Hongyou

    2015-08-01

    MAdCAM-1 plays an important role in mediating immune response and inflammation. This study aimed to express and purify a fusion protein of MAdCAM-1 in prokaryotic cells and to prepare rat anti-bovine MAdCAM-1 polyclonal antibodies. Prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1-MAdCAM-1 and pET-28a-MAdCAM-1 were constructed, respectively. The above plasmids were transformed into BL21 Escherichia coli strain. These recombinant strains were induced by IPTG and identified by Western blot analysis and SDS-PAGE. Wistar rats were immunized with recombinant protein (pET-28a-MAdCAM-1) emulsified with Freund's adjuvant, and antibody titers were measured by indirect ELISA. Antibody titers reached the highest value (1:128,000) after the third immunization. Western blot showed that rat anti-bovine MAdCAM-1 polyclonal antibody can not only recognize recombinant MAdCAM-1 protein expressed in E. coli but also recognizes natural MAdCAM-1 protein extracted from bovine tissues. However, commercial anti-mouse MAdCAM-1 monoclonal antibodies did not recognize the recombinant MAdCAM-1 protein or natural protein, which indicated no cross-reactivity between bovine MAdCAM-1 and mouse MAdCAM-1. Real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that MAdCAM-1 expression was limited in mammary lymphoid nodes of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows. We speculate that MAdCAM-1 expression is inconsistent in different periods of the dairy cows. The successful preparation of rat anti-bovine MAdCAM-1 polyclonal antibody and its preliminary application in dairy cows provide the foundation for further study of the mechanism of anti-inflammation of MAdCAM-1 in dairy cows with subclinical mastitis. PMID:26301930

  15. Altering the motility of Trypanosoma cruzi with rabbit polyclonal anti-peptide antibodies reduces infection to susceptible mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Finkelsztein, Eli J; Diaz-Soto, Juan C; Vargas-Zambrano, Juan C; Suesca, Elizabeth; Guzmán, Fanny; López, Manuel C; Thomas, M Carmen; Forero-Shelton, Manu; Cuellar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción J; González, John M

    2015-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi's trypomastigotes are highly active and their incessant motility seems to be important for mammalian host cell infection. The kinetoplastid membrane protein-11 (KMP-11) is a protein expressed in all parasite stages, which induces a cellular and humoral immune response in the infected host, and is hypothesized to participate in the parasite's motility. An N-terminal peptide from KMP-11, termed K1 or TcTLE, induced polyclonal antibodies that inhibit parasitic invasion of Vero cells. The goal of this study was to evaluate the motility and infectivity of T. cruzi when exposed to polyclonal anti-TcTLE antibodies. Rabbits were immunized with TcTLE peptide along with FIS peptide as an immunomodulator. ELISA assay results showed that post-immunization sera contained high titers of polyclonal anti-TcTLE antibodies, which were also reactive against the native KMP-11 protein and live parasites as detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry assays. Trypomastigotes of T. cruzi were incubated with pre- or post-immunization sera, and infectivity to human astrocytes was assessed by Giemsa staining/light microscope and flow cytometry using carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeled parasites. T. cruzi infection in astrocytes decreased approximately by 30% upon incubation with post-immunization sera compared with pre-immunization sera. Furthermore, trypomastigotes were recorded by video microscopy and the parasite's flagellar speed was calculated by tracking the flagella. Trypomastigotes exposed to post-immunization sera had qualitative alterations in motility and significantly slower flagella (45.5 µm/s), compared with those exposed to pre-immunization sera (69.2 µm/s). In summary, polyclonal anti-TcTLE serum significantly reduced the parasite's flagellar speed and cell infectivity. These findings support that KMP-11 could be important for parasite motility, and that by targeting its N-terminal peptide infectivity can be reduced

  16. Effect of maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies and polyclonal IVIG on the activation status of vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    RADDER, C M; BEEKHUIZEN, H; KANHAI, H H H; BRAND, A

    2004-01-01

    Maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies can cause severe fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), complicated by intracranial haemorrhage (ICH). Antenatal treatment with maternal intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) seems to protect against ICH even when thrombocytopenia persists. The aim of this study was to investigate if anti-HPA-1a antibodies and IVIG potentially affect vascular endothelial cells (ECs) in order to identify susceptibility for ICH. Human umbilical cord endothelial cells (HUVEC) were incubated with anti-HPA-1a antibodies with or without polyclonal IVIG and evaluated for EC activation. Maternal sera with anti-HPA-1a antibodies affected neither the EC expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and tissue factor (TF) nor the release of van Willebrand factor (vWF) or interleukin (IL)-8 nor the integrity of ECs. Maternal sera obtained after IVIG treatment and polyclonal IVIG decrease constitutive and cytokine-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression on ECs. The results show that maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies cause no activation or damage of ECs in this model. The clinical relevance of the de-activating properties of IVIG on EC activation with respect to ICH deserves further investigation. PMID:15196265

  17. Species-Specific Chromosome Engineering Greatly Improves Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production Profile in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Wang, Zhongde; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of fully human IgG (hIgG) or human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) by transgenic animals could be useful for human therapy. However, production level of hpAbs in transgenic animals is generally very low, probably due to the fact that evolutionarily unique interspecies-incompatible genomic sequences between human and non-human host species may impede high production of fully hIgG in the non-human environment. To address this issue, we performed species-specific human artificial chromosome (HAC) engineering and tested these engineered HAC in cattle. Our previous study has demonstrated that site-specific genomic chimerization of pre-B cell receptor/B cell receptor (pre-BCR/BCR) components on HAC vectors significantly improves human IgG expression in cattle where the endogenous bovine immunoglobulin genes were knocked out. In this report, hIgG1 class switch regulatory elements were subjected to site-specific genomic chimerization on HAC vectors to further enhance hIgG expression and improve hIgG subclass distribution in cattle. These species-specific modifications in a chromosome scale resulted in much higher production levels of fully hIgG of up to 15 g/L in sera or plasma, the highest ever reported for a transgenic animal system. Transchromosomic (Tc) cattle containing engineered HAC vectors generated hpAbs with high titers against human-origin antigens following immunization. This study clearly demonstrates that species-specific sequence differences in pre-BCR/BCR components and IgG1 class switch regulatory elements between human and bovine are indeed functionally distinct across the two species, and therefore, are responsible for low production of fully hIgG in our early versions of Tc cattle. The high production levels of fully hIgG with hIgG1 subclass dominancy in a large farm animal species achieved here is an important milestone towards broad therapeutic applications of hpAbs. PMID:26107496

  18. Species-Specific Chromosome Engineering Greatly Improves Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production Profile in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hua; Wang, Zhongde; Jiao, Jin-an; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of fully human IgG (hIgG) or human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) by transgenic animals could be useful for human therapy. However, production level of hpAbs in transgenic animals is generally very low, probably due to the fact that evolutionarily unique interspecies-incompatible genomic sequences between human and non-human host species may impede high production of fully hIgG in the non-human environment. To address this issue, we performed species-specific human artificial chromosome (HAC) engineering and tested these engineered HAC in cattle. Our previous study has demonstrated that site-specific genomic chimerization of pre-B cell receptor/B cell receptor (pre-BCR/BCR) components on HAC vectors significantly improves human IgG expression in cattle where the endogenous bovine immunoglobulin genes were knocked out. In this report, hIgG1 class switch regulatory elements were subjected to site-specific genomic chimerization on HAC vectors to further enhance hIgG expression and improve hIgG subclass distribution in cattle. These species-specific modifications in a chromosome scale resulted in much higher production levels of fully hIgG of up to 15 g/L in sera or plasma, the highest ever reported for a transgenic animal system. Transchromosomic (Tc) cattle containing engineered HAC vectors generated hpAbs with high titers against human-origin antigens following immunization. This study clearly demonstrates that species-specific sequence differences in pre-BCR/BCR components and IgG1 class switch regulatory elements between human and bovine are indeed functionally distinct across the two species, and therefore, are responsible for low production of fully hIgG in our early versions of Tc cattle. The high production levels of fully hIgG with hIgG1 subclass dominancy in a large farm animal species achieved here is an important milestone towards broad therapeutic applications of hpAbs. PMID:26107496

  19. Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP): prokaryotic expression, purification, and preparation of a polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H L; Li, H; Sun, Y S; Yang, Z Y; Yu, Q

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) plays important roles in promoting cancer occurrence and in the development of bone metastases. To increase our knowledge of the biological functions of PTHrP, the prokaryotic expression vector pET-PTHrP was successfully constructed and the His-PTHrP fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. Anti-PTHrP polyclonal antibody was then prepared from rabbits. Finally, the goat tissue expression profile of PTHrP was analyzed by Western blot with the anti-PTHrP polyclonal antibody. The results showed that the expression of PTHrP in goat mammary glands was significantly higher than that in other organs. This indicates that PTHrP may play important roles in the goat mammary gland. The antibody prepared will be a useful tool for detecting PTHrP and will be valuable in future studies investigating the role of PTHrP in calcium metabolism in the goat model. PMID:25158263

  20. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL DETECTION OF P-GLYCOPROTEIN IN TELEOST TISSUES USING MAMMALIAN POLYCLONAL AND MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammalian P-glycoprotein is a highly conserved 170 kD integral plasma membrane protein functioning as an energy dependent efflux pump of exogenous and endogenous lipophilic aromatic compounds entering the cell by diffusion. n this study, the tissue specificity of one polyclonal (...

  1. Production and characterization of polyclonal antibodies in rabbits to 4S-limonene synthase from spearmint (Mentha spicata).

    PubMed

    Alonso, W R; Crock, J E; Croteau, R

    1993-02-15

    Limonene synthase, a monoterpene cyclase from the oil glands of spearmint (Mentha spicata) leaves that catalyzes the conversion of geranyl pyrophosphate to (-)-4S-limonene, was purified, and polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits against the sodium dodecyl sulfate-denatured protein. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the antibodies were very specific for denatured limonene synthase from all Mentha species tested. However, no immunological cross-reactivity was observed with denatured limonene synthases from Valencia oranges (Citrus sinensis, Rutaceae) or wormseed (Chenopodium ambrosioides, Chenopodiaceae). Furthermore, the antibody preparation did not detectably cross-react with other monoterpene cyclases from related angiosperm species of the Lamiaceae, Asteraceae, and Umbellifereae, or from conifer species, and no cross-reactivity was demonstrated toward several sesquiterpene cyclases of higher plant and fungal origin. Although the antibody preparation was highly selective for denatured limonene cyclase from Mentha, the antibodies did not recognize the native protein in several different types of experiments. Nevertheless, specificity for the target enzyme was unambiguously demonstrated when the antibody preparation was shown to cross-react with the cyclase protein expressed in Escherichia coli that harbored the corresponding limonene synthase cDNA gene from M. spicata. PMID:8442666

  2. Expression and purification of a Tuber borchii fruitbody-specific protein, TBF-1, from Escherichia coli: generation of polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Palma, Francesco; Agostini, Deborah; Cerigini, Emanuela; Polidori, Emanuela; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2005-01-01

    TBF-1 is a fruitbody-specific protein present in the white truffle species Tuber borchii Vittad. A similar protein has been found only in the closely related species Tuber dryophilum (TDF-1), but not in other truffles. The protein from T. borchii was overexpressed as fusion protein in E. coli and was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. Recombinant protein was used for generating polyclonal antibodies. The antiserum strongly reacted with TBF-1, weakly recognized TDF-1, and did not detect correlate band in the other white truffle species. The high level of expression of this protein in the fruitbody and the specificity of the antibody anti-TBF-1 make it possible to set up a diagnostic tool for detecting these species in natural samples and foodstuffs. PMID:15881596

  3. Immunocapture of circulating Schistosoma mansoni cathepsin B antigen (Sm31) by anti-Sm31 polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    González, Amelia Y; Sulbarán, Guidenn S; Ballen, Diana E; Cesari, Italo M

    2016-06-01

    Adult Schistosoma mansoni parasites have the capacity to degrade ingested host hemoglobin and other host plasma proteins by using a series of gut proteolytic enzymes, including cathepsin B; this enzyme is released to the host intravascular environment during regurgitations of adult worms. Cathepsin B becomes thus a circulating parasite component that has been shown to be specifically recognized as the Sm31 antigen by antibodies present in most S. mansoni infected patients. Taking advantage of this immunological property, we attempted here to immunocapture Sm31 from sera of infected patients using specific polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against a highly enriched preparation of Sm31 and detect its intrinsic proteolytic activity using a previously described solid-phase procedure called Cysteine Protease Immuno Assay (CPIA). To produce highly specific anti-Sm31/cathepsin B antibodies, cathepsin B (Sm31 or SmCB) was enriched more than 3000-folds from an adult worm preparation using a series of conventional biochemical steps including ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Anti-cathepsin B antibodies were generated by immunizing rabbits with the enriched cathepsin B fraction; these antibodies recognized a band of Mr.~31 kDa in Western-blot (WB) analysis of this fraction and were able to capture, in a modified CPIA procedure, Sm31/SmCB present in sera from infected Venezuelan patients living in low endemic areas for schistosomiasis. CPIA showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity; representing a new diagnostic tool to detect circulating Sm31 antigen in actual infections. PMID:26709076

  4. DNA Copy Number Profiles in Affinity-Purified Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Mao, Tsui-Lien; Chen, Xu; Feng, Yuanjian; Nakayama, Kentaro; Wang, Yue; Glas, Ruth; Ma, M. Joe; Kurman, Robert J.; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Advanced ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is one of the most malignant ovarian malignancies, in part because it tends to be resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy. At present, little is known about the molecular genetic alterations in CCCs except that there are frequent activating mutations in PIK3CA. The purpose of this study is to comprehensively define the genomic changes in CCC based on DNA copy number alterations. Experimental Design We performed 250K high-density SNP array analysis in 12 affinity-purified CCCs and 10 CCC cell lines. Discrete regions of amplification and deletion were also analyzed in additional 21 affinity-purified CCCs using quantitative real-time PCR. Results The level of chromosomal instability in CCC as defined by the extent of DNA copy number changes is similar to those previously reported in low-grade ovarian serous carcinoma but much less than those in high-grade serous carcinoma. The most remarkable region with DNA copy number gain is at chr20 which harbors a potential oncogene, ZNF217. This is observed in 36% of CCCs but rarely detected in serous carcinomas regardless of grade. In addition, homozygous deletions are detected at CDKN2A/2B and LZTS1 loci. Interestingly, the DNA copy number changes observed in fresh CCC tissues are rarely detected in the established CCC cell lines. Conclusions This study provides the first high resolution, genome-wide view of DNA copy number alterations in ovarian CCC. The findings provide a genomic landscape for future studies aimed at elucidating the pathogenesis and developing new target-based therapies for CCCs. PMID:20233889

  5. Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase 1): localization and in vitro inhibition of promastigotes growth by polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Porcino, Gabriane Nascimento; Carvalho-Campos, Cristiane; Maia, Ana Carolina Ribeiro Gomes; Detoni, Michelle Lima; Faria-Pinto, Priscila; Coimbra, Elaine Soares; Marques, Marcos José; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; Diniz, Vanessa Álvaro; Corte-Real, Suzana; Vasconcelos, Eveline Gomes

    2012-10-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity was recently characterized in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis promastigotes (Lb), and an antigenic conserved domain (r82-121) from the specific NTPDase 1 isoform was identified. In this work, mouse polyclonal antibodies produced against two synthetic peptides derived from this domain (LbB1LJ, r82-103; LbB2LJ, r102-121) were used. The anti-LbB1LJ or anti-LbB2LJ antibodies were immobilized on protein A-sepharose and immunoprecipitated the NTPDase 1 of 48 kDa and depleted approximately 40% of the phosphohydrolytic activity from detergent-homogenized Lb preparation. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical microscopy identified the NTPDase 1 on the parasite surface and in its subcellular cytoplasmic vesicles, mitochondria, kinetoplast and nucleus. The ATPase and ADPase activities of detergent-homogenized Lb preparation were partially inhibited by anti-LbB1LJ antibody (43-79%), which was more effective than that inhibition (18-47%) by anti-LbB2LJ antibody. In addition, the immune serum anti-LbB1LJ (67%) or anti-LbB2LJ (33%) was cytotoxic, significantly reducing the promastigotes growth in vitro. The results appoint the conserved domain from the L. braziliensis NTPDase as an important target for inhibitor design and the potential application of these biomolecules in experimental protocols of disease control. PMID:22921497

  6. Determination of allergenic load and pollen count of Cupressus arizonica pollen by flow cytometry using Cup a1 polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Benítez, Francisco Moreno; Camacho, Antonio Letrán; Del Cuvillo Bernal, Alfonso; de Medina, Pedro Lobatón Sánchez; Cózar, Francisco J García; Romeu, Ma Luisa Espinazo

    2013-07-10

    Background: There is an increase in the incidence of pollen related allergy, thus information on pollen schedules would be a great asset for physicians to improve the clinical care of patients. Like cypress pollen sensitization shows a high prevalence among the causes of allergic rhinitis, and therefore it is of interest to use it like a model of study, distinguishing cypress pollen, pollen count and allergenic load level. In this work, we use a flow cytometry based technique to obtain both Cupressus arizonica pollen count and allergenic load, using specific rabbit polyclonal antibody Cup a1 and its comparison with optical microscopy technique measurement. Methods: Airborne samples were collected from Burkard Spore-Trap and Burkard Cyclone Cupressus arizonica pollen was studied using specific rabbit polyclonal antibody Cup a1, labelled with AlexaFluor(®) 488 or 750 and analysed by Flow Cytometry in both an EPICS XL and Cyan ADP cytometers (Beckman Coulter(®) ). Optical microscopy study was realized with a Leica optical microscope. Bland & Altman was used to determine agreement between both techniques measured. Results: We can identify three different populations based on rabbit polyclonal antibody Cup a1 staining. The main region (44.5%) had 97.3% recognition, a second region (25%) with 28% and a third region (30.5%) with 68% respectively. Immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy showed that main region corresponds to whole pollen grains, the second region are pollen without exine and the third region is constituted by smaller particles with allergenic properties. Pollen schedule shows a higher correlation measured by optical microscopy and flow cytometry in the pollen count with a p-value: 0.0008E(-2) and 0.0002 with regard to smaller particles, so the Bland & Altman measurement showed a good correlation between them, p-value: 0,0003. Conclusion: Determination of pollen count and allergenic load by flow cytometry represents an important tool in the

  7. Development of a Cost-effective Ovine Polyclonal Antibody-Based Product, EBOTAb, to Treat Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dowall, Stuart David; Callan, Jo; Zeltina, Antra; Al-Abdulla, Ibrahim; Strecker, Thomas; Fehling, Sarah K.; Krähling, Verena; Bosworth, Andrew; Rayner, Emma; Taylor, Irene; Charlton, Sue; Landon, John; Cameron, Ian; Hewson, Roger; Nasidi, Abdulsalami; Bowden, Thomas A.; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    The highly glycosylated glycoprotein spike of Ebola virus (EBOV-GP1,2) is the primary target of the humoral host response. Recombinant EBOV-GP ectodomain (EBOV-GP1,2ecto) expressed in mammalian cells was used to immunize sheep and elicited a robust immune response and produced high titers of high avidity polyclonal antibodies. Investigation of the neutralizing activity of the ovine antisera in vitro revealed that it neutralized EBOV. A pool of intact ovine immunoglobulin G, herein termed EBOTAb, was prepared from the antisera and used for an in vivo guinea pig study. When EBOTAb was delivered 6 hours after challenge, all animals survived without experiencing fever or other clinical manifestations. In a second series of guinea pig studies, the administration of EBOTAb dosing was delayed for 48 or 72 hours after challenge, resulting in 100% and 75% survival, respectively. These studies illustrate the usefulness of EBOTAb in protecting against EBOV-induced disease. PMID:26715676

  8. The cloning and characterization of the enolase2 gene of Gekko japonicus and its polyclonal antibody preparation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wu, Ronghua; Chen, Haijiao; Zhou, Youlang; Li, Yan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei

    2013-01-01

    The enolase2 gene is usually expressed in mature neurons and also named neuron specific enolase (NSE). In the present study, we first obtained the NSE gene cDNA sequence by using the RACE method based on the expressed sequence tag (EST) fragment from the cDNA library of Gekko japonicus and identified one transcript of about 2.2 kb in central nervous system of Gekko japonicus by Northern blotting. The open reading frame of NSE is 1305 bp, which encodes a 435 amino-acid protein. We further investigated the multi-tissue expression pattern of NSE by RT-PCR and found that the expression of NSE mRNA was very high in brain, spinal cord and low in heart, while it was not detectable in other tissues. The real-time quantitative PCR was used to investigate the time-dependent change in the expression of the NSE mRNA level after gecko spinal cord transection and found it significantly increased at one day, reaching its highest level three days post-injury and then decreasing at the seventh day of the experiment. The recombinant plasmid of pET-32a-NSE was constructed and induced to express His fused NSE protein. The purified NSE protein was used to immunize rabbits to generate polyclonal antisera. The titer of the antiserum was more than 1:65536 determined by ELISA. Western blotting showed that the prepared antibody could specifically recognize the recombinant and endogenous NSE protein. The result of immunohistochemistry revealed that positive signals were present in neurons of the brain and the spinal cord. This study provided the tools of cDNA and polyclonal antibody for studying NSE function in Gekko japonicus. PMID:23615470

  9. Quantification of natural populations of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus and Herbaspirillum spp. In sugar cane (Saccharum spp.) Using differente polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    da Silva-Froufe, Lúcia Gracinda; Boddey, Robert Michael; Reis, Veronica Massena

    2009-01-01

    The species Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, Herbaspirillum seropedicae and H. rubrisubalbicans are endophytic N2-fixing [diazotrophic] bacteria which colonise not only roots, but also the aerial tissue of sugar cane. However, the technique most commonly used to quantify the populations of these microbes in plants is by culturing serial dilutions of macerates of plant tissues in N free semi-solid media which are only semi-selective for the species/genera [the Most Probable Number (MPN) Technique] and each culture must be further subjected to several tests to identify the isolates at the species level. The use of species-specific polyclonal antibodies with the indirect ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) can be an alternative which is rapid and specific to quantify these populations of bacteria. This study was performed to investigate the viability of adapting the indirect ELISA technique to quantify individually the populations of these three species of diazotroph within the root and shoot tissues of sugarcane. The results showed that species-specific polyclonal antibodies could be obtained by purifying sera in protein-A columns which removed non-specific immuno-globulins. It was possible to quantify the three bacterial species in the Brazilian sugarcane variety SP 70-1143 in numbers above 105 cells per g fresh weight in roots, rhizomes and leaves. The numbers of the different bacterial species evaluated using the ELISA technique were found to be higher than when the same populations were evaluated using the MPN technique, reaching 1400 times greater for G. diazotrophicus and 225 times greater for Herbaspirillum spp. These results constitute the first quantification of Herbaspirillum using immunological techniques. PMID:24031435

  10. Cloning of neuromedin B and its receptor in the rabbit and generating a polyclonal antibody to the neuromedin B protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting-Ting; Su, Juan; Ma, Zhi-Yu; Ma, Jun-Xiao; Jin, Meng-Meng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhi-Hai

    2015-06-10

    Neuromedin B (NMB) is a highly conserved bombesin-related neuropeptide found in mammals. Neuromedin B (NMB) executes its effect by binding to the cell surface receptor, neuromedin B receptor (NMBR). In this study, we cloned the rabbit NMB and NMBR genes. The similarity and phylogenetic analyses of NMB and NMBR gene sequences were performed. The expression of NMB and NMBR mRNA in the rabbit was investigated using real-time RT-PCR. Our bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that the cloned rabbit NMB precursor cDNA encoded Gly-His-Phe-Met-NH2 amino acids at the C-terminus, and that its receptor possessed typical transmembrane features. The NMB mRNA was highly expressed in the CNS, while the NMBR mRNA was widely expressed in many tissues, with the highest expression in the gastrointestinal tract. The studies on the NMB distribution and function are limited by the lack of a specific antibody to this neuropeptide. In this paper, polyclonal NMB antibody was generated in mice. Western blotting analysis revealed that the prepared antibody could specifically recognize the recombinant and the endogenous NMB proteins. Immunohistochemistry analysis indicated that the NMB protein was localized in the cytoplasm of the pituitary cells. The existence of NMB protein in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis suggests that NMB might function in rabbit reproduction. PMID:25796599

  11. Polyclonal B-cell activation by Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharides elicit antibodies protective against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Milani, S R; Travassos, L R

    1996-01-01

    A hyperimmune rabbit antiserum against group C Neisseria meningitidis agglutinated and lysed Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes in a complement-mediated reaction. Immunization of rabbits with the purified polysaccharide C from N. meningitidis and of human volunteers with the AC-polysaccharide vaccine against meningitis also resulted in antibody production cross-reactive with T. cruzi infective forms. The rabbit antibodies bound to parasites, lysed metacyclic forms, and recognized several components from lysates of cell-derived trypomastigotes. The sera from six human volunteers reacted with cell-cultured trypomastigotes in vitro, lysed these forms, and recognized glycoconjugates migrating diffusely on the top of immunoblots. One serum also reacted with the isolated mucin-like glycoconjugate carrying the Ssp-3 epitope from cell-derived trypomastigotes, but treatment with sialidase did not abolish this reactivity. The anti-AC human antiserum also protected against HeLa cell infection and markedly decreased the number of parasites liberated after cell burst. The polyclonal response that resulted from human immunization with N. meningitidis polysaccharides A and C comprised trypanolytic antibodies that recognized nonsialylated epitopes expressed on infective forms of the parasite. It is suggested that human AC vaccination could be potentially helpful as an adjuvant to a specific immunotherapy of Chagas disease, developed with native or recombinant antigens of the parasite. PMID:8811466

  12. Polyclonal B-cell activation reveals antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in HIV-1-seronegative individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Jehuda-Cohen, T; Slade, B A; Powell, J D; Villinger, F; De, B; Folks, T M; McClure, H M; Sell, K W; Ahmed-Ansari, A

    1990-01-01

    Identification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals is of paramount importance for the control of the spread of AIDS worldwide. Currently, the vast majority of screening centers throughout the world rely on serological techniques. As such, clinically asymptomatic but HIV-infected, seronegative individuals are rarely identified. In this report we show that 18% (30/165) of seronegative individuals who were considered to be a unique cohort of patients at high risk for HIV infection had circulating B cells that, upon in vitro polyclonal activation with pokeweed mitogen, produced antibodies reactive with HIV. Furthermore, polymerase chain reaction analysis of DNA obtained from aliquots of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these seronegative but pokeweed mitogen assay-positive individuals tested revealed the presence of HIV-specific sequences in a significant number of samples. In addition, depletion of CD8+ T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1-seronegative individuals prior to in vitro culture with pokeweed mitogen resulted in increased sensitivity for detecting HIV-reactive antibodies. This assay has obvious epidemiological implications, especially in the case of high-risk groups, and also provides a simple technique to enhance detection of HIV-infected individuals. Of further interest is the determination of the mechanisms related to the lack of HIV-specific antibodies in the serum of these infected individuals. Images PMID:2111024

  13. Production of anti-Gordonia amarae mycolic acid polyclonal antibody for detection of mycolic acid-containing bacteria in activated sludge foam.

    PubMed

    Iwahori, K; Miyata, N; Takata, N; Morisada, S; Mochizuki, T

    2001-01-01

    Mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes (mycolata) are considered the causative agents of foaming of activated sludge and scum formation in activated sludge treatment plants. In this study, the production of anti-Gordonia amarae mycolic acid polyclonal antibodies was investigated. Rabbits were immunized with a conjugate of keyhole limpet hemocyanin and mycolic acids of G. amarae, which contained 48 to 56 carbon atoms (average, 52.0). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) demonstrated that the polyclonal antibodies could recognize cells of G. amarae ranging from 0.1 to 10 microg. The antibodies also reacted with other tested mycolata strains belonging to the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Dietzia, Mycobacterium and Tsukamurella. However, reactivities against other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria not containing mycolic acid were negligible or much lower. The results indicate that the anti-G. amarae mycolic acid antibodies show a reactivity selective for a group of mycolata involved in the foaming of activated sludge. PMID:16233121

  14. An epitope-specific novel anti-EMMPRIN polyclonal antibody inhibits tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Miriam; Simanovich, Elina; Brod, Vera; Lahat, Nitza; Bitterman, Haim; Rahat, Michal A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN/CD147) mediates tumor cell–macrophage interactions, and has been shown to induce both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, the epitope responsible for MMP induction is controversial, and the epitope responsible for VEGF induction is yet unknown. We generated a novel anti-EMMPRIN antibody directed against a specific epitope that successfully inhibited the production of both MMP-9 and VEGF in tumor cell–macrophage in vitro co-culture systems, exhibiting a U-shaped dose response. Furthermore, this antibody efficiently inhibited in vivo tumor progression in both the RENCA renal cell carcinoma and CT26 colon carcinoma subcutaneous tumor models, and reduced tumor size and number of metastatic foci in the 4T1 orthotopic model. This was achieved by inhibiting angiogenesis as assessed by immunohistochemical staining for the endothelial marker CD31, by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation as assessed by the staining for Ki-67, and by enhancing tumor cell apoptosis as assessed in the TUNEL assay. Moreover, administration of the antibody recruited more macrophages into the tumor, and skewed the tumor microenvironment for macrophages from TGFβ-dominated anti-inflammatory microenvironment, to a less immunosuppressive one. The antibody improved the ability of stimulated macrophages to perform antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) and kill tumor cells. Thus, our new antibody maps the epitope capable of inducing both MMPs and VEGF, and places EMMPRIN as a good target for cancer therapy. PMID:27057452

  15. Protein Delivery System Containing a Nickel-Immobilized Polymer for Multimerization of Affinity-Purified His-Tagged Proteins Enhances Cytosolic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Desplancq, Dominique; Orlov, Igor; Arntz, Youri; Spehner, Danièle; Mely, Yves; Klaholz, Bruno P; Schultz, Patrick; Weiss, Etienne; Zuber, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant proteins with cytosolic or nuclear activities are emerging as tools for interfering with cellular functions. Because such tools rely on vehicles for crossing the plasma membrane we developed a protein delivery system consisting in the assembly of pyridylthiourea-grafted polyethylenimine (πPEI) with affinity-purified His-tagged proteins pre-organized onto a nickel-immobilized polymeric guide. The guide was prepared by functionalization of an ornithine polymer with nitrilotriacetic acid groups and shown to bind several His-tagged proteins. Superstructures were visualized by electron and atomic force microscopy using 2 nm His-tagged gold nanoparticles as probes. The whole system efficiently carried the green fluorescent protein, single-chain antibodies or caspase 3, into the cytosol of living cells. Transduction of the protease caspase 3 induced apoptosis in two cancer cell lines, demonstrating that this new protein delivery method could be used to interfere with cellular functions. PMID:26230624

  16. Development and characterization of polyclonal peptide antibodies for the detection of Yellow fever virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Stock, N K; Escadafal, C; Achazi, K; Cissé, M; Niedrig, M

    2015-09-15

    There is still a considerable need for development of new tools and methods detecting specific viral proteins for the diagnosis and pathogenesis study of the Yellow fever virus (YFV). This study aimed to develop and characterize polyclonal peptide antisera for detection of YFV-C and -NS1 proteins. The antisera were used further to investigate NS1 protein expression during YFV infection in mammalian cells. YFV target proteins were detected by all antisera in western blot and immunofluorescence assays. No cross-reactivity was observed with Dengue virus, West Nile virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus and Japanese encephalitis virus. Nuclear localization of the YFV-C protein was demonstrated for the first time. Experiments investigating NS1 expression suggested a potential use of the YFV-NS1 antisera for development of diagnostic approaches targeting the secreted form of the NS1 protein. The antisera described in this study offer new possibilities for use in YFV research and for the development of novel diagnostic tests. PMID:26086983

  17. Preparation and Characterization of a Polyclonal Antibody against Human Actin Filament-Associated Protein-120 kD

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yujian; Liu, Yong; Guo, Jiayu; Tang, Tao; Gao, Jian; Huang, Tao; Wang, Bin; Liu, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Actin filament-associated protein-120kD (AFAP-120) is an alternatively spliced isoform of actin filament-associated protein-110kD (AFAP-110) and contains an additional neuronal insert (NINS) fragment in addition to identical domains to the AFAP-110. Unlike AFAP-110 widely expressed in tissues, AFAP-120 is specifically expressed in the nervous system and plays a role in organizing dynamic actin structures during neuronal differentiation. However, anti-AFAP-120 antibody is still commercially unavailable, and this may hinder the function research for AFAP-120. In this study, we simultaneously used the ABCpred online server and the BepiPred 1.0 server to predict B-cell epitopes in the exclusive NINS sequence of human AFAP-120 protein, and found that a 16aa-peptide sequence was the consensus epitope predicted by both tools. This peptide was chemically synthesized and used as an immunogen to develop polyclonal antibody against AFAP-120 (anti-AFAP-120). The sensitivity and specificity of anti-AFAP-120 were analyzed with immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence assays. Our results indicated that anti-AFAP-120 could react with over-expressed and endogenous human AFAP-120 protein under denatured condition, but not with human AFAP-110 protein. Moreover, native human AFAP-120 protein could also be recognized by the anti-AFAP-120 antibody. These results suggested that the prepared anit-AFAP-120 antibody would be a useful tool for studying the biochemical and biological functions of AFAP-120. PMID:27322249

  18. Antigenic Analysis of Bordetella pertussis Filamentous Hemagglutinin with Phage Display Libraries and Rabbit Anti-Filamentous Hemagglutinin Polyclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan R.; Siebers, Annette; Finlay, B. Brett

    1998-01-01

    Although substantial advancements have been made in the development of efficacious acellular vaccines against Bordetella pertussis, continued progress requires better understanding of the antigenic makeup of B. pertussis virulence factors, including filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA). To identify antigenic regions of FHA, phage display libraries constructed by using random fragments of the 10-kbp EcoRI fragment of B. pertussis fhaB were affinity selected with rabbit anti-FHA polyclonal antibodies. Characterization of antibody-reactive clones displaying FHA-derived peptides identified 14 antigenic regions, each containing one or more epitopes. A number of clones mapped within regions containing known or putative FHA adhesin domains and may be relevant for the generation of protective antibodies. The immunogenic potential of the phage-displayed peptides was assessed indirectly by comparing their recognition by antibodies elicited by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-denatured and native FHA and by measuring the inhibition of this recognition by purified FHA. FHA residues 1929 to 2019 may contain the most dominant linear epitope of FHA. Clones mapping to this region accounted for ca. 20% of clones recovered from the initial library selection and screening procedures. They are strongly recognized by sera against both SDS-denatured and native FHA, and this recognition is readily inhibited by purified FHA. Given also that this region includes a factor X homolog (J. Sandros and E. Tuomanen, Trends Microbiol. 1:192–196, 1993) and that the single FHA epitope (residues 2001 to 2015) was unequivocally defined in a comparable study by E. Leininger et al. (J. Infect. Dis. 175:1423–1431, 1997), peptides derived from residues of 1929 to 2019 of FHA are strong candidates for future protection studies. PMID:9746593

  19. Human Antibody Responses to the Polyclonal Dryvax Vaccine for Smallpox Prevention Can Be Distinguished from Responses to the Monoclonal Replacement Vaccine ACAM2000

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Christine; Keasey, Sarah; Korman, Lawrence; Pittman, Phillip R.

    2014-01-01

    Dryvax (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc., Marietta, PA) is representative of the vaccinia virus preparations that were previously used for preventing smallpox. While Dryvax was highly effective, the national supply stocks were depleted, and there were manufacturing concerns regarding sterility and the clonal heterogeneity of the vaccine. ACAM2000 (Acambis, Inc./Sanofi-Pasteur Biologics Co., Cambridge, MA), a single-plaque-purified vaccinia virus derivative of Dryvax, recently replaced the polyclonal smallpox vaccine for use in the United States. A substantial amount of sequence heterogeneity exists within the polyclonal proteome of Dryvax, including proteins that are missing from ACAM2000. Reasoning that a detailed comparison of antibody responses to the polyclonal and monoclonal vaccines may be useful for identifying unique properties of each antibody response, we utilized a protein microarray comprised of approximately 94% of the vaccinia poxvirus proteome (245 proteins) to measure protein-specific antibody responses of 71 individuals receiving a single vaccination with ACAM2000 or Dryvax. We observed robust antibody responses to 21 poxvirus proteins in vaccinated individuals, including 11 proteins that distinguished Dryvax responses from ACAM2000. Analysis of protein sequences from Dryvax clones revealed amino acid level differences in these 11 antigenic proteins and suggested that sequence variation and clonal heterogeneity may contribute to the observed differences between Dryvax and ACAM2000 antibody responses. PMID:24759651

  20. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C.; Calder, Lesley J.; Melero, José A.

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  1. Development of a new polyclonal antibody for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in indoor air by ic-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Yu; Zhuang, Hui-Sheng; Yang, Guang-Xin; Ji, Xiu-Ling

    2013-04-01

    A new polyclonal antibody (pAb) was prepared and used for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in air samples to promote the application of immunoassay technology in the determination of PCBs. Three PCB congeners immunogen mixture was used to stimulate immune responses in rabbits. The specific pAb to PCBs was obtained and used to develop an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA). A standard curve for Aroclor 1248 was prepared using concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100 μg L(-1). The average IC50 value was 16.21 μg L(-1) and the limit of detection at 10% inhibition (IC90) was 0.069 μg L(-1). The entire procedure was then evaluated using spiked air samples. The recoveries of Aroclor 1248 at various spiking levels in the air samples ranged from 84 to 113%, with relative standard deviations of 3 to 6%. Under optimum conditions, the cross-reactivity profiles of the assays were obtained using three selected congeners, four Aroclor products, and other structurally related compounds of PCBs. The assays were found to be highly specific for PCB congeners and Aroclors 1248 and 1242. The air samples were then analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry to confirm the ic-ELISA results. The attained results demonstrated that the proposed method was an effective and inexpensive technique for the PCBs determination in air samples. PMID:22843339

  2. Evaluation of a polyclonal antibody for the detection and identification of ranaviruses from freshwater fish and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Cinkova, Katerina; Reschova, Stanislava; Kulich, Pavel; Vesely, Tomas

    2010-04-01

    A rabbit polyclonal antibody (PAb) raised against European catfish virus (ECV; isolated from black bullhead Ameiurus melas in France) was produced and then evaluated using a panel of 9 ranavirus isolates collected from different lower vertebrate species originating from Australia, North and South America, Southeast Asia, and Europe. Using ranavirus-infected epithelioma papillosum cyprini (EPC) cell cultures, the specificity of the PAb was determined by Western blot, immunogold electron microscopy, and direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Western blot analysis demonstrated that the PAb reacted strongly with a protein with a molecular weight corresponding to approximately 49 kDa. Immunogold electron microscopy provided direct evidence that the epitopes recognized by this PAb were located on the outer surface of virions. The PAb was used for the preparation of a peroxidase-labeled conjugate for the direct ELISA detection of ranaviruses in infected EPC cell cultures. The specificity of the conjugated PAb was tested using ranaviruses, some representative fish viruses of the genera Rhabdovirus and Birnavirus, and samples from various non-infected fish species. The PAb detected all tested ranaviruses except for 2 Santee-Cooper ranaviruses. The direct ELISA enabled the detection of ranavirus from a concentration of 10(3.5) to 10(3.8) TCID50 ml(-1) cell culture. The results of this study revealed that the rabbit PAb raised against ECV could be useful for the development of specific and standardized diagnostic assays for the detection of ranaviruses from freshwater fish and amphibians. PMID:20481086

  3. Sensitive detection of capsaicinoids using a surface plasmon resonance sensor with anti-homovanillic Acid polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shingo; Yatabe, Rui; Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH) for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes. PMID:25586413

  4. Evolutionarily Successful Asian 1 Dengue Virus 2 Lineages Contain One Substitution in Envelope That Increases Sensitivity to Polyclonal Antibody Neutralization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunling; Katzelnick, Leah C; Montoya, Magelda; Hue, Kien Duong Thi; Simmons, Cameron P; Harris, Eva

    2016-03-15

    The 4 dengue virus serotypes (DENV-1-4) cause the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease of humans worldwide. DENV-2 Asian 1 (A1) genotype viruses replaced the Asian-American (AA) genotype in Vietnam and Cambodia, after which A1 viruses containing Q or M at envelope (E) residue 160 became more prevalent than those with residue 160K in both countries (2008-2011). We investigated whether these substitutions conferred a fitness advantage by measuring neutralizing antibody titer against reporter virus particles (RVPs) representing AA, A1-160K, A1-160Q, and A1-160M, using patient sera from Vietnam and a well-characterized Nicaraguan cohort. Surprisingly, we found that A1-160Q and A1-160M RVPs were better neutralized by heterologous antisera than A1-160K. Despite this, Vietnamese patients infected with A1-160Q or A1-160M viruses had higher viremia levels than those infected with A1-160K. We thus found that independent lineages in Vietnam and Cambodia acquired a substitution in E that significantly increased polyclonal neutralization but nonetheless were successful in disseminating and infecting human hosts. PMID:26582957

  5. Sensitive Detection of Capsaicinoids Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Anti-Homovanillic Acid Polyclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shingo; Yatabe, Rui; Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH) for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes. PMID:25586413

  6. Conjugation of ampicillin and enrofloxacin residues with bovine serum albumin and raising of polyclonal antibodies against them

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, B. Sampath; Ashok, Vasili; Kalyani, P.; Nair, G. Remya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to test the potency of bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugated ampicillin (AMP) and enrofloxacin (ENR) antigens in eliciting an immune response in rats using indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA). Materials and Methods: AMP and ENR antibiotics were conjugated with BSA by carbodiimide reaction using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) as a cross-linker. The successful conjugation was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Sprague-Dawley rats were immunized with the conjugates and blood samples were collected serially at 15 days time interval after first immunization plus first booster, second booster, third booster, and the fourth sampling was done 1½ month after the third booster. The antibody titres in the antisera of each antibiotic in all the four immunization cycles (ICs) were determined by an icELISA at various serum dilutions ranging from 1/100 to 1/6400. Results: Analysis of antibiotic-BSA conjugates by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and coomassie blue staining revealed high molecular weight bands of 85 kDa and 74 kDa for AMP-BSA and ENR-BSA respectively when compared to 68 kDa band of BSA. Both the antibiotic conjugates elicited a good immune response in rats but comparatively the response was more with AMP-BSA conjugate than ENR-BSA conjugate. Maximum optical density 450 value of 2.577 was recorded for AMP-BSA antisera, and 1.723 was recorded for ENR-BSA antisera at 1/100th antiserum dilution in third IC. Conclusion: AMP and ENR antibiotics proved to be good immunogens when conjugated to BSA by carbodiimide reaction with EDC as crosslinker. The polyclonal antibodies produced can be employed for detecting AMP and ENR residues in milk and urine samples. PMID:27182138

  7. Polyclonal Antibodies Recognizing the AmoB Protein of Ammonia Oxidizers of the β-Subclass of the Class Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pinck, Claudia; Coeur, Caroline; Potier, Patrick; Bock, Eberhard

    2001-01-01

    A 41-kDa protein of Nitrosomonas eutropha was purified, and the N-terminal amino acid sequence was found to be nearly identical with the sequence of AmoB, a subunit of ammonia monooxygenase. This protein was used to develop polyclonal antibodies, which were highly specific for the detection of the four genera of ammonia oxidizers of the β-subclass of Proteobacteria (Nitrosomonas, including Nitrosococcus mobilis, which belongs phylogenetically to Nitrosomonas; Nitrosospira; Nitrosolobus; and Nitrosovibrio). In contrast, the antibodies did not react with ammonia oxidizers affiliated with the γ-subclass of Proteobacteria (Nitrosococcus oceani and Nitrosococcus halophilus). Moreover, methane oxidizers (Methylococcus capsulatus, Methylocystis parvus, and Methylomonas methanica) containing the related particulate methane monooxygenase were not detected. Quantitative immunoblot analysis revealed that total cell protein of N. eutropha consisted of approximately 6% AmoB, when cells were grown using standard conditions (mineral medium containing 10 mM ammonium). This AmoB amount was shown to depend on the ammonium concentration in the medium. About 14% AmoB of total protein was found when N. eutropha was grown with 1 mM ammonium, whereas 4% AmoB was detected when 100 mM ammonium were used. In addition, the cellular amount of AmoB was influenced by the absence of the substrate. Cells starved for more than 2 months contained nearly twice as much AmoB as actively growing cells, although these cells possessed low ammonia-oxidizing activity. AmoB was always present and could even be detected in cells of Nitrosomonas after 1 year of ammonia starvation. PMID:11133435

  8. Monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against purified cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from Helianthus tuberosus. Immunopurification, immunoquantitation, and interspecies cross-reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Werck-Reichhart, D; Batard, Y; Kochs, G; Lesot, A; Durst, F

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported the purification of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (CA4H), a cytochrome P-450 catalyzing the second reaction of the general phenylpropanoid pathway, from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) (B. Gabriac, D. Werck-Reichhart, H. Teutsch, F. Durst [1991] Arch Biochem Biophys 288: 302-309). Rabbit polyclonal antibodies were raised against the native and denaturated nitrocellulose-bound enzyme. Only the immunoglobulins G (IgGs) elicited upon immunization with native enzyme produced strong inhibition of catalytic activity and good cross-reactivity on western blots. In microsomes from H. tuberosus tissues induced by wounding and various chemicals, a positive correlation between catalytic activity and amounts of immunoreactive protein on western blots was observed. When coupled to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose, purified IgGs selectively retained CA4H activity from solubilized plant microsomes. Acid elution from the immunoaffinity matrix provided a rapid procedure for high-yield purification of the CA4H protein. The same IgGs immunoprecipitated a single protein from the in vitro translation products of mRNA isolated from wounded tissues. The apparent molecular weight (57,000) of this polypeptide was identical to that of CA4H purified from tuber microsomes. Immunochemical relatedness between CA4H from different plant species was demonstrated by strong inhibition of catalytic activity and immunopurification of several orthologous enzymes, using IgGs directed against CA4H from H. tuberosus. However, only limited interspecies cross-reactivity was observed on western blots. A careful immunochemical analysis indicates that CA4H immunoreactivity significantly differs from plant to plant. Results are discussed in terms of antibody specificity, enzyme glycosylation, and CA4H regulation. PMID:8278549

  9. Identification and expression of an allergen Asp f 13 from Aspergillus fumigatus and epitope mapping using human IgE antibodies and rabbit polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, L P; Liu, S L; Yu, C J; Liao, H K; Tsai, J J; Tang, T K

    2000-01-01

    The Aspergillus genus of fungi is known to be one of the most prevalent aeroallergens. On two-dimensional immunoblotting using patients' sera containing IgE specific for Asp f 13, an allergen with a molecular mass of 33 kDa and a pI of 6.2 was identified. This allergen was also present in A. fumigatus culture filtrates. Furthermore, the sequence of the Asp f 13 cDNA was identical to that for alkaline protease isolated from A. fumigatus and showed 42-49% identity of amino acids with two proteases from P. cyclopium and T. album and with the Pen c 1 allergen from P. citrinum. Asp f 13 coding sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli as a [His](6)-tagged fusion protein which was purified by Ni(2+)-chelate affinity chromatography. Recombinant Asp f 13 was recognized by rabbit polyclonal antibodies against Asp f 13 and by IgE antibodies from subject allergic to A. fumigatus. To identify and characterize the linear epitopes of this allergen, a combination of chemical and enzymatic cleavage and immunoblotting techniques, with subsequent N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry, were performed. At least 13 different linear epitopes reacting with the rabbit anti-Asp f 13 antiserum were identified, located throughout the entire molecule. In contrast, IgE from A. fumigatus-sensitive patients bound to three immunodominant epitopes at the C-terminal of the protein. PMID:10677362

  10. [Molecular cloning of tubulin beta 3 (TUBB3) in Gekko japonicus and preparation of its polyclonal antibody].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Qin, Yong; Gu, Yun; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei

    2012-08-01

    The tubulin beta III (TUBB3) gene encodes a class III member of the beta tubulin protein family that is primarily expressed in neurons and is considered to play a critical role in proper axon guidance and maintenance. This protein is generally used as a specific marker of neurons in the central nervous system. We obtained the full length cDNA sequence of TUBB3 by using the RACE method based on the EST fragment from the brain and spinal cord cDNA library of Gekko japonicus. We further investigated the multi-tissue expression pattern by RT-PCR and identified one transcript of TUBB3 about 1.8 kb in the central nervous system of Gekko japonicus by Northern blotting. The completed cDNA of gecko TUBB3 is 1 790 bp with an open reading frame of 1 350 bp, encoding a 450 amino-acid protein. The recombinant plasmid of pET-32a-TUBB3 was constructed and induced to express His-tagged TUBB3 protein in prokaryotic BL21 cells. The purified TUBB3 protein was then used to immunize rabbits to generate polyclonal antisera. The titer of the antiserum was more than 1:65 536 determined by ELISA. The result of western blotting showed that the TUBB3 antibody could specifically recognize the recombinant TUBB3 protein and endogenous TUBB3 protein. Our findings provide the tools to further understand the TUBB3 gene and investigate the regeneration of the central nervous system in Gekko japonicas. PMID:22855447

  11. Incidence of Lettuce mosaic virus in lettuce and its detection by polyclonal antibodies produced against recombinant coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prachi; Sharma, Susheel; Singh, Jasvir; Saha, Swati; Baranwal, V K

    2016-04-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus of family Potyviridae, causes mosaic disease in lettuce has recently been identified in India. The virus is seed borne and secondary infection occurs through aphids. To ensure virus freedom in seeds it is important to develop diagnostic tools, for serological methods the production of polyclonal antibodies is a prerequisite. The coat protein (CP) gene of LMV was amplified, cloned and expressed using pET-28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 competent cells. The LMV CP was expressed as a fusion protein containing a fragment of the E. coli His tag. The LMV CP/His protein reacted positively with a commercial antiserum against LMV in an immunoblot assay. Polyclonal antibodies purified from serum of rabbits immunized with the fusion protein gave positive results when LMV infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was tested at 1:1000 dilution in PTA-ELISA. These were used for specific detection of LMV in screening lettuce accessions. The efficacy of the raised polyclonal antiserum was high and it can be utilized in quarantine and clean seed production. PMID:26850143

  12. Evaluation of the molecular recognition of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies for sensitive detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) by indirect competitive surface plasmon resonance immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Dhesingh Ravi; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu; Kim, Sook Jin; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Miura, Norio

    2006-11-01

    Detection of TNT is an important environmental and security concern all over the world. We herein report the performance and comparison of four immunoassays for rapid and label-free detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The immunosensor surface was constructed by immobilization of a home-made 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (TNPh-KLH) conjugate onto an SPR gold surface by simple physical adsorption within 10 min. The immunoreaction of the TNPh-KLH conjugate with four different antibodies, namely, monoclonal anti-TNT antibody (M-TNT Ab), monoclonal anti-trinitrophenol antibody (M-TNP Ab), polyclonal anti-trinitrophenyl antibody (P-TNPh Ab), and polyclonal anti-TNP antibody (P-TNP Ab), was studied by SPR. The principle of indirect competitive immunoreaction was employed for quantification of TNT. Among the four antibodies, the P-TNPh Ab prepared by our group showed highest sensitivity with a detection limit of 0.002 ng/mL (2 ppt) TNT. The lowest detection limits observed with other commercial antibodies were 0.008 ng/mL (8 ppt), 0.25 ng/mL (250 ppt), and 40 ng/mL (ppb) for M-TNT Ab, P-TNP Ab, and M-TNP Ab, respectively, in the similar assay format. The concentration of the conjugate and the antibodies were optimized for use in the immunoassay. The response time for an immunoreaction was 36 s and a single immunocycle could be done within 2 min, including the sensor surface regeneration using pepsin solution. In addition to the quantification of TNT, all immunoassays were evaluated for robustness and cross-reactivity towards several TNT analogs. PMID:16900380

  13. Combinations of Polyclonal or Monoclonal Antibodies to Proteins of the Outer Membranes of the Two Infectious Forms of Vaccinia Virus Protect Mice against a Lethal Respiratory Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Shlomo; Fogg, Christiana; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Moss, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antibodies to live vaccinia virus infection are needed for optimal protection against orthopoxvirus infection. The present report is the first to compare the protective abilities of individual and combinations of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that target proteins of the intracellular (IMV) and extracellular (EV) forms of vaccinia virus. The antibodies were directed to one IMV membrane protein, L1, and to two outer EV membrane proteins, A33 and B5. In vitro studies showed that the antibodies to L1 neutralized IMV and that the antibodies to A33 and B5 prevented the spread of EV in liquid medium. Prophylactic administration of individual antibodies to BALB/c mice partially protected them against disease following intranasal challenge with lethal doses of vaccinia virus. Combinations of antibodies, particularly anti-L1 and -A33 or -L1 and -B5, provided enhanced protection when administered 1 day before or 2 days after challenge. Furthermore, the protection was superior to that achieved with pooled immune gamma globulin from human volunteers inoculated with live vaccinia virus. In addition, single injections of anti-L1 plus anti-A33 antibodies greatly delayed the deaths of severe combined immunodeficiency mice challenged with vaccinia virus. These studies suggest that antibodies to two or three viral membrane proteins optimally derived from the outer membranes of IMV and EV, may be beneficial for prophylaxis or therapy of orthopoxvirus infections. PMID:16227266

  14. DNA-affinity-purified Chip (DAP-chip) Method to Determine Gene Targets for Bacterial Two component Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-01-01

    In vivo methods such as ChIP-chip are well-established techniques used to determine global gene targets for transcription factors. However, they are of limited use in exploring bacterial two component regulatory systems with uncharacterized activation conditions. Such systems regulate transcription only when activated in the presence of unique signals. Since these signals are often unknown, the in vitro microarray based method described in this video article can be used to determine gene targets and binding sites for response regulators. This DNA-affinity-purified-chip method may be used for any purified regulator in any organism with a sequenced genome. The protocol involves allowing the purified tagged protein to bind to sheared genomic DNA and then affinity purifying the protein-bound DNA, followed by fluorescent labeling of the DNA and hybridization to a custom tiling array. Preceding steps that may be used to optimize the assay for specific regulators are also described. The peaks generated by the array data analysis are used to predict binding site motifs, which are then experimentally validated. The motif predictions can be further used to determine gene targets of orthologous response regulators in closely related species. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by determining the gene targets and binding site motifs and thus predicting the function for a sigma54-dependent response regulator DVU3023 in the environmental bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. PMID:25079303

  15. A natural IgM antibody does inhibit polyclonal and antigen-specific IgM but not IgG B-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Kiss, K; Uher, F; Gergely, J

    1994-03-01

    Since a B-cell growth-inhibitory natural IgM antibody was identified in the culture supernatants of LPS-stimulated murine splenic B lymphocytes [11], attempts have been made to define other possible functional role(s) of this antibody. Here we show that this regulatory IgM is able to inhibit not only the proliferation of splenic B cells, but also their IgM secretion during LPS-induced polyclonal, as well as antigen (FITC-KLH)-specific antibody responses. In contrast, IgG1 production of hapten (FITC)-specific B cells neither during restimulation with LPS nor in the presence of carrier-specific T lymphocytes in vitro was affected by regulatory IgM. Therefore, whereas newly emerging naive B cells are highly susceptible, IgG-secreting B cells appear to be completely resistant to inactivation by the regulatory IgM autoantibody. PMID:7518418

  16. Analysis of Epitopes on Dengue Virus Envelope Protein Recognized by Monoclonal Antibodies and Polyclonal Human Sera by a High Throughput Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong-En; Tsai, Wen-Yang; Liu, I-Ju; Li, Pi-Chun; Liao, Mei-Ying; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Lai, Chih-Yun; Lu, Chih-Hsuan; Huang, Jyh-Hsiung; Chang, Gwong-Jen; Wu, Han-Chung; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2012-01-01

    Background The envelope (E) protein of dengue virus (DENV) is the major target of neutralizing antibodies and vaccine development. While previous studies on domain III or domain I/II alone have reported several epitopes of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against DENV E protein, the possibility of interdomain epitopes and the relationship between epitopes and neutralizing potency remain largely unexplored. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a dot blot assay by using 67 alanine mutants of predicted surface-exposed E residues as a systematic approach to identify epitopes recognized by mAbs and polyclonal sera, and confirmed our findings using a capture-ELISA assay. Of the 12 mouse mAbs tested, three recognized a novel epitope involving residues (Q211, D215, P217) at the central interface of domain II, and three recognized residues at both domain III and the lateral ridge of domain II, suggesting a more frequent presence of interdomain epitopes than previously appreciated. Compared with mAbs generated by traditional protocols, the potent neutralizing mAbs generated by a new protocol recognized multiple residues in A strand or residues in C strand/CC′ loop of DENV2 and DENV1, and multiple residues in BC loop and residues in DE loop, EF loop/F strand or G strand of DENV1. The predominant epitopes of anti-E antibodies in polyclonal sera were found to include both fusion loop and non-fusion residues in the same or adjacent monomer. Conclusions/Significance Our analyses have implications for epitope-specific diagnostics and epitope-based dengue vaccines. This high throughput method has tremendous application for mapping both intra and interdomain epitopes recognized by human mAbs and polyclonal sera, which would further our understanding of humoral immune responses to DENV at the epitope level. PMID:22235356

  17. Expression, purification and characterization of two truncated peste des petits ruminants virus matrix proteins in Escherichia coli, and production of polyclonal antibodies against this protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Liu, Zengshan; Wang, Zhiliang

    2013-09-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), the etiological agent of peste des petits ruminants, is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) gene is composed of 1483 base pairs, encoding a 335 amino acids M protein with a molecular weight of approximately 38kD. We have demonstrated previously that the full-length M protein was expressed at an extremely low level or not even expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). In this study, the M protein was split into two truncated forms to be successfully expressed in E. coli at a high level using the pET30a (+) vector, respectively, by analysis of SDS-PAGE, western blot and MALDI-TOF-MS. The optimization of culture conditions led us to perform the recombinant protein induction with 0.2mM IPTG at 28°C for 12h, whereby both proteins nevertheless were expressed in the insoluble form. Therefore, both His-tagged proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using a commercially available kit. Balb/c mice were immunized with the complex of purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by the analysis of ELISA. The specificity of the prepared polyclonal antibodies was checked by western blot and immunofluorescence, revealing them with the desirable specificity against both non-denatured and denatured M proteins. PMID:23827209

  18. Evidence for monomeric and oligomeric hormone-binding domains in affinity-purified gonadotropin receptor from rat ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.Y.; Menon, K.M.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Rat ovarian lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor was purified from a Triton X-100-solubilized membrane preparation by affinity chromatography with Affi-Gel 10 coupled to purified human choriogonadotropin. The affinity-purified receptor preparations contained a single class of high-affinity binding sites for {sup 125}I-labeled human choriogonadotropin, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} M, which is comparable to the K{sub d} values for membrane-bound and solubilized receptors. The purified receptor appeared as two dominant bands with molecular weights of 135,000 and 92,000 after sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) under nonreducing conditions. When the individual affinity-purified receptor bands were electroeluted from the gel and analyzed again by SDS/PAGE under nonreducing conditions, both the M{sub r} 92,000 and the 135,000 proteins retained their original molecular form even when 8 M urea was included in the gel. However, when the electrophoretically purified M{sub r} 92,000 and 135,000 bands were subjected to SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions, the M{sub r} 135,000 species was almost completely converted to a M{sub r} 92,000 band, but the M{sub r} 92,000 species did not undergo any alteration in molecular weight. The results suggest that the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor from rat ovary exists in two molecular forms, and the higher molecular weight form appears to be composed of disulfide-linked M{sup r} 92,000 subunit, which comprises the hormone-binding domain.

  19. Anti-infectivity of camel polyclonal antibodies against hepatitis C virus in Huh7.5 hepatoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To extend the study of the camel milk proteins which have antiviral activity against HCV, camel naïve polyclonal IgGs, α-lactalbumin were purified from camel milk and their anti-HCV effect was examined using PBMCs and Huh7.5 cell-lines. They were compared with the activity of human polyclonal IgGs and camel lactoferrin and casein. Material and methods Three types of experiments were performed on PBMCs and HuH7.5 cell. HCV was directly incubated with the purified proteins and then mixed with both cell types, or the proteins were incubated with the cells and then exposed to HCV, or the HCV pre-infected cells were treated with the proteins to inhibit intracellular replication. The proteins were added to cells or virus at different concentrations and time intervals. Results Pretreated PBMCs and Huh7.5 cells with milk proteins were not protected when exposed to HCV infection. The direct interaction between HCV and camel IgGs and camel lactoferrin (cLf) led to a complete inhibition of HCV entry into cells, while casein, α-lactalbumin and human IgGs failed to inhibit HCV entry at any tested concentration. Camel IgGs showed ability to recognize HCV peptides with a significant titer (12 × 103) in comparison with human IgGs which failed to do it. Camel lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting the intracellular HCV replication at concentrations of 0.25-1.25 mg/ml. Conclusion Camel milk naïve polyclonal IgGs isolated from camel milk could inhibit the HCV infectivity and demonstrated strong signal against its synthetic peptides. Lactoferrin inhibit the HCV infectivity started from 0.25 mg/ml. However, α-lactalbumin, human IgGs and casein failed to demonstrate any activity against HCV infectivity. PMID:22978304

  20. Intermediate filament proteins in classic and variant types of small cell lung carcinoma cell lines: a biochemical and immunochemical analysis using a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Broers, J L; Carney, D N; Klein Rot, M; Schaart, G; Lane, E B; Vooijs, G P; Ramaekers, F C

    1986-07-01

    The intermediate filament protein (IFP) characteristics of a panel of lung cancer cell lines including adenocarcinoma (two cell lines) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC, three classic and three variant cell lines) were examined using one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoretic techniques, immunocytochemical techniques and immunoblotting assays. A panel of 28 monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to the five different types of IFP were used. The results of our studies indicate that these human lung adenocarcinoma, classic SCLC and variant SCLC cell lines can be differentiated on the basis of their pattern of IFP. The main conclusions from this study can be summarized as follows. The two adenocarcinoma cell lines contain cytokeratins 7, 8, 18, and sometimes 19, next to vimentin intermediate filament (IF). The three classic-type SCLC cell lines contain only cytokeratin IFs but not vimentin IF or neurofilaments (NFs). Cytokeratin polypeptides 7, 8, 18 and 19 could be detected. All three variant-type SCLC cell lines do not contain detectable amounts of cytokeratins. In contrast, two out of three variant SCLC cell lines contain neurofilament proteins. All three variant-type SCLC cell lines contain vimentin IF. Using immunoblotting assays with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to defined NF proteins the presence of the 68 X 10(3) Mr and the 160 X 10(3) Mr NF polypeptide could be demonstrated in two variant SCLC cell lines. As patients with SCLC-variant phenotype have a poorer prognosis after cytotoxic therapy than patients with 'pure' SCLC, the use of antibodies to IFP in staining fresh lung tumours, especially anaplastic ones, may differentiate the two subtypes of SCLC. Such a distinction would have a major impact on therapy selections and may be of prognostic importance. PMID:2433295

  1. Production of Nurr-1 Specific Polyclonal Antibodies Free of Cross-reactivity Against Its Close Homologs, Nor1 and Nur77

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Pierre; Moon, Minho; Kim, Woori; Jeong, Inhye; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptor subfamily 4 (NR4A) is composed of 3 related proteins sharing a DNA binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD). The nuclear receptor related 1 protein (Nurr1 or NR4A2) plays a key role in the maintenance of the dopaminergic system. Dopamine dysfunctions associated with the Nurr1 gene include Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and manic depression among others. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that Nurr1 is also expressed in other brain areas such as the hippocampus and plays critical roles for learning and memory. The other members of the family are nerve growth factor IB (Nur77 or NR4A1) and neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR1 or NR4A3). To help investigate the precise functional roles of Nurr1 in dopaminergic and other brain region-related neuronal dysfunctions antibodies devoid of cross-reactivities against Nur77 and NOR1 were needed. Since the proteins are more divergent in their LBDs than in their DNA binding domains immunization with purified LBDs should yield antibodies specific for Nurr1 with minimal reactivities against Nur77 and/or NOR1. Although anti-Nurr1 antibodies were successfully generated these showed significant immunoreactivity against the other members of the family. Affinity chromatography over immobilized Protein A followed by pre-adsorption against immobilized Nur77 and NOR1 LBDs yielded Nurr1 specific antibodies free of cross-reactivity. Here, we selectively target antibodies against a specific member of a highly conserved family of proteins by immunizing animals with their most divergent regions followed by removing cross reactive antibodies by pre-adsorption. The goal of the protocol is to increase polyclonal antibodies specificity through pre-adsorption against cross-reactive antigens. PMID:26325389

  2. Production of Nurr-1 Specific Polyclonal Antibodies Free of Cross-reactivity Against Its Close Homologs, Nor1 and Nur77.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Pierre; Moon, Minho; Kim, Woori; Jeong, Inhye; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor subfamily 4 (NR4A) is composed of 3 related proteins sharing a DNA binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD). The nuclear receptor related 1 protein (Nurr1 or NR4A2) plays a key role in the maintenance of the dopaminergic system. Dopamine dysfunctions associated with the Nurr1 gene include Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and manic depression among others. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that Nurr1 is also expressed in other brain areas such as the hippocampus and plays critical roles for learning and memory. The other members of the family are nerve growth factor IB (Nur77 or NR4A1) and neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR1 or NR4A3). To help investigate the precise functional roles of Nurr1 in dopaminergic and other brain region-related neuronal dysfunctions antibodies devoid of cross-reactivities against Nur77 and NOR1 were needed. Since the proteins are more divergent in their LBDs than in their DNA binding domains immunization with purified LBDs should yield antibodies specific for Nurr1 with minimal reactivities against Nur77 and/or NOR1. Although anti-Nurr1 antibodies were successfully generated these showed significant immunoreactivity against the other members of the family. Affinity chromatography over immobilized Protein A followed by pre-adsorption against immobilized Nur77 and NOR1 LBDs yielded Nurr1 specific antibodies free of cross-reactivity. Here, we selectively target antibodies against a specific member of a highly conserved family of proteins by immunizing animals with their most divergent regions followed by removing cross reactive antibodies by pre-adsorption. The goal of the protocol is to increase polyclonal antibodies specificity through pre-adsorption against cross-reactive antigens. PMID:26325389

  3. Development of porcine ficolin-alpha monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies for determining the binding capacity of multiple GlcNAc-binding proteins to bacterial danger components.

    PubMed

    Nahid, M Abu; Ross, Steven J; Umiker, Benjamin R; Li, Huapeng; Sugii, Sunji; Bari, Latiful

    2016-02-01

    Ficolins are a group of oligomeric defense proteins assembled from collagen-like stalks and fibrinogen-like domains that have common biochemical specificity for N-acetyl-d-glucose amine (GlcNAc) and can function as opsonins. In this report, GlcNAc-binding protein (GBP) purified from porcine nonimmune serum was biochemically characterized as ficolin-α. Ficolin-α was used as an immunogen to generate both rabbit polyclonal and murine monoclonal anti-ficolin-α antibodies, which are not yet commercially available. GBPs have been shown to be present in many animals, including humans; however, their functions are largely unknown. GBPs from chicken, dog, horse, bovine, and human sera were isolated using various chromatography methods. Interestingly, anti-ficolin-α antibody showed cross-reaction with those animal sera GBPs. Furthermore, anti-ficolin-α antibody was reactive with the GlcNAc eluate of Escherichia coli O26-bound and Salmonella-bound porcine serum proteins. Functionally, GBPs and bacteria-reactive pig serum proteins were able to bind with pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as lipopolysaccharides and lipoteichoic acids. Our studies demonstrate that ficolin-α specific antibody was reactive with GBPs from many species as well as bacteria-reactive serum proteins. These proteins may play important roles in innate immunity by sensing danger components that can lead to antibacterial activity. PMID:26872626

  4. [The protective activity of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A in in vivo experiments].

    PubMed

    Del'vig, A A; Krasnoproshina, L I; Volgareva, G M; Bobyleva, G V; Kuvakina, V I; Artem'eva, T A

    1990-10-01

    The protective activity of the sera of mice immunized with the preparations of native and detoxified N. meningitidis lipopolysaccharide (LPS), group A, as well as with monoclonal antibodies to N. meningitidis antigens, groups A and B, was studied on the mucin model of meningococcal infection. The study showed that the maximum level of anti-LPS antibodies in mice was observed on day 7 after the injection of LPS. Immune sera obtained from mice were capable of protecting the animals from fetal meningococcemia induced by N. meningitidis strains of homologous and heterologous groups. As shown by the results of this study, the alkaline treatment of N. meningitidis native LPS did not decrease the protective properties of antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies under study were found to possess high preventive activity in mice challenged with N. meningitidis, groups A and B. Anti-LPS monoclonal antibodies showed greater protective activity than antipolysaccharide monoclonal antibodies. PMID:2127501

  5. Comparison of biotinylated monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in an evaluation of a direct rapid immunohistochemical test for the routine diagnosis of rabies in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Coetzer, Andre; Sabeta, Claude T; Markotter, Wanda; Rupprecht, Charles E; Nel, Louis H

    2014-09-01

    The major etiological agent of rabies, rabies virus (RABV), accounts for tens of thousands of human deaths per annum. The majority of these deaths are associated with rabies cycles in dogs in resource-limited countries of Africa and Asia. Although routine rabies diagnosis plays an integral role in disease surveillance and management, the application of the currently recommended direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test in countries on the African and Asian continents remains quite limited. A novel diagnostic assay, the direct rapid immunohistochemical test (dRIT), has been reported to have a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity equal to that of the DFA test while offering advantages in cost, time and interpretation. Prior studies used the dRIT utilized monoclonal antibody (MAb) cocktails. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a biotinylated polyclonal antibody (PAb) preparation, applied in the dRIT protocol, would yield equal or improved results compared to the use of dRIT with MAbs. We also wanted to compare the PAb dRIT with the DFA test, utilizing the same PAb preparation with a fluorescent label. The PAb dRIT had a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100%, which was shown to be marginally higher than the diagnostic efficacy observed for the PAb DFA test. The classical dRIT, relying on two-biotinylated MAbs, was applied to the same panel of samples and a reduced diagnostic sensitivity (83.50% and 90.78% respectively) was observed. Antigenic typing of the false negative samples indicated all of these to be mongoose RABV variants. Our results provided evidence that a dRIT with alternative antibody preparations, conjugated to a biotin moiety, has a diagnostic efficacy equal to that of a DFA relying on the same antibody and that the antibody preparation should be optimized for virus variants specific to the geographical area of focus. PMID:25254652

  6. Comparison of Biotinylated Monoclonal and Polyclonal Antibodies in an Evaluation of a Direct Rapid Immunohistochemical Test for the Routine Diagnosis of Rabies in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Coetzer, Andre; Sabeta, Claude T.; Markotter, Wanda; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Nel, Louis H.

    2014-01-01

    The major etiological agent of rabies, rabies virus (RABV), accounts for tens of thousands of human deaths per annum. The majority of these deaths are associated with rabies cycles in dogs in resource-limited countries of Africa and Asia. Although routine rabies diagnosis plays an integral role in disease surveillance and management, the application of the currently recommended direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test in countries on the African and Asian continents remains quite limited. A novel diagnostic assay, the direct rapid immunohistochemical test (dRIT), has been reported to have a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity equal to that of the DFA test while offering advantages in cost, time and interpretation. Prior studies used the dRIT utilized monoclonal antibody (MAb) cocktails. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a biotinylated polyclonal antibody (PAb) preparation, applied in the dRIT protocol, would yield equal or improved results compared to the use of dRIT with MAbs. We also wanted to compare the PAb dRIT with the DFA test, utilizing the same PAb preparation with a fluorescent label. The PAb dRIT had a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100%, which was shown to be marginally higher than the diagnostic efficacy observed for the PAb DFA test. The classical dRIT, relying on two-biotinylated MAbs, was applied to the same panel of samples and a reduced diagnostic sensitivity (83.50% and 90.78% respectively) was observed. Antigenic typing of the false negative samples indicated all of these to be mongoose RABV variants. Our results provided evidence that a dRIT with alternative antibody preparations, conjugated to a biotin moiety, has a diagnostic efficacy equal to that of a DFA relying on the same antibody and that the antibody preparation should be optimized for virus variants specific to the geographical area of focus. PMID:25254652

  7. A prepared anti-MSTN polyclonal antibody reverses insulin resistance of diet-induced obese rats via regulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR&FoxO1 signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Liu, Chen-tao; Wang, Xu-dan; Luo, Kai; Zhang, Di-di; Chi, Ai-ping; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Li-jun

    2014-12-01

    Suppression of myostatin (MSTN) is associated with skeletal muscle atrophy and insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms by which MSTN regulates insulin resistance are not well known. We have explored the signaling pathways through which MSTN regulates insulin resistance in diet-induced obese rats using a polyclonal antibody for MSTN. The anti-MSTN polyclonal antibody significantly improved insulin resistance and whole-body insulin sensitivity, decreased MSTN protein expression in muscle samples by 39% in diet-induced obese rats. Furthermore, the anti-MSTN polyclonal antibody significantly enhanced PI3K activity (140%), Akt phosphorylation (86%), GLUT4 protein expression (23%), the phosphorylation of mTOR (21%), and inhibited the phosphorylation of FoxO1 (57%), but did not affect the phosphorylation of GSK-3β. Thus, suppression of MSTN by the anti-MSTN polyclonal antibody reverses insulin resistance of diet-induced obesity via MSTN/PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MSTN/PI3K/Akt/FoxO1 signaling pathways. PMID:25048241

  8. Polyclonal antibody effects on the human cardiac 5-HT4(e) receptors depend upon the expression system.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Emmanuella; Rose, Stéphanie; Hérault, Olivier; Argibay, Jorge; Cosnay, Pierre; Bozon, Véronique

    2004-01-01

    The initial objective of this work was to examine the effects of an antibody (Anti-G21V) directed against the second extracellular loop of human heart 5-HT4 receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The antibody anti-G21V had no effect upon either basal cAMP-or 5-HT-evoked increases in cAMP in CHO cells, whereas it had shown an agonist-like effect in COS-7 cells. Analysis of agonist fractions of h5-HT4(e) receptors in CHO and COS-7 cells revealed that equilibrium constant could underlie the different responses of the receptor toward the anti-G21V antibody. Therefore, different expression systems could give rise to functional differences in 5-HT4 receptor behavior. PMID:15512847

  9. Widespread occurrence of low levels of alternariol in apple and tomato products, as determined by comparative immunochemical assessment using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Yvonne; Curtui, Valeriu; Dietrich, Richard; Gross, Madeleine; Latif, Hadri; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Usleber, Ewald

    2011-06-22

    This study investigated the production of polyclonal (pAB) antibodies and the first time production of monoclonal (mAB) antibodies against the mycotoxin alternariol, and their implementation in enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the rapid determination of alternariol in foods. Both EIAs were highly sensitive, with detection limits (IC₂₀) of 35 ± 6.9 pg/mL (mAb EIA) and 59 ± 16 pg/mL (pAb EIA). Food products (n = 109; apple and tomato products, white wine) from German retail shops were analyzed. At a detection limit of 1-2 μg/kg, alternariol at 1-13 μg/kg was found with high frequency in apple (67%) and tomato (93%) products. Tomatoes with visible signs of Alternaria infection, stored at room temperature for up to 4 weeks, contained alternariol at levels up to 50 mg/kg, as determined by EIA and HPLC-FLD. It is concluded that the alternariol immunoassays present a versatile screening tool which could facilitate food control for Alternaria toxins. PMID:21534631

  10. Preparation of polyclonal antibodies for nateglinide (NTG) and development of a sensitive chemiluminescent immunoassay to detect NTG in tablets and serum.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Song, Zhaorui; Dong, Yaqing; Wang, Yufen; Tong, Zhongsheng; Deng, Chuan; Yin, Yongmei; Meng, Meng; Xi, Rimo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we prepared polyclonal antibodies against anti-diabetic drug nateglinide (NTG), and established a sensitive chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) to detect NTG in tablets and serum. Two kinds of immunogens were synthesized using ethylcarbodiimide (EDC)/hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and carbonyldiimidazole (CDI)/4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) as coupling reagents respectively. When activated by EDC/NHS, more molecules of NTG coupled with carrier protein in immunogens. A horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-luminol-H2O2 system with p-iodophenol enhancement was applied in the CLIA analysis. The antibodies in EDC/NHS group showed higher titer, sensitivity and wider detection linear range than those in CDI/DMAP group, and were chosen for next studies. The developed CLIA assay exhibited good selectivity towards NTG among structually similar analogs. The method could detect as low as 0.35 ng mL(-1) NTG in buffer, 2.1 ng mL(-1) NTG in serum and 0.84 ng mL(-1) NTG in tablets. The CLIA method provided consistent results with HPLC method (r=0.9986) in determination of NTG from 5.0 to 400 µg mL(-1). The CLIA method could detect 78 samples in one assay, and the samples need only dilution in pretreatment. As a summary, this research offers a sensitive assay for high-throughout screening of NTG in formulation control and pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:26695294

  11. Preparation of Polyclonal Antibody Specific for BRD7 and Detection of Its Expression Pattern in the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huaying; Li, Xiaoling; Niu, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Ming; Huang, He; He, Jiajin; Zhang, Wenling; Xiao, Lan; Tang, Yunlian; Wang, Li; Li, Guiyuan

    2008-01-01

    BRD7 is a novel bromodomain gene. It plays critical role in cell growth, cell cycle progression, and signal-dependent gene expression. Overexpression of the BRD7 gene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells is effective to inhibit cell growth and cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. However, little is known about its bio-functions because of the unavailability of a specific BRD7 antibody. In this study, for the first time, we generated a highly specific BRD7 antibody. It is able to specifically recognize recombinant GST-BRD7N protein with a molecular mass of 65 kDa and recognize BRD7-Myc and endogenously expressed BRD7 protein with an approximate molecular mass of 75 kDa, which corresponds well with the calculated molecular mass of the BRD7 protein. More importantly, with these antisera, we analyzed BRD7 distribution in the human fetus by Western blot and immunohistochemistry assays. Obvious nuclear expression of BRD7 protein presents in human cerebellum, pancreas, intestines, liver, and kidney. Cardiomyocyte shows high cytoplasm expression of the BRD7 protein. Weak nuclear expression of the BRD7 protein is found in human cerebrum, lung, and stomach. These data may help to further study the cellular role of the BRD7 gene. In particular, the prepared BRD7 antibody will be helpful for studying the bio-functions of endogenously expressed BRD7 protein. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:531–538, 2008) PMID:18071067

  12. Human Polyclonal Antibodies Produced through DNA Vaccination of Transchromosomal Cattle Provide Mice with Post-Exposure Protection against Lethal Zaire and Sudan Ebolaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bounds, Callie E.; Kwilas, Steven A.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Brannan, Jennifer M.; Bakken, Russell R.; Dye, John M.; Hooper, Jay W.; Dupuy, Lesley C.; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-an; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination of transchromosomal bovines (TcBs) with DNA vaccines expressing the codon-optimized (co) glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Sudan virus (SUDV) produce fully human polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) that recognize both viruses and demonstrate robust neutralizing activity. Each TcB was vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation (IM-EP) a total of four times and at each administration received 10 mg of the EBOV-GPco DNA vaccine and 10 mg of the SUDV-GPco DNA vaccine at two sites on the left and right sides, respectively. After two vaccinations, robust antibody responses (titers > 1000) were detected by ELISA against whole irradiated EBOV or SUDV and recombinant EBOV-GP or SUDV-GP (rGP) antigens, with higher titers observed for the rGP antigens. Strong, virus neutralizing antibody responses (titers >1000) were detected after three vaccinations when measured by vesicular stomatitis virus-based pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA). Maximal neutralizing antibody responses were identified by traditional plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) after four vaccinations. Neutralizing activity of human immunoglobulins (IgG) purified from TcB plasma collected after three vaccinations and injected intraperitoneally (IP) into mice at a 100 mg/kg dose was detected in the serum by PsVNA up to 14 days after administration. Passive transfer by IP injection of the purified IgG (100 mg/kg) to groups of BALB/c mice one day after IP challenge with mouse adapted (ma) EBOV resulted in 80% protection while all mice treated with non-specific pAbs succumbed. Similarly, interferon receptor 1 knockout (IFNAR -/-) mice receiving the purified IgG (100 mg/kg) by IP injection one day after IP challenge with wild type SUDV resulted in 89% survival. These results are the first to demonstrate that filovirus GP DNA vaccines administered to TcBs by IM-EP can elicit neutralizing antibodies that provide post-exposure protection. Additionally, these data describe

  13. Development of a Polyclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Detection of Spores of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris in Various Fruit Juices.

    PubMed

    Mast, Sophia; Dietrich, Richard; Didier, Andrea; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2016-01-20

    A polyclonal rabbit antibody-based sandwich ELISA for the rapid and specific detection of spores of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris was established. The reactivity of the antisera with spores was confirmed by immunofluorescence. For a thorough evaluation of the ELISA, 61 strains and isolates of Alicyclobacillus spp. were characterized regarding their guaiacol production ability and genetic variability. The ELISA was highly sensitive, the detection limits were isolate-dependent and ranged from 2.1 × 10(3) - 3.8 × 10(4) spores/mL, except for one isolate, for which a slightly lower sensitivity (5 × 10(5) spores/mL) was observed. Inclusivity tests revealed that the ELISA reacts with all tested A. acidoterrestris, while no cross-reactions with spores of 30 strains of Bacillus spp. and Clostridium spp. were observed. Further on, the assay applicability was tested with orange, apple (clear and unfiltered), tomato, pink grapefruit, pear, and white grape juices. Juices were inoculated with 1 or 10 spores/mL of A. acidoterrestris. After enrichment for 48 h, the established ELISA enabled the reliable and reproducible detection of contaminated samples. The enriched samples could be applied directly to the assay, underlining the robustness of the developed ELISA method. PMID:26653108

  14. A Polyclonal Antibody Based Immunoassay Detects Seven Subtypes of Shiga Toxin 2 Produced by Escherichia coli in Human and Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaohua; Patfield, Stephanie; Hnasko, Robert; Rasooly, Reuven; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are frequent causes of severe human diseases ranging from diarrhea to hemolytic uremic syndrome. The existing strategy for detection of STEC relies on the unique sorbitol-negative fermentation property of the O157 strains, the most commonly identified serotype has been E. coli O157. It is becoming increasingly evident, however, that numerous non-O157 STEC serotypes also cause outbreaks and severe illnesses. It is necessary to have new methods that are capable of detecting all STEC strains. Methods and Findings Here we describe the development of a sandwich ELISA assay for detecting both O157 and non-O157 STECs by incorporating a novel polyclonal antibody (pAb) against Stx2. The newly established immunoassay was capable of detecting Stx2a spiked in environmental samples with a limit of detection between 10 and 100 pg/mL in soil and between 100 and 500 pg/mL in feces. When applied to 36 bacterial strains isolated from human and environmental samples, this assay detected Stx2 in all strains that were confirmed to be stx2-positive by real-time PCR, demonstrating a 100% sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions The sandwich ELISA developed in this study will enable any competent laboratory to identify and characterize Stx2-producing O157 and non-O157 strains in human and environmental samples, resulting in rapid diagnosis and patient care. The results of epitope mapping from this study will be useful for further development of a peptide-based antibody and vaccine. PMID:24146860

  15. Expression and Characterization of the Extracellular Domain of Human HER2 from Escherichia Coli, and Production of Polyclonal Antibodies Against the Recombinant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Feng, Xue; Qu, Jiao; Han, Wenqi; Liu, Zi; Li, Xu; Zou, Ming; Zhen, Yuhong; Zhu, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family. In this study, the whole extracellular domain gene of HER2 was amplified by RT-PCR from human breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3. The genes of membrane-distal region (A) and membrane proximal region (B) of HER2 extracellular domain were amplified from the cloned template, and then inserted into the expression vector pET-28a and pET-30a, respectively. The recombinant expression vectors were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and induced by isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for expression of proteins His-A and His-B. The expressed proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blot. The optimization of culture conditions led us to accomplish the recombinant protein induction with 1.0 mM IPTG at 37 °C for 8 h, and both proteins were expressed in the insoluble form. Both proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using Ni-NTA sepharose column. Balb/c mice were immunized with the purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by ELISA testing and had good specificity by western blot detection. The HER2 ECD proteins His-A and His-B could be expressed in E. coli and were suitable for production of high titer antibodies against HER2 ECD. PMID:25906688

  16. Localization and Distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in Citrus and Periwinkle by Direct Tissue Blot Immuno Assay with an Anti-OmpA Polyclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fang; Duan, Yongping; Paul, Cristina; Brlansky, Ronald H; Hartung, John S

    2015-01-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CaLas), a non-cultured member of the α-proteobacteria, is the causal agent of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). Due to the difficulties of in vitro culture, antibodies against CaLas have not been widely used in studies of this pathogen. We have used an anti-OmpA polyclonal antibody based direct tissue blot immunoassay to localize CaLas in different citrus tissues and in periwinkle leaves. In citrus petioles, CaLas was unevenly distributed in the phloem sieve tubes, and tended to colonize in phloem sieve tubes on the underside of petioles in preference to the upper side of petioles. Both the leaf abscission zone and the junction of the petiole and leaf midrib had fewer CaLas bacteria compared to the main portions of the petiole and the midribs. Colonies of CaLas in phloem sieve tubes were more frequently found in stems with symptomatic leaves than in stems with asymptomatic leaves with an uneven distribution pattern. In serial sections taken from the receptacle to the peduncle, more CaLas were observed in the peduncle sections adjacent to the stem. In seed, CaLas was located in the seed coat. Many fewer CaLas were found in the roots, as compared to the seeds and petioles when samples were collected from trees with obvious foliar symptoms. The direct tissue blot immuno assay was adapted to whole periwinkle leaves infected by CaLas. The pathogen was distributed throughout the lateral veins and the results were correlated with results of qPCR. Our data provide direct spatial and anatomical information for CaLas in planta. This simple and scalable method may facilitate the future research on the interaction of CaLas and host plant. PMID:25946013

  17. Localization and Distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in Citrus and Periwinkle by Direct Tissue Blot Immuno Assay with an Anti-OmpA Polyclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Fang; Duan, Yongping; Paul, Cristina; Brlansky, Ronald H.; Hartung, John S.

    2015-01-01

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CaLas), a non-cultured member of the α-proteobacteria, is the causal agent of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). Due to the difficulties of in vitro culture, antibodies against CaLas have not been widely used in studies of this pathogen. We have used an anti-OmpA polyclonal antibody based direct tissue blot immunoassay to localize CaLas in different citrus tissues and in periwinkle leaves. In citrus petioles, CaLas was unevenly distributed in the phloem sieve tubes, and tended to colonize in phloem sieve tubes on the underside of petioles in preference to the upper side of petioles. Both the leaf abscission zone and the junction of the petiole and leaf midrib had fewer CaLas bacteria compared to the main portions of the petiole and the midribs. Colonies of CaLas in phloem sieve tubes were more frequently found in stems with symptomatic leaves than in stems with asymptomatic leaves with an uneven distribution pattern. In serial sections taken from the receptacle to the peduncle, more CaLas were observed in the peduncle sections adjacent to the stem. In seed, CaLas was located in the seed coat. Many fewer CaLas were found in the roots, as compared to the seeds and petioles when samples were collected from trees with obvious foliar symptoms. The direct tissue blot immuno assay was adapted to whole periwinkle leaves infected by CaLas. The pathogen was distributed throughout the lateral veins and the results were correlated with results of qPCR. Our data provide direct spatial and anatomical information for CaLas in planta. This simple and scalable method may facilitate the future research on the interaction of CaLas and host plant. PMID:25946013

  18. Evidence for a novel human-specific xeno-auto-antibody response against vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tho; Gregg, Christopher J; Karp, Felix; Chow, Renee; Padler-Karavani, Vered; Cao, Hongzhi; Chen, Xi; Witztum, Joseph L; Varki, Nissi M; Varki, Ajit

    2009-12-10

    Humans are genetically unable to synthesize the common mammalian sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). However, Neu5Gc can be metabolically incorporated and covalently expressed on cultured human cell surfaces. Meanwhile, humans express varying and sometimes high titers of polyclonal anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. Here, a survey of human tissues by immunohistochemistry with both a monospecific chicken anti-Neu5Gc antibody and with affinity-purified human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies demonstrates endothelial expression of Neu5Gc, likely originating from Neu5Gc-rich foods like red meats. We hypothesized that the combination of Neu5Gc incorporation and anti-Neu5Gc antibodies can induce endothelial activation. Indeed, the incubation of high-titer human sera with Neu5Gc-fed endothelial cells led to Neu5Gc-dependent antibody binding, complement deposition, endothelial activation, selectin expression, increased cytokine secretion, and monocyte binding. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha also selectively enhanced human anti-Neu5Gc antibody reactivity. Anti-Neu5Gc antibodies affinity-purified from human serum also directed Neu5Gc-dependent complement deposition onto cultured endothelial cells. These data indicate a novel human-specific mechanism in which Neu5Gc-rich foods deliver immunogenic Neu5Gc to the endothelium, giving anti-Neu5Gc antibody- and complement-dependent activation, and potentially contributing to human vascular pathologies. In the case of atherosclerosis, Neu5Gc is present both in endothelium overlying plaques and in subendothelial regions, providing multiple pathways for accelerating inflammation in this disease. PMID:19828701

  19. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Flagellin, and Characterization of the Elicited Anti-Flagellin Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Behrouz, Bahador; Amirmozafari, Nour; Khoramabadi, Nima; Bahroudi, Mahboobeh; Legaee, Parisa; Mahdavi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic human pathogen that causes serious infections in immunocompromised hosts. The single polar flagellum is an important factor in both virulence and colonization. Objectives As flagellin is the major component of the flagellar filament, the main aims of the present study are to identify, clone, express, and purify the recombinant type B flagellin (r-B-flagellin) of P. aeruginosa, as well as to evaluate the functional activity of the rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against this r-B-flagellin. Materials and Methods In the current experimental study, the r-B-flagellin gene was isolated from the P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain by PCR. It was cloned into the pET-28a vector and then transformed into the E. coli BL21 strain. Next, r-B-flagellin was overexpressed and affinity purified by Ni-NTA agarose-affinity chromatography, followed by on-column resolubilization. Polyclonal antisera against the recombinant flagellin were raised in rabbits, and the functional activity of the anti-r-B-flagellin antibody was determined by in vitro assays. Results The polyclonal antibodies raised against this r-B-flagellin inhibited the motility of the homologous PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, which significantly decreased the invasion of the PAO1 strain into the A549 cells and also enhanced the opsonophagocytosis of this strain. However, our polyclonal antibody showed little effect on the heterologous PAK strain. Conclusions The r-B-flagellin carried antigenic epitopes just like the native flagellin, while the polyclonal antibody raised against it exhibited functional activity. PMID:27621933

  20. Real time detection of lysozyme by pulsed streaming potentials using polyclonal antibodies immobilized on a renewable nonfouling surface inside plastic microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vera, Fernando; Ferguson, Josephus D; Alvarez, Julio C

    2011-03-15

    A composite surface was prepared on cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) microchannels by UV-photografting of polyethylene glycol acrylate (PEGA) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) films. A PEGA layer of globular particles with average thickness of 60 nm was formed after 15 min of polymerization. Real time monitoring by pulsed streaming potentials demonstrated the ability of the PEGA layer to inhibit the adhesion of five different nonspecific adsorbing proteins when compared with pristine COC. Roughness determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) after PAA grafting on COC-PEGA at different UV illumination times suggests that PAA formation is initiated at the free space in between the PEGA particles. Carboxylic groups activated with N-hydroxysuccinimide and N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide were used to bind anti-lysozyme polyclonal antibodies. The composite COC-PEGA-PAA-anti-lysozyme surface demonstrated its ability to detect lysozyme with a dynamic range between 140 and 860 nM. Linearity was maintained even when samples were spiked with 250 nM of cytochrome as interfering species. The equilibrium constant K(eq) for the adsorption of Ly on COC-PEGA-PAA-anti-Ly was estimated to be 2.7 × 10(6) M(-1), and it shows that this kinetic approach of monitoring the surface charge is also useful to estimate affinity interactions for proteins in label free fashion. The regeneration of the surface exhibited an average percentage of recovery of ∼97% for each of six adsorption-regeneration cycles. This feature enables curve calibration on a single microfluidic chip because each point of the curve has a reproducible and renewable surface. PMID:21322582

  1. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function. PMID:26205082

  2. Induction of polyclonal immunoglobulin synthesis.

    PubMed

    James, S P

    2001-05-01

    This unit is designed to examine the effects of T cells or lymphokines on B cell differentiation in situations where the antigen specificity of the B cells is not of interest. In these cases, antibody production induced by polyclonal stimuli (e.g., mitogens, antibodies, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), or lymphokines) can be measured instead of antigen-specific immunoglobulin production. Because B cells in the circulation and tissues are pleomorphic (containing subpopulations of cells that may be resting, cells that may have had prior antigenic exposure, and cells that may have undergone prior isotype commitment), the antibody responses of these subpopulations to various growth and differentiation factors differ. Therefore, the choice of which lymphocyte subpopulation to culture and which activation signal to use is determined by the particular experimental question. PMID:18432825

  3. Effect of dietary inclusion of distillers dried grains with solubles, soybean hulls, or a polyclonal antibody product on the ability of growing pigs to resist a Lawsonia intracellularis challenge.

    PubMed

    Whitney, M H; Shurson, G C; Guedes, R C

    2006-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine if dietary inclusion of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), soybean hulls, or soybean hulls sprayed with an egg-based, polyclonal antibody product would reduce the incidence or severity of infection, or both, in growing pigs after a Lawsonia intracellularis challenge. One hundred 17-d-old weaned pigs were blocked by sex, ancestry, and BW, and randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatment groups: negative control, unchallenged, corn-soy diet; positive control, challenged, corn-soy diet; 20% DDGS diet (D), challenged; 5% soybean hulls diet (SH), challenged; and SH sprayed with a polyclonal antibody product diet, challenged. Challenged pigs were orally inoculated with 6.4 x 10(8) L. intracellularis organisms after a 4-wk prechallenge feeding period. On d 21 postchallenge, pigs were euthanized, lesions of intestinal mucosa were evaluated, and ileal tissue samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the presence and proliferation rate of L. intracellularis. Challenging pigs with L. intracellularis reduced growth rate, feed intake, and efficiency of gain (P < 0.02) and increased the proportion of internal organ weights relative to BW (P < 0.01). Dietary treatment did not affect growth performance pre- or postchallenge (P > 0.10). Heart, empty stomach, and liver weights were similar among dietary treatments (P > 0.10). Weight of the large intestine as a percentage of BW was increased in D and SH pigs compared with positive control pigs (P < 0.05). Lesion length, prevalence, and severity, and fecal shedding of L. intracellularis were primarily unaffected by dietary treatment (P > 0.10), although ileal lesion length and severity observed tended to be greater in the SH sprayed with polyclonal antibody product diet vs. the D pigs (P < 0.10). Results from a previous study indicated that diet composition may affect length, severity, and prevalence of lesions caused by L. intracellularis in growing pigs subjected to a

  4. Exploration of high-density protein microarrays for antibody validation and autoimmunity profiling.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Mattsson, Cecilia; Andersson, Eni; Hellström, Cecilia; Uhlen, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Ayoglu, Burcu; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-09-25

    High-density protein microarrays of recombinant human protein fragments, representing 12,412 unique Ensembl Gene IDs, have here been produced and explored. These protein microarrays were used to analyse antibody off-target interactions, as well as for profiling the human autoantibody repertoire in plasma against the antigens represented by the protein fragments. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies produced within the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) were analysed on microarrays of three different sizes, ranging from 384 antigens to 21,120 antigens, for evaluation of the antibody validation criteria in the HPA. Plasma samples from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients were also screened in order to explore the feasibility of these arrays for broad-scale profiling of autoantibody reactivity. Furthermore, analysis on these near proteome-wide microarrays was complemented with analysis on HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarrays. The HPA recombinant protein microarray with 21,120 antigens and the HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarray are currently the largest protein microarray platforms available to date. The results on these arrays show that the Human Protein Atlas antibodies have few off-target interactions if the antibody validation criteria are kept stringent and demonstrate that the HPA-produced high-density recombinant protein fragment microarrays allow for a high-throughput analysis of plasma for identification of possible autoantibody targets in the context of various autoimmune conditions. PMID:26417875

  5. Enhanced activation of human T cell clones specific for virus-like particles expressing the HIV V3 loop in the presence of HIV V3 loop-specific polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Peifang, S.; Pira, G. L.; Fenoglio, D.; Harris, S.; Costa, M. G.; Venturino, V.; Dessì, V.; Layton, G.; Laman, J.; Huisman, J. G.; Manca, F.

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLP), formed by the yeast Ty p1 protein, carrying the HIV gp120 V3 loop on their surface (V3-VLP) have been tested in vitro for immunogenicity and antigenicity by using VLP p1-specific human CD4+ T cell lines and clones. VLP-specific human T cell lines and clones were generated from normal individuals, indicating that VLP-specific precursor cells present in the peripheral lymphocyte pool can be induced to expand clonally upon antigen challenge in vitro, in the absence of previous immunization. It was also shown that V3-specific polyclonal antibodies enhance V3-VLP-induced activation of VLP-specific T cell clones. Antibody-dependent potentiation has been shown previously in other antigen systems, and it depends on enhanced uptake of complexed antigen by Fc receptor-positive antigen-presenting cells. Since in this case antigen is internalized by presenting cells as a complex, it can be inferred that a similar event of antibody-mediated antigen uptake can take place with V3-specific B cells, resulting in presentation by the B cells of T helper epitopes derived from processing of the VLP p1 moiety. This suggests that T helper cells specific for the carrier VLP p1 protein can be activated to provide help to V3-specific B cells in the presence of the appropriate antigen construct. PMID:7915974

  6. Conformational state of human cardiac 5-HT(4(g)) receptors influences the functional effects of polyclonal anti-5-HT(4) receptor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Emmanuella; Rose, Stéphanie; Hérault, Olivier; Argibay, Jorge; Cosnay, Pierre; Bozon, Véronique

    2007-04-01

    The functional effects of the anti-G21V antibody directed against the second extracellular loop of human heart 5-HT(4) receptors can differ when the receptors are expressed in different cell lines. Here, we extend these studies to show variation in the responses of 5-HT(4(g)) receptors to the antibody within the same expression system. In a previous report no effect of the anti-G21V antibodies had been shown upon 5-HT(4(g)) receptors expressed in CHO cells. Here the same antibodies alone or when added before 5-HT had a functional "inverse-agonist like" effect upon 5-HT(4(g)) receptors expressed in a separate line of CHO cells. Although these CHO cells showed a lower efficacy of cAMP production evoked by 5-HT than the previous report they express a similar h5-HT(4(g)) receptor density. Inhibition of either phosphodiesterases or Gi proteins had no effect upon the action of the antibody. Conformational states of the 5-HT(4) receptor and/or equilibrium between different states of receptors may then determine the functional effect of antibodies against this receptor. PMID:17222392

  7. Label-free Fab and Fc affinity/avidity profiling of the antibody complex half-life for polyclonal and monoclonal efficacy screening.

    PubMed

    Read, Thomas; Olkhov, Rouslan V; Williamson, E Diane; Shaw, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    A unified approach to affinity screening for Fab and Fc interactions of an antibody for its antigen and FcγR receptor has been developed. An antigen array is used for the Fab affinity and cross-reactivity screening and protein A/G proxy is the FcγR receptor. The affinities are derived using a simple 1:1 binding model with a consistent error analysis. The association and dissociation kinetics are measured over optimised times for accurate determination. The Fab/Fc affinities are derived for ten antibodies: mAb-actin (mouse), pAb-BSA (sheep), pAb-collagen V (rabbit), pAb-CRP (goat), mAb-F1 (mouse), mAbs (mouse) 7.3, 12.3, 29.3, 36.3 and 46.3 raised against LcrV in Yersinia pestis. The rate of the dissociation of antigen-antibody complexes relates directly to their immunological function as does the Fc-FcγR complex and a new half-life plot has been defined with a Fab/Fc half-life range of 17-470 min. The upper half-life value points to surface avidity. Two antibodies that are protective as an immunotherapy define a Fab half-life >250 min and an Fc half-life >50 min as characteristics of ideal interactions which can form the basis of an antibody screen for immunotherapy. PMID:26187320

  8. Radioimmunocytochemistry using a tritiated goat anti-rabbit second antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, E.J.; Ramachandran, J.; Basbaum, A.I.

    1984-07-01

    Affinity-purified goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G (GAR) was conjugated with (/sup 3/H)-propionyl succinimidate and used to localize substance P (SP), enkephalin (ENK), and serotonin immunoreactive sites in the spinal dorsal horn and medulla of the rat and cat. Autoradiographic localization was demonstrated on paraffin, frozen, Vibratome, and 2 micron plastic sections. The latter were obtained from radiolabeled Vibratome sections that were embedded in epoxy resin. The distribution of SP, ENK, and serotonin demonstrated by radioimmunocytochemistry was comparable to that observed on semiadjacent sections using peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) immunocytochemistry. The autoradiograms, however, were generated using primary antibody concentrations up to five times more dilute than concentrations used for the PAP procedure. Indirect radioimmunocytochemistry using a (3H) anti-immunoglobulin G second antibody can be used to localize a variety of monoclonal and polyclonal antisera. It is quantifiable at the light microscopic level and can be potentially used with peroxidase histochemistry to double label immunoreactive structures at the ultrastructural level.

  9. Localization and distribution of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in citrus and periwinkle by direct tissue blot immuno assay with an anti-OmpA polyclonal antibody

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CaLas), a non-cultured member of the a-proteobacteria, is the causal agent of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). Due to the difficulties of in vitro culture, antibodies against CaLas have not been widely used in studies of this pathogen. We have used an anti-OmpA poly...

  10. Cooperative mixtures of bispecific F(ab')2 antibodies for delivering saporin to lymphoma in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.R.; Courtenay, A.E.; Ingamells, S.; Stevenson, G.T.; Glennie, M.J. )

    1991-05-01

    We report that selected combinations of two or more monoclonal bispecific F(ab')2 antibodies (BsAbs) far outperform single derivatives in the delivery of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin, to guinea pig L2C leukemic cells. Throughout the work, BsAbs were constructed by thioether-linking the hinges of two Fab'gamma, one from monoclonal anti-L2C-idiotype antibody and the other from anti-saporin antibody. The latter was either affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal or one of a panel of five mouse monoclonal antibodies. In vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that, though all derivatives were effective, the BsAb made with the polyclonal antibody was always 10 to 20 times more potent than those made with a monoclonal antibody in yielding 50% inhibition of (3H)leucine uptake. This superior activity could be matched by selective mixtures of two or more of the monoclonal derivatives. Furthermore, in immunotherapeutic delivery of saporin to tumor, a pair of BsAbs performed significantly better than did either individually. Binding and uptake studies with radiolabeled saporin demonstrated a 20-fold increase in functional affinity when saporin was held at the cell surface by an appropriate BsAb mixture rather than by a single BsAb. In contrast, only small differences were recorded in the rate at which saporin was internalized as a result of the same maneuver. We conclude that the improved performance of combinations of BsAbs arises from their ability to provide multiple linkages between saporin molecules and cell surfaces, increasing the functional affinity with which saporin is tethered to the cell, but, in this system at least, having only a minor effect on the rate at which it is internalized. Cocktails of two or more BsAbs, selected to bind to multiple epitopes on ribosome-inactivating proteins could provide an important new strategy in immunotherapy.

  11. Postbooster Antibodies from Humans as Source of Diphtheria Antitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Alonso, Ana; González-Rivera, Milagros; Tamayo, Eduardo; Eiros, Jose María; Almansa, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin for therapeutic use is in limited supply. A potential source might be affinity-purified antibodies originally derived from plasma of adults who received a booster dose of a vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid. These antibodies might be useful for treating even severe cases of diphtheria. PMID:27314309

  12. Postbooster Antibodies from Humans as Source of Diphtheria Antitoxin.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Martin, Jesús F; Avila-Alonso, Ana; González-Rivera, Milagros; Tamayo, Eduardo; Eiros, Jose María; Almansa, Raquel

    2016-07-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin for therapeutic use is in limited supply. A potential source might be affinity-purified antibodies originally derived from plasma of adults who received a booster dose of a vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid. These antibodies might be useful for treating even severe cases of diphtheria. PMID:27314309

  13. Radioimmunodetection of cancer with monoclonal antibodies: current status, problems, and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Unger, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    Early studies of immunoscintography with affinity-purified /sup 131/I-labeled polyclonal antibodies reactive against oncofetal antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were moderately successful in detecting metastatic colorectal carcinoma. However, because of low tumor to background ratios of isotope, background subtraction techniques using /sup 99/Tc-labeled albumin were required to visualize small lesions. Antisera were often of low titer and lacked specificity. These problems could be overcome for the most part following the development of highly specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against a variety of tumor-associated antigens. A number of clinical trials using /sup 131/I- or /sup 111/In-labeled MoAb to image tumors have demonstrated successful localization without the use of subtraction techniques. Variables limiting the usefulness of murine MoAb for diagnosis have included increased localization in liver and spleen, tumor vascularity and heterogeneity of antigen expression, and development of human antimurine globulins. Methods to overcome some of these problems are discussed. Radiolabeled MoAb appear useful as an adjunct to conventional diagnostic techniques both as a means to predict which antibodies might be useful for treatment and, in select patients, as a basis for treatment decisions. 163 references.

  14. Polyclonal antibody against a recombinant chlorotoxin-like peptide from the Chinese scorpion and detection of its putative receptors in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yue-Jun; Yin, Li-Tian; Liang, Ai-Hua

    2006-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a type of chlorotoxin-like peptide, an inhibitor of small-conductance Cl(-) channels, from the scorpion, Buthus martensii Karsch, was synthesized (named rBmK CTa) according to the sequence optimized for codon usage in E. coli. It was over-expressed using a pExSecI expression system and purified to homogeneity. Polycolonal antibodies to the purified protein were raised in rats. Overlay assay and pull-down assay showed that this toxin specially binds to two proteins in the glioma cells with corresponding molecular weights of about 80 and 35 kDa. They may serve as candidate receptors or alternative cellular component for interaction with rBmK CTa. PMID:16791718

  15. Development and characterization of a polyclonal antibody against rat liver mitochondrial overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I). Distinction of CPT I from CPT II and of isoforms of CPT I in different tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, M P; Crilly, P J; Corstorphine, C G; Zammit, V A

    1992-01-01

    The [3H]tetradecylglycidyl-CoA (TDG-CoA)-binding protein (Mr approx. 88,000) of purified outer membranes from rat liver mitochondria was identified by SDS/PAGE. The region in which it migrated was shown to contain another protein which stained strongly with periodic acid-Schiff reagent and could be removed from membrane extracts by incubation with Sepharose-concanavalin A. Amounts of TDG-CoA-binding protein were prepared from lectin-treated extracts using preparative SDS/PAGE and used to raise a polyclonal antibody in a sheep. The IgG fraction purified from this anti-serum reacted strongly with a protein of Mr approximately 88,000 on Western blots, and much more weakly with two other proteins of Mr approximately 76,000 and Mr approximately 53,000 in extracts of rat liver mitochondrial outer membranes. The crude IgG fraction and immunopurified IgG both removed carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I activity from very pure outer membrane extracts, suggesting that the TDG-CoA-binding protein against which the antiserum was raised also expresses CPT I activity. This was confirmed by the demonstration of a strong positive correlation between CPT I activity and the amount of immunoreactive protein of Mr approximately 88,000 in mitochondria prepared from rats in different physiological states. By contrast, the antibody did not react with CPT II either in mitochondria or in purified form. Similarly, an anti-(CPT II) antibody did not cross-react with CPT I on Western blots, proving conclusively that CPT I and CPT II are immunologically distinct proteins, as well as being of different functional molecular sizes [Zammit, Corstophine & Kelliher (1988) Biochem. J. 250, 415-420]. Immunoblots of mitochondrial proteins obtained from different tissues indicated that, of the rat tissues tested, only kidney cortex mitochondria contain the same isoform of CPT I as that in liver. Heart, skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue mitochondria contain a slightly smaller isoform which was

  16. Affinity-purified CCAAT-box-binding protein (YEBP) functionally regulates expression of a human class II major histocompatibility complex gene and the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zeleznik-Le, N.J.; Azizkhan, J.C.; Ting, J.P.Y. )

    1991-03-01

    Efficient major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression requires conseved protein-binding promoter elements, including X and Y elements. The authors affinity purified an HLA-DRA Y-element (CCAAT)-binding protein (YEBP) and used it to reconstitute Y-depleted HLA-DRA in vitro transcription. This directly demonstrates a positive functional role for YEBP in HLA-DRA transcription. The ability of YEBP to regulate divergent CCAAT elements was also assessed; YEBP was found to partially activate the thymidine kinase promoter. This functional analysis of YEBP shows that this protein plays an important role in the regulation of multiple genes.

  17. PAS-1, a protein affinity purified from Ascaris suum worms, maintains the ability to modulate the immune response to a bystander antigen.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Telma M; Enobe, Cristina S; Araújo, Cláudia A; Macedo, Mahasti S; Macedo-Soares, Maria Fernanda

    2006-04-01

    Helminth infections and parasite components have potent immunomodulatory effects on a host's immune system. In the present study, we investigated the effect of PAS-1, a protein component of Ascaris suum adult worms recognized by a monoclonal antibody (MAIP-1), on humoral and cell-mediated responses to a bystander antigen (ovalbumin [OVA]). MAIP-1 recognized only one of the three polypeptide chains of PAS-1, but neutralized the suppressive effect of the whole worm extract on OVA-specific antibody production. PAS-1 inhibited antibody production against a T-cell-dependent, but not a T-cell-independent, antigen in a dose-dependent way. IgM, IgG1, IgG2b, and also IgE and anaphylactic IgG1 levels were downregulated. In addition, PAS-1 inhibited OVA-specific delayed type hypersensitivity reactions in the footpad of mice, showing a potent immunosuppressive activity on both Th1 and Th2 responses that seems to be mediated by the induction of large amounts of IL-10 and IL-4. Indeed, PAS-1-specific spleen cells secreted sevenfold more IL-10 and threefold more IL-4 than OVA-specific cells in response to in vitro restimulation with the respective antigens. In conclusion, we showed that PAS-1, a single protein component from A. suum, maintains all its immunosuppressive properties. PMID:16519731

  18. Effects of feeding a spray-dried multivalent polyclonal antibody preparation on feedlot performance, feeding behavior, carcass characteristics, rumenitis, and blood gas profile of Brangus and Nellore yearling bulls.

    PubMed

    Millen, D D; Pacheco, R D L; DiLorenzo, N; Martins, C L; Marino, C T; Bastos, J P S T; Mariani, T M; Barducci, R S; Sarti, L M N; DiCostanzo, A; Rodrigues, P H M; Arrigoni, M D B

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of replacing monensin (MON) with a spray-dried multivalent polyclonal antibody preparation (PAP) against several ruminal microorganisms on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, feeding behavior, blood gas profile, and the rumenitis incidence of Brangus and Nellore yearling bulls. The study was designed as a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, replicated 6 times (4 bulls per pen and a total of 24 pens), in which bulls ( = 48) of each biotype were fed diets containing either MON fed at 300 mg/d or PAP fed at 3 g/d. No significant feed additive main effects were observed for ADG ( = 0.27), G:F ( = 0.28), HCW ( = 0.99), or dressing percentage ( = 0.80). However, bulls receiving PAP had greater DMI ( = 0.02) and larger ( = 0.02) final LM area as well as greater ( < 0.01) blood concentrations of bicarbonate and base excess in the extracellular fluid than bulls receiving MON. Brangus bulls had greater ( < 0.01) ADG and DMI expressed in kilograms, final BW, heavier HCW, and larger initial and final LM area than Nellore bulls. However, Nellore bulls had greater daily DMI fluctuation ( < 0.01), expressed as a percentage, and greater incidence of rumenitis ( = 0.05) than Brangus bulls. In addition, Brangus bulls had greater ( < 0.01) DMI per meal and also presented lower ( < 0.01) DM and NDF rumination rates when compared with Nellore bulls. Significant interactions ( < 0.05) between biotype and feed additive were observed for SFA, unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), MUFA, and PUFA concentrations in adipose tissues. When Nellore bulls were fed PAP, fat had greater ( < 0.05) SFA and PUFA contents but less ( < 0.01) UFA and MUFA than Nellore bulls receiving MON. For Brangus bulls, MON led to greater ( < 0.05) SFA and PUFA and less ( < 0.05) UFA and MUFA than Brangus bulls fed PAP. Feeding a spray-dried PAP led to similar feedlot performance compared with that when feeding MON. Spray

  19. Inhibition of HIV-1 transmission in trans from dendritic cells to CD4+ T lymphocytes by natural antibodies to the CRD domain of DC-SIGN purified from breast milk and intravenous immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Requena, Mary; Bouhlal, Hicham; Nasreddine, Nadine; Saidi, Hela; Gody, Jean-Chrysostome; Aubry, Sylvie; Grésenguet, Gérard; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Bélec, Laurent; Hocini, Hakim

    2008-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that human breast milk and normal human polyclonal immunoglobulins purified from plasma [intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg)] contain functional natural immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibodies directed against the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) domain of the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) molecule, which is involved in the binding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 to dendritic cells (DCs). Antibodies to DC-SIGN CRD were affinity-purified on a matrix to which a synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal CRD domain (amino-acid 342–amino-acid 371) had been coupled. The affinity-purified antibodies bound to the DC-SIGN peptide and to the native DC-SIGN molecule expressed by HeLa DC-SIGN+ cells and immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iMDDCs), in a specific and dose-dependent manner. At an optimal dose of 200 µg/ml, natural antibodies to DC-SIGN CRD peptide purified from breast milk and IVIg stained 25 and 20% of HeLa DC-SIGN+ cells and 32 and 12% of iMDDCs, respectively. Anti-DC-SIGN CRD peptide antibodies inhibited the attachment of virus to HeLa DC-SIGN by up to 78% and the attachment to iMDDCs by only 20%. Both breast milk- and IVIg-derived natural antibodies to the CRD peptide inhibited 60% of the transmission in trans of HIV-1JRCSF, an R5-tropic strain, from iMDDCs to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Taken together, these observations suggest that the attachment of HIV to DCs and transmission in trans to autologous CD4+ T lymphocytes occur through two independent mechanisms. Our data support a role of natural antibodies to DC-SIGN in the modulation of postnatal HIV transmission through breast-feeding and in the natural host defence against HIV-1 in infected individuals. PMID:17999675

  20. Generation of antibodies specific to D-mannitol, a unique haptenic allergen, using reductively aminated D-mannose-bovine serum albumin conjugate as the immunogen.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Venkatesh L; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2007-01-01

    D-mannitol is commonly used as a food additive and excipient due to its sweetness, non-toxicity, and low calorific value. However, several cases of hypersensitivity reactions to mannitol have been reported. Owing to its inert nature, mannitol cannot produce an immunological response. In order to explain the mechanism of immunogenicity of mannitol, a method to obtain mannitol epitopes on a carrier protein, which serves as an immunogen to generate antibodies against mannitol, is described. In the present investigation, D-mannitol-specific polyclonal antibodies were generated by immunizing rabbits with reductively aminated mannose-bovine serum albumin (BSA) (33 haptens/molecule) as the hapten-carrier conjugate. Anti-mannitol IgG antibodies were purified from the immune serum by hapten-affinity chromatography on a D-mannitol-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)-Sepharose CL-6B affinity matrix. The yield of mannitol-specific antibodies was approximately 40 microg per mL of rabbit antiserum. The specificity of the purified antibodies towards D-mannitol was demonstrated by hapten-inhibition in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The affinity-purified antibodies were found to be very specific to D-mannitol showing less than 5% cross-reactivity with other sugars and sugar alcohols, with the exception of its epimer, sorbitol, which showed 8.8% cross-reactivity. Importantly, the antibodies showed <1% cross-reactivity with L-mannitol epitope, thus exhibiting configurational specificity. The inhibition studies provided evidence for the haptenic nature of mannitol and confirmed that the mannitoyl group is a single epitope. The reaction scheme utilized here for the generation of mannitol epitopes provides the basis for the immunogenicity of mannitol. PMID:17336832

  1. IgG-Mediated Immune Suppression to Erythrocytes by Polyclonal Antibodies Can Occur in the Absence of Activating or Inhibitory Fcγ Receptors in a Full Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Yu, Honghui; Amash, Alaa; Zimring, James C; Lazarus, Alan H

    2015-09-01

    Polyclonal anti-D has been used to prevent RhD-negative mothers from becoming immunized against RhD positive fetal erythrocytes, and this mechanism has been referred as Ab or IgG-mediated immune suppression (AMIS). Although anti-D has been highly successful, the inhibitory mechanisms remain poorly understood. Two major theories behind AMIS involve the binding of IgG to activating or inhibitory FcγR, which can induce either erythrocyte clearance or immune inhibition, respectively. In this work, we explored the absolute role of activating and inhibitory FcγR in the AMIS mechanism using the HOD mouse model of RBC immunization. HOD mice contain a RBC-specific recombinant protein composed of hen egg lysozyme (HEL), OVA and human transmembrane Duffy Ag, and erythrocytes from HOD mice can stimulate an immune response to HEL. To assess the contribution of activating and inhibitory FcγR to AMIS, C57BL/6 versus FcRγ-chain(-/-) or FcγRIIB(-/-) mice were used as recipients of HOD-RBC alone or together with anti-HEL Abs (i.e., AMIS) and the resulting immune response to HEL evaluated. We show that anti-HEL polyclonal Abs induce the same degree of AMIS effect in mice lacking these IgG binding receptors as compared with wild-type mice. In agreement with this, F(ab')2 fragments of the AMIS Ab also significantly reduced the Ab response to the HOD cells. In conclusion, successful inhibition of in vivo Ab responses to HOD-RBC by polyclonal IgG can occur independently of activating or inhibitory FcγR involvement. These results may have implications for the understanding of RhD prophylaxis. PMID:26188060

  2. Ultrasensitive Characterization of Site-Specific Glycosylation of Affinity Purified Haptoglobin from Lung Cancer Patient Plasma Using 10 μm i.d. Porous Layer Open Tubular (PLOT) LC-LTQ-CID/ETD-MS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Rejtar, Tomas; Karger, Barry L.

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific analysis of protein glycosylation is important for biochemical and clinical research efforts. Glycopeptide analysis using liquid chromatography - collision induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation - mass spectrometry (LC-CID/ETD-MS) allows simultaneous characterization of glycan structure and attached peptide site. However, due to the low ionization efficiency of glycopeptides during electrospray ionization (ESI), 200–500 fmol of sample per injection is needed for a single LC-MS run, which makes it challenging for the analysis of limited amounts of glycoprotein purified from biological matrices. To improve the sensitivity of LC-MS analysis for glycopeptides, an ultra-narrow porous layer open tubular (PLOT) LC column (2.5 m × 10 μm i.d.) was coupled to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ-CID/ETD-MS) to provide sensitive analysis of N-linked protein glycosylation heterogeneity. The potential of the developed method is demonstrated by the characterization of site-specific glycosylation using haptoglobin (Hpt) as a model protein. To limit the amount of haptoglobin to low pmole amounts of protein, we affinity purified it from 1 μL of pooled lung cancer patients plasma. A total of 26 glycoforms/glycan compositions on three Hpt tryptic glycopeptides were identified and quantified from 10 LC-MS runs with a consumption of 100 fmol Hpt digest (13 ng protein, 10 fmol per injection). Included in this analysis was the determination of the glycan occupancy level. At this sample consumption level, the high sensitivity of the PLOT LC-LTQ-CID/ETD-MS allowed glycopeptide identification and structure determination, along with relative quantitation of glycans presented on the same peptide backbone, even for low abundant glycopeptides at the ~100 attomole level. The PLOT LC-MS is shown to have sufficient sensitivity to allow characterization of site-specific protein glycosylation from trace levels of glycosylated proteins. PMID:21338062

  3. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  4. Characterization and Formulation of Multiple Epitope-Specific Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies for Passive Immunization against Cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Deborah A.; Auerbach-Dixon, Beth A.; Riggs, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    The coccidian parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes diarrhea in humans, calves, and other mammals. Neither immunization nor parasite-specific pharmaceuticals that are consistently effective against this organism are available. While polyclonal antibodies against whole C. parvum reduce infection, their efficacy and predictability are suboptimal. We hypothesized that passive immunization against cryptosporidiosis could be improved by using neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeting functionally defined antigens on the infective stages. We previously reported that the apical complex and surface-exposed zoite antigens CSL, GP25-200, and P23 are critical in the infection process and are therefore rational targets. In the present study, a panel of 126 MAbs generated against affinity-purified CSL, GP25-200, and P23 was characterized to identify the most efficacious neutralizing MAb formulation targeting each antigen. To identify neutralizing MAbs, sporozoite infectivity following exposure to individual MAbs was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of 126 MAbs evaluated, 47 had neutralizing activity. These were then evaluated individually in oocyst-challenged neonatal mice, and 14 MAbs having highly significant efficacy were identified for further testing in formulations. Epitope specificity assays were performed to determine if candidate MAbs recognized the same or different epitopes. Formulations of two or three neutralizing MAbs, each recognizing distinct epitopes, were then evaluated. A formulation of MAbs 3E2 (anti-CSL [αCSL]), 3H2 (αGP25-200), and 1E10 (αP23) provided highly significant additive efficacy over that of either individual MAbs or combinations of two MAbs and reduced intestinal infection by 86 to 93%. These findings indicate that polyvalent neutralizing MAb formulations targeting epitopes on defined antigens may provide optimal passive immunization against cryptosporidiosis. PMID:10768951

  5. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  6. Analysis of culture filtrate and cell wall-associated antigens of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Mutharia, L M; Moreno, W; Raymond, M

    1997-01-01

    Proteins secreted by Mycobacterium species have been suggested as major immune targets in the early phase of infection. In this study, we sought to identify specific antigens in culture filtrates and in soluble cell extracts of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. The release of antigens into the culture medium during growth of the bacilli and the distribution of specific epitopes within the Mycobacterium species were investigated by immunoblot analysis with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against M. paratuberculosis antigens. MAb B6A interacted with a cellular antigen with an apparent molecular mass of 34.5 kDa in lysates of M. paratuberculosis. MAb B6A did not interact with lysates from any other mycobacterial species, suggesting recognition of an M. paratuberculosis species-specific epitope. MAb FL1-A1 reacted with an antigen of 44.3 kDa in M. paratuberculosis and a 9-kDa antigen in Mycobacterium kansasii. MAb PII-B1 reacted with concanavalin A (ConA)-binding cellular and filtrate molecules of M. paratuberculosis and with lysates of Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium 18. The affinity-purified glycosylated antigens migrated as a diffuse band of between 35 and 45.6 kDa and reacted strongly with ovine and bovine paratuberculosis serum and polyclonal serum against M. tuberculosis lipoarabinomannan antigens. These glycoconjugates were the earliest antigens detected in culture filtrates of M. paratuberculosis. Deglycosylation of the ConA-binding molecules with alpha-mannosidase enzyme abolished the reaction with MAb PII-B1 and with bovine but not ovine paratuberculosis serum, suggesting selective immunogenicity in the different animal species. PMID:9009287

  7. Significance of the 19-kDa hemolymph protein HP19 for the development of the rice moth Corcyra cephalonica: morphological and biochemical effects caused by antibody application.

    PubMed

    Arif, Abul; Gullipalli, Damodar; Scheller, Klaus; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna

    2007-09-01

    The hemolymph protein HP19 of the rice moth, Corcyra cephalonica, mediates the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E)-dependent acid phosphatase (ACP) activity at a nongenomic level. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibody against HP19 (alphaHP19-IgG) was used in the present study to understand the role of HP19 during the postembryonic development of Corcyra. In the in vitro studies, HP19 action was blocked either by immuno-precipitation using alphaHP19-IgG, prior to its addition to the fat body culture or by the addition of the antibody directly to the culture, along with 20E and hemolymph containing HP19. The alphaHP19-IgG blocked the HP19-mediated 20E-dependent ACP activation. In the in vivo studies, the alphaHP19-IgG was injected into the fully developed last (final/Vth) instar larvae of Corcyra, to complex the HP19 in vivo, in order to block the action of HP19. The injection of alphaHP19-IgG resulted in defective development of larvae, which grew either into non-viable larvae or larval-pupal/pupal-adult intermediates relative to the effect of pre-immune IgG injected controls. The present study shows that HP19 plays an important role in controlling the metamorphosis of Corcyra by regulating the 20E-dependent ACP activity. Coupled with the earlier findings, the ecdysteroid hormone regulates this action at a nongenomic level. PMID:17694564

  8. The expression of acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins on the surface membrane of different tissues in autoimmune and normal mice which are the target molecules for anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, K H; Liu, W T; Tang, S J; Tsai, C Y; Hsieh, S C; Wu, T H; Han, S H; Yu, C L

    1996-01-01

    Affinity-purified polyclonal anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) exert a cytostatic effect on cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells (MC). The cognate antigens expressed on the surface of MC have been proved to be acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins (P proteins) in our previous study. The mesangial cytostatic effect of anti-dsDNA antibodies is attributed to the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with membrane-expressed P proteins, but not to the effect of minute amounts of anti-ribosomal P proteins antibodies contained in the anti-dsDNA preparations. Immunofluorescence staining of the native cells demonstrated that anti-dsDNA antibodies bound to the surface of rat mesangial cells, rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1) and mouse fibroblasts (3T3). Anti-dsDNA antibodies also exert potent cytostatic effects on these cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the plasma membranes of different cell lines and tissues from normal and autoimmune mice were isolated and probed by anti-dsDNA antibodies in Western blot analysis. We found the actively proliferating cells such as MC, RBA-1 and 3T3 may express both P0 (38,000 MW) and P1 (19,000 MW) on the surface membrane. In addition, the kidney, liver and spleen from either autoimmune MRL-lpr/lpr or BALB/c mice may constantly express P0 protein, but the expression of P1 is inconsistent. In contrast, brain and muscle from either mice failed to express P proteins on their surface. Unexpectedly, a high molecular weight substance (larger than 205,000 MW) with unknown nature appears in the membrane of brain and muscle tissues in both mice. Immunoprecipitation of the surface-biotinylated MC-lysate by anti-dsDNA antibodies further confirmed that P1 (19,000 MW) and P2 (17,000 MW) are really expressed on the cell surface. These results suggest that P proteins expressed on the surface of different tissues become the targets for anti-dsDNA antibodies mediating pleomorphic tissue

  9. Activating and propagating polyclonal gamma delta T cells with broad specificity for malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Deniger, Drew C.; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Mi, Tiejuan; Switzer, Kirsten C.; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Hurton, Lenka V.; Ang, Sonny; Olivares, Simon; Rabinovich, Brian A.; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Bast, Robert C.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To activate and propagate populations of γδT cells expressing polyclonal repertoire of γ and δ TCR chains for adoptive immunotherapy for cancer, which has yet to be achieved. Experimental Design Clinical-grade artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) derived from K562 tumor cells were used as irradiated feeders to activate and expand human γδT cells to clinical scale. These cells were tested for proliferation, TCR expression, memory phenotype, cytokine secretion, and tumor killing. Results γδT cell proliferation was dependent upon CD137L expression on aAPC and addition of exogenous IL-2 and IL-21. Propagated γδT cells were polyclonal as they expressed Vδ1, Vδ2, Vδ3, Vδ5, Vδ7, and Vδ8 with Vγ2, Vγ3, Vγ7, Vγ8, Vγ9, Vγ10, and Vγ11 TCR chains. Interferon-γ production by Vδ1, Vδ2, and Vδ1negVδ2neg subsets was inhibited by pan-TCRγδantibody when added to co-cultures of polyclonal γδT cells and tumor cell lines. Polyclonal γδT cells killed acute and chronic leukemia, colon, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer cell lines, but not healthy autologous or allogeneic normal B cells. Blocking antibodies demonstrated that polyclonal γδT cells mediated tumor cell lysis through combination of DNAM1, NKG2D, and TCRγδ. The adoptive transfer of activated and propagated γδT cells expressing polyclonal versus defined Vδ TCR chains imparted a hierarchy (polyclonal>Vδ1>Vδ1negVδ2neg>Vδ2) of survival of mice with ovarian cancer xenografts. Conclusions Polyclonal γδT cells can be activated and propagated with clinical-grade aAPC and demonstrate broad anti-tumor activities, which will facilitate the implementation of γδT cell cancer immunotherapies in humans. PMID:24833662

  10. Specific antibody for pesticide residue determination produced by antibody-pesticide complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new method for specific antibody production was developed using antibody (Ab)-pesticide complex as a unique immunogen. Parathion (PA) was the targeted pesticide, and rabbit polyclonal antibody (Pab) and mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab) were used as carrier proteins. The Ab-PA complexes were genera...

  11. Pancreatic Cancer Metastases Harbor Evidence of Polyclonality

    PubMed Central

    Maddipati, Ravikanth; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the cancer genome have demonstrated that tumors are comprised of multiple sub-clones with varied genetic and phenotypic properties. However, little is known about how metastases arise and evolve from these sub-clones. To understand the cellular dynamics that drive metastasis, we used multi-color lineage tracing technology in an autochthonous mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that precursor lesions exhibit significant clonal heterogeneity but that this diversity decreases during pre-malignant progression. Furthermore, we present evidence that a significant fraction of metastases are polyclonally seeded by distinct tumor sub-clones. Finally, we show that clonality during metastatic growth – leading to either monoclonal or polyclonal expansion – differs based on the site of metastatic invasion. These results provide an unprecedented window into the cellular dynamics of tumor evolution and suggest that heterotypic interactions between tumor subpopulations contribute to metastatic progression in native tumors. PMID:26209539

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, B; Rosén, A; Holme, T

    1982-01-01

    A cell line producing monoclonal antibodies directed against the core region of Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide has been established. These antibodies were inhibited by lipopolysaccharide preparations of both O-group 1 vibrios and some non-O-group 1 vibrios as detected in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-inhibition experiments. Coagglutination experiments with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies adsorbed to protein A-carrying staphylococci were performed. All V. cholerae strains tested, regardless of serotype, were agglutinated when mixed with staphylococci coated with the monoclonal antibodies, whereas staphylococci coated with group-specific (O1) polyclonal antibodies only agglutinated with O-group 1 vibrios. Images PMID:6183214

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to the thyrotropin receptor raised by an autoantiidiotypic protocol and their relationship to monoclonal autoantibodies from Graves' patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.L.; Erlanger, B.F.

    1988-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to the TSH receptor were obtained by an autoantiidiotypic approach in which immunization of BALB/c mice was performed with mixtures of bovine (b) and human (h) TSH. Two of 28 positive wells were selected for cloning and characterization: D2 and 4G11. Their antiidiotypic character was evidenced by TSH-inhibitable binding to affinity-purified polyclonal anti-TSH. The specificity of D2 and 4G11 for the hormone-binding region of the TSH receptor was demonstrated by several findings: 1) they inhibited the binding of (125I)iodo-bTSH to receptor in a dose-dependent manner; 2) their binding to partially purified thyroid plasma membranes could be completely inhibited by bTSH and hTSH; and 3) they inhibited the TSH-dependent growth and adenylate cyclase stimulation in FRTL-5 cells in a dose-dependent manner. By Western blot analysis of bovine thyroid membranes, D2 bound to a polypeptide of 188,000-195,000 mol wt under nonreducing conditions and 54,000-59,000 mol wt after treatment of membranes with beta-mercaptoethanol; the 4G11 epitope was undetectable. Scatchard analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled antibodies to receptor showed that 4G11 bound to a single site with a Kd of 5.7 X 10(-9) M, whereas D2 showed complex binding characterized by high affinity (Kd = 1.74 X 10(-11) M) and low affinity (Kd = 1.3 X 10(-8) M) sites. Binding studies in which D2 and 4G11 competed with each other for the TSH receptor showed mutual but unequal inhibition. The data suggest that portions of the D2 and 4G11 epitopes overlap, but that there is a high affinity binding site(s) for D2 for which 4G11 competes less effectively. The binding of D2 and 4G11 to TSH receptor was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies secreted by Graves' heterohybridomas, showing that D2 and 4G11 share characteristics with autoantibodies of Graves' disease.

  14. Production, Characterization and Applications for Toxoplasma gondii-Specific Polyclonal Chicken Egg Yolk Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Júnior, Álvaro; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Silva, Murilo V.; Ferreira, Flávia B.; Macêdo Júnior, Arlindo G.; Mota, Caroline M.; Faria, Matheus S.; Filho, Hercílio H. Silva; Silva, Deise A. O.; Cunha-Júnior, Jair P.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Toxoplasma gondii may cause abortions, ocular and neurological disorders in warm-blood hosts. Immunized mammals are a wide source of hyperimmune sera used in different approaches, including diagnosis and the study of host-parasite interactions. Unfortunately, mammalian antibodies present limitations for its production, such as the necessity for animal bleeding, low yield, interference with rheumatoid factor, complement activation and affinity to Fc mammalian receptors. IgY antibodies avoid those limitations; therefore they could be an alternative to be applied in T. gondii model. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we immunized hens with soluble tachyzoite antigens of T. gondii (STAg) and purified egg yolk antibodies (IgY) by an inexpensive and simple method, with high yield and purity degree. IgY anti-STAg antibodies presented high avidity and were able to recognize a broad range of parasite antigens, although some marked differences were observed in reactivity profile between antibodies produced in immunized hens and mice. Interestingly, IgY antibodies against Neospora caninum and Eimeria spp. did not react to STAg. We also show that IgY antibodies were suitable to detect T. gondii forms in paraffin-embedded sections and culture cell monolayers. Conclusions/Significance Due to its cost-effectiveness, high production yield and varied range of possible applications, polyclonal IgY antibodies are useful tools for studies involving T. gondii. PMID:22808150

  15. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  16. Human and murine antibodies to rye grass pollen allergen LolpIV share a common idiotope.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, R; Ekramoddoullah, A K; Kisil, F T; Sehon, A H

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb 12) to Rye grass pollen allergen LolpIV and LolpIV-specific antibodies in the sera of grass allergic individuals share a common idiotope (Id) was investigated. It was first established that mAb 12 and human IgE antibodies recognized the same (or similar) epitope(s) on LolpIV; i.e. mAb 12 could inhibit, to the extent of 35-60%, the binding of 125I-LolpIV to the human IgE antibodies present in the sera of grass pollen-allergic individuals. Subsequently, a rabbit anti-Id antiserum was produced against mAb 12 and rendered Id-specific by appropriate immune absorptions, and its IgG antibody fraction was isolated (Rb-aId). The specificity of Rb-aId was demonstrated by the fact that the antibodies bound only to mAb 12 and not to any other murine monoclonal antibody tested. Observations that Rb-aId inhibited the binding of 125I-LolpIV to mAb 12 indicated that the Id determinants recognized on mAb 12 were located at or near the antibody-combining sites. The Rb-aId also bound specifically to affinity-purified human anti-LolpIV antibodies isolated from human sera, but not to affinity-purified human anti-tetanus toxoid antibodies. This indicated that the human anti-LolpIV antibodies share a cross-reactive Id. The binding of Rb-aId to human anti-LolpIV antibody could also be inhibited by mAb 12. Therefore, it was concluded that the murine and human antibodies to LolpIV share a cross-reactive idiotope. PMID:2452788

  17. Polyclonal B cell activation in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, P; Olivieri, I; Benedettini, G; Marelli, P; Ciompi, M L; Pasero, G; Campa, M

    1990-01-01

    The peripheral blood lymphocyte response of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) to several polyclonal B cell activators was investigated. No differences were found in the reactivity to pokeweed mitogen and protein A between patients and controls; in contrast, the peripheral blood lymphocyte response to Staphylococcus aureus strain Cowan I (SAC) was significantly higher in patients with AS than in controls. This responsiveness was not influenced either by the presence of the HLA-B27 antigen or by environmental factors or associated diseases, and it was higher in patients with active AS than in those with inactive disease. The percentage of circulating B cells was normal. The responses to T cell mitogens and the percentages of T cell subpopulations were similar in patients and in controls. The peripheral blood lymphocyte hyperactivity of patients with AS to SAC was associated with an increased in vitro production of immunoglobulins. PMID:2383063

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against the native or denatured forms of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    André, C; Guillet, J G; De Backer, J P; Vanderheyden, P; Hoebeke, J; Strosberg, A D

    1984-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with affinity-purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from calf brain and their splenocytes fused with NS1 myeloma cells. Hybrid cultures were grown and selected for production of antibodies on the basis of enzyme immunoassays on calf and rat forebrain membrane preparations. Thirty-four clones were retained and six of them further subcloned. Two of these subclones produced antibodies that selectively recognized muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-bearing membranes. The M-35b antibodies interacted only with native digitonin-solubilized receptors, and not with denatured receptors. The M-23c antibodies did not react with active digitonin-solubilized receptors but recognized the denatured form. The M-23c antibodies should thus be useful in the purification of the receptor and its precursor translation products, while the M-35b antibodies could be used for the immunocytochemical localization of the receptor in cells and tissues of different species. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6200320

  19. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  20. Functional effects of anticardiolipin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Harris, E N; Pierangeli, S S

    1996-10-01

    The 'lupus anticoagulant' phenomenon is the best documented functional effect of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies, occurring either by inhibition of the prothrombinase and/or Factor X activation reactions. Understanding the mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent coagulation reactions may yield important clues about their 'thrombogenic effects' in vivo. We conducted a series of studies to determine the specificity, diversity, and mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent reactions. Results showed that purified immunoglobulins with lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin activities were absorbed by negatively charged phospholipids and both activities were recovered from the phospholipid-antibody precipitate. Purified aPL antibodies inhibited the prothrombinase reaction in a plasma free system in which beta 2-glycoprotein 1 (beta 2-GP1) was absent. Affinity purified aPL antibodies had 25-50 times the inhibitory activity of immunoglobulin preparations. The phospholipid binding proteins, beta 2-GPI and placental anticoagulant protein I (PAP I), independently inhibited the prothrombinase reaction, and when these proteins were combined with aPL, inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction was additive. Antibodies of syphilis had no inhibitory effect, partially accounted for by lack of specificity for phosphotidylserine (PS). Although aPL antibodies inhibited the protein C activation reaction, there was no correlation of these activities with inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction. Together, these results show that aPL exert their effects by interaction with negatively charged phospholipids, in particular phosphotidylserine, but lack of correlation between inhibition of the prothrombinase and protein C activation reactions, suggests that the nature of the coagulation protein is also important. PMID:8902763

  1. Polyclonal Th1 cells transfer oil-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Svelander, L; Müssener, A; Erlandsson-Harris, H; Kleinau, S

    1997-01-01

    T-cells play a critical role in oil-induced arthritis (OIA) in DA rats. The present study focuses on the involvement of CD4/CD8 T cells in OIA by using adoptive transfer. Mitogen-activated T cells from DA rats previously injected with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) were depleted of CD4+ T cells or CD8+ T cells before transfer to irradiated naive receipients. The results indicate that CD4+ T cells are essential for the induction of passively induced OIA. However, in vitro blocking experiments with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to the CD4 molecule of the T cells before transfer did not affect the passive OIA. Neither was passive OIA inhibited by treating the CD4+ T cells with mAb to intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in order to block cell-cell interactions or migration. The arthritogenic CD4+ T cells were sensitive, however, to in vitro treatment with mAb to the interleukin-2 receptor, which inhibited the disease or delayed the onset of passive OIA in recipients. The arthritogenic CD4+ T cells were also analysed for expression of specific T-cell receptor (TCR) variable (V) beta chains, critical for recognition of autoantigen, by utilizing V beta gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results show a heterogeneous expression of V beta segments of the TCR, indicating a polyclonal origin of the pathogenic cells. Moreover, an investigation of the T helper (Th)1/Th2 status of the CD4+ T cells, defined by cytokine expression, was made at the mRNA level by using in situ hybridization. High numbers of interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA expressing cells and also interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-expressing cells could be identified. We conclude from this study that non-immunogenic IFA triggers polyclonal, IL-2-dependent Th1 cells which induce arthritis. The contribution of the CD4 or ICAM-1 molecules for arthritis induction seem to be of minor importance. PMID:9227326

  2. Polyclonal B cell activation, circulating immune complexes and autoimmunity in human american visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Galvão-Castro, B; Sá Ferreira, J A; Marzochi, K F; Marzochi, M C; Coutinho, S G; Lambert, P H

    1984-01-01

    In a prospective study, serum and plasma samples from 17 patients with kala-azar were collected in Rio de Janeiro. High levels of immune complexes (IC) were detected in serum by means of 125I-Clq and conglutinin binding assays. The Clq binding material had a sedimentation coefficient of 19-25S, as determined by ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient. Plasma levels of C3 and C3 breakdown products were measured and the C3d levels were increased in six out of 11 patients. The occurrence of polyclonal B cell activation was suggested by (a) a marked increase of serum IgG and IgM levels and (b) of the presence of antibodies against various proteins and haptens (SRBC, DNP-BSA, FITC-BSA,KLH). There was a close association between the presence of IC and anti-immunoglobulin antibodies. Anti-smooth muscle antibodies were also observed. These data are consistent with a major role of polyclonal B cell activation in the induction of IC during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:6424987

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to the h1 agglutinogen from Staphylococcus aureus 17A. Serological testing with type strains.

    PubMed

    Haaheim, L R; Lund, H

    1984-12-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies to the h1 agglutinogen were produced by conventional means, and slide agglutination of S. aureus type strains was performed with protein A affinity purified IgG1 antibodies. In accordance with Oeding's serotype system the type strains 17A and 670 were strongly and consistently agglutinated. In addition, however, several of the remaining twelve type strains investigated showed varying reaction patterns. Our results indicate that the h1 agglutinogen may be more widely distributed among S. aureus strains than previously assumed. PMID:6532111

  4. Detection of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B at Picogram Levels Using Piezoelectric-Excited Millimeter-Sized Cantilever Sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a highly sensitive and rapid method for thhe detection of Staphylocoiccus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB) at picogram levels using a piezolelectric-excited millimeter cantilever (PEMC) sensor. Affinity purified polyclonal antibody to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (anti-SEB) was immobilized on th...

  5. Latex agglutination assays for detection and of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Latex agglutination assays were developed for the top six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups utilizing polyclonal antibodies. Rabbit antisera were affinity purified through Protein A/G columns and the isolated immunoglobulins (IgG) were covalently immobilized onto pol...

  6. Clearance of circulating radio-antibodies using streptavidin or second antibodies in a xenograft model.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, D.; Pedley, R. B.; Boden, J. A.; Boden, R.; Begent, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The improved tumour to non-tumour ratios needed for effective tumour targeting with antibodies requires that blood background radioactivity is reduced. We investigated the effect of streptavidin as a clearing agent for 125I-labelled biotinylated anti-CEA antibodies in a human colon carcinoma xenograft model. By comparing the biodistribution of the monoclonal antibody A5B7 with four, nine or 22 biotins per antibody molecule, we investigated how the degree of biotinylation of the primary radiolabelled antibody affects its clearance with streptavidin. Limiting the degree of biotinylation limited blood clearance, whereas nine or 22 biotins per antibody molecule resulted in a 13- to 14-fold reduction in blood radioactivity, the streptavidin-biotinylated antibody complexes clearing rapidly via the liver and spleen. Although a reduction in tumour activity was also seen, a 6.6-fold improvement in the tumour to blood ratio was achieved. A comparative study of streptavidin versus second antibody clearance was carried out using the polyclonal antibody PK4S biotinylated with 12 biotins per antibody molecule. This study indicated that second antibody was superior for clearance of the polyclonal antibody, resulting in a larger and faster reduction in blood radioactivity and improved tumour to blood ratios. In this case the primary antibody was polyclonal, and therefore non-uniformity of biotinylation may affect complexation with streptavidin. Therefore, the degree of biotinylation and type of antibody must be carefully considered before the use of streptavidin clearance. PMID:8123481

  7. Production of monoclonal antibodies against avidin.

    PubMed

    Ashorn, R; Ashorn, P; Kulomaa, M; Tuohimaa, P; Krohn, K

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies of the IgG1 subclass were generated against chicken avidin. These antibodies were shown to be as sensitive as polyclonal antiserum in detecting avidin by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Furthermore, the monoclonal antibodies were considerably more specific. Our results with a monoclonal anti-avidin RIA support previous findings that in inflammatory conditions avidin is synthesized also in other organs than the oviduct, although in the liver a major part of the activity detected by polyclonal anti-avidin RIA or biotin-bentonite assay was not due to avidin. PMID:4053566

  8. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  9. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, S.R.; Lin, C.S.; Potts, J.T. Jr.; Rosenthal, A.S.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen monocloanl antibodies against the aminoterminal portion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were generated by using BALB/c mouse for immunization fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods, and a solid-phase screening assay. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat antimouse immunoglobulins specific for IgG heavy chains and ..mu..(IgM). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background activity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labelled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a radioimmunoassay.

  10. Ultrasensitive characterization of site-specific glycosylation of affinity-purified haptoglobin from lung cancer patient plasma using 10 μm i.d. porous layer open tubular liquid chromatography-linear ion trap collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Rejtar, Tomas; Karger, Barry L

    2011-03-15

    Site-specific analysis of protein glycosylation is important for biochemical and clinical research efforts. Glycopeptide analysis using liquid chromatography-collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry (LC-CID/ETD-MS) allows simultaneous characterization of the glycan structure and attached peptide site. However, due to the low ionization efficiency of glycopeptides during electrospray ionization, 200-500 fmol of sample per injection is needed for a single LC-MS run, which makes it challenging for the analysis of limited amounts of glycoprotein purified from biological matrixes. To improve the sensitivity of LC-MS analysis for glycopeptides, an ultranarrow porous layer open tubular (PLOT) LC column (2.5 m × 10 μm i.d.) was coupled to a linear ion trap (LTQ) collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometer to provide sensitive analysis of N-linked protein glycosylation heterogeneity. The potential of the developed method is demonstrated by the characterization of site-specific glycosylation using haptoglobin (Hpt) as a model protein. To limit the amount of haptoglobin to low picomole amounts of protein, we affinity purified it from 1 μL of pooled lung cancer patient plasma. A total of 26 glycoforms/glycan compositions on three Hpt tryptic glycopeptides were identified and quantified from 10 LC-MS runs with a consumption of 100 fmol of Hpt digest (13 ng of protein, 10 fmol per injection). Included in this analysis was the determination of the glycan occupancy level. At this sample consumption level, the high sensitivity of the PLOT LC-LTQ-CID/ETD-MS system allowed glycopeptide identification and structure determination, along with relative quantitation of glycans presented on the same peptide backbone, even for low abundant glycopeptides at the ∼100 amol level. The PLOT LC-MS system is shown to have sufficient sensitivity to allow characterization of site-specific protein glycosylation from trace

  11. Demonstration of anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against IgM rheumatoid factor in the serum of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, W K; Barnett, E V

    1989-01-01

    We have identified the presence of anti-idiotypic activity against IgMRF in the sera of RA patients. Only patients seropositive for IgMRF had significant levels of anti-idiotypic activity, while seronegative patients and normal volunteers did not. When this anti-idiotypic activity was affinity-purified from a single RA patient, two separate binding activities were identified. IgG antibodies were pepsin-digested to F(ab')2 fragments before affinity-purification to remove the Fc portion capable of binding to IgMRF. Anti-idiotypic F(ab')2 fragments of IgG were eluted from an IgMRF-Sepharose 4B column. These F(ab')2 bound preferentially to IgMRF bearing an idiotype recognized by the anti-idiotypic murine monoclonal 17.109. A second anti-idiotypic F(ab')2 was affinity purified using rabbit anti-human Fc antibody bound to Sepharose 4B. These eluted antibodies behaved as the internal image of IgG, binding five out of seven IgMRF's tested. The binding of both anti-idiotypic F(ab')2 was inhibited with human IgG. The presence of both IgMRF and anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against it in the sera of RA patients suggests that anti-idiotypic antibodies alone are not capable of inhibiting the production of rheumatoid factor. PMID:2702773

  12. Polyclonality of Parathyroid Tumors in Neonatal Severe Hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Kristin R; Andrade, Simone Caixeta; Bellizzi, Justin; D'Souza-Li, Lilia; Arnold, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) is a rare disorder characterized by major hypercalcemia, elevated parathyroid hormone levels, and marked enlargement of multiple parathyroid glands, usually associated with germline mutations in the calcium receptor gene CASR. However, little is known about the outgrowth of parathyroid tumors in NSHPT, including whether they represent monoclonal or polyclonal expansions. We sought to examine the clonality of parathyroid tissues resected from a patient with NSHPT and biallelic CASR mutations. DNA from two distinct parathyroid tumors resected from a girl with NSHPT, plus polyclonal/monoclonal control samples, were subjected to analyses of clonality by two independent methods, X-chromosome inactivation analysis at the androgen receptor locus (HUMARA) and BAC array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Both parathyroid tumor samples revealed polyclonal patterns by X-inactivation analysis, with polyclonal and monoclonal controls yielding the expected patterns. Similarly, by BAC array CGH, neither parathyroid sample contained monoclonal copy number changes and both appeared identical to the patient-matched polyclonal controls. Our observations provide direct experimental evidence that the markedly enlarged parathyroid tumors in the setting of NSHPT constitute polyclonal, generalized hyperplastic growths rather than monoclonal neoplasms. PMID:25828954

  13. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  14. Functional Analysis of the Human Antibody Response to Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Beernink, Peter T.; Giuntini, Serena; Costa, Isabella; Lucas, Alexander H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Two licensed serogroup B meningococcal vaccines contain factor H binding protein (FHbp). The antigen specifically binds human FH, which downregulates complement. In wild-type mice whose mouse FH does not bind to FHbp vaccines, the serum anti-FHbp antibody response inhibited binding of human FH to FHbp. The inhibition was important for eliciting broad anti-FHbp serum bactericidal activity. In human FH transgenic mice and some nonhuman primates, FHbp was able to form a complex with FH and FHbp vaccination elicited anti-FHbp antibodies that did not inhibit FH binding. To investigate the human anti-FHbp repertoire, we cloned immunoglobulin heavy- and light-chain-variable-region genes of individual B cells from three adults immunized with FHbp vaccines and generated 10 sequence-distinct native anti-FHbp antibody fragments (Fabs). All 10 Fabs bound to live meningococci; only 1 slightly inhibited binding of human FH, while 4 enhanced FH binding. Affinity-purified anti-FHbp antibody from serum of a fourth immunized adult also enhanced binding of human FH to live meningococcal bacteria. Despite the bound FH, the affinity-purified serum anti-FHbp antibodies elicited human complement-mediated bactericidal activity that was amplified by the alternative pathway. The lack of FH inhibition by the human anti-FHbp Fabs and serum antibodies suggests that binding of human FH to the vaccine antigen skews the anti-FHbp antibody repertoire to epitopes outside the FH-binding site. Mutant FHbp vaccines with decreased FH binding may represent a means to redirect the human antibody repertoire to epitopes within the FH binding site, which can inhibit FH binding and, potentially, increase safety and protective activity. PMID:26106082

  15. Data on the characterization of follicle-stimulating hormone monoclonal antibodies and localization in Japanese eel pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Jung; Park, Chae-Won; Byambaragchaa, Munkhzaya; Kim, Shin-Kwon; Lee, Bae-Ik; Hwang, Hyung-Kyu; Myeong, Jeong-In; Hong, Sun-Mee; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Min, Kwan-Sik

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rec-FSH) from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica; rec-FSH was produced in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA Sepharose column chromatography. In support of our recent publication, "Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against recombinant tethered follicle-stimulating hormone from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica" [1], it was important to characterize the specificity of eel follicle-stimulating hormone antibodies. Here, the production and ELISA system of these monoclonal antibodies are presented. The affinity-purified monoclonal antibodies specifically detected eel rec-FSH in ELISA and on western blots of rec-FSH produced from CHO cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that FSH staining was specifically localized in the eel pituitary. PMID:27331121

  16. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes. PMID:27330002

  17. Ex vivo expanded autologous polyclonal regulatory T cells suppress inhibitor formation in hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debalina; Biswas, Moanaro; Liao, Gongxian; Seay, Howard R; Perrin, George Q; Markusic, David M; Hoffman, Brad E; Brusko, Todd M; Terhorst, Cox; Herzog, Roland W

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy utilizing ex vivo expanded polyclonal CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) is in use in clinical trials for the treatment of type 1 diabetes and prevention of graft versus host disease in bone marrow transplantation. Here, we seek to evaluate this approach in the treatment of inherited protein deficiencies, i.e., hemophilia, which is often complicated by antibody formation against the therapeutic protein. Treg from mice that express green fluorescent protein–marked FoxP3 were highly purified by two-step magnetic/flow sorting and ex vivo expanded 50- to 100-fold over a 2-week culture period upon stimulation with antibody-coated microbeads. FoxP3 expression was maintained in >80% of expanded Treg, which also expressed high levels of CD62L and CTLA-4. Transplanted Treg suppressed inhibitory antibody formation against coagulation factors VIII and IX in protein and gene therapies in strain-matched hemophilia A and B mice, including in mice with pre-existing antibodies. Although transplanted Treg became undetectable within 2 weeks, suppression persisted for >2 months. Additional studies suggested that antigen-specific suppression emerged due to induction of endogenous Treg. The outcomes of these studies support the concept that cell therapy with ex vivo expanded autologous Treg can be used successfully to minimize immune responses in gene and protein replacement therapies. PMID:25364772

  18. Multiple myeloma in a dog with multiple concurrent infectious diseases and persistent polyclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Geigy, Caroline; Riond, Barbara; Bley, Carla Rohrer; Grest, Paula; Kircher, Patrick; Lutz, Hans

    2013-03-01

    A 12-year-old, spayed female, mixed-breed dog was presented for acute hematuria, stranguria, polyuria, and polydipsia, as well as lameness for 8 days. Previous medical history included treatment for infection with Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Leishmania infantum, and Dirofilaria immitis 6.5 years prior to presentation. Besides persistently increased antibody titers to E canis and A phagocytophilum, polyclonal gammopathy with a monoclonal spike and moderate hypercalcemia were observed. There was marked hematuria, and Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from urine. Two weeks after successful treatment of the urinary tract infection, radiographs showed an extensive destructive monostotic lesion of the right humerus. Cytologic examination of fine-needle aspirates of this lesion revealed a neoplastic round cell population suggestive of multiple myeloma. The dog was treated with melphalan and prednisolone for suspected multiple myeloma and doxycycline for suspected ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis. Treatments lead to resolution of the clinical signs, hypercalcemia, and monoclonal gammopathy, and there was radiographic improvement of bone lesions; polyclonal gammopathy persisted. About one year after presentation the dog was still in clinical remission. This is a rare report of a dog with suspected multiple myeloma and a history of multiple chronic infectious diseases, suggesting that chronic infection and uncontrolled long-term stimulation of the immune system could contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. PMID:23278475

  19. Quality of histone modification antibodies undermines chromatin biology research

    PubMed Central

    Kungulovski, Goran; Jeltsch, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modification (PTM) antibodies are essential research reagents in chromatin biology. However, they suffer from variable properties and insufficient documentation of quality. Antibody manufacturers and vendors should provide detailed lot-specific documentation of quality, rendering further quality checks by end-customers unnecessary. A shift from polyclonal antibodies towards sustainable reagents like monoclonal or recombinant antibodies or histone binding domains would help to improve the reproducibility of experimental work in this field. PMID:26834995

  20. Detection of Polyclonality among Clinical Isolates from Prosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    De-la-Fuente, Marta; Martinez-Perez, Marta; Gonzalez-Pallares, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is an increasingly important health concern in the Western world due to the rising number of joint arthroplasties. Although most infections are considered to be monomicrobial, the introduction of sonication procedures has led to an increase in the detection of polymicrobial infections. To date, no published studies have investigated the presence of different clones of the same species in the infected patient. The objective of this study was to analyze whether the phenomenon of polyclonality, or the appearance of different clones in the same sample, occurs in PJI. Bacteria isolated by sonication of the retrieved implant from patients with theoretically monomicrobial PJI were included in the study. Two techniques (random amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD] and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight [MALDI-TOF] mass spectrometry) were used to determine the presence of several clones in the same sample. Results were analyzed to determine bacterial species and infection type (acute versus chronic). RAPD showed a predominance of polyclonal cases (16 of 19). However, when performing the analysis with MALDI-TOF, all cases were shown to be polyclonal. We were unable to establish any relationship between the two methodologies. Polyclonality is a common phenomenon in acute and chronic PJI. Further studies are needed to establish the potential implications of this phenomenon on patient outcomes. PMID:26378278

  1. Monoclonal versus polyclonal anti-D in the treatment of ITP.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Alan H

    2013-10-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder caused by low numbers of platelets generally due to the production of anti-platelet antibodies. One effective treatment for ITP patients who express the RhD antigen on their red blood cells has been the use of blood donor-derived pooled polyclonal anti-D. Although anti-D has served us well, it needs to be replaced with a recombinant product. While the mechanism of action of anti-D in ITP remains highly speculative, this has not thwarted attempts to replace anti-D with a monoclonal product. Although a single attempt at a monoclonal antibody was not successful in the 1990s for the treatment of ITP, more recent efforts in mouse models of ITP and ITP patients now show that monoclonal antibodies can be successful in ITP. These studies also finally help substantiate the concept that it is unlikely that contaminants in the original donor-derived preparations mediate the major ameliorative activity of anti-D in ITP. PMID:23919777

  2. Schistosoma mansoni: autoantibodies and polyclonal B cell activation in infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, E; Camus, D; Santoro, F; Capron, A

    1981-01-01

    The appearance of autoantibodies was investigated during the course of Schistosoma mansoni infection in C57Bl/6 mice. Anti-liver autoantibodies or lymphocyte-reactive alloantibodies were detected respectively without cell-mediated immunity against liver antigen or lymphocytotoxic activity. Anti-liver, anti-DNA, anti-Ig and anti-lymphocyte antibodies were shown 6-7 weeks after the beginning of the infection concomitantly with the increase of immunoglobulin levels and circulating immune complexes. At this period, the antibody response to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was increased and the injection of spleen cells from day-45-infected mice to uninfected recipients increased the anti-PVP antibody response. Conversely, the injection of spleen cells from uninfected to infected mice did not modify the anti-PVP Ab response. After 6 weeks of infection, the basal thymidine incorporation of spleen cells was increased contrasting with the marked inhibition of spleen cell response to PHA. The present data are consistent with the induction of a polyclonal non-specific B cell activation by S. mansoni. PMID:6978217

  3. New haptens and antibodies for ractopamine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhui; Liu, Meixuan; Shi, Weimin; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-09-15

    In this work, three unreported immunizing haptens of ractopamine (RAC) were synthesized and used to produce highly sensitive and specific polyclonal antibody. The spacer arms of haptens for coupling to protein carrier were located on different position of RAC with different length. High affinity polyclonal antibodies were obtained and characterized in terms of titer and sensitivity by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The best antibody employed in a heterologous competitive ELISA exhibited an IC50 value as low as 0.12ngmL(-1) and could not recognize other 10 β-agonists including clenbuterol and salbutamol. The heterologous competitive ELISA was preliminary applied to swine urine and the results showed the new antibody was sufficiently sensitive and specific, and potentially used for the detection of RAC at trace level in real samples. PMID:25863617

  4. Human polyclonal immunoglobulin G from transchromosomic bovines inhibits MERS-CoV in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luke, Thomas; Wu, Hua; Zhao, Jincun; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Coleman, Christopher M; Jiao, Jin-An; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Liu, Ye; Postnikova, Elena N; Ork, Britini L; Glenn, Gregory; Flyer, David; Defang, Gabriel; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Kochel, Tadeusz; Wang, Jonathan; Nie, Wensheng; Smith, Gale; Hensley, Lisa E; Olinger, Gene G; Kuhn, Jens H; Holbrook, Michael R; Johnson, Reed F; Perlman, Stanley; Sullivan, Eddie; Frieman, Matthew B

    2016-02-17

    As of 13 November 2015, 1618 laboratory-confirmed human cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection, including 579 deaths, had been reported to the World Health Organization. No specific preventive or therapeutic agent of proven value against MERS-CoV is currently available. Public Health England and the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium identified passive immunotherapy with neutralizing antibodies as a treatment approach that warrants priority study. Two experimental MERS-CoV vaccines were used to vaccinate two groups of transchromosomic (Tc) bovines that were genetically modified to produce large quantities of fully human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. Vaccination with a clade A γ-irradiated whole killed virion vaccine (Jordan strain) or a clade B spike protein nanoparticle vaccine (Al-Hasa strain) resulted in Tc bovine sera with high enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralizing antibody titers in vitro. Two purified Tc bovine human IgG immunoglobulins (Tc hIgG), SAB-300 (produced after Jordan strain vaccination) and SAB-301 (produced after Al-Hasa strain vaccination), also had high ELISA and neutralizing antibody titers without antibody-dependent enhancement in vitro. SAB-301 was selected for in vivo and preclinical studies. Administration of single doses of SAB-301 12 hours before or 24 and 48 hours after MERS-CoV infection (Erasmus Medical Center 2012 strain) of Ad5-hDPP4 receptor-transduced mice rapidly resulted in viral lung titers near or below the limit of detection. Tc bovines, combined with the ability to quickly produce Tc hIgG and develop in vitro assays and animal model(s), potentially offer a platform to rapidly produce a therapeutic to prevent and/or treat MERS-CoV infection and/or other emerging infectious diseases. PMID:26888429

  5. Antibody therapeutics for Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Larry; Whaley, Kevin J; Olinger, Gene G; Jacobs, Michael; Gopal, Robin; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P

    2016-04-01

    With the unprecedented scale of the 2014-2016 West Africa outbreak, the clinical and scientific community scrambled to identify potential therapeutics for Ebola virus disease (EVD). Passive administration of antibodies has a long successful history for prophylaxis and therapy of a variety of infectious diseases, but the importance of antibodies in EVD has been unclear and is the subject of some debate. Recent studies in non-human primates have renewed interest in the potential of antibodies to impact EVD. Currently ongoing clinical evaluation of polyclonal and monoclonal antibody therapy in EVD patients in West Africa may finally offer a definitive answer to this debate. PMID:26826442

  6. Specificity of a Polyclonal Fecal Elastase ELISA for CELA3

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Christoph; Lerch, Markus M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Elastase is a proteolytic pancreatic enzyme that passes through the gastrointestinal tract undergoing only limited degradation. ELISA tests to determine stool elastase concentrations have therefore been developed for the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Five different isoforms of pancreatic elastase (CELA1, CELA2A, CELA2B, CELA3A, CELA3B) are encoded in the human genome. We have investigated three different polyclonal antisera that are used in a commercial fecal elastase ELISA to determine their specificity for different pancreatic elastase isoforms. Material and Methods Different polyclonal rabbit antisera against human elastase peptides (BIOSERV Diagnostics GmbH, Germany) were tested by Western blot analysis of human pancreatic juice, in HEK-293 cells expressing Elastase constructs, and in the protein content of porcine pancreatin, used for treatment of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Results In human pancreatic juice the polyclonal antisera detected proteins at the corresponding size of human pancreatic elastase isoforms (~29kDa). Transiently expressed GFP fusion protein of elastase isoform CELA3A (CELA3A-GFP), but not CELA2A (CELA2A-GFP) could be precipitated from HEK-293 cell lysates with the elastase antisera. We detected no cross-reactivity with elastases in the porcine pancreatic extracts (pancreatin) used for enzyme replacement therapy. Conclusion The polyclonal antisera used in a commercial fecal elastase ELISA are specific for the human pancreatic elastase isoform CELA3 and do not cross-react with elastase contained in pig pancreatin. While pancreatic elastase 1 (CELA1) is not expressed in the adult human pancreas, possible differences between the other isoforms regarding their cellular expression, pathophysiological role and relevance in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency deserve further investigation. PMID:27459204

  7. [Asymptomatic 32 year old female smoker with persistent polyclonal lymphocytosis].

    PubMed

    Chapuy, B; Wulf, G; Tessen, H W; Griesinger, F; Trümper, L; Schroers, R

    2007-03-01

    A 32 year old female smoker (20 pack years) presented with an asymptomatic lymphocytosis of 13,000/nl and splenomegaly. The patient's blood smear showed an absolute lymphocytosis with 65% atypical lymphocytes. A total of 1% of the lymphocytes were bilobulated. Bone marrow histology and immunphenotyping of blood and bone marrow excluded leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. IgH-CDR-3 PCR analysis revealed a polyclonal pattern. In summary, a persistent polyclonal B-cell-lymphocytosis (PPBL) was diagnosed. The exact etiology of PPBL is still unclear, however, it is associated with a polyclonal raise in the lymphocyte count of CD27+IgD+-memory-B-lymphocytes due to a defect in apoptosis signaling and leukocyte homing to secondary lymphoid tissues. An association with cigarette smoking is obvious since all patients are smokers. From all published cases, only two developed a malignancy with an uncertain association with PPBL. We have been monitoring our patient for 6.5 years without any evidence of the development of a lymphoma. PMID:17287965

  8. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    PubMed

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  9. Murine Visceral Leishmaniasis: IgM and Polyclonal B-Cell Activation Lead to Disease Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Deak, Eszter; Jayakumar, Asha; Wing Cho, Ka; Goldsmith-Pestana, Karen; Dondji, Blaise; Lambris, John D.; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2010-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the draining lymph node (DLN) is the initial site for colonization and establishment of infection after intradermal transmission by the sand fly vector; however, little is known about the developing immune response within this site. Using an intradermal infection model, which allows for parasite visceralization, we have examined the ongoing immune responses in the DLN of BALB/c mice infected with L. infantum. Although not unexpected, at early times post-infection there is a marked B cell expansion in the DLN, which persists throughout infection. However, the characteristics of this response were of interest; as early as day 7 post-infection, polyclonal antibodies (TNP, OVA, chromatin) were observed and the levels appeared comparable to the specific anti-leishmania response. Although B-cell-deficient JHD BALB/c mice are relatively resistant to infection, neither B-cell-derived IL-10 nor B-cell antigen presentation appear to be primarily responsible for the elevated parasitemia. However, passive transfer and reconstitution of JHD BALB/c with secretory immunoglobulins, (IgM or IgG; specific or non-specific immune complexes) results in increased susceptibility to L. infantum infection. Further, JHD BALB/c mice transgenetically reconstituted to secrete IgM demonstrated exacerbated disease in comparison to wild type BALB/c mice as early as 2 days post-infection. Evidence suggests that complement activation (generation of C5a) and signaling via the C5aR (CD88) is related to the disease exacerbation caused by IgM rather than cytokine levels (IL-10 or IFN-γ). Overall these studies indicate that polyclonal B cell activation, which is known to be associated with human visceral leishmaniasis, is an early and intrinsic characteristic of disease and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:20213734

  10. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  11. Construction of Recombinant Single Chain Variable Fragment (ScFv) Antibody Against Superantigen for Immunodetection Using Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Agrawal, Ranu; Kamboj, D V; Singh, Lokendra

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens are a class of antigens that bind to the major histocompatibility complex class (MHC) II and T-cell receptor (TCR) and cause the nonspecific activation of T cells, resulting in a massive release of pro-inflammatory mediators. They are produced by the gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, and by a variety of other microbes such as viruses and mycoplasma, and cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and even death in some cases. The immunodetection of superantigens is difficult due to the polyclonal activation of T-cells leading to nonspecific antibody production. The production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies against superantigens can solve this problem and are far better than polyclonal antibodies in terms of detection. Here, we describe the construction of recombinant single chain variable fragments (ScFv) antibodies against superantigens with specific reference to SEB (staphylococcal enterotoxin B) using antibody phage display technology. PMID:26676049

  12. Dissecting antibodies with regards to linear and conformational epitopes.

    PubMed

    Forsström, Björn; Axnäs, Barbara Bisławska; Rockberg, Johan; Danielsson, Hanna; Bohlin, Anna; Uhlen, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    An important issue for the performance and specificity of an antibody is the nature of the binding to its protein target, including if the recognition involves linear or conformational epitopes. Here, we dissect polyclonal sera by creating epitope-specific antibody fractions using a combination of epitope mapping and an affinity capture approach involving both synthesized peptides and recombinant protein fragments. This allowed us to study the relative amounts of antibodies to linear and conformational epitopes in the polyclonal sera as well as the ability of each antibody-fraction to detect its target protein in Western blot assays. The majority of the analyzed polyclonal sera were found to have most of the target-specific antibodies directed towards linear epitopes and these were in many cases giving Western blot bands of correct molecular weight. In contrast, many of the antibodies towards conformational epitopes did not bind their target proteins in the Western blot assays. The results from this work have given us insights regarding the nature of the antibody response generated by immunization with recombinant protein fragments and has demonstrated the advantage of using antibodies recognizing linear epitopes for immunoassay involving wholly or partially denatured protein targets. PMID:25816293

  13. Production and characterization of antibodies to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Hazum, E; Schvartz, I; Popliker, M

    1987-01-15

    Antibodies to the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor of bovine pituitary membranes have been raised in rabbits by immunization with affinity-purified receptor preparations. These antibodies did not compete with 125I-labeled GnRH analog (Buserelin) for binding to the receptors but did precipitate rat and bovine solubilized receptors labeled with 125I-Buserelin. Binding of the antibodies to the receptors was also demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of 125I-labeled purified receptors and photoaffinity-labeled receptors. The antibodies did not have a GnRH-like activity but rather inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone release from cultured rat pituitary cells. In addition, the antibodies did not inhibit luteinizing hormone release stimulated by high K+ concentration. This suggests that the antibodies recognize domains of the receptor other than the binding site of the hormone and thereby inhibit the biological response. These GnRH receptor antibodies provide a useful tool for studying GnRH receptor structure, function, localization, and biosynthesis. PMID:3027055

  14. Autoimmune anti-HIV-1gp120 antibody with antiidiotype-like activity in sera and immune complexes of HIV-1-related immunologic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Nardi, M

    1992-01-01

    Autoimmune antiidiotype-like antibody (Ab2) directed against anti-HIV-1gp120 (Ab1) was found in high titer in the sera of 10 consecutive homosexual and 11 narcotic addict HIV-1-related immunologic thrombocytopenia (HIV-1-ITP) patients, was barely detectable in 10 nonthrombocytopenic HIV-1 sero-positive individuals, and was not detectable in 5 normal subjects by use of a solid-phase RIA. Reactivity of autologous Ab2 for Ab1 was 4-120-fold greater than Ab2 for homologous Ab1. Affinity-purified Ab2 did not block the binding of affinity-purified Ab1 to its HIV-1gp120 epitopes on immunoblot, indicating the absence of "internal image" antiidiotype. Both Ab1 and Ab2 are precipitable from sera with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and present in a macromolecular complex that is excluded by gel filtration on G200 and contains IgG, IgM, C3, and the anti-F(ab')2 antiidiotype-like complex. PEG-precipitable complexes bind to platelets in a saturation-dependent manner. Neither affinity-purified Ab1 nor Ab2 binds to platelets. However, the combination of Ab1 and Ab2 (preincubated for 2 h at 22 degrees C) binds to platelets in a saturation-dependent manner at an optimum ratio range of 10-20:1. Ab2 reactivity correlates with serum PEG-precipitable immune complex level (r = 0.91; P less than 0.001) and with thrombocytopenia (r = 0.89; P less than 0.001). We suggest that the anti-HIV-1gp120 antiidiotype-like complex contributes to the markedly elevated platelet Ig and C3 level of HIV-1-ITP patients and propose that this may contribute to their thrombocytopenia. Images PMID:1737832

  15. Polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with binucleated lymphocytes (PPBL).

    PubMed

    Troussard, Xavier; Cornet, Edouard; Lesesve, Jean-François; Kourel, Carine; Mossafa, Hossein

    2008-01-01

    Persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (PPBL) is a rare and recently described entity. The review of the literature show PPBL is diagnosed predominantly but not exclusively in women, usually smokers. PPBL is recognized by a moderate, chronic and absolute lymphocytosis (>4 × 10(9)/l) in the peripheral blood. In 10% of cases without lymphocytosis, the PPBL diagnosis has to be suggested by peripheral blood examination showing in all cases atypical binucleated lymphocytes. A polyclonal serum IgM is also associated and HLA-DR7 expression is present in most cases. Contrary to B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (B-CLPD), peripheral B cells are polyclonal with kappa and lambda light-chain expression and no clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes is usually demonstrated. The detection of an extra isochromosome for the long arm of chromosome 3 +i(3)(q10) has to be considered as a specific marker of PPBL. We performed conventional cytogenetic analysis (CCA) in 111 patients with typical PPBL we followed-up more than 4 years. +i(3q) was detected in 34% (33/98), PCC in 8% (8/98) and both abnormalities in 31% (30/98). CCA showed neither +i(3q) nor PCC in 28% (27/98). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was also performed in 84 cases and +i(3q) was detected in 71% (60/84). When combining both procedures in 84 patients, +i(3q) was detected in 17 patients with negative CCA and was confirmed in 43 patients with positive CCA. CCA and FISH were both negative in 24 cases. Whether patients with PPBL are at increased risk of hematological malignancy remains unclear. After a median follow-up of 4.4 years, most PPBL patients presented a stable clinical and biological course. Six patients died from pulmonary cancer, myocardial infarction, cerebral aneurysm rupture or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Two patients had IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) at the time of PPBL diagnosis and two other patients developed IgM MGUS

  16. Anti-F(ab')2 antibodies in thrombocytopenic patients at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J R; Lennette, E T; Karpatkin, S

    1986-01-01

    22 homosexual or narcotic addict patients at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or with AIDS, were studied for the presence of antiimmunoglobulin antibodies and circulating immune complexes (20 were thrombocytopenic, 6 had AIDS). Circulating immune complex levels were 10-fold higher than levels in normal subjects. IgG anti-F(ab')2 antibodies were noted in homosexual as well as narcotic addict patients. Of 16 homosexual patients, 7 had IgG anti-F(ab')2 antibody of moderate to marked titer with broad reactivity against autologous, homologous, and control F(ab')2 fragments. Three others demonstrated limited reactivity against one or two F(ab')2 fragments. The remaining six patients were negative. Six of six narcotic addict patients had IgG anti-F(ab')2 antibody, five with limited reactivity, one with broad reactivity. In contrast, neither elevated circulating immune complexes nor anti-F(ab')2 antibodies were detectable in six autoimmune thrombocytopenic patients. Anti-F(ab')2 antibody could be affinity purified from serum or circulating immune complexes. Anti-F(ab')2 reactivity correlated with circulating immune complex levels, r = 0.83, P less than 0.01. PMID:3011860

  17. Immunoradiometric assay for examination and quantitation of Brucella abortus-specific antibodies reactive with the antigen(s) used in the indirect hemolysis test.

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, T F; Hoffmann, E M

    1981-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay was designed to quantitate antibodies which bind to Brucella abortus antigens adsorbed to bovine erythrocytes. This allowed examination of antibodies specific for B. abortus antigens detectable in the indirect hemolysis test for bovine brucellosis. Assay parameters were optimized for measuring antigen-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2, and IgM antibodies. The immunoradiometric assay allowed examination of binding interactions which occur during the indirect hemolysis test. Affinity-purified antibovine IgG1, IgG2, and IgM were used to detect specific bovine antibodies of these classes (and subclasses). The binding of the anti-immunoglobulins was linear as a function of immunoglobulin concentration. However, the binding of bovine antibodies of the different classes and subclasses to B. abortus antigen was nonlinear. Since B. abortus-specific antibodies of all classes and subclasses were present in the "standard serum" during the immunoradiometric assays, it is possible that the non-linearity was due to competition between antibodies for antigenic sites. IgG2 and IgM antibodies specific for B. abortus antigen(s) appeared to be capable of binding independently to antigen(s). However, the binding efficiencies of IgG1 antibodies changed as the ratio of antigenic sites to antibodies was increased. PMID:6793625

  18. Characterization of the subclasses and light chain types of IgG antibodies to rubella.

    PubMed Central

    Skvaril, F; Schilt, U

    1984-01-01

    IgG subclasses of antibodies to rubella were determined in indirect enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) with monoclonal antibodies specific for human IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4. Eleven sera from women with long past history of rubella, two hyperimmune and five non-hyperimmune immunoglobulin preparations were tested. Light chain types of the antibodies were tested in ELISA with polyclonal specific antibodies to kappa and lambda chains. Antibodies to rubella in the sera as well as in the immunoglobulin preparations were found in the IgG1 subclass only. Both light chain types were present in the antibodies. PMID:6423327

  19. Lipopolysaccharide deacylation by an endogenous lipase controls innate antibody responses to Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingfang; Zhang, Mei; Takashima, Akira; Weiss, Jerrold; Apicella, Michael A; Li, Xiang-Hong; Yuan, Dorothy; Munford, Robert S

    2005-10-01

    T cell-independent type 1 agonists such as Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharides can stimulate B lymphocytes to proliferate and produce antibodies by signaling through Toll-like receptors. This phenomenon is well established in vitro, yet polyclonal B cell responses after bacterial infection in vivo are often weak and short-lived. We show here that B cell proliferation and polyclonal antibody production in response to Gram-negative bacterial infection are modulated by acyloxyacyl hydrolase, a host enzyme that deacylates bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Deacylation of lipopolysaccharide occurred over several days, allowing lipopolysaccharide to act as an innate immune stimulant yet limiting the eventual amount of B cell proliferation and polyclonal antibody production. Control of lipopolysaccharide activation by acyloxyacyl hydrolase indicates that mammals can regulate immune responses to bacterial infection by chemical modification of a Toll-like receptor agonist. PMID:16155573

  20. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  1. Differentiating Asthma Phenotypes in Young Adults through Polyclonal Cytokine Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zoratti, Edward; Havstad, Suzanne; Wegienka, Ganesa; Nicholas, Charlotte; Bobbitt, Kevin R.; Woodcroft, Kimberley J.; Ownby, Dennis R.; Johnson, Christine Cole

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent research has emphasized the need to better discriminate asthma phenotypes and consider underlying mechanistic endotypes in epidemiological and clinical studies. While allergic asthma and non-allergic asthma are frequently combined into one disease category in observational research and clinical trials, few studies have investigated the extent to which these two separate phenotypes are associated with distinct cytokine immunological profiles in a representative young adult population. Objective To investigate the cytokine production-based endotypes underlying the clinical phenotypes of allergic and non-allergic asthma among a population-based birth cohort evaluated as young adults. Methods Subjects included 18–21 year-old members (n=540) of a suburban Detroit birth cohort study, the Childhood Allergy Study. PMA-stimulated whole blood IL4, IL5, IL10, IL12, IL13, IL17A, IL17F, IL22 and IFNγ secretory responses were analyzed for associations comparing participants with allergic versus non-allergic asthma phenotypes to those without asthma. Results Th2-polarized responses, measured as higher mean IL5 and IL13 secretion and lower ratios of IFNγ and IL12 to three Th2 cytokines IL4, IL5, or IL13, were observed only in allergic asthmatics. Non-allergic asthma was associated with Th1-polarized responses including higher adjusted IFNγ secretion compared to both allergic asthmatics and surprisingly, to those without asthma [OR=2.5 (1.2–5.1), p<0.01]. Conclusions As expected, young adults with a history of an allergic asthma phenotype exhibit a Th2-polarized cytokine response after polyclonal stimulation. However, Th1-polarization was observed in subjects with a history of non-allergic asthma. Allergic and non-allergic asthma are associated with etiologically distinct immune endotypes underscoring the importance of discriminating these endotypes in research analyses and clinical management. PMID:24801891

  2. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody complexes on platelets of seropositive thrombocytopenic homosexuals and narcotic addicts.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Nardi, M; Lennette, E T; Byrne, B; Poiesz, B

    1988-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection develop an immunologic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with markedly elevated platelet IgG, IgM, and C3C4 as well as serum immune complexes determined by the polyethylene glycol (PEG) method. Analysis of their serum PEG-precipitable immune complexes as well as platelet acid eluates revealed the presence of anti-HIV-1 antibody existing as a complex that eluted in the void volume of a Sephadex G-200 gel-filtration column. The complex binds to washed normal platelets, whereas affinity-purified anti-HIV-1 (gp120) antibody does not. HIV-1 antigen or proviral DNA was not detectable in the immune complexes or platelet extracts. However, anti-antibodies directed against anti-HIV-1 antibody were detectable in the immune complexes as well as platelet eluates. Approximately 50% of eluted platelet IgG contained anti-HIV-1 antibody. Thus the markedly elevated platelet immunoglobulin is partly due to the presence of anti-HIV-1 antibody complexes. This may be responsible for the enhanced platelet clearance and thrombocytopenia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related immunologic thrombocytopenia. Images PMID:3200854

  3. Polyclonal B-cell stimulation by L3T4+ T cells in experimental leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Lohoff, M; Matzner, C; Röllinghoff, M

    1988-01-01

    The well-established polyclonal B-cell stimulation in the lymphoid organs in mice infected with Leishmania major is thought to be dependent on T cells. Here we present clear experimental evidence that this is indeed the case by showing that BALB/c-derived, L3T4-positive L. major-specific T cells induce syngeneic B cells to polyclonal proliferation and immunoglobulin production. PMID:3260894

  4. Homeostatic 'bystander' proliferation of human peripheral blood B cells in response to polyclonal T-cell stimulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Pietruczuk, Krzysztof; Frąckowiak, Joanna; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of maintenance of adequate numbers of B lymphocytes and of protective levels of immunoglobulins in the absence of antigenic (re)stimulation remain not fully understood. Meanwhile, our results presented here show that both peripheral blood naive and memory B cells can be activated strongly and non-specifically (in a mitogen-like fashion) in 5-day in vitro cultures of anti-CD3- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy people. This polyclonal, bystander activation of the B cells includes multiple divisions of most of them (assessed here by the flow cytometric technique of dividing cell tracking) and significant antibody [immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG] secretion. Observed proliferation of the CD19(+) B cells depends on contact with stimulated T helper (Th) cells (via CD40-CD40L interaction) and on the response of B cells to secreted interleukins IL-5, IL-10 and IL-4, and is correlated with the levels of these Th-derived molecules, while it does not involve the ligation of the BCR/CD19 complex. We suggest that the effect might reflect the situation occurring in vivo as the homeostatic proliferation of otherwise non-stimulated, peripheral B lymphocytes, providing an always ready pool for efficient antibody production to any new (or cognate) antigen challenge. PMID:25995267

  5. A comparison between cytokine- and bead-stimulated polyclonal T cells: the superiority of each and their possible complementary role.

    PubMed

    Chan, Weng-Chee; Linn, Yeh-Ching

    2016-08-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells and T cells expanded by co-stimulation with beads presenting anti-CD3 and -CD28 antibodies are both polyclonal T cells under intensive laboratory and clinical studies, but there has not been any direct comparison between both. We compared the expansion, memory T cell subsets and cytotoxicity for T cells expanded in parallel by the two methods. Bead-stimulated T cells showed superior expansion as compared to CIK cells on D14 of culture. Bead-stimulated T cells consisted of a significantly higher CD4(+) subset and significantly lower CD8(+) subset as compared to CIK cells, as well as a higher proportion of less terminally differentiated T cells and a higher proportion of homing molecules. On the other hand, CIK cells exhibited significantly superior cytotoxicity against two myelomonocytic leukemia cell lines (THP-1 and U937) and two RCC cell lines (786.0 and CaKi-2). The cytotoxicity on D14 against THP-1 was 58.1 % for CIK cells and 8.3 % for bead-stimulated T cells at E:T of 10:1 (p < 0.01). Cytotoxicity correlated positively with the proportion of the CD8 subset in the culture and was independent of NKG2D recognition of susceptible targets. Polyclonal T cells expanded by different methods exhibit different characteristics which may define the specific role of each in different clinical scenario. We postulate that the more potent CIK cells may offer short term benefit while bead-stimulated T cells may offer a more sustained immune response. PMID:25481728

  6. A Highly Functional Synthetic Phage Display Library Containing over 40 Billion Human Antibody Clones

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Marcel; Bujak, Emil; Putelli, Alessia; Villa, Alessandra; Matasci, Mattia; Gualandi, Laura; Hemmerle, Teresa; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Several synthetic antibody phage display libraries have been created and used for the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. The performance of antibody libraries, which is usually measured in terms of their ability to yield high-affinity binding specificities against target proteins of interest, depends both on technical aspects (such as library size and quality of cloning) and on design features (which influence the percentage of functional clones in the library and their ability to be used for practical applications). Here, we describe the design, construction and characterization of a combinatorial phage display library, comprising over 40 billion human antibody clones in single-chain fragment variable (scFv) format. The library was designed with the aim to obtain highly stable antibody clones, which can be affinity-purified on protein A supports, even when used in scFv format. The library was found to be highly functional, as >90% of randomly selected clones expressed the corresponding antibody. When selected against more than 15 antigens from various sources, the library always yielded specific and potent binders, at a higher frequency compared to previous antibody libraries. To demonstrate library performance in practical biomedical research projects, we isolated the human antibody G5, which reacts both against human and murine forms of the alternatively spliced BCD segment of tenascin-C, an extracellular matrix component frequently over-expressed in cancer and in chronic inflammation. The new library represents a useful source of binding specificities, both for academic research and for the development of antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:24950200

  7. Evaluation of the polyclonal ELISA HPV serology assay as a biomarker for HPV exposure

    PubMed Central

    Coseo, Sarah E.; Porras, Carolina; Dodd, Lori E.; Hildesheim, Allan; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Sherman, Mark E.; Jimenez, Silvia; Solomon, Diane; Bougelet, Catherine; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Quint, Wim; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2011-01-01

    Background Seropositivity to HPV16 and 18 antibodies is used as a measure of cumulative HPV exposure and as a stratifier of HPV exposure for vaccine efficacy analyses. Overall performance of these assays, as a measure of HPV exposure, has not been evaluated. Methods Using data from the enrollment phase of the HPV16/18 vaccine trial in Costa Rica, we evaluated the performance of the polyclonal ELISA HPV16 and 18 serological assays as a measure of HPV exposure. Biological (for eg. HPV infection at the cervix) and behavioral characteristics (for eg. lifetime number of sexual partners) with known associations with current and past HPV infection were used to define cases and controls (HPV exposed vs. not exposed). Pre-vaccination serum was measured for antibodies against HPV16 and HPV18 by ELISA; cervical samples were tested for HPV DNA using PCR SPF10/LiPA25. ELISA results were analyzed using receiver-operator-characteristic curves (ROC); performance was evaluated at the manufacturer set cutpoint (HPV16 =8, HPV18 =7) and at cutpoints chosen to optimize sensitivity and specificity (HPV16 =34, HPV18 =60). Results Defining cases as type-specific HPV DNA positive with high-grade abnormal cytolzogy (i.e. combined molecular and microscopic markers of infection), HPV16-ELISA gave sensitivity that was lower at the optimal cutpoint than the manufacturer cutpoint (62.2 compared with 75.7, respectively; p=0.44). However, specificity was higher (85.3 compared with 70.4, respectively; p<0.0001). Similarly, HPV18-ELISA gave sensitivity that was lower at the optimal cutpoint than the manufacturer cutpoint (34.5 compared with 51.7, respectively; p=0.40), with higher specificities (94.9 compared with 72.6, respectively; p<0.0001). Conclusions Modifying cutpoints did not improve the low sensitivity. The low sensitivity of this assay does not support its use for risk stratification or clinical settings. PMID:21934576

  8. Inhibitory activity of antibodies against the human atrial 5-HT(4)receptor.

    PubMed

    Sallé, L; Eftekhari, P; Aupart, M; Cosnay, P; Hoebeke, J; Argibay, J A

    2001-03-01

    Antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop of G protein-coupled receptors have been shown to exert "agonist-like" activities. In order to test the hypothesis that this is a general phenomenon, antibodies were raised in rabbits against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the newly sequenced human cardiac 5-HT(4)receptor. The antibodies were affinity-purified and shown to recognize the 5-HT(4)receptor in immunoblots of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the receptor. The antibodies had no intrinsic effect but could depress the activation of L -type calcium channel induced by serotonin in human atrial cells. This antagonist-like effect was exerted both by intact IgG and by Fab fragments. These results are physiologically important since it has been shown that the 5-HT(4)receptor could be a target for autoantibodies in mothers at risk of giving birth to children with neonatal atrio-ventricular block. PMID:11181010

  9. Antibodies against thrombin in dengue patients contain both anti-thrombotic and pro-fibrinolytic activities.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Wang, Jen-Reng; Yeh, Trai-Ming

    2013-08-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection may result in severe life-threatening Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). The mechanisms causing haemorrhage in those with DHF are unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that antibodies against human thrombin were increased in the sera of Dengue patients but not in that of patients infected with other viruses. To further characterise the properties of these antibodies, affinity-purified anti-thrombin antibodies (ATAs) were collected from Dengue patient sera by thrombin and protein A/L affinity columns. Most of the ATAs belonged to the IgG class and recognized DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1). In addition, we found that dengue patient ATAs also cross-reacted with human plasminogen (Plg). Functional studies in vitro indicated that Dengue patient ATAs could inhibit thrombin activity and enhance Plg activation. Taken together, these results suggest that DENV NS1-induced thrombin and Plg cross-reactive antibodies may contribute to the development of haemorrhage in patients with DHF by interfering with coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:23740201

  10. How to assess the binding strength of antibodies elicited by vaccination against HIV and other viruses

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vaccines that protect against viral infections generally induce neutralizing antibodies. When vaccines are evaluated, the need arises to assess the affinity maturation of the antibody responses. Binding titers of polyclonal sera depend not only on the affinities of the constituent antibodies but also on their individual concentrations, which are difficult to ascertain. Therefore an assay based on chaotrope disruption of antibody-antigen complexes was designed for measuring binding strength. This assay works well with many viral antigens but gives differential results depending on the conformational dependence of epitopes on complex antigens such as the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1. Kinetic binding assays might offer alternatives, since they can measure average off-rate constants for polyclonal antibodies in a serum. Here, potentials and fallacies of these techniques are discussed. PMID:26641943

  11. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Alistair P.; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites. PMID:26252765

  12. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ulaeto, David O; Hutchinson, Alistair P; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites. PMID:26252765

  13. Deconvolution of antibody affinities and concentrations by non-linear regression analysis of competitive ELISA data.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Bobrovnik, S. A.; Biosciences Division; Palladin Inst. Biochemistry

    2007-12-01

    Physiological responses of the adaptive immune system are polyclonal in nature whether induced by a naturally occurring infection, by vaccination to prevent infection or, in the case of animals, by challenge with antigen to generate reagents of research or commercial significance. The composition of the polyclonal responses is distinct to each individual or animal and changes over time. Differences exist in the affinities of the constituents and their relative proportion of the responsive population. In addition, some of the antibodies bind to different sites on the antigen, whereas other pairs of antibodies are sterically restricted from concurrent interaction with the antigen. Even if generation of a monoclonal antibody is the ultimate goal of a project, the quality of the resulting reagent is ultimately related to the characteristics of the initial immune response. It is probably impossible to quantitatively parse the composition of a polyclonal response to antigen. However, molecular regression allows further parameterization of a polyclonal antiserum in the context of certain simplifying assumptions. The antiserum is described as consisting of two competing populations of high- and low-affinity and unknown relative proportions. This simple model allows the quantitative determination of representative affinities and proportions. These parameters may be of use in evaluating responses to vaccines, to evaluating continuity of antibody production whether in vaccine recipients or animals used for the production of antisera, or in optimizing selection of donors for the production of monoclonal antibodies.

  14. Do antibodies to myelin basic protein isolated from multiple sclerosis cross-react with measles and other common virus antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, C C; Townsend, E; Randell, V B; Williamson, H G

    1983-01-01

    Immunological activity to various antigens, including brain components, measles and other viruses, has been associated with IgG in multiple sclerosis (MS). One possible explanation for the presence of anti-viral antibodies and antibody to myelin basic protein (MBP) in MS patients is that there are antigenic determinants common to certain viruses and MBP. To assess this possibility, IgG from individual brains and sera from patients with MS, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and controls was isolated by protein A and MBP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Antibody to MBP was measured with a solid phase radioimmunoassay and antibody to measles and other viruses by immunofluorescence and/or complement fixation. Anti-MBP activity was detected in brain extracts and sera of all MS patients tested. In contrast to the low levels of antibody to MBP in control brains, high levels of anti-MBP antibodies were found in most of the normal sera. There was no correlation between the presence and levels of serum anti-measles antibodies and the anti-MBP activity. None of the anti-MBP antibodies affinity purified from brain and serum of MS patients reacted with any of the viruses tested, including measles. IgG purified from SSPE patients or from a rabbit hyperimmunized with measles antigen had no reactivity to MBP, despite high levels of anti-measles antibody. It is concluded that there is not direct link between the presence of antibody to MBP and antibody to measles and other viruses in MS patients. PMID:6190599

  15. Proteomic profiling of tandem affinity purified 14-3-3 protein complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ing-Feng; Curran, Amy; Woolsey, Rebekah; Quilici, David; Cushman, John; Mittler, Ron; Harmon, Alice; Harper, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 14-3-3 dimers regulate hundreds of functionally diverse proteins (clients), typically in phosphorylation-dependent interactions. To uncover new clients, a 14-3-3 omega (At1g78300) from Arabidopsis was engineered with a “tandem affinity purification” (TAP) tag and expressed in transgenic plants. Purified complexes were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Results indicate that 14-3-3 omega can dimerize with at least 10 of the 12 14-3-3 isoforms expressed in Arabidopsis. The identification here of 121 putative clients provides support for in vivo 14-3-3 interactions with a diverse array of proteins, including those involved in: (1) Ion transport, such as a K+ channel (GORK), a Cl− channel (CLCg), Ca2+ channels belonging to the glutamate receptor family (GLRs 1.2, 2.1, 2.9, 3.4, 3.7); (2) hormone signaling, such as ACC synthase (isoforms ACS-6, 7 and 8 involved in ethylene synthesis) and the brassinolide receptors BRI1 and BAK1; (3) transcription, such as 7 WRKY family transcription factors; (4) metabolism, such as phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) carboxylase; and (5) lipid signaling, such as phospholipase D (β, and γ). More than 80% (101) of these putative clients represent previously unidentified 14-3-3 interactors. These results raise the number of putative 14-3-3 clients identified in plants to over 300. PMID:19452453

  16. Characterization of affinity-purified isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively. PMID:24892084

  17. Characterization of Affinity-Purified Isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively. PMID:24892084

  18. Polymorphism of normal factor IX detected by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wallmark, A; Ljung, R; Nilsson, I M; Holmberg, L; Hedner, U; Lindvall, M; Sjögren, H O

    1985-01-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-chromosomal recessive disease due to deficiency of coagulation factor IX. Three monoclonal antibodies against factor IX were prepared and used to develop immunoradiometric assays (IRMAs) of factor IX antigen (IX-Ag). IX-Ag was measured in 65 normal individuals with one IRMA based on polyclonal anti-IX antibodies and two IRMAs based on three monoclonal anti-IX antibodies. One of the monoclonal antibodies differed in specificity since it neutralized less than 50% of the clotting activity of factor IX (IX-C), whereas the other two monoclonal antibodies neutralized 80-95%. When the former antibody was used as the solid phase in IRMA, two groups of normal individuals were distinguished: group A with measurable IX-Ag, and group B without demonstrable IX-Ag. There were no differences between the groups either in IX-C or in IX-Ag measured with polyclonal antibodies. A subgroup comprising only women could be distinguished in group A, in whom intermediate IX-Ag concentrations were found. Family studies showed the group B variant of normal factor IX to be transmitted according to the pattern of X-linked recessive inheritance. The allelic frequency of group A was 0.66, and that of group B was 0.34. PMID:3873655

  19. Rapid screening for potential epitopes reactive with a polycolonal antibody by solution-phase H/D exchange monitored by FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Noble, Kyle A; Mao, Yuan; Young, Nicolas L; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H; Marshall, Alan G

    2013-07-01

    The potential epitopes of a recombinant food allergen protein, cashew Ana o 2, reactive to polyclonal antibodies, were mapped by solution-phase amide backbone H/D exchange (HDX) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Ana o 2 polyclonal antibodies were purified in the serum from a goat immunized with cashew nut extract. Antibodies were incubated with recombinant Ana o 2 (rAna o 2) to form antigen:polyclonal antibody (Ag:pAb) complexes. Complexed and uncomplexed (free) rAna o 2 were then subjected to HDX-MS analysis. Four regions protected from H/D exchange upon pAb binding are identified as potential epitopes and mapped onto a homologous model. PMID:23681851

  20. Rapid Screening for Potential Epitopes Reactive with a Polycolonal Antibody by Solution-Phase H/D Exchange Monitored by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Noble, Kyle A.; Mao, Yuan; Young, Nicolas L.; Sathe, Shridhar K.; Roux, Kenneth H.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-07-01

    The potential epitopes of a recombinant food allergen protein, cashew Ana o 2, reactive to polyclonal antibodies, were mapped by solution-phase amide backbone H/D exchange (HDX) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Ana o 2 polyclonal antibodies were purified in the serum from a goat immunized with cashew nut extract. Antibodies were incubated with recombinant Ana o 2 (rAna o 2) to form antigen:polyclonal antibody (Ag:pAb) complexes. Complexed and uncomplexed (free) rAna o 2 were then subjected to HDX-MS analysis. Four regions protected from H/D exchange upon pAb binding are identified as potential epitopes and mapped onto a homologous model.

  1. Detailed analyses of antibodies recognizing mitochondrial antigens suggest similar or identical mechanism for production of natural antibodies and natural autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Czömpöly, Tamás; Olasz, Katalin; Nyárády, Zoltán; Simon, Diána; Bovári, Judit; Németh, Péter

    2008-06-01

    Because of their endosymbiotic evolutionary origin, proteins compartmentalized into mitochondria represent an interesting transition from prokaryotic foreign to essential self molecules. We investigated the presence of naturally occurring antibodies (nAbs) recognizing mitochondrial inner membrane enzymes. Epitope mapping analysis of a mitochondrial inner membrane enzyme, citrate synthase (CS) by synthetic overlapping peptides and phage display libraries using sera from healthy individuals and from patients having systemic autoimmune disease revealed CS recognizing nAbs with IgM isotype. We analyzed cross-reactive epitopes on human CS, bacterial CS, and various standard autoantigens. We have found that the fine epitope pattern on CS is different under physiological and pathological conditions. Moreover sera affinity purified on CS cross reacts with nucleosome antigen, which cross-reactivity could be mapped to a short epitope on human CS. These data indicate that in theory, nAbs "specific" for a given self antigen could fulfill the function of participating in innate defense mechanisms and at the same time recognize a target antigen in a systemic autoimmune disease. Thus, at the level of recognized epitopes there is a possible link between the innate like part and the adaptive-autoimmune arm of the humoral immune system. PMID:18558363

  2. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  3. Development of antibody arrays for monoclonal antibody Higher Order Structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing; Li, Qing; Davies, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Antibody arrays were developed to probe a monoclonal antibody's three-dimensional structure (3-D structure). Peptides with overlapping regions were designed to cover the whole mAb light chain and heavy chain, respectively, and used to generate polyclonal antibodies after the conjugation of the peptides to a carrier protein, KLH. It was shown that good peptide specificity was achieved from the antibodies generated. Using more than 30 different polyclonal antibodies to measure the surface epitope distribution, it was shown that the mAb antibody array can detect epitope exposure as low as 0.1% of defined mAb populations. This ELISA-based analysis of mAb epitope exposure can be considered as a measurement of “conformational impurity” in biologics development, similar to the analysis of other product-related impurities such as different forms of glycosylation, deamidation, and oxidation. This analysis of “conformational impurity” could provide valuable information on the mAb conformational comparability for biosimilar mAbs as well as novel mAbs, especially in the area of protein immunogenicity. Furthermore, stability studies indicated that there are several conformational “hot spots” in many mAbs tested, especially in the hinge region. This antibody array technology can be used for novel mAb Higher Order Structure (HOS) analysis during process and formulation development. Another important area of application is for biosimilar mAb development where the innovator molecule and biosimilar molecule could be compared based on their systemic “fingerprint” from the 30 plus antibodies. PMID:23970865

  4. Microinjection of fos-specific antibodies blocks DNA synthesis in fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Riabowol, K.T.; Vosatka, R.J.; Ziff, E.B.; Lamb, N.J.; Feramisco, J.R.

    1988-04-01

    Transcription of the protooncogene c-fos is increased >10-fold within minutes of treatment of fibroblasts with serum or purified growth factors. Recent experiments with mouse 3T3 cell lines containing inducible fos antisense RNA constructs have shown that induced fos antisense RNA transcripts cause either a marked inhibition of growth in continuously proliferating cells or, conversely, a minimal effect except during the transition from a quiescent (G/sub o/) state into the cell cycle. Since intracellular production of large amounts of antisense RNA does not completely block gene expression, the authors microinjected affinity-purified antibodies raised against fos to determine whether and when during the cell cycle c-fos expression was required for cell proliferation. Using this independent method, they found that microinjected fos antibodies efficiently blocked serum-stimulated DNA synthesis when injected up to 6 to 8 h after serum stimulation of quiescent REF-52 fibroblasts. Furthermore, when fos antibodies were injected into asynchronously growing cells, a consistently greater number of cells was prevented from synthesizing DNA than when cells were injected with nonspecific immunoglobulins. Thus, whereas the activity of c-fos may be necessary for transition of fibroblasts from G/sub o/ to G/sub 1/ of the cell cycle, its function is also required during the early G/sub 1/ portion of the cell cycle to allow subsequent DNA synthesis.

  5. Structure of the Malaria Antigen AMA1 in Complex with a Growth-Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Kim, Hanna; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2007-01-01

    Identifying functionally critical regions of the malaria antigen AMA1 (apical membrane antigen 1) is necessary to understand the significance of the polymorphisms within this antigen for vaccine development. The crystal structure of AMA1 in complex with the Fab fragment of inhibitory monoclonal antibody 1F9 reveals that 1F9 binds to the AMA1 solvent-exposed hydrophobic trough, confirming its importance. 1F9 uses the heavy and light chain complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) to wrap around the polymorphic loops adjacent to the trough, but uses a ridge of framework residues to bind to the hydrophobic trough. The resulting 1F9-AMA1–combined buried surface of 2,470 Å2 is considerably larger than previously reported Fab–antigen interfaces. Mutations of polymorphic AMA1 residues within the 1F9 epitope disrupt 1F9 binding and dramatically reduce the binding of affinity-purified human antibodies. Moreover, 1F9 binding to AMA1 is competed by naturally acquired human antibodies, confirming that the 1F9 epitope is a frequent target of immunological attack. PMID:17907804

  6. Generation of novel recombinant antibodies against nitrotyrosine by antibody phage display.

    PubMed

    Hof, Danielle; Cooksley-Decasper, Seraina; Moergeli, Sandra; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Nitrotyrosine is a posttranslational protein modification that occurs under oxidative and nitrosative stress, and plays an important role in numerous pathological conditions. To analyse nitrotyrosine formation several commercial monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies reacting with 3-nitrotyrosine have been developed which however do not work properly in all required assays. Here, antibody phage display was used to select recombinant antibodies that specifically react with nitrotyrosine in various protein contexts. Nine initial selections were carried out, using synthetic peptides, peroxynitrite-modified proteins and conjugated proteins as antigens. Four antibodies were isolated that each exhibited a characteristic binding reactivity that greatly depended on the antigens that were used for their selections. In general, the selections using small, synthetic and biotinylated peptides were the most successful approach. Subsequently, antibody 11B1 was affinity matured by error prone mutagenesis, resulting in the isolation of two antibodies, designated 47A7 and 47B1. Competition ELISA and immunoblotting after treatment with sodium dithionite further demonstrated the specificity of antibody 47B1 for nitrotyrosine. The results presented here demonstrate that antibody phage display is a useful method to isolate antibodies against posttranslational modifications, which are powerful tools in the proteomic era. PMID:21558620

  7. Antibodies against a novel nucleolar and cytoplasmic antigen (p105-p42) present in the sera of patients with a subset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with signs of scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Labrador, M; Algueró, A; Díaz, C; Geli, C; Pérez, E; García-Valero, J; Rodriguez-Sanchez, J L; Gelpí, C

    1998-01-01

    We identified three patients (two of them relatives) with RA and signs of scleroderma whose sera contained a high titre of IgG class antibodies against the nucleoli and the nucleoplasm of cells of different mammalian origins. Sera from these patients uniformly immunoprecipitated four polypeptides, from a 35S-methionine-labelled HeLa cell extract, whose mol. wts were 120, 105, 95 and 42 kD. Of these, the 95-kD protein was highly phosphorylated. By immunoblotting, these sera reacted with 105-, 95- and 42-kD proteins and affinity-purified antibodies from these, demonstrating that 105- and 95-kD proteins shared cross-reactive epitopes. Moreover, affinity-purified antibodies from each of these proteins immunoprecipitated the whole complex. Localization studies using immunoelectron microscopy and in vivo actinomycin-D-treated cells demonstrated that the 105-, 95- and 42-kD proteins were present in the granular component of the nucleolus and the nucleoplasm. In addition, the 105- and 95-kD were present in free polyribosomes as well as ribosomes attached to endoplasmic reticulum. Pulse/chase experiments strongly suggested that the complex was accomplished shortly after a 10-min pulse. It was preferentially present in the nucleus after a 2 h chase and in both nucleus and cytoplasm after a 5 h chase. We conclude that a protein complex with a main nucleolar distribution is a new autoantigen (p105-p42) recognized by autoantibodies present in the serum of a subgroup of patients with RA and scleroderma signs. These antibodies could be useful as diagnostic markers and as tools for further studies involving the biology of the nucleolus. PMID:9822291

  8. FIBEROPTIC BIOSENSOR EMPLOYING ALEXA-FLUOR CONJUGATED ANTIBODY FOR DETECTION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 AND SHIGA-LIKE TOXINS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed an antibody-based fiber-optic biosensor to rapidly detect low levels of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and shiga-like toxins (SLTs) in ground beef samples. The principle of the sensor is a sandwich immunoassay using an antibody which is specific for E. coli O157:H7 or toxins. A polyclonal a...

  9. [Polyclonal activation due to Epstein-Barr virus superinfection in a case with chronic hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    Bakir Ozbey, Saliha; Mistik, Reşit; Gürcüoğlu, Emel; Oral, Barbaros; Göral, Güher

    2007-10-01

    Primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) often occurs subclinically during childhood, resulting in a latent infection of B lymphocytes. In this report, a chronic hepatitis B case who presented with a serologic profile mimicking acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and exhibiting transient autoantibody positivities because of the polyclonal activation of B cells due to EBV reactivation has been presented. The test results of 56 years old male patient who suffered from fatigue and pain on the right upper quadrant, revealed high levels of liver enzymes (AST: 187 U/L, ALT: 569 U/L), positivity of HBsAg, anti-HBc IgG and anti-HBe, and negativity of anti-HBc IgM, HBeAg and anti-HBs. Since HBV-DNA level was found 405,974 copies/mL by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the patient was taken into follow-up. At the 6th month AST and ALT levels further elevated (352 U/L and 609 U/L, respectively), and anti-HBc IgM and anti-HBs became positive in addition to the previous positive markers of HBV. With the suspicion of superinfection, further laboratory investigations yielded negative results in CMV-IgM and Paul Bunnel test, while positive results in EBV anti-VCA IgM and IgG, anti-EBNA IgM and IgG, anti-p22 IgM and IgG and anti-EA IgM. In the follow-up period high levels of autoantibody positivities [rheumatoid factor (42.200 U/ml), anti-nuclear antibody (1/100) and anti-Ro-52] together with increased levels of total IgG, IgM and IgA were detected. In the following months, the levels of transaminases, total immunoglobulins and HBV-DNA have distinctively decreased, and in the 20th month the previous HBV profile regained (HBsAg, anti-HBc IgG and anti-HBe positive, anti-HBc IgM and anti-HBs negative, HBV-DNA: 6984 copies/ml) and the other pathological test results returned to normal. As a result, ALT increases seen during the course of chronic hepatitis B should not always be considered as HBV manifestations and the unusual serologic patterns should

  10. Development of antinuclear antibodies and a genetic linkage in pigs infected with porcine circovirus type 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives. Prominent nuclear immunohistochemical staining of a PCV-2 free porcine kidney cell line (PK-15) was detected with a rabbit polyclonal antibody produced against a conserved PCV2 Rep-protein peptide. This unexpected finding led us to retrospectively test sera from gnotobiotic pigs for the ...

  11. Antibodies with specificity to native gp120 and neutralization activity against primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates elicited by immunization with oligomeric gp160.

    PubMed Central

    VanCott, T C; Mascola, J R; Kaminski, R W; Kalyanaraman, V; Hallberg, P L; Burnett, P R; Ulrich, J T; Rechtman, D J; Birx, D L

    1997-01-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccine candidates elicit high antibody binding titers with neutralizing activity against T-cell line-adapted but not primary HIV-1 isolates. Serum antibodies from these human vaccine recipients were also found to be preferentially directed to linear epitopes within gp120 that are poorly exposed on native gp120. Systemic immunization of rabbits with an affinity-purified oligomeric gp160 protein formulated with either Alhydrogel or monophosphoryl lipid A-containing adjuvants resulted in the induction of high-titered serum antibodies that preferentially bound epitopes exposed on native forms of gp120 and gp160, recognized a restricted number of linear epitopes, efficiently bound heterologous strains of monomeric gp120 and cell surface-expressed oligomeric gp120/gp41, and neutralized several strains of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1. Additionally, those immune sera with the highest oligomeric gp160 antibody binding titers had neutralizing activity against some primary HIV-1 isolates, using phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell targets. Induction of an antibody response preferentially reactive with natively folded gp120/gp160 was dependent on the tertiary structure of the HIV-1 envelope immunogen as well as its adjuvant formulation, route of administration, and number of immunizations administered. These studies demonstrate the capacity of a soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein vaccine to elicit an antibody response capable of neutralizing primary HIV-1 isolates. PMID:9151820

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  13. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  14. Constant Domain-regulated Antibody Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies. PMID:22948159

  15. Immunoperoxidase inhibition assay for rabies antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Batista, H B C R; Lima, F E S; Maletich, D; Silva, A C R; Vicentini, F K; Roehe, L R; Spilki, F R; Franco, A C; Roehe, P M

    2011-06-01

    An immunoperoxidase inhibition assay (IIA) for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera is described. Diluted test sera are added to microplates with paraformaldehyde-fixed, CER cells infected with rabies virus. Antibodies in test sera compete with a rabies polyclonal rabbit antiserum which was added subsequently. Next, an anti-rabbit IgG-peroxidase conjugate is added and the reaction developed by the addition of the substrate 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The performance of the assay was compared to that of the "simplified fluorescence inhibition microtest" (SFIMT), an established virus neutralization assay, by testing 422 human sera. The IIA displayed 97.6% sensitivity, 98% specificity and 97.6% accuracy (Kappa correlation coefficient=0.9). The IIA results can be read by standard light microscopy, where the clearly identifiable specific staining is visible in antibody-negative sera, in contrast to the absence of staining in antibody-positive samples. The assay does not require monoclonal antibodies or production of large amounts of virus; furthermore, protein purification steps or specialized equipment are not necessary for its performance. The IIA was shown to be suitable for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy comparable to that of a neutralization-based assay. This assay may be advantageous over other similar methods designed to detect rabies-specific binding antibodies, in that it can be easily introduced into laboratories, provided basic cell culture facilities are available. PMID:21458492

  16. CD4 T cell epitope specificity determines follicular versus non-follicular helper differentiation in the polyclonal response to influenza infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, Zackery A G; Sant, Andrea J

    2016-01-01

    Follicular helper T cells (Tfh) are essential for B cell production of high-affinity, class-switched antibodies. Much interest in Tfh development focuses on the priming environment of CD4 T cells. Here we explored the role that peptide specificity plays in the partitioning of the polyclonal CD4 T cell repertoire between Tfh and NonTfh lineages during the response to influenza. Surprisingly, we found that CD4 T cells specific for different epitopes exhibited distinct tendencies to segregate into Tfh or NonTfh. To alter the microenvironment and abundance, viral antigens were introduced as purified recombinant proteins in adjuvant as native proteins. Also, the most prototypical epitopes were expressed in a completely foreign protein. In many cases, the epitope-specific response patterns of Tfh vs. NonTfh persisted. The functional TcR avidity of only a subset of epitope-specific cells correlated with the tendency to drive a Tfh response. Thus, we conclude that in a polyclonal CD4 T cell repertoire, features of TcR-peptide:MHC class II complex have a strong deterministic influence on the ability of CD4 T cells to become a Tfh or a NonTfh. Our data is most consistent with at least 2 checkpoints of Tfh selection that include both TcR affinity and B cell presentation. PMID:27329272

  17. CD4 T cell epitope specificity determines follicular versus non-follicular helper differentiation in the polyclonal response to influenza infection or vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Knowlden, Zackery A. G.; Sant, Andrea J.

    2016-01-01

    Follicular helper T cells (Tfh) are essential for B cell production of high-affinity, class-switched antibodies. Much interest in Tfh development focuses on the priming environment of CD4 T cells. Here we explored the role that peptide specificity plays in the partitioning of the polyclonal CD4 T cell repertoire between Tfh and NonTfh lineages during the response to influenza. Surprisingly, we found that CD4 T cells specific for different epitopes exhibited distinct tendencies to segregate into Tfh or NonTfh. To alter the microenvironment and abundance, viral antigens were introduced as purified recombinant proteins in adjuvant as native proteins. Also, the most prototypical epitopes were expressed in a completely foreign protein. In many cases, the epitope-specific response patterns of Tfh vs. NonTfh persisted. The functional TcR avidity of only a subset of epitope-specific cells correlated with the tendency to drive a Tfh response. Thus, we conclude that in a polyclonal CD4 T cell repertoire, features of TcR-peptide:MHC class II complex have a strong deterministic influence on the ability of CD4 T cells to become a Tfh or a NonTfh. Our data is most consistent with at least 2 checkpoints of Tfh selection that include both TcR affinity and B cell presentation. PMID:27329272

  18. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies reacting with the core component of lipopolysaccharide from Rhizobium leguminosarum strain 3841 and mutant derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, M M; Peart, J L; Brewin, N J; Kannenberg, E L

    1996-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reacting with the core oligosaccharide or lipid A component of Rhizobium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) could be useful for the elucidation of the structure and biosynthesis of this group of macromolecules. Mutant derivatives of Rhizobium leguminosarum 3841 with LPS structures lacking the major O-antigen moiety were used as immunogens, and eight antibodies were selected for further study. All the antibodies reacted with the fast-migrating species known as LPS-2 following gel electrophoresis of Rhizobium cell extracts. For four of these antibodies, reactivity with affinity-purified LPS was lost after mild acid hydrolysis, indicating that they probably recognized the core oligosaccharide component. The four other antibodies still reacted with acid-treated LPS and may recognize the lipid A moiety, which is stable to mild acid hydrolysis. The pattern of antibody staining after gel electrophoresis revealed differences in LPS-2 epitope structure between each of the mutants and the wild type. Furthermore, for each of the mutants the antibodies crossreacted with a minor band that migrated more slowly than LPS-2; we have termed this more slowly migrating form LPS-3. The majority of the antibodies also reacted with LPS from strain CE109, a derivative of Rhizobium etli CE3, confirming that the LPS core antigens can be relatively conserved between strains of different Rhizobium species. One of the antibodies isolated in this study (JIM 32) was unusual because it appeared to react with all forms of LPS from strain 3841 (namely, LPS-1, LPS-2, and LPS-3). Furthermore, JIM 32 reacted positively with the LPS from many strains of Rhizobium tested (excluding the Rhizobium meliloti subgroup). JIM 32 did not react with representative strains from Bradyrhizobium, Azorhizobium or other related bacterial species. PMID:8631658

  19. Interaction of periodate-oxidized target cells and cytolytic T lymphocytes: a model system of "polyclonal MHC recognition".

    PubMed

    Keren, Z; Berke, G

    1986-09-01

    In oxidation-dependent cytotoxicity (ODCC), cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) non-specifically recognize, bind to and lyse oxidized target cells (O-TC) but the precise mechanism whereby CTL react with O-TC is far from clear (Berke, G., Immunol. Rev. 1983. 72:5). Here we present evidence that CTL/O-TC interactions are blocked by aldehyde-reactive reagents such as hydroxylamine, adipic acid dihydrazide and thiocarbohydrazide and that preformed CTL/O-TC conjugates dissociate upon reduction with NaBH4, suggesting that active aldehyde groups of O-TC rather than intercellular Schiff bases are involved in the recognition and lysis of O-TC by CTL in ODCC. The aldehydes are bound to trypsin-sensitive, non-H-2 glycoproteins that appear to be different and unique in the three different target cell lines so far examined (EL4, L1210, R1.1). In view of these and previous findings we would like to suggest that in ODCC, active aldehydes react with adjacent major histocompatibility complex and perhaps other cell-surface molecules to create a multitude of modified conformations, responsible for the "polyclonal" (nonspecific) MHC recognition and lysis of O-TC by CTL, as well as for an altered pattern of H-2 antibody binding to O-TC. PMID:3019706

  20. Antibodies specific for Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 cross-react with human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, J William; deGannes, Samantha L; Pate, Kimberly A; Zhao, Xiurong

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), and antibodies to the EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) are consistently increased in MS patients. The hypothesis of this study is that anti-EBNA-1 antibodies cross-react with a self antigen in MS patients. We affinity purified anti-EBNA-1 antibodies from human plasma, used the anti-EBNA-1 to immunoprecipitate antigens from human brain, and identified bound antigens with mass spectrometry. Anti-EBNA-1 consistently bound heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (HNRNPL). We expressed both the long and short isoforms of this protein, and verified with Western blots and ELISA that the long isoform cross-reacts with EBNA-1. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that anti-EBNA-1 bound to an antigen in the nucleus of cultured rat central nervous system cells. ELISA demonstrated the presence of antibodies to HNRNPL in the plasma of both healthy controls and MS patients, but anti-HNRNPL was not increased in MS patients. We conclude that HNRNPL is an autoantigen which cross-reacts with EBNA-1. The relevance of this autoantigen to MS and other autoimmune diseases remains to be investigated. PMID:26637929

  1. Gamma scintigraphy using Tc-99m labeled antibody to human chorionic gonadotropin

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.T.; Lyster, D.M.; Alcorn, L.N.; Rhodes, B.A.; Breslow, K.; Burchiel, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    A case report is presented describing a 27-year-old woman with invasive trophoblastic hydatidiform mole metastatic to the lung. Gamma scintiscanning, using a polyclonal and monoclonal antibody specific to human chorionic gonadotropin, hCG, and labeled with Tc-99m, is described. The area of the primary lesion in the uterus was demonstrated with both antibodies tested without computer subtraction techniques; metastatic deposits in the lung were detected only with the aid of blood pool subtraction techniques.

  2. Expression of alpha and beta tropomyosin subunits during early myogenesis in somites and limb buds of chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Delezoide, A L; Pavlovitch, J H; Nato, F; Fiszman, M Y

    1989-06-01

    The appearance of alpha and beta subunits of skeletal tropomyosin in early myogenesis was studied histochemically using monoclonal antibody to alpha tropomyosin and affinity-purified polyclonal antibody to beta tropomyosin. In muscle cells, in both somites and limb buds, the alpha and beta subunits are simultaneously expressed and first appear in the somites at the 30-36 somites. The relatively greater amount of beta than alpha tropomyosin found in early myogenesis is thus likely to result from a higher rate of beta tropomyosin synthesis. PMID:2743399

  3. Affinity immunoblotting - High resolution isoelectric focusing analysis of antibody clonotype distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knisley, Keith A.; Rodkey, L. Scott

    1986-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method is proposed for the analysis of specific antibody clonotype changes occurring during an immune response and for comparing multiple sera for antibody clonotype similarities. Polyclonal serum antibodies separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF) were analyzed by an affinity immunoblotting method using antigen-coated nitrocellulose membranes. Antibodies present on the surface of the acrylamide gels following IEF bind the antigen on the nitrocellulose when the coated nitrocellulose is laid over the gels. The technique has been used to analyze Ig clonotypes specific for five protein antigens and two carbohydrate antigens. Optimal antigen concentrations for coating the nitrocellulose membranes were found to range from 10-100 microgram/ml.

  4. Biological cost of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli implicated in polyclonal infection.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Corvec, S; Guitton, C; Giraudeau, C; Le Gargasson, G; Espaze, E; Drugeon, H

    2007-07-01

    Polyclonal Escherichia coli strains were isolated in a transplanted patient who experienced successive septic shocks. Fluoroquinolone susceptible and resistant strains were corresponding to different PFGE fragment profiles. The gyrA S83L mutation was associated with a reduction in biological fitness. Resistant strain was selected by a long-term single use of ofloxacin. PMID:16884861

  5. Immunohistochemical/immunogold detection and distribution of the endosymbiont Wolbachia of Dirofilaria immitis and Brugia pahangi using a polyclonal antiserum raised against WSP (Wolbachia surface protein).

    PubMed

    Kramer, L H; Passeri, B; Corona, S; Simoncini, L; Casiraghi, M

    2003-03-01

    Intracellular bacteria in filarial nematodes were described as early as the 1970s, yet it was only with the work on Dirofilaria immitis, the agent of canine and feline heartworm disease, that these microorganisms were identified as belonging to Wolbachia, a genus known for encompassing bacteria infecting insects and other arthropods. The implications for the presence of intracellular bacteria in filarial nematodes is now the subject of intense research, particularly regarding their role in the immunology and pathogenesis of disease in infected humans and animals and as a possible target for therapy. Here, the authors report results on the immunohistochemical and immunogold staining of Wolbachia in D. immitis and Brugia pahangi using polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant Wolbachia surface protein (WSP). The bacteria were present in the lateral hypodermal chords of both male and female worms and in the reproductive tract of adult females (oocytes, morulae, microfilariae). In D. immitis and B. pahangi from animals treated with tetracycline, positive staining was observed in the lateral chords of adult males and females, but was absent from the oocytes and morulae. These results indicate that Wolbachia endosymbionts can be identified immunohistochemically with anti-WSP polyclonal antibodies, that their distribution matches that already described for Wolbachia of other filarial worms, and that antibiotic treatment may impede the vertical transmission of these bacteria. Unequivocal detection of Wolbachia is essential for the study of this symbiont, in particular to monitor the effects of antibiotic treatment on worms. The use of a specific marker for bacteria in their nematode hosts represents an extremely useful tool in evaluating the pathogenic role and the effect of antibiotic treatment on these potential targets in the control of filarial disease. PMID:12632152

  6. Heavy and light chain pairing of bivalent quadroma and knobs-into-holes antibodies analyzed by UHR-ESI-QTOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Wolfgang; Völger, Hans R; Lorenz, Stefan; Imhof-Jung, Sabine; Regula, Jörg T; Klein, Christian; Mølhøj, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The quadroma antibody represents the first attempt to produce a bispecific heterodimeric IgG antibody by somatic fusion of 2 hybridoma cells each expressing monoclonal antibodies with distinctive specificities. However, because of random heavy and light chain pairing, the desired functional bispecific antibody represents only a small fraction of the protein produced. Subsequently, the knobs-into-holes (KiH) approach was developed to enforce correct heavy chain heterodimerization. Assuming equimolar expression of 4 unmodified chains comprising 2 heavy and 2 light chains, the statistical distribution of all paired combinations can be calculated. With equimolar expression as the goal, we transfected HEK cells with 1:1:1:1 plasmid ratios and analyzed the protein A affinity-purified antibodies from the quadroma and KiH approaches qualitatively and quantitatively with regard to the estimated relative amounts of the products using electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results show that all expected species are formed, and that, within the methodological limits, the species distribution in the mixtures corresponds approximately to the statistical distribution. PMID:26496506

  7. Feasibility studies of using the Catfish Immune System to produce monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, T.M.

    1987-03-01

    The objective of these studies was to determine the feasibility of using a teleost cell line to produce monoclonal antibodies. Studies were undertaken to demonstrate the production of a polyclonal response of channel catfish (Icatalurus punctatus) challenged with mycotoxins coupled to a protein carrier. Companion studies were also performed to induce a permanent cell line with catfish lymphocytes. Attempts to demonstrate a polyclonal response to haptenized mycotoxins were inconclusive. Tests to induce an immortal, permanent cell line with benzene and x-ray irradiated cells were also inconclusive. 3 refs., 13 tabs.

  8. Anti-Echis carinatus venom antibodies from chicken egg yolk: isolation, purification and neutralization efficacy.

    PubMed

    Paul, K; Manjula, J; Deepa, E P; Selvanayagam, Z E; Ganesh, K A; Subba Rao, P V

    2007-12-01

    High titer antibodies (IgY) were raised in egg yolk of white leghorn chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) by immunizing with the venom of Echis carinatus (Saw scaled viper or carpet viper), an Indian venomous snake belonging to the family Viperidae. The anti-snake venom antibodies (antivenom) were isolated from egg yolk by the water dilution method, enriched by 19% sodium sulfate precipitation and purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. A single, electrophoretically pure IgY band of 180-200 kDa was obtained on SDS-PAGE. Immunoblot analysis revealed not only the specific binding of the antivenom but also dose-dependent blocking of antivenom by venom proteins. In neutralization studies, a preincubated mixture of both affinity-purified (50 mg/kg body weight) as well as partially purified (210 mg/kg body weight) anti-E. carinatus IgY with 2 LD(50) dose of E. carinatus venom (2 x 6.65 mg/kg body weight) gave 100% protection in mice when administered subcutaneously. PMID:17681579

  9. Monoclonal antibodies against tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and its isolated cytokine-like domain.

    PubMed

    Kondratiuk, Iuliia; Khoruzenko, Antonina; Cherednyk, Olga; Filonenko, Valeriy; Kornelyuk, Aleksander

    2013-06-01

    Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) is one of the key enzymes of protein biosynthesis. In addition to its basic role, this enzyme reveals some important non-canonical functions. Under apoptotic conditions, the full-length enzyme splits into two fragments having distinct cytokine activities, thereby linking protein synthesis to cytokine signaling pathways. The NH2-terminal catalytic fragment, known as miniTyrRS, binds strongly to the CXC-chemokine receptor CXCR1 and, like interleukin 8, functions as a chemoattractant for polymorphonuclear leukocytes. On the other hand, an extra COOH-terminal domain of human TyrRS has cytokine activities like those of a mature human endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II). Moreover, the etiology of specific diseases (cancer, neuronal pathologies, autoimmune disorders, and disrupted metabolic conditions) is connected to specific aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Here we report the generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific to N- and C-terminal domains of TyrRS. Recombinant TyrRS and its N- and C-terminal domains were expressed as His-tag fusion proteins in bacteria. Affinity purified proteins have been used as antigens for immunization and hybridoma cell screening. Monoclonal antibodies specific to catalytic N-terminal module and C-terminal EMAP II-like domain of TyrRS may be useful as tools in various aspects of TyrRS function and cellular localization. PMID:23750478

  10. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies. PMID:27606599

  11. Considerations in producing preferentially reduced half-antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Makaraviciute, Asta; Jackson, Carolyn D; Millner, Paul A; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2016-02-01

    Half-antibody fragments are a promising reagent for biosensing, drug-delivery and labeling applications, since exposure of the free thiol group in the Fc hinge region allows oriented reaction. Despite the structural variations among the molecules of different IgG subclasses and those obtained from different hosts, only generalized preferential antibody reduction protocols are currently available. Preferential reduction of polyclonal sheep anti-digoxin, rabbit anti-Escherichia coli and anti-myoglobin class IgG antibodies to half-antibody fragments has been investigated. A mild reductant 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA) and a slightly stronger reductant tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) were used and the fragments obtained were quantitatively determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. It has been shown that the yields of half-antibody fragments could be increased by lowering the pH of the reduction mixtures. However, antibody susceptibility to the reductants varied. At pH4.5 the highest yield of sheep anti-digoxin IgG half-antibody fragments was obtained with 1M 2-MEA. Conversely, rabbit IgG half-antibody fragments could only be obtained with the stronger reductant TCEP. Preferential reduction of rabbit anti-myoglobin IgG antibodies was optimized and the highest half-antibody yield was obtained with 35 mM TCEP. Finally, it has been demonstrated that produced anti-myoglobin half-IgG fragments retained their binding activity. PMID:26779832

  12. Production of monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis B surface and core antigens, and use in the detection of viral antigens in liver biopsies.

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, R. S.; Guarascio, P.; Yao, J. L.; Lord, R. B.; Eddleston, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to HBsAg and HBcAg were prepared from immunized mice. An antibody capture radioimmunoassay was used to detect and select appropriate hybrids for propagation and cloning. The advantages of this assay were discussed. The resulting monoclonal antibodies were compared with conventional polyclonal antisera for the detection of virus antigens in liver tissue and found to give excellent results. Images Plate 2 Plate 1 PMID:6337208

  13. Anti-DNA antibody production by CD5+ and CD5- B cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, N; Sakane, T; Engleman, E G

    1990-01-01

    Although the presence of anti-DNA antibody is a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), neither the subsets of B cells that secrete anti-DNA antibody nor the stimuli responsible for the induction of anti-DNA secretion is known. In particular, the role of CD5+ B cells in human SLE, a distinct subpopulation of antibody-secreting cells shown previously to be a source of anti-DNA antibody in murine models of SLE, is unknown. To approach these questions, we developed a sensitive enzyme-linked immunospot (ELIspot) assay to measure spontaneous secretion of antibody to single-stranded (ss) DNA, double-stranded (ds) DNA, tetanus toxoid, and polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) by purified CD5+ and CD5- B cells of 15 SLE patients and 15 healthy control subjects. The B cells of only 1 of 15 healthy subjects secreted a significant level of anti-ssDNA antibody, and none secreted anti-dsDNA. By contrast, in the majority of SLE patients both CD5+ and CD5- B cells secreted IgG and/or IgM anti-ssDNA as well as anti-dsDNA antibody. Further analysis of the anti-ssDNA response revealed that the level of IgG and IgM anti-DNA antibody secretion by CD5- B cells correlated closely with the level of polyclonal Ig production by the same subpopulation (r = 0.81 and 0.70, respectively). In contrast, production of anti-DNA by CD5+ B cells occurred independently of polyclonal Ig production by both CD5+ and CD5- B cell subpopulations. These results suggest that in human SLE there exist two anti-DNA antibody-producing B cell subpopulations with distinct induction mechanisms: one (CD5+), which independently secretes anti-DNA, and another (CD5-), which produces anti-DNA as an apparent consequence of polyclonal B cell activation. PMID:1688569

  14. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies raised against p300: both p300 and CBP are present in intracellular TBP complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, P B; Yaciuk, P; Moran, E

    1997-01-01

    The amino terminus of the adenovirus E1A protein is involved in E1A transforming functions, repression of tissue-specific gene expression, and E1A-mediated enhancer repression. These N-terminal functions are associated with the ability of this region of E1A to bind to p300 and CBP, two closely related cellular proteins thought to function as transcriptional adaptor molecules. Here we describe the characterization of a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies raised against E1A-affinity-purified 300-kDa proteins. The panel can be divided into two groups based on immunoprecipitation patterns. The first group consists of five p300/CBP-cross-reactive and two p300-specific monoclonal antibodies, all of which immunoprecipitate p300 and/or CBP without associated cellular proteins. In contrast, the second group immunoprecipitates p300 or both p300 and CBP in association with a complex of at least seven other cellular proteins. Taking advantage of the specificities of these monoclonal antibodies, we have identified both p300 and CBP in in vivo complexes with TBP, a finding consistent with a role for both p300 and CBP in promoting interactions between upstream promoter elements and the basal transcription apparatus. PMID:8995708

  15. Therapeutic Immunoglobulin Selected for High Antibody Titer to RSV also Contains High Antibody Titers to Other Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.; Du, Wei; Falsey, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Specific antibodies against infections most relevant to patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases are not routinely evaluated in commercial polyclonal immunoglobulin preparations. A polyclonal immunoglobulin prepared from plasma of donors having high neutralizing antibody titers to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was studied for the presence of antibody titers against seven additional respiratory viruses. While donors were not selected for antibody titers other than against RSV, the immunoglobulin preparation had significantly higher titers to 6 of 7 viruses compared to those present in 10 commercially available therapeutic immunoglobulin products (p ≤ 0.01 to p ≤ 0.001). To consider this as a donor-specific attribute, 20 random donor plasma samples were studied individually and identified a significant correlation between the RSV antibody titer and other respiratory virus titers: donors with high RSV titers were more likely to have higher titers to other respiratory viruses. These findings suggest either some humoral antiviral response bias or more frequent viral exposure of certain individuals. PMID:26379667

  16. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... test is done to confirm the cause of thyroid problems, including Hashimoto thyroiditis . The test is also ...

  17. Specificity of human anti-carbohydrate IgG antibodies as probed with polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Smorodin, E P; Kurtenkov, O A; Sergeyev, B L; Pazynina, G V; Bovin, N V

    2004-01-01

    The TF, Tn, and SiaTn glycotopes are frequently expressed in cancer-associated mucins. Antibodies to these glycotopes were found in human serum. A set of polyacrylamide (PAA)--based glycoconjugates was applied to the direct and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to characterize the specificity of serum IgG antibodies. The anti-TF, -Tn and -SiaTn IgG were affinity purified from serum of cancer patients and characterized using PAA-conjugates and free saccharides. The anti-TF and -Tn antibodies were shown to be specific. The anti-TF IgG bound both Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha- and Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta-PAA, the latter was three-four times more effective inhibitor of antibody binding. The anti-Tn IgG reacted only with GalNAcalpha-PAA. The anti-SiaTn IgG cross-reacted with Tn-PAA but SiaTn-PAA was five-six times more effective inhibitor in a competitive assay. The IC50 values for PAA-conjugates with the corresponding antibodies typically ranged from 2 to 5 x 10(-8) M. The antibodies display a low specificity to mucin-type glycoconjugates in comparison with PAA-conjugates as was shown for mucins isolated from human malignant tumor tissues, ovine submaxillary mucin (OSM) and asialo-OSM. The unusual IgG-antibody specificity to GalNAcbeta and GalNAcbeta1-3GalNAcbeta ligands was found in human serum. PMID:15001840

  18. Antibody-mediated neutralization of African swine fever virus: myths and facts.

    PubMed

    Escribano, José M; Galindo, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2013-04-01

    Almost all viruses can be neutralized by antibodies. However, there is some controversy about antibody-mediated neutralization of African swine fever virus (ASFV) with sera from convalescent pigs and about the protective relevance of antibodies in experimentally vaccinated pigs. At present, there is no vaccine available for this highly lethal and economically relevant virus and all classical attempts to generate a vaccine have been unsuccessful. This failure has been attributed, in part, to what many authors describe as the absence of neutralizing antibodies. The findings of some studies clearly contradict the paradigm of the impossibility to neutralize ASFV by means of monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. This review discusses scientific evidence of these types of antibodies in convalescent and experimentally immunized animals, the nature of their specificity, the neutralization-mediated mechanisms demonstrated, and the potential relevance of antibodies in protection. PMID:23159730

  19. Infection of Macrophages and Dendritic Cells with Primary R5-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Inhibited by Natural Polyreactive Anti-CCR5 Antibodies Purified from Cervicovaginal Secretions▿

    PubMed Central

    Eslahpazir, Jobin; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Bouhlal, Hicham; Hocini, Hakim; Carbonneil, Cédric; Grésenguet, Gérard; Kéou, François-Xavier Mbopi; LeGoff, Jérôme; Saïdi, Héla; Requena, Mary; Nasreddine, Nadine; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Bélec, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Heterosexual contact is the primary mode of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) transmission worldwide. The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major coreceptor that is associated with the mucosal transmission of R5-tropic HIV-1 during sexual intercourse. The CCR5 molecule is thus a target for antibody-based therapeutic strategies aimed at blocking HIV-1 entry into cells. We have previously demonstrated that polyreactive natural antibodies (NAbs) from therapeutic preparations of immunoglobulin G and from human breast milk contain NAbs directed against CCR5. Such antibodies inhibit the infection of human macrophages and T lymphocytes by R5-tropic isolates of HIV in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that human immunoglobulins from the cervicovaginal secretions of HIV-seronegative or HIV-seropositive women contain NAbs directed against the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. Natural affinity-purified anti-CCR5 antibodies bound to CCR5 expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells and further inhibited the infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary and laboratory-adapted R5-tropic HIV but not with X4-tropic HIV. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies moderately inhibited R5-tropic HIV transfer from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to autologous T cells. Our results suggest that mucosal anti-CCR5 antibodies from healthy immunocompetent donors may hamper the penetration of HIV and may be suitable for use in the development of novel passive immunotherapy regimens in specific clinical settings of HIV infection. PMID:18353923

  20. Effect of polyclonal activators on cytokine production by blood cells and by malignant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kunts, T A; Karpukhina, K V; Mikhaylova, E S; Marinkin, I O; Varaksin, N A; Autenshlyus, A I; Lyakhovich, V V

    2016-01-01

    The production of cytokines by peripheral blood cells and biopsy specimens of tumors stimulated by polyclonal activators (PAs) was evaluated in 34 patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Positive correlation between the stimulation index of polyclonal activators (SIPA) for IL-18 production by the tumor and the relative content of poorly differentiated cells was revealed. The latter, in turn, was positively correlated with the numbers of normal and pathologic mitoses and the degree of malignancy. Cancer cells can produce IL-18, which is involved in the process of angiogenesis, stimulates invasion and metastasis. Decrease in SIPA for the production of IL-6 and GCSF by peripheral blood cells could serve as an indicator of malignant progression in invasive ductal breast carcinoma. PMID:27021370

  1. Highly efficient immunodiagnosis of Large cardamom chirke virus using the polyclonal antiserum against Escherichia coli expressed recombinant coat protein.

    PubMed

    Vijayanandraj, S; Yogita, M; Das, Amrita; Ghosh, Amalendu; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-09-01

    Large cardamom chirke virus (LCCV), genus Macluravirus, family Potyviridae is an important constrain in large cardamom production in India. Purification of LCCV from large cardamom tissues is difficult and therefore immunodiagnostic reagents are not available. In the present study, we have successfully expressed coat protein (CP) gene of LCCV in Escherichia coli. The purification of expressed protein by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was inefficient due to precipitation of protein during renaturation. We have optimized a simple, inexpensive and efficient method for purification of the expressed CP through gel extraction with 5 % SDS followed by renaturation in Milli-Q water, which resulted in high yield (4.7 mg/ml) and good quality of the protein. A higher titer (1:256,000) polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the recombinant CP was produced, which strongly recognized LCCV in crude leaf extract and showed minimal background reaction with the healthy leaf extract in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot immunobinding assay (DIBA). The sensitivities of the ELISA and DIBA were 5 and 0.1 ng of expressed protein, respectively. Both the ELISA and DIBA were validated with 100 % accuracy in detecting LCCV in field samples. The PAb differentiated Cardamom mosaic virus, another close relative of LCCV. Our study is first to report highly efficient immunodiagnosis with PAb to E. coli expressed recombinant CP of a virus under the genus Macluravirus. The antigen expression construct and PAb developed in the present study will be useful in production of virus free planting materials of large cardamom. PMID:24426280

  2. Generation of Anti-Boa Immunoglobulin Antibodies for Serodiagnostic Applications, and Their Use to Detect Anti-Reptarenavirus Antibodies in Boa Constrictor.

    PubMed

    Korzyukov, Yegor; Hetzel, Udo; Kipar, Anja; Vapalahti, Olli; Hepojoki, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs), the key effectors of the adaptive immune system, mediate the specific recognition of foreign structures, i.e. antigens. In mammals, IgM production commonly precedes the production of IgG in the response to an infection. The reptilian counterpart of IgG is IgY, but the exact kinetics of the reptilian immune response are less well known. Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD), an often fatal disease of captive boas and pythons has been linked to reptarenavirus infection, and BIBD is believed to be immunosuppressive. However, so far, the study of the serological response towards reptarenaviruses in BIBD has been hampered by the lack of reagents. Thus we set up a purification protocol for boa constrictor IgY and IgM, which should also be applicable for other snake species. We used centrifugal filter units, poly ethylene glycol precipitation and gel permeation chromatography to purify and separate the IgM and IgY fractions from boa constrictor serum, which we further used to immunise rabbits. We affinity purified IgM and IgY specific reagents from the produced antiserum, and labelled the reagents with horseradish peroxidase. Finally, using the sera of snakes with known exposure to reptarenaviruses we demonstrated that the newly generated reagents can be utilised for serodiagnostic purposes, such as immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show reptarenavirus-specific antibodies in boa constrictors. PMID:27355360

  3. Generation of Anti-Boa Immunoglobulin Antibodies for Serodiagnostic Applications, and Their Use to Detect Anti-Reptarenavirus Antibodies in Boa Constrictor

    PubMed Central

    Korzyukov, Yegor; Hetzel, Udo; Kipar, Anja; Vapalahti, Olli; Hepojoki, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs), the key effectors of the adaptive immune system, mediate the specific recognition of foreign structures, i.e. antigens. In mammals, IgM production commonly precedes the production of IgG in the response to an infection. The reptilian counterpart of IgG is IgY, but the exact kinetics of the reptilian immune response are less well known. Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD), an often fatal disease of captive boas and pythons has been linked to reptarenavirus infection, and BIBD is believed to be immunosuppressive. However, so far, the study of the serological response towards reptarenaviruses in BIBD has been hampered by the lack of reagents. Thus we set up a purification protocol for boa constrictor IgY and IgM, which should also be applicable for other snake species. We used centrifugal filter units, poly ethylene glycol precipitation and gel permeation chromatography to purify and separate the IgM and IgY fractions from boa constrictor serum, which we further used to immunise rabbits. We affinity purified IgM and IgY specific reagents from the produced antiserum, and labelled the reagents with horseradish peroxidase. Finally, using the sera of snakes with known exposure to reptarenaviruses we demonstrated that the newly generated reagents can be utilised for serodiagnostic purposes, such as immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show reptarenavirus-specific antibodies in boa constrictors. PMID:27355360

  4. Systematic fractionation of serum antibodies using multiple antigen homologous peptides as affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Tribbick, G; Triantafyllou, B; Lauricella, R; Rodda, S J; Mason, T J; Geysen, H M

    1991-06-01

    The fractionation of polyclonal antibodies on multiple peptide ligands is described. The method is an application of a procedure for the synthesis of large numbers of peptides on individual polyethylene pins (Geysen et al., 1987). In this application, each pin-bound peptide is used as an affinity support. Antibodies bound to the peptides are then eluted, using buffers of either high or low pH. Each eluted antibody is then tested for specific binding to peptides or proteins, using ELISA procedures. A rabbit antiserum raised to gonococcal pilin was fractionated on a complete set of octapeptides homologous with the sequence of the pilin protein. Antibodies eluted from some of the peptides bound to pilin in solution. In a second example three hyperimmune sera raised to three different potyviruses were fractionated on their respective homologous peptide sequences. Testing the eluted antibodies on the three virus coat proteins revealed peptides which bound cross-reacting antibodies. Thus the method can be used to confirm direct peptide binding evidence for sequential epitopes. These peptides can then be used in affinity chromatography to increase the specificity of polyclonal sera. This can be achieved either by elution of the specific antibody from the peptide or by removal of cross-reacting antibodies from the whole serum by absorption on peptide. PMID:1904463

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans: paradigm for the role of antibody immunity against fungi?

    PubMed

    Pirofski, L A; Casadevall, A

    1996-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated fungus that is a frequent cause of life-threatening infections in patients with AIDS. C. neoformans has many similarities with encapsulated bacteria such as S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae for which antibody immunity is important in protection. However the role of antibody immunity in protection against C. neoformans has been controversial. Experiments with polyclonal sera have produced conflicting evidence for and against the importance of antibody immunity in host defense. Experiments with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to the C. neoformans capsular polysaccharide (CPS) have revealed the existence of protective, non-protective and disease-enhancing mAbs, suggesting that the divergent results obtained with polyclonal preparations may be a result of relative proportion of protective and non-protective antibodies in immune sera. Administration of protective mAbs can prolong survival, decrease organ fungal burden, and reduce serum polysaccharide antigen. In vitro experiments suggests that protective mAbs modify the course of infection by enhancing effector cell function against C. neoformans. Addition of mAb to antifungal drugs enhances their efficacy against C. neoformans in vivo and in vitro. Human-mouse chimeric antibodies with activity against C. neoformans have been constructed. A highly immunogenic capsular polysaccharide-protein vaccine has been synthesized that elicits protective antibodies in mice. Antibody immunity elicited by conjugate vaccines or provided by passive administration may be useful in the prevention treatment of human cryptococcal infections. PMID:8899968

  6. Design, expression and evaluation of a novel humanized single chain antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).

    PubMed

    Akbari, Bahman; Farajnia, Safar; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Mahdieh, Nejat; Rahmati, Mohammad; Khosroshahi, Shiva Ahdi; Rahbarnia, Leila

    2016-11-01

    Various strategies have been attempted for targeting of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), as an essential biomarker in a variety of cancers. Several anti-EGFR antibodies including cetuximab are used in clinics for treatment of EGFR-overexpressing colorectal and head and neck cancers but the efficiency of these antibodies is threatened by their large size and chimeric nature. Humanized single chains antibodies (huscFv) are smaller generation of antibodies with lower immunogenicity may overcome these limitations. This article reports production and evaluation of a novel humanized anti-EGFR scFv. The CDRs of cetuximab heavy and light chains were grafted onto human antibody frameworks as framework donors. To maintain the antigen binding affinity of murine antibody, the murine vernier zone residues were retained in framework regions of huscFv. Additionally, two point mutations in CDR-L1 and CDR-L3 and three point mutations in CDR-H2 and CDR-H3 loops of the humanized scFv (huscFv) were introduced to increase affinity of the huscFv to EGFR. Analysis of results demonstrated that the humanness degree of resultant huscFv was increased as 19%. HuscFv was expressed in BL21 (DE3) and affinity purified via Ni-NTA column. The reactivity of huscFv with EGFR was evaluated by ELISA and dot blot techniques. Analysis by ELISA and dot blot showed that the huscFv was able to recognize and react with EGFR. Toxicity analysis by MTT assay indicated an inhibitory effect on growth of EGFR-overexpressing A431 cells. In conclusion, the huscFv produced in this study revealed decreased immunogenicity while retained growth inhibitory effect on EGFR-overexpressing tumor cells. PMID:27298212

  7. Engineering Venom’s Toxin-Neutralizing Antibody Fragments and Its Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Larissa M.; Zahid, Muhammad; di Tommaso, Anne; Juste, Matthieu O.; Aubrey, Nicolas; Billiald, Philippe; Muzard, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Serum therapy remains the only specific treatment against envenoming, but anti-venoms are still prepared by fragmentation of polyclonal antibodies isolated from hyper-immunized horse serum. Most of these anti-venoms are considered to be efficient, but their production is tedious, and their use may be associated with adverse effects. Recombinant antibodies and smaller functional units are now emerging as credible alternatives and constitute a source of still unexploited biomolecules capable of neutralizing venoms. This review will be a walk through the technologies that have recently been applied leading to novel antibody formats with better properties in terms of homogeneity, specific activity and possible safety. PMID:25153256

  8. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be due to: Graves disease Hashimoto thyroiditis Hypothyroidism Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) Thyrotoxicosis Type 1 diabetes ... Antibody Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease) Graves disease Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Systemic lupus erythematosus T3 test Update Date 5/ ...

  9. PRODUCTION OF POLYCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST PELARGONIUM ZONATE SPOT VIRUS COAT PROTEIN EXPRESSED IN ESCHERICHIA COLI AND APPLICATION FOR IMMUNODIAGNOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonium zonate spot virus (PZSV), a new emerging disease on tomato in the United States, has been classified as the first member of new proposed genus, Anulavirus, within the family Bromoviridae and characterized as having unstable virions with weakly immunogenic properties. To develop serologic...

  10. Production of Polyclonal Antibodies to the Recombinant Coat Protein of Citrus tristeza virus and Their Effectiveness for Virus Detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The p25 coat protein gene of three Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates, two from Mexico and one from India, was amplified by RT-PCR and further cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The recombinant coat protein (rCP) of the three CTV isolates was injected into rabbits and goats for antibo...

  11. Disease-enhancing antibodies improve the efficacy of bacterial toxin-neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Siu-Kei; Smith, Cameron; MacCarthy, Thomas; Pohl, Mary Ann; Bergman, Aviv; Casadevall, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY During infection, humoral immunity produces a polyclonal response with various immunoglobulins recognizing different epitopes within the microbe or toxin. Despite this diverse response, the biological activity of an antibody (Ab) is usually assessed by the action of a monoclonal population. We demonstrate that a combination of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that are individually disease-enhancing or neutralizing to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA), a component of anthrax toxin, results in significantly augmented protection against the toxin. This boosted protection is Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-dependent and involves the formation of stoichiometrically defined mAb-PA complexes that requires immunoglobulin bivalence and simultaneous interaction between PA and the two mAbs. The formation of these mAb-PA complexes inhibits PA oligomerization, resulting in protection. These data suggest that functional assessments of single Abs may inaccurately predict how the same Abs will operate in polyclonal preparations and imply that potentially therapeutic mAbs may be overlooked in single Ab screens. PMID:23601104

  12. Antibody for the prevention of neonatal noscocomial staphylococcal infection: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Weisman, L E

    2007-09-01

    Staphylococci, especially coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS), are responsible for over 75 % of late-onset infections in very low birth weight infants. These infections cause increased length of hospital stay, need for antibiotics, and cost of medical care. Several drug companies have developed and evaluated hyperimmune polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies for the prevention of neonatal staphylococcal infection including 1) Altastaph by North American Biologics Inc., 2) Veronate by Inhibitex Inc., and 3) Pagibaximab by Biosynexus Inc, and Glaxo Smith Kline Inc. We will review the development and status of these potential products. Altastaph is a S. aureus serotype 5 and 8 vaccine induced hyperimmune polyclonal antibody whose development has been placed on hold due to its failure to demonstrate any trend toward efficacy in a recently completed Phase II study. Veronate is a polyclonal antibody obtained by plasmapheresis from donors with high titers of MSCRAMM (microbial surface components recognizing adhesion matrix molecules) activity against CONS whose development has been placed on hold due to its failure to demonstrate effectiveness in a recently completed Phase III study. Pagibaximab is a humanized mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody (previously known as BSYX-A110) directed against lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a major cell wall component of gram-positive bacteria, that has recently completed a Phase II study suggesting efficacy and is being developed further for clinical investigation. PMID:17939955

  13. Surface plasmon resonance biosensing: Approaches for screening and characterising antibodies for food diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yakes, B J; Buijs, J; Elliott, C T; Campbell, K

    2016-08-15

    Research in biosensing approaches as alternative techniques for food diagnostics for the detection of chemical contaminants and foodborne pathogens has increased over the last twenty years. The key component of such tests is the biorecognition element whereby polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies still dominate the market. Traditionally the screening of sera or cell culture media for the selection of polyclonal or monoclonal candidate antibodies respectively has been performed by enzyme immunoassays. For niche toxin compounds, enzyme immunoassays can be expensive and/or prohibitive methodologies for antibody production due to limitations in toxin supply for conjugate production. Automated, self-regenerating, chip-based biosensors proven in food diagnostics may be utilised as rapid screening tools for antibody candidate selection. This work describes the use of both single channel and multi-channel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors for the selection and characterisation of antibodies, and their evaluation in shellfish tissue as standard techniques for the detection of domoic acid, as a model toxin compound. The key advantages in the use of these biosensor techniques for screening hybridomas in monoclonal antibody production were the real time observation of molecular interaction and rapid turnaround time in analysis compared to enzyme immunoassays. The multichannel prototype instrument was superior with 96 analyses completed in 2h compared to 12h for the single channel and over 24h for the ELISA immunoassay. Antibodies of high sensitivity, IC50's ranging from 4.8 to 6.9ng/mL for monoclonal and 2.3-6.0ng/mL for polyclonal, for the detection of domoic acid in a 1min analysis time were selected. Although there is a progression for biosensor technology towards low cost, multiplexed portable diagnostics for the food industry, there remains a place for laboratory-based SPR instrumentation for antibody development for food diagnostics as shown herein. PMID:27260435

  14. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B lymphocytes produce natural antibodies to histones.

    PubMed

    Garzelli, C; Incaprera, M; Bazzichi, A; Manunta, M; Rognini, F; Falcone, G

    1994-03-01

    To study the mechanism(s) responsible for the appearance of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced anti-histone autoantibodies, peripheral blood B lymphocytes from healthy donors were infected with EBV and the resulting lymphoblastoid cell lines were tested for secretion of antibodies reacting with histones. It was found that EBV-transformed cells produce IgM antibody reactive with histones and that the frequency of EBV-inducible circulating B lymphocytes that produce antibodies to histones is at least 10(-5). Moreover, in cultures of tonsillar lymphoid cells, the enrichment in CD5+ B lymphocytes increases the percentage of EBV-transformed cultures making anti-histone IgM antibodies. EBV may therefore, also in vivo, induce natural anti-histone antibody by polyclonal B-cell activation without any requirement of antigen to trigger antibody response. PMID:7518420

  15. Characterization of immobilization methods of antiviral antibodies in serum for electrochemical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huy, Tran Quang; Hanh, Nguyen Thi Hong; Van Chung, Pham; Anh, Dang Duc; Nga, Phan Thi; Tuan, Mai Anh

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we describes different methods to immobilize Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) antibodies in human serum onto the interdigitated surface of a microelectrode sensor for optimizing electrochemical detection: (1) direct covalent binding to the silanized surface, (2) binding to the silanized surface via a cross-linker of glutaraldehyde (GA), (3) binding to glutaraldehyde/silanized surface via goat anti-human IgG polyclonal antibody and (4) binding to glutaraldehyde/silanized surface via protein A (PrA). Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and fluorescence microscopy are used to verify the characteristics of antibodies on the interdigitated surface after the serum antibodies immobilization. The analyzed results indicate that the use of protein A is an effective choice for immobilization and orientation of antibodies in serum for electrochemical biosensors. This study provides an advantageous immobilization method of serum containing antiviral antibodies to develop electrochemical biosensors for preliminary screening of viruses in clinical samples from outbreaks.

  16. Analysis of the role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic antibody activity in murine neonatal herpes simplex virus infection with antibodies to synthetic peptides of glycoprotein D and monoclonal antibodies to glycoprotein B.

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, S; Strynadka, N C; Hodges, R S; Pereira, L

    1990-01-01

    The role of antibody in neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection remains controversial. A battery of well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to HSV glycoprotein B (gB), and polyclonal antibodies against synthetic peptides of predicted epitopes of HSV glycoprotein D (gD) were used to determine in vitro functional activity and association with protection against lethal infection in a murine model of neonatal HSV disease. Antiviral neutralization activity of HSV was not associated with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity to HSV-infected cells in vitro. In a model of high dose challenge (10(4) PFU), protection was not afforded by any antibody alone, but was by antibody plus human mononuclear cells, and highly associated with ADCC functional activity (P less than 0.001). In a low dose challenge model, neutralizing activity of antibody alone was associated with protection in vivo (P less than 0.001). Of the nine neutralizing epitopes of gD in vitro, eight were predicted surface regions. Four of the five epitopic sites of gD (2-21, 267-276, 288-297, and 303-312) that were determined to be important targets of ADCC and in vivo protection were also predicted to be surface regions. The only exception was the antiserum to region 52-61 which was predicted to be buried and also showed these activities. ADCC as well as neutralizing antibody activity are important in protection against neonatal HSV infection. PMID:2164044

  17. Immunization with Immune Complexes Modulates the Fine Specificity of Antibody Responses to a Flavivirus Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Tsouchnikas, Georgios; Zlatkovic, Juergen; Jarmer, Johanna; Strauß, Judith; Vratskikh, Oksana; Kundi, Michael; Stiasny, Karin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The antibody response to proteins may be modulated by the presence of preexisting antigen-specific antibodies and the formation of immune complexes (ICs). Effects such as a general increase or decrease of the response as well as epitope-specific phenomena have been described. In this study, we investigated influences of IC immunization on the fine specificity of antibody responses in a structurally well-defined system, using the envelope (E) protein of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus as an immunogen. TBE virus occurs in Europe and Asia and—together with the yellow fever, dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis viruses—represents one of the major human-pathogenic flaviviruses. Mice were immunized with a dimeric soluble form of E (sE) alone or in complex with monoclonal antibodies specific for each of the three domains of E, and the antibody response induced by these ICs was compared to that seen after immunization with sE alone. Immunoassays using recombinant domains and domain combinations of TBE virus sE as well as the distantly related West Nile virus sE allowed the dissection and quantification of antibody subsets present in postimmunization sera, thus generating fine-specificity patterns of the polyclonal responses. There were substantially different responses with two of the ICs, and the differences could be mechanistically related to (i) epitope shielding and (ii) antibody-mediated structural changes leading to dissociation of the sE dimer. The phenomena described may also be relevant for polyclonal responses upon secondary infections and/or booster immunizations and may affect antibody responses in an individual-specific way. IMPORTANCE Infections with flaviviruses such as yellow fever, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) viruses pose substantial public health problems in different parts of the world. Antibodies to viral envelope protein E induced by natural infection or vaccination were shown to

  18. Platelet antibodies of the IgM class in immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Wilson, S.B.; Tomaski, A.; Schreiber, A.D.

    1985-04-01

    The clinical course and response to therapy of patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are not completely determined by the level of IgG present on the platelet surface. It is possible that antibodies of other immunoglobulin classes also play a role in platelet destruction in some of these patients. Therefore, the authors studied 175 patients with ITP for the presence of IgM anti-platelet antibodies using radiolabeled polyclonal or monoclonal anti-IgM. They observed that 57% of patients with clinical ITP had increased levels of IgM on their platelets, compared with normal controls and patients with thrombocytopenia who did not have ITP. They obtained similar results using either radiolabeled polyclonal or monoclonal anti-IgM, reagents whose integrity was first characterized using erythrocytes coated with defined amounts of IgM antibody. Among patients with increased platelet-IgM there was a significant correlation both with the presence of increased platelet-C3 as well as the amount of platelet-C3. The authors demonstrated the presence of warm-reacting IgM anti-platelet antibodies in the plasma of two of these patients who were further studied. These studies demonstrate the presence of warm-reacting IgM anti-platelet antibodies in some patients with ITP. They suggest that the binding of complement to platelets by IgM antibodies may initiate platelet clearance as well as enhance the effect of IgG antibodies in ITP.

  19. Lipoproteins are Major Targets of the Polyclonal Human T-cell Response to M. tuberculosis1

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Chetan; Turner, Marie T.; Lewinsohn, David M.; Moody, D. Branch; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2012-01-01

    Most vaccines and basic studies of T cell epitopes in M. tuberculosis emphasize water soluble proteins that are secreted into the extracellular space and presented in the context of MHC Class II. Much less is known about the role of antigens retained within the cell wall. We used polyclonal T cells from infected humans to probe for responses to immunodominant antigens in the M. tuberculosis cell wall. We found that the magnitude of response to secreted or cell wall intrinsic compounds was similar among healthy controls, patients with latent tuberculosis, and patients with active tuberculosis. Individual responses to secreted antigens and cell wall extract were strongly correlated (r2=0.495, p=0.001), suggesting that T cells responding to cell wall and secreted antigens are present at similar frequency. Surprisingly, T cell stimulatory factors intrinsic to the cell wall partition into organic solvents; however, these responses are not explained by CD1-mediated presentation of lipids. Instead, we find that molecules soluble in organic solvents are dependent upon MHC Class II and recognized by IFN-γ secreting CD4+ T cells. We reasoned that MHC Class II dependent antigens extracting into lipid mixtures might be found among triacylated lipoproteins present in mycobacteria. We used M. tuberculosis lacking prolipoprotein signal peptidase A (lspA), an enzyme required for lipoprotein synthesis, to demonstrate loss of polyclonal T cell responses. Our results demonstrate the use of bacterial genetics to identify lipoproteins as an unexpected and immunodominant class of cell wall-associated antigens targeted by the polyclonal human T cell response to M. tuberculosis. PMID:23197260

  20. Bispecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kontermann, Roland E; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) combine specificities of two antibodies and simultaneously address different antigens or epitopes. BsAbs with 'two-target' functionality can interfere with multiple surface receptors or ligands associated, for example with cancer, proliferation or inflammatory processes. BsAbs can also place targets into close proximity, either to support protein complex formation on one cell, or to trigger contacts between cells. Examples of 'forced-connection' functionalities are bsAbs that support protein complexation in the clotting cascade, or tumor-targeted immune cell recruiters and/or activators. Following years of research and development (R&D), the first bsAb was approved in 2009. Another bsAb entered the market in December 2014 and several more are in clinical trials. Here, we describe the potentials of bsAbs to become the next wave of antibody-based therapies, focusing on molecules in clinical development. PMID:25728220

  1. Brucella fractions behave as nonspecific mitogens and polyclonal B-cell activators for human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, J P; Rabesandratana, H; Huguet, M F; Cannat, A; Serre, A

    1985-01-01

    Two lipid-A-free fractions which were extracted from Brucella melitensis and were designated PI and SF stimulated human unsensitized mononuclear cells to proliferate and to secrete immunoglobulins. Both of these effects were observed in cultures of peripheral blood, tonsils, and cord blood lymphocytes. Neither B cells nor T cells alone proliferated in the presence of these fractions, whereas the proliferative response of T cells plus B cells was largely independent of accessory cells. Polyclonal activation was estimated by counting the cells which secreted immunoglobulins of different isotypes into culture supernatants. This phenomenon was strongly T dependent. PMID:3876286

  2. Individual Plasmodium vivax msp1 Variants within Polyclonal P. vivax Infections Display Different Propensities for Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Jonathan J.; Kharabora, Oksana; Sem, Rithy; Lin, Feng-Chang; Muth, Sinuon; Ménard, Didier; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Rogers, William O.; Meshnick, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Using a newly developed Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 gene (Pvmsp1) heteroduplex tracking assay, we genotyped 107 P. vivax infections in individuals from Cambodia, 45 of whom developed recurrent parasitemia within 42 days. The majority of isolates were polyclonal, but recurrent parasitemias displayed fewer variants compared to initial parasitemias. Two Pvmsp1 gene variants occurred more frequently in the initial genotypes of those who developed recurrent parasitemia, representing the first time P. vivax variants associated with a higher risk of relapse have been described. PMID:22205791

  3. Antibodies to the Plasmodium falciparum Proteins MSPDBL1 and MSPDBL2 Opsonize Merozoites, Inhibit Parasite Growth, and Predict Protection From Clinical Malaria.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chris Y H; Hodder, Anthony N; Lin, Clara S; Hill, Danika L; Li Wai Suen, Connie S N; Schofield, Louis; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Cowman, Alan F; Hansen, Diana S

    2015-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that antibodies against merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) play an important role in clinical immunity to malaria. Two unusual members of the MSP-3 family, merozoite surface protein duffy binding-like (MSPDBL)1 and MSPDBL2, have been shown to be extrinsically associated to MSP-1 on the parasite surface. In addition to a secreted polymorphic antigen associated with merozoite (SPAM) domain characteristic of MSP-3 family members, they also contain Duffy binding-like (DBL) domain and were found to bind to erythrocytes, suggesting that they play a role in parasite invasion. Antibody responses to these proteins were investigated in a treatment-reinfection study conducted in an endemic area of Papua New Guinea to determine their contribution to naturally acquired immunity. Antibodies to the SPAM domains of MSPDBL1 and MSPDBL2 as well as the DBL domain of MSPDBL1 were found to be associated with protection from Plasmodium falciparum clinical episodes. Moreover, affinity-purified anti-MSPDBL1 and MSPDBL2 were found to inhibit in vitro parasite growth and had strong merozoite opsonizing capacity, suggesting that protection targeting these antigens results from ≥2 distinct effector mechanisms. Together these results indicate that MSPDBL1 and MSPDBL2 are important targets of naturally acquired immunity and might constitute potential vaccine candidates. PMID:25646353

  4. Production and characterization of antibodies against fumigaclavine A.

    PubMed

    Latif, Hadri; Curtui, Valeriu; Ackermann, Yvonne; Groß, Madeleine; Usleber, Ewald

    2009-10-01

    Polyclonal antibodies against fumigaclavine A (FuA) were obtained from rabbits after immunization with a FuA-keyhole limpet hemocyanine conjugate prepared by formaldehyde condensation. Using these antibodies and a FuA-bovine serum albumine conjugate, a competitive indirect enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was established. The antiserum obtained from one rabbit enabled highly sensitive detection of FuA, with an IC50 level and detection limit of the standard curve of 3.3 ng/ml and approx. 1 ng/ml, respectively. The EIA was very specific for FuA, with 1.3% cross-reactivity with FuB. Several other lysergic acid derivatives (ergonovine, ergotamine, alpha-ergocryptine) were tested but did not cross-react in the FuA EIA. This is the first description of antibodies against FuA and the first development of an EIA for FuA. PMID:23605095

  5. The production and characterisation of dinitrocarbanilide antibodies raised using antigen mimics.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Lisa; Fodey, Terence L; Crooks, Steven R H; Delahaut, Philippe; Elliott, Christopher T

    2002-06-01

    Polyclonal antibodies were produced to detect the coccidiostat nicarbazin. Due to structural constraints of the active component of nicarbazin, dinitrocarbanilide (DNC), three different compounds that shared a common substructure with DNC were used as antigen mimics. The compounds (N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine 4-nitroanilide (SAN), L-glutamic acid gamma-(p-nitroanilide) (GAN) and p-nitrosuccinanilic acid (NSA)) were conjugated to a carrier protein and used in the immunisation of rabbits. Five different polyclonal sera were produced and consequently characterised. The antibodies exhibited an IC(50) range of 2.3-7.6 ng/ml using a competitive ELISA procedure. Serum from one rabbit, R555, exhibited an IC(50) of 2.9 ng/ml for DNC and cross-reactivity studies showed that this serum was specific for DNC and did not cross-react with other coccidiostats such as halofuginone, toltrazuril or ronidazole. PMID:12191508

  6. Expression, purification and antibody preparation of PCV2 Rep and ORF3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhiyuan; Ma, Teng; Pang, Daxin; Su, Dan; Chen, Fuwang; Chen, Xinrong; Guo, Ning; Ouyang, Ting; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Ren, Linzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rep and ORF3 proteins are important functional proteins of porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2). Here, Rep and ORF3 genes were cloned, expressed and used to raise polyclonal antibodies. The result showed the recombinant plasmids of Rep and ORF3 genes constructed in this study were expressed efficiently in the prokaryotic system, and the recombinant proteins had antigenicity and immunogenicity. Furthermore, reactivity and specificity of the antiserums were characterized by western blot and indirect immunofluorescent assays. The results elucidated that polyclonal antiserum prepared with Rep or ORF3 had good reactivity and specificity against PCV2, or the Rep and ORF3 expressed in PK-15 cells, respectively. The Rep protein is promising for PCV2 antibody and vaccine development. These results will be helpful for further studies focusing on pathogenesis of PCV2 and serology diagnostic test or vaccine development against PCV2. PMID:26812108

  7. Single-domain antibody based thermally stable electrochemical immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aparajita; Pasha, Syed Khalid; Manickam, Pandiaraj; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2016-09-15

    Conventional monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are sensitive to changes in environmental factors such as temperature, pH, humidity, etc. This limits the current cost-effective and portable electrochemical immunosensors in harsh environments. Using Ricin Chain-A, a naturally occurring toxin, as a model analyte we report fabrication of a thermally stable electrochemical immunosensor. Single-domain antibodies (sdAb) or nanobodies have been employed as recognition elements for direct detection of Ricin at temperatures great than 4°C. Immunosensor fabricated using the conventional Ricin monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies have also been demonstrated for comparison. In the case of sdAb immunosensor, Ricin was detected in a linear range of 1log(fg/mL)-1log(μg/mL) with a sensitivity of 0.07μA/log(g/mL)/cm(2) using cyclic voltammetry. The fabricated miniaturized sensors have demonstrated higher shelf life and stability at temperatures up to 40°C. Therefore these electrochemical sensors can be integrated as a part of a portable device for point-of-care immunosensing. PMID:27125838

  8. Polyclonal breast cancer metastases arise from collective dissemination of keratin 14-expressing tumor cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kevin J; Padmanaban, Veena; Silvestri, Vanesa; Schipper, Koen; Cohen, Joshua D; Fairchild, Amanda N; Gorin, Michael A; Verdone, James E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Bader, Joel S; Ewald, Andrew J

    2016-02-16

    Recent genomic studies challenge the conventional model that each metastasis must arise from a single tumor cell and instead reveal that metastases can be composed of multiple genetically distinct clones. These intriguing observations raise the question: How do polyclonal metastases emerge from the primary tumor? In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to demonstrate that polyclonal seeding by cell clusters is a frequent mechanism in a common mouse model of breast cancer, accounting for >90% of metastases. We directly observed multicolored tumor cell clusters across major stages of metastasis, including collective invasion, local dissemination, intravascular emboli, circulating tumor cell clusters, and micrometastases. Experimentally aggregating tumor cells into clusters induced a >15-fold increase in colony formation ex vivo and a >100-fold increase in metastasis formation in vivo. Intriguingly, locally disseminated clusters, circulating tumor cell clusters, and lung micrometastases frequently expressed the epithelial cytoskeletal protein, keratin 14 (K14). RNA-seq analysis revealed that K14(+) cells were enriched for desmosome and hemidesmosome adhesion complex genes, and were depleted for MHC class II genes. Depletion of K14 expression abrogated distant metastases and disrupted expression of multiple metastasis effectors, including Tenascin C (Tnc), Jagged1 (Jag1), and Epiregulin (Ereg). Taken together, our findings reveal K14 as a key regulator of metastasis and establish the concept that K14(+) epithelial tumor cell clusters disseminate collectively to colonize distant organs. PMID:26831077

  9. Polyclonal breast cancer metastases arise from collective dissemination of keratin 14-expressing tumor cell clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Kevin J.; Padmanaban, Veena; Silvestri, Vanesa; Schipper, Koen; Cohen, Joshua D.; Fairchild, Amanda N.; Gorin, Michael A.; Verdone, James E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Bader, Joel S.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic studies challenge the conventional model that each metastasis must arise from a single tumor cell and instead reveal that metastases can be composed of multiple genetically distinct clones. These intriguing observations raise the question: How do polyclonal metastases emerge from the primary tumor? In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to demonstrate that polyclonal seeding by cell clusters is a frequent mechanism in a common mouse model of breast cancer, accounting for >90% of metastases. We directly observed multicolored tumor cell clusters across major stages of metastasis, including collective invasion, local dissemination, intravascular emboli, circulating tumor cell clusters, and micrometastases. Experimentally aggregating tumor cells into clusters induced a >15-fold increase in colony formation ex vivo and a >100-fold increase in metastasis formation in vivo. Intriguingly, locally disseminated clusters, circulating tumor cell clusters, and lung micrometastases frequently expressed the epithelial cytoskeletal protein, keratin 14 (K14). RNA-seq analysis revealed that K14+ cells were enriched for desmosome and hemidesmosome adhesion complex genes, and were depleted for MHC class II genes. Depletion of K14 expression abrogated distant metastases and disrupted expression of multiple metastasis effectors, including Tenascin C (Tnc), Jagged1 (Jag1), and Epiregulin (Ereg). Taken together, our findings reveal K14 as a key regulator of metastasis and establish the concept that K14+ epithelial tumor cell clusters disseminate collectively to colonize distant organs. PMID:26831077

  10. A deep sequencing tool for partitioning clearance rates following antimalarial treatment in polyclonal infections

    PubMed Central

    Mideo, Nicole; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Hathaway, Nicholas J.; Ngasala, Billy; Saunders, David L.; Lon, Chanthap; Kharabora, Oksana; Jamnik, Andrew; Balasubramanian, Sujata; Björkman, Anders; Mårtensson, Andreas; Meshnick, Steven R.; Read, Andrew F.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Current tools struggle to detect drug-resistant malaria parasites when infections contain multiple parasite clones, which is the norm in high transmission settings in Africa. Our aim was to develop and apply an approach for detecting resistance that overcomes the challenges of polyclonal infections without requiring a genetic marker for resistance. Methodology: Clinical samples from patients treated with artemisinin combination therapy were collected from Tanzania and Cambodia. By deeply sequencing a hypervariable locus, we quantified the relative abundance of parasite subpopulations (defined by haplotypes of that locus) within infections and revealed evolutionary dynamics during treatment. Slow clearance is a phenotypic, clinical marker of artemisinin resistance; we analyzed variation in clearance rates within infections by fitting parasite clearance curves to subpopulation data. Results: In Tanzania, we found substantial variation in clearance rates within individual patients. Some parasite subpopulations cleared as slowly as resistant parasites observed in Cambodia. We evaluated possible explanations for these data, including resistance to drugs. Assuming slow clearance was a stable phenotype of subpopulations, simulations predicted that modest increases in their frequency could substantially increase time to cure. Conclusions and implications: By characterizing parasite subpopulations within patients, our method can detect rare, slow clearing parasites in vivo whose phenotypic effects would otherwise be masked. Since our approach can be applied to polyclonal infections even when the genetics underlying resistance are unknown, it could aid in monitoring the emergence of artemisinin resistance. Our application to Tanzanian samples uncovers rare subpopulations with worrying phenotypes for closer examination. PMID:26817485

  11. Promotion of remyelination by polyclonal immunoglobulin in Theiler's virus-induced demyelination and in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    van Engelen, B G; Miller, D J; Pavelko, K D; Hommes, O R; Rodriguez, M

    1994-01-01

    Spontaneous remyelination occurs in experimental models of demyelination and in patients with multiple sclerosis, although to a limited extent. This enables the search for factors that promote remyelination. Using the Theiler's virus model of central nervous system demyelination, promotion of remyelination was observed after passive transfer of CNS-specific antiserum and transfer of CNS-specific purified immunoglobulin. Mouse polyclonal immunoglobulin from normal non-syngeneic mice, comparable with the human immunoglobulin preparation, also promotes CNS remyelination in the Theiler's virus model of multiple sclerosis. These experimental findings further bridge the gap with a pilot study that suggests clinical improvement after polyclonal immunoglobulin administration, possibly due to remyelination, in some multiple sclerosis patients with stable, steroid-unresponsive optic neuritis. In view of these experimental and clinical data, the physiological role of myelin in demyelination and remyelination is discussed, and the role of IgG solely as a deleterious molecule in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis and experimental demyelination is addressed. PMID:7964859

  12. Reactivity of human anti-alpha-galactosyl IgG antibody with alpha(1-->3)-linked galactosyl epitopes exposed on basement membranes and on glomerular epithelial cells: an in vitro and in vivo study in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Vecchi, M L; Davin, J C; Castronovo, V; Foidart, J M; Malaise, M; Foidart, J B; Dechene, C; Sangiorgi, G B; Mahieu, P

    1989-01-01

    Anti-alpha-galactosyl antibody (a-Gal Ab) is a human natural antibody belonging to the IgG class, found in high titres in all normal sera regardless of blood group, and specifically recognizing alpha (1-->3)-linked galactosyl residues. We have observed by radioimmunoassay, ELISA, passive haemagglutination and immunofluorescence blocking studies that affinity-purified a-Gal Ab reacted with mouse laminin, but not with the other mouse basement membrane proteins tested; it was able to fix complement in vitro. When injected intravenously into mice, the a-Gal Ab was found to mainly accumulate in kidneys, liver, spleen and lungs. No acute respiratory distress syndrome was observed shortly after the i.v. injection of 100 or 200 microg of antibodies. These doses of a-Gal Ab were also unable to induce acute glomerular injury. However, in primary cultures, the a-Gal Ab (100 or 200 microg per ml of medium) was shown to impair the attachment of mouse glomerular epithelial cells to mouse laminin and to elicit complement-dependent cell damage. The data indicate that the a-Gal Ab can interact in vitro and/or in vivo with alpha (1-->3)-linked galactosyl residues exposed on murine laminin or on murine cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Although this antibody fails to be pathogenic when administered at low doses in the intact animal, similar doses can alter some metabolic properties of these cells in vitro. PMID:12412761

  13. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb Images Blood test References Guber HA, Faraq AF. Evaluation of endocrine function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical ...

  14. Internal-image anti-idiotype HIV-1gp120 antibody in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive individuals with thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Nardi, M A; Kouri, Y H

    1992-01-01

    Anti-CD4 antibody was found in 30% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-seropositive thrombocytopenic patients compared with 5% of nonthrombocytopenic seropositive patients (chi 2 = 21.7, P less than 0.001) and was shown by the following observations to contain internal-image anti-idiotype antibody (Ab2) directed against the antibody (Ab1) to gp120, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein that binds to CD4: (i) affinity-purified anti-CD4 (Ab2) bound to affinity-purified anti-HIV-1gp120 (Ab1) on solid-phase radioimmunoassay, and binding could be blocked by recombinant CD4 (rCD4) as well as recombinant gp120 (rgp120); (ii) F(ab')2 fragments of Ab1 inhibited the binding of Ab2 to rCD4; (iii) Ab2 inhibited the binding of Ab1 to HIV-1 beads; (iv) Ab2 inhibited the binding of Ab1 to gp120 on immunoblot; (v) Ab2 bound to the CD4 receptor on a CD4-bearing T-cell line, H9; (vi) Ab3 (anti-rgp120) could be produced in vivo by immunizing mice with Ab2, and binding of Ab3 to rgp120 could be blocked with rCD4; and (vii) three different Ab2 preparations bound to two different homologous Ab1 preparations. Ab1 or Ab2 alone did not bind to platelets, whereas the idiotype-anti-idiotype complex did bind to platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. Binding of the internal-image complex was 10-fold greater than that of a non-internal-image Ab1-Ab2 complex composed of anti-HIV-1gp120 and anti-anti-HIV-1gp120. Thus, patients with HIV-1 thrombocytopenia contain internal-image idiotype-anti-idiotype complexes that could be affecting CD4 cell number or function, inhibiting HIV-1 binding to CD4 cells or contributing to HIV-1 thrombocytopenia. Images PMID:1741404

  15. Subsetting of acetylcholine receptor-reactive antibodies by preparative isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P A; Krolick, K A

    1991-01-01

    The antibodies produced against most foreign antigens are composed of a family of immunoglobulins, a family composed of members that are of a number that often reflects the size/complexity of the molecule that stimulates their production. In other words, such responses involve the activation of a "polyclonal" B lymphocyte population. The antibody products of the B cells, although all capable of binding the original antigen, bind at various immunogenic sites (epitopes) on that antigen. Such differences in antigen-binding fine specificity is determined by amino acid residues in the antibody variable region domains found associated with the antigen combining site and tend to have a complimentary biochemistry with the molecule for which they are intended to interact. Furthermore, in addition to amino acid differences that dictate the isotypes and allotypes of antibody molecules, differences in the amino acids that compose the variable regions can produce differences in net charge of particular antibody molecules; thus, families of polyclonal antibodies, all reactive with the same antigen but with different fine specificities, can be separated and, as shown below, purified based on their isoelectric points by preparative isoelectric focusing (pIEF). PMID:1780274

  16. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today. PMID:26936774

  17. Immunoglobulin G is the main protective antibody in mouse vaginal secretions after vaginal immunization with attenuated herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Parr, E L; Parr, M B

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the protective role of antibodies in vaginal secretions of mice that were immune to vaginal challenge with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Unfractionated vaginal immunoglobulins from immune and nonimmune mice and affinity-purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) and secretory IgA (S-IgA) from immune secretions were adjusted to their concentrations in vivo. Wild-type HSV-2 was incubated in the immunoglobulin preparations for 15 min in vitro, followed by inoculation into vaginae of nonimmune mice. HSV-2 was neutralized by unfractionated antibody and purified IgG from immune secretions but not by unfractionated nonimmune antibody or by purified immune S-IgA. The protective effect of IgG in vivo was investigated by passively transferring purified serum IgG from immune and nonimmune donors to nonimmune recipients before vaginal challenge infection. Immune IgG significantly reduced the percentage of vaginal epithelium infected, concentrations of shed virus protein in the vaginal lumen, and illness scores, even though the viral antibody titers in serum and vaginal secretions of recipient mice at the time of challenge were only 29 and 8%, respectively, of those in actively immunized mice. Additionally, removal of vaginal secretions from immune mice 10 min before vaginal challenge with HSV-2 significantly increased the concentration of shed virus protein in the vaginal lumen after challenge. Collectively, the data indicate that IgG antibody in vaginal secretions of immune mice provides early protection against vaginal challenge infection, probably by neutralizing virus in the vaginal lumen. In contrast, S-IgA antibody contributed relatively little to immune protection of the vagina. PMID:9343160

  18. Detection of enterovirus 70 with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L J; Hatch, M H; Flemister, M R; Marchetti, G E

    1984-09-01

    To improve the ability to identify enterovirus-70 (EV-70) from patients with acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, we developed four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to EV-70. We reacted the four MAbs against nine previously characterized strains of EV-70 and heterologous viruses by virus neutralization, indirect immunofluorescence, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two of the MAbs neutralized all nine strains of EV-70 and none of the other enterovirus types tested. Two of the MAbs gave a positive reaction with all nine strains by indirect immunofluorescence, and three reacted with all nine strains by ELISA. None of the MAbs gave a positive reaction with heterologous viruses, including those associated with eye disease, by indirect immunofluorescence or ELISA. The two neutralizing MAbs failed to give a positive reaction with some of the strains of EV-70 by indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA, yet they neutralized these viruses. By ELISA with a polyclonal serum as capture antibody and a mixture of MAbs as detector antibody, we were able to detect from 10(2.2) to 10(5.8) 50% tissue culture infective doses of virus and to type lyophilized isolates of EV-70 sent from Taiwan from which we could not recover infectious virus. By choosing the appropriate MAb, or mixture of MAbs, we could construct a test which had the type specificity and strain sensitivity needed to type isolates of EV-70. PMID:6092426

  19. Detection of enterovirus 70 with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, L J; Hatch, M H; Flemister, M R; Marchetti, G E

    1984-01-01

    To improve the ability to identify enterovirus-70 (EV-70) from patients with acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, we developed four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to EV-70. We reacted the four MAbs against nine previously characterized strains of EV-70 and heterologous viruses by virus neutralization, indirect immunofluorescence, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two of the MAbs neutralized all nine strains of EV-70 and none of the other enterovirus types tested. Two of the MAbs gave a positive reaction with all nine strains by indirect immunofluorescence, and three reacted with all nine strains by ELISA. None of the MAbs gave a positive reaction with heterologous viruses, including those associated with eye disease, by indirect immunofluorescence or ELISA. The two neutralizing MAbs failed to give a positive reaction with some of the strains of EV-70 by indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA, yet they neutralized these viruses. By ELISA with a polyclonal serum as capture antibody and a mixture of MAbs as detector antibody, we were able to detect from 10(2.2) to 10(5.8) 50% tissue culture infective doses of virus and to type lyophilized isolates of EV-70 sent from Taiwan from which we could not recover infectious virus. By choosing the appropriate MAb, or mixture of MAbs, we could construct a test which had the type specificity and strain sensitivity needed to type isolates of EV-70. PMID:6092426

  20. Legionella micdadei and Legionella dumoffii monoclonal antibodies for laboratory diagnosis of Legionella infections.

    PubMed Central

    Cercenado, E; Edelstein, P H; Gosting, L H; Sturge, J C

    1987-01-01

    Two different monoclonal antibodies directed against Legionella micdadei and L. dumoffii (Genetic Systems Corp., Seattle, Wash.) were evaluated for their specificity and ability to detect L. micdadei and L. dumoffii in human and animal clinical samples and bacterial isolates in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. All three frozen sputum samples and all three Formalin-fixed sputum and liver samples from patients with culture-documented L. micdadei pneumonia were positive when tested with the L. micdadei monoclonal antibody. A Formalin-preserved lung sample from a patient with culture-documented L. dumoffii pneumonia was positive with its homologous monoclonal antibody. No cross-staining reactions were found with either monoclonal antibody on any of 25 human sputum samples tested from patients without Legionella infections. A total of 66 Legionella strains and 56 non-Legionella strains including 22 Pseudomonas strains and 34 other bacterial strains were studied. No cross-staining reactions were found except in Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 ATCC 12598. The lower limit of detection in seeded sputum samples was about 7 X 10(4) cells per ml for both monoclonal antibodies. Lung and tracheal lavage specimens from L. micdadei- or L. dumoffii-infected guinea pigs showed specific staining only with their respective monoclonal antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies stained homologous bacteria slightly less intensely than did the polyclonal antisera, but the signal-to-noise ratio was considerably higher for the monoclonal antibodies. No differences in sensitivity of staining of clinical specimens or bacterial isolates were noted between the monoclonal antibodies and the polyclonal reagents for L. micdadei and L. dumoffii (Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga., and BioDx, Denville, N.J. These monoclonal antibodies ae sensitive and specific, making them good candidates for laboratory diagnostic purposes. PMID:3320084

  1. A comparative study of two PODXL antibodies in 840 colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Podocalyxin (PODXL) is a transmembrane sialomucin, whose aberrant expression and/or allelic variation associates with poor prognosis and unfavourable clinicopathological characteristics in different cancers. Membranous expression of PODXL has been suggested to be an independent marker of poor prognosis in colorectal cancer (CRC), and previously by an in-house monoclonal antibody, we showed that also cytoplasmic overexpression of PODXL predicts poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare two PODXL antibodies with different epitopes case-by-case in CRC patients. Methods Of 840 consecutively operated CRC patients from Helsinki University Central Hospital, PODXL expression by polyclonal HPA 2110 antibody was evaluated from 780. Associations of PODXL expression with clinicopathological parameters and the impact of PODXL expression on survival were assessed. Kappa-value was used to assess the comparability of the two antibodies. Results Membranous PODXL expression associated with unfavourable clinicopathological parameters and with higher risk for disease-specific death from CRC within 5 years (unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.90; 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.32-2.75); adjusted HR = 1.64; 95% CI (1.11-2.43)). The comparability of expressions by the two antibodies was low (kappa =0.219, standard error 0.060, p < 0.0001). Combination of two antibodies identified a group of patients with even worse prognosis (unadjusted HR = 6.00; 95% CI (3.27-13.0); adjusted HR = 2.14; 95% CI (1.12-4.07)). Conclusion Membranous expression by the polyclonal PODXL antibody and cytoplasmic overexpression by the monocolonal PODXL antibody are both independent markers of poor prognosis, but they recognise different groups of patients, both of which have poor prognosis. The combined use of the antibodies reveals a group with an even worse prognosis. The biological reasons for the difference between antibodies warrant further studies. PMID:25004935

  2. Affinity and catalytic heterogeneity of polyclonal myelin basic protein-hydrolyzing IgGs from sera of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Legostaeva, Galina A; Polosukhina, Dar’ya I; Bezuglova, Anna M; Doronin, Boris M; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Human myelin basic protein (hMBP)-hydrolyzing activity was recently shown to be an intrinsic property of antibodies (Abs) from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Here, we present the first evidence demonstrating a significant diversity of different fractions of polyclonal IgGs (pIgGs) from MS patients in their affinity for hMBP and in the ability of pIgGs to hydrolyze hBMP at different optimal pHs (3–10.5). IgGs containing λ- and κ-types of light chains demonstrated comparable relative activities in the hydrolysis of hMBP. IgGs of IgG1–IgG4 sub-classes were analyzed for catalytic activity. IgGs of all four sub-classes were catalytically active, with their contribution to the total activity of Abzs in the hydrolysis of hMBP and its 19-mer oligopeptide increasing in the order: IgG1 (1.5–2.1%) < IgG2 (4.9–12.8%) < IgG3 (14.7–25.0%) < IgG4 (71–78%). Our findings suggest that the immune systems of individual MS patients generate a variety of anti-hMBP abzymes with different catalytic properties, which can attack hMBP of myelin-proteolipid shell of axons, playing an important role in MS pathogenesis. PMID:19438809

  3. Anti-La (SS-B) but not anti-Ro52 (SS-A) antibodies cross-react with laminin--a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart block?

    PubMed

    Li, J M; Horsfall, A C; Maini, R N

    1995-03-01

    Cross-reactions between maternally derived autoantibodies and fetal cardiac antigens have been postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart block (CHB). We have explored the cross-reactivity of autoantibodies to the small ribonuclear autoantigens, La/SS-B and Ro/SS-A, with laminin, the major component of cardiac sarcolemmal membrane using affinity-purified antibodies from patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Anti-La antibodies purified from eight of 10 patients cross-reacted significantly with mouse laminin by ELISA. In contrast, purified antibodies to Ro52 from the same 10 patients showed little or no binding to laminin. Laminin inhibited up to 70% binding of anti-La antibodies to La antigen, and La inhibited up to 65% binding of anti-La antibodies to laminin. The cross-reaction was further examined on cryosections of 10 human fetal hearts aged from 8.7 to 14.9 weeks of gestation, two normal adult hearts, and one pathological adult heart with a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Anti-Ro52 antibodies did not bind to the surface of cardiac cells. However, anti-La antibodies from seven of 10 patients tested bound to the surface of fetal myocytes from hearts aged 9.4 to 14.9 weeks of gestation, and also to the myocytes from the pathological adult heart but not to normal adult hearts. Preincubation with La antigen abolished the binding of anti-La antibodies to the surface of adult heart myocytes with dilated cardiomyopathy, and pre-incubation with mouse laminin could partially block this binding. These results suggest that molecular mimicry between laminin and La, but not Ro52, may act as a target for specific maternal autoantibodies, and contribute to the pathogenesis of CHB at a critical stage during fetal cardiac development. PMID:7882552

  4. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic demonstration of polyclonality in an acinic cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, C.; Jin, Y.; Höglund, M.; Wennerberg, J.; Akervall, J.; Willén, R.; Dictor, M.; Mandahl, N.; Mitelman, F.; Mertens, F.

    1998-01-01

    The paradigm that human malignancies are monoclonal has been questioned during recent years by the finding of unrelated, cytogenetically aberrant clones in short-term cultures from certain tumour types, notably carcinomas of the breast, skin and upper aerodigestive tract. In order to analyse whether cytogenetically unrelated clones are also unrelated at the molecular level, we analysed the X-chromosome inactivation status in cell cultures from a cytogenetically highly polyclonal acinic cell carcinoma of the parotid gland. By using cell cultures dominated by a single abnormal clone, obtained through in vitro culturing for 3-5 passages, we showed that the different clones must indeed have originated from different cells. Images Figure 2 PMID:9703273

  5. Functional T-cell anergy in a case of persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mitterer, Manfred; Lanthaler, Andrea J; Irschick, Eveline U; Engelmann, Hartmut; Larcher, Clara; Huemer, Hartwig P

    2005-12-01

    The T-cell population of a patient with persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (PPBL) presenting with an intermittent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated disease was studied. Unstimulated T-cells did not express CD40 ligand (CD40L), whereas activation with IL-2 led to expression of this costimulatory molecule. CD40L expression was inhibited upon incubation with the supernatant of an EBV-positive B-cell line (SM) which had been grown spontaneously from the patient's peripheral blood cells. The supernatant of SM cells effectively inhibited cytotoxic T-cells. Elevated levels of IL-10, TNF-alpha and soluble CD40 were found in the supernatant of SM cells. Additionally, enhanced levels of LMP-1 protein were detected. PMID:15979703

  6. Antiphospholipid Antibodies Bind ATP: A putative Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Neuronal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J.; Soloveichick, L.; Shavit, S.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Korczyn, A. D.

    2005-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) generated in experimental animals cross-react with ATP. We therefore examined the possibility that aPL IgG from human subjects bind to ATP by affinity column and an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sera with high levels of aPL IgG were collected from 12 patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). IgG fractions from 10 of 12 APS patients contained aPL that could be affinity-bound to an ATP column and completely eluted with NaCl 0.5 M. A significant (>50%) inhibition of aPL IgG binding by ATP 5 mM was found in the majority. Similar inhibition was obtained with ADP but not with AMP or cAMP. All the affinity purified anti-ATP antibodies also bound β2-glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI, also known as apolipoprotein H) suggesting that, similar to most pathogenic aPL, their binding depends on this serum cofactor. We further investigated this possibility and found that the binding of β2-GPI to the ATP column was similar to that of aPL IgG in that most was reversed by NaCl 0.5 M. Furthermore, addition of β2-GPI to aPL IgG significantly increased the amount of aPL binding to an ATP column. We conclude that aPL IgG bind ATP, probably through β2-GPI. This binding could interfere with the normal extracellular function of ATP and similar neurotransmitters. PMID:16295522

  7. Noncanonical Amino Acid Labeling in Vivo to Visualize and Affinity Purify Newly Synthesized Proteins in Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein expression in the nervous system undergoes regulated changes in response to changes in behavioral states, in particular long-term memory formation. Recently, methods have been developed (BONCAT and FUNCAT), which introduce noncanonical amino acids bearing small bio-orthogonal functional groups into proteins using the cells’ own translational machinery. Using the selective “click reaction”, this allows for the identification and visualization of newly synthesized proteins in vitro. Here we demonstrate that noncanonical amino acid labeling can be achieved in vivo in an intact organism capable of simple learning behavior, the larval zebrafish. We show that azidohomoalanine is metabolically incorporated into newly synthesized proteins, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, but has no apparent toxic effect and does not influence simple behaviors such as spontaneous swimming and escape responses. This enables fluorescent labeling of newly synthesized proteins in whole mount larval zebrafish. Furthermore, stimulation with a GABA antagonist that elicits seizures in the larval zebrafish causes an increase in protein synthesis throughout the proteome, which can also be visualized in intact larvae. PMID:22347535

  8. Optimization of the surfaces used to capture antibodies from single hybridomas reduces the time required for microengraving.

    PubMed

    Ronan, Jehnna L; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Love, J Christopher

    2009-01-30

    The most common method for the generation of monoclonal antibodies involves the identification and isolation of hybridomas from polyclonal populations. The discovery of new antibodies for biochemical and immunohistochemical assays in a rapid and efficient manner, however, remains a challenge. Here, a series of experiments are described that realize significant improvements to an approach for screening large numbers of single cells to identify antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies in a high-throughput manner (10(5)-10(6) cells in less than 12 h). The soft lithographic process called microengraving yields microarrays of monoclonal antibodies that can be correlated to individual hybridomas; the cells can then be retrieved and expanded to establish new cell lines. The factors examined here included the glass slide used for the microarray, the buffer used to deposit capture antibodies onto the glass, the type of polyclonal antibodies used to capture the secreted antibodies, and the time required for microengraving. Compared to earlier reports of this method, these studies resulted in increased signal-to-noise ratios for individual elements in the microarrays produced, and a considerable decrease in the time required to produce one microarray from a set of cells (from 2-4 h to 3-10 min). These technical advances will improve the throughput and reduce the costs for this alternative to traditional screening by limiting serial dilution. PMID:19028499

  9. The antiperinuclear factor and the so-called antikeratin antibodies are the same rheumatoid arthritis-specific autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Sebbag, M; Simon, M; Vincent, C; Masson-Bessière, C; Girbal, E; Durieux, J J; Serre, G

    1995-01-01

    The so-called antikeratin antibodies (AKA) and the antiperinuclear factor (APF) are the most specific serological markers of RA. Using indirect immunofluorescence, AKA label the stratum corneum of various cornified epithelia and APF the keratohyalin granules of human buccal mucosa epithelium. We recently demonstrated that AKA recognize human epidermal filaggrin. Here, we report the identification of the major APF antigen as a diffuse protein band of 200-400 kD. This protein is seen to be closely related to human epidermal (pro) filaggrin since it was recognized by four antifilaggrin mAbs specific for different epitopes, and since the APF titers of RA sera were found to be correlated to their AKA titers and to their immunoblotting reactivities to filaggrin. Immunoabsorption of RA sera on purified epidermal filaggrin abolished their reactivities to the granules of buccal epithelial cells and to the 200-400-kD antigen. Moreover, antifilaggrin autoantibodies, i.e., AKA, affinity purified from RA sera, were shown to immunodetect the 200-400-kD antigen and to stain these granules. These results indicate that AKA and APF are largely the same autoantibodies. They recognize human epidermal filaggrin and (pro) filaggrin-related proteins of buccal epithelial cells. Identification of the epitopes recognized by these autoantibodies, which we propose to name antifilaggrin autoantibodies, will certainly open new paths of research into the pathophysiology of RA. Images PMID:7539459

  10. The cytokines effect on EBV-immortalized human B cells producing antisperm antibody.

    PubMed

    Fiszer, D; Niedbała, W; Fernandez, N; Kurpisz, M

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed the antisperm antibody production of autoimmunized male subjects using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immortalization of B lymphocytes. We evaluated the influence of several in vitro culture variants applied prior to EBV infection on the frequence of antibody-producing cells and affinity of secreted antibodies. The following variants were applied: a) polyclonal antigenic stimulation of lymphocytes with PWM, b) PWM (pokeweed mitogen) + IL-2 + interferon gamma and c) PWM + IL-2 + interferon gamma + sperm antigenic extract. The variants where the cytokines were added did not increase the frequency of EBV-infected antibody-producing cells as comparing to EBV infection previously amplified by the use of polyclonal activator. Furthermore the cytokine activation either in combination with mitogen or in vitro secondary antigenic sensitization (prior to EBV transformation) did not seem to have beneficial effect on affinity of antibodies produced by EBV-infected cells in comparison to straight EBV infection. On the other hand, the attempt to promote an immunoglobulin secretion (IgM) by previously obtained human-human antisperm hybridomas by adding of IL-2 was quite successful. PMID:1338684

  11. Functional Activity of Antibodies Directed towards Flagellin Proteins of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Girish; Tennant, Sharon M; Boyd, Mary A; Wang, Jin Y; Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Pasetti, Marcela F; Levine, Myron M; Simon, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are major causes of invasive bacterial infections in children under 5 years old in sub-Saharan Africa, with case fatality rates of ~20%. There are no licensed NTS vaccines for humans. Vaccines that induce antibodies against a Salmonella Typhi surface antigen, Vi polysaccharide, significantly protect humans against typhoid fever, establishing that immune responses to Salmonella surface antigens can be protective. Flagella proteins, abundant surface antigens in Salmonella serovars that cause human disease, are also powerful immunogens, but the functional capacity of elicited anti-flagellar antibodies and their role in facilitating bacterial clearance has been unclear. We examined the ability of anti-flagellar antibodies to mediate microbial killing by immune system components in-vitro and assessed their role in protecting mice against invasive Salmonella infection. Polyclonal (hyperimmune sera) and monoclonal antibodies raised against phase 1 flagellin proteins of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium facilitated bacterial uptake and killing of the homologous serovar pathogen by phagocytes. Polyclonal anti-flagellar antibodies accompanied by complement also achieved direct bacterial killing. Serum bactericidal activity was restricted to Salmonella serovars expressing the same flagellin used as immunogen. Notably, individual anti-flagellin monoclonal antibodies with complement were not bactericidal, but this biological activity was restored when different monoclonal anti-flagellin antibodies were combined. Passive transfer immunization with a monoclonal IgG antibody specific for phase 1 flagellin from S. Typhimurium protected mice against lethal challenge with a representative African invasive S. Typhimurium strain. These findings have relevance for the use of flagellin proteins in NTS vaccines, and confirm the role of anti-flagellin antibodies as mediators of protective immunity. PMID:26998925

  12. Functional Activity of Antibodies Directed towards Flagellin Proteins of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Mary A.; Wang, Jin Y.; Tulapurkar, Mohan E.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Levine, Myron M.; Simon, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are major causes of invasive bacterial infections in children under 5 years old in sub-Saharan Africa, with case fatality rates of ~20%. There are no licensed NTS vaccines for humans. Vaccines that induce antibodies against a Salmonella Typhi surface antigen, Vi polysaccharide, significantly protect humans against typhoid fever, establishing that immune responses to Salmonella surface antigens can be protective. Flagella proteins, abundant surface antigens in Salmonella serovars that cause human disease, are also powerful immunogens, but the functional capacity of elicited anti-flagellar antibodies and their role in facilitating bacterial clearance has been unclear. We examined the ability of anti-flagellar antibodies to mediate microbial killing by immune system components in-vitro and assessed their role in protecting mice against invasive Salmonella infection. Polyclonal (hyperimmune sera) and monoclonal antibodies raised against phase 1 flagellin proteins of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium facilitated bacterial uptake and killing of the homologous serovar pathogen by phagocytes. Polyclonal anti-flagellar antibodies accompanied by complement also achieved direct bacterial killing. Serum bactericidal activity was restricted to Salmonella serovars expressing the same flagellin used as immunogen. Notably, individual anti-flagellin monoclonal antibodies with complement were not bactericidal, but this biological activity was restored when different monoclonal anti-flagellin antibodies were combined. Passive transfer immunization with a monoclonal IgG antibody specific for phase 1 flagellin from S. Typhimurium protected mice against lethal challenge with a representative African invasive S. Typhimurium strain. These findings have relevance for the use of flagellin proteins in NTS vaccines, and confirm the role of anti-flagellin antibodies as mediators of protective immunity. PMID:26998925

  13. Understanding the Cellular Function of TRPV2 Channel through Generation of Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Huynh, Kevin W.; Cawley, Daniel; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is a Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channel proposed to play a critical role in a wide array of cellular processes. Although TRPV2 surface expression was originally determined to be sensitive to growth factor signaling, regulated trafficking of TRPV2 has remained controversial. TRPV2 has proven difficult to study due to the lack of specific pharmacological tools to modulate channel activity; therefore, most studies of the cellular function of TRPV2 rely on immuno-detection techniques. Polyclonal antibodies against TRPV2 have not been properly validated and characterized, which may contribute to conflicting results regarding its function in the cell. Here, we developed monoclonal antibodies using full-length TRPV2 as an antigen. Extensive characterization of these antibodies and comparison to commonly used commercially available TRPV2 antibodies revealed that while monoclonal antibodies generated in our laboratory were suitable for detection of endogenous TRPV2 by western blot, immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry, the commercially available polyclonal antibodies we tested were not able to recognize endogenous TRPV2. We used our newly generated and validated TRPV2 antibodies to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on TRPV2 surface expression in heterologous and endogenous expression systems. We found that IGF-1 had little to no effect on trafficking and plasma membrane expression of TRPV2. Overall, these new TRPV2 monoclonal antibodies served to dispel the controversy of the effects of IGF-1 on TRPV2 plasma membrane expression and will clarify the role TRPV2 plays in cellular function. Furthermore, our strategy of using full-length tetrameric TRP channels may allow for the generation of antibodies against other TRP channels of unclear function. PMID:24392006

  14. Isolation and characterization of My23, a myeloid cell-derived antigen reactive with the monoclonal antibody AML-2-23.

    PubMed

    Maliszewski, C R; Ball, E D; Graziano, R F; Fanger, M W

    1985-09-01

    In this study, we describe the isolation and characterization of My23, a human myeloid antigen defined by the monoclonal antibody (MoAb) AML-2-23. Cells of the HL-60 human promyelocytic cell line, when cultured in the presence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol), express a surface protein of approximately 50 to 55 kilodaltons (Kd) which was immunoprecipitated with the AML-2-23 MoAb. Furthermore, after 2 days of exposure to calcitriol, HL-60 cells began to release My23 into culture medium, as determined by the ability of culture supernatant from these cells to block the binding of AML-2-23 to myeloid cells. My23 release was almost totally inhibited by incubation of cells at 4 degrees C, and was partially blocked by treatment of cells with cycloheximide or tunicamycin. The culture supernatant blocking factor, soluble My23, was identified as a 45 to 50 Kd protein by Western blot/immune overlay, using AML-2-23 and an 125I-labeled second antibody. My23, which was affinity-purified from culture supernatant, retained the ability to block AML-2-23 binding to myeloid cells. The affinity-purified antigen migrated on SDS-PAGE as a diffuse band in the m.w. range of 44 to 52 Kd. On treatment with endoglycosidase, the apparent m.w. of My23 decreased to approximately 40,000, indicating the presence of carbohydrate residues on My23. Serum from mice immunized with the purified antigen reacted with the same spectrum of myeloid cells as AML-2-23 MoAb, reacted with the My23 soluble protein in immunoblots, and competed with AML-2-23 for binding to myeloid cells. Binding of this antiserum to myeloid cells was blocked by cell supernatant from both monocytes and calcitriol-treated HL-60 cells, suggesting, along with results from m.w. determinations of the two preparations, that the soluble and cell surface forms of My23 are similar. Moreover, based on our finding that human plasma specifically inhibits the binding of AML-2-23 to myeloid cells, My23 may also be released in vivo. The

  15. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  16. [The development of methods for obtaining monoclonal antibody-producing cells].

    PubMed

    Skowicki, Michał; Lipiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are biomolecules of great scientific and practical significance. In contrast to polyclonal antibodies from immune sera, they are homogeneous and monospecific, since they are produced by hybridoma cells representing a clone arising from a single cell. The successful technology was described for the first time in 1975; the inventors were later awarded the Nobel Prize. Currently, mAbs are broadly used as a research tool, in diagnostics and medicine in particular for the treatment of cancer or in transplantology. About 47 therapeutics based on monoclonal antibodies are now available in the US and Europe, and the number is still growing. Production of monoclonal antibodies is a multistage, time-consuming and costly process. Growing demand for these molecules creates space for research focused on improvements in hybridoma technology. Lower costs, human labor, and time are important goals of these attempts. In this article, a brief review of current methods and their advances is given. PMID:27117113

  17. Measurement of free light chains with assays based on monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Te Velthuis, Henk; Drayson, Mark; Campbell, John P

    2016-06-01

    Recently, serum free light chain (FLC) assays incorporating anti-kappa (κ) and anti-lambda (λ) FLC monoclonal antibodies have become available: N Latex FLC assay (Siemens) and Seralite® (Abingdon Health). The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of these two new monoclonal antibody-based methods. In doing so, the review will outline the performance characteristics of each method, including a summary of: assay principles, antibody specificity, analytical performance and assay performance in disease. Additionally, the review will describe the potential user benefits of adopting these new generation FLC assays, which are designed to overcome the established limitations of existing polyclonal antibody based FLC assays. PMID:27010775

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Hapten-Protein Conjugates for Antibody Production against Cyanogenic Glycosides.

    PubMed

    Bolarinwa, Islamiyat Folashade

    2015-07-01

    Consumption of cyanogenic plants can cause serious health problems for humans. The ability to detect and quantify cyanogenic glycosides, capable of generating cyanide, could contribute to prevention of cyanide poisoning from the consumption of improperly processed cyanogenic plants. Hapten-protein conjugates were synthesized with amygdalin and linamarin by using a novel approach. Polyclonal antibodies were generated by immunizing four New Zealand White rabbits with synthesized amygdalin-bovine serum albumin and linamarin-bovine serum albumin immunogen. This is the first time an antibody was produced against linamarin. Antibody titer curves were obtained from all the four rabbits by using a noncompetitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. High antibody titer was obtained at dilutions greater than 1:50,000 from both immunogens. This new method is an important step forward in preventing ingestion of toxic cyanogenic glycosides. PMID:26197297

  19. 2-D Western blotting for evaluation of antibodies developed for detection of host cell protein.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom; Harbers, Adriana; Bandhakavi, Sricharan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins generated for therapeutic use must be substantially free of residual host cell protein (HCP). The presence of host cell protein (HCP) is usually assayed by ELISA using a polyclonal antibody mixture raised against a population of proteins derived from the host cell background. This antibody should recognize as high a proportion as possible of the potential HCPs in a given sample. A recommended method for evaluating the assay involves two-dimensional electrophoretic separation followed by Western blotting.We present here a method using commercial anti-HCP antibody and samples derived from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The 2-D electrophoresis procedure gives highly reproducible spot patterns and entire procedure can be completed in less than 2 days. Software analysis enables the straightforward generation of percent coverage values for the antibody when used to probe HCP-containing samples. PMID:25820736

  20. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003352.htm Serum herpes simplex antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Serum herpes simplex antibodies is a blood test that looks for antibodies ...

  1. Specificity of Anti-Tau Antibodies when Analyzing Mice Models of Alzheimer's Disease: Problems and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Franck R.; Pelletier, Jérôme; Bretteville, Alexis; Morin, Françoise; Calon, Frédéric; Hébert, Sébastien S.; Whittington, Robert A.; Planel, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein are found in a group of diseases called tauopathies, which includes Alzheimer's disease. The causes and consequences of tau hyperphosphorylation are routinely investigated in laboratory animals. Mice are the models of choice as they are easily amenable to transgenic technology; consequently, their tau phosphorylation levels are frequently monitored by Western blotting using a panel of monoclonal/polyclonal anti-tau antibodies. Given that mouse secondary antibodies can recognize endogenous mouse immunoglobulins (Igs) and the possible lack of specificity with some polyclonal antibodies, non-specific signals are commonly observed. Here, we characterized the profiles of commonly used anti-tau antibodies in four different mouse models: non-transgenic mice, tau knock-out (TKO) mice, 3xTg-AD mice, and hypothermic mice, the latter a positive control for tau hyperphosphorylation. We identified 3 tau monoclonal antibody categories: type 1, characterized by high non-specificity (AT8, AT180, MC1, MC6, TG-3), type 2, demonstrating low non-specificity (AT270, CP13, CP27, Tau12, TG5), and type 3, with no non-specific signal (DA9, PHF-1, Tau1, Tau46). For polyclonal anti-tau antibodies, some displayed non-specificity (pS262, pS409) while others did not (pS199, pT205, pS396, pS404, pS422, A0024). With monoclonal antibodies, most of the interfering signal was due to endogenous Igs and could be eliminated by different techniques: i) using secondary antibodies designed to bind only non-denatured Igs, ii) preparation of a heat-stable fraction, iii) clearing Igs from the homogenates, and iv) using secondary antibodies that only bind the light chain of Igs. All of these techniques removed the non-specific signal; however, the first and the last methods were easier and more reliable. Overall, our study demonstrates a high risk of artefactual signal when performing Western blotting with routinely used anti-tau antibodies, and proposes several

  2. Polyclonal Intestinal Colonization with Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporin-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae upon Traveling to India

    PubMed Central

    Pires, João; Kuenzli, Esther; Kasraian, Sara; Tinguely, Regula; Furrer, Hansjakob; Hilty, Markus; Hatz, Christoph; Endimiani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess the intestinal colonization dynamics by multiple extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (ESC-R-Ent) clones in Swiss travelers to India, a country with high prevalence of these multidrug-resistant pathogens. Fifteen healthy volunteers (HVs) colonized with ESC-R-Ent after traveling to India who provided stools before, after, and at 3- and 6-month follow-up are presented in this study. Stools were enriched in a LB broth containing 3 mg/L cefuroxime and plated in standard selective media (BLSE, ChromID ESBL, Supercarba) to detect carbapenem- and/or ESC-R-Ent. At least 5 Enterobacteriaceae colonies were analyzed for each stool provided. All strains underwent phenotypic tests (MICs in microdilution) and molecular typing to define bla genes (microarray, PCR/sequencing), clonality (MLST, rep-PCR), and plasmid content. While only three HVs were colonized before the trip, all participants had positive stools after returning, but the colonization rate decreased during the follow-up period (i.e., six HVs were still colonized at both 3 and 6 months). More importantly, polyclonal acquisition (median of 2 clones, range 1–5) was identified at return in all HVs. The majority of the Escherichia coli isolates belonged to phylogenetic groups A and B1 and to high diverse non-epidemic sequence types (STs); however, 15% of them belonged to clonal complex 10 and mainly possessed blaCTX−M−15 genes. F family plasmids were constantly found (~80%) in the recovered ESC-R-Ent. Our results indicate a possible polyclonal acquisition of the ESC-R-Ent via food-chain and/or through an environmental exposure. For some HVs, prolonged colonization in the follow-up period was observed due to clonal persistence or presence of the same plasmid replicon types in a new bacterial host. Travel medicine practitioners, clinicians, and clinical microbiologists who are facing the returning travelers and their samples for different reasons should be aware of this

  3. Comparison of type 2 and type 6 fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis by using agglutinating monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Z M; Brennan, M J; David, J L; Carter, P H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1988-12-01

    Two types of fimbriae have been identified on the pathogenic gram-negative organism Bordetella pertussis. Monoclonal antibodies to these fimbriae were produced to better understand the role of fimbriae as serotype-specific agglutinogens and to investigate the antigenic relationship between these fimbriae. Three monoclonal antibodies were identified that specifically agglutinated B. pertussis cells containing the U.S. Reference Factor 2 agglutinogen, and six monoclonal antibodies were produced that agglutinated only those strains containing the U.S. Reference Factor 6 agglutinogen. Indirect immunofluorescence studies and immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that these monoclonal antibodies bind to an outer membrane component on serotype-specific strains of B. pertussis. All of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with native or partially assembled type-specific fimbriae but not with monomeric fimbrial subunits as indicated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The fimbrial agglutinogens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies were also uniquely reactive with either U.S. Reference Factor 2 or 6 antiserum (Eldering agglutinogen 2 or 6 polyclonal antiserum) in an indirect ELISA. No cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with the unrelated fimbriae was observed in any of the comparative immunological studies. Some of the monoclonal antibodies agglutinated certain strains of B. bronchiseptica, suggesting that this closely related species can contain antigenically similar fimbriae. These monoclonal antibodies should prove useful for further structural and functional analysis of Bordetella fimbriae and for studies on the role that these antigens play in prevention of infection and disease. PMID:2903125

  4. Comparison of type 2 and type 6 fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis by using agglutinating monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z M; Brennan, M J; David, J L; Carter, P H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1988-01-01

    Two types of fimbriae have been identified on the pathogenic gram-negative organism Bordetella pertussis. Monoclonal antibodies to these fimbriae were produced to better understand the role of fimbriae as serotype-specific agglutinogens and to investigate the antigenic relationship between these fimbriae. Three monoclonal antibodies were identified that specifically agglutinated B. pertussis cells containing the U.S. Reference Factor 2 agglutinogen, and six monoclonal antibodies were produced that agglutinated only those strains containing the U.S. Reference Factor 6 agglutinogen. Indirect immunofluorescence studies and immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that these monoclonal antibodies bind to an outer membrane component on serotype-specific strains of B. pertussis. All of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with native or partially assembled type-specific fimbriae but not with monomeric fimbrial subunits as indicated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The fimbrial agglutinogens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies were also uniquely reactive with either U.S. Reference Factor 2 or 6 antiserum (Eldering agglutinogen 2 or 6 polyclonal antiserum) in an indirect ELISA. No cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with the unrelated fimbriae was observed in any of the comparative immunological studies. Some of the monoclonal antibodies agglutinated certain strains of B. bronchiseptica, suggesting that this closely related species can contain antigenically similar fimbriae. These monoclonal antibodies should prove useful for further structural and functional analysis of Bordetella fimbriae and for studies on the role that these antigens play in prevention of infection and disease. Images PMID:2903125

  5. Acute infection by hepatitis E virus with a slight immunoglobulin M antibody response.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yuki; Oshiro, Yukio; Imanishi, Mamiko; Ishige, Kazunori; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody response is generally regarded as a useful marker for diagnosing primary infection. However, in some cases, this antibody is not detected during the acute phase of infection. An 81-year-old man with stable membranous nephropathy who presented with asymptomatic acute liver dysfunction came to our hospital. HEV RNA of genotype 3 was detected in his serum, and he was diagnosed with acute hepatitis E. According to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, high-level positivity for anti-HEV IgG and IgA antibodies was observed, but the assay was negative for IgM antibody throughout the clinical course of infection. The patient was not immunosuppressed. We further investigated the presence of IgM antibody using two other polyclonal antibodies against human IgM as secondary antibodies and another recombinant ORF2 protein of genotype 3 as an immobilized antigen. IgM was weakly detected in the serum during the acute phase only by the test with the antigen of genotype 3. Multi-genotype antigens can detect a slight IgM antibody response; however, anti-HEV IgA is more useful in diagnosing primary HEV infection, particularly in cases with a low IgM antibody response. PMID:26215116

  6. Configuration of antibodies for assay of urinary cortisol in dogs influences analytic specificity.

    PubMed

    Zeugswetter, F K; Neffe, F; Schwendenwein, I; Tichy, A; Möstl, E

    2013-08-01

    Whether the variation in the reported urinary corticoid-to-creatinine ratio in dogs is affected by the application of 2 commonly applied anticortisol antibodies was investigated. Free-catch morning urine samples of 50 healthy dogs were analyzed in duplicate with the use of 2 different polyclonal antibodies (antibody A and B) raised in different rabbits. Antibody A was raised against cortisol-3-carboxymethyl-oxime and antibody B against cortisol-21-hemisuccinate linked to BSA. Enzyme immunoassays were applied by using corresponding biotinylated labels. To examine possible cross-reactions with conjugated and nonconjugated cortisol metabolites, EIA measurements were performed with urine samples both before (directly assayed) and after diethyl-ether extraction, as well as after reversed-phase HPLC. Although the results correlated (P < 0.001), urinary corticoid concentrations and accordingly the urinary corticoid-to-creatinine ratios were 8 times higher when using antibody A than when using antibody B (mean ± SD corticoid concentrations, 223 ± 131 vs 29 ± 12 nmol/L; P < 0.001). Irrespective of the antibody used, extraction significantly decreased measured corticoid concentrations (antibody A, 158 ± 120 nmol/L; antibody B, 15 ± 8 nmol/L; P < 0.001), but the decrease was conspicuous when antibody A was used. Antibody A cross-reacted significantly with polar (eg, conjugated) metabolites, clearly depicted in the chromatogram by 3 additional peaks in earlier fractions well separated from cortisol. In contrast the assay that used antibody B was specific, showing only 1 major peak in the fractions eluting authentic cortisol. In summary, the study indicates that the configuration of the antibody considerably influences the analytic specificity of cortisol assays and underlines the pivotal importance of assay validation for each species and sample material. PMID:23849086

  7. Production of antibodies to canine IL-1beta and canine TNF to assess the role of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Vannozza; Ott, Fabienne; Fischer, René W; Gram, Hermann; Peele, John; Spreng, David; Schmökel, Hugo; Jungi, Thomas W

    2005-08-15

    IL-1 and TNF are important proinflammatory cytokines implicated in both antimicrobial host defense and pathogenesis of diseases with an immune-mediated and/or inflammatory component. Respective studies in the dog have been hampered by the unavailability of reagents allowing the specific measurement of canine cytokine proteins and the effect of canine cytokine neutralization by Ab. Starting with recombinant canine (rcan) IL-1beta and rcanTNF, four polyclonal antisera and 22 mAb specific for rcanIL-1beta and rcanTNF were generated. Their usefulness in neutralization assays was determined. Using cytokine-containing supernatants of canine cells in bioassays, polyclonal antisera neutralized either canine IL-1beta or TNF. TNF was also neutralized by three antibodies developed in this study and one commercial mAb. The usefulness of monoclonal and polyclonal Ab in canine cytokine-specific Ab capture ELISA's was assessed. This resulted in the identification of a commercial mAb combination and one pair developed in this study allowing low levels of TNF to be detected by antibody capture ELISA. The detection limit was 141 pg/ml rcanTNF for both combinations. Using rcanIL-1beta as an antigen allowed the detection of lower concentrations of rcanIL-1beta (20 pg/ml, on the average) by a pair of polyclonal antisera than when monoclonals were used. By using such IL-1beta-specific and TNF-specific ELISA's, the respective cytokines were detected in supernatants of canine PBMC stimulated with LPS or heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes and interferon-gamma combined. Thus, monoclonal and polyclonal reagents were identified allowing the quantitation of canine IL-1beta and TNF production in vitro, and the neutralization of these cytokines. PMID:15982477

  8. Characterization of specific antibodies and the establishment of sandwich ELISA and ELISPOT systems for swine IL-4.

    PubMed

    Nuntaprasert, A; Mori, Y; Fujita, K; Yoneda, M; Miura, R; Tsukiyama-Kohara, K; Kai, C

    2004-11-01

    We produced four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and two polyclonal antibodies using the purified cytokine expressed in bacteria and characterized them. Specific binding of each of the mAb and polyclonal antibodies to recombinant swine IL-4 (rSwIL-4) purified from Escherichia coli and baculovirus was demonstrated in an indirect ELISA and/or in western blotting. We established a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring concentration of SwIL-4 in biological samples and established an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay for detecting IL-4-secreting cells using a mAb and a polyclonal IgG from goat. The detection limit of the sandwich ELISA for SwIL-4 was 78 pg/ml. Using sandwich ELISA, SwIL-4 was detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of pigs experimentally infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and could quantitate in supernatants of mitogen-stimulated PBMC culture. The ELISPOT system is useful for the detection of IL-4 producing cells in swine PBMC culture. PMID:15325518

  9. Characterization of Antibodies for Grain-Specific Gluten Detection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Girdhari M; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Williams, Kristina M; Pahlavan, Autusa

    2016-03-01

    Gluten ingestion causes immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergy or celiac disease in sensitive individuals, and a strict gluten-free diet greatly limits food choices. Immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are used to quantify gluten to ensure labeling compliance of gluten-free foods. Anti-gluten antibodies may not exhibit equal affinity to gluten from wheat, rye, and barley. Moreover, because wheat gluten is commonly used as a calibrator in ELISA, accurate gluten quantitation from rye and barley contaminated foods may be compromised. Immunoassays utilizing grain-specific antibodies and calibrators may help improve gluten quantitation. In this study, polyclonal antibodies raised against gluten-containing grain-specific peptides were characterized for their immunoreactivity to gluten from different grain sources. Strong immunoreactivity to multiple gluten polypeptides from wheat, rye, and barley was observed in the range 34 to 43 kDa with anti-gliadin, 11 to 15 and 72 to 95 kDa with anti-secalin, and 30 to 43 kDa with anti-hordein peptide antibodies, respectively. Minimal or no cross-reactivity with gluten from other grains was observed among these antibodies. The anti-consensus peptide antibody raised against a repetitive amino acid sequence of proline and glutamine exhibited immunoreactivity to gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and oat. The antibodies exhibited similar immunoreactivity with most of the corresponding grain cultivars by ELISA. The high specificity and minimal cross-reactivity of grain-specific antibodies suggest their potential use in immunoassays for accurate gluten quantitation. PMID:26878584

  10. A Novel Polyclonal Antiserum against Toxoplasma gondii Sodium Hydrogen Exchanger 1

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bin; Kuang, Zhenzhan; Zhan, Yanli; Chen, Daxiang; Gao, Yang; Li, Ming; Luo, Shuhong; Hao, Wenbo

    2016-01-01

    The sodium hydrogen exchanger 1 (NHE1), which functions in maintaining the ratio of Na+ and H+ ions, is widely distributed in cell plasma membranes. It plays a prominent role in pH balancing, cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. However, its exact subcellular location and biological functions in Toxoplasma gondii are largely unclear. In this study, we cloned the C-terminal sequence of T. gondii NHE1 (TgNHE1) incorporating the C-terminal peptide of NHE1 (C-NHE1) into the pGEX4T-1 expression plasmid. The peptide sequence was predicted to have good antigenicity based on the information obtained from an immune epitope database. After induction of heterologous gene expression with isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactoside, the recombinant C-NHE1 protein successfully expressed in a soluble form was purified by glutathione sepharose beads as an immunogen for production of a rabbit polyclonal antiserum. The specificity of this antiserum was confirmed by western blotting and immunofluorescence. The antiserum could reduce T. gondii invasion into host cells, indicated by the decreased TgNHE1 expression in T. gondii parasites that were pre-incubated with antiserum in the process of cell entry. Furthermore, the antiserum reduced the virulence of T. gondii parasites to host cells in vitro, possibly by blocking the release of Ca2+. In this regard, this antiserum has potential to be a valuable tool for further studies of TgNHE1. PMID:26951975

  11. Polyclonal origin and hair induction ability of dermal papillae in neonatal and adult mouse back skin

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Charlotte A.; Jensen, Kim B.; MacRae, Elizabeth J.; Mansfield, William; Watt, Fiona M.

    2012-01-01

    Hair follicle development and growth are regulated by Wnt signalling and depend on interactions between epidermal cells and a population of fibroblasts at the base of the follicle, known as the dermal papilla (DP). DP cells have a distinct gene expression signature from non-DP dermal fibroblasts. However, their origins are largely unknown. By generating chimeric mice and performing skin reconstitution assays we show that, irrespective of whether DP form during development, are induced by epidermal Wnt activation in adult skin or assemble from disaggregated cells, they are polyclonal in origin. While fibroblast proliferation is necessary for hair follicle formation in skin reconstitution assays, mitotically inhibited cells readily contribute to DP. Although new hair follicles do not usually develop in adult skin, adult dermal fibroblasts are competent to contribute to DP during hair follicle neogenesis, irrespective of whether they originate from skin in the resting or growth phase of the hair cycle or skin with β-catenin-induced ectopic follicles. We propose that during skin reconstitution fibroblasts may be induced to become DP cells by interactions with hair follicle epidermal cells, rather than being derived from a distinct subpopulation of cells. PMID:22537489

  12. Cross-presentation of HCMV chimeric protein enables generation and measurement of polyclonal T cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi H O; Sullivan, Lucy C; Kotsimbos, Tom C; Schwarer, Anthony P; Mifsud, Nicole A

    2010-08-01

    CD8(+) T cell immunity has a critical function in controlling human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. In immunocompromized individuals, HCMV reactivation or disease can lead to increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in transplant recipients. In this setting, adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells is a promising vaccine strategy to restore viral immunity, with most clinical approaches focussing on the use of peptides for the generation of single epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells. We show that using an IE1-pp65 chimeric protein as the antigen source promotes effective cross-presentation, by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), to generate polyclonal CD8(+) T cell epitopes. By exploring human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted immunodominance hierarchies both within and across two immunodominant proteins, we show that HLA-B7 epitopes elicit higher CD8(+) T cell responses compared with HLA-A1, -A2 or -B8. This study provides important evidence highlighting both the efficacy of the IE1-pp65 chimeric protein and the importance of immunodominance in designing future therapeutic vaccines. PMID:20195281

  13. Polyclonal Mucosa-Associated Invariant T Cells Have Unique Innate Functions in Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Wei-Jen; Truscott, Steven M.; Eickhoff, Christopher S.; Blazevic, Azra

    2012-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a unique population of αβ T cells in mammals that reside preferentially in mucosal tissues and express an invariant Vα paired with limited Vβ T-cell receptor (TCR) chains. Furthermore, MAIT cell development is dependent upon the expression of the evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ib molecule MR1. Using in vitro assays, recent studies have shown that mouse and human MAIT cells are activated by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) infected with diverse microbes, including numerous bacterial strains and yeasts, but not viral pathogens. However, whether MAIT cells play an important, and perhaps unique, role in controlling microbial infection has remained unclear. To probe MAIT cell function, we show here that purified polyclonal MAIT cells potently inhibit intracellular bacterial growth of Mycobacterium bovis BCG in macrophages (MΦ) in coculture assays, and this inhibitory activity was dependent upon MAIT cell selection by MR1, secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and an innate interleukin 12 (IL-12) signal from infected MΦ. Surprisingly, however, the cognate recognition of MR1 by MAIT cells on the infected MΦ was found to play only a minor role in MAIT cell effector function. We also report that MAIT cell-deficient mice had higher bacterial loads at early times after infection compared to wild-type (WT) mice, demonstrating that MAIT cells play a unique role among innate lymphocytes in protective immunity against bacterial infection. PMID:22778103

  14. Polyclonal origin and hair induction ability of dermal papillae in neonatal and adult mouse back skin.

    PubMed

    Collins, Charlotte A; Jensen, Kim B; MacRae, Elizabeth J; Mansfield, William; Watt, Fiona M

    2012-06-15

    Hair follicle development and growth are regulated by Wnt signalling and depend on interactions between epidermal cells and a population of fibroblasts at the base of the follicle, known as the dermal papilla (DP). DP cells have a distinct gene expression signature from non-DP dermal fibroblasts. However, their origins are largely unknown. By generating chimeric mice and performing skin reconstitution assays we show that, irrespective of whether DP form during development, are induced by epidermal Wnt activation in adult skin or assemble from disaggregated cells, they are polyclonal in origin. While fibroblast proliferation is necessary for hair follicle formation in skin reconstitution assays, mitotically inhibited cells readily contribute to DP. Although new hair follicles do not usually develop in adult skin, adult dermal fibroblasts are competent to contribute to DP during hair follicle neogenesis, irrespective of whether they originate from skin in the resting or growth phase of the hair cycle or skin with β-catenin-induced ectopic follicles. We propose that during skin reconstitution fibroblasts may be induced to become DP cells by interactions with hair follicle epidermal cells, rather than being derived from a distinct subpopulation of cells. PMID:22537489

  15. Polyclonal Expansion of NKG2C+ NK Cells in TAP-Deficient Patients

    PubMed Central

    Béziat, Vivien; Sleiman, Marwan; Goodridge, Jodie P.; Kaarbø, Mari; Liu, Lisa L.; Rollag, Halvor; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Zimmer, Jacques; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive natural killer (NK) cell responses to human cytomegalovirus infection are characterized by the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Here, we set out to study the HLA class I dependency of such NKG2C+ NK cell expansions. We demonstrate the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells in patients with transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) deficiency, who express less than 10% of normal HLA class I levels. In contrast to normal individuals, expanded NKG2C+ NK cell populations in TAP-deficient patients display a polyclonal KIR profile and remain hyporesponsive to HLA class I-negative target cells. Nonetheless, agonistic stimulation of NKG2C on NK cells from TAP-deficient patients yielded significant responses in terms of degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, while interactions with self-HLA class I molecules likely shape the KIR repertoire of expanding NKG2C+ NK cells during adaptive NK cell responses in normal individuals, they are not a prerequisite for NKG2C+ NK cell expansions to occur. The emergence of NKG2C-responsive adaptive NK cells in TAP-deficient patients may contribute to antiviral immunity and potentially explain these patients’ low incidence of severe viral infections. PMID:26500647

  16. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  17. Glycation of polyclonal IgGs: Effect of sugar excipients during stability studies.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Y; Bihoreau, N; Jube, M; Andre, M-H; Tellier, Z; Chevreux, G

    2016-05-01

    A number of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations are stabilized with sugar additives that may lead over time to undesirable glycation reactions especially in liquid formulation. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of sugar excipients on such preparations in condition of temperature, formulation and concentration commonly used for pharmaceutical products. Through an innovative LC-MS method reported to characterize post-translational modifications of IgGs Fc/2 fragments, a stability study of IVIg formulated with reducing and non-reducing sugars has been undertaken. The rate of polyclonal IgGs glycation was investigated during 6months at 5, 25, 30 and 40°C. High levels of glycation were observed with reducing sugars such as glucose and maltose in the first months of the stability study from 25°C. Non-reducing sugars presented a low reactivity even at the highest tested temperature (40°C). Furthermore, a site by site analysis was performed by MS/MS to determine the glycation sites which were mainly identified at Lys246, Lys248 and Lys324. This work points out the high probability of glycation reactions in some commercialized products and describes a useful method to characterize IVIg glycated products issued from reducing sugar excipients. PMID:26992291

  18. Antibodies Against Glycolipids Enhance Antifungal Activity of Macrophages and Reduce Fungal Burden After Infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Renata A; Thomaz, Luciana; Muñoz, Julian E; da Silva, Cássia J; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Pinto, Márcia R; Travassos, Luiz R; Taborda, Carlos P

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease endemic in Latin America. Polyclonal antibodies to acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis opsonized yeast forms in vitro increasing phagocytosis and reduced the fungal burden of infected animals. Antibodies to GSL were active in both prophylactic and therapeutic protocols using a murine intratracheal infection model. Pathological examination of the lungs of animals treated with antibodies to GSL showed well-organized granulomas and minimally damaged parenchyma compared to the untreated control. Murine peritoneal macrophages activated by IFN-γ and incubated with antibodies against acidic GSLs more effectively phagocytosed and killed P. brasiliensis yeast cells as well as produced more nitric oxide compared to controls. The present work discloses a novel target of protective antibodies against P. brasiliensis adding to other well-studied mediators of the immune response to this fungus. PMID:26870028

  19. Antibodies Against Glycolipids Enhance Antifungal Activity of Macrophages and Reduce Fungal Burden After Infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Renata A.; Thomaz, Luciana; Muñoz, Julian E.; da Silva, Cássia J.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Pinto, Márcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Taborda, Carlos P.

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease endemic in Latin America. Polyclonal antibodies to acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis opsonized yeast forms in vitro increasing phagocytosis and reduced the fungal burden of infected animals. Antibodies to GSL were active in both prophylactic and therapeutic protocols using a murine intratracheal infection model. Pathological examination of the lungs of animals treated with antibodies to GSL showed well-organized granulomas and minimally damaged parenchyma compared to the untreated control. Murine peritoneal macrophages activated by IFN-γ and incubated with antibodies against acidic GSLs more effectively phagocytosed and killed P. brasiliensis yeast cells as well as produced more nitric oxide compared to controls. The present work discloses a novel target of protective antibodies against P. brasiliensis adding to other well-studied mediators of the immune response to this fungus. PMID:26870028

  20. Antibody reactivity to an Epstein-Barr virus BERF4-encoded epitope occurring also in Asp-57 region of HLA-DQ8 beta chain. Childhood Diabetes in Finland Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Parkkonen, P; Hyöty, H; Ilonen, J; Reijonen, H; Ylä-Herttuala, S; Leinikki, P

    1994-01-01

    A five amino acids-long sequence (GPPAA) in the region of the 57th amino acid of HLA-DQ8 beta chain, which seems to be important in defining the risk for type 1 diabetes, occurs also in the BERF4-encoded EBNA3C protein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in six successive repeats. The antigenicity of this region was analysed using synthetic peptides containing different modifications of the GPPAA sequence. Two of the seven individuals who had acute EBV infection produced antibodies against an EBV-derived peptide (GPPAAGPPAAGPPAA) paralleling the EBNA2 antibodies. These two cases also contracted type 1 diabetes immediately after the infection. High antibody levels against this peptide were found in a total of 12% of EBV+ individuals, and in most cases antibodies remained at high levels for several years. Human sera as well as affinity-purified antibodies specific for the GPPAAGPPAAGPPAA peptide reacted also with shorter peptide analogues (GPPAAGPPAA and GPPAA), as well as with peptides containing the surrounding motifs from DQ8 beta chains. However, none of these antibodies bound to denatured DQ8 beta chains in immunoblotting. The charge of the 57th amino acid modulated the antigenicity of this epitope, as peptides from Asp-57-negative DQ molecules were reactive, while peptides from Asp-57-positive DQ molecules were not. The responsiveness was seen in both HLA-DQ8-positive and -negative subjects as well as in type 1 diabetic individuals. The results suggest that some individuals who carry the GPPAA sequence in their HLA-DQ molecule recognize this epitope in EBV. This phenomenon may have potential importance in EBV-induced immune abnormalities, although cross-reactivity against DQ molecules could not be demonstrated in the present study. PMID:7508347

  1. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science. PMID:22244834

  2. Tolerance is established in polyclonal CD4(+) T cells by distinct mechanisms, according to self-peptide expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Deepali; Linehan, Jonathan L; Dileepan, Thamotharampillai; Lee, You Jeong; Purtha, Whitney E; Lu, Jennifer V; Nelson, Ryan W; Fife, Brian T; Orr, Harry T; Anderson, Mark S; Hogquist, Kristin A; Jenkins, Marc K

    2016-02-01

    Studies of repertoires of mouse monoclonal CD4(+) T cells have revealed several mechanisms of self-tolerance; however, which mechanisms operate in normal repertoires is unclear. Here we studied polyclonal CD4(+) T cells specific for green fluorescent protein expressed in various organs, which allowed us to determine the effects of specific expression patterns on the same epitope-specific T cells. Peptides presented uniformly by thymic antigen-presenting cells were tolerated by clonal deletion, whereas peptides excluded from the thymus were ignored. Peptides with limited thymic expression induced partial clonal deletion and impaired effector T cell potential but enhanced regulatory T cell potential. These mechanisms were also active for T cell populations specific for endogenously expressed self antigens. Thus, the immunotolerance of polyclonal CD4(+) T cells was maintained by distinct mechanisms, according to self-peptide expression patterns. PMID:26726812

  3. Enhancing Blockade of Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Invasion: Assessing Combinations of Antibodies against PfRH5 and Other Merozoite Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Choudhary, Prateek; Murungi, Linda M.; Furze, Julie M.; Diouf, Ababacar; Miotto, Olivo; Crosnier, Cécile; Wright, Gavin J.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Long, Carole A.; Draper, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    No vaccine has yet proven effective against the blood-stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. We recently found that PfRH5, a P. falciparum-specific protein expressed in merozoites, is efficiently targeted by broadly-neutralizing, vaccine-induced antibodies. Here we show that antibodies against PfRH5 efficiently inhibit the in vitro growth of short-term-adapted parasite isolates from Cambodia, and that the EC50 values of antigen-specific antibodies against PfRH5 are lower than those against PfAMA1. Since antibody responses elicited by multiple antigens are speculated to improve the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines, we conducted detailed assessments of parasite growth inhibition by antibodies against PfRH5 in combination with antibodies against seven other merozoite antigens. We found that antibodies against PfRH5 act synergistically with antibodies against certain other merozoite antigens, most notably with antibodies against other erythrocyte-binding antigens such as PfRH4, to inhibit the growth of a homologous P. falciparum clone. A combination of antibodies against PfRH4 and basigin, the erythrocyte receptor for PfRH5, also potently inhibited parasite growth. This methodology provides the first quantitative evidence that polyclonal vaccine-induced antibodies can act synergistically against P. falciparum antigens and should help to guide the rational development of future multi-antigen vaccines. PMID:23144611

  4. Immunoparesis in MGUS - Relationship of uninvolved immunoglobulin pair suppression and polyclonal immunoglobuline levels to MGUS risk categories.

    PubMed

    Pika, T; Lochman, P; Sandecka, V; Maisnar, V; Minarik, J; Tichy, M; Zapletalova, J; Solcova, L; Scudla, V; Hajek, R

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is an asymptomatic, potentially malignant condition. It has been established that annually approximately 1-2% of MGUS cases transforms into one of the malignant forms of monoclonal gammopathies. Progression risk factors include the quantity and type of M-protein, and namely the ratio of free light immunoglobulin chains (FLC). These factors, enable purposeful stratification of MGUS individuals. Some authors consider suppression of polyclonal immunoglobulin levels to be another progression factor. The aim of the study was to compare polyclonal immunoglobulin (PIg) levels with uninvolved heavy/light chain pair (HLC) levels in order to verify the degree of immunoparesis depending on MGUS risk category (0-3). The analyzed set consisted of 159 serum samples from MGUS patients (102 IgG, 57 IgA), who were stratified into 4 risk groups (0 - low, 1 - low-intermediate, 2 - high-intermediate and 3 - high risk of transformation). The results of analysis showed that with increasing degree of MGUS increases risk of immune paresis defined by decreasing levels of polyclonal immunoglobulins, ie. IgA and IgM in the case of IgG MGUS, respectively, IgG and IgM in case of IgA MGUS. Significant differences were also found when analyzing the levels of uninvolved HLC pairs IgG kappa (resp. IgG lambda) in IgG lambda (IgG kappa) dominant secretion. In the case of MGUS with IgA isotype, the results were similar. Discovery of the connection between the degree of immunosuppression and the level of MGUS risk contributes to our understanding of the relationship between biology, development and potential malignant transformation of MGUS. It is apparent that uninvolved HLC pair assay enables more reliable identification of at-risk MGUS patients than a simple quantitative assay for polyclonal immunoglobulins alone. PMID:26278155

  5. Development of an immunoassay to measure the humoral immune response of hybrid striped bass Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Shelby, R A; Shoemaker, C A; Klesius, P H

    2003-02-10

    Hybrid striped bass (HSB) were immunized with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the specific anti-BSA immunoglobulin (Ig) was affinity purified from the resulting serum by means of an agarose gel-BSA column. The native Ig had an apparent molecular size of 893 KDD, by size exclusion chromatography, and when examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) under denaturing conditions, resolved to heavy (H) and light (L) chains of 76 and 27 KDD, respectively. Affinity purified native HSB Ig was used to immunize a goat which produced specific anti-HSB Ig antibody (Ab). Purified native HSB Ig was also used to produce two murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with specific affinities for H and L chain moieties of the HSB Ig molecule. Both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies could be used individually in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure specific anti-BSA Ig in HSB serum. These antibodies could also be used in combination to measure total Ig in a capture ELISA format. Using both assays, the kinetics of the humoral immune response of HSB was measured for 98 days following two injections of BSA. PMID:12586484

  6. A simple and rapid colloidal gold-based immunochromatogarpic strip test for detection of FMDV serotype A.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Liang, Zhong; Ren, Wei-wei; Chen, Juan; Zhi, Xiao-ying; Qi, Guang-yu; Liu, Xiang-tao; Cai, Xue-peng

    2011-02-01

    A sandwich format immunochromatographic assay for detecting foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotypes was developed. In this rapid test, affinity purified polyclonal antibodies from Guinea pigs which were immunized with sucking-mouse adapted FMD virus (A/AV88(L) strain) were conjugated to colloidal gold beads and used as the capture antibody, and affinity purified polyclonal antibodies from rabbits which were immunized with cell-culture adapted FMD virus (A/CHA/09 strain) were used as detector antibody. On the nitrocellulose membrane of the immunochromatographic strip, the capture antibody was laid on a sample pad, the detector antibody was printed at the test line(T) and goat anti-guinea pigs IgG antibodies were immobilized to the control line(C). The lower detection limit of the test for a FMDV 146S antigen is 11.7 ng/ml as determined in serial tests after the strip device was assembled and the assay condition optimization. No cross reactions were found with FMDV serotype C, Swine vesicular disease (SVD), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and vesicular exanthema of swine virus (VES) viral antigens with this rapid test. Clinically, the diagnostic sensitivity of this test for FMDV serotypes A was 88.7% which is as same as an indirect-sandwich ELISA. The specificity of this strip test was 98.2% and is comparable to the 98.7% obtained with indirect-sandwich ELISA. This rapid strip test is simple, easy and fast for clinical testing on field sites; no special instruments and skills are required, and the result can be obtained within 15 min. To our knowledge, this is the first rapid immunochromatogarpic assay for serotype A of FMDV. PMID:21331888

  7. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease in a case of persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mitterer, M; Pescosta, N; Fend, F; Larcher, C; Prang, N; Schwarzmann, F; Coser, P; Huemer, H P

    1995-07-01

    Persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (PPBL) is a rare haematological disorder. It is characterized by activated and morphologically atypical B lymphocytes and polyclonal IgM production and has been associated with female sex, cigarette smoking, and HLA-DR7 expression. We report a case of PPBL with intermitting symptoms compatible with a chronic fatigue syndrome, recurrent erythema nodosum and multiforme. Serological findings suggested a chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Messenger RNA of EBV immediate early gene transactivation BZLF1 was detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes by reverse transcriptase PCR indicating a persistent replication of the virus. Over 2 years of observation we detected varying numbers of atypical lymphocytes. These cells hybridized with a probe specific for the EBV internal repeat region (BamHI W) which indicates a productive infection. Of interest, no reaction was observed with a probe specific for the latency-associated small RNAs (EBERs). The immunological phenotype of the polyclonal B cells was similar to B-cell lines immortalized by EBV in vitro, expressing a number of activation molecules (CD23, CD25, CD54) and the bcl-2 protein. In summary, our findings suggest that persistent EBV replication might be crucial in the development of lymphoproliferative disorders such as PPBL. PMID:7646989

  8. Evaluation of Breast Cancer Polyclonality by Combined Chromosome Banding and Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Manuel R; Tsarouha, Haroula; Kraggerud, Sigrid M; Pandis, Nikos; Dimitriadis, Euthymios; Andersen, Johan A; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Heim, Sverre

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetically unrelated clones have been detected by chromosome banding analysis in many breast carcinomas. Because these karyotypic studies were performed on short-term cultured samples, it may be argued that in vitro selection occurred or that small clones may have arisen during culturing. To address this issue, we analyzed 37 breast carcinomas by G-banding and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), a fluorescent in situ hybridization-based screening technique that does not require culturing or tumor metaphases. All but two of the 37 karyotypically abnormal cases presented copy number changes by CGH. The picture of genomic alterations revealed by the two techniques overlapped only partly. Sometimes the CGH analysis revealed genomic imbalances that belonged to cell populations not picked up by the cytogenetic analysis and in other cases, especially when the karyotypes had many markers and chromosomes with additional material of unknown origin, CGH gave a more reliable overall picture of the copy number gains and losses. However, besides sometimes revealing cell populations with balanced chromosome aberrations or unbalanced changes that nevertheless remained undetected by CGH, G-banding analysis was essential to understand how the genomic imbalances arose in the many cases in which both techniques detected the same clonal abnormalities. Furthermore, because CGH pictures only imbalances present in a significant proportion of the test sample, the very detection by this technique of imbalances belonging to apparently small, cytogenetically unrelated clones of cells proves that these clones must have been present in vivo. This constitutes compelling evidence that the cytogenetic polyclonality observed after short-term culturing of breast carcinomas is not an artifact. PMID:11494114

  9. Evidence of polyclonality in neurofibromatosis type 2–associated multilobulated vestibular schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Ramita; Pemov, Alex; Kim, H. Jeffrey; Morgan, Keaton L.; Vasquez, Raul A.; Chittiboina, Prashant; Wang, Xiang; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Butman, John A.; Stewart, Douglas R.; Asthagiri, Ashok R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a tumor syndrome that results from mutation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene. The hallmark of NF2 is the presence of bilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS). Though NF2-associated and sporadic VS share identical histopathologic findings and cytogenetic alterations, NF2-associated VS often appears multilobulated, is less responsive to radiosurgery, and has worse surgical outcomes. Temporal bone autopsy specimens and MRI of the inner ear performed on NF2 patients suggest that multiple discrete tumors may be present within the labyrinth and cerebellopontine angle. Methods Treatment-naïve ears in patients enrolled in a prospective NF2 natural history study (NIH#08-N-0044) were included for MRI analysis. T2-weighted and postcontrast T1-weighted MRIs were evaluated for the presence of multiple discrete tumors or a multilobulated mass. Peripheral blood (germline) and regional samples of tumor tissue were procured from consecutive patients enrolled in this study undergoing resection of a multilobulated VS (MVS). Histopathologic evaluation and genetic analysis (single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, NF2 sequencing) were performed on each specimen. Results Over half of NF2 ears harbored either an MVS (60/139 ears) or multiple discrete masses (19/139 ears). For 4 successive MVSs, genetic analysis revealed an admixture of cell populations, each with its own somatic NF2 mutation or deletion. Conclusions These findings suggest that the majority of NF2-associated VSs are polyclonal, such that the tumor mass represents a collision of multiple, distinct tumor clones. This explains the characteristic lobulated gross appearance of NF2-associated VS, and may also explain the substantially different treatment outcomes compared with sporadic VS. PMID:25452392

  10. Identification of dominant epitopes of synthetic immunocontraceptive vaccines that induce antibodies in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meng; Zeng, Weiguang; Pagnon, Joanne; Walker, John; Ghosh, Souravi; Wang, Lin-Fa; Jackson, David C

    2005-08-31

    The specificities of immunoglobulin G antibodies obtained from the sera of dogs inoculated with totally synthetic immunocontraceptive vaccine candidates based on luteinising hormone releasing hormone (LHRH: amino acid sequence HWSYGLRPG) were examined using peptides expressed in a phage display library. The three vaccine candidates each contained a different T helper-cell epitope chemically linked with the same LHRH amino acid sequence HWSYGLRPG and all of them elicited high antibody titres against the hormone. Delineation of epitopes recognised by sera from vaccinated dogs using a phage display library indicated that two of the three vaccine candidates induced antibody directed to the consensus sequence xHWSxxLxxx whereas the third vaccine candidate induced antibody against the consensus sequence xxxxxxxRPx. Two of the three vaccine candidates elicited antibodies against B cell epitopes present within the helper T-cell epitope component of the vaccine whereas the third vaccine did not. The occurrence of anti-T helper cell epitope antibodies appeared to have little or no effect on the generation of the anti-LHRH responses indicating that carrier-induced epitope suppression was not operating here. Our results also demonstrated that with animal sera of high quality, it is possible to delineate immunodominant epitopes recognised by polyclonal antibodies with high efficiency using phage display library. The approach has utility in the definition of immunodominant epitopes, which may "decoy" antibody responses away from other epitopes, which may be more useful in prophylaxis or therapy. PMID:15927323

  11. Expression of human protein S100A7 (psoriasin), preparation of antibody and application to human larynx squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Up-regulation of S100A7 (Psoriasin), a small calcium-binding protein, is associated with the development of several types of carcinomas, but its function and possibility to serve as a diagnostic or prognostic marker have not been fully defined. In order to prepare antibodies to the protein for immunohistochemical studies we produced the recombinant S100A7 protein in E. coli. mRNA extracted from human tracheal tumor tissue which was amplified by RT-PCR to provide the region coding for the S100A7 gene. The amplified fragment was cloned in the vector pCR2.1-TOPO and sub-cloned in the expression vector pAE. The protein rS100A7 (His-tag) was expressed in E. coli BL21::DE3, purified by affinity chromatography on an Ni-NTA column, recovered in the 2.0 to 3.5 mg/mL range in culture medium, and used to produce a rabbit polyclonal antibody anti-rS100A7 protein. The profile of this polyclonal antibody was evaluated in a tissue microarray. Results The rS100A7 (His-tag) protein was homogeneous by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry and was used to produce an anti-recombinant S100A7 (His-tag) rabbit serum (polyclonal antibody anti-rS100A7). The molecular weight of rS100A7 (His-tag) protein determined by linear MALDI-TOF-MS was 12,655.91 Da. The theoretical mass calculated for the nonapeptide attached to the amino terminus is 12,653.26 Da (delta 2.65 Da). Immunostaining with the polyclonal anti-rS100A7 protein generated showed reactivity with little or no background staining in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells, detecting S100A7 both in nucleus and cytoplasm. Lower levels of S100A7 were detected in non-neoplastic tissue. Conclusions The polyclonal anti-rS100A7 antibody generated here yielded a good signal-to-noise contrast and should be useful for immunohistochemical detection of S100A7 protein. Its potential use for other epithelial lesions besides human larynx squamous cell carcinoma and non-neoplastic larynx should be explored in future. PMID:22082027

  12. Epitope specificity of murine and human bactericidal antibodies against PorA P1.7,16 induced with experimental meningococcal group B vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rouppe van der Voort, E M; Kuipers, B; Brugghe, H F; van Unen, L M; Timmermans, H A; Hoogerhout, P; Poolman, J T

    1997-03-01

    Synthetic peptides derived from the predicted loops 1 and 4 of meningococcal PorA, sero-subtype P1.7,16, were used to study the epitope specificity of murine and human PorA P1.7,16 bactericidal antibodies. The predicted loops 1 and 4 are surface exposed and carry in their apices the sero-subtype epitopes P1.7 (loop 1) or P1.16 (loop 4), respectively. Peptides were synthesized as mono- and multimeric peptides. Murine monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were induced with meningococcal whole cell preparations. Polyclonal antibodies were evoked in volunteers after one immunization with 50 micrograms or 100 micrograms protein of a hexavalent meningococcal PorA vesicle vaccine. The induction of PorA antibodies was determined in ELISA using purified PorA P1.7,16. The epitope specificity of anti-PorA antibodies for both murine and human antibodies could be demonstrated by direct peptide ELISA using overlapping multimeric peptides almost spanning the entire loops 1 or 4 of the protein. The capacity of peptides to inhibit the bactericidal activity of murine and human antibodies was investigated using meningococcal strain H44/76 (B:15:P1.7,16) as a target strain. Bactericidal activities could be inhibited with both monomeric and multimeric peptides derived from epitopes P1.7 and P1.16. PMID:9093834

  13. Complement-mediated bactericidal activity of human antibodies to poly alpha 2-->8 N-acetylneuraminic acid, the capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B.

    PubMed

    Mandrell, R E; Azmi, F H; Granoff, D M

    1995-11-01

    Serum antibodies to Neisseria meningitidis group B (MenB) polysaccharide are reported not to elicit bacteriolysis in the presence of human complement. To reexamine this question, we evaluated the ability of two human IgM anti-MenB polysaccharide monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and seven human MenB polysaccharide-reactive human IgM paraproteins to elicit bacteriolysis. In the presence of human complement, both MAbs and five of the seven paraproteins were bactericidal at antibody concentrations of 0.25-9.6 micrograms/mL (50% killing). Activity of the respective antibodies was enhanced 200- to > 10,000-fold when rabbit complement was used instead of human complement. With rabbit complement, the bactericidal activity of human IgM polyclonal antibody or MAb to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) polysaccharide but not human IgG polyclonal antibody or MAb to Hib polysaccharide was similarly augmented. Thus, for both MenB and Hib, IgM antipolysaccharide antibodies elicit complement-mediated bactericidal activity in the presence of human complement, and the use of rabbit complement yields spuriously high activity. PMID:7594665

  14. Characterization of MARCKS (Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) identified by a monoclonal antibody generated against chick embryo neural retina.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, F R; Hellman, U; Baz, A; Arruti, C

    1999-04-13

    To identify molecular markers of cell differentiation in developing nervous tissue, monoclonal antibodies against chick embryo neural retina were made. One of them, 3C3mAb, recognized a developmentally regulated antigen present in several organs of the CNS. Data from MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and peptide sequencing of the immuno-affinity purified protein indicated identity of the antigen with MARCKS. The immunoreactive material was always found as a unique polypeptide (Mr 71 kDa) in SDS-PAGE, however isoelectrofocusing revealed the existence of several bands (pI ranging from 4.0 to 4.5). Interestingly some retinal cell types, as photoreceptors, exhibited an extremely significant decrease in the intensity of the immunoreactive material during the final phases of terminal differentiation while others, as some retinal neurons, maintained the immunoreactivity when fully differentiated. Taken together these results indicate that MARCKS, a protein susceptible of several posttranslational modifications as myristoylation and phosphorylation at variable extent, may act differently in neural retina cell types. PMID:10198238

  15. Effects of Environmental Factors on Soluble Expression of a Humanized Anti-TNF-α scFv Antibody in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sina, Mohammad; Farajzadeh, Davoud; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The bacterial cultivation conditions for obtaining anti-TNF-α single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody as the soluble product in E. coli was investigated. Methods: To avoid the production of inclusion bodies, the effects of lactose, IPTG, incubation time, temperature, shaking protocol, medium additives (Mg+2, sucrose), pH, osmotic and heat shocks were examined. Samples from bacterial growth conditions with promising results of soluble expression of GST-hD2 scFv were affinity purified and quantified by SDS-PAGE and image processing for further evaluation. Results: The results showed that cultivation in LB medium under induction by low concentrations of lactose and incubation at 10 °C led to partial solubilization of the expressed anti-TNF-α scFv (GST-hD2). Other variables which showed promising increase in soluble expression of GST-hD2 were osmotic shock and addition of magnesium chloride. Furthermore, addition of sucrose to medium suppressed the expression of scFv completely. The other finding was that the addition of sorbitol decreased the growth rate of bacteria. Conclusion: It can be concluded that low cultivation temperature in the presence of low amount of inducer under a long incubation time or addition of magnesium chloride are the most effective environmental factors studied for obtaining the maximum solubilization of GST-hD2 recombinant protein. PMID:26819916

  16. Standardization of an enzyme immunoassay for the in vitro potency assay of inactivated tissue culture rabies vaccines: determination of the rabies virus glycoprotein with polyclonal antisera.

    PubMed

    Thraenhart, O; Ramakrishnan, K

    1989-10-01

    A non-competitive enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) has been standardized to supplement the in vivo potency test used for the quality control of inactivated tissue culture vaccines against rabies. The essentials of the ELISA were: fixation of the virus in different dilutions of vaccine on the surface of microtitre plates; testing of the reference and up to six test vaccines on one plate; incubation with polyclonal antisera to rabies virus glycoprotein containing an excess of antibody; further incubation with a species-specific anti-IgG coupled to peroxidase; a final incubation with a substrate. The incubation periods were 1 h, 1 h and 30 min both at +37 degrees C. The relative potency determinations were made graphically or by a computer using a parallel line bioassay in which the potencies of the vaccines of unknown potency were tested against the reference preparation on a single microtitre plate. Under these conditions inactivated rabies vaccines of different types (virus strains, cell substrates, inactivation and concentration procedures) were tested for potency. Furthermore, it was possible with this in vitro method to assay adjuvanted vaccines, in process samples such as tissue culture supernatants with live or inactivated rabies virus, concentrates, and vaccines undergoing thermal stability tests. The rabies glycoprotein antigen-antibody reaction was highly specific according to the results and the glycoprotein content was measured quantitatively. The potency determined by the in vitro ELISA correlated with the in vivo NIH protection potency test. The lower limit of detection of the ELISA was 0.015 IU/ml. Quantitative antigen determination was possible with both homologous and heterologous antisera to rabies virus glycoprotein when vaccines of the same virus strain were tested. When the potencies of vaccines of different virus strain specificity were calculated, it was necessary to take into account the strain-specific antigenicity. Even so vaccines of high

  17. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A.; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J.; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Townsend, Alain R.

    2015-01-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses. PMID:26011643

  18. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W; Daniels, Rodney S; Townsend, Alain R

    2015-07-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses. PMID:26011643

  19. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Guillen, Eduardo; Love, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for any particular antigen remains limited. Microengraving is a soft lithographic technique that provides a rapid and efficient alternative for discovering new mAbs. This protocol describes how to use microengraving to screen mouse hybridomas to establish new cell lines producing unique mAbs. Single cells from a polyclonal population are isolated into an array of microscale wells (~105 cells per screen). The array is then used to print a protein microarray, where each element contains the antibodies captured from individual wells. The antibodies on the microarray are screened with antigens of interest, and mapped to the corresponding cells, which are then recovered from their microwells by micromanipulation. Screening and retrieval require approximately 1–3 d (9–12 d including the steps for preparing arrays of microwells). PMID:19528952

  20. Llama-Derived Single Domain Antibodies Specific for Abrus Agglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ellen R.; Anderson, George P.; Zabetakis, Dan; Walper, Scott; Liu, Jinny L.; Bernstein, Rachael; Calm, Alena; Carney, James P.; O’Brien, Thomas W.; Walker, Jennifer L.; Garber, Eric A. E.

    2011-01-01

    Llama derived single domain antibodies (sdAb), the recombinantly expressed variable heavy domains from the unique heavy-chain only antibodies of camelids, were isolated from a library derived from llamas immunized with a commercial abrin toxoid preparation. Abrin is a potent toxin similar to ricin in structure, sequence and mechanism of action. The selected sdAb were evaluated for their ability to bind to commercial abrin as well as abrax (a recombinant abrin A-chain), purified abrin fractions, Abrus agglutinin (a protein related to abrin but with lower toxicity), ricin, and unrelated proteins. Isolated sdAb were also evaluated for their ability to refold after heat denaturation and ability to be used in sandwich assays as both capture and reporter elements. The best binders were specific for the Abrus agglutinin, showing minimal binding to purified abrin fractions or unrelated proteins. These binders had sub nM affinities and regained most of their secondary structure after heating to 95 °C. They functioned well in sandwich assays. Through gel analysis and the behavior of anti-abrin monoclonal antibodies, we determined that the commercial toxoid preparation used for the original immunizations contained a high percentage of Abrus agglutinin, explaining the selection of Abrus agglutinin binders. Used in conjunction with anti-abrin monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, these reagents can fill a role to discriminate between the highly toxic abrin and the related, but much less toxic, Abrus agglutinin and distinguish between different crude preparations. PMID:22174977

  1. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Guillen, Eduardo; Love, J Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for any particular antigen remains limited. Microengraving is a soft lithographic technique that provides a rapid and efficient alternative for discovering new mAbs. This protocol describes how to use microengraving to screen mouse hybridomas to establish new cell lines producing unique mAbs. Single cells from a polyclonal population are isolated into an array of microscale wells (approximately 10(5) cells per screen). The array is then used to print a protein microarray, where each element contains the antibodies captured from individual wells. The antibodies on the microarray are screened with antigens of interest, and mapped to the corresponding cells, which are then recovered from their microwells by micromanipulation. Screening and retrieval require approximately 1-3 d (9-12 d including the steps for preparing arrays of microwells). PMID:19528952

  2. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  3. Effect of specific antibodies on the cell-associated spread of pseudorabies virus in monolayers of different cell types.

    PubMed

    Nauwynck, H J; Pensaert, M B

    1995-01-01

    The effect of specific pseudorabies virus (PRV) antibodies on the enlargement of plaques produced by PRV were studied in monolayers of different cell types. The plaque size was used as parameter for the efficacy of the cell-associated spread (CAS) of PRV. First, the effect of anti-PRV hyperimmune serum on the plaque growth was examined in monolayers of the continuous cell lines ST, SK-6 and MDCK and monolayers of the primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts, endothelial cells and endometrial cells. A tenfold increase in the serum concentration did reduce the plaque size with 50% in both SK-cells and fibroblasts and with 40, 28 and 16% in MDCK, endothelial and endometrial cells, respectively. In ST cells, no change in size was observed with increasing antibody concentrations. Secondly, the effects of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against PRV glycoproteins gB, gC, gD and gE and polyclonal antibodies against gC were evaluated in SK-6 cells. MAbs against gB, gD and gE were able to reduce the CAS with a cumulative effect between mAbs against gD and either mAbs against gB or mAbs against gE. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against gC did not change the plaque size. PMID:7611884

  4. Dissecting Polyclonal Vaccine-Induced Humoral Immunity against HIV Using Systems Serology.

    PubMed

    Chung, Amy W; Kumar, Manu P; Arnold, Kelly B; Yu, Wen Han; Schoen, Matthew K; Dunphy, Laura J; Suscovich, Todd J; Frahm, Nicole; Linde, Caitlyn; Mahan, Alison E; Hoffner, Michelle; Streeck, Hendrik; Ackerman, Margaret E; McElrath, M Juliana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Pau, Maria G; Baden, Lindsey R; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Barouch, Dan H; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Alter, Galit

    2015-11-01

    While antibody titers and neutralization are considered the gold standard for the selection of successful vaccines, these parameters are often inadequate predictors of protective immunity. As antibodies mediate an array of extra-neutralizing Fc functions, when neutralization fails to predict protection, investigating Fc-mediated activity may help identify immunological correlates and mechanism(s) of humoral protection. Here, we used an integrative approach termed Systems Serology to analyze relationships among humoral responses elicited in four HIV vaccine trials. Each vaccine regimen induced a unique humoral "Fc fingerprint." Moreover, analysis of case:control data from the first moderately protective HIV vaccine trial, RV144, pointed to mechanistic insights into immune complex composition that may underlie protective immunity to HIV. Thus, multi-dimensional relational comparisons of vaccine humoral fingerprints offer a unique approach for the evaluation and design of novel vaccines against pathogens for which correlates of protection remain elusive. PMID:26544943

  5. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts. PMID:23851482

  6. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts. PMID:23851482

  7. Specific antibody-mediated detection of Brochothrix thermosphacta in situ in British fresh sausage.

    PubMed

    Stringer, S C; Chaffey, B J; Dodd, C E; Morgan, M R; Waites, W M

    1995-04-01

    A rabbit polyclonal antibody-linked probe was developed which detected 76% of 800 food isolates of the spoilage bacterium Brochothrix thermosphacta when cells were bound to nitrocellulose. In slide cross-reaction tests all six environmental isolates tested were stained but the type strain was not. The antibody did not cross-react with Listeria grayi, L. monocytogenes, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus mutans, Bacillus cereus or B. subtilis. The antibody-linked probe detected Br. thermosphacta in thin sections of British fresh sausage when the viable count was greater than 10(6) g-1. Cells were detected mainly within 1 or 2 mm of the surface on the loose starchy material. They were not detected within muscle blocks or in the centre of the sausage. Such results suggest that growth of this organism occurs close to the surface of the sausage. PMID:7538105

  8. A potent adjuvant effect of CD40 antibody attached to antigen

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Tom A; Mccormick, Adele L; Carlring, Jennifer; Heath, Andrew W

    2003-01-01

    There is great potential for novel vaccines based on recombinant proteins and synthetic peptides. Unfortunately these antigens often lack the immunogenicity of whole, killed pathogens used in traditional vaccines. Thus there is strong interest in the identification of immunological adjuvants with low reactogenicity, but high potency, to enhance immune responses and realize the potential of these new vaccine strategies. CD40 antibodies have been shown to have adjuvant effects when administered at very high doses. These large doses are impractical and induce a cascade of cytokine release giving rise to septic shock-like symptoms, as well as splenomegaly and polyclonal antibody production. We show here that a very small amount of CD40 antibody can exhibit potent adjuvant effects when attached to soluble antigen. The lack of detectable systemic effects indicates that this method may be a powerful and practical means of enhancing the efficacy of recombinant vaccines. PMID:12709021

  9. Deoxyribonuclease activity of polyclonal IgGs: a putative serological marker in patients with spondyloarthritides.

    PubMed

    Kundzer, Alena V; Volkova, Margarita V; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Rödiger, Stefan; Schierack, Peter; Generalov, I; Nevinsky, Georgy A; Roggenbuck, Dirk

    2013-07-01

    Antibodies executing catalytic activity are referred to as antibody enzymes or short "abzymes" and may have diagnostic relevance. Abzymes with deoxyribonuclease (DNase) activity have been demonstrated in patients with autoimmune and infectious diseases. Despite several reports on the occurrence of DNase abzymes in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, conclusive data about DNase activity of antibodies in patients with spondyloarthritides (SpAs) are lacking. In recent cross-sectional studies evaluating levels of IgG DNase activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), reactive arthritis (ReA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS), DNase activity of IgG has been assessed by the rivanol clot method and confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Remarkably, levels of IgG DNase activity were significantly higher in sera of SpA patients than those in control subjects. In patients with PsA, ReA, and AS, a positive correlation of DNase IgG activity with synovitis, disease activity, and stage of spondylitis was observed, respectively. Given the involvement of autoimmune reactions in cytolysis and connective tissue degradation in PsA, ReA, and to a lesser extent in AS, abzymes might have an impact on the pathophysiology of SpAs. Detection of IgG DNase activity in patients suffering from SpA represents an exciting new research field and may assist in the differential diagnosis of SpA. PMID:23592052

  10. Purification of the Immunogenic Fractions and Determination of Toxicity in Mesobuthus eupeus (Scorpionida: Buthidae) Venom

    PubMed Central

    Khoobdel, Mehdi; Zahraei-Salehi, Taghi; Nayeri-Fasaei, Bahar; Khosravi, Mohammad; Omidian, Zahra; Motedayen, Mohammad Hassan; Akbari, Abolfazal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Scorpions stings are a health problem in many parts of the world. Mesobuthus eupeus (Buthidae) is the most prevalent species in the Middle East and Central Asia. Definition of toxicogenic and immunogenic characteristics of the venom is necessary to produce antidote. In this study, the noted properties of M. eupeus venom were evaluated. Methods: Venom was obtained by milking M. eupeus scorpions for lyophilization. Toxicity was determined after injecting the venom to albino mice and calculating LD50. Polyclonal antibodies against M. eupeus venom were obtained from immunized rabbits. The CH-Sepharose 4B column was used for isolating the specific antibodies. 10 mg of the affinity-purified antibodies were conjugated with a CH-Sepharose 4B column and M. eupeus venom was applied to the column. The bound fragments were eluted using hydrogen chloride (pH: 2.5). Crude venom and affinity-purified fractions of the venom were analyzed by SDS-PAGE technique. Results: Lethal dose (LD) was 8.75, 11.5 and 4.5 mg/kg for IP, SC and IV respectively. The LD50 of M. eupeus venom was 6.95 mg/kg. The crude venom had 12 detectable bands with molecular weights of 140, 70, 50, 33, 30, 27, 22, 18, 14, 10 kDa and two bands less than 5 kDa. The affinity-purified venom presented eight bands. The 27 kDa band was clearly sharper than other bands but 70, 18, 10 and one of the less than 5 kDa bands were not observed. Conclusions: Contrary to popular belief, which know scorpion venom as non-immunogenic composition, the current study was shown that the most fractions of the M. eupeus are immunogenic. PMID:24409439

  11. The development and validation of an immunoassay for the measurement of anti-thymidine phosphorylase antibodies in mouse and dog sera.

    PubMed

    Gasson, Charlotte; Levene, Michelle; Bax, Bridget E

    2013-01-01

    Erythrocyte encapsulated thymidine phosphorylase (EE-TP) is under development as an enzyme replacement therapy for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), a fatal metabolic disorder resulting from an inherited deficiency of the enzyme thymidine phosphorylase. We report here the development and validation of a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) bridging immunoassay to support Good Laboratory Practice (GLP)-compliant preclinical safety studies of EE-TP in the mouse and dog. Affinity-purified rabbit anti-E. coli thymidine phosphorylase (TP) antibody was used as a calibrator standard with an effective working range of 2.5-7500 ng/mL. The minimum required dilution (MRD) for both mouse and dog sera was 1:10. The mean analytical recoveries for anti-TP antibodies spiked into serum at 70 ng/mL and 7000 ng/mL were 117.9% and 93.2%, respectively for mouse, and 112.0% and 104.3%, respectively for dog. The intra-assay precision (coefficient of variation, CV) ranged between 1.1% and 8.0% in mouse serum, and 1.9% and 2.5% in dog serum. Inter-assay precision ranged between -1.6% and 6.7% in mouse serum, and -13.0% and -2.5% in dog serum. Assay cut-point/screening cut-point correction factors were 201.37 and 44.4, respectively for mouse and dog sera. For future analysis of positive test samples, less than 37.12% (mouse) and 31.41% (dog) inhibition of the assay signal in the confirmation assay will confer anti-TP antibody specificity. Assay drift and hook effects (prozone) were not observed. The intra-assay and inter-assay accuracy for robustness were within ±20%. PMID:23146222

  12. Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies from an HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy Trial Target Multiple Epitopes and Preferentially Use the VH1 Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Pollara, Justin; Moody, M. Anthony; Alpert, Michael D.; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B.; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Kozink, Daniel M.; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Lewis, George K.; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T.; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2012-01-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs. PMID:22896626

  13. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating antibodies from an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial target multiple epitopes and preferentially use the VH1 gene family.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Pollara, Justin; Moody, M Anthony; Alpert, Michael D; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kozink, Daniel M; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Lewis, George K; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2012-11-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs. PMID:22896626

  14. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2016-06-30

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  15. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  16. Radioimmunoassay of digoxin in serum using monoclonal antibodies and assessment of interference by digoxin-like immunoreactive substances

    SciTech Connect

    Loucari-Yiannakou, E.; Yiannakou, L.; Souvatzoglou, A.; Diamandis, E.P. )

    1990-03-01

    We used 7 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and one polyclonal antibody to develop radioimmunoassays (RIAs) for digoxin in serum or plasma. These RIAs were tested for measuring apparent digoxin concentrations in serum from patients receiving the drug, from normal individuals, and in cord blood plasma. We found that two MoAbs cross-reacted significantly with substances in cord blood. The magnitude of cross-reactivity was dependent on the incubation time and temperature. Under equilibrium conditions, one antibody gave apparent digoxin values in cord blood plasma averaging 2.15 ng/ml. We suggest that this cross-reactivity is partially due to progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone in cord blood plasma. The antibody that shows high cross-reactivity with digoxin-like immunoreactive substances may prove a useful tool for studies dealing with characterization of the cross-reacting compounds.

  17. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  18. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page ... Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content ...

  19. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ... may use this test to help diagnose pernicious anemia. Pernicious anemia is a decrease in red blood ...

  20. Lyme disease antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  1. Applying bioinformatics for antibody epitope prediction using affinity-selected mimotopes - relevance for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Galina F; Denisov, Dimitri A; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2010-01-01

    To properly characterize protective polyclonal antibody responses, it is necessary to examine epitope specificity. Most antibody epitopes are conformational in nature and, thus, cannot be identified using synthetic linear peptides. Cyclic peptides can function as mimetics of conformational epitopes (termed mimotopes), thereby providing targets, which can be selected by immunoaffinity purification. However, the management of large collections of random cyclic peptides is cumbersome. Filamentous bacteriophage provides a useful scaffold for the expression of random peptides (termed phage display) facilitating both the production and manipulation of complex peptide libraries. Immunoaffinity selection of phage displaying random cyclic peptides is an effective strategy for isolating mimotopes with specificity for a given antiserum. Further epitope prediction based on mimotope sequence is not trivial since mimotopes generally display only small homologies with the target protein. Large numbers of unique mimotopes are required to provide sufficient sequence coverage to elucidate the target epitope. We have developed a method based on pattern recognition theory to deal with the complexity of large collections of conformational mimotopes. The analysis consists of two phases: 1) The learning phase where a large collection of epitope-specific mimotopes is analyzed to identify epitope specific "signs" and 2) The identification phase where immunoaffinity-selected mimotopes are interrogated for the presence of the epitope specific "signs" and assigned to specific epitopes. We are currently using computational methods to define epitope "signs" without the need for prior knowledge of specific mimotopes. This technology provides an important tool for characterizing the breadth of antibody specificities within polyclonal antisera. PMID:21067548

  2. Type-specific neutralization of the human immunodeficiency virus with antibodies to env-encoded synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Palker, T J; Clark, M E; Langlois, A J; Matthews, T J; Weinhold, K J; Randall, R R; Bolognesi, D P; Haynes, B F

    1988-01-01

    A synthetic peptide (SP-10-IIIB) with an amino acid sequence [Cys-Thr-Arg-Pro-Asn-Asn-Asn-Thr-Arg-Lys-Ser-Ile-Arg-Ile-Gln-Arg-Gly-Pro -Pro-Gly-(Tyr); amino acids 303-321] from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolate human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) HTLV-IIIB envelope glycoprotein gp120 was coupled to tetanus toxoid and used to raise goat antibodies to HIV gp120. Goat anti-SP-10-IIIB serum bound to the surface of HTLV-IIIB-infected CEM T cells but not to the surface of HTLV-IIIRF-infected or uninfected CEM T cells. Anti-SP-10-IIIB antibodies also selectively bound to gp120 from lysates of HTLV-IIIB cells in immunoblot assays. Twenty-one percent of sera (28 of 175) from patients seropositive for HIV contained antibodies that reacted with SP-10-IIIB in RIA. Human anti-SP-10-IIIB antibodies affinity purified from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient serum bound to HTLV-IIIB-infected cells and immunoprecipitated gp120. Goat antibodies to SP-10-IIIB neutralized HTLV-IIIB (80% neutralization titer of 1/600), inhibited HTLV-IIIB-induced syncytium formation, but did not neutralize HIV isolates HTLV-IIIRF or HTLV-IIIMN or inhibit syncytium formation with these isolates. Also, goat antiserum to an homologous synthetic peptide [SP-10-IIIRF(A), (Cys)-Arg-Lys-Ser-Ile-Thr-Lys-Gly-Pro-Gly-Arg-Val-Ile-Tyr] from gp120 of HIV isolate HTLV-IIIRF inhibited syncytium formation by HTLV-IIIRF, but did not inhibit syncytium formation by HTLV-IIIB or by HTLV-IIIMN. Thus, the amino acid sequences of SP-10-IIIB and SP-10-IIIRF(A) define homologous regions of gp120 that are important in type-specific virus neutralization. The identification of these type-specific neutralizing epitopes should facilitate the design of a polyvalent, synthetic vaccine for AIDS. Images PMID:2450351

  3. Antibody specificities of children living in a malaria endemic area to inhibitory and blocking epitopes on MSP-1 19 of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Omosun, Y O; Adoro, S; Anumudu, C I; Odaibo, A B; Uthiapibull, C; Holder, A A; Nwagwu, M; Nwuba, R I

    2009-03-01

    Merozoite surface protein-1(19) (MSP-1(19)) specific antibodies which include processing inhibitory, blocking and neutral antibodies have been identified in individuals exposed to Plasmodium falciparum. Here we intend to look at the effect of single and multiple amino acid substitutions of MSP-1(19) on the recognition by polyclonal antibodies from children living in Igbo-Ora, Nigeria. This would provide us with information on the possibility of eliciting mainly processing inhibitory antibodies with a recombinant MSP-1(19) vaccine. Blood was collected from children in the rainy season and binding of anti-MSP-1(19) antibodies to modified mutants of MSP-1(19) was analysed by ELISA. The MSP-1(19) mutant proteins with single substitutions at positions 22 (Leu-->Arg), 43 (Glu-->Leu) and 53 (Asn-->Arg) and the MSP-1(19) mutant protein with multiple substitutions at positions 27+31+34+43 (Glu-->Tyr, Leu-->Arg, Tyr-->Ser, Glu-->Leu); which had inhibitory epitopes; had the highest recognition. Children recognised both sets of mutants with different age groups having different recognition levels. The percentage of malaria positive individuals (32-80%) with antibodies that bound to the mutants MSP-1(19) containing epitopes that recognise only processing inhibitory and not blocking antibodies, were significantly different from those with antibodies that did not bind to these mutants (21-28%). The amino acid substitutions that abolished the binding of blocking antibodies without affecting the binding of inhibitory antibodies are of particular interest in the design of MSP-1(19) based malaria vaccines. Although these MSP-1(19) mutants have not been found in natural population, their recognition by polyclonal antibodies from humans naturally infected with malaria is very promising for the future use of MSP-1(19) mutants in the design of a malaria vaccine. PMID:19081386

  4. Moult-inhibiting fusion protein augments while polyclonal antisera attenuate moult stages and duration in Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Vrinda, S; Jasmin, C; Sivakumar, K C; Jose, Blessy; Philip, Rosamma; Bright Singh, I S

    2016-07-01

    Moulting in crustaceans is regulated by moult-inhibiting hormone (MIH) of the CHH family neuropeptides. The inhibitory functions of MIH have pivotal roles in growth and reproduction of Penaeus monodon. In this study, we report the expression of a thioredoxin-fused mature MIH I protein (mf-PmMIH I) of P. monodon in a bacterial system and its use as antigen to raise polyclonal antiserum (anti-mf-PmMIH I). The mature MIH I gene of 231bp, that codes for 77 amino acids, was cloned into the Escherichia coli thioredoxin gene fusion expression system. The translation expression vector construct (mf-PmMIH I+pET32a+) upon induction produced 29.85kDa mature MIH I fusion protein (mf-PmMIH I). The purified fusion protein was used as exogenous MIH I and as antigen to raise polyclonal antisera. When fusion protein (mf-PmMIH I) was injected into D2 and D3 stages of juvenile shrimp, the moult cycle duration was extended significantly to 16.67±1.03 and 14.67±1.03days respectively compared to that of 11.67±1.03days in controls. Moult duration was further reduced to 8.33±0.82days when polyclonal antiserum (anti-mf-PmMIH I - 1:500 dilutions) was injected. Anti-mf-PmMIH I immunolocalized MIH I producing neurosecretory cells in the eyestalk of P. monodon. In short, the present manuscript reports an innovative means of moult regulation in P. monodon with thioredoxin fused MIH I and antisera developed. PMID:27179884

  5. Application of streptavidin mass spectrometric immunoassay tips for immunoaffinity based antibody phage display panning.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chai Fung; Ler, Lian Wee; Choong, Yee Siew; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Ismail, Asma; Tye, Gee Jun; Lim, Theam Soon

    2016-01-01

    Antibody phage display panning involves the enrichment of antibodies against specific targets by affinity. In recent years, several new methods for panning have been introduced to accommodate the growing application of antibody phage display. The present work is concerned with the application of streptavidin mass spectrometry immunoassay (MSIA™) Disposable Automation Research Tips (D.A.R.T's®) for antibody phage display. The system was initially designed to isolate antigens by affinity selection for mass spectrometry analysis. The streptavidin MSIA™ D.A.R.T's® system allows for easy attachment of biotinylated target antigens on the solid surface for presentation to the phage library. As proof-of-concept, a domain antibody library was passed through the tips attached with the Hemolysin E antigen. After binding and washing, the bound phages were eluted via standard acid dissociation and the phages were rescued for subsequent panning rounds. Polyclonal enrichment was observed for three rounds of panning with five monoclonal domain antibodies identified. The proposed method allows for a convenient, rapid and semi-automated alternative to conventional antibody panning strategies. PMID:26581498

  6. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  7. Purification of antibodies to O antigen of Salmonella Typhimurium from human serum by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Goodall, Margaret; Cobbold, Mark; Saul, Allan; Maclennan, Calman A

    2013-01-31

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS) are a common cause of bacteraemia in children and HIV-infected adults in Sub-Saharan Africa. We have previously shown that antibodies play a key role in both bactericidal and cellular mechanisms of immunity to NTS, but found that high concentrations of antibody to Salmonella Typhimurium O antigen (OAg) in the serum of some HIV-infected African adults is associated with impaired killing of NTS. To further investigate the function of antibodies to the OAg of NTS, we developed a method to purify these antibodies from human serum by affinity chromatography. Purified Salmonella Typhimurium OAg was activated with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) via two different chemistries before linking to N-hydroxysuccinamide-Sepharose resin: one ADH molecule was introduced per OAg chain on its terminal 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid sugar (OAg-ADH), or multiple ADH molecules were attached along the OAg chain after oxidation with sodium periodate (OAgoxADH). Both resulting columns worked well when tested with commercial polyclonal anti-O:4,5 antibodies from rabbit serum. Over 90% of the applied antibodies bound to the resin and 89% of these antibodies were then eluted as detected by ELISA. OAg-ADH was preferred as the method for OAg derivatisation as it does not modify the saccharide chain and can be applied to OAg from different bacteria. Both columns were able to bind OAg-specific antibodies in human serum, but antibody recovery was initially low. Different elution buffers were tested and different amounts of OAg-ADH were linked to the resin to improve the yield. Optimal recovery (51%) was obtained by loading 1mg of activated OAg per ml of resin and eluting with 0.1M glycine, 0.1M NaCl pH2.4. The column matrix could be regenerated following elution with no detectable loss in performance for over ten uses. This method offers the potential to purify antibodies to Salmonella OAg from polyclonal serum following vaccination or natural exposure to Salmonella

  8. Monoclonal antibody evidence for structural similarities between the central rod regions of actinin and dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T M; Ellis, J M; Ginjaar, I B; van Paassen, M M; van Ommen, G J; Moorman, A F; Cartwright, A J; Morris, G E

    1990-10-15

    A monoclonal antibody, MANDYS141, binds to both dystrophin and actinin on Western blots (SDS-denatured), but only to actinin in frozen sections of human muscle (native conformation). It differs from a polyclonal cross-reacting antiserum in that it binds to several muscle isoforms of actinin (smooth, fast and slow) from man, mouse and chicken and recognises a quite different part of the proposed triple-helical region of dystrophin (amino acids 1750-2248). The results suggest that structural homologies between actinin and dystrophin occur more than once in their central helical regions and provide experimental support for an actinin-like central rod model for dystrophin. PMID:1699800

  9. Requirement for Fc Effector Mechanisms in the APOBEC3/Rfv3-Dependent Neutralizing Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Halemano, Kalani; Barrett, Bradley S.; Heilman, Karl J.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses are often evaluated in the absence of Fc-dependent immune effectors. In murine Friend retrovirus infection, Apobec3/Rfv3 promotes a potent polyclonal NAb response. Here, we show that the Apobec3/Rfv3-dependent NAb response correlated with virus-specific IgG2 titers and that the in vivo neutralization potency of Apobec3/Rfv3-resistant antisera was dependent on activating Fcγ receptors but not complement. The data strengthen retroviral vaccine strategies aimed at eliciting NAbs that activate specific Fcγ receptors. PMID:25589647

  10. High-throughput assay for measuring monoclonal antibody self-association and aggregation in serum.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoning; Geng, Steven B; Chiu, Mark L; Saro, Dorina; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-03-18

    Subcutaneous delivery is one of the preferred administration routes for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). High antibody dosing requirements and small injection volumes necessitate formulation and delivery of highly concentrated mAb solutions. Such elevated antibody concentrations can lead to undesirable solution behaviors such as mAb self-association and aggregation, which are relatively straightforward to detect using various biophysical methods because of the high purity and concentration of antibody formulations. However, the biophysical properties of mAbs in serum can also impact antibody activity, but these properties are less well understood because of the difficulty characterizing mAbs in such a complex environment. Here we report a high-throughput assay for directly evaluating mAb self-association and aggregation in serum. Our approach involves immobilizing polyclonal antibodies specific for human mAbs on gold nanoparticles, and then using these conjugates to capture human antibodies at a range of subsaturating to saturating mAb concentrations in serum. Antibody aggregation is detected at subsaturating mAb concentrations via blue-shifted plasmon wavelengths due to the reduced efficiency of capturing mAb aggregates relative to monomers, which reduces affinity cross-capture of mAbs by multiple conjugates. In contrast, antibody self-association is detected at saturating mAb concentrations via red-shifted plasmon wavelengths due to attractive interparticle interactions between immobilized mAbs. The high-throughput nature of this assay along with its compatibility with unusually dilute mAb solutions (0.1-10 μg per mL) should make it useful for identifying antibody candidates with high serum stability during early antibody discovery. PMID:25714504

  11. Bispecific antibodies and CARs: generalized immunotherapeutics harnessing T cell redirection.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, Eugene A; Morse, Richard J; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-06-01

    To realize the full potential of cancer immunotherapy, the latest generation immunotherapeutics are designed to harness the potent tumor-killing capacity of T cells. Thus, to mobilize T cells, new optimized bispecific antibody (BsAb) designs, enabling efficient polyclonal redirection of cytotoxic activity through binding to CD3 and a Tumor Associated Antigen (TAA) and refined genetically modified T cells have recently expanded the arsenal of available options for cancer treatment. This review presents the current understanding of the parameters crucial to the design of optimal T cell redirecting BsAb and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells. However, there are additional questions that require thorough elucidation. Both modalities will benefit from design changes that may increase the therapeutic window. One such approach could employ the discrimination afforded by multiple TAA to significantly increase selectivity. PMID:26963133

  12. Anti-11[E]-pyroglutamate-modified amyloid β antibodies cross-react with other pathological Aβ species: relevance for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garmendia, Roxanna; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Vanessa; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Govezensky, Tzipe; Acero, Gonzalo; Manoutcharian, Karen; Cribbs, David H; Gevorkian, Goar

    2010-12-15

    N-truncated/modified forms of amyloid beta (Aß) peptide are found in diffused and dense core plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome patients as well as animal models of AD, and represent highly desirable therapeutic targets. In the present study we have focused on N-truncated/modified Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 11 (AβN11(pE)). We identified two B-cell epitopes recognized by rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies. Interestingly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies bound also to full-length Aβ1-42 and N-truncated/modified AβN3(pE), suggesting that the three peptides may share a common B-cell epitope. Importantly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) antibodies bound to naturally occurring Aβ aggregates present in brain samples from AD patients. These results are potentially important for developing novel immunogens for targeting N-truncated/modified Aβ aggregates as well, since the most commonly used immunogens in the majority of vaccine studies have been shown to induce antibodies that recognize the N-terminal immunodominant epitope (EFRH) of the full length Aβ, which is absent in N-amino truncated peptides. PMID:20864186

  13. ANTI-11[E]-PYROGLUTAMATE-MODIFIED AMYLOID β ANTIBODIES CROSS-REACT WITH OTHER PATHOLOGICAL Aβ SPECIES: RELEVANCE FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Garmendia, Roxanna; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Vanessa; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Govezensky, Tzipe; Acero, Gonzalo; Manoutcharian, Karen; Cribbs, David H.; Gevorkian, Goar

    2010-01-01

    N-truncated/modified forms of amyloid beta (Aß) peptide are found in diffused and dense core plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome patients as well as animal models of AD, and represent highly desirable therapeutic targets. In the present study we have focused on Ntruncated/modified Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 11 (AβN11(pE)). We identified two B-cell epitopes recognized by rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies. Interestingly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies bound also to full-length Aβ1-42 and N-truncated/modified AβN3(pE), suggesting that the three peptides may share a common B-cell epitope. Importantly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) antibodies bound to naturally occurring Aβ aggregates present in brain samples from AD patients. These results are potentially important for developing novel immunogens for targeting N-truncated/modified Aβ aggregates as well, since the most commonly used immunogens in the majority of vaccine studies have been shown to induce antibodies that recognize the N-terminal immunodominant epitope (EFRH) of the full length Aβ, which is absent in N-amino truncated peptides. PMID:20864186

  14. Defective disposal of immune complexes and polyclonal B cell activation persist long after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, N.A.; Cavallo, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus experience clinical exacerbation during superimposed bacterial infection. Previous studies in mice indicated that heightened immune phenomena during exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) appear to be related, in part, to polyclonal B cell activation, to abnormal disposal of immune complexes (IC), and to increased localization of IC in tissues. To investigate whether such effects were reversible, we administered bacterial LPS to C57BL/6 mice for 5 weeks. Control mice received vehicle alone. We then discontinued LPS, and 6 weeks later LPS and control mice were challenged with a subsaturating dose of radiolabeled IC; the removal of IC from the circulation, their localization in the liver, spleen, and kidney were determined. In comparison to values in control mice, in mice previously exposed to LPS, serologic features of polyclonal B cell activation persisted; liver uptake of pathogenic IC (greater than Ag2Ab2) was normal, but removal of small size IC (less than or equal to Ag2Ab2) from the circulation was delayed; localization of IC in the kidneys was enhanced, and pathologic proteinuria developed. The effects of repeated exposure to bacterial LPS are partially reversible, but they last long after LPS is discontinued and may contribute to altered disposal of IC, enhanced organ localization of IC, and organ dysfunction.

  15. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests. PMID:25163614

  16. Cancer therapy with trifunctional antibodies: linking innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Hess, Juergen; Ruf, Peter; Lindhofer, Horst

    2012-01-01

    Trifunctional antibodies (trAbs) are promising novel anticancer biologics with a particular mode of action capable of linking innate with adaptive immunity. Based on their unique structure, trifunctional IgG-like heterodimeric antibodies, consisting of nonhuman mouse and rat immunoglobulin halves are able to redirect T lymphocytes, as well as accessory cells, to the tumor site. This recruitment of immune cells is accompanied by cellular activation events elicited by anti-CD3, as well as Fcγ-receptor engagement of trAbs supported by a proinflammatory Th1-biased cytokine milieu. All necessary immunological factors required for long-term vaccination-like effects are stimulated along trAb-mediated therapeutic interventions. Thus, the concerted interplay of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity plus the polyclonal T-cell cytotoxicity and Fcγ-receptor-driven induction of long-lasting immune responses after the initial tumor cell elimination represent the major hallmarks of trAb-mediated treatment of malignant diseases. PMID:22149036

  17. Influence of unlabeled monoclonal anti-mouse antibody on the clearance rate of radiolabeled mouse monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Laino, L.; Jackson, G.; Fisher, S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-05-01

    High blood background levels of intact radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) after intravenous (iv) injection are problematic. The injection of unlabeled polyclonal antimouse Abs following injection with labeled MoAbs produces accelerated MoAb clearance. This study evaluates a Mo antimouse Ab for efficacy of accelerating radio MoAb clearance. HB-58 is a rat/mouse MoAb which binds strongly to mouse kappa light chains present in 95% of murine monoclonals. It is unreactive with rat, rabbit or human kappa chains. Six rats were injected iv with 30 ..mu..Ci (approximately 6 ..mu..g) of I-125 UPC-10, a non-specific IgG2ak MoAb that is bound to well by HB-58. No alteration was seen in the clearance of UPC-10 in any of the animals, regardless of the injection type or amount on the second day. In addition, no increase in liver or spleen activity was seen in those rats that received HB-58. The lack of change in rate of clearance and biodistribution of UPC-10 after the iv injection of a purified, specific, anti-mouse MoAb is in marked contrast to the accelerated clearance reported following polyclonal anti-mouse antibody administration. This may be due to the inability of MoAbs to cross link. These preliminary studies suggest that Mo anti-mouse Abs, at these dose levels, are not useful in achieving increased rates of radiolabeled murine MoAb clearance.

  18. Xenohybridization of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cells for the production of human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tiebout, R F; Stricker, E A; Oosterhof, F; van Heemstra, D J; Zeijlemaker, W P

    1985-12-01

    Transformation of human B lymphocytes, obtained from hyperimmune donors with Epstein-Barr virus, yields polyclonal cell populations in which a minority of cells produce IgG antibodies of predetermined specificity, whereas the majority of cells produce 'non-specific' immunoglobulin (mainly of the IgM class). Such lymphoblastoid cell lines can be easily propagated in high-density cultures. Because cloning at 1 cell per well is not possible, stabilization of lymphoblastoid cell lines by limiting dilution is not feasible and most newly established lines cease to produce specific antibody within a few weeks. Xenohybrids, resulting from fusion of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cells with NS1 mouse plasmacytoma cells, can be cloned at 1 cell per well. Stable xenohybridoma subclones, producing antibody of the desired specificity, can be isolated after a series of limiting dilutions. In a model system, we have studied the efficiency of xenohybridization of human lymphoblastoid cells. Using this system, we have constructed IgG anti-tetanus-toxoid- and IgG anti-HBsAg-producing cell lines. Next, we investigated whether transformation with Epstein-Barr virus is essential in such a two-step procedure or whether a polyclonal stimulator, such as pokeweed mitogen, could also be used. It was found that antibody-producing xenohybrids can be obtained after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. However, this latter system is subject to more variations and lacks the advantage of pre-selection of antibody-producing cells as compared to xenohybridization after transformation. PMID:3003887

  19. Rapid Transient Production in Plants by Replicating and Non-Replicating Vectors Yields High Quality Functional Anti-HIV Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Sainsbury, Frank; Sack, Markus; Stadlmann, Johannes; Quendler, Heribert; Fischer, Rainer; Lomonossoff, George P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The capacity of plants and plant cells to produce large amounts of recombinant protein has been well established. Due to advantages in terms of speed and yield, attention has recently turned towards the use of transient expression systems, including viral vectors, to produce proteins of pharmaceutical interest in plants. However, the effects of such high level expression from viral vectors and concomitant effects on host cells may affect the quality of the recombinant product. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess the quality of antibodies transiently expressed to high levels in plants, we have expressed and characterised the human anti-HIV monoclonal antibody, 2G12, using both replicating and non-replicating systems based on deleted versions of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) RNA-2. The highest yield (approximately 100 mg/kg wet weight leaf tissue) of affinity purified 2G12 was obtained when the non-replicating CPMV-HT system was used and the antibody was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Glycan analysis by mass-spectrometry showed that the glycosylation pattern was determined exclusively by whether the antibody was retained in the ER and did not depend on whether a replicating or non-replicating system was used. Characterisation of the binding and neutralisation properties of all the purified 2G12 variants from plants showed that these were generally similar to those of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-produced 2G12. Conclusions Overall, the results demonstrate that replicating and non-replicating CPMV-based vectors are able to direct the production of a recombinant IgG similar in activity to the CHO-produced control. Thus, a complex recombinant protein was produced with no apparent effect on its biochemical properties using either high-level expression or viral replication. The speed with which a recombinant pharmaceutical with excellent biochemical characteristics can be produced transiently in plants makes CPMV-based expression vectors

  20. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  1. Studies on the gonococcal IgA1 protease II. Improved methods of enzyme purification and production of monoclonal antibodies to the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Blake, M S; Eastby, C

    1991-11-22

    Two types of extremely active proteases that cleave human IgA1 are produced by pathogenic Neisseria in minute concentrations. To study the antigenicity of these enzymes, a simplified method is described to purify these enzymes from large batch cultures to obtain a sufficient quantity of these IgA1 proteases to study these characteristics. In addition, we describe the production of both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies to one of these enzymes. One such monoclonal antibody seemed directed toward the active site of the IgA1 protease and inhibited its enzymatic activity. PMID:1960418

  2. Specific cross-reactivity of antibodies raised against two major stress proteins, stress 70 and chaperonin 60, in diverse species

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, B.M.; Martin, L.S.; Nakagawa, P.A. ); Hunter, D.A. . Biologisk Inst.); Miller, S. ); Ullrich, S.J. . National Cancer Inst.)

    1994-08-01

    Immunoblot analysis using several antibodies raised against two major families of stress proteins, stress 70 and chaperonin 60 (cpn60), which are highly conserved in mammals, was carried out in diverse species often used in environmental research, including molluscs, annelids, crustaceans, echinoderms, and fish. The study revealed surprisingly different patterns of antibody cross-reactivity among species. The monoclonal anti-stress 70 antibody (mAb) C92 was the least cross-reactive for all species tested. The mAbs anti-stress 70 N27, BRM-22, and 3a3 were more broadly cross-reactive, but their binding specifities to stress 70 isoforms in the diverse species tested did not correlate with one another or follow taxonomic lines. The polyclonal anti-stress 70 antibody reacted to proteins in the 70 to 74 kDa range in all fish examined and in most invertebrates. When a polyclonal antibody (pAb) raised against cpn60 from a moth was used as a probe, specific binding was observed with proteins in the 60 to 64 kDa range in all fish examined and in most invertebrates. However, the size and number of isoforms that reacted with the pAb were species specific. These data suggest that these two major stress protein families are less highly conserved in invertebrates and fish than in mammals. Therefore, to minimize misinterpretation when using antibodies in heterologous assays with species in which the stress response has not been well characterized, it is important to determine which isoforms of stress 70 react with a particular antibody and to take into account the differential regulation of each member of this multigene family.

  3. Latex agglutination test based on single-chain Fv recombinant antibody fragment.

    PubMed

    Golchin, M; Khalili-Yazdi, A; Karamouzian, M; Abareghi, A

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies have been proposed as invaluable tools for various therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Here, we describe the development of a novel latex agglutination test (LAT) using single-chain Fv recombinant antibody fragment for the detection of K99(+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains. For the production of a single-chain Fv antibody fragment (scFv) against the major colonization factor (FanC) of K99 antigen, the scFv gene was integrated into a bacterial expression vector under the control of T7 promoter. After high-level expression of soluble scFv (approximately 50 mg/l) in flask cultivation of E. coli DE3 and purification, scFv was immobilized on different latex particles, and then, these sensitized beads were used in LAT. Results obtained with our latex reagents revealed that the recombinant antibody-coated particles were able to give a good agglutination signal with purified antigen, intact cells displaying this protein and clinical specimens. The strength of agglutination of scFv-coated beads for antigen was comparable to that of polyclonal anti-K99-coated particles. However, the assay proved to be simple and rapid, similar to conventional LATs, and owing to more convenient and economical production of recombinant antibodies, they can be considered as a useful reagent for replacing monoclonal antibodies in LATs. PMID:21916915

  4. Distinct oligoclonal band antibodies in multiple sclerosis recognize ubiquitous self-proteins.

    PubMed

    Brändle, Simone M; Obermeier, Birgit; Senel, Makbule; Bruder, Jessica; Mentele, Reinhard; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Kristoferitsch, Wolfgang; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Wekerle, Hartmut; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Dornmair, Klaus

    2016-07-12

    Oligoclonal Ig bands (OCBs) of the cerebrospinal fluid are a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), a disabling inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). OCBs are locally produced by clonally expanded antigen-experienced B cells and therefore are believed to hold an important clue to the pathogenesis. However, their target antigens have remained unknown, mainly because it was thus far not possible to isolate distinct OCBs against a background of polyclonal antibodies. To overcome this obstacle, we copurified disulfide-linked Ig heavy and light chains from distinct OCBs for concurrent analysis by mass spectrometry and aligned patient-specific peptides to corresponding transcriptome databases. This method revealed the full-length sequences of matching chains from distinct OCBs, allowing for antigen searches using recombinant OCB antibodies. As validation, we demonstrate that an OCB antibody from a patient with an infectious CNS disorder, neuroborreliosis, recognized a Borrelia protein. Next, we produced six recombinant antibodies from four MS patients and identified three different autoantigens. All of them are conformational epitopes of ubiquitous intracellular proteins not specific to brain tissue. Our findings indicate that the B-cell response in MS is heterogeneous and partly directed against intracellular autoantigens released during tissue destruction. In addition to helping elucidate the role of B cells in MS, our approach allows the identification of target antigens of OCB antibodies in other neuroinflammatory diseases and the production of therapeutic antibodies in infectious CNS diseases. PMID:27325759

  5. Neutrophil Priming by Cigarette Smoke Condensate and a Tobacco Anti-Idiotypic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Koethe, Susan M.; Kuhnmuench, John R.; Becker, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    A polyphenol-rich reagent, referred to as CSC, was isolated from cigarette smoke condensate and shown to prime purified human neutrophils. A mouse monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody directed against the polyphenol-reactive determinants on a rabbit polyclonal anti-tobacco glycoprotein antibody was generated and shown to also prime neutrophils. After priming by CSC or tobacco anti-idiotypic antibody, there was a 2.5-fold to threefold increase in CD11b/18 expression and doubling of the number of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine receptors on the cells. The primed cells showed a twofold increase, compared with unprimed cells, in production of superoxide and release of neutrophil elastase after stimulation with formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. Neutrophils in peripheral blood of cigarette smokers have been shown to be primed and more responsive to activating agents. The priming effects attributed to whole cigarette smoke have been demonstrated in these studies using purified neutrophils and CSC or tobacco anti-idiotypic antibody. These studies are a first step in testing the hypothesis that the inflammatory process contributing to progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in ex-smokers may be driven, in part, by tobacco anti-idiotypic antibodies. This hypothesis is novel and carries with it the implication of a heretofore unrecognized autoimmune component in the disease process manifested through production of anti-idiotypic antibodies with tobacco-like activity. PMID:11073832

  6. An antibody toolkit for the study of membrane traffic in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Falko; Gillingham, Alison K.; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Galindo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism has been pivotal to understanding the developmental processes of metazoans. However, the use of flies for studying subcellular organization is hampered by a paucity of reliable reagents to label specific organelles. Here, we describe the generation of mouse monoclonal antibodies against a set of markers of the secretory and endocytic pathways, along with goat polyclonal antibodies against two Golgi proteins. We show that the monoclonal antibodies are highly specific and sufficiently sensitive to detect endogenous proteins in crude extracts by immunoblotting with little background staining. By immunofluorescence the major compartments of the membrane traffic system (including the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi, and early and late endosomes) are labeled by at least one antibody. Moreover, the antibodies can be used to label organelles in fly tissues including salivary glands and wing imaginal discs. We anticipate that these antibodies will provide a useful tool kit to facilitate the investigation of how the endomembrane system functions and varies in the diverse tissue types of metazoans. PMID:27256406

  7. An antibody toolkit for the study of membrane traffic in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Falko; Gillingham, Alison K; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Galindo, Antonio; Munro, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The use of Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism has been pivotal to understanding the developmental processes of metazoans. However, the use of flies for studying subcellular organization is hampered by a paucity of reliable reagents to label specific organelles. Here, we describe the generation of mouse monoclonal antibodies against a set of markers of the secretory and endocytic pathways, along with goat polyclonal antibodies against two Golgi proteins. We show that the monoclonal antibodies are highly specific and sufficiently sensitive to detect endogenous proteins in crude extracts by immunoblotting with little background staining. By immunofluorescence the major compartments of the membrane traffic system (including the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi, and early and late endosomes) are labeled by at least one antibody. Moreover, the antibodies can be used to label organelles in fly tissues including salivary glands and wing imaginal discs. We anticipate that these antibodies will provide a useful tool kit to facilitate the investigation of how the endomembrane system functions and varies in the diverse tissue types of metazoans. PMID:27256406

  8. Second generation competitive enzyme immunoassay for detection of bovine antibody to Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K; Smith, P; Yu, W L; Elmgren, C; Nicoletti, P; Perez, B; Bermudez, R; Renteria, T

    2007-09-20

    A second generation competitive enzyme immunoassay (CELISA) for detection of bovine antibody to Brucella abortus was developed. This assay was different from previously developed CELISAs in that the detection reagent used was a recombinant combination of the receptor portions of protein A and protein G, labelled with horseradish peroxidase. This eliminates the need for polyclonal anti-mouse-enzyme conjugate reagents for detection thus allowing for true standardization. The assay utilized a monoclonal antibody specific for a common epitope of the O-polysaccharide (OPS) of smooth lipopolysaccharide (SLPS) derived from B. abortus S1119.3 but which did not react with protein A/G. This monoclonal antibody was used to compete with antibody in the bovine test serum. Binding of bovine antibody to the smooth lipopolysaccharide antigen was then measured directly with the protein A/G enzyme conjugate. In this case, development of colour in the reaction was indicative of the presence of bovine antibody. The performance characteristics, sensitivity, specificity and exclusion of B. abortus S19 vaccinated animals, of the assay were very similar to those of the classical CELISA. PMID:17467200

  9. Aqueous two-phase system patterning of detection antibody solutions for cross-reaction-free multiplex ELISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, John P.; White, Joshua B.; Simon, Arlyne B.; Tsuei, Michael; Paczesny, Sophie; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-05-01

    Accurate disease diagnosis, patient stratification and biomarker validation require the analysis of multiple biomarkers. This paper describes cross-reactivity-free multiplexing of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) using aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) to confine detection antibodies at specific locations in fully aqueous environments. Antibody cross-reactions are eliminated because the detection antibody solutions are co-localized only to corresponding surface-immobilized capture antibody spots. This multiplexing technique is validated using plasma samples from allogeneic bone marrow recipients. Patients with acute graft versus host disease (GVHD), a common and serious condition associated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, display higher mean concentrations for four multiplexed biomarkers (HGF, elafin, ST2 and TNFR1) relative to healthy donors and transplant patients without GVHD. The antibody co-localization capability of this technology is particularly useful when using inherently cross-reactive reagents such as polyclonal antibodies, although monoclonal antibody cross-reactivity can also be reduced. Because ATPS-ELISA adapts readily available antibody reagents, plate materials and detection instruments, it should be easily transferable into other research and clinical settings.

  10. Aqueous two-phase system patterning of detection antibody solutions for cross-reaction-free multiplex ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, John P.; White, Joshua B.; Simon, Arlyne B.; Tsuei, Michael; Paczesny, Sophie; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Accurate disease diagnosis, patient stratification and biomarker validation require the analysis of multiple biomarkers. This paper describes cross-reactivity-free multiplexing of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) using aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) to confine detection antibodies at specific locations in fully aqueous environments. Antibody cross-reactions are eliminated because the detection antibody solutions are co-localized only to corresponding surface-immobilized capture antibody spots. This multiplexing technique is validated using plasma samples from allogeneic bone marrow recipients. Patients with acute graft versus host disease (GVHD), a common and serious condition associated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, display higher mean concentrations for four multiplexed biomarkers (HGF, elafin, ST2 and TNFR1) relative to healthy donors and transplant patients without GVHD. The antibody co-localization capability of this technology is particularly useful when using inherently cross-reactive reagents such as polyclonal antibodies, although monoclonal antibody cross-reactivity can also be reduced. Because ATPS-ELISA adapts readily available antibody reagents, plate materials and detection instruments, it should be easily transferable into other research and clinical settings. PMID:24786974

  11. Mice are actively immunized after passive monoclonal antibody prophylaxis and ricin toxin challenge. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Lemley, P.V.; Wright, D.C.

    1992-12-31

    Mice passively immunized by a protective, anti-ricin A-chain monoclonal antibody, then challenged intravenously with ricin, were protected from a subsequent ricin challenge, and were actively immunized. Two significant advantages accrued from this experiment: the monoclonal antibody neutralized the toxicity of the ricin immunogen, and active immunization was achieved with very low antigen load (approx. 0.5 micrograms/mouse). We ruled out the possibility that residual monoclonal antibody provided the protection by using three independent criteria. There was significant (four orders of magnitude) enhancement of the immune response in the presence of the monoclonal antibody; control immunizations of mice with ricin A-chain, ricin B-chain or either chain with the monoclonal antibody did not induce active immunity; and the active immunization could not be replicated when protective goat polyclonal antibody was substituted for the monoclonal antibody. Because high titers were achieved rapidly without any adjuvant, we are currently investigating haptenized ricin to determine if anti-hapten monoclonal antibodies can be produced by this refined procedure.

  12. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  13. Anti-idiotypic antibody to an anti-alprenolol monoclonal antibody: promotion of ligand binding to the idiotype

    SciTech Connect

    Sawutz, G.; Homcy, C.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors previously described the production of four monoclonal antibodies to the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist alprenolol. One of these antibodies, 5B7 (IgG/sub 2a/k), was used to generate polyclonal anti-idiotypic antisera in rabbits. In contrast to the predicted results, the anti-idiotypic antisera (R-9) promoted (/sup 125/I)-CYP binding to the monoclonal antibody 5B7. In the presence of R-9 antisera (1:300 dilution), the binding affinity improved with the dissociation constant decreasing 100-fold from 10nM to 0.1nM. This effect could not be reproduced with pre-immune, rabbit anti-mouse, or antiidiotypic antisera generated to monoclonal antibodies of different specificity. Furthermore, R-9 alone did not bind ligand. The R-9 IgG fraction was isolated by DEAE-cellulose chromatography then adsorbed to a 5B7-immunoaffinity resin and eluted with 0.5 M NaCl. This yielded a fraction with enhanced binding activity. F(ab) fragments of 5B7 and R-9 produced the same effect indicating that polyvalency was not necessary for the enhanced ligand binding. Finally, the ligand alprenolol promoted the binding of (/sup 125/I)-5B7 to %-9 as assessed by fractionating the resulting soluble complex by size exclusion chromatography on a TSK-3000 HPLC column. These results demonstrate that anti-idiotypic antibodies can be generated which will promote the binding of antigen to the original idiotype.

  14. A polyclonal antibody based immunoassay detects seven subtypes of Shiga toxin 2 produced by escherichia coli in human and environmental samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase of outbreaks and illnesses linked to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) has necessitated the development of effective detection methods for these pathogens in various matrices. The best way to determine if a bacterial strain is a STEC is to examine the production of Shiga tox...

  15. A Single Amino Acid Deletion in the Matrix Protein of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Confers Resistance to a Polyclonal Swine Antibody with Broadly Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Luca N.; Monday, Nicholas; Calvert, Jay G.; Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of virus neutralization (VN) activity in 176 pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) identified one pig with broadly neutralizing activity. A Tyr-10 deletion in the matrix protein provided escape from broad neutralization without affecting homologous neutralizing activity. The role of the Tyr-10 deletion was confirmed through an infectious clone with a Tyr-10 deletion. The results demonstrate differences in the properties and specificities of VN responses elicited during PRRSV infection. PMID:25855739

  16. A simple nonradioactive method for the determination of the binding affinities of antibodies induced by hapten bioconjugates for drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Torres, Oscar B; Antoline, Joshua F G; Li, Fuying; Jalah, Rashmi; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C; Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R

    2016-02-01

    The accurate analytical measurement of binding affinities of polyclonal antibody in sera to heroin, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), and morphine has been a challenging task. A simple nonradioactive method that uses deuterium-labeled drug tracers and equilibrium dialysis (ED) combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to measure the apparent dissociation constant (K d) of antibodies to 6-AM and morphine is described. The method can readily detect antibodies with K d in the low nanomolar range. Since heroin is rapidly degraded in sera, esterase inhibitors were included in the assay, greatly reducing heroin hydrolysis. MS/MS detection directly measured the heroin in the assay after overnight ED, thereby allowing the quantitation of % bound heroin in lieu of K d as an alternative measurement to assess heroin binding to polyclonal antibody sera. This is the first report that utilizes a solution-based assay to quantify heroin-antibody binding without being confounded by the presence of 6-AM and morphine and to measure K d of polyclonal antibody to 6-AM. Hapten surrogates 6-AcMorHap, 6-PrOxyHap, MorHap, DiAmHap, and DiPrOxyHap coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) were used to generate high affinity antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In comparison to competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS which gave K d values in the nanomolar range, the commonly used competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measured the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values in the micromolar range. Despite the differences in K d and IC50 values, similar trends in affinities of hapten antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine were observed by both methods. Competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS revealed that among the five TT-hapten bioconjugates, TT-6-AcMorHap and TT-6-PrOxyHap induced antibodies that bound heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In contrast, TT-MorHap induced antibodies that poorly bound heroin, while TT-DiAmHap and TT-DiPrOxyHap induced antibodies either did not

  17. Identification of conformational epitopes for human IgG on Chemotaxis inhibitory protein of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Erika; Haas, Pieter-Jan; Walse, Björn; Hijnen, Marcel; Furebring, Christina; Ohlin, Mats; van Strijp, Jos AG; van Kessel, Kok PM

    2009-01-01

    Background The Chemotaxis inhibitory protein of Staphylococcus aureus (CHIPS) blocks the Complement fragment C5a receptor (C5aR) and formylated peptide receptor (FPR) and is thereby a potent inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis and activation of inflammatory responses. The majority of the healthy human population has antibodies against CHIPS that have been shown to interfere with its function in vitro. The aim of this study was to define potential epitopes for human antibodies on the CHIPS surface. We also initiate the process to identify a mutated CHIPS molecule that is not efficiently recognized by preformed anti-CHIPS antibodies and retains anti-inflammatory activity. Results In this paper, we panned peptide displaying phage libraries against a pool of CHIPS specific affinity-purified polyclonal human IgG. The selected peptides could be divided into two groups of sequences. The first group was the most dominant with 36 of the 48 sequenced clones represented. Binding to human affinity-purified IgG was verified by ELISA for a selection of peptide sequences in phage format. For further analysis, one peptide was chemically synthesized and antibodies affinity-purified on this peptide were found to bind the CHIPS molecule as studied by ELISA and Surface Plasmon Resonance. Furthermore, seven potential conformational epitopes responsible for antibody recognition were identified by mapping phage selected peptide sequences on the CHIPS surface as defined in the NMR structure of the recombinant CHIPS31–121 protein. Mapped epitopes were verified by in vitro mutational analysis of the CHIPS molecule. Single mutations introduced in the proposed antibody epitopes were shown to decrease antibody binding to CHIPS. The biological function in terms of C5aR signaling was studied by flow cytometry. A few mutations were shown to affect this biological function as well as the antibody binding. Conclusion Conformational epitopes recognized by human antibodies have been mapped on the

  18. Matrix effects in applying mono- and polyclonal ELISA systems to the analysis of weathered oils in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Pollard, S J T; Farmer, J G; Knight, D M; Young, P J

    2002-01-01

    Commercial mono- and polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems were applied to the on-site analysis of weathered hydrocarbon-contaminated soils at a former integrated steelworks. Comparisons were made between concentrations of solvent extractable matter (SEM) determined gravimetrically by Soxhlet (dichloromethane) extraction and those estimated immunologically by ELISA determination over a concentration range of 2000-330,000 mg SEM/kg soil dry weight. Both ELISA systems tinder-reported for the more weathered soil samples. Results suggest this is due to matrix effects in the sample rather than any inherent bias in the ELISA systems and it is concluded that, for weathered hydrocarbons typical of steelworks and coke production sites, the use of ELISA requires careful consideration as a field technique. Consideration of the target analyte relative to the composition of the hydrocarbon waste encountered appears critical. PMID:11858166

  19. Pure red cell aplasia associated with malignant thymoma, myasthenia gravis, polyclonal large granular lymphocytosis and clonal thymic T cell expansion.

    PubMed Central

    Handa, S I; Schofield, K P; Sivakumaran, M; Short, M; Pumphrey, R S

    1994-01-01

    A case with the triad of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), myasthenia gravis, and malignant thymoma is reported. There was a clonal proliferation of T cells within the thymoma, as demonstrated by a T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta chain gene rearrangement. However, despite a large granular lymphocytosis, clonality could not be shown in the peripheral blood either before or after thymectomy. There was no evidence of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 7 (HTLV1) infection. It is postulated that the clonal thymic T cell population secreted cytokine(s), which stimulated the polyclonal proliferation of large granular lymphocytes, which in turn suppressed erythropoiesis. Thymectomy removed the stimulus to the large granular lymphocytes and hence there was a resurgence of erythropoiesis. Images PMID:8089232

  20. Protective activities in mice of monoclonal antibodies against pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Sato, Y

    1990-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) protein, which is the most important protective antigen of Bordetella pertussis, has a hexameric structure composed of five subunits, designated S1 through S5. Immunoprotective activity of 20 different mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against pertussis toxin, 10 anti-S1, 1 anti-S2, 2 anti-S3, 4 anti-S23, and 3 anti-S4 antibodies, were investigated by aerosol and intracerebral challenges with virulent B. pertussis organisms in mice. Four anti-S1, named 1B7, 1D7, 3F11, and 10D6, and three anti-S23 antibodies, named 11E6, 10B5, and 10C9, showed the highest, and almost complete, protectivity against the aerosol challenge. Mouse protectivity against the intracerebral challenge was significant for these four anti-S1 MAbs but not for any of the three anti-S23 MAbs. Four anti-S1 and two anti-S4 MAbs did not protect the mice against either challenge. The other seven MAbs also showed dose-dependent moderate but significant protection against the aerosol challenge. In the aerosol challenge system, bacterial numbers and amounts of PT detected in the lung and the number of peripheral leukocytes were lower in the mice given the protective MAbs. All mice surviving 5 weeks after the infection produced high titers of antibodies against PT, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and agglutinogens from the challenge organisms. A combination of the protective MAbs 1B7 and 11E6 strongly suppressed the disease and mortality of the mice at smaller amounts than with the anti-PT polyclonal antibody. Although combinations of one of the protective MAb and anti-FHA or anti-agglutinogen 2 also showed extremely high mouse protection without development of symptoms of the disease, antibody titers of the survivors against PT, FHA, and agglutinogens were significantly low. The foregoing results suggest that some important protective epitopes should be in S1 and S2 and/or S3, although there are both differences and similarities in the protective roles between anti-S1 and anti-S23

  1. Protective activities in mice of monoclonal antibodies against pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Sato, Y

    1990-10-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) protein, which is the most important protective antigen of Bordetella pertussis, has a hexameric structure composed of five subunits, designated S1 through S5. Immunoprotective activity of 20 different mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against pertussis toxin, 10 anti-S1, 1 anti-S2, 2 anti-S3, 4 anti-S23, and 3 anti-S4 antibodies, were investigated by aerosol and intracerebral challenges with virulent B. pertussis organisms in mice. Four anti-S1, named 1B7, 1D7, 3F11, and 10D6, and three anti-S23 antibodies, named 11E6, 10B5, and 10C9, showed the highest, and almost complete, protectivity against the aerosol challenge. Mouse protectivity against the intracerebral challenge was significant for these four anti-S1 MAbs but not for any of the three anti-S23 MAbs. Four anti-S1 and two anti-S4 MAbs did not protect the mice against either challenge. The other seven MAbs also showed dose-dependent moderate but significant protection against the aerosol challenge. In the aerosol challenge system, bacterial numbers and amounts of PT detected in the lung and the number of peripheral leukocytes were lower in the mice given the protective MAbs. All mice surviving 5 weeks after the infection produced high titers of antibodies against PT, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and agglutinogens from the challenge organisms. A combination of the protective MAbs 1B7 and 11E6 strongly suppressed the disease and mortality of the mice at smaller amounts than with the anti-PT polyclonal antibody. Although combinations of one of the protective MAb and anti-FHA or anti-agglutinogen 2 also showed extremely high mouse protection without development of symptoms of the disease, antibody titers of the survivors against PT, FHA, and agglutinogens were significantly low. The foregoing results suggest that some important protective epitopes should be in S1 and S2 and/or S3, although there are both differences and similarities in the protective roles between anti-S1 and anti-S23

  2. Structural basis for quinine-dependent antibody binding to platelet integrin αIIbβ3

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianghai; Zhu, Jieqing; Bougie, Daniel W.; Aster, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is caused by antibodies that react with specific platelet-membrane glycoproteins when the provoking drug is present. More than 100 drugs have been implicated as triggers for this condition, quinine being one of the most common. The cause of DITP in most cases appears to be a drug-induced antibody that binds to a platelet membrane glycoprotein only when the drug is present. How a soluble drug promotes binding of an otherwise nonreactive immunoglobulin to its target, leading to platelet destruction, is uncertain, in part because of the difficulties of working with polyclonal human antibodies usually available only in small quantities. Recently, quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies were developed that recognize a defined epitope on the β-propeller domain of the platelet integrin αIIb subunit (GPIIb) only when the drug is present and closely mimic the behavior of antibodies found in human patients with quinine-induced thrombocytopenia in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of quinine to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of these antibodies and define in crystal structures the changes induced in the CDR by this interaction. Because no detectable binding of quinine to the target integrin could be demonstrated in previous studies, the findings indicate that a hybrid paratope consisting of quinine and reconfigured antibody CDR plays a critical role in recognition of its target epitope by an antibody and suggest that, in this type of drug-induced immunologic injury, the primary reaction involves binding of the drug to antibody CDRs, causing it to acquire specificity for a site on a platelet integrin. PMID:26282540

  3. A peptide mimic blocks the cross-reaction of anti-DNA antibodies with glomerular antigens.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Eryilmaz, E; Der, E; Pawar, R D; Guo, X; Cowburn, D; Putterman, C

    2016-03-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with renal antigens. Previously, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to self-antigens is isotype-dependent. Furthermore, significant variability in renal pathogenicity was seen among a panel of anti-DNA isotypes [derived from a single murine immunoglobulin (Ig)G3 monoclonal antibody, PL9-11] that share identical variable regions. In this study, we sought to select peptide mimics that effectively inhibit the binding of all murine and human anti-DNA IgG isotypes to glomerular antigens. The PL9-11 panel of IgG anti-DNA antibodies (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3) was used for screening a 12-mer phage display library. Binding affinity was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry and glomerular binding assays were used for the assessment of peptide inhibition of antibody binding to nuclear and kidney antigens. We identified a 12 amino acid peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP, or 'ALW') which binds to all PL9-11 IgG isotypes. Preincubation with the ALW peptide reduced the binding of the PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies to DNA, laminin, mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli significantly. Furthermore, we confirmed the specificity of the amino acid sequence in the binding of ALW to anti-DNA antibodies by alanine scanning. Finally, ALW inhibited the binding of murine and human lupus sera to dsDNA and glomeruli significantly. In conclusion, by inhibiting the binding of polyclonal anti-DNA antibodies to autoantigens in vivo, the ALW peptide (or its derivatives) may potentially be a useful approach to block anti-DNA antibody binding to renal tissue. PMID:26482679

  4. Demonstration of a boar testicular protein band that is immunoreactive to proacrosin and proacrosin binding protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yi, L S; Runion, C M; Polakoski, K L

    1992-04-30

    A testicular protein band has been identified and shown to be immunoreactive to both of the proacrosin (53-55 kd) and the proacrosin binding protein (28 kd) antibodies. pH 4.5 extracts of boar testis were prepared and subjected to Western blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies of the proacrosin and the proacrosin binding protein. In addition to their respective antigens, a distinct high molecular weight protein band of approximately 200 kd was detected by both of the antibodies. Gelatin SDS-PAGE analysis of the extracts showed that this protein band was proteinase active. These results suggest that the proacrosin molecule is present as a much higher molecular weight form in the boar testis than the currently known 53-55 kd forms that have been isolated from spermatozoa. PMID:1575748

  5. A historical essay on detection of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Niels; Wiik, Allan; Jayne, David R

    2015-04-01

    In this essay we describe a number of the known and not so known experiences of the early anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) days, explaining why and how we reached consensus on the standard indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) techniques, the naming of the two principal C- and P-ANCA patterns, why we chose to use IIF as the standard technique, how the solid phase assays have developed and where we stand today, the use of ANCA for diagnosis and the importance of using several techniques for that purpose, how ANCA titres are related to disease activity and the clinical impact of this, and finally the implications of ANCA being a natural, polyclonal antibody response against various epitopes in relation to diagnostics and disease patterns. PMID:25805749

  6. Bovine antibody against Cryptosporidium parvum elicits a circumsporozoite precipitate-like reaction and has immunotherapeutic effect against persistent cryptosporidiosis in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, M W; Cama, V A; Leary, H L; Sterling, C R

    1994-01-01

    , the defined antigens can be evaluated as subunit immunogens to produce better-characterized polyclonal antibody for control of cryptosporidiosis or as targets for monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. Images PMID:8168959

  7. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  8. Antibodies as effectors.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, L B

    2002-09-10

    Antibodies are critical in protection against extracellular microbial pathogens. Although antibodies also play a role in transplant/tumor rejection and in autoimmune disease, this paper focuses on defense against bovine infections. Effector mechanisms of different bovine isotypes, subisotypes and allotypes are discussed. The importance of antigen specificity is also stressed. PMID:12072231

  9. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  10. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  11. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  12. Antibodies in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression of antibodies in plants has several promising applications that are currently being developed. Plants are being considered for the large scale production of antibodies needed for medical purposes. The benefit of using plants is that they are able to perform post-translational modifi...

  13. [Recombinant antibodies against bioweapons].

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Pelat, Thibaut; Vidal, Dominique

    2009-12-01

    The threat posed by bioweapons (BW) could lead to the re-emergence of such deadly diseases as plague or smallpox, now eradicated from industrialized countries. The development of recombinant antibodies allows tackling this risk because these recombinant molecules are generally well tolerated in human medicine, may be utilized for prophylaxis and treatment, and because antibodies neutralize many BW. Recombinant antibodies neutralizing the lethal toxin of anthrax, botulinum toxins and the smallpox virus have in particular been isolated recently, with different technologies. Our approach, which uses phage-displayed immune libraries built from non-human primates (M. fascicularis) to obtain recombinant antibodies, which may later be super-humanized (germlinized), has allowed us to obtain such BWs-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20035695

  14. [Antiphospholipid antibodies in practice].

    PubMed

    Miyara, M; Diemert, M-C; Amoura, Z; Musset, L

    2012-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the occurrence of thrombotic or obstetrical events associated with the presence in the serum of patients of antibodies that are associated with thrombosis. For the diagnosis of APS, the presence of either lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein1 antibodies of IgG or IgM isotype is required through laboratory testing. Other autoantibodies such as antiphosphatidylethanolamin or antiphosphatidylserin/prothrombin complex antibodies may be interesting in the diagnosis of APS when common antiphospholipid antibodies are missing. These autoantibodies are still under evaluation for their diagnostic contribution. Despite numerous attempts, the assays that are available for the identification of antiphospholipid antibodies have not been standardized yet, which leads to high variability between reagents and laboratories. Thus, to optimize the biological monitoring of APS syndromes, it is mandatory to have consecutive samples analyzed in the same laboratory. PMID:22100197

  15. Affinity Purification of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M; McGarvey, Jeffery A

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that include antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant, or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facilitate assay reproducibility, economy, and reduced interference of nonspecific components as well as improved storage, stability, and bio-conjugation. Although not always necessary, the relative simplicity of antibody purification using commercially available protein-A, protein-G, or protein-L resins with basic chromatographic principles warrants purification when antibody source material is available in sufficient quantity. Here, we define three simple methods using immobilized (1) protein-A, (2) protein-G, and (3) protein-L agarose beads to yield highly purified antibody. PMID:26160561

  16. Influence of polyclonal immunoglobulins on the polymorphonuclear leukocyte response to lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella enteritidis as measured with luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, D R; Heinrich, D

    1994-01-01

    In gram-negative sepsis, the activation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the resulting production of superoxide and other oxygen radicals may be an important cause of tissue damage. A suppression of the PMN response to LPS stimulation would be therapeutically beneficial. The aim of this study was to determine whether different polyclonal immunoglobulins (Igs; 5S-Ig, 7S-Ig, and 19S-Ig) influence the PMN response to LPS of Salmonella enteritidis in vitro. The respiratory burst activity of PMN was measured with luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. After addition of a 5S-Ig solution containing F(ab')2 fragments of IgG and a 19S-Ig solution containing 12% polyclonal IgM, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence was reduced by 27% (P < 0.05) and 46% (P < 0.005), respectively. However, after addition of a 7S-Ig solution containing polyclonal IgG, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence was increased fourfold (P < 0.05). The results suggest that the influence of polyclonal Igs on PMN response to LPS stimulation is dependent on the Ig class, F(ab')2 fragments of IgG and IgM leading to LPS neutralization and IgG leading to the production of potentially toxic oxygen radicals. PMID:7927690

  17. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates from an Unusual Melioidosis Case Identifies a Polyclonal Infection with the Same Multilocus Sequence Type

    PubMed Central

    Sarovich, Derek S.; Viberg, Linda; Mayo, Mark; Kaestli, Mirjam; Tuanyok, Apichai; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Keim, Paul; Pearson, Talima; Currie, Bart J.

    2014-01-01

    Twelve Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates collected over a 32-month period from a patient with chronic melioidosis demonstrated identical multilocus sequence types (STs). However, whole-genome sequencing suggests a polyclonal infection. This study is the first to report a mixed infection with the same ST. PMID:25339397

  18. Polyclonal Mycobacterium avium infections in patients with AIDS: variations in antimicrobial susceptibilities of different strains of M. avium isolated from the same patient.

    PubMed Central

    von Reyn, C F; Jacobs, N J; Arbeit, R D; Maslow, J N; Niemczyk, S

    1995-01-01

    Broth microdilution MICs were determined for pairs of strains isolated from five AIDS patients with polyclonal Mycobacterium avium infection. Four (80%) of the five patients were infected simultaneously with strains having different antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. These findings have implications for the interpretation of susceptibility data in M. avium prophylaxis and treatment trials. PMID:7790424

  19. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies. PMID:27236551

  20. Antibodies against recombinant catalytic domain of lethal toxin of Clostridium sordellii neutralize lethal toxin toxicity in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Arya, Preetika; Ponmariappan, S; Singh, Lokendra; Prasad, G B K S

    2013-02-01

    Lethal toxin of Clostridium sordellii (MLD 150 ng/kg) is one of the most potent Clostridial toxins and is responsible for most of the diseases including sudden death syndrome in cattle, sheep and toxic shock syndrome, necrotizing faciitis, neonatal omphalitis and gangrene in humans. Lethal toxin (TcsL) is a single chain protein of about 270 kDa. In the present study, 1.6 kb DNA fragment encoding for the catalytic domain of TcsL was PCR amplified, cloned in pQE30 UA vector and expressed in E. coli SG 13009. The expression of recombinant lethal toxin protein (rTcsL) was optimized and it was purified under native conditions using a single step Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified recombinant protein was used for the production of polyclonal antibodies in mice and rabbit. The raised antibodies reacted specifically with the purified rTcsL and intact native lethal toxin on Western blot. The biological activity of the recombinant protein was tested in HeLa cells where it showed the cytotoxicity. Further, the polyclonal antibodies were used for in-vitro neutralization of purified rTcsL, acid precipitated C. sordellii and C. difficile native toxins in HeLa cells. Mice and rabbit anti-rTcsL sera effectively neutralized the cytotoxicity of rTcsL and C. sordellii native toxin but it did not neutralize the cytotoxicity of C. difficile toxin in HeLa cells. PMID:22894159

  1. Kinetics of antibody-induced modulation of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in a human epithelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sarmiento, Rosa E; Tirado, Rocio G; Valverde, Laura E; Gómez-Garcia, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    Background The binding of viral-specific antibodies to cell-surface antigens usually results in down modulation of the antigen through redistribution of antigens into patches that subsequently may be internalized by endocytosis or may form caps that can be expelled to the extracellular space. Here, by use of confocal-laser-scanning microscopy we investigated the kinetics of the modulation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigen by RSV-specific IgG. RSV-infected human epithelial cells (HEp-2) were incubated with anti-RSV polyclonal IgG and, at various incubation times, the RSV-cell-surface-antigen-antibody complexes (RSV Ag-Abs) and intracellular viral proteins were detected by indirect immunoflourescence. Results Interaction of anti-RSV polyclonal IgG with RSV HEp-2 infected cells induced relocalization and aggregation of viral glycoproteins in the plasma membrane formed patches that subsequently produced caps or were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis participation. Moreover, the concentration of cell surface RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins showed a time dependent cyclic variation and that anti-RSV IgG protected HEp-2 cells from viral-induced death. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that interaction between RSV cell surface proteins and specific viral antibodies alter the expression of viral antigens expressed on the cells surface and intracellular viral proteins; furthermore, interfere with viral induced destruction of the cell. PMID:17608950

  2. Development and utilization of camelid VHH antibodies from alpaca for 2,2',4,4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether detection.

    PubMed

    Bever, Candace R S; Majkova, Zuzana; Radhakrishnan, Rajeswaran; Suni, Ian; McCoy, Mark; Wang, Yanru; Dechant, Julie; Gee, Shirley; Hammock, Bruce D

    2014-08-01

    An antibody-based analytical method for the detection of a chemical flame retardant using antibody fragments isolated from an alpaca has been developed. One specific chemical flame retardant congener, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47), is often the major poly-BDE (PBDE) congener present in human and environmental samples and that which is the most frequently detected. An alpaca was immunized with a surrogate of BDE-47 covalently attached to a carrier protein. The resulting mRNA coding for the variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH) were isolated, transcribed to cDNA, and cloned into a phagemid vector for phage display library construction. Selection of VHHs recognizing BDE-47 was achieved by panning under carefully modified conditions. The assay sensitivity for detecting BDE-47 was down to the part-per-billion (microgram per liter) level. Cross-reactivity analyses confirmed that this method was highly selective for BDE-47 and selected hydroxylated metabolites. When exposed to elevated temperatures, the camelid VHH antibodies retained more reactivity than a polyclonal antibody developed to the same target analyte. The use of this VHH antibody reagent immobilized onto a Au electrode for impedance biosensing demonstrates the increased versatility of VHH antibodies. PMID:25005746

  3. Characterization of anti-podoplanin monoclonal antibodies: critical epitopes for neutralizing the interaction between podoplanin and CLEC-2.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Price, Janet E; Kato, Yukinari

    2008-08-01

    Podoplanin (Aggrus) is a mucin-type sialoglycoprotein that is known as a useful marker for lymphatic endothelium and tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Interaction between podoplanin and C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) is reported to be critical for podoplanin-induced platelet aggregation and cancer metastasis. Recently, several anti-human podoplanin antibodies have been created; however, these anti-podoplanin antibodies have not been well characterized. Five anti-podoplanin antibodies (NZ-1, D2-40, AB3, 18H5, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody) were investigated using ELISA, Western blot, and flow cytometry with synthesized podoplanin peptides and deletion mutants of recombinant podoplanin. The epitope of NZ-1 is platelet aggregation-stimulating (PLAG) domain-2/3; the epitope of D2-40, AB3, and 18H5 is PLAG1/2. The epitopes of D2-40 and AB3 are quite similar, although 18H5 is different from D2-40 and AB3. Using flow cytometric analysis, NZ-1 partially inhibited the interaction between podoplanin and CLEC-2, although other antibodies did not. In conclusion, the two most frequently used anti-podoplanin antibodies, D2-40 and AB3, have similar properties, although several studies have reported differences. NZ-1 neutralizes the interaction between podoplanin and CLEC-2, which may lead to the development of therapeutic antibodies against podoplanin-dependent cancer metastasis. PMID:18707544

  4. Generation and purification of highly-specific antibodies for detecting post-translationally modified proteins in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arur, Swathi; Schedl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications alter protein structure, affecting activity, stability, localization and/or binding partners. Antibodies that specifically recognize post-translationally modified proteins have a number of uses including immuno-cytochemistry and immuno-precipitation of the modified protein to purify protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid complexes. However, antibodies directed at modified sites on individual proteins are often non-specific. Here we describe a protocol to purify polyclonal antibodies that specifically detect the modified protein of interest. The approach uses iterative rounds of subtraction and affinity purification, using stringent washes to remove antibodies that recognize the unmodified protein and low sequence complexity epitopes containing the modified amino acid. Dot and western blots assays are employed to assess antibody preparation specificity. The approach is designed to overcome the common occurrence that a single round of subtraction and affinity purification is not sufficient to obtain a modified protein specific antibody preparation. One full round of antibody purification and specificity testing takes 6 days of discontinuous time. PMID:24457330

  5. An Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor Based on Gold-Magnetic Nanoparticles and Phage Displayed Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xihui; Tong, Zhaoyang; Huang, Qibin; Liu, Bing; Liu, Zhiwei; Hao, Lanqun; Dong, Hua; Zhang, Jinping; Gao, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Using the multiple advantages of the ultra-highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technique, Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) functionalized gold-magnetic nanoparticles and phage displayed antibodies, and using gold-magnetic nanoparticles coated with SPA and coupled with a polyclonal antibody (pcAb) as magnetic capturing probes, and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody as a specific luminescence probe, this study reports a new way to detect ricin with a highly sensitive and specific ECL immunosensor and amplify specific detection signals. The linear detection range of the sensor was 0.0001~200 µg/L, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.0001 µg/L, which is 2500-fold lower than that of the conventional ELISA technique. The gold-magnetic nanoparticles, SPA and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody displayed different amplifying effects in the ECL immunosensor and can decrease LOD 3-fold, 3-fold and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the ECL immunosensors without one of the three effects. The integrated amplifying effect can decrease the LOD 180-fold. The immunosensor integrates the unique advantages of SPA-coated gold-magnetic nanoparticles that improve the activity of the functionalized capturing probe, and the amplifying effect of the Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibodies, so it increases specificity, interference-resistance and decreases LOD. It is proven to be well suited for the analysis of trace amounts of ricin in various environmental samples with high recovery ratios and reproducibility. PMID:26927130

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies Directed Against the Outer Membrane Protein of Bordetella avium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanhua; Liang, Manfei; Zuo, Xuemei; Zhao, Xue; Guo, Fanxia; Yang, Shifa

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the etiologic agent of coryza and rhinotracheitis in poultry. This respiratory disease is responsible for substantial economic losses in the poultry industry. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of B. avium isolated from diseased chickens. BALB/c mice were immunized with the extracted B. avium OMPs. Then the splenocytes from immunized mice and SP2/0 myeloma cells were fused using PEG 4000. Three stable hybridoma clones (designated as 3G10, 4A3, and 4E8) were produced via indirect ELISA and three rounds of subcloning. The MAbs were classified as IgG1, and can recognize the 58 kDa OMP band by Western blot assays. No MAb cross-reactivity with chicken Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella was observed. A double antibody sandwich ELISA (DAS-ELISA) was developed using the rabbit polyclonal antibodies as the capture antibody and MAb 4A3 as the detection antibody. Under the DAS-ELISA, the minimum detectable concentration of B. avium was 1×104 CFU/mL, and no cross-reactivity occurred with chicken Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Results showed that the DAS-ELISA has good sensitivity and specificity. Clinical application showed the DAS-ELISA was more sensitive than the plate agglutination test. This study may be used to develop a quick and specific diagnostic kit, analyze epitopes, and establish systems for typing B. avium. PMID:23909425

  7. Proteomic identification of sperm antigens using serum samples from individuals with and without antisperm antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nowicka-Bauer, K; Kamieniczna, M; Cibulka, J; Ulcova-Gallova, Z; Kurpisz, M

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to identify human sperm antigens reacting with polyclonal antisperm antibodies. Protein sperm extracts were subjected to electrofocusing, and next immune reactions (immunoblotting) were carried out with positive for antisperm antibodies and control (not containing antisperm antibodies) serum samples. Proteomic analysis of human sperm proteins resulted in identification of 80 sperm antigens that could be divided into three groups: antigens specific for patients with antisperm antibodies (32), antigens recognised by both infertile patients and control sera (35) and antigens detected by control serum samples only (13). Among antigens specific for infertile patients, there were 12 sperm entities known to be involved in fertilisation process. We have also characterised three protein entities identified only by sera of infertile women. Altogether, the proteomic analysis resulted in identification of 27 sperm entities not reported previously in human sperm proteome. Identified proteins are sperm antigens that could be potentially responsible for immunological infertility. The study also sheds new light on the sperm antigens in aspect of gender specificity. The investigation of human sperm proteome by the use of antisperm antibodies-containing sera of infertile individuals not only may indicate new proteins but also can draft their immunological nature. PMID:26659478

  8. Functional characterization of a monoclonal antibody epitope using a lambda phage display-deep sequencing platform

    PubMed Central

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described a method, named PROFILER, for the identification of antigenic regions preferentially targeted by polyclonal antibody responses after vaccination. To test the ability of the technique to provide insights into the functional properties of monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes, we used here a well-characterized epitope of meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp), which is recognized by mAb 12C1. An fHbp library, engineered on a lambda phage vector enabling surface expression of polypeptides of widely different length, was subjected to massive parallel sequencing of the phage inserts after affinity selection with the 12C1 mAb. We detected dozens of unique antibody-selected sequences, the most enriched of which (designated as FrC) could largely recapitulate the ability of fHbp to bind mAb 12C1. Computational analysis of the cumulative enrichment of single amino acids in the antibody-selected fragments identified two overrepresented stretches of residues (H248-K254 and S140-G154), whose presence was subsequently found to be required for binding of FrC to mAb 12C1. Collectively, these results suggest that the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify, in the context of complex conformational epitopes, discrete “hot spots” with a crucial role in antigen-antibody interactions, thereby providing useful clues for the functional characterization of the epitope. PMID:27530334

  9. Functional characterization of a monoclonal antibody epitope using a lambda phage display-deep sequencing platform.

    PubMed

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described a method, named PROFILER, for the identification of antigenic regions preferentially targeted by polyclonal antibody responses after vaccination. To test the ability of the technique to provide insights into the functional properties of monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes, we used here a well-characterized epitope of meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp), which is recognized by mAb 12C1. An fHbp library, engineered on a lambda phage vector enabling surface expression of polypeptides of widely different length, was subjected to massive parallel sequencing of the phage inserts after affinity selection with the 12C1 mAb. We detected dozens of unique antibody-selected sequences, the most enriched of which (designated as FrC) could largely recapitulate the ability of fHbp to bind mAb 12C1. Computational analysis of the cumulative enrichment of single amino acids in the antibody-selected fragments identified two overrepresented stretches of residues (H248-K254 and S140-G154), whose presence was subsequently found to be required for binding of FrC to mAb 12C1. Collectively, these results suggest that the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify, in the context of complex conformational epitopes, discrete "hot spots" with a crucial role in antigen-antibody interactions, thereby providing useful clues for the functional characterization of the epitope. PMID:27530334

  10. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  11. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush. PMID:17691940

  12. Anti-PcrV antibody strategies against virulent Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Ito, Emi; Nguyen, Vinh Huu; Haight, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes fatal acute lung infections in critically ill individuals. Its pathogenesis is associated with bacterial virulence conferred by the type III secretion system (TTSS), through which P. aeruginosa causes necrosis of the lung epithelium and disseminates into the circulation, resulting in bacteremia, sepsis, and mortality. TTSS allows P. aeruginosa to directly translocate cytotoxins into eukaryotic cells, inducing cell death. The P. aeruginosa V-antigen PcrV, a homolog of the Yersinia V-antigen LcrV, is an indispensable contributor to TTS toxin translocation. Vaccination against PcrV ensures the survival of challenged mice and decreases lung inflammation and injury. Both the rabbit polyclonal anti-PcrV antibody and the murine monoclonal anti-PcrV antibody, mAb166, inhibit TTS toxin translocation. mAb166 IgG was cloned, and a molecular engineered humanized anti-PcrV IgG antigen-binding fragment, KB001, was developed for clinical use. KB001 is currently undergoing Phase-II clinical trials for ventilator-associated pneumonia in France and chronic pneumonia in cystic fibrosis in USA. In these studies, KB001 has demonstrated its safety, a favorable pharmacokinetic profile, and promising potential as a nonantibiotic strategy to reduce airway inflammation and damage in P. aeruginosa pneumonia. PMID:25483637

  13. Heart antibodies in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Trueman, T; Thompson, R A; Cummins, P; Littler, W A

    1981-01-01

    The reported frequency of circulating heart reactive antibodies in cardiomyopathies has varied and their significance is unknown. In this study such antibodies were sought in patients with primary congestive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies and other heart diseases. Standard "single sandwich" and the more sensitive "double sandwich" indirect immunofluorescence techniques failed to disclose a significant difference between any cardiomyopathic group and controls in repeated experiments. With both techniques results were subject to considerable method-specific artefacts and observer variation. No published work associating heart antibodies detected by immunofluorescence methods with cariomyopathies adequately takes these into account. PMID:7028058

  14. High concentrations of antibodies to xanthine oxidase in human and animal sera. Molecular characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, G; Jarasch, E D; Heid, H W

    1984-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of antibodies (IgG) specific to xanthine oxidase in both normal (nonimmune) human and animal sera, and in antisera raised against a diversity of unrelated antigens is described. A study of sera from 81 humans revealed that xanthine oxidase-specific IgG represents a high proportion (1-8%) of total IgG. No obvious correlation to pathological events or symptoms of disease could be found. These xanthine oxidase-specific antibodies could be isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography on purified human or bovine xanthine oxidase and showed specific binding to the enzyme polypeptide of Mr 155,000 in immunoblotting experiments. By immunofluorescence microscopy they displayed the same cell type-specific reaction as experimentally induced antibodies, i.e., the staining of lactating mammary gland epithelium and capillary endothelium. The naturally occurring xanthine oxidase-specific antibodies consisted of polyclonal IgG of various subclasses. F(ab')2 preparations gave immune-reactions identical to those of IgG. The human xanthine oxidase-specific IgG cross-reacted with the bovine enzyme and both human and animal antibodies partially inhibited its activity. The xanthine oxidase activity of human milk lipid globules and supernatant fractions from various human tissues was extremely low when compared with that of the bovine antigen. The enzyme protein, however, was effectively precipitated from these sources by both the human and bovine antibodies. We suggest that the exceptionally high concentrations of antibodies against one protein, xanthine oxidase, are due to self-immunization to the xanthine oxidase antigen present in endothelial cells of capillaries. We do not exclude, however, nutritional contributions of bovine milk antigen to the appearance of xanthine oxidase antibodies in human sera. The possible biological functions of this immunological reaction are discussed. Images PMID:6381540

  15. Purification and determination of C-reactive protein and inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 in dogs after major surgery through generation of specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Soler, L; García, N; Unzueta, A; Piñeiro, M; Álava, M A; Lampreave, F

    2016-10-15

    Inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been isolated from acute phase dog sera by affinity chromatography with insolubilized polyclonal antibodies anti pig Major Acute phase Protein (Pig-MAP) and with p-Aminophenyl Phosphoryl Choline, respectively. Isolated proteins were used to prepare specific polyclonal rabbit antisera that have allowed quantifying their concentration in serum samples by single radial immunodifussion. Both proteins were quantified in sera from female dogs that had undergone ovariohysterectomy (OVH, n=9) or mastectomy (n=10). The observed increases in CRP concentrations showed that surgical traumas induced an acute phase response of a great magnitude in the dogs. In both surgeries a four-fold increase of ITIH4 concentrations was detected. It can be concluded that ITIH4 is a new positive acute phase protein in dogs, as reported in other species. PMID:27590422

  16. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) activity in response to different immune stimuli in haemocytes of the common periwinkle Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, Nadya V; Gorbushin, Alexander M; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-09-01

    The modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in haemocytes of the common periwinkle (Littorina littorea) in response to immune challenges by lipopolysaccharide from Echerichia coli (LPS), mannan from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and secretory-excretory products (SEP) of trematodes Himasthla elongata (Echinostomatidae) or after the treatment with phorbol ester (PMA) has been studied by Western blotting using affinity purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Exposure of the cells in suspension to PMA, LPS and mannan triggered an activation of p38 and ERK2. The JNK-mediated cascade was modulated differently by the elicitors examined. PMA treatment caused a transient activation of the JNK54 isoform, LPS exposure resulted in a decrease in activity of JNK46, and mannan had no effect on JNK phosphorylation status. Incubation of periwinkle haemocytes in culture medium containing trematode SEP did not affect the activity of any MAPK. PMID:16533608

  17. Polyclonal B Cell Responses to Conserved Neutralization Epitopes in a Subset of HIV-1-Infected Individuals▿†

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Georgia D.; Binley, James M.; Gray, Elin S.; Crooks, Emma T.; Osawa, Keiko; Moore, Penny L.; Tumba, Nancy; Tong, Tommy; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L.; Decker, Julie; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gao, Feng; Alam, S. Munir; Easterbrook, Philippa; Abdool Karim, Salim; Kamanga, Gift; Crump, John A.; Cohen, Myron; Shaw, George M.; Mascola, John R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Montefiori, David C.; Morris, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    A small proportion of HIV-infected individuals generate a neutralizing antibody (NAb) response of exceptional magnitude and breadth. A detailed analysis of the critical epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies should help to define optimal targets for vaccine design. HIV-1-infected subjects with potent cross-reactive serum neutralizing antibodies were identified by assaying sera from 308 subjects against a multiclade panel of 12 “tier 2” viruses (4 each of subtypes A, B, and C). Various neutralizing epitope specificities were determined for the top 9 neutralizers, including clade A-, clade B-, clade C-, and clade A/C-infected donors, by using a comprehensive set of assays. In some subjects, neutralization breadth was mediated by two or more antibody specificities. Although antibodies to the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) were identified in some subjects, the subjects with the greatest neutralization breadth targeted gp120 epitopes, including the CD4 binding site, a glycan-containing quaternary epitope formed by the V2 and V3 loops, or an outer domain epitope containing a glycan at residue N332. The broadly reactive HIV-1 neutralization observed in some subjects is mediated by antibodies targeting several conserved regions on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. PMID:21849452

  18. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  19. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... despite the fact that the person is infected ( false negative ). If an HIV antibody test is negative ... infection (around 28 days) and may give a false-negative result. ^ Back to top Is there anything ...

  20. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  1. Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and Comparison of Serological Methods for Its Sensitive Detection on Potato Tubers.

    PubMed

    Gorris, M T; Alarcon, B; Lopez, M M; Cambra, M

    1994-06-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica have been produced. One, called 4G4, reacted with high specificity for serogroup I of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, the most common serogroup on potato tubers in differe