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Sample records for affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies

  1. Therapeutic effects of antigen affinity-purified polyclonal anti-receptor of advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) antibodies on cholestasis-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Deng, Qing; Gao, Jin; Yu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Yang; Li, Jingjing; Guan, Wen; Hu, Jianjun; Tan, Quanhui; Zhou, Liang; Han, Wei; Yuan, Yunsheng; Yu, Yan

    2016-05-15

    Cholestasis leads to acute hepatic injury, fibrosis/cirrhosis, inflammation, and duct proliferation. We investigated whether blocking receptor of advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) with polyclonal anti-RAGE antibodies (anti-RAGE) could regulate acute liver injury and fibrosis in a rat bile duct ligation (BDL) model. Male Wister rats received 0.5mg/kg rabbit anti-RAGE or an equal amount of rabbit IgG by subcutaneous injection twice a week after BDL. Samples of liver tissue and peripheral blood were collected at 14 days after BDL. Serum biochemistry and histology were used to analyze the degree of liver injury. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunohistochemical staining were used to further analyze liver injury. Anti-RAGE improved the gross appearance of the liver and the rat survival rate. Liver tissue histology and relevant serum biochemistry indicated that anti-RAGE attenuated liver necrosis, inflammation, liver fibrosis, and duct proliferation in the BDL model. qPCR and western blotting showed significant reductions in interleukin-1β expression levels in the liver by treatment with anti-RAGE. Anti-RAGE also significantly reduced the mRNA levels of α1(1) collagen (Col1α1) and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, and the ratio of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 to matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the liver. In addition, anti-RAGE regulated the transcriptional level of Col1α1 and MMP-9 in transforming growth factor-β-induced activated LX-2 cells in vitro. Anti-RAGE was found to inhibit hepatic stellate cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, anti-RAGE can protect the liver from injury induced by BDL in rats. PMID:26970185

  2. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  3. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  4. Identification and subcellular localization of a 21-kilodalton molecule using affinity-purified antibodies against. cap alpha. -transforming growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hazarika, P.; Pardue, R.L.; Earls, R.; Dedman, J.R.

    1987-04-07

    Monospecific antibodies were generated against each of six different peptide sequences derived from rat and human ..cap alpha..-transforming growth factor (..cap alpha..-TGF). The affinity-purified antibody to the 17 amino acid carboxyl-terminal portion of the molecule proved most useful in detecting ..cap alpha..-TGF. When used in a peptide-based radioimmunoassay, it was possible to measure nanogram quantities of native ..cap alpha..-TGF in conditioned cell culture media. When used to analyze cell lysate, these antibodies specifically recognized a 21-kilodalton protein species. Indirect immunofluorescence localization procedures revealed a high concentration of ..cap alpha..-TCF in a perinuclear ring with a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. These results suggest that a precursor form of ..cap alpha..-TGF has a cellular role beyond that of an autocrine growth factor.

  5. The effects of affinity-purified anti-DNA antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus on the fluorescent antinuclear antibody assay using HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Kawamura, Masahide; Mineo, Midori; Shinohara, Tadashi; Kataharada, Koji; Okada, Makoto; Takada, Kunio; Miyawaki, Shoji; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of anti-dsDNA antibodies on the titer and the nuclear staining pattern(s) in a fluorescent antinuclear antibody (FANA) assay using HEp-2 cells. Anti-dsDNA derived from 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was individually affinity-purified. The anti-dsDNA titer of the purified anti-dsDNA solution was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) or by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the FANA assay, the anti-dsDNA solution was diluted in a stepwise manner and its titer was expressed by the endpoint dilution. The nuclear staining pattern in the anti-dsDNA solution was examined at the 1:5 and 1:20 dilutions and at the endpoint dilution. The anti-dsDNA titers of the affinity-purified anti-dsDNA solution were high enough (13 to 126 IU/ml) to be measured by RIA. However, the antinuclear antibody (ANA) titers of this solution were relatively low: 1:20 to 1:320. In the study of nuclear staining the peripheral pattern was observed in nine of the 14 cases at a 1:5 dilution. However, at the endpoint dilution, all cases exhibited the homogeneous pattern. These findings indicate that in the FANA assay using HEp-2 cells, 1) although serum samples show high anti-dsDNA titers by RIA or by ELISA, the antibodies' direct contribution to ANA titers is limited, and 2) when samples reveal a homogeneous staining pattern at the endpoint dilution, this suggests the presence of anti-dsDNA.

  6. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of affinity-purified Plasmodium falciparum exoantigens in Aotus nancymai monkeys.

    PubMed

    James, M A; Fajfar-Whetstone, C J; Kakoma, I; Buese, M M; Clabaugh, G W; Hansen, R; Ristic, M

    1991-03-01

    Soluble Plasmodium falciparum polypeptides, affinity-purified from culture supernatant fluids using sequential immunoadsorptions employing both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, induced protective immunity against experimental falciparum malaria in Peruvian Aotus nancymai monkeys. Susceptible monkeys were vaccinated with polypeptides affinity-purified from supernatant fluids of P. falciparum Indochina I/CDC cultures. Eighteen animals (6 immunized with purified antigens plus adjuvants, 6 injected with only the adjuvant preparation, and 6 untreated) were challenged with whole blood containing monkey-adapted virulent organisms of the Indochina I/CDC strain. Selected hematologic, serologic and parasitologic profiles served as potential indicators of protection. This immunogen, when fortified with an aluminum hydroxide/Quil-A saponin adjuvant combination, elicited good antibody responses to major P. falciparum antigens. Protection in vaccinated animals was evidenced by a significantly limited reduction in hematocrit and hemoglobin levels and a relatively moderate course of infection after homologous needle-challenge with Aotus monkey-adapted P. falciparum parasites.

  7. Polyclonal antibody to soman-tyrosine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Duysen, Ellen G.; Froment, Marie-Thérèse; Masson, Patrick; Nachon, Florian; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Klassen, Lynell W.; Cashman, John; Williams, Gareth R.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    Soman forms a stable, covalent bond with tyrosine 411 of human albumin, with tyrosines 257 and 593 in human transferrin, and with tyrosine in many other proteins. The pinacolyl group of soman is retained, suggesting that pinacolyl methylphosphonate bound to tyrosine could generate specific antibodies. Tyrosine in the pentapeptide RYGRK was covalently modified with soman simply by adding soman to the peptide. The phosphonylated-peptide was linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and the conjugate was injected into rabbits. The polyclonal antiserum recognized soman-labeled human albumin, soman-mouse albumin, and soman human transferrin, but not non-phosphonylated control proteins. The soman-labeled tyrosines in these proteins are surrounded by different amino acid sequences, suggesting that the polyclonal recognizes soman-tyrosine independent of the amino acid sequence. Antiserum obtained after 4 antigen injections over a period of 18 weeks was tested in a competition ELISA where it had an IC50 of 10−11 M. The limit of detection on Western blots was 0.01 μg (15 picomoles) of soman-labeled albumin. In conclusion, a high-affinity, polyclonal antibody that specifically recognizes soman adducts on tyrosine in a variety of proteins has been produced. Such an antibody could be useful for identifying secondary targets of soman toxicity. PMID:23469927

  8. ETRAP (efficient trapping and purification) of target protein polyclonal antibodies from GST-protein immune sera.

    PubMed

    Crimmins, Dan L; Brada, Nancy A; Lockwood, Christina M; Griest, Terry A; Waldemer, Rachel J; Cervinski, Mark A; Ohlendorf, Matthew F; McQuillan, Jay J; Ladenson, Jack H

    2010-12-01

    Recombinant GST (glutathione transferase) proteins are widely used as immunogens to generate polyclonal antibodies. Advantages of using GST proteins include: commercially available cloning vectors, vast literature for protein expression in Escherichia coli, the ease of protein purification, immunogen can be used as an ELISA standard and GST can be removed in some systems. However, there are disadvantages: GST oligomerization, inclusion body formation and target protein insolubility after GST removal. Perhaps the most detrimental is the significant generation of anti-GST antibodies by the host animal. A two-column procedure using a glutathione-GST column and a glutathione-(GST-protein) column can yield affinity-purified anti-(GST-protein) polyclonal antibody. Several passes over the first column are often required, though, to completely extract the anti-GST antibodies from the immune sera. We reasoned that knowledge of the target protein linear epitope(s) would allow construction of a peptide affinity resin for a single-pass 'one and done' purification termed ETRAP (efficient trapping and purification). In the present paper, we describe our efforts and present data on rabbits and sheep immunized with GST proteins having target protein molecular masses of ~8, 21 and 33 kDa. The titre and purity of the target antibodies using the ETRAP protocol were comparable to the more laborious multi-column purifications but with a considerable saving in time. PMID:21054278

  9. Induction of antihemagglutinin antibodies by polyclonal antiidiotype antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dinca, L; Neuwirth, S; Schulman, J; Bona, C

    1993-01-01

    Antiidiotypic antibodies can be envisioned as an alternative approach in the development of vaccines against influenza virus, which exhibits natural antigenic variations. In our work, we obtained two polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies against PY102, VM113, and VM202 mAbs, which in turn are specific respectively for PR8 virus and laboratory-induced virus variants (PY102-V1 and VM113-V1). With these cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies, we were able to elicit anti-HA antibodies in mice. In comparing the anti-HA antibody response in animals injected with anti-Id antibodies to those immunized with PR8 influenza virus, we demonstrated that the HI titer was higher after virus immunization and that the PR8 virus boost was more efficient in this group. Our results showed that the polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies were more efficient than the individual anti-Ids at eliciting responses. At the same time, we demonstrated that PR8-primed T cells, cultured with B cells from animals immunized with anti-Id antibodies, were able to produce anti-PR8 antibodies subsequent to stimulation with influenza virus. PMID:8476510

  10. Induction of antihemagglutinin antibodies by polyclonal antiidiotype antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dinca, L; Neuwirth, S; Schulman, J; Bona, C

    1993-01-01

    Antiidiotypic antibodies can be envisioned as an alternative approach in the development of vaccines against influenza virus, which exhibits natural antigenic variations. In our work, we obtained two polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies against PY102, VM113, and VM202 mAbs, which in turn are specific respectively for PR8 virus and laboratory-induced virus variants (PY102-V1 and VM113-V1). With these cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies, we were able to elicit anti-HA antibodies in mice. In comparing the anti-HA antibody response in animals injected with anti-Id antibodies to those immunized with PR8 influenza virus, we demonstrated that the HI titer was higher after virus immunization and that the PR8 virus boost was more efficient in this group. Our results showed that the polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies were more efficient than the individual anti-Ids at eliciting responses. At the same time, we demonstrated that PR8-primed T cells, cultured with B cells from animals immunized with anti-Id antibodies, were able to produce anti-PR8 antibodies subsequent to stimulation with influenza virus.

  11. Affinity-purified antibodies of defined specificity for use in a solid-phase microplate radioimmunoassay of human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein in urine.

    PubMed

    Hunt, J S; McGiven, A R; Groufsky, A; Lynn, K L; Taylor, M C

    1985-05-01

    Rabbit antibodies to human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (prepared by salt precipitation from normal urine) were purified by affinity chromatography using columns containing Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein linked to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. The specificity of these antibodies was determined by analysis of their binding characteristics on Western blots of Tamm-Horsfall protein from sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gradient gels and comparison with the reactivity of monoclonal antibodies to this glycoprotein. Optimal conditions of adsorption to poly(vinyl chloride) microtitre plates were established such that these purified antibodies could be used in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay for the determination of urinary Tamm-Horsfall-glycoprotein concentration. The specificity of the immunoassay was confirmed by competitive inhibition of the urinary Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein by purified freeze-dried material in solution. A standard curve obtained with this material showed the radioimmunoassay to have a sensitivity of at least 5 ng/ml, with linearity between 30 and 600 ng/ml. The mean coefficient of variation over the linear section of the curve was 11.3 +/- 2.2% (n = 13). The effects of dialysis and freezing of urine samples before determination of Tamm-Horsfall-glycoprotein concentrations were investigated and the mean 24 h urinary excretion rate in 60 normal donors was shown to be 84.9 +/- 44.1 mg.

  12. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-zhe; Coljee, Vincent W.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  13. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Zhe; Coljee, Vincent W; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2013-11-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  14. Development of polyclonal antibodies for detection of aflatoxigenic molds involving culture filtrate and chimeric proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shapira, R; Paster, N; Menasherov, M; Eyal, O; Mett, A; Meiron, T; Kuttin, E; Salomon, R

    1997-03-01

    Polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were raised against an aflatoxigenic strain of Aspergillus parasiticus by using two different sources for antibody elicitation: (i) filtrate of a culture on which the fungus had been grown (ii) and two chimeric proteins, expressed in Escherichia coli as separate products, of the genes ver-1 and apa-2, which are involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. The gene products were amplified by PCR, and each was cloned into the E. coli expression vector pGEX2T. Upon induction, the bacteria overexpressed 38- and 33-kDa chimeric proteins corresponding to the N-terminal domains of the genes ver-1 and apa-2, respectively. The chimeric proteins were isolated and affinity purified for use as antigens. The specificity of the raised antibodies was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The PAbs raised against the culture filtrate reacted with all the species of Aspergillus and Penicillium tested but not with Fusarium species or corn gain. However, the PAbs elicited against the chimeric proteins were highly specific, showing significantly higher ELISA absorbance values (A405) against A. parasiticus and A. flavus than against the other fungi tested and the corn grain. The approach of utilizing gene products associated with aflatoxin biosynthesis for antibody production therefore appears to be feasible. Such a multiantibody system combined with the PCR technique, could provide a useful tool for the rapid, sensitive, and accurate detection of aflatoxin producers present in grains and foods. PMID:9055416

  15. Characterization of rabbit cells by monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ponsard, D C; Cinader, B; Chou, C T; Dubiski, S

    1986-01-01

    Reagents for the identification of rabbit cell markers have been developed at a relatively slow rate. In this paper, rabbit cells are being characterized by polyclonal antibodies against a T-cell antigen (RTLA), a B-cell antigen (RABELA) and an analogue of murine Ia antigen. A number of monoclonal antibodies, specific for lymphocytes and/or bone marrow and/or polymorphonuclear leucocytes, have been used for the analysis of cells with identifiable membrane antigens. Populations that have cells with two of the above antigens in the membranes were identified. To these ends, complement-mediated cell kill by antisera alone and in mixtures was employed. PMID:3489667

  16. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium using polyclonal antibody immobilized magnetostrictive biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guntupalli, R.; Hu, Jing; Lakshmanan, Ramji S.; Wan, Jiehui; Huang, Shichu; Yang, Hong; Barbaree, James M.; Huang, T. S.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2006-05-01

    Novel mass-sensitive, magnetostrictive sensors have a characteristic resonant frequency that can be determined by monitoring the magnetic flux emitted by the sensor in response to an applied, time varying, magnetic field. This magnetostrictive platform has a unique advantage over conventional sensor platforms in that measurement is wireless or remote. These biosensors can thus be used in-situ for detecting pathogens and biological threat agents. In this work, we have used a magnetostrictive platform immobilized with a polyclonal antibody (the bio-molecular recognition element) to form a biosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium. Upon exposure to solutions containing Salmonella typhimurium bacteria, the bacteria were bound to the sensor and the additional mass of the bound bacteria caused a shift in the sensor's resonant frequency. Responses of the sensors to different concentrations of S. typhimurium were recorded and the results correlated with those obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of samples. Good agreement between the measured number of bound bacterial cells (attached mass) and frequency shifts were obtained. The longevity and specificity of the selected polyclonal antibody were also investigated and are reported.

  17. Immunoreactivity of polyclonal antibodies generated against the carboxy terminus of the predicted amino acid sequence of the Huntington disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Alkatib, G.; Graham, R.; Pelmear-Telenius, A.

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA fragment spanning the 3{prime}-end of the Huntington disease gene (from 8052 to 9252) was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector containing the E. Coli lac promoter and a portion of the coding sequence for {beta}-galactosidase. The truncated {beta}-galactosidase gene was cleaved with BamHl and fused in frame to the BamHl fragment of the Huntington disease gene 3{prime}-end. Expression analysis of proteins made in E. Coli revealed that 20-30% of the total cellular proteins was represented by the {beta}-galactosidase-huntingtin fusion protein. The identity of the Huntington disease protein amino acid sequences was confirmed by protein sequence analysis. Affinity chromatography was used to purify large quantities of the fusion protein from bacterial cell lysates. Affinity-purified proteins were used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits for antibody production. The generated polyclonal antibodies were used to immunoprecipitate the Huntington disease gene product expressed in a neuroblastoma cell line. In this cell line the antibodies precipitated two protein bands of apparent gel migrations of 200 and 150 kd which together, correspond to the calculated molecular weight of the Huntington disease gene product (350 kd). Immunoblotting experiments revealed the presence of a large precursor protein in the range of 350-750 kd which is in agreement with the predicted molecular weight of the protein without post-translational modifications. These results indicate that the huntingtin protein is cleaved into two subunits in this neuroblastoma cell line and implicate that cleavage of a large precursor protein may contribute to its biological activity. Experiments are ongoing to determine the precursor-product relationship and to examine the synthesis of the huntingtin protein in freshly isolated rat brains, and to determine cellular and subcellular distribution of the gene product.

  18. Immunodiagnosis of episomal Banana streak MY virus using polyclonal antibodies to an expressed putative coat protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Kumar, P Vignesh; Baranwal, Virendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    A cryptic Badnavirus species complex, known as banana streak viruses (BSV) poses a serious threat to banana production and genetic improvement worldwide. Due to the presence of integrated BSV sequences in the banana genome, routine detection is largely based on serological and nucleo-serological diagnostic methods which require high titre specific polyclonal antiserum. Viral structural proteins like coat protein (CP) are the best target for in vitro expression, to be used as antigen for antiserum production. However, in badnaviruses precise CP sequences are not known. In this study, two putative CP coding regions (p48 and p37) of Banana streak MY virus (BSMYV) were identified in silico by comparison with caulimoviruses, retroviruses and Rice tungro bacilliform virus. The putative CP coding region (p37) was in vitro expressed in pMAL system and affinity purified. The purified fusion protein was used as antigen for raising polyclonal antiserum in rabbit. The specificity of antiserum was confirmed in Western blots, immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) and antigen coated plate-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ACP-ELISA). The antiserum (1:2000) was successfully used in ACP-ELISA for specific detection of BSMYV infection in field and tissue culture raised banana plants. The antiserum was also utilized in immuno-capture PCR (IC-PCR) based indexing of episomal BSMYV infection. This is the first report of in silico identification of putative CP region of BSMYV, production of polyclonal antiserum against recombinant p37 and its successful use in immunodetection.

  19. Antigen-specific human polyclonal antibodies from hyperimmunized cattle.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, Yoshimi; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sathiyaseelan, Thillainayagen; Jiao, Jin-an; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sathiyaseelan, Janaki; Wu, Hua; Mellquist, Jenny; Hammitt, Melissa; Koster, Julie; Kamoda, Satoru; Tachibana, Katsumi; Ishida, Isao; Robl, James M

    2009-02-01

    Antigen-specific human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs), produced by hyperimmunization, could be useful for treating many human diseases. However, yields from available transgenic mice and transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying human immunoglobulin loci are too low for therapeutic applications. We report a Tc bovine system that produces large yields of hpAbs. Tc cattle were generated by transferring a human artificial chromosome vector carrying the entire unrearranged, human immunoglobulin heavy (hIGH) and kappa-light (hIGK) chain loci to bovine fibroblasts in which two endogenous bovine IgH chain loci were inactivated. Plasma from the oldest animal contained >2 g/l of hIgG, paired with either human kappa-light chain (up to approximately 650 microg/ml, fully human) or with bovine kappa- or lambda-light chain (chimeric), with a normal hIgG subclass distribution. Hyperimmunization with anthrax protective antigen triggered a hIgG-mediated humoral immune response comprising a high proportion of antigen-specific hIgG. Purified, fully human and chimeric hIgGs were highly active in an in vitro toxin neutralization assay and protective in an in vivo mouse challenge assay.

  20. Pneumococcal cell wall phosphorylcholine elicits polyclonal antibody secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Bach, M A; Beckmann, E; Levitt, D

    1984-07-01

    Immunization of mice with phosphorylcholine (PC)-bearing Staphylococcus pneumoniae Type 2, strain 36a (R36a) results in both a PC-specific and a polyclonal increase in splenic plaque-forming cells. The polyclonal increase was observed in all strains tested, including those bearing an X-linked immune defect resulting in an undetectable anti-PC immune response. The magnitude of the polyclonal response is directly related to the amount of bacterial surface PC as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Congenitally athymic (nude) mice mount an anti-PC plaque-forming cell response after R36a immunization but fail to produce a significant polyclonal response. From our results it appears that PC on the cell wall of a bacterium acts both as a polyclonal activator and a specific antigen, stimulating each by different mechanisms.

  1. Artificial antigen synthesis and the development of polyclonal antibody-based immunoassay for citreoviridin determination.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Zhen Hong; Que, Shan Jin; Gao, Yue Ming; Yuan, Jun; Ye, Zhou; Du, Min; Lin, Guang Mei; Liu, Li Cai; Wang, Shi Hua

    2014-01-01

    Citreoviridin, a mycotoxin produced by Penicillium citreonigrum is a common contaminant of wide range of agri-products and detrimental to human and animal health. Therefore it is important to develop a rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay for citreoviridin detection. In this study, polyclonal antibody against citreoviridin was developed. For the preparation of citreoviridin-bovine serum albumin conjugate (CIT-BSA), hydroxyl groups on adjacent carbon atoms were oxidized by sodium periodate, so the product with reactive aldehyde residues was suitable for coupling with amine. Anti-citreoviridin polyclonal antibody was prepared by immunizing mice with CIT-BSA conjugate. The specificity and sensitivity of the polyclonal antibody was determined by indirect competitive ELISA. Results showed that the IC50 value of the polyclonal antibody was 0.56 μg/mL and no cross-reactivity was found between antiserum and other mycotoxins used in the experiment. The citreoviridin recovery rates by this polyclonal antibody were calculated through rice powder spiked by artificial citreoviridin. The recovery rates ranged were found from 70.5 ± 0.08 % to 94.7 ± 0.09% for inter-assay, and from 77.5 ± 0.04% to 95.4 ± 0.18% for intra-assay, which indicated that this polyclonal antibody could detect trace amount of CIT from the tested samples. Consequently, this study provided a specific and sensitive anti-citreoviridin polyclonal antibody, which made the determination of citreoviridin easier, quicker, and more accurate. PMID:23900904

  2. Preserved antiviral adaptive immunity following polyclonal antibody immunotherapy for severe murine influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Natalie E.; Hatjopolous, Antoinette; Fraser, Cara K.; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Hayball, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy may have particular benefits for the treatment of severe influenza infection in at-risk populations, however little is known of the impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation of memory responses to the virus. Ideally, passive immunotherapy should attenuate the severity of infection while still allowing the formation of adaptive responses to confer protection from future exposure. In this study, we sought to determine if administration of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies could inhibit adaptive immune responses in a murine model of lethal influenza infection. Ovine polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant PR8 (H1N1) hemagglutinin exhibited potent prophylactic capacity and reduced lethality in an established influenza infection, particularly when administered intranasally. Surviving mice were also protected against reinfection and generated normal antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to the virus. The longevity of ovine polyclonal antibodies was explored with a half-life of over two weeks following a single antibody administration. These findings support the development of an ovine passive polyclonal antibody therapy for treatment of severe influenza infection which does not affect the formation of subsequent acquired immunity to the virus. PMID:27380890

  3. Polyclonal Antibody Production for Membrane Proteins via Genetic Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Debra T.; Robida, Mark D.; Craciunescu, Felicia M.; Loskutov, Andrey V.; Dörner, Katerina; Rodenberry, John-Charles; Wang, Xiao; Olson, Tien L.; Patel, Hetal; Fromme, Petra; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are essential for structural determinations and functional studies of membrane proteins, but antibody generation is limited by the availability of properly-folded and purified antigen. We describe the first application of genetic immunization to a structurally diverse set of membrane proteins to show that immunization of mice with DNA alone produced antibodies against 71% (n = 17) of the bacterial and viral targets. Antibody production correlated with prior reports of target immunogenicity in host organisms, underscoring the efficiency of this DNA-gold micronanoplex approach. To generate each antigen for antibody characterization, we also developed a simple in vitro membrane protein expression and capture method. Antibody specificity was demonstrated upon identifying, for the first time, membrane-directed heterologous expression of the native sequences of the FopA and FTT1525 virulence determinants from the select agent Francisella tularensis SCHU S4. These approaches will accelerate future structural and functional investigations of therapeutically-relevant membrane proteins. PMID:26908053

  4. Characterization and neutralization of Nemopilema nomurai (Scyphozoa: Rhizostomeae) jellyfish venom using polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Kang, Changkeun; Han, Dae-Yong; Park, Kwang-Il; Pyo, Min-Jung; Heo, Yunwi; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Kim, Gon Sup; Kim, Euikyung

    2014-08-01

    Jellyfish stings have often caused serious health concerns for sea bathers especially in tropical waters. In the coastal areas of Korea, China and Japan, the blooming and stinging accidents of poisonous jellyfish species have recently increased, including Nemopilema nomurai. We have generated a polyclonal antibody against N. nomurai jellyfish venom (NnV) by the immunization of white rabbits with NnV antigen. In the present study, the antibody has been characterized for its neutralizing effect against NnV. At first, the presence of NnV polyclonal antibody has been confirmed from the immunized rabbit serum by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Then, the neutralizing activities of the polyclonal antibody have been investigated using cell-based toxicity test, hemolysis assay, and mice lethality test. When the polyclonal antibody was preincubated with NnV, it shows a high effectiveness in neutralizing the NnV toxicities in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, we explored proteomic analyses using 2-D SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to illustrate the molecular identities of the jellyfish venom. From this, 18 different protein families have been identified as jellyfish venom-derived proteins; the main findings of which are matrix metalloproteinase-14, astacin-like metalloprotease toxin 3 precursor. It is expected that the present results would have contributed to our understandings of the envenomation by N. nomurai, their treatment and some valuable knowledge on the pathological processes of the jellyfish stinging.

  5. Generation and characterization of polyclonal antibody against part of immunoglobulin constant heavy υ chain of goose.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Yongli; Ma, Bo; Xing, Mingwei; Wang, Junwei

    2014-08-01

    Immunoglobulin Y (abbreviated as IgY) is a type of immunoglobulin that is the major antibody in bird, reptile, and lungfish blood. IgY consists of two light (λ) and two heavy (υ) chains. In the present study, polyclonal antibody against IgYFc was generated and evaluated. rIgYCυ3/Cυ4 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and utilized to raise polyclonal antibody in rabbit. High affinity antisera were obtained, which successfully detected the antigen at a dilution of 1:204,800 for ELISA assay. The antibody can specifically recognize both rIgYCυ3/Cυ4 and native IgY by Western bolt analysis. Furthermore, the serum of Grus japonensis or immunoglobulin of chicken, duck, turkey, and silkie samples and dynamic changes of serum GoIgY after immunogenicity with GPV-VP3-virus-like particles (GPV-VP3-VLPs) can be detected with the anti-GoIgYFc polyclonal antibody. These results suggested that the antibody is valuable for the investigation of biochemical properties and biological functions of GoIgY.

  6. Immunocytochemical detection of androgen receptor in human temporal cortex characterization and application of polyclonal androgen receptor antibodies in frozen and paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Puy, L; MacLusky, N J; Becker, L; Karsan, N; Trachtenberg, J; Brown, T J

    1995-11-01

    Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies have demonstrated the presence of androgen receptor protein in various regions of the rodent and non-human primate cortex. Localization of androgen receptor in the human brain has, however, not been studied as extensively, because of difficulties in obtaining suitable tissue samples. In the present study, we have localized androgen receptors in both frozen and paraffin-embedded temporal cortex from epileptic patients undergoing resection. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against fusion proteins containing fragments of the human androgen receptor protein. The antibodies were affinity-purified against the corresponding fusion protein. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting using extracts from human cell lines demonstrated the specificity of the antibodies for the human androgen receptor and lack of cross-reactivity with other steroid hormone receptors. Immunocytochemistry was performed on frozen and paraffin sections of human temporal cortex and in paraffin-embedded benign hyperplastic prostates (BPH), as well as prostate and breast carcinomas, by the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method. Antigen-retrieval was performed in paraffin-embedded sections using microwave irradiation. Specific nuclear and cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for androgen receptor was detected in neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia cells of the temporal cortex. In contrast, only nuclear staining was observed in BPH, prostate and breast carcinomas. Immunoprecipitation of human temporal cortex lysate and subsequent Western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of a 98 kDa immunoreactive protein, slightly smaller than the reported molecular weight of the wild-type androgen receptor. These results provide further evidence for the expression of androgen receptor in the human temporal cortex. The use of these immunocytochemical techniques should enable the retrospective determination of possible changes in androgen receptor expression in

  7. Establishment of a panel of in-house polyclonal antibodies for the diagnosis of enterovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Osamu; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sato, Yuko; Nakajima, Noriko; Koike, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Takuya; Sata, Tetsutaro; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Taguchi, Fumihiro; Hasegawa, Hideki; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Noriyo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a reliable method of virus detection for the diagnosis of critical enterovirus infections such as acute infective encephalitis, encephalomyelitis and myocarditis. Because histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of paraffin-embedded tissues play an important role in recognizing infectious agents in tissue samples, six in-house polyclonal antibodies raised against three representative enteroviruses using an indirect immunofluorescence assay and immunohistochemistry were examined. This panel of polyclonal antibodies recognized three serotypes of enterovirus. Two of the polyclonal antibodies were raised against denatured virus particles from enterovirus A71, one was raised against the recombinant VP1 protein of coxsackievirus B3, and the other for poliovirus type 1 were raised against denatured virus particles, the recombinant VP1 protein and peptide 2C. Western blot analysis revealed that each of these antibodies recognized the corresponding viral antigen and none cross-reacted with non-enteroviruses within the family Picornaviridae. However, all cross-reacted to some extent with the antigens derived from other serotypes of enterovirus. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and immunohistochemistry revealed that the virus capsid and non-structural proteins were localized in the cytoplasm of affected culture cells, and skeletal muscles and neurons in neonatal mice experimentally-infected with human enterovirus. The antibodies also recognized antigens derived from recent clinical isolates of enterovirus A71, coxsackievirus B3 and poliovirus. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed that representative antibodies tested showed the same recognition pattern according to each serotype. Thus, the panel of in-house anti-enterovirus polyclonal antibodies described herein will be an important tool for the screening and pathological diagnosis for enterovirus infections, and may be useful for the classification of different

  8. Cloning, expression and polyclonal antibody preparation of the asialoglycoprotein receptor of Marmota himalayan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Huang, Huang; Zhang, Zhenghua; Wang, Baoju; Tian, Yongjun; Lu, Mengji; Yang, Dongliang

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study is to express the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) H1 and H2 subunits of Marmota himalayan in vitro, and develop polyclonal antibodies against the recombinant proteins. RT-PCR was used to amplify ASGPR CRDH1 and CRDH2 from the liver tissue of Marmota himalayan. The products of amplification were subcloned into prokaryotic expression vector pRSET-B, and expressed in E.coli BL21(DE3)plysS. The recombinant proteins were purified using Ni-NTA spin column. The purified proteins were inoculated into BALB/c mice to develop polyclonal antibodies. The sensitivity and specificity of antibodies were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining (IHC). The polyclonal antibodies showed high sensitivity and specificity against both denaturated and native ASGPR proteins. We successfully amplified and expressed the ASGPR CRDs of Marmota himalayan. The nucleic sequences of ASGPR CRDH1 and CRDH2 of Marmota himalayan have been submitted to Genbank and the sequence ID are DQ 845465 and DQ845466, respectively. The proteins and antibodies prepared can be used for targeting gene therapy in a new animal model-Marmota Himalayan-for the research of infectious diseases of hepatitis viruses and liver cancer treatment.

  9. Iodine-131 labeled anti-CEA polyclonal antibody detection of gastrointestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, H.A.; Hinkle, G.H.; Olsen, J.O.; Haagensen, D.A.; Thurston, M.O.; Mojzisik, C.; Houchens, D.; Martin, E.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To localize gastrointestinal tumor, 31 patients were injected with 1.7-2.1 mCi I-131 anti-CEA baboon polyclonal antibody. Whole body imaging at 48, 72, and occasionally 96 hrs was performed with a Signa Camera (Technicare) peaked at 364 keV with 20% window. Additional spot views were usually obtained. No subtraction methods were used. All patients had surgical and pathological confirmation of the nuclear medicine studies. Labeled antibody images were positive in 15 (8 recurrent or metastatic colorectal, 2 gastric, 1 pancreatic, 1 primary colon, and 1 breast metastatic to chest wall). In 1, antibody images were positive for metastatic deposits in para-aortic lymph nodes, but negative for primary rectal tumor. True negative images were observed in 6; false negative images in 9 (4 liver metastases, 2 rectal, 1 pancreatic, 1 mesenteric lymph node metastasis, 1 bone metastasis). In all cases, no correlation existed between preoperative CEA serum levels and imaging. I-131 labeled anti-CEA polyclonal antibody imaging proved highly efficient in detecting gastric cancer (2/2) and moderately efficient in detecting recurrent colorectal cancer (8/15). On the other hand, the I-131 labeled polyclonal anti-CEA antibody imaging was of limited value in detecting colon cancer (1/9), pancreatic cancer (1/4) and metastatic liver disease (0/4).

  10. Preparation of polyclonal antibodies against pig trachea apomucin

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.H.; Carlson, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    Purified procine tracheal mucin (PTM) was deglycosylated by treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS). A preferrential release of fucose, galactose > GlcNAc > GalNAc was observed during the deglycosylation. After five hours of TFMS treatment at 5C, over 90% of the carbohydrate was released leaving mainly Ga1NAc attached to the core protein. The residual Ga1NAc was further removed by three series of the Smith Degradation. The resulting apomucin consisted mainly of (mol %) Thr, 14; Ser, 12; Gly, 12; Glx, 10; Ala, 9; Pro, 8; Val, 7; Asx, 7. Sugars were not detected by gas chromatography. Antibodies obtained by immunizing rabbits with the apomucin recognized only the apomucin and not the holomucin in a double-sandwich ELISA assay. The ELISA is highly specific and has detection limits in the ng range. This antibody preparation was used in precipitation assays of cell-free translation products of pig trachea epithelium RNAs. Translocation products labeled with (TH)Ser and (TH)Thr showed significantly higher counts than with control serum.

  11. Molecular deconvolution of the monoclonal antibodies that comprise the polyclonal serum response

    PubMed Central

    Wine, Yariv; Boutz, Daniel R.; Lavinder, Jason J.; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Hughes, Randall A.; Hoi, Kam Hon; Jung, Sang Taek; Horton, Andrew P.; Murrin, Ellen M.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Georgiou, George

    2013-01-01

    We have developed and validated a methodology for determining the antibody composition of the polyclonal serum response after immunization. Pepsin-digested serum IgGs were subjected to standard antigen-affinity chromatography, and resulting elution, wash, and flow-through fractions were analyzed by bottom-up, liquid chromatography–high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Identification of individual monoclonal antibodies required the generation of a database of IgG variable gene (V-gene) sequences constructed by NextGen sequencing of mature B cells. Antibody V-gene sequences are characterized by short complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of high diversity adjacent to framework regions shared across thousands of IgGs, greatly complicating the identification of antigen-specific IgGs from proteomically observed peptides. By mapping peptides marking unique VH CDRH3 sequences, we identified a set of V-genes heavily enriched in the affinity chromatography elution, constituting the serum polyclonal response. After booster immunization in a rabbit, we find that the antigen-specific serum immune response is oligoclonal, comprising antibodies encoding 34 different CDRH3s that group into 30 distinct antibody VH clonotypes. Of these 34 CDRH3s, 12 account for ∼60% of the antigen-specific CDRH3 peptide mass spectral counts. For comparison, antibodies with 18 different CDRH3s (12 clonotypes) were represented in the antigen-specific IgG fraction from an unimmunized rabbit that fortuitously displayed a moderate titer for BSA. Proteomically identified antibodies were synthesized and shown to display subnanomolar affinities. The ability to deconvolute the polyclonal serum response is likely to be of key importance for analyzing antibody responses after vaccination and for more completely understanding adaptive immune responses in health and disease. PMID:23382245

  12. Preparation of Polyclonal Antibody and Expression Analysis of GR in Tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuanhong; Zhu, Benzhong; Luo, Yunbo; Chen, Xiangning; Zhang, Hongxing

    The fruit ripening of Green-ripe (Gr) mutant tomato was inhibited dramatically. To determine the expression patterns of Gr in tomato, we first produced the polyclonal antibody of Gr protein. RT-PCR was used to amplify the Gr gene from green ripe tomato fruit. And the PCR product was subcloned into prokaryotic protein expression vectors pET-30a to generate recombinant plasmid. The Gr protein was induced by IPTG in BL21 (DE3) and purified by Ni-NTA agarose column. The anti-Gr serum was produced by immunizing rabbits, and the titer of the anti-Gr serum was above 5000 by ELISA analysis. Purified by the DEAE-52 ion-column, the high purification level of anti-Gr polyclonal antibody was obtained. Furthermore, RT-CPR was used in the RNA level to demonstrate that the expression of Gr gene was specialized in some cultures of tomato. For example, the expressions of Gr were higher in seed, flower and green ripe fruit than others, and the expression level were reduced by exogenous ethylene treatment in the flower and green ripe fruit. Moreover, Polyclonal antibody of Gr was used to investigate the expression pattern of Gr in protein level by the Western blotting. Our results show that the expression level of Gr in protein level was complied with the expressions in RNA. So, we suggested that the regulation of Gr was transcriptional.

  13. Development, characterization, and use of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the myxosporean, Ceratomyxa shasta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Rohovec, J.S.; Fryer, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Both monoclonal and polyclonal antisera were produced against Ceratomyxa shasta. Ascites containing trophozoites of the parasite was collected from infected fish and used as antigen for immunization of mice. The resulting monoclonal antibodies reacted specifically with trophozoite and sporoblast stages but did not react with C. shasta spores by either indirect fluorescent antibody techniques or in Western blots. This indicates that some C. shasta antigens are specific to certain life stages of the parasite. Polyclonal antiserum was produced in a rabbit by injecting a spore protein electro-eluted from an SDS-polyacrylamide gel. This antiserum reacted with both trophozoites and spores by indirect fluorescent antibody techniques and in Western blots. All antisera were tested for cross-reactivity to trout white blood cells, a contaminant of the ascites, and to other myxosporea. Two monoclonal antibodies reacted with white blood cells and myxosporea of the genera Sphaerospora and Myxobilatus. One hybridoma produced antibodies of high specificity for C. shasta pre-spore stages. This is the first report of a monoclonal antibody produced against a myxosporean parasite.

  14. Different molecular weight forms of opioid receptors revealed by polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Zhu, Y X; Lee, N M; Loh, H H

    1988-01-15

    Polyclonal antibodies were raised against a purified opioid receptor from bovine brain (Cho, et. al., 1986), and shown to inhibit 3H-diprenorphine binding to this receptor in a dose-dependent fashion. These antibodies were then used to characterize opioid-binding material present in rat brain and in NG108-15 neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the antibodies reacted with a single species of 58,000 molecular weight in rat brain membranes; this closely corresponds in size to the bovine opioid receptor used to raise the antibodies. In contrast, the polyclonal antibodies reacted with a 45,000 molecular weight species in NG108-15 neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells; moreover, this band was specifically reduced in NG108-15 cells in which opioid receptors had been down-regulated by incubation with D-ala2-D-leu5-enkephalin for 24 hours. Thus at least two distinct opioid receptor molecules have been identified, which have antigenic similarities.

  15. Bacillus anthracis Capsular Conjugates Elicit Chimpanzee Polyclonal Antibodies That Protect Mice from Pulmonary Anthrax.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaochun; Schneerson, Rachel; Lovchik, Julie A; Dai, Zhongdong; Kubler-Kielb, Joanna; Agulto, Liane; Leppla, Stephen H; Purcell, Robert H

    2015-08-01

    The immunogenicity of Bacillus anthracis capsule (poly-γ-D-glutamic acid [PGA]) conjugated to recombinant B. anthracis protective antigen (rPA) or to tetanus toxoid (TT) was evaluated in two anthrax-naive juvenile chimpanzees. In a previous study of these conjugates, highly protective monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against PGA were generated. This study examines the polyclonal antibody response of the same animals. Preimmune antibodies to PGA with titers of >10(3) were detected in the chimpanzees. The maximal titer of anti-PGA was induced within 1 to 2 weeks following the 1st immunization, with no booster effects following the 2nd and 3rd immunizations. Thus, the anti-PGA response in the chimpanzees resembled a secondary immune response. Screening of sera from nine unimmunized chimpanzees and six humans revealed antibodies to PGA in all samples, with an average titer of 10(3). An anti-PA response was also observed following immunization with PGA-rPA conjugate, similar to that seen following immunization with rPA alone. However, in contrast to anti-PGA, preimmune anti-PA antibody titers and those following the 1st immunization were ≤300, with the antibodies peaking above 10(4) following the 2nd immunization. The polyclonal anti-PGA shared the MAb 11D epitope and, similar to the MAbs, exerted opsonophagocytic killing of B. anthracis. Most important, the PGA-TT-induced antibodies protected mice from a lethal challenge with virulent B. anthracis spores. Our data support the use of PGA conjugates, especially PGA-rPA targeting both toxin and capsule, as expanded-spectrum anthrax vaccines.

  16. Analysis of erythritol in foods by polyclonal antibody-based indirect competitive ELISA.

    PubMed

    Sreenath, Kundimi; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2008-05-01

    Sugar alcohols are widely used as food additives and drug excipients. Erythritol (INS 968) is an important four-carbon sugar alcohol in the food industry. Erythritol occurs naturally in certain fruits, vegetables, and fermented foods. Currently, HPLC and GC methods are in use for the quantification of erythritol in natural/processed foods. However, an immunoassay for erythritol has not been developed so far. We have utilized affinity-purified erythritol-specific antibodies generated earlier [9] to develop an indirect competitive ELISA. With erythritol-BSA conjugate (54 mol/mol; 100 ng/well) as the coating antigen, a calibration curve was prepared using known amounts of standard meso-erythritol (0.1-100,000 ng) in the immunoassay. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and red wine were selected as the food sources containing meso-erythritol. The amount of meso-erythritol was calculated as 2.36 mg/100 g fresh weight of watermelon and 206.7 mg/L of red wine. The results obtained from the immunoassay are in close agreement with the reported values analyzed by HPLC and GC (22-24 mg/kg in watermelon and 130-300 mg/L in red wine). The recovery analyses showed that added amounts of meso-erythritol were recovered fairly accurately with recoveries of 86-105% (watermelon) and 85-93.3% (red wine). The method described here for erythritol is the first report of an immunoassay for a sugar alcohol.

  17. [Preparation and detection of anti-influenza A virus polymerase basic protein 1 polyclonal antibody].

    PubMed

    Qin, Yujie; Zhang, Tinghong; Ye, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is an enveloped virus that belongs to the Orthomyxoviridae family. It has 8 negative RNA segments that encode 16 viral proteins. The viral polymerase consists of 3 proteins (PB 1, PB2 and PA) which plays an important role in the transcription and replication of the influenza A virus. Polymerase basic protein 1 (PB 1) is a critical member of viral polymerase complex. In order to further study the function of PB1, we need to prepare the PB1 antibody with good quality. Therefore, we amplified PB1 conserved region (nt1648-2265) by PCR and cloned it into pET-30a vector, and transformed into Escherichia coli BL2 1. The expression of His tagged PB 1 protein was induced by IPTG, and His-PB 1 proteins were purified by Ni-NTA resin. For preparation of PB 1 protein antiserum, rabbits were immunized with His-PB 1 fusion protein 3 times. Then the titer of PB 1 polyclonal antibody was measured by indirect ELISA. The antibody was purified by membrane affinity purification and subjected to immunoblotting analysis. Data showed that PB1 antibody can recognize PB 1 protein from WSN virus infected or pCMV FLAG-PB 1 transfected cells. Meanwhile, PB 1 antibody can also recognize specifically other subtype strains of influenza A virus such as H9N2 and H3N2. PB 1 polyclonal antibody we generated will be a useful tool to study the biological function of PB1. PMID:27363203

  18. Production of Polyclonal Antibody against Grapevine fanleaf virus Movement Protein Expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Koolivand, Davoud; Bashir, Nemat Sokhandan; Behjatnia, Seyed Aliakbar; Joozani, Raziallah Jafari

    2016-01-01

    The genomic region of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) encoding the movement protein (MP) was cloned into pET21a and transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) to express the protein. Induction was made with a wide range of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) concentrations (1, 1.5, and 2 mM) each for duration of 4, 6, or 16 h. However, the highest expression level was achieved with 1 mM IPTG for 4 h. Identity of the expressed protein was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by Western blotting. The expressed 41 kDa protein was purified under denaturing condition by affinity chromatography, reconfirmed by Western blotting and plate-trapped antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PTA-ELISA) before being used as a recombinant antigen to raise polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Purified anti-GFLV MP immunoglobulines (IgGs) and conjugated IgGs detected the expressed MP and GFLV virions in infected grapevines when used in PTA-ELISA, double antibody sandwich-ELISA, and Western blotting. This is the first report on the production of anti-GFLV MP polyclonal antibodies and application for the virus detection. PMID:27721695

  19. Immunomagnetic separation of scum-forming bacteria using polyclonal antibody that recognizes mycolic acids.

    PubMed

    Morisada, S; Miyata, N; Iwahori, K

    2002-10-01

    Mycolic acid-containing bacteria (mycolata) are thought to be involved in scum formation in aeration basins of activated sludge plants due to their ability to produce biosurfactants and their cell surface hydrophobicity. To isolate these bacteria, immunomagnetic separation (IMS) using an anti-mycolic acid polyclonal antibody was investigated. IMS that targeted Gordonia amarae SC1 exhibited a 100% recovery at 5x10(3) CFU ml(-1). At cell concentration of 7.8x10(6) CFU ml(-1), the recovery was lowered, but 80% of cells were still captured. Effect of bead concentrations on the recovery of SC1 at 10(6) CFU ml(-1) was examined. The results showed that addition of more than 6-7x10(6) beads for 1x10(6) CFU reached a maximum recovery (83%). Furthermore, the IMS procedure optimized with SC1 cells was tested with another mycolata. The results suggested that variation of the recovery for each mycolata is dependent on the specificity of the polyclonal antibody and that mycolata which are recognized by the antibody can be recovered by this procedure. PMID:12133606

  20. Production of Potent Fully Human Polyclonal Antibodies against Ebola Zaire Virus in Transchromosomal Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Dye, John M.; Wu, Hua; Hooper, Jay W.; Khurana, Surender; Kuehne, Ana I.; Coyle, Elizabeth M.; Ortiz, Ramon A.; Fuentes, Sandra; Herbert, Andrew S.; Golding, Hana; Bakken, Russell A.; Brannan, Jennifer M.; Kwilas, Steve A.; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Luke, Thomas C.; Smith, Gale; Glenn, Gregory; Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Yang, Chinglai; Compans, Richard W.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Jiao, Jin-an

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies, derived from humans or hyperimmunized animals, have been used prophylactically or therapeutically as countermeasures for a variety of infectious diseases. SAB Biotherapeutics has successfully developed a transchromosomic (Tc) bovine platform technology that can produce fully human immunoglobulins rapidly, and in substantial quantities, against a variety of disease targets. In this study, two Tc bovines expressing high levels of fully human IgG were hyperimmunized with a recombinant glycoprotein (GP) vaccine consisting of the 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) Makona isolate. Serum collected from these hyperimmunized Tc bovines contained high titers of human IgG against EBOV GP as determined by GP specific ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and virus neutralization assays. Fully human polyclonal antibodies against EBOV were purified and evaluated in a mouse challenge model using mouse adapted Ebola virus (maEBOV). Intraperitoneal administration of the purified anti-EBOV IgG (100 mg/kg) to BALB/c mice one day after lethal challenge with maEBOV resulted in 90% protection; whereas 100% of the control animals succumbed. The results show that hyperimmunization of Tc bovines with EBOV GP can elicit protective and potent neutralizing fully human IgG antibodies rapidly and in commercially viable quantities. PMID:27109916

  1. Production of Potent Fully Human Polyclonal Antibodies against Ebola Zaire Virus in Transchromosomal Cattle.

    PubMed

    Dye, John M; Wu, Hua; Hooper, Jay W; Khurana, Surender; Kuehne, Ana I; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Ortiz, Ramon A; Fuentes, Sandra; Herbert, Andrew S; Golding, Hana; Bakken, Russell A; Brannan, Jennifer M; Kwilas, Steve A; Sullivan, Eddie J; Luke, Thomas C; Smith, Gale; Glenn, Gregory; Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Yang, Chinglai; Compans, Richard W; Tripp, Ralph A; Jiao, Jin-An

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies, derived from humans or hyperimmunized animals, have been used prophylactically or therapeutically as countermeasures for a variety of infectious diseases. SAB Biotherapeutics has successfully developed a transchromosomic (Tc) bovine platform technology that can produce fully human immunoglobulins rapidly, and in substantial quantities, against a variety of disease targets. In this study, two Tc bovines expressing high levels of fully human IgG were hyperimmunized with a recombinant glycoprotein (GP) vaccine consisting of the 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) Makona isolate. Serum collected from these hyperimmunized Tc bovines contained high titers of human IgG against EBOV GP as determined by GP specific ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and virus neutralization assays. Fully human polyclonal antibodies against EBOV were purified and evaluated in a mouse challenge model using mouse adapted Ebola virus (maEBOV). Intraperitoneal administration of the purified anti-EBOV IgG (100 mg/kg) to BALB/c mice one day after lethal challenge with maEBOV resulted in 90% protection; whereas 100% of the control animals succumbed. The results show that hyperimmunization of Tc bovines with EBOV GP can elicit protective and potent neutralizing fully human IgG antibodies rapidly and in commercially viable quantities. PMID:27109916

  2. Cross-reactive polyclonal antibodies to the inner core of lipopolysaccharide from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Svein Rune; Guthrie, Terry; Guile, Geoffrey R; Kolberg, Jan; Hou, Sam; Hyland, Lisa; Wong, Simon Y C

    2002-03-01

    Sera from mice immunized with native or detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles derived from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutant 44/76(Mu-4) of Neisseria meningitidis were analyzed for antibodies to LPS. The carbohydrate portion of 44/76(Mu-4) LPS consists of the complete inner core, Glc beta 1-->4[GlcNAc alpha 1-->2Hep alpha 1-->3]Hep alpha 1-->5KDO[4-->2 alpha KDO]. Immunoblot analysis revealed that some sera contained antibodies to wild-type LPS which has a fully extended carbohydrate chain of immunotype L3,7, as well as to the homologous LPS. Sera reacted only weakly to LPS from 44/76(Mu-3), which lacks the terminal glucose of the inner core. No binding to more truncated LPS was observed. Consequently, the cross-reactive epitopes are expressed mainly by the complete inner core. Dephosphorylation of wild-type LPS abolished antibody binding to LPS in all but one serum. Thus, at least two specificities of cross-reactive antibodies exist: one is dependent on phosphoethanolamine groups in LPS, and one is not. Detection of these cross-reactive antibodies strongly supports the notion that epitopes expressed by meningococcal LPS inner core are also accessible to antibodies when the carbohydrate chain is fully extended. Also, these inner core epitopes are sufficiently immunogenic to induce antibody levels detectable in polyclonal antibody responses. Meningococci can escape being killed by antibodies to LPS that bind only to a specific LPS variant, by altering the carbohydrate chain length. Cross-reactive antibodies may prevent such escape. Therefore, inner core LPS structures may be important antigens in future vaccines against meningococcal disease. PMID:11854213

  3. A Polyclonal Antibody Against Recombinant Bovine Haptoglobin Expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhang, Hong; Li, Chunqiu

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the predicted immunodominant region of bovine haptoglobin (pirBoHp), without the signal peptide sequence, was synthesized based on the codon usage bias of Escherichia coli. The synthesized pirBoHp gene was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-32a (+), which contains a His-tag. The recombinant pirBoHp protein was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells. Western blot analysis showed that the purified recombinant pirBoHp protein could be recognized by an anti-His-tag monoclonal antibody. Further investigations indicated that a polyclonal antibody against the recombinant pirBoHp protein could recognize the α and β chains of native bovine haptoglobin in a pooled plasma sample from dairy cattle suffering from foot rot. PMID:24328747

  4. Immunodiagnosis of Citrus leprosis virus C using a polyclonal antibody to an expressed putative coat protein.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Nandlal; Roy, Avijit; Guillermo, Leon M; Picton, D D; Wei, G; Nakhla, M K; Levy, L; Brlansky, R H

    2013-11-01

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C), a causal agent for citrus leprosis disease, is present in South and Central America and is a threat for introduction into the U.S. citrus industry. A specific, inexpensive and reliable antibody based detection system is needed for the rapid identification of CiLV-C. The CiLV-C is very labile and has not been purified in sufficient amount for antibody production. The p29 gene of CiLV-C genome that codes for the putative coat protein (PCP) was codon optimized for expression in Escherichia coli and synthesized in vitro. The optimized gene was sub-cloned into the bacterial expression vector pDEST17 and transferred into E. coli BL21AI competent cells. The expression of PCP containing N-terminal His-tag was optimized by induction with l-arabinose. Induced cells were disrupted by sonication and expressed PCP was purified by affinity chromatography using Ni-NTA agarose. The purified expressed PCP was then used as an immunogen for injections into rabbits to produce polyclonal antibody (PAb). The PAb specific to the expressed PCP was identified using Western blotting. The antibody was successfully used to detect CiLV-C in the symptomatic CiLV-C infected tissues using double antibody sandwich-enzyme-linked-immunosorbent (DAS-ELISA), indirect ELISA and dot-blot immunoassay (DBIA) formats.

  5. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-Influenza Virus Antibodies: Enhancement of Neutralizing Potency in Polyclonal Mixtures and IgA Backbones

    PubMed Central

    He, Wenqian; Mullarkey, Caitlin E.; Duty, J. Andrew; Moran, Thomas M.; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current influenza virus vaccines rely upon the accurate prediction of circulating virus strains months in advance of the actual influenza season in order to allow time for vaccine manufacture. Unfortunately, mismatches occur frequently, and even when perfect matches are achieved, suboptimal vaccine efficacy leaves several high-risk populations vulnerable to infection. However, the recent discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that target the hemagglutinin (HA) stalk domain has renewed hope that the development of “universal” influenza virus vaccines may be within reach. Here, we examine the functions of influenza A virus hemagglutinin stalk-binding antibodies in an endogenous setting, i.e., as polyclonal preparations isolated from human sera. Relative to monoclonal antibodies that bind to the HA head domain, the neutralization potency of monoclonal stalk-binding antibodies was vastly inferior in vitro but was enhanced by several orders of magnitude in the polyclonal context. Furthermore, we demonstrated a surprising enhancement in IgA-mediated HA stalk neutralization relative to that achieved by antibodies of IgG isotypes. Mechanistically, this could be explained in two ways. Identical variable regions consistently neutralized virus more potently when in an IgA backbone compared to an IgG backbone. In addition, HA-specific memory B cells isolated from human peripheral blood were more likely to be stalk specific when secreting antibodies of IgA isotypes compared to those secreting IgG. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that HA stalk-binding antibodies perform optimally when in a polyclonal context and that the targeted elicitation of HA stalk-specific IgA should be an important consideration during “universal” influenza virus vaccine design. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses remain one of the most worrisome global public health threats due to their capacity to cause pandemics. While seasonal vaccines fail to protect against the

  6. Characterization of fimbriae of Actinomyces naeslundii N16 using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Two populations of fimbriae, which differ both in antigenicity and biological activity, have been identified on Actinomyces viscosus T14V cells. Although A. naeslundii serotype 1 isolates possess only one of these fimbrial populations (type 2 fimbriae), there was functional evidence to suggest that A. naeslundii serotype 3 strain N16 had both types of fimbriae. The purpose of this study was to characterize the fimbriae of A. naeslundii N16 immunologically by using both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to N16 were produced; all three bound to N16 fimbriae as determined by immunoelectron microscopy. In a solid-phase radioimmunoassay MAb 3B5.A1 reacted with 100% of the A. naeslundii serotype 3 isolates tested, but it did not react with any heterologous isolates. Type 1 and type 2 fimbriae were detected in Lancefield extracts of N16 cells by crossed immunoelectrophoresis (XIEP) using rabbit antiserum against N16 whole cells. When {sup 125}I-MAb 3B5.A1 was also incorporated into the gel, autoradiography indicated that MAb 3B5.A1 was specific for type 2 fimbriae. The N16 type 2 fimbriae were purified by gel filtration and immunoaffinity chromatography on a MAb 3B5.A1 column. Fimbriae-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were used in various immunological assays to determine that (a) N16 type 1 fimbriae are not related antigenically to type 2 fimbriae, (b) each type of fimbriae has epitopes that are present on the corresponding fimbriae of certain heterologous strains, and (c) MAb 3B5.A1 recognizes a serotype-specific epitope residing on the type 2 fimbriae of A. naeslundii serotype 3 strains.

  7. Expression, purification of IL-38 in Escherichia coli and production of polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhonglan; Chen, Zhenyu; Huang, Nongyu; Teng, Xiu; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Wei, Xiaoqiong; Qin, Ke; Liu, Xiao; Wu, Xueping; Tang, Huan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Cui, Kaijun; Li, Jiong

    2015-03-01

    Members of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family play important roles in inflammation and host defense against pathogens. Here, we describe a novel member of the IL-1 family, interleukin-38 (IL-38, IL-1F10, or IL-1HY2), which was discovered in 2001. Although the functional role of IL-38 remains unclear, recent reports show that IL-38 binds to the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) which is also targeted by the IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra). Consequently, these two molecules have similar effects on immune cells. Here, we describe the expression of soluble and active recombinant IL-38 in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The IL-38 gene sequence was optimized for expression in E. coli and then cloned into a pEHISTEV expression vector, which has an N-terminal 6-His affinity tag under control of the T7 lac strong promoter. Optimization of culture conditions allowed induction of the recombinant fusion protein with 0.1 mM isopropyl β-D-1-thio galactoside (IPTG) at 37°C for 4h. The recombinant fusion protein was purified using an Ni affinity column and was further digested with TEV protease; the cleaved protein was purified by molecular-exclusion chromatography. Next, we measured IL-38 binding ability using functional ELISA. The purified proteins were used to immunize a New Zealand white rabbit four times to enable the production of polyclonal antibodies. The specificity of the prepared polyclonal antibodies was determined using Western blot, and the results showed they have high specificity against IL-38. Here, we describe the development of an effective and reliable method to express and purify IL-38 and anti-IL-38 antibodies. This will enable the function and structure of IL-38 to be determined.

  8. Anti-miroestrol polyclonal antibodies: a comparison of immunogen preparations used to obtain desired antibody properties.

    PubMed

    Kitisripanya, Tharita; Jutathis, Kamonthip; Inyai, Chadathorn; Komaikul, Jukrapun; Udomsin, Orapin; Yusakul, Gorawit; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Putalun, Waraporn

    2016-04-01

    Immunogen quality is one important factor that contributes to desirable antibody characteristics. Highly specific antibodies against miroestrol can be used to develop a quality control immunoassay for Pueraria candollei products. In this study, we investigated how various immunogen preparations affect antibody properties. The results show that immunogen prepared using the Mannich reaction provides antibodies with higher specificity and sensitivity against miroestrol than immunogen prepared with the periodate reaction. The results suggest the Mannich reaction maintains the original structure of miroestrol and generates useful antibodies for developing immunoassays. PMID:26563142

  9. Anti-miroestrol polyclonal antibodies: a comparison of immunogen preparations used to obtain desired antibody properties.

    PubMed

    Kitisripanya, Tharita; Jutathis, Kamonthip; Inyai, Chadathorn; Komaikul, Jukrapun; Udomsin, Orapin; Yusakul, Gorawit; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Putalun, Waraporn

    2016-04-01

    Immunogen quality is one important factor that contributes to desirable antibody characteristics. Highly specific antibodies against miroestrol can be used to develop a quality control immunoassay for Pueraria candollei products. In this study, we investigated how various immunogen preparations affect antibody properties. The results show that immunogen prepared using the Mannich reaction provides antibodies with higher specificity and sensitivity against miroestrol than immunogen prepared with the periodate reaction. The results suggest the Mannich reaction maintains the original structure of miroestrol and generates useful antibodies for developing immunoassays.

  10. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N.; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D.; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P.; Dixit, Vishva M.; Zarrin, Ali A.

    2013-01-01

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  11. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P; Dixit, Vishva M; Zarrin, Ali A

    2013-09-24

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  12. Serological Differentiation of Plant-parasitic Nematode Species with Polyclonal and Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schots, Arjen; Gommers, Fred J.; Bakker, Jaap; Egberts, Egbert

    1990-01-01

    Although several attempts have been made to differentiate nematode species with polyclonal antisera, these efforts thus far have met with limited success because of extensive crossreactivities of the sera. Since the hybridoma technique offers the opportunity to develop more specific serological reagents, some research groups have recently started to apply this technology to the problem of species identification in nematology. Monoclonal antibodies (MA) that differentiate the potato-cyst nematodes Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallida, as well as MA specific for Meloidogyne species, have been developed. The possibilities of developing serodiagnostic tools for identification of nematodes recovered from soil samples and the implications of such monitoring of nematode infestations in view of integrated control of plant-parasitic nematodes are discussed. PMID:19287684

  13. Antigen capture ELISA system for henipaviruses using polyclonal antibodies obtained by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Marsh, Glenn A; Barr, Jennifer A; Okutani, Akiko; Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Broder, Christopher C; Yamada, Akio; Inoue, Satoshi; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-08-01

    A novel antigen-capture sandwich ELISA system targeting the glycoproteins of the henipaviruses Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) was developed. Utilizing purified polyclonal antibodies derived from NiV glycoprotein-encoding DNA-immunized rabbits, we established a system that can detect the native antigenic structures of the henipavirus surface glycoproteins using simplified and inexpensive methods. The lowest detection limit against live viruses was achieved for NiV Bangladesh strain, 2.5 × 10(4) TCID(50). Considering the recent emergence of genetic variants of henipaviruses and the resultant problems that arise for PCR-based detection, this system could serve as an alternative rapid diagnostic and detection assay. PMID:22585045

  14. Production and application of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against Spiroplasma eriocheiris

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Bao, Haixun; Miao, Fengqin; Peng, Yaqin; Shen, Yuqing; Gu, Wei; Meng, Qingguo; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-01-01

    A new species of spiroplasma, Spiroplasma eriocheiris (S. eriocheiris), was identified as a lethal pathogen of tremor disease (TD) in Chinese mitten crab recently. In order to acquire appropriate biological and diagnostic tools for characterizing this newly discovered pathogen, 5 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a polyclonal antibody (pAb) against S. eriocheiris were produced. Among the mAbs, 6F5, 7C8 and 12H5 lead to the deformation of S. eriocheiris. A peptide sequence, YMRDMQSGLPRY was identified as a mimic motif of MreB that is the cell shape determining protein of S. eriocheiris interacting with 3 mAbs. Furthermore, a double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) for detection of S. eriocheiris was established using the mAb and pAb we prepared. It detected as low as 0.1 μg/mL of S. eriocheiris. No cross-reaction was observed with three other common bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis) and the hemolymph samples of healthy Eriocheir sinensis. Collectively, our results indicated that the mAbs and pAb we prepared could be used in the analysis of S. eriocheiris membrane proteins mimotope and development of a diagnostic kit for S. eriocheiris infections. PMID:26639364

  15. Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to bacterial infection using next generation phage display.

    PubMed

    Naqid, Ibrahim A; Owen, Jonathan P; Maddison, Ben C; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D; Warry, Andrew; Tchórzewska, Monika A; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J; Davies, Robert H; La Ragione, Roberto M; Gough, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to infectious diseases to identify individual epitopes has the potential to underpin the development of novel serological assays and vaccines. Here, phage-peptide library panning coupled with screening using next generation sequencing was used to map antibody responses to bacterial infections. In the first instance, pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was investigated. IgG samples from twelve infected pigs were probed in parallel and phage binding compared to that with equivalent IgG from pre-infected animals. Seventy-seven peptide mimotopes were enriched specifically against sera from multiple infected animals. Twenty-seven of these peptides were tested in ELISA and twenty-two were highly discriminatory for sera taken from pigs post-infection (P < 0.05) indicating that these peptides are mimicking epitopes from the bacteria. In order to further test this methodology, it was applied to differentiate antibody responses in poultry to infections with distinct serovars of Salmonella enterica. Twenty-seven peptides were identified as being enriched specifically against IgY from multiple animals infected with S. Enteritidis compared to those infected with S. Hadar. Nine of fifteen peptides tested in ELISA were highly discriminatory for IgY following S. Enteritidis infection (p < 0.05) compared to infections with S. Hadar or S. Typhimurium. PMID:27072017

  16. Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to bacterial infection using next generation phage display

    PubMed Central

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Spiliotopoulos, Anastasios; Emes, Richard D.; Warry, Andrew; Tchórzewska, Monika A.; Martelli, Francesca; Gosling, Rebecca J.; Davies, Robert H.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping polyclonal antibody responses to infectious diseases to identify individual epitopes has the potential to underpin the development of novel serological assays and vaccines. Here, phage-peptide library panning coupled with screening using next generation sequencing was used to map antibody responses to bacterial infections. In the first instance, pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was investigated. IgG samples from twelve infected pigs were probed in parallel and phage binding compared to that with equivalent IgG from pre-infected animals. Seventy-seven peptide mimotopes were enriched specifically against sera from multiple infected animals. Twenty-seven of these peptides were tested in ELISA and twenty-two were highly discriminatory for sera taken from pigs post-infection (P < 0.05) indicating that these peptides are mimicking epitopes from the bacteria. In order to further test this methodology, it was applied to differentiate antibody responses in poultry to infections with distinct serovars of Salmonella enterica. Twenty-seven peptides were identified as being enriched specifically against IgY from multiple animals infected with S. Enteritidis compared to those infected with S. Hadar. Nine of fifteen peptides tested in ELISA were highly discriminatory for IgY following S. Enteritidis infection (p < 0.05) compared to infections with S. Hadar or S. Typhimurium. PMID:27072017

  17. Production of cocktail of polyclonal antibodies using bacterial expressed recombinant protein for multiple virus detection.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Reetika; Mandal, Bikash; Paul, Prabir Kumar; Chigurupati, Phaneendra; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Cocktail of polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were produced that will help in multiple virus detection and overcome the limitation of individual virus purification, protein expression and purification as well as immunization in multiple rabbits. A dual fusion construct was developed using conserved coat protein (CP) sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) in an expression vector, pET-28a(+). The fusion protein (∼40kDa) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Likewise, a triple fusion construct was developed by fusing conserved CP sequences of CMV and PRSV with conserved nucleocapsid protein (N) sequence of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) and expressed as a fusion protein (∼50kDa) in pET-28a(+). PAb made separately to each of these three viruses recognized the double and triple fusion proteins in Western blot indicating retention of desired epitopes for binding with target antibodies. The fusion proteins (∼40kDa and ∼50kDa) were used to produce cocktail of PAb by immunizing rabbits, which simultaneously detected natural infection of CMV and PRSV or CMV, PRSV and GBNV in Cucurbitaceous, Solanaceous and other hosts in DAC-ELISA. This is the first report on production of a cocktail of PAb to recombinant fusion protein of two or three distinct viruses.

  18. Investigation of a panel of monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal sera against anthrax toxins resulted in identification of an anti-lethal factor antibody with disease-enhancing characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Parul; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Priyanka; Joon, Shikha; Sinha, Subrata; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-12-01

    Hybridomas were created using spleen of mice that were actively immunized with rLFn (recombinant N-terminal domain of lethal factor). Later on, separate group of mice were immunized with rLFn to obtain a polyclonal control for passive immunization studies of monoclonal antibodies. This led to the identification of one cohort of rLFn-immnized mice that harboured disease-enhancing polyclonal antibodies. At the same time, the monoclonal antibodies secreted by all the hybridomas were being tested. Two hybridomas secreted monoclonal antibodies (H10 and H8) that were cross-reactive with EF (edema factor) and LF (lethal factor), while the other two hybridomas secreted LF-specific antibodies (H7 and H11). Single chain variable fragment (LETscFv) was derived from H10 hybridoma. H11 was found to have disease-enhancing property. Combination of H11 with protective monoclonal antibodies (H8 and H10) reduced its disease enhancing nature. This in vitro abrogation of disease-enhancement provides the proof of concept that in polyclonal sera the disease enhancing character of a fraction of antibodies is overshadowed by the protective nature of the rest of the antibodies generated on active immunization.

  19. Production and characterization of rabbit polyclonal antibodies to almond (Prunus dulcis L.) major storage protein.

    PubMed

    Acosta, M R; Roux, K H; Teuber, S S; Sathe, S K

    1999-10-01

    Rabbits were immunized with purified almond major protein (AMP), the primary storage protein in almonds. Rabbit anti-AMP polyclonal antibodies (PA) could detect AMP when as little as 1-10 ng/mL were used to coat microtiter plates in a noncompetitive enzyme linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Competitive inhibition ELISA assays detected the AMP down to 300 ng/mL. PA recognized the AMP in protein extracts from all U.S. major marketing cultivars of almonds (Mission, Neplus, Peerless, Carmel, and Nonpareil) with specific reactivity of 52.6-75% as compared to that of the AMP alone. Immunoreactivity of protein extracts prepared from commercial samples of blanched almonds, roasted almonds, and almond paste was respectively reduced by 50.0%, 56.6%, and 68.4% (noncompetitive ELISA) when compared to the immunoreactivity of the AMP. Moist heat (121 degrees C, 15 min) pretreatment of the AMP reduced the PA reactivity by 87% (noncompetitive ELISA). Exposing AMP to pH extremes (12.5 and 1.5-2.5) caused a 53% and 57% reduction in PA reactivity, respectively (noncompetitive ELISA). PA showed some cross-reactivity with the cashew major globulin, and to a lesser extent, the Tepary and Great Northern bean major storage protein (7S or phaseolin). The presence of almonds in a commercial food was detected using PA in a competitive ELISA. PMID:10552764

  20. Production and characterization of a broad-specificity polyclonal antibody for O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides and a quantitative structure-activity relationship study of antibody recognition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyclonal antibody (PAb) with broad-specificity for O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) against a generic hapten, 4-(diethoxyphosphoro thioyloxy) benzoic acid, was produced. The obtained PAb showed high sensitivity to seven commonly used O,O-diethyl OPs in a competitive indirect enzyme-l...

  1. Production of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against the Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa16.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamadou-Charfi, Dorra; Sauer, Annette Juliane; Abdelkafi-Mesrati, Lobna; Jaoua, Samir; Stephan, Dietrich

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to establish a quantitative determination of the vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3A from the culture supernatant of Bacillus thuringiensis either by ELISA or by the conventional quantification method of the Western blot band. The Vip3A protein was produced by fermentation of the B. thuringiensis reference strain BUPM95 in 3 L. By Western blot, the Vip3Aa16 toxin was detected in the culture supernatant during the exponential growth phase of B. thuringiensis BUPM95. However, the detection of Vip3Aa16 on Western blot showed in addition to the toxin two other strips (62 and 180 kDa) recognized by the anti-Vip3Aa16 polyclonal antibodies prepared at the Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax Tunisia. For that reason and in order to develop a technique for reliable quantification of the toxin, we have considered the production of polyclonal antibodies at the Julius Kühn Institute, Germany. These antibodies were the basis for the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against the protein produced by the Vip3Aa16 recombinant strain Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). These monoclonal antibodies were tested by plate-trapped antigen (PTA) and triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA). The selection of hybridoma supernatants gave us four positive clones producing monoclonal antibodies.

  2. Polyclonal antibody based coproantigen detection immunoassay for diagnosis of Oesophagostomum columbianum infection in goats.

    PubMed

    Jas, R; Ghosh, J D; Das, K

    2010-06-24

    A polyclonal antibody based coproantigen detection enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (cAg-ELISA) for diagnosis of experimental and natural Oesophagostomum columbianum infection in goats was developed and evaluated. Adult O. columbianum worms, collected from the caecum and colon of slaughtered goats, were triturated and cultured for obtaining infective third stage larvae (L(3)) and also used for preparation of excretory-secretory antigen (ESAg). Experimental goats were orally infected each with 600 L(3)/kg of the body weight. Filter sterilized faecal supernatant, i.e. the coproantigen (cAg) was harvested from the rectal faeces of all the infected goats, on alternate days from day-5 till day-31 after the infection. Hyperimmune serum (HIS) against ESAg of O. columbianum was raised in rabbits. Molecular and antigenic characterization of ES products of O. columbianum by HIS revealed that 50 and 39kDa polypeptides were immuno-dominant. Coproantigen detection ELISA was standardized by using the cAg as coating antigen and its subsequent binding with the HIS against ESAg of O. columbianum. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the standardized assay were determined by evaluating the assay on the faecal supernatant of 96 slaughtered goats taking into consideration their recorded parasitological status in respect of the abomasal and the intestinal parasites. The cAg-ELISA detected the prepatent oesophagostomosis on 20-24-day-post-infection with a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 88, 89.13 and 88.54%, respectively. The assay is relatively easy to perform and would serve as a reliable tool for detection of caprine nodular oesophagostomosis.

  3. Altering the motility of Trypanosoma cruzi with rabbit polyclonal anti-peptide antibodies reduces infection to susceptible mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Finkelsztein, Eli J; Diaz-Soto, Juan C; Vargas-Zambrano, Juan C; Suesca, Elizabeth; Guzmán, Fanny; López, Manuel C; Thomas, M Carmen; Forero-Shelton, Manu; Cuellar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción J; González, John M

    2015-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi's trypomastigotes are highly active and their incessant motility seems to be important for mammalian host cell infection. The kinetoplastid membrane protein-11 (KMP-11) is a protein expressed in all parasite stages, which induces a cellular and humoral immune response in the infected host, and is hypothesized to participate in the parasite's motility. An N-terminal peptide from KMP-11, termed K1 or TcTLE, induced polyclonal antibodies that inhibit parasitic invasion of Vero cells. The goal of this study was to evaluate the motility and infectivity of T. cruzi when exposed to polyclonal anti-TcTLE antibodies. Rabbits were immunized with TcTLE peptide along with FIS peptide as an immunomodulator. ELISA assay results showed that post-immunization sera contained high titers of polyclonal anti-TcTLE antibodies, which were also reactive against the native KMP-11 protein and live parasites as detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry assays. Trypomastigotes of T. cruzi were incubated with pre- or post-immunization sera, and infectivity to human astrocytes was assessed by Giemsa staining/light microscope and flow cytometry using carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeled parasites. T. cruzi infection in astrocytes decreased approximately by 30% upon incubation with post-immunization sera compared with pre-immunization sera. Furthermore, trypomastigotes were recorded by video microscopy and the parasite's flagellar speed was calculated by tracking the flagella. Trypomastigotes exposed to post-immunization sera had qualitative alterations in motility and significantly slower flagella (45.5 µm/s), compared with those exposed to pre-immunization sera (69.2 µm/s). In summary, polyclonal anti-TcTLE serum significantly reduced the parasite's flagellar speed and cell infectivity. These findings support that KMP-11 could be important for parasite motility, and that by targeting its N-terminal peptide infectivity can be reduced.

  4. Effect of maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies and polyclonal IVIG on the activation status of vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    RADDER, C M; BEEKHUIZEN, H; KANHAI, H H H; BRAND, A

    2004-01-01

    Maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies can cause severe fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), complicated by intracranial haemorrhage (ICH). Antenatal treatment with maternal intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) seems to protect against ICH even when thrombocytopenia persists. The aim of this study was to investigate if anti-HPA-1a antibodies and IVIG potentially affect vascular endothelial cells (ECs) in order to identify susceptibility for ICH. Human umbilical cord endothelial cells (HUVEC) were incubated with anti-HPA-1a antibodies with or without polyclonal IVIG and evaluated for EC activation. Maternal sera with anti-HPA-1a antibodies affected neither the EC expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and tissue factor (TF) nor the release of van Willebrand factor (vWF) or interleukin (IL)-8 nor the integrity of ECs. Maternal sera obtained after IVIG treatment and polyclonal IVIG decrease constitutive and cytokine-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression on ECs. The results show that maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies cause no activation or damage of ECs in this model. The clinical relevance of the de-activating properties of IVIG on EC activation with respect to ICH deserves further investigation. PMID:15196265

  5. 10-nm filaments are induced to collapse in living cells microinjected with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against tubulin

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Cells were microinjected with four mouse monoclonal antibodies that were directed against either alpha- or beta-tubulin subunits, one monoclonal with activity against both subunits, and a guinea pig polyclonal antibody with activity directed against both subunits, to determine the effects on the distribution of cytoplasmic microtubules and 10-nm filaments. The specificities of the antibodies were confirmed by Western blots, solid phase radioimmunoassay, and Western blot analysis of alpha- and beta-tubulin peptide maps. Two monoclonals DM1A and DM3B3, an anti-alpha- and anti-beta-tubulin respectively, and the guinea pig polyclonal anti-alpha/beta-tubulin antibody (GP1T4) caused the 10-nm filaments to collapse into large lateral aggregates collecting in the cell periphery or tight juxtanuclear caps; the other monoclonal antibodies had no effect when microinjected into cells. The filament collapsing was observed to be complete at 1.5-2 h after injection. During the first 30 min after injection a few cytoplasmic microtubules near the cell periphery could be observed by fluorescence microscopy. This observation was confirmed by electron microscopy, which also demonstrated assembled microtubules in the juxtanuclear region. By 1.5 h, when most of the 10-nm filaments were collapsed, the complete cytoplasmic array of microtubules was observed. Cells injected in prophase were able to assemble a mitotic spindle, suggesting that the antibody did not block microtubule assembly. Metabolic labeling with [35S]methionine of microinjected cells revealed that total protein synthesis was the same as that observed in uninjected cells. This indicated that the microinjected antibody apparently did not produce deleterious effects on cellular metabolism. These results suggest that through a direct interaction of antibodies with either alpha- or beta- tubulin subunits, 10-nm filaments were dissociated from their normal distribution. It is possible that the antibodies disrupted postulated 10

  6. Species-Specific Chromosome Engineering Greatly Improves Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production Profile in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hua; Wang, Zhongde; Jiao, Jin-an; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of fully human IgG (hIgG) or human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) by transgenic animals could be useful for human therapy. However, production level of hpAbs in transgenic animals is generally very low, probably due to the fact that evolutionarily unique interspecies-incompatible genomic sequences between human and non-human host species may impede high production of fully hIgG in the non-human environment. To address this issue, we performed species-specific human artificial chromosome (HAC) engineering and tested these engineered HAC in cattle. Our previous study has demonstrated that site-specific genomic chimerization of pre-B cell receptor/B cell receptor (pre-BCR/BCR) components on HAC vectors significantly improves human IgG expression in cattle where the endogenous bovine immunoglobulin genes were knocked out. In this report, hIgG1 class switch regulatory elements were subjected to site-specific genomic chimerization on HAC vectors to further enhance hIgG expression and improve hIgG subclass distribution in cattle. These species-specific modifications in a chromosome scale resulted in much higher production levels of fully hIgG of up to 15 g/L in sera or plasma, the highest ever reported for a transgenic animal system. Transchromosomic (Tc) cattle containing engineered HAC vectors generated hpAbs with high titers against human-origin antigens following immunization. This study clearly demonstrates that species-specific sequence differences in pre-BCR/BCR components and IgG1 class switch regulatory elements between human and bovine are indeed functionally distinct across the two species, and therefore, are responsible for low production of fully hIgG in our early versions of Tc cattle. The high production levels of fully hIgG with hIgG1 subclass dominancy in a large farm animal species achieved here is an important milestone towards broad therapeutic applications of hpAbs. PMID:26107496

  7. Species-Specific Chromosome Engineering Greatly Improves Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production Profile in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Wang, Zhongde; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of fully human IgG (hIgG) or human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) by transgenic animals could be useful for human therapy. However, production level of hpAbs in transgenic animals is generally very low, probably due to the fact that evolutionarily unique interspecies-incompatible genomic sequences between human and non-human host species may impede high production of fully hIgG in the non-human environment. To address this issue, we performed species-specific human artificial chromosome (HAC) engineering and tested these engineered HAC in cattle. Our previous study has demonstrated that site-specific genomic chimerization of pre-B cell receptor/B cell receptor (pre-BCR/BCR) components on HAC vectors significantly improves human IgG expression in cattle where the endogenous bovine immunoglobulin genes were knocked out. In this report, hIgG1 class switch regulatory elements were subjected to site-specific genomic chimerization on HAC vectors to further enhance hIgG expression and improve hIgG subclass distribution in cattle. These species-specific modifications in a chromosome scale resulted in much higher production levels of fully hIgG of up to 15 g/L in sera or plasma, the highest ever reported for a transgenic animal system. Transchromosomic (Tc) cattle containing engineered HAC vectors generated hpAbs with high titers against human-origin antigens following immunization. This study clearly demonstrates that species-specific sequence differences in pre-BCR/BCR components and IgG1 class switch regulatory elements between human and bovine are indeed functionally distinct across the two species, and therefore, are responsible for low production of fully hIgG in our early versions of Tc cattle. The high production levels of fully hIgG with hIgG1 subclass dominancy in a large farm animal species achieved here is an important milestone towards broad therapeutic applications of hpAbs.

  8. Species-Specific Chromosome Engineering Greatly Improves Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production Profile in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Wang, Zhongde; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of fully human IgG (hIgG) or human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) by transgenic animals could be useful for human therapy. However, production level of hpAbs in transgenic animals is generally very low, probably due to the fact that evolutionarily unique interspecies-incompatible genomic sequences between human and non-human host species may impede high production of fully hIgG in the non-human environment. To address this issue, we performed species-specific human artificial chromosome (HAC) engineering and tested these engineered HAC in cattle. Our previous study has demonstrated that site-specific genomic chimerization of pre-B cell receptor/B cell receptor (pre-BCR/BCR) components on HAC vectors significantly improves human IgG expression in cattle where the endogenous bovine immunoglobulin genes were knocked out. In this report, hIgG1 class switch regulatory elements were subjected to site-specific genomic chimerization on HAC vectors to further enhance hIgG expression and improve hIgG subclass distribution in cattle. These species-specific modifications in a chromosome scale resulted in much higher production levels of fully hIgG of up to 15 g/L in sera or plasma, the highest ever reported for a transgenic animal system. Transchromosomic (Tc) cattle containing engineered HAC vectors generated hpAbs with high titers against human-origin antigens following immunization. This study clearly demonstrates that species-specific sequence differences in pre-BCR/BCR components and IgG1 class switch regulatory elements between human and bovine are indeed functionally distinct across the two species, and therefore, are responsible for low production of fully hIgG in our early versions of Tc cattle. The high production levels of fully hIgG with hIgG1 subclass dominancy in a large farm animal species achieved here is an important milestone towards broad therapeutic applications of hpAbs. PMID:26107496

  9. Production and Application of Polyclonal Antibodies Against Recombinant Capsid Protein of Extra Small Virus of Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Neethi, V; Sivakumar, N; Kumar, Kundan; Rajendran, K V; Makesh, M

    2012-12-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus along with a satellite virus, extra small virus (XSV) causes white tail disease (WTD) in the giant freshwater prawn M. rosenbergii. Infected M. rosenbergii postlarvae were collected from a hatchery in Kakinada, Andhra Pradesh. The gene coding the capsid protein of XSV was cloned in a bacterial expression vector pRSET A and the recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS cells. The recombinant protein was purified by Nickel affinity chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies were produced in mice against the recombinant protein and the antibodies reacted specifically with the recombinant protein and XSV in WTD-infected tissues. This is the first report of detection of XSV using antibodies against recombinant capsid protein. PMID:24293828

  10. Production and Application of Polyclonal Antibodies Against Recombinant Capsid Protein of Extra Small Virus of Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Neethi, V; Sivakumar, N; Kumar, Kundan; Rajendran, K V; Makesh, M

    2012-12-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus along with a satellite virus, extra small virus (XSV) causes white tail disease (WTD) in the giant freshwater prawn M. rosenbergii. Infected M. rosenbergii postlarvae were collected from a hatchery in Kakinada, Andhra Pradesh. The gene coding the capsid protein of XSV was cloned in a bacterial expression vector pRSET A and the recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS cells. The recombinant protein was purified by Nickel affinity chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies were produced in mice against the recombinant protein and the antibodies reacted specifically with the recombinant protein and XSV in WTD-infected tissues. This is the first report of detection of XSV using antibodies against recombinant capsid protein.

  11. Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP): prokaryotic expression, purification, and preparation of a polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H L; Li, H; Sun, Y S; Yang, Z Y; Yu, Q

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) plays important roles in promoting cancer occurrence and in the development of bone metastases. To increase our knowledge of the biological functions of PTHrP, the prokaryotic expression vector pET-PTHrP was successfully constructed and the His-PTHrP fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. Anti-PTHrP polyclonal antibody was then prepared from rabbits. Finally, the goat tissue expression profile of PTHrP was analyzed by Western blot with the anti-PTHrP polyclonal antibody. The results showed that the expression of PTHrP in goat mammary glands was significantly higher than that in other organs. This indicates that PTHrP may play important roles in the goat mammary gland. The antibody prepared will be a useful tool for detecting PTHrP and will be valuable in future studies investigating the role of PTHrP in calcium metabolism in the goat model. PMID:25158263

  12. Production and characterization of polyclonal antibodies in rabbits to 4S-limonene synthase from spearmint (Mentha spicata).

    PubMed

    Alonso, W R; Crock, J E; Croteau, R

    1993-02-15

    Limonene synthase, a monoterpene cyclase from the oil glands of spearmint (Mentha spicata) leaves that catalyzes the conversion of geranyl pyrophosphate to (-)-4S-limonene, was purified, and polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits against the sodium dodecyl sulfate-denatured protein. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the antibodies were very specific for denatured limonene synthase from all Mentha species tested. However, no immunological cross-reactivity was observed with denatured limonene synthases from Valencia oranges (Citrus sinensis, Rutaceae) or wormseed (Chenopodium ambrosioides, Chenopodiaceae). Furthermore, the antibody preparation did not detectably cross-react with other monoterpene cyclases from related angiosperm species of the Lamiaceae, Asteraceae, and Umbellifereae, or from conifer species, and no cross-reactivity was demonstrated toward several sesquiterpene cyclases of higher plant and fungal origin. Although the antibody preparation was highly selective for denatured limonene cyclase from Mentha, the antibodies did not recognize the native protein in several different types of experiments. Nevertheless, specificity for the target enzyme was unambiguously demonstrated when the antibody preparation was shown to cross-react with the cyclase protein expressed in Escherichia coli that harbored the corresponding limonene synthase cDNA gene from M. spicata.

  13. A Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Polymorphism Confers Resistance to Neutralization by Polyclonal Sera and Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wasilewski, Lisa N.; El-Diwany, Ramy; Munshaw, Supriya; Snider, Anna E.; Brady, Jillian K.; Osburn, William O.; Ray, Stuart C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a global health problem, with millions of chronically infected individuals at risk for cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV vaccine development is vital in the effort toward disease control and eradication, an undertaking aided by an increased understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). In this study, we identified HCV codons that vary deep in a phylogenetic tree of HCV sequences and showed that a polymorphism at one of these positions renders Bole1a, a computationally derived, ancestral genotype 1a HCV strain, resistant to neutralization by both polyclonal-HCV-infected plasma and multiple broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies with unique binding epitopes. This bNAb resistance mutation reduces replicative fitness, which may explain the persistence of both neutralization-sensitive and neutralization-resistant variants in circulating viral strains. This work identifies an important determinant of bNAb resistance in an ancestral, representative HCV genome, which may inform HCV vaccine development. IMPORTANCE Worldwide, more than 170 million people are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver transplantation in the United States. Despite recent significant advances in HCV treatment, a vaccine is needed. Control of the HCV pandemic with drug treatment alone is likely to fail due to limited access to treatment, reinfections in high-risk individuals, and the potential for resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) block infection by diverse HCV variants and therefore serve as a useful guide for vaccine development, but our understanding of resistance to bNAbs is incomplete. In this report, we identify a viral polymorphism conferring resistance to neutralization by both polyclonal plasma and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, which may inform HCV vaccine development

  14. Sol-gel immunosorbents doped with polyclonal antibodies for the selective extraction of malathion and triazines from aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Vera-Avila, Luz E; Vázquez-Lira, Juan C; García de Llasera, Martha; Covarrubias, Rosario

    2005-07-15

    Sol-gel immunosorbents (IS) prepared by encapsulation of polyclonal antibodies in silica were packed in cartridges and evaluated for selective immunoaffinity extraction (IAE) of malathion and triazines from aqueous samples. Encapsulated atrazine antibodies highly cross-reacted with simazine and propazine but did not recognize prometon and prometryn. No cross-reactivity of malathion antibodies was observed with the closely related metabolites oxomalathion and isomalathion. Mean IS binding capacities per milligram of entrapped antibody were 0.33 nmol of malathion and 0.47 nmol of atrazine (approximately 100 ng each). This capacity remained constant for at least 10 weeks, and the cartridge reusability was excellent (>60 IAE runs); also, high preconcentration factors were feasible because the breakthrough of analytes from IS cartridges did not occur up to the 250 mL sample volumes, provided that the capacity was not surpassed. Simple and rapid methods for determination of malathion or three triazines in surface water were developed using off-line IAE and HPLC-UV. The application to 50 mL dam water samples spiked at approximately 1 ng/mL of pesticides resulted in recoveries of approximately 90% and RSD < 5% (n=7). LODs for this sample volume (direct injection of IS eluates) were in the range of 0.15-0.50 ng/mL. Lower LODs (0.03-0.1 ng/mL) were achieved by online analysis of whole eluates previously loaded in RP precolumns.

  15. Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase 1): localization and in vitro inhibition of promastigotes growth by polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Porcino, Gabriane Nascimento; Carvalho-Campos, Cristiane; Maia, Ana Carolina Ribeiro Gomes; Detoni, Michelle Lima; Faria-Pinto, Priscila; Coimbra, Elaine Soares; Marques, Marcos José; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; Diniz, Vanessa Álvaro; Corte-Real, Suzana; Vasconcelos, Eveline Gomes

    2012-10-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity was recently characterized in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis promastigotes (Lb), and an antigenic conserved domain (r82-121) from the specific NTPDase 1 isoform was identified. In this work, mouse polyclonal antibodies produced against two synthetic peptides derived from this domain (LbB1LJ, r82-103; LbB2LJ, r102-121) were used. The anti-LbB1LJ or anti-LbB2LJ antibodies were immobilized on protein A-sepharose and immunoprecipitated the NTPDase 1 of 48 kDa and depleted approximately 40% of the phosphohydrolytic activity from detergent-homogenized Lb preparation. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical microscopy identified the NTPDase 1 on the parasite surface and in its subcellular cytoplasmic vesicles, mitochondria, kinetoplast and nucleus. The ATPase and ADPase activities of detergent-homogenized Lb preparation were partially inhibited by anti-LbB1LJ antibody (43-79%), which was more effective than that inhibition (18-47%) by anti-LbB2LJ antibody. In addition, the immune serum anti-LbB1LJ (67%) or anti-LbB2LJ (33%) was cytotoxic, significantly reducing the promastigotes growth in vitro. The results appoint the conserved domain from the L. braziliensis NTPDase as an important target for inhibitor design and the potential application of these biomolecules in experimental protocols of disease control. PMID:22921497

  16. Development of a Cost-effective Ovine Polyclonal Antibody-Based Product, EBOTAb, to Treat Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dowall, Stuart David; Callan, Jo; Zeltina, Antra; Al-Abdulla, Ibrahim; Strecker, Thomas; Fehling, Sarah K.; Krähling, Verena; Bosworth, Andrew; Rayner, Emma; Taylor, Irene; Charlton, Sue; Landon, John; Cameron, Ian; Hewson, Roger; Nasidi, Abdulsalami; Bowden, Thomas A.; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    The highly glycosylated glycoprotein spike of Ebola virus (EBOV-GP1,2) is the primary target of the humoral host response. Recombinant EBOV-GP ectodomain (EBOV-GP1,2ecto) expressed in mammalian cells was used to immunize sheep and elicited a robust immune response and produced high titers of high avidity polyclonal antibodies. Investigation of the neutralizing activity of the ovine antisera in vitro revealed that it neutralized EBOV. A pool of intact ovine immunoglobulin G, herein termed EBOTAb, was prepared from the antisera and used for an in vivo guinea pig study. When EBOTAb was delivered 6 hours after challenge, all animals survived without experiencing fever or other clinical manifestations. In a second series of guinea pig studies, the administration of EBOTAb dosing was delayed for 48 or 72 hours after challenge, resulting in 100% and 75% survival, respectively. These studies illustrate the usefulness of EBOTAb in protecting against EBOV-induced disease. PMID:26715676

  17. The cloning and characterization of the enolase2 gene of Gekko japonicus and its polyclonal antibody preparation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wu, Ronghua; Chen, Haijiao; Zhou, Youlang; Li, Yan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei

    2013-01-01

    The enolase2 gene is usually expressed in mature neurons and also named neuron specific enolase (NSE). In the present study, we first obtained the NSE gene cDNA sequence by using the RACE method based on the expressed sequence tag (EST) fragment from the cDNA library of Gekko japonicus and identified one transcript of about 2.2 kb in central nervous system of Gekko japonicus by Northern blotting. The open reading frame of NSE is 1305 bp, which encodes a 435 amino-acid protein. We further investigated the multi-tissue expression pattern of NSE by RT-PCR and found that the expression of NSE mRNA was very high in brain, spinal cord and low in heart, while it was not detectable in other tissues. The real-time quantitative PCR was used to investigate the time-dependent change in the expression of the NSE mRNA level after gecko spinal cord transection and found it significantly increased at one day, reaching its highest level three days post-injury and then decreasing at the seventh day of the experiment. The recombinant plasmid of pET-32a-NSE was constructed and induced to express His fused NSE protein. The purified NSE protein was used to immunize rabbits to generate polyclonal antisera. The titer of the antiserum was more than 1:65536 determined by ELISA. Western blotting showed that the prepared antibody could specifically recognize the recombinant and endogenous NSE protein. The result of immunohistochemistry revealed that positive signals were present in neurons of the brain and the spinal cord. This study provided the tools of cDNA and polyclonal antibody for studying NSE function in Gekko japonicus. PMID:23615470

  18. Cloning of neuromedin B and its receptor in the rabbit and generating a polyclonal antibody to the neuromedin B protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting-Ting; Su, Juan; Ma, Zhi-Yu; Ma, Jun-Xiao; Jin, Meng-Meng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhi-Hai

    2015-06-10

    Neuromedin B (NMB) is a highly conserved bombesin-related neuropeptide found in mammals. Neuromedin B (NMB) executes its effect by binding to the cell surface receptor, neuromedin B receptor (NMBR). In this study, we cloned the rabbit NMB and NMBR genes. The similarity and phylogenetic analyses of NMB and NMBR gene sequences were performed. The expression of NMB and NMBR mRNA in the rabbit was investigated using real-time RT-PCR. Our bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that the cloned rabbit NMB precursor cDNA encoded Gly-His-Phe-Met-NH2 amino acids at the C-terminus, and that its receptor possessed typical transmembrane features. The NMB mRNA was highly expressed in the CNS, while the NMBR mRNA was widely expressed in many tissues, with the highest expression in the gastrointestinal tract. The studies on the NMB distribution and function are limited by the lack of a specific antibody to this neuropeptide. In this paper, polyclonal NMB antibody was generated in mice. Western blotting analysis revealed that the prepared antibody could specifically recognize the recombinant and the endogenous NMB proteins. Immunohistochemistry analysis indicated that the NMB protein was localized in the cytoplasm of the pituitary cells. The existence of NMB protein in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis suggests that NMB might function in rabbit reproduction.

  19. Development of a polyclonal antibody-based AC-ELISA and its comparison with PCR for diagnosis of canine parvovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Nandi, Sukdeb; Chidri, Sunil

    2010-10-01

    A polyclonal antibody-based antigen-capture ELISA (AC-ELISA) has been developed for detection of Canine parvovirus (CPV) antigens in faecal samples of dogs. The assay uses rabbit anti-CPV polyclonal antibody as the capture antibody, guinea pig anti-CPV polyclonal antibody as tracing antibody and anti-guinea pig HRPO conjugate as the detection system. The optimum dilution of the capture antibody and the tracing antibody capable of detecting the CPV-2 antigens was found to be 1:1 600 and 1:400, respectively, in the check-board titration. In this study, a total of 152 samples (129 faecal samples and 23 cell culture supernatant) were tested both by AC-ELISA and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of the samples tested, 69 and 78 samples were found positive by AC-ELISA and PCR, respectively. The AC-ELISA had relative sensitivity, relative specificity and accuracy of 88.4%, 100.0% and 91.4% respectively. The analytical sensitivity of AC-ELISA was estimated to be 10(2.8) TCID(50)/mL whereas PCR sensitivity was 10(0.8) TCID(50)/mL. The AC-ELISA is a simple, quick and reliable method for screening large numbers of faecal samples of dogs suspected of CPV infection.

  20. Protein Delivery System Containing a Nickel-Immobilized Polymer for Multimerization of Affinity-Purified His-Tagged Proteins Enhances Cytosolic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Desplancq, Dominique; Orlov, Igor; Arntz, Youri; Spehner, Danièle; Mely, Yves; Klaholz, Bruno P; Schultz, Patrick; Weiss, Etienne; Zuber, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant proteins with cytosolic or nuclear activities are emerging as tools for interfering with cellular functions. Because such tools rely on vehicles for crossing the plasma membrane we developed a protein delivery system consisting in the assembly of pyridylthiourea-grafted polyethylenimine (πPEI) with affinity-purified His-tagged proteins pre-organized onto a nickel-immobilized polymeric guide. The guide was prepared by functionalization of an ornithine polymer with nitrilotriacetic acid groups and shown to bind several His-tagged proteins. Superstructures were visualized by electron and atomic force microscopy using 2 nm His-tagged gold nanoparticles as probes. The whole system efficiently carried the green fluorescent protein, single-chain antibodies or caspase 3, into the cytosol of living cells. Transduction of the protease caspase 3 induced apoptosis in two cancer cell lines, demonstrating that this new protein delivery method could be used to interfere with cellular functions.

  1. Development and characterization of polyclonal peptide antibodies for the detection of Yellow fever virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Stock, N K; Escadafal, C; Achazi, K; Cissé, M; Niedrig, M

    2015-09-15

    There is still a considerable need for development of new tools and methods detecting specific viral proteins for the diagnosis and pathogenesis study of the Yellow fever virus (YFV). This study aimed to develop and characterize polyclonal peptide antisera for detection of YFV-C and -NS1 proteins. The antisera were used further to investigate NS1 protein expression during YFV infection in mammalian cells. YFV target proteins were detected by all antisera in western blot and immunofluorescence assays. No cross-reactivity was observed with Dengue virus, West Nile virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus and Japanese encephalitis virus. Nuclear localization of the YFV-C protein was demonstrated for the first time. Experiments investigating NS1 expression suggested a potential use of the YFV-NS1 antisera for development of diagnostic approaches targeting the secreted form of the NS1 protein. The antisera described in this study offer new possibilities for use in YFV research and for the development of novel diagnostic tests.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of a Polyclonal Antibody against Human Actin Filament-Associated Protein-120 kD

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yujian; Liu, Yong; Guo, Jiayu; Tang, Tao; Gao, Jian; Huang, Tao; Wang, Bin; Liu, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Actin filament-associated protein-120kD (AFAP-120) is an alternatively spliced isoform of actin filament-associated protein-110kD (AFAP-110) and contains an additional neuronal insert (NINS) fragment in addition to identical domains to the AFAP-110. Unlike AFAP-110 widely expressed in tissues, AFAP-120 is specifically expressed in the nervous system and plays a role in organizing dynamic actin structures during neuronal differentiation. However, anti-AFAP-120 antibody is still commercially unavailable, and this may hinder the function research for AFAP-120. In this study, we simultaneously used the ABCpred online server and the BepiPred 1.0 server to predict B-cell epitopes in the exclusive NINS sequence of human AFAP-120 protein, and found that a 16aa-peptide sequence was the consensus epitope predicted by both tools. This peptide was chemically synthesized and used as an immunogen to develop polyclonal antibody against AFAP-120 (anti-AFAP-120). The sensitivity and specificity of anti-AFAP-120 were analyzed with immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence assays. Our results indicated that anti-AFAP-120 could react with over-expressed and endogenous human AFAP-120 protein under denatured condition, but not with human AFAP-110 protein. Moreover, native human AFAP-120 protein could also be recognized by the anti-AFAP-120 antibody. These results suggested that the prepared anit-AFAP-120 antibody would be a useful tool for studying the biochemical and biological functions of AFAP-120. PMID:27322249

  3. An automated packed protein G micro-pipette tip assay for rapid quantification of polyclonal antibodies in ovine serum.

    PubMed

    Chhatre, Sunil; Francis, Richard; Bracewell, Daniel G; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J

    2010-11-15

    The demands on the biopharmaceutical sector to expedite process development have instigated the deployment of micro-biochemical engineering techniques to acquire manufacturing insight with extremely small sample volumes. In conjunction with automated liquid handlers, this permits the simultaneous evaluation of multiple operating conditions and reduces manual intervention. For these benefits to be sustained, novel ways are now required to accelerate analysis and so prevent this becoming a throughput bottleneck. For example, although Protein G HPLC is used to quantify antibody titres in bioprocess feedstocks, it can be time-consuming owing to the serial nature of its application. Although commercial options are available that can process many samples simultaneously, these require separate, potentially expensive instruments. A more integrated approach is desirable wherein the assay is implemented directly on a robot. This article describes a high-throughput alternative to antibody HPLC analysis which uses an eight-channel liquid handler to control pipette tips packed with 40 μL of Protein G affinity matrix. The linearity, range, limit of detection, specificity and precision of the method were established, with results showing that antibody was detected reliably and specifically between 0.10 and 1.00 mg/mL. Subsequently, the technique was used to quantify the antibody titre in ovine serum, which is used as feed material by BTG PLC for manufacturing FDA-approved polyclonal bio-therapeutics. The mean concentration determined by the tips was comparable to that found by HPLC, but the tip method delivered its results in less than 40% of the time and with the potential for further, substantial time-savings possible by using higher capacity robots.

  4. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase from Pseudomonas fluorescens promoting the growth of Chinese cabbage and its polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Soh, Byoung Yul; Lee, Gun Woong; Go, Eun Byeul; Kim, Byeo-Ri; Lee, Kui-Jae; Chae, Jong-Chan

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxlyate (ACC) deaminase (AcdS) is an enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of the plant hormone ethylene, into α-ketobutyrate and ammonia. The acdS gene was cloned from Pseudomonas fluorescens, which was capable of improving the seedling of Chinese cabbage under salinity condition. The recombinant AcdS (rAcdS) exhibited optimal activity at pH 8.5 and 30°C. Strong activity was sustained at up to 100 mM NaCl. The polyclonal anti-P. fluorescens AcdS antibody was produced in a rabbit that had been immunized with the purified rAcdS. This antibody successfully recognized the homologous antigens derived from the total proteins of isolated plant growth-promoting microorganisms. A statistically significant correlation was observed between the intensity of hybridization signal and AcdS activity measured by a biochemical method, suggesting its application as a useful indicator for active deaminases.

  5. Protective Efficacy and Mechanism of Passive Immunization with Polyclonal Antibodies in a Sepsis Model of Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyong; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jing, Haiming; Ren, Chunyan; Cai, Changzhi; Dong, Yandong; Zhang, Yudong; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for a diverse spectrum of human diseases, resulting in considerable yearly mortality rates. Due to its rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance, it becomes increasingly difficult to cure S. aureus infections with conventional antibiotics. Immunotherapy represents a promising alternative strategy to prevent and/or treat the infection. In the present study, passive immunization with polyclonal antibodies targeting three possible S. aureus antigens, Hla, SEB and MntC (termed “SAvac-pcAb”) after challenge with lethal dose of S. aureus resulted in reduced bacterial loads, inflammatory cell infiltration and decreased pathology, and was able to provide nearly complete protection in a murine sepsis model. In vitro studies confirmed the direct interaction of SAvac-pcAb with S. aureus bacteria. Additional studies validated that SAvac-pcAb contained both opsonic and neutralizing antibodies that contributed to its protective efficacy. The former mediated opsonophagocytosis in a neutrophil-dependent manner, while the later inhibited the biological functions of Hla and SEB, two major virulence factors secreted by S. aureus. Critically, we demonstrated that SAvac-pcAb was cross-reactive with different clinical strains of S. aureus. These results confirmed the efficacy for treatment of S. aureus infection by passive immunization as an important therapeutic option. PMID:26490505

  6. Human antibody responses to the polyclonal Dryvax vaccine for smallpox prevention can be distinguished from responses to the monoclonal replacement vaccine ACAM2000.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Christine; Keasey, Sarah; Korman, Lawrence; Pittman, Phillip R; Ulrich, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    Dryvax (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc., Marietta, PA) is representative of the vaccinia virus preparations that were previously used for preventing smallpox. While Dryvax was highly effective, the national supply stocks were depleted, and there were manufacturing concerns regarding sterility and the clonal heterogeneity of the vaccine. ACAM2000 (Acambis, Inc./Sanofi-Pasteur Biologics Co., Cambridge, MA), a single-plaque-purified vaccinia virus derivative of Dryvax, recently replaced the polyclonal smallpox vaccine for use in the United States. A substantial amount of sequence heterogeneity exists within the polyclonal proteome of Dryvax, including proteins that are missing from ACAM2000. Reasoning that a detailed comparison of antibody responses to the polyclonal and monoclonal vaccines may be useful for identifying unique properties of each antibody response, we utilized a protein microarray comprised of approximately 94% of the vaccinia poxvirus proteome (245 proteins) to measure protein-specific antibody responses of 71 individuals receiving a single vaccination with ACAM2000 or Dryvax. We observed robust antibody responses to 21 poxvirus proteins in vaccinated individuals, including 11 proteins that distinguished Dryvax responses from ACAM2000. Analysis of protein sequences from Dryvax clones revealed amino acid level differences in these 11 antigenic proteins and suggested that sequence variation and clonal heterogeneity may contribute to the observed differences between Dryvax and ACAM2000 antibody responses.

  7. Epitope map of two polyclonal antibodies that recognize amyloid lesions in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiso, J; Wisniewski, T; Vidal, R; Rostagno, A; Frangione, B

    1992-01-01

    Two synthetic peptides with sequences identical with those of fragments of the extracellular domain of the Alzheimer's-disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) were used to raise antibodies. SP28 comprises positions 597-624 of the APP695 isoform, whereas SP41 extends towards the N-terminus (amino acids 584-624) and contains the entire SP28 peptide. Using e.l.i.s.a. and inhibition experiments we identified the two beta-turn-containing segments 602-607 and 617-624 as the epitopes recognized by anti-SP41 and anti-SP28 respectively. Both antibodies immunolabelled amyloid lesions in brains from Alzheimer's-disease patients and patients with related disorders, whereas they were unreactive in control brains. However, when probed on immunoblots, anti-SP28 failed to detect full-length APP from baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells, and anti-SP41 reacted weakly compared with other anti-APP antisera. The data suggest that these antibodies are directed to conformational epitopes not existent in the native molecules but present after alternative APP processing. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1372166

  8. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C.; Calder, Lesley J.; Melero, José A.

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  9. Polyclonal antibodies specific for mutagenic alkylated base O/sup 4/-ethylthymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Wani, A.; Miller, R.; D'Ambrosio, S.

    1986-05-01

    Alkylating carcinogen induced base O-alkylation appear to be the genomic modifications most relevant to cellular oncogenic transformation. O/sup 4/-ethylthymidine (O/sup 4/-EtThy) though minor DNA alkylation product lacks repair in mammalian including human cells. High affinity and high titer antibodies in rabbits were developed against this lesion using O/sup 4/-EtThy-KLH conjugates as antigen. Antiserum TB3 (affinity constant = 8.1 x 10/sup 8/ l/mol) shows titers of 10/sup -6/ in ELISA against O/sup 4/-EtThy-KLH and ethylated poly(dT) and 2 x 10/sup -4/ in tracerRIA against O/sup 4/(/sup 3/H)-EtThy as antigen. In competitive inhibition assays 50% inhibition of tracer-antibody binding was observed at 0.5 pmoles of O/sup 4/-EtThy, while requiring 150, 2 x 10/sup 4/ and >5 x 10/sup 6/ -fold higher amounts of O/sup 2/-EtThy, N3-EtThy and Thy respectively. In non-competitive ELISA the antibody shows optimal binding to ENU ethylated poly(dT) at 100 ng immobilized antigen while no significant binding could be observed against 10/sup 3/ -fold higher amounts of unalkylated poly(dT). ENU concentration dependent binding could be seen using 100 ng poly(dT) alkylated in vitro with as low as 0.1 mM ENU. Suitable assay conditions for monitoring the persistent levels of O/sup 4/-EtThy in DNA after in vivo alkylation of mammalian cells with subtoxic concentrations of ENU are being developed to relate this mutagenic and potential carcinogenic lesion to its biological consequence.

  10. Polyclonal Antibodies to Phospholipid/Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinase and Immunocytochemical Localization of the Enzyme in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Peggy R.; Mazzei, Gonzalo J.; Wood, John G.; Kuo, J. F.

    1985-05-01

    Antisera against phospholipid/Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) were raised in rabbits. Immunospecificity of the polyclonal antibodies, as determined by immunoblot and ELISA, was shown by their reactivity to the enzyme but not to other protein kinases or any of many other proteins tested. Immunocytochemical localization of the kinase in rat brains revealed that although the enzyme was distributed broadly in different brain regions, it was highly restricted to the periphery of the nucleus of neurons in cerebral cortex and to axons and cells strongly resembling oligodendroglia in white-matter regions. Initial electron microscopy of cerebral cortex revealed that the enzyme was highly concentrated in the presynaptic terminals, and only rarely were labeled postsynaptic specialization elements seen. It is suggested that the discrete localization of the enzyme, which is distinct from that of the calmodulin/Ca2+-dependent system, may be related to certain biological and functional aspects of brain that are regulated by Ca2+ at the level of protein phosphorylation.

  11. Sensitive Detection of Capsaicinoids Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Anti-Homovanillic Acid Polyclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shingo; Yatabe, Rui; Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH) for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes. PMID:25586413

  12. Polyclonal neural cell adhesion molecule antibody prolongs the effective duration time of botulinum toxin in decreasing muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Pan, Lizhen; Liu, Wuchao; Pan, Yougui; Nie, Zhiyu; Jin, Lingjing

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate if the effective duration time of botulinum toxin A (Btx-A) could be prolonged by polyclonal neural cell adhesion molecule antibody (P-NCAM-Ab). 175 male SD rats were randomly divided into three major groups: control group (n = 25), Btx-A group (n = 25), and P-NCAM-Ab groups. P-NCAM-Ab groups were composed of five sub-groups, with 25 rats each in the dose-response study. Muscle strength of rat lower limbs was determined using a survey system. The expressions of muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) and western blotting (WB). The muscle strength was significantly decreased by Btx-A in Btx-A/P-NCAM-Ab groups compared with normal control group. Besides, the muscle strength of P-NCAM-Ab group was significantly decreased compared with the Btx-A group. The recovery time of muscle strength in P-NCAM-Ab group was significantly longer compared with Btx-A group. RT-PCR and WB assay showed that PNCAM-Ab delayed the increase of MuSK and NCAM after Btx-A injection. P-NCAM-Ab prolongs the effective duration time of Btx-A in decreasing muscle strength, which could provide a novel enhancement in clinical application.

  13. Conjugation of ampicillin and enrofloxacin residues with bovine serum albumin and raising of polyclonal antibodies against them

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, B. Sampath; Ashok, Vasili; Kalyani, P.; Nair, G. Remya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to test the potency of bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugated ampicillin (AMP) and enrofloxacin (ENR) antigens in eliciting an immune response in rats using indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA). Materials and Methods: AMP and ENR antibiotics were conjugated with BSA by carbodiimide reaction using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) as a cross-linker. The successful conjugation was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Sprague-Dawley rats were immunized with the conjugates and blood samples were collected serially at 15 days time interval after first immunization plus first booster, second booster, third booster, and the fourth sampling was done 1½ month after the third booster. The antibody titres in the antisera of each antibiotic in all the four immunization cycles (ICs) were determined by an icELISA at various serum dilutions ranging from 1/100 to 1/6400. Results: Analysis of antibiotic-BSA conjugates by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and coomassie blue staining revealed high molecular weight bands of 85 kDa and 74 kDa for AMP-BSA and ENR-BSA respectively when compared to 68 kDa band of BSA. Both the antibiotic conjugates elicited a good immune response in rats but comparatively the response was more with AMP-BSA conjugate than ENR-BSA conjugate. Maximum optical density 450 value of 2.577 was recorded for AMP-BSA antisera, and 1.723 was recorded for ENR-BSA antisera at 1/100th antiserum dilution in third IC. Conclusion: AMP and ENR antibiotics proved to be good immunogens when conjugated to BSA by carbodiimide reaction with EDC as crosslinker. The polyclonal antibodies produced can be employed for detecting AMP and ENR residues in milk and urine samples. PMID:27182138

  14. A feasible enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against glucosyltransferase-B from Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Kuwahara, Noriko; Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2012-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans has been considered the principal etiological agent of dental caries in humans. S. mutans can secrete three kinds of glucosyltransferases (GTFs). One of these, GTF-B, which synthesizes water-insoluble glucans from sucrose, has been considered to be one of the most important factors of cariogenic dental plaque formation. Therefore, determination of whether GTF-B is present in plaque and saliva samples may contribute to the evaluation of individual virulence potential (caries risk). The aim of this study was to develop a feasible enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the routine quantification of GTF-B in plaque-derived cultures and clinical samples, and to apply this assay to an epidemiological study. To determine the presence of GTF-B in plaque samples, a sandwich-ELISA was devised, consisting of mouse monoclonal and rabbit polyclonal antibodies against GTF-B and a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated anti-rabbit antibody. The developed ELISA allowed for quantification of the amounts of purified GTF-B with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity; this method was not affected by other components such as plaque and saliva. Plaque samples from healthy volunteers were examined using this ELISA method and microbial analysis to apply the assay to an epidemiological study. A correlation was observed between the amount of extracted GTF-B and S. mutans levels as determined by ELISA and cultivated with Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar plates derived from plaque samples, although there were some exceptions. In this regard, this ELISA system has the advantage of estimating both the individual numbers of S. mutans and the productivity of GTF-B, namely, the cariogenic potential of S. mutans simultaneously. These results indicate that this ELISA method is a useful tool for the diagnosis of caries risk.

  15. Incidence of Lettuce mosaic virus in lettuce and its detection by polyclonal antibodies produced against recombinant coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prachi; Sharma, Susheel; Singh, Jasvir; Saha, Swati; Baranwal, V K

    2016-04-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus of family Potyviridae, causes mosaic disease in lettuce has recently been identified in India. The virus is seed borne and secondary infection occurs through aphids. To ensure virus freedom in seeds it is important to develop diagnostic tools, for serological methods the production of polyclonal antibodies is a prerequisite. The coat protein (CP) gene of LMV was amplified, cloned and expressed using pET-28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 competent cells. The LMV CP was expressed as a fusion protein containing a fragment of the E. coli His tag. The LMV CP/His protein reacted positively with a commercial antiserum against LMV in an immunoblot assay. Polyclonal antibodies purified from serum of rabbits immunized with the fusion protein gave positive results when LMV infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was tested at 1:1000 dilution in PTA-ELISA. These were used for specific detection of LMV in screening lettuce accessions. The efficacy of the raised polyclonal antiserum was high and it can be utilized in quarantine and clean seed production. PMID:26850143

  16. Incidence of Lettuce mosaic virus in lettuce and its detection by polyclonal antibodies produced against recombinant coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prachi; Sharma, Susheel; Singh, Jasvir; Saha, Swati; Baranwal, V K

    2016-04-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus of family Potyviridae, causes mosaic disease in lettuce has recently been identified in India. The virus is seed borne and secondary infection occurs through aphids. To ensure virus freedom in seeds it is important to develop diagnostic tools, for serological methods the production of polyclonal antibodies is a prerequisite. The coat protein (CP) gene of LMV was amplified, cloned and expressed using pET-28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 competent cells. The LMV CP was expressed as a fusion protein containing a fragment of the E. coli His tag. The LMV CP/His protein reacted positively with a commercial antiserum against LMV in an immunoblot assay. Polyclonal antibodies purified from serum of rabbits immunized with the fusion protein gave positive results when LMV infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was tested at 1:1000 dilution in PTA-ELISA. These were used for specific detection of LMV in screening lettuce accessions. The efficacy of the raised polyclonal antiserum was high and it can be utilized in quarantine and clean seed production.

  17. Identification of Reissner's fiber-like glycoproteins in two species of freshwater planarians (Tricladida), by use of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Arrabal, P M; Estivill-Torrús, G; Miranda, E; Pérez, J; Fernández-Llebrez, P

    2000-06-01

    By using one polyclonal antiserum raised against bovine Reissner's fiber and seven monoclonal antibodies raised against bovine Reissner's fiber and against immunopurified bovine subcommissural organ glycoproteins, we have investigated two freshwater planarian species (Girardia tigrina, Schmidtea mediterranea) by light- and electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry. ELISA probes showed that the monoclonal antibodies recognized different, nonoverlapping, unrepeated, proteinaceous epitopes present in the same compounds of bovine Reissner's fiber. Cells immunoreactive to the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were found in the dorsal and ventral integument of both planarian species. Labeled cuboid epidermal cells bore cilia and displayed several types of secretory granules; they were covered by a film of immunoreactive material. Studies on adjacent thin and semithin sections revealed coexistence of label in the same regions and in the same cells when two different monoclonal antibodies were used. These results indicate that a secretory substance immunologically similar to the secretion of the vertebrate subcommissural organ is present in primitive tripoblasts such as planarians, suggesting that these secretions are ancient and well conserved in phylogeny.

  18. Triple immunoglobulin gene knockout transchromosomic cattle: bovine lambda cluster deletion and its effect on fully human polyclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/-; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM-/-, bIGHML1-/- and bIGL-/-; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ).

  19. Triple Immunoglobulin Gene Knockout Transchromosomic Cattle: Bovine Lambda Cluster Deletion and Its Effect on Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-an; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    Towards the goal of producing fully human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs or hIgGs) in transchromosomic (Tc) cattle, we previously reported that Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (hIGH), kappa-chain (hIGK), and lambda-chain (hIGL) germline loci produced physiological levels of hIgGs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, were homozygously inactivated (bIGHM−/−, bIGHML1−/−; double knockouts or DKO). However, because endogenous bovine immunoglobulin light chain loci are still intact, the light chains are produced both from the hIGK and hIGL genomic loci on the HAC and from the endogenous bovine kappa-chain (bIGK) and lambda-chain (bIGL) genomic loci, resulting in the production of fully hIgGs (both Ig heavy-chains and light-chains are of human origin: hIgG/hIgκ or hIgG/hIgλ) and chimeric hIgGs (Ig heavy-chains are of human origin while the Ig light-chains are of bovine origin: hIgG/bIgκ or hIgG/bIgλ). To improve fully hIgG production in Tc cattle, we here report the deletion of the entire bIGL joining (J) and constant (C) gene cluster (bIGLJ1-IGLC1 to bIGLJ5-IGLC5) by employing Cre/loxP mediated site-specific chromosome recombination and the production of triple knockout (bIGHM−/−, bIGHML1−/− and bIGL−/−; TKO) Tc cattle. We further demonstrate that bIGL cluster deletion greatly improves fully hIgGs production in the sera of TKO Tc cattle, with 51.3% fully hIgGs (hIgG/hIgκ plus hIgG/hIgλ). PMID:24603704

  20. DNA-affinity-purified chip (DAP-chip) method to determine gene targets for bacterial two component regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-07-21

    In vivo methods such as ChIP-chip are well-established techniques used to determine global gene targets for transcription factors. However, they are of limited use in exploring bacterial two component regulatory systems with uncharacterized activation conditions. Such systems regulate transcription only when activated in the presence of unique signals. Since these signals are often unknown, the in vitro microarray based method described in this video article can be used to determine gene targets and binding sites for response regulators. This DNA-affinity-purified-chip method may be used for any purified regulator in any organism with a sequenced genome. The protocol involves allowing the purified tagged protein to bind to sheared genomic DNA and then affinity purifying the protein-bound DNA, followed by fluorescent labeling of the DNA and hybridization to a custom tiling array. Preceding steps that may be used to optimize the assay for specific regulators are also described. The peaks generated by the array data analysis are used to predict binding site motifs, which are then experimentally validated. The motif predictions can be further used to determine gene targets of orthologous response regulators in closely related species. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by determining the gene targets and binding site motifs and thus predicting the function for a sigma54-dependent response regulator DVU3023 in the environmental bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

  1. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry mapping of human immunodeficiency virus-gp120 epitopes recognized by a limited polyclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Jeyarajah, S; Parker, C E; Summer, M T; Tomer, K B

    1998-02-01

    In this study we have applied epitope excision and epitope extraction strategies, combined with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, to determine the fine structure of epitopes recognized by a polyclonal antibody to human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein gp120. This is the first application of this approach to epitope mapping on a large, heavily glycosylated protein. In the epitope excision method, gp120 in the native form is first bound to the antibody immobilized on sepharose beads and cleaved with endoproteinase enzymes. In the epitope extraction method, the gp120 was first proteolytically cleaved and then allowed to react with the immobilized antibody. The fragments that remain bound to the antibody, after repeated washing to remove the unbound peptides, contain the antigenic region that is recognized by the antibody, and the bound peptides in both methods can be characterized by direct analysis of the immobilized antibody by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry. In this study we have carried out epitope excision and extraction experiments with three different enzymes and have identified residues 472-478 as a major epitope. In addition, antigenic regions containing minor epitopes have also been identified.

  2. Evidence for monomeric and oligomeric hormone-binding domains in affinity-purified gonadotropin receptor from rat ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.Y.; Menon, K.M.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Rat ovarian lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor was purified from a Triton X-100-solubilized membrane preparation by affinity chromatography with Affi-Gel 10 coupled to purified human choriogonadotropin. The affinity-purified receptor preparations contained a single class of high-affinity binding sites for {sup 125}I-labeled human choriogonadotropin, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} M, which is comparable to the K{sub d} values for membrane-bound and solubilized receptors. The purified receptor appeared as two dominant bands with molecular weights of 135,000 and 92,000 after sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) under nonreducing conditions. When the individual affinity-purified receptor bands were electroeluted from the gel and analyzed again by SDS/PAGE under nonreducing conditions, both the M{sub r} 92,000 and the 135,000 proteins retained their original molecular form even when 8 M urea was included in the gel. However, when the electrophoretically purified M{sub r} 92,000 and 135,000 bands were subjected to SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions, the M{sub r} 135,000 species was almost completely converted to a M{sub r} 92,000 band, but the M{sub r} 92,000 species did not undergo any alteration in molecular weight. The results suggest that the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor from rat ovary exists in two molecular forms, and the higher molecular weight form appears to be composed of disulfide-linked M{sup r} 92,000 subunit, which comprises the hormone-binding domain.

  3. Expression, purification and characterization of two truncated peste des petits ruminants virus matrix proteins in Escherichia coli, and production of polyclonal antibodies against this protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Liu, Zengshan; Wang, Zhiliang

    2013-09-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), the etiological agent of peste des petits ruminants, is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) gene is composed of 1483 base pairs, encoding a 335 amino acids M protein with a molecular weight of approximately 38kD. We have demonstrated previously that the full-length M protein was expressed at an extremely low level or not even expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). In this study, the M protein was split into two truncated forms to be successfully expressed in E. coli at a high level using the pET30a (+) vector, respectively, by analysis of SDS-PAGE, western blot and MALDI-TOF-MS. The optimization of culture conditions led us to perform the recombinant protein induction with 0.2mM IPTG at 28°C for 12h, whereby both proteins nevertheless were expressed in the insoluble form. Therefore, both His-tagged proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using a commercially available kit. Balb/c mice were immunized with the complex of purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by the analysis of ELISA. The specificity of the prepared polyclonal antibodies was checked by western blot and immunofluorescence, revealing them with the desirable specificity against both non-denatured and denatured M proteins.

  4. An Empirical Approach towards the Efficient and Optimal Production of Influenza-Neutralizing Ovine Polyclonal Antibodies Demonstrates That the Novel Adjuvant CoVaccine HT™ Is Functionally Superior to Freund's Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Alsharifi, Mohammed; Brown, Michael P.; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Hayball, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunotherapies utilising polyclonal antibodies could have a valuable role in preventing and treating infectious diseases such as influenza, particularly in pandemic situations but also in immunocompromised populations such as the elderly, the chronically immunosuppressed, pregnant women, infants and those with chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to optimise current methods used to generate ovine polyclonal antibodies. Polyclonal antibodies to baculovirus-expressed recombinant influenza haemagglutinin from A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 H1N1 (PR8) were elicited in sheep using various immunisation regimens designed to investigate the priming immunisation route, adjuvant formulation, sheep age, and antigen dose, and to empirically ascertain which combination maximised antibody output. The novel adjuvant CoVaccine HT™ was compared to Freund’s adjuvant which is currently the adjuvant of choice for commercial production of ovine polyclonal Fab therapies. CoVaccine HT™ induced significantly higher titres of functional ovine anti-haemagglutinin IgG than Freund’s adjuvant but with fewer side effects, including reduced site reactions. Polyclonal hyperimmune sheep sera effectively neutralised influenza virus in vitro and, when given before or after influenza virus challenge, prevented the death of infected mice. Neither the age of the sheep nor the route of antigen administration appeared to influence antibody titre. Moreover, reducing the administrated dose of haemagglutinin antigen minimally affected antibody titre. Together, these results suggest a cost effective way of producing high and sustained yields of functional ovine polyclonal antibodies specifically for the prevention and treatment of globally significant diseases. PMID:23894371

  5. Production of Nurr-1 Specific Polyclonal Antibodies Free of Cross-reactivity Against Its Close Homologs, Nor1 and Nur77.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Pierre; Moon, Minho; Kim, Woori; Jeong, Inhye; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2015-08-17

    The nuclear receptor subfamily 4 (NR4A) is composed of 3 related proteins sharing a DNA binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD). The nuclear receptor related 1 protein (Nurr1 or NR4A2) plays a key role in the maintenance of the dopaminergic system. Dopamine dysfunctions associated with the Nurr1 gene include Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and manic depression among others. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that Nurr1 is also expressed in other brain areas such as the hippocampus and plays critical roles for learning and memory. The other members of the family are nerve growth factor IB (Nur77 or NR4A1) and neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR1 or NR4A3). To help investigate the precise functional roles of Nurr1 in dopaminergic and other brain region-related neuronal dysfunctions antibodies devoid of cross-reactivities against Nur77 and NOR1 were needed. Since the proteins are more divergent in their LBDs than in their DNA binding domains immunization with purified LBDs should yield antibodies specific for Nurr1 with minimal reactivities against Nur77 and/or NOR1. Although anti-Nurr1 antibodies were successfully generated these showed significant immunoreactivity against the other members of the family. Affinity chromatography over immobilized Protein A followed by pre-adsorption against immobilized Nur77 and NOR1 LBDs yielded Nurr1 specific antibodies free of cross-reactivity. Here, we selectively target antibodies against a specific member of a highly conserved family of proteins by immunizing animals with their most divergent regions followed by removing cross reactive antibodies by pre-adsorption. The goal of the protocol is to increase polyclonal antibodies specificity through pre-adsorption against cross-reactive antigens.

  6. Comparison of Biotinylated Monoclonal and Polyclonal Antibodies in an Evaluation of a Direct Rapid Immunohistochemical Test for the Routine Diagnosis of Rabies in Southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Coetzer, Andre; Sabeta, Claude T.; Markotter, Wanda; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Nel, Louis H.

    2014-01-01

    The major etiological agent of rabies, rabies virus (RABV), accounts for tens of thousands of human deaths per annum. The majority of these deaths are associated with rabies cycles in dogs in resource-limited countries of Africa and Asia. Although routine rabies diagnosis plays an integral role in disease surveillance and management, the application of the currently recommended direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test in countries on the African and Asian continents remains quite limited. A novel diagnostic assay, the direct rapid immunohistochemical test (dRIT), has been reported to have a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity equal to that of the DFA test while offering advantages in cost, time and interpretation. Prior studies used the dRIT utilized monoclonal antibody (MAb) cocktails. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a biotinylated polyclonal antibody (PAb) preparation, applied in the dRIT protocol, would yield equal or improved results compared to the use of dRIT with MAbs. We also wanted to compare the PAb dRIT with the DFA test, utilizing the same PAb preparation with a fluorescent label. The PAb dRIT had a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100%, which was shown to be marginally higher than the diagnostic efficacy observed for the PAb DFA test. The classical dRIT, relying on two-biotinylated MAbs, was applied to the same panel of samples and a reduced diagnostic sensitivity (83.50% and 90.78% respectively) was observed. Antigenic typing of the false negative samples indicated all of these to be mongoose RABV variants. Our results provided evidence that a dRIT with alternative antibody preparations, conjugated to a biotin moiety, has a diagnostic efficacy equal to that of a DFA relying on the same antibody and that the antibody preparation should be optimized for virus variants specific to the geographical area of focus. PMID:25254652

  7. Comparison of biotinylated monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in an evaluation of a direct rapid immunohistochemical test for the routine diagnosis of rabies in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Coetzer, Andre; Sabeta, Claude T; Markotter, Wanda; Rupprecht, Charles E; Nel, Louis H

    2014-09-01

    The major etiological agent of rabies, rabies virus (RABV), accounts for tens of thousands of human deaths per annum. The majority of these deaths are associated with rabies cycles in dogs in resource-limited countries of Africa and Asia. Although routine rabies diagnosis plays an integral role in disease surveillance and management, the application of the currently recommended direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test in countries on the African and Asian continents remains quite limited. A novel diagnostic assay, the direct rapid immunohistochemical test (dRIT), has been reported to have a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity equal to that of the DFA test while offering advantages in cost, time and interpretation. Prior studies used the dRIT utilized monoclonal antibody (MAb) cocktails. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a biotinylated polyclonal antibody (PAb) preparation, applied in the dRIT protocol, would yield equal or improved results compared to the use of dRIT with MAbs. We also wanted to compare the PAb dRIT with the DFA test, utilizing the same PAb preparation with a fluorescent label. The PAb dRIT had a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100%, which was shown to be marginally higher than the diagnostic efficacy observed for the PAb DFA test. The classical dRIT, relying on two-biotinylated MAbs, was applied to the same panel of samples and a reduced diagnostic sensitivity (83.50% and 90.78% respectively) was observed. Antigenic typing of the false negative samples indicated all of these to be mongoose RABV variants. Our results provided evidence that a dRIT with alternative antibody preparations, conjugated to a biotin moiety, has a diagnostic efficacy equal to that of a DFA relying on the same antibody and that the antibody preparation should be optimized for virus variants specific to the geographical area of focus.

  8. Comparison of biotinylated monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in an evaluation of a direct rapid immunohistochemical test for the routine diagnosis of rabies in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Coetzer, Andre; Sabeta, Claude T; Markotter, Wanda; Rupprecht, Charles E; Nel, Louis H

    2014-09-01

    The major etiological agent of rabies, rabies virus (RABV), accounts for tens of thousands of human deaths per annum. The majority of these deaths are associated with rabies cycles in dogs in resource-limited countries of Africa and Asia. Although routine rabies diagnosis plays an integral role in disease surveillance and management, the application of the currently recommended direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test in countries on the African and Asian continents remains quite limited. A novel diagnostic assay, the direct rapid immunohistochemical test (dRIT), has been reported to have a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity equal to that of the DFA test while offering advantages in cost, time and interpretation. Prior studies used the dRIT utilized monoclonal antibody (MAb) cocktails. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a biotinylated polyclonal antibody (PAb) preparation, applied in the dRIT protocol, would yield equal or improved results compared to the use of dRIT with MAbs. We also wanted to compare the PAb dRIT with the DFA test, utilizing the same PAb preparation with a fluorescent label. The PAb dRIT had a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100%, which was shown to be marginally higher than the diagnostic efficacy observed for the PAb DFA test. The classical dRIT, relying on two-biotinylated MAbs, was applied to the same panel of samples and a reduced diagnostic sensitivity (83.50% and 90.78% respectively) was observed. Antigenic typing of the false negative samples indicated all of these to be mongoose RABV variants. Our results provided evidence that a dRIT with alternative antibody preparations, conjugated to a biotin moiety, has a diagnostic efficacy equal to that of a DFA relying on the same antibody and that the antibody preparation should be optimized for virus variants specific to the geographical area of focus. PMID:25254652

  9. Affinity-purified tetanus neurotoxin interaction with synaptic membranes: properties of a protease-sensitive receptor component

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarovici, P.; Yavin, E.

    1986-11-04

    The pharmacokinetic interaction of an affinity-purified /sup 125/I-labeled tetanotoxin fraction with guinea pig brain synaptosomal preparations was investigated. Binding of tetanotoxin was time- and temperature-dependent, was proportional to protein concentration, and was saturable at about 8 x 10/sup -9/ M as estimated by a solid-surface binding assay. Binding was optimal at pH 6.5 under low ionic strength buffer and was almost entirely blocked by gangliosides or antitoxin. In analogy to intact nerve cells, binding of toxin to membranes resulted in a tight association operationally defined as sequestration. Binding and sequestration were abolished after membrane pretreatment with sialidase. The enzyme could not dissociate the membrane-bound toxin formed at 4 or 37/sup 0/C under low ionic strength conditions, which is in part compatible with internalization as defined in nerve cell cultures. In the latter system the toxin could be removed at 4/sup 0/C but not at 37/sup 0/C. Binding was significantly reduced upon pretreatment of guinea pig brain membranes by a variety of hydrolytic enzymes. It is proposed that, in addition to a ganglioside, interaction of tetanotoxin with synaptic membranes is facilitated by a protein and may also require an appropriate lipid environment. These latter membrane constituents may play a pivotal role in the sequestration of the toxin.

  10. Development of polyclonal antibody-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of Alicyclobacillus strains in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhouli; Yue, Tianli; Yuan, Yahong; Cai, Rui; Guo, Caixia; Wang, Xin; Niu, Chen

    2012-11-01

    A sort of specific polyclonal anti-Alicyclobacillus antibody was generated by immunizing New Zealand white rabbits, and a sensitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for Alicyclobacillus detection in apple juice. A set of experimental parameters such as concentration of antigen, dilutions of the antibody and goat anti-rabbit IgG-horseradish peroxidase conjugate, selection of the blocking reagent, incubation time, and temperature was optimized. The cross-reactivity of the antibody was evaluated by ELISA and the result was consistent with Western blot analysis. The detection limit of the ELISA was about 10(5) colony forming units (CFU)/mL in apple juice samples. Samples were detected by ELISA and conventional culture method, and the ELISA results gave a good agreement with the results obtained by plating on Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris medium agar. ELISA takes a total detection time of 6 to 7 h, which is less than the time of conventional techniques requiring more than 24 to 48 h. These results indicated that the established ELISA was a potential useful analytical method for detection of Alicyclobacillus in apple juice.

  11. Preparation of a polyclonal antibody against goldfish (Carassius auratus) vitellogenin and its application to detect the estrogenic effects of monocrotophos pesticide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Bing, Xin; Yu, Kun; Tian, Hua; Wang, Wei; Ru, Shaoguo

    2015-01-01

    Goldfish (Carassius auratus) represents a good model to detect the estrogenic effects of chemicals, and vitellogenin (Vtg) is a vital indicator of estrogenic activity. The heterologous anti-carp Vtg antibody has previously been used for goldfish Vtg detection. Here, we report the preparation of an anti-goldfish Vtg antibody to improve the sensitivity and specificity of goldfish Vtg immunoassays. Vtg was purified from the plasma of 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced goldfish by gel filtration followed by anion-exchange chromatography. It was characterized as a phospholipoglycoprotein with an apparent molecular weight of ~460 kDa and separated into three major polypeptides corresponding to ~130, ~106, and ~81 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). A polyclonal antibody against goldfish Vtg was raised in rabbits and found to be specific for goldfish Vtg through immunoelectrophoresis and Western blot. A sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the quantification of plasma Vtg, with a detection limit of 3.6 ng/mL and a detection range from 7.8 to 250 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variations were 2.4-6.8% and 6.7-10.8%, respectively. Additionally, we qualitatively and quantitatively detected the induction of Vtg in male fish exposed to 0.01, 0.01, and 1.00 mg/L monocrotophos pesticide by Western blot and ELISA. The homologous sandwich ELISA based on the anti-goldfish Vtg antibody could provide a valuable tool for the study of estrogenic effects of exogenous chemicals on goldfish.

  12. Preparation of polyclonal antibodies for nateglinide (NTG) and development of a sensitive chemiluminescent immunoassay to detect NTG in tablets and serum.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Song, Zhaorui; Dong, Yaqing; Wang, Yufen; Tong, Zhongsheng; Deng, Chuan; Yin, Yongmei; Meng, Meng; Xi, Rimo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we prepared polyclonal antibodies against anti-diabetic drug nateglinide (NTG), and established a sensitive chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) to detect NTG in tablets and serum. Two kinds of immunogens were synthesized using ethylcarbodiimide (EDC)/hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and carbonyldiimidazole (CDI)/4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) as coupling reagents respectively. When activated by EDC/NHS, more molecules of NTG coupled with carrier protein in immunogens. A horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-luminol-H2O2 system with p-iodophenol enhancement was applied in the CLIA analysis. The antibodies in EDC/NHS group showed higher titer, sensitivity and wider detection linear range than those in CDI/DMAP group, and were chosen for next studies. The developed CLIA assay exhibited good selectivity towards NTG among structually similar analogs. The method could detect as low as 0.35 ng mL(-1) NTG in buffer, 2.1 ng mL(-1) NTG in serum and 0.84 ng mL(-1) NTG in tablets. The CLIA method provided consistent results with HPLC method (r=0.9986) in determination of NTG from 5.0 to 400 µg mL(-1). The CLIA method could detect 78 samples in one assay, and the samples need only dilution in pretreatment. As a summary, this research offers a sensitive assay for high-throughout screening of NTG in formulation control and pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:26695294

  13. Preparation of polyclonal antibodies for nateglinide (NTG) and development of a sensitive chemiluminescent immunoassay to detect NTG in tablets and serum.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Song, Zhaorui; Dong, Yaqing; Wang, Yufen; Tong, Zhongsheng; Deng, Chuan; Yin, Yongmei; Meng, Meng; Xi, Rimo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we prepared polyclonal antibodies against anti-diabetic drug nateglinide (NTG), and established a sensitive chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) to detect NTG in tablets and serum. Two kinds of immunogens were synthesized using ethylcarbodiimide (EDC)/hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and carbonyldiimidazole (CDI)/4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) as coupling reagents respectively. When activated by EDC/NHS, more molecules of NTG coupled with carrier protein in immunogens. A horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-luminol-H2O2 system with p-iodophenol enhancement was applied in the CLIA analysis. The antibodies in EDC/NHS group showed higher titer, sensitivity and wider detection linear range than those in CDI/DMAP group, and were chosen for next studies. The developed CLIA assay exhibited good selectivity towards NTG among structually similar analogs. The method could detect as low as 0.35 ng mL(-1) NTG in buffer, 2.1 ng mL(-1) NTG in serum and 0.84 ng mL(-1) NTG in tablets. The CLIA method provided consistent results with HPLC method (r=0.9986) in determination of NTG from 5.0 to 400 µg mL(-1). The CLIA method could detect 78 samples in one assay, and the samples need only dilution in pretreatment. As a summary, this research offers a sensitive assay for high-throughout screening of NTG in formulation control and pharmacokinetic studies.

  14. Polyclonal antibodies to light-harvesting CHL-protein of PSII (LHC II) in marine green algae Bryopsis corticulans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaonan; Zhou, Baicheng; Tseng, C. K.

    1992-06-01

    Polyc·lonal antibodies raised against LHC II isolated from SDS-solubilized Bryopsis corticulans thylakiod membranes by SDS-PAGE, were characterised by double immunodiffusion, Rocket immunoelectrophoresis and antigen-antibody crossed immunoelectro-phoresis assays showed the antibodies had strong cross-reaction with all B. corticulans LHC II components (even with those which were incubated in boiling water) and showed immunological cross-reactivity with LHC II polypeptides of spinach and the marine green alga Codium fragile. The results suggested that LHC II of different species had similar antigenic determinants and also conservation of amino acid sequences of the polypeptides during evolution, and that the antibodies could cross react with apoproteins of D2 proteins (which contain P680) from B. corticulans, spinach and C. fragile, but not with apoproteins of P700 Chl-proteins. Our results indicated some similarities in primary structure between LHC II of different species, and between LHC II and D2 proteins of marine green algae and spinach. Our finding that D2 and P700 Chl-proteins are not immunologically related suggested that P700 Chl-proteins and D2 proteins pass through independent evolutionary pathways.

  15. Recombinant N-Domain of Pregnancy-Specific Glycoprotein from E. coli Cells: Analysis of the Spectrum of Polyclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Prokopenko, P G; Shkoporov, A N; Petrenko, O Yu; Efimov, B A; Negrebetskii, V V; Terent'ev, A A

    2015-11-01

    We studied antibody spectrum in antisera to IgG-like recombinant N-domain of pregnancyspecific glycoprotein-1 (rPSG-N) from E. coli cells. In three experimental series, the fraction of IgG antibodies from anti-rPSG-N sera was immobilized on 3 immunoadsorbents: by polymerization with glutaraldehyde, on glutaraldehyde activated biogel P-300, and on commercial CNBr-activated 4B sepharose. Retroplacental serum was incubated with immobilized antibodies to rPSG1-N, protein was eluted and tested in the precipitation test in standard test systems with PSG1, IgG, and human serum albumin. Three proteins were eluted from all 3 immunoadsorbents: PSG1, IgG, and human serum albumin, which demonstrated the spectrum of antibodies to 3 proteins present also in natural serum PSG1 complex. The proportions of PSG1 and IgG obtained in these experiments were similar to those in natural serum PSG1 complex, while the level of human serum albumin was significantly higher in natural PSG1 complex. Thus, we failed to obtain PSG1 monoprotein free from IgG and human serum albumin. Antigenic mosaicism of the polypeptide chain of IgG-like rPSG1-N relative to the antigenic polyvalence of the complex of three proteins present in bioactive preparation of natural serum PSG1 was discussed.

  16. Relative contribution of dengue prM- and E-specific polyclonal antibodies to neutralization and enhancement.

    PubMed

    Rodpothong, P; Boonarkart, Ch; Ruangrung, K; Onsirisakul, N; Kanistanon, D; Auewarakul, P

    2016-01-01

    Viral surface proteins, premembrane protein (prM) and envelope (E) protein have been shown to induce a production of antibodies that are involved in both enhancement and neutralization. To explore the feasibility of modifying the relative immune responses to prM and E proteins, four DNA constructs were created and administered into groups of Balb/c mice; pPW01 contains prM and E genes of DENV1, pPW02 contains prM and E genes of DENV2, pPW03 contains DENV1 prM and DENV2 E, and pPW04 contains DENV2 prM and DENV1 E. Exchange of either prM or E from a heterologous serotype does not appear to have an effect on the immunogenicity of the proteins. We have proved that the chimeric pPW03 and pPW04 constructs can produce humoral response in mice. Immunized sera were subjected to neutralization and enhancement assays against DENV2. The results showed that only serotype-specific anti-E antibodies conferred protective function, while the cross-reactive anti-E and anti-prM enhanced infection. In addition, the enhancement of DENV2 infection exhibited a serotype-preference for anti-E antibodies while such response was not observed with anti-prM, reflecting a degree of structural conservation of prM. Taken together, neutralization and enhancement appeared to occur at the same time during the course of infection. Successful prevention of severe symptoms of DENV infection depends on the ability to induce high levels of neutralizing antibodies to subdue the effect of enhancing antibodies. PMID:27640435

  17. Relative contribution of dengue prM- and E-specific polyclonal antibodies to neutralization and enhancement.

    PubMed

    Rodpothong, P; Boonarkart, Ch; Ruangrung, K; Onsirisakul, N; Kanistanon, D; Auewarakul, P

    2016-01-01

    Viral surface proteins, premembrane protein (prM) and envelope (E) protein have been shown to induce a production of antibodies that are involved in both enhancement and neutralization. To explore the feasibility of modifying the relative immune responses to prM and E proteins, four DNA constructs were created and administered into groups of Balb/c mice; pPW01 contains prM and E genes of DENV1, pPW02 contains prM and E genes of DENV2, pPW03 contains DENV1 prM and DENV2 E, and pPW04 contains DENV2 prM and DENV1 E. Exchange of either prM or E from a heterologous serotype does not appear to have an effect on the immunogenicity of the proteins. We have proved that the chimeric pPW03 and pPW04 constructs can produce humoral response in mice. Immunized sera were subjected to neutralization and enhancement assays against DENV2. The results showed that only serotype-specific anti-E antibodies conferred protective function, while the cross-reactive anti-E and anti-prM enhanced infection. In addition, the enhancement of DENV2 infection exhibited a serotype-preference for anti-E antibodies while such response was not observed with anti-prM, reflecting a degree of structural conservation of prM. Taken together, neutralization and enhancement appeared to occur at the same time during the course of infection. Successful prevention of severe symptoms of DENV infection depends on the ability to induce high levels of neutralizing antibodies to subdue the effect of enhancing antibodies.

  18. Preparation of Polyclonal Antibody Specific for BRD7 and Detection of Its Expression Pattern in the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huaying; Li, Xiaoling; Niu, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Ming; Huang, He; He, Jiajin; Zhang, Wenling; Xiao, Lan; Tang, Yunlian; Wang, Li; Li, Guiyuan

    2008-01-01

    BRD7 is a novel bromodomain gene. It plays critical role in cell growth, cell cycle progression, and signal-dependent gene expression. Overexpression of the BRD7 gene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells is effective to inhibit cell growth and cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. However, little is known about its bio-functions because of the unavailability of a specific BRD7 antibody. In this study, for the first time, we generated a highly specific BRD7 antibody. It is able to specifically recognize recombinant GST-BRD7N protein with a molecular mass of 65 kDa and recognize BRD7-Myc and endogenously expressed BRD7 protein with an approximate molecular mass of 75 kDa, which corresponds well with the calculated molecular mass of the BRD7 protein. More importantly, with these antisera, we analyzed BRD7 distribution in the human fetus by Western blot and immunohistochemistry assays. Obvious nuclear expression of BRD7 protein presents in human cerebellum, pancreas, intestines, liver, and kidney. Cardiomyocyte shows high cytoplasm expression of the BRD7 protein. Weak nuclear expression of the BRD7 protein is found in human cerebrum, lung, and stomach. These data may help to further study the cellular role of the BRD7 gene. In particular, the prepared BRD7 antibody will be helpful for studying the bio-functions of endogenously expressed BRD7 protein. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:531–538, 2008) PMID:18071067

  19. Human Polyclonal Antibodies Produced through DNA Vaccination of Transchromosomal Cattle Provide Mice with Post-Exposure Protection against Lethal Zaire and Sudan Ebolaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bounds, Callie E.; Kwilas, Steven A.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Brannan, Jennifer M.; Bakken, Russell R.; Dye, John M.; Hooper, Jay W.; Dupuy, Lesley C.; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-an; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination of transchromosomal bovines (TcBs) with DNA vaccines expressing the codon-optimized (co) glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Sudan virus (SUDV) produce fully human polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) that recognize both viruses and demonstrate robust neutralizing activity. Each TcB was vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation (IM-EP) a total of four times and at each administration received 10 mg of the EBOV-GPco DNA vaccine and 10 mg of the SUDV-GPco DNA vaccine at two sites on the left and right sides, respectively. After two vaccinations, robust antibody responses (titers > 1000) were detected by ELISA against whole irradiated EBOV or SUDV and recombinant EBOV-GP or SUDV-GP (rGP) antigens, with higher titers observed for the rGP antigens. Strong, virus neutralizing antibody responses (titers >1000) were detected after three vaccinations when measured by vesicular stomatitis virus-based pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA). Maximal neutralizing antibody responses were identified by traditional plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) after four vaccinations. Neutralizing activity of human immunoglobulins (IgG) purified from TcB plasma collected after three vaccinations and injected intraperitoneally (IP) into mice at a 100 mg/kg dose was detected in the serum by PsVNA up to 14 days after administration. Passive transfer by IP injection of the purified IgG (100 mg/kg) to groups of BALB/c mice one day after IP challenge with mouse adapted (ma) EBOV resulted in 80% protection while all mice treated with non-specific pAbs succumbed. Similarly, interferon receptor 1 knockout (IFNAR -/-) mice receiving the purified IgG (100 mg/kg) by IP injection one day after IP challenge with wild type SUDV resulted in 89% survival. These results are the first to demonstrate that filovirus GP DNA vaccines administered to TcBs by IM-EP can elicit neutralizing antibodies that provide post-exposure protection. Additionally, these data describe

  20. Development of a Polyclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Detection of Spores of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris in Various Fruit Juices.

    PubMed

    Mast, Sophia; Dietrich, Richard; Didier, Andrea; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2016-01-20

    A polyclonal rabbit antibody-based sandwich ELISA for the rapid and specific detection of spores of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris was established. The reactivity of the antisera with spores was confirmed by immunofluorescence. For a thorough evaluation of the ELISA, 61 strains and isolates of Alicyclobacillus spp. were characterized regarding their guaiacol production ability and genetic variability. The ELISA was highly sensitive, the detection limits were isolate-dependent and ranged from 2.1 × 10(3) - 3.8 × 10(4) spores/mL, except for one isolate, for which a slightly lower sensitivity (5 × 10(5) spores/mL) was observed. Inclusivity tests revealed that the ELISA reacts with all tested A. acidoterrestris, while no cross-reactions with spores of 30 strains of Bacillus spp. and Clostridium spp. were observed. Further on, the assay applicability was tested with orange, apple (clear and unfiltered), tomato, pink grapefruit, pear, and white grape juices. Juices were inoculated with 1 or 10 spores/mL of A. acidoterrestris. After enrichment for 48 h, the established ELISA enabled the reliable and reproducible detection of contaminated samples. The enriched samples could be applied directly to the assay, underlining the robustness of the developed ELISA method. PMID:26653108

  1. Localization and Distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in Citrus and Periwinkle by Direct Tissue Blot Immuno Assay with an Anti-OmpA Polyclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fang; Duan, Yongping; Paul, Cristina; Brlansky, Ronald H; Hartung, John S

    2015-01-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CaLas), a non-cultured member of the α-proteobacteria, is the causal agent of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). Due to the difficulties of in vitro culture, antibodies against CaLas have not been widely used in studies of this pathogen. We have used an anti-OmpA polyclonal antibody based direct tissue blot immunoassay to localize CaLas in different citrus tissues and in periwinkle leaves. In citrus petioles, CaLas was unevenly distributed in the phloem sieve tubes, and tended to colonize in phloem sieve tubes on the underside of petioles in preference to the upper side of petioles. Both the leaf abscission zone and the junction of the petiole and leaf midrib had fewer CaLas bacteria compared to the main portions of the petiole and the midribs. Colonies of CaLas in phloem sieve tubes were more frequently found in stems with symptomatic leaves than in stems with asymptomatic leaves with an uneven distribution pattern. In serial sections taken from the receptacle to the peduncle, more CaLas were observed in the peduncle sections adjacent to the stem. In seed, CaLas was located in the seed coat. Many fewer CaLas were found in the roots, as compared to the seeds and petioles when samples were collected from trees with obvious foliar symptoms. The direct tissue blot immuno assay was adapted to whole periwinkle leaves infected by CaLas. The pathogen was distributed throughout the lateral veins and the results were correlated with results of qPCR. Our data provide direct spatial and anatomical information for CaLas in planta. This simple and scalable method may facilitate the future research on the interaction of CaLas and host plant. PMID:25946013

  2. Localization and Distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in Citrus and Periwinkle by Direct Tissue Blot Immuno Assay with an Anti-OmpA Polyclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Fang; Duan, Yongping; Paul, Cristina; Brlansky, Ronald H.; Hartung, John S.

    2015-01-01

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CaLas), a non-cultured member of the α-proteobacteria, is the causal agent of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). Due to the difficulties of in vitro culture, antibodies against CaLas have not been widely used in studies of this pathogen. We have used an anti-OmpA polyclonal antibody based direct tissue blot immunoassay to localize CaLas in different citrus tissues and in periwinkle leaves. In citrus petioles, CaLas was unevenly distributed in the phloem sieve tubes, and tended to colonize in phloem sieve tubes on the underside of petioles in preference to the upper side of petioles. Both the leaf abscission zone and the junction of the petiole and leaf midrib had fewer CaLas bacteria compared to the main portions of the petiole and the midribs. Colonies of CaLas in phloem sieve tubes were more frequently found in stems with symptomatic leaves than in stems with asymptomatic leaves with an uneven distribution pattern. In serial sections taken from the receptacle to the peduncle, more CaLas were observed in the peduncle sections adjacent to the stem. In seed, CaLas was located in the seed coat. Many fewer CaLas were found in the roots, as compared to the seeds and petioles when samples were collected from trees with obvious foliar symptoms. The direct tissue blot immuno assay was adapted to whole periwinkle leaves infected by CaLas. The pathogen was distributed throughout the lateral veins and the results were correlated with results of qPCR. Our data provide direct spatial and anatomical information for CaLas in planta. This simple and scalable method may facilitate the future research on the interaction of CaLas and host plant. PMID:25946013

  3. Localization and Distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in Citrus and Periwinkle by Direct Tissue Blot Immuno Assay with an Anti-OmpA Polyclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fang; Duan, Yongping; Paul, Cristina; Brlansky, Ronald H; Hartung, John S

    2015-01-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CaLas), a non-cultured member of the α-proteobacteria, is the causal agent of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). Due to the difficulties of in vitro culture, antibodies against CaLas have not been widely used in studies of this pathogen. We have used an anti-OmpA polyclonal antibody based direct tissue blot immunoassay to localize CaLas in different citrus tissues and in periwinkle leaves. In citrus petioles, CaLas was unevenly distributed in the phloem sieve tubes, and tended to colonize in phloem sieve tubes on the underside of petioles in preference to the upper side of petioles. Both the leaf abscission zone and the junction of the petiole and leaf midrib had fewer CaLas bacteria compared to the main portions of the petiole and the midribs. Colonies of CaLas in phloem sieve tubes were more frequently found in stems with symptomatic leaves than in stems with asymptomatic leaves with an uneven distribution pattern. In serial sections taken from the receptacle to the peduncle, more CaLas were observed in the peduncle sections adjacent to the stem. In seed, CaLas was located in the seed coat. Many fewer CaLas were found in the roots, as compared to the seeds and petioles when samples were collected from trees with obvious foliar symptoms. The direct tissue blot immuno assay was adapted to whole periwinkle leaves infected by CaLas. The pathogen was distributed throughout the lateral veins and the results were correlated with results of qPCR. Our data provide direct spatial and anatomical information for CaLas in planta. This simple and scalable method may facilitate the future research on the interaction of CaLas and host plant.

  4. Spectra analysis of coating antigen: A possible explanation for difference in anti-AFB1 polyclonal antibody sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yang; Liu, Aiping; Wang, Xiaohong; Chen, Fusheng

    2016-10-01

    For the detection of small hapten molecules, indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) is a preferred method. However, diverse coating antigen might bring different antiserum titer and sensitivity for the identical antiserum. In the present study, four AFB1-protein (aflatoxin B1-carrier protein) conjugates were prepared by activated ester method (AFB1O-BSA/AFB1O-OVA) and mannich method (AFB1-cBSA/AFB1-cOVA), and then applied as coating antigen for titer and sensitivity detection of the identical antiserum obtained from rabbit immunized by AFB1-KLH. Afterwards, the ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence and far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (far-UV CD) spectra were recorded for understanding the difference in titer and sensitivity obtained. Results revealed that AFB1O-BSA/AFB1O-OVA showed a strong intrinsic fluorescence band centered at 450 nm that originated from the emission of AFB1, which differed from AFB1-cBSA/AFB1-cOVA, while the decrease of α-helical and increase of β-sheet in AFB1-cBSA was the most remarkable. This indicated that the better sensitivity obtained by using AFB1O-BSA as coating antigen might be caused by its extended structure, because such structure affect the binding between AFB1 and antibody. The study might offer structural information for understanding the titer and sensitivity difference caused by coating antigen.

  5. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Flagellin, and Characterization of the Elicited Anti-Flagellin Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Behrouz, Bahador; Amirmozafari, Nour; Khoramabadi, Nima; Bahroudi, Mahboobeh; Legaee, Parisa; Mahdavi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic human pathogen that causes serious infections in immunocompromised hosts. The single polar flagellum is an important factor in both virulence and colonization. Objectives As flagellin is the major component of the flagellar filament, the main aims of the present study are to identify, clone, express, and purify the recombinant type B flagellin (r-B-flagellin) of P. aeruginosa, as well as to evaluate the functional activity of the rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against this r-B-flagellin. Materials and Methods In the current experimental study, the r-B-flagellin gene was isolated from the P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain by PCR. It was cloned into the pET-28a vector and then transformed into the E. coli BL21 strain. Next, r-B-flagellin was overexpressed and affinity purified by Ni-NTA agarose-affinity chromatography, followed by on-column resolubilization. Polyclonal antisera against the recombinant flagellin were raised in rabbits, and the functional activity of the anti-r-B-flagellin antibody was determined by in vitro assays. Results The polyclonal antibodies raised against this r-B-flagellin inhibited the motility of the homologous PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, which significantly decreased the invasion of the PAO1 strain into the A549 cells and also enhanced the opsonophagocytosis of this strain. However, our polyclonal antibody showed little effect on the heterologous PAK strain. Conclusions The r-B-flagellin carried antigenic epitopes just like the native flagellin, while the polyclonal antibody raised against it exhibited functional activity. PMID:27621933

  6. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Flagellin, and Characterization of the Elicited Anti-Flagellin Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Behrouz, Bahador; Amirmozafari, Nour; Khoramabadi, Nima; Bahroudi, Mahboobeh; Legaee, Parisa; Mahdavi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic human pathogen that causes serious infections in immunocompromised hosts. The single polar flagellum is an important factor in both virulence and colonization. Objectives As flagellin is the major component of the flagellar filament, the main aims of the present study are to identify, clone, express, and purify the recombinant type B flagellin (r-B-flagellin) of P. aeruginosa, as well as to evaluate the functional activity of the rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against this r-B-flagellin. Materials and Methods In the current experimental study, the r-B-flagellin gene was isolated from the P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain by PCR. It was cloned into the pET-28a vector and then transformed into the E. coli BL21 strain. Next, r-B-flagellin was overexpressed and affinity purified by Ni-NTA agarose-affinity chromatography, followed by on-column resolubilization. Polyclonal antisera against the recombinant flagellin were raised in rabbits, and the functional activity of the anti-r-B-flagellin antibody was determined by in vitro assays. Results The polyclonal antibodies raised against this r-B-flagellin inhibited the motility of the homologous PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, which significantly decreased the invasion of the PAO1 strain into the A549 cells and also enhanced the opsonophagocytosis of this strain. However, our polyclonal antibody showed little effect on the heterologous PAK strain. Conclusions The r-B-flagellin carried antigenic epitopes just like the native flagellin, while the polyclonal antibody raised against it exhibited functional activity.

  7. Detection and estimation of avian infectious bronchitis virus antigen by a novel indirect liquid-phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using chicken and rabbit affinity purified immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Lougovskaia, Natalia N; Lougovskoi, Andrei A; Bochkov, Yuri A; Batchenko, Galina V; Mudrak, Natalia S; Drygin, Vladimir V; Borisov, Alexander V; Borisov, Vladimir V; Gusev, Anatoly A

    2002-12-01

    An indirect liquid-phase blocking (LPB) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using chicken and rabbit affinity purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) has been developed to detect and estimate avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) antigen concentration directly in infected allantoic fluid. The method is based on the principle of binding of specific IgG to the test IBV antigen and the assay of unbound IgG on an antigen-coated ELISA plate. The immunoglobulins are chicken N-terminal S2 peplomeric protein-specific IgG isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography on synthetic peptide coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B or rabbit polyclonal IgG purified from the serum using Protein A Sepharose 4B. The assay detected all tested IBV strains and field isolates propagated in chicken embryos. Signal to noise ratios were calculated from LPB ELISA absorbance units and a diagnostic threshold was established from the signal to noise ratio frequency distribution of samples positive or negative for IBV by virus titration or reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relative sensitivity of the test ranged between 10(5) and 10(6) median egg infectious doses (EID(50)) for chicken IgG and between 10(3) and 10(4) EID(50) for rabbit IgG, depending on the test strain. The assay is simple and takes less than 3 h to perform. It does not require expensive reagents and can be readily adapted to monitor the IBV antigen concentration in allantoic fluids during propagation of vaccine strains or in samples of freeze-dried, live-attenuated IBV vaccines.

  8. Antibodies to PhnD Inhibit Staphylococcal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Hubert; Kesselly, Augustus; Stegalkina, Svetlana; Kleanthous, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation on central lines or peripheral catheters is a serious threat to patient well-being. Contaminated vascular devices can act as a nidus for bloodstream infection and systemic pathogen dissemination. Staphylococcal biofilms are the most common cause of central-line-associated bloodstream infections, and antibiotic resistance makes them difficult to treat. As an alternative to antibiotic intervention, we sought to identify anti-staphylococcal biofilm targets for the development of a vaccine or antibody prophylactic. A screening strategy was devised using a microfluidic system to test antibody-mediated biofilm inhibition under biologically relevant conditions of shear flow. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to target antigen PhnD inhibited both Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus biofilms. PhnD-specific antibodies blocked biofilm development at the initial attachment and aggregation stages, and deletion of phnD inhibited normal biofilm formation. We further adapted our microfluidic biofilm system to monitor the interaction of human neutrophils with staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrated that PhnD-specific antibodies also serve as opsonins to enhance neutrophil binding, motility, and biofilm engulfment. These data support the identification of PhnD as a lead target for biofilm intervention strategies performed either by vaccination or through passive administration of antibodies. PMID:24958708

  9. Epitope mapping of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody and induction of growth-inhibitory polyclonal antibodies by vaccination with EGFR mimotope.

    PubMed

    Navari, Mohsen; Zare, Mehrak; Javanmardi, Masoud; Asadi-Ghalehni, Majid; Modjtahedi, Helmout; Rasaee, Mohammad Javed

    2014-10-01

    One of the proposed approaches in cancer therapy is to induce and direct the patient's own immune system against cancer cells. In this study, we determined the epitope mapping of the rat anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody ICR-62 using a phage display of random peptide library and identified a 12 amino acids peptide, which was recognized as a mimotope. The peptide was synthesized and conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) as carrier protein (P-BSA). We have shown that ICR-62 can react specifically with P-BSA as well as native EGFR. Two rabbits were immunized either by BSA or P-BSA and the rabbits IgGs were purified and examined for binding to the antigens, mimotope and the EGFR protein purified from the EGFR overexpressing A431 cell line. We showed that the rabbit IgG generated against the mimotope is capable of inhibiting the growth of A431 cells by 15%, but does not have any effect on the growth of EGFR-negative MDA-MB-453 cell line in vitro. Our results support the need for further investigations on the potential of vaccination with either mimotope of the EGFR or epitope displayed on the surface of phage particles for use in active immunotherapy of cancer.

  10. Idiotypes of pre-existing human anti-carcinoma anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, M; Lenert, G; Springer, G F

    1993-02-01

    All humans normally possess antibodies, predominantly IgM, that react specifically with the Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) and the Tn antigens which are present in immunoreactive form on > 85% of all human carcinomas, but not in healthy and otherwise diseased tissues. We report here a serological study of idiotype expression and antigen reactivity of the anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies. Idiotypy was analyzed with rabbit antibodies raised against, and made specific for, affinity-purified polyclonal anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies from blood group A1B healthy adult donors. Anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies cross-reacted idiotypically in spite of their distinct epitope specificities. By adsorbing anti-T antibodies on insolubilized synthetic T carbohydrate we could firmly link idiotype expression with antigen reactivity. The relation of idiotype expression to the antigen-binding site of plant seed lectins was also studied; one originated from Arachis hypogaea [peanut agglutinin (PNA)], the other from Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin). PNA inhibited only anti-T antibodies. Jacalin inhibited both anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. Neither idiotypic nor anti-idiotypic antibodies diminished the binding of lectins to T and Tn epitopes. The shared idiotypes on natural anti-T and anti-Tn antibodies permit consideration of application of their anti-idiotypes in treatment and/or prevention of human carcinoma.

  11. Exploration of high-density protein microarrays for antibody validation and autoimmunity profiling.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Mattsson, Cecilia; Andersson, Eni; Hellström, Cecilia; Uhlen, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Ayoglu, Burcu; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-09-25

    High-density protein microarrays of recombinant human protein fragments, representing 12,412 unique Ensembl Gene IDs, have here been produced and explored. These protein microarrays were used to analyse antibody off-target interactions, as well as for profiling the human autoantibody repertoire in plasma against the antigens represented by the protein fragments. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies produced within the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) were analysed on microarrays of three different sizes, ranging from 384 antigens to 21,120 antigens, for evaluation of the antibody validation criteria in the HPA. Plasma samples from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients were also screened in order to explore the feasibility of these arrays for broad-scale profiling of autoantibody reactivity. Furthermore, analysis on these near proteome-wide microarrays was complemented with analysis on HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarrays. The HPA recombinant protein microarray with 21,120 antigens and the HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarray are currently the largest protein microarray platforms available to date. The results on these arrays show that the Human Protein Atlas antibodies have few off-target interactions if the antibody validation criteria are kept stringent and demonstrate that the HPA-produced high-density recombinant protein fragment microarrays allow for a high-throughput analysis of plasma for identification of possible autoantibody targets in the context of various autoimmune conditions. PMID:26417875

  12. Label-free Fab and Fc affinity/avidity profiling of the antibody complex half-life for polyclonal and monoclonal efficacy screening.

    PubMed

    Read, Thomas; Olkhov, Rouslan V; Williamson, E Diane; Shaw, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    A unified approach to affinity screening for Fab and Fc interactions of an antibody for its antigen and FcγR receptor has been developed. An antigen array is used for the Fab affinity and cross-reactivity screening and protein A/G proxy is the FcγR receptor. The affinities are derived using a simple 1:1 binding model with a consistent error analysis. The association and dissociation kinetics are measured over optimised times for accurate determination. The Fab/Fc affinities are derived for ten antibodies: mAb-actin (mouse), pAb-BSA (sheep), pAb-collagen V (rabbit), pAb-CRP (goat), mAb-F1 (mouse), mAbs (mouse) 7.3, 12.3, 29.3, 36.3 and 46.3 raised against LcrV in Yersinia pestis. The rate of the dissociation of antigen-antibody complexes relates directly to their immunological function as does the Fc-FcγR complex and a new half-life plot has been defined with a Fab/Fc half-life range of 17-470 min. The upper half-life value points to surface avidity. Two antibodies that are protective as an immunotherapy define a Fab half-life >250 min and an Fc half-life >50 min as characteristics of ideal interactions which can form the basis of an antibody screen for immunotherapy.

  13. Radioimmunocytochemistry using a tritiated goat anti-rabbit second antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, E.J.; Ramachandran, J.; Basbaum, A.I.

    1984-07-01

    Affinity-purified goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin G (GAR) was conjugated with (/sup 3/H)-propionyl succinimidate and used to localize substance P (SP), enkephalin (ENK), and serotonin immunoreactive sites in the spinal dorsal horn and medulla of the rat and cat. Autoradiographic localization was demonstrated on paraffin, frozen, Vibratome, and 2 micron plastic sections. The latter were obtained from radiolabeled Vibratome sections that were embedded in epoxy resin. The distribution of SP, ENK, and serotonin demonstrated by radioimmunocytochemistry was comparable to that observed on semiadjacent sections using peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) immunocytochemistry. The autoradiograms, however, were generated using primary antibody concentrations up to five times more dilute than concentrations used for the PAP procedure. Indirect radioimmunocytochemistry using a (3H) anti-immunoglobulin G second antibody can be used to localize a variety of monoclonal and polyclonal antisera. It is quantifiable at the light microscopic level and can be potentially used with peroxidase histochemistry to double label immunoreactive structures at the ultrastructural level.

  14. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibody to a 110,000-molecular-weight hemolysin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, J N; Inzana, T J

    1990-01-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect swine antibody to a 110,000-molecular-weight hemolysin (110K hemolysin) of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal immunoglobulin G to the hemolysin of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 5 strain J45, followed by hemolysin-rich concentrated culture supernatant, was used to bind swine antibody to hemolysin to microdilution plates. Sixty-nine serum samples from swine that were clinically normal, presented with clinical evidence of pleuropneumonia, were experimentally immunized or challenged, or were free of pleuropneumonia were tested, and their ELISA titers were compared with complement fixation (CF) titers. On the basis of serum samples from swine that were clinically normal and negative by CF, an ELISA titer of 1:320 or greater was considered positive. In comparison with CF, the sensitivity of the ELISA was 98.1% and the specificity was 90%. The two samples negative by CF and positive by indirect ELISA were, however, also positive for antibody to serotype 5 capsule by ELISA. Immunization of normal pigs with whole cells or purified hemolysin boosted titers 4- to 128-fold within 4 weeks. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the affinity-purified immunoglobulin G to hemolysin used for capture in the assay recognized only a 110K protein of A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1 to 7, although the reactivity was quantitatively variable between serotypes. Therefore, the indirect ELISA is capable of identifying animals infected with or exposed to most, if not all, serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. If an indirect ELISA titer of 1:320 or greater is considered positive, the assay can be a valuable diagnostic tool in both clinical and research laboratories. Images PMID:2380363

  15. Cooperative mixtures of bispecific F(ab')2 antibodies for delivering saporin to lymphoma in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.R.; Courtenay, A.E.; Ingamells, S.; Stevenson, G.T.; Glennie, M.J. )

    1991-05-01

    We report that selected combinations of two or more monoclonal bispecific F(ab')2 antibodies (BsAbs) far outperform single derivatives in the delivery of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin, to guinea pig L2C leukemic cells. Throughout the work, BsAbs were constructed by thioether-linking the hinges of two Fab'gamma, one from monoclonal anti-L2C-idiotype antibody and the other from anti-saporin antibody. The latter was either affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal or one of a panel of five mouse monoclonal antibodies. In vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that, though all derivatives were effective, the BsAb made with the polyclonal antibody was always 10 to 20 times more potent than those made with a monoclonal antibody in yielding 50% inhibition of (3H)leucine uptake. This superior activity could be matched by selective mixtures of two or more of the monoclonal derivatives. Furthermore, in immunotherapeutic delivery of saporin to tumor, a pair of BsAbs performed significantly better than did either individually. Binding and uptake studies with radiolabeled saporin demonstrated a 20-fold increase in functional affinity when saporin was held at the cell surface by an appropriate BsAb mixture rather than by a single BsAb. In contrast, only small differences were recorded in the rate at which saporin was internalized as a result of the same maneuver. We conclude that the improved performance of combinations of BsAbs arises from their ability to provide multiple linkages between saporin molecules and cell surfaces, increasing the functional affinity with which saporin is tethered to the cell, but, in this system at least, having only a minor effect on the rate at which it is internalized. Cocktails of two or more BsAbs, selected to bind to multiple epitopes on ribosome-inactivating proteins could provide an important new strategy in immunotherapy.

  16. Postbooster Antibodies from Humans as Source of Diphtheria Antitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Alonso, Ana; González-Rivera, Milagros; Tamayo, Eduardo; Eiros, Jose María; Almansa, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin for therapeutic use is in limited supply. A potential source might be affinity-purified antibodies originally derived from plasma of adults who received a booster dose of a vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid. These antibodies might be useful for treating even severe cases of diphtheria. PMID:27314309

  17. The natural antibody repertoire of sharks and humans recognizes the potential universe of antigens.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Miranda K; Schluter, Samuel F; Marchalonis, John J

    2004-02-01

    In ancestral sharks, a rapid emergence in the evolution of the immune system occurred, giving jawed-vertebrates the necessary components for the combinatorial immune response (CIR). To compare the natural antibody (NAb) repertoires of the most divergent vertebrates with the capacity to produce antibodies, we isolated NAbs to the same set of antigens by affinity chromatography from two species of Carcharhine sharks and from human polyclonal IgG and IgM antibody preparations. The activities of the affinity-purified anti-T-cell receptor (anti-TCR) NAbs were compared with those of monoclonal anti-TCR NAbs that were generated from a systemic lupus erythematosus patient. We report that sharks and humans, representing the evolutionary extremes of vertebrate species sharing the CIR, have NAbs to human TCRs, Igs, the human senescent cell antigen, and to numerous retroviral antigens, indicating that essential features of the combinatorial repertoire and the capacity to recognize the potential universe of antigens is shared among all jawed-vertebrates.

  18. Radioimmunodetection of cancer with monoclonal antibodies: current status, problems, and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Unger, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    Early studies of immunoscintography with affinity-purified /sup 131/I-labeled polyclonal antibodies reactive against oncofetal antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were moderately successful in detecting metastatic colorectal carcinoma. However, because of low tumor to background ratios of isotope, background subtraction techniques using /sup 99/Tc-labeled albumin were required to visualize small lesions. Antisera were often of low titer and lacked specificity. These problems could be overcome for the most part following the development of highly specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against a variety of tumor-associated antigens. A number of clinical trials using /sup 131/I- or /sup 111/In-labeled MoAb to image tumors have demonstrated successful localization without the use of subtraction techniques. Variables limiting the usefulness of murine MoAb for diagnosis have included increased localization in liver and spleen, tumor vascularity and heterogeneity of antigen expression, and development of human antimurine globulins. Methods to overcome some of these problems are discussed. Radiolabeled MoAb appear useful as an adjunct to conventional diagnostic techniques both as a means to predict which antibodies might be useful for treatment and, in select patients, as a basis for treatment decisions. 163 references.

  19. Improving adjuvant systems for polyclonal egg yolk antibody (IgY) production in laying hens in terms of productivity and animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Marcq, Christopher; Marlier, Didier; Beckers, Yves

    2015-05-15

    The antibody production in the egg yolks of immunized laying hens is seen as a way of improving animal welfare compared with conventional production by mammals. Immunoglobulin Y (IgY) technology, however, has still to address welfare issues linked to the widespread use of an adjuvant in vaccines. Currently, Freund's adjuvants, complete (FCA) or incomplete (FIA), remain the standard. This study sought to evaluate various approaches used to enhance egg yolk antibody production in terms of both productivity and avian welfare. The outer membrane protein (OMP) of Salmonella Typhimurium was used as the prototype antigen. At 20 weeks of age, 56 ISA Brown hens, with specific-Salmonella-free status, were divided into seven groups (n=8) and received an initial intramuscular immunization. Hens in the two negative control groups received phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or FIA alone. Hens in the other groups received 80μg of Salmonella OMP emulsified with one of the following adjuvants: 200μl of FIA alone (T1); 200μl of FIA supplemented with 8μg of C-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) (T2); and 280μl of Montanide ISA 70 VG (T4). Birds in the T3 group received the antigen in emulsion with FIA and were given the tested immunostimulatory component (l-carnitine) via their feed (100mg/kg). A positive control group (PC) received FCA for the first and final immunizations and FIA for the other boosters. Immunization was repeated after 20, 46, 82 and 221 days. Eggs were collected regularly until 242 days after the first immunization and the anti-Salmonella Typhimurium activities in the yolk were determined by ELISA. After 242 days, the birds were euthanized and the injection sites were evaluated for gross and microscopic lesions. Among the tested immunostimulatory approaches, supplementation of FIA with CpG-ODN led to a significant and long-lasting enhancement of the specific antibody response. This treatment was even higher than the positive benchmark using FCA in

  20. Polyclonal antibody against a recombinant chlorotoxin-like peptide from the Chinese scorpion and detection of its putative receptors in human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yue-Jun; Yin, Li-Tian; Liang, Ai-Hua

    2006-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a type of chlorotoxin-like peptide, an inhibitor of small-conductance Cl(-) channels, from the scorpion, Buthus martensii Karsch, was synthesized (named rBmK CTa) according to the sequence optimized for codon usage in E. coli. It was over-expressed using a pExSecI expression system and purified to homogeneity. Polycolonal antibodies to the purified protein were raised in rats. Overlay assay and pull-down assay showed that this toxin specially binds to two proteins in the glioma cells with corresponding molecular weights of about 80 and 35 kDa. They may serve as candidate receptors or alternative cellular component for interaction with rBmK CTa.

  1. Endotoxin concentration in neutropenic patients with suspected gram-negative sepsis: correlation with clinical outcome and determination of anti-endotoxin core antibodies during therapy with polyclonal immunoglobulin M-enriched immunoglobulins.

    PubMed Central

    Behre, G; Schedel, I; Nentwig, B; Wörmann, B; Essink, M; Hiddemann, W

    1992-01-01

    We carried out a study in patients with severe neutropenia from hematologic malignancy and suspected gram-negative sepsis to evaluate the clinical significance of endotoxin concentrations in plasma before and during a therapeutic intervention with a human polyclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM)-enriched immunoglobulin preparation (Pentaglobin; Biotest, Dreieich, Germany). Twenty-one patients with acute leukemia or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma entered the study upon the development of clinical signs of gram-negative sepsis and received the IgM-enriched immunoglobulin preparation every 6 h for 3 days (total dose, 1.3 liter with 7.8 g of IgM, 7.8 g of IgA, and 49.4 g of IgG), in addition to standardized antibiotic treatment. Concentrations of endotoxin and IgM and IgG antibodies against lipid A and Re lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in plasma were determined by a modified chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate test and semiquantitative enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, before each immunoglobulin infusion and during the following 25 days. Seventeen patients were endotoxin positive; in five of these patients, gram-negative infection was confirmed by microbiologic findings. Prior to therapy, endotoxemia correlated significantly with the occurrence of fever, and a quantitative correlation between the endotoxin concentration and body temperature was found during the individual course of infection in 8 of the 17 patients. Overall mortality from endotoxin-positive sepsis was 41% (7 of 17) and 64% (7 of 11) in patients with symptoms of septic shock. Nonsurvivors had significantly higher maximum concentration of endotoxin in plasma compared with those of survivors at the first study day (median of 126 versus 34 pg/ml; P < 0.05) and during the whole septic episode (median of 126 versus 61 pg/ml; P < 0.05). In survivors, immunoglobulin therapy resulted in a significant decrease in endotoxin levels in plasma within the initial 18-h treatment period, from a pretreatment median value of

  2. Anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies: an additional diagnostic marker for APS?

    PubMed

    Pregnolato, Francesca; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Encabo, Susan; Shums, Zakera; Norman, Gary L; Tripodi, Armando; Chantarangkul, Veena; Bertero, Tiziana; De Micheli, Valeria; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2013-07-01

    Among the diagnostic assays for anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS), lupus anticoagulant (LA) is the strongest predictor of thrombosis; however, it presents several limitations as interference with anticoagulant therapy and poor inter-laboratory agreement. Two-thirds of LA activity is apparently due to antibodies against prothrombin (PT), usually detectable by ELISA. Binding of PT to phosphatidylserine (PS) has been shown to enhance solid-phase anti-PT assay sensitivity. To determine the prevalence of antibodies against PS/PT (aPS/PT) in APS, we tested the semiquantitative QUANTA Lite(®) aPS/PT ELISA in a cohort of 80 APS patients. The prevalence of aPS/PT was 81.3%, rising to 87.6% when considering LA-positive subjects only. We observed a strong correlation between aPS/PT and LA (p = 0.006). To note, APS patients with thrombotic manifestations displayed significantly higher IgG aPS/PT titers compared to 20 aPL asymptomatic carriers (p = 0.012). To rule out a possible cross-reactivity of anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies (aβ2GPI) with PS/PT complex, we tested two monoclonal aβ2GPI antibodies and an affinity-purified (AP) polyclonal aβ2GPI IgG obtained from the serum of a patient reacting against both β2GPI and PS/PT. The two monoclonal antibodies did not show any reactivity against PS/PT complex, similarly the AP IgGs did not react toward PS/PT antigen while preserved their aβ2GPI activity. Our findings suggest that aPS/PT are a definite antibody population in APS. Moreover, the good correlation between aPS/PT ELISA and LA may support its use as a surrogate test for LA, particularly useful to overcome the technical limitations of the functional assay.

  3. Effects of feeding a spray-dried multivalent polyclonal antibody preparation on feedlot performance, feeding behavior, carcass characteristics, rumenitis, and blood gas profile of Brangus and Nellore yearling bulls.

    PubMed

    Millen, D D; Pacheco, R D L; DiLorenzo, N; Martins, C L; Marino, C T; Bastos, J P S T; Mariani, T M; Barducci, R S; Sarti, L M N; DiCostanzo, A; Rodrigues, P H M; Arrigoni, M D B

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of replacing monensin (MON) with a spray-dried multivalent polyclonal antibody preparation (PAP) against several ruminal microorganisms on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, feeding behavior, blood gas profile, and the rumenitis incidence of Brangus and Nellore yearling bulls. The study was designed as a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, replicated 6 times (4 bulls per pen and a total of 24 pens), in which bulls ( = 48) of each biotype were fed diets containing either MON fed at 300 mg/d or PAP fed at 3 g/d. No significant feed additive main effects were observed for ADG ( = 0.27), G:F ( = 0.28), HCW ( = 0.99), or dressing percentage ( = 0.80). However, bulls receiving PAP had greater DMI ( = 0.02) and larger ( = 0.02) final LM area as well as greater ( < 0.01) blood concentrations of bicarbonate and base excess in the extracellular fluid than bulls receiving MON. Brangus bulls had greater ( < 0.01) ADG and DMI expressed in kilograms, final BW, heavier HCW, and larger initial and final LM area than Nellore bulls. However, Nellore bulls had greater daily DMI fluctuation ( < 0.01), expressed as a percentage, and greater incidence of rumenitis ( = 0.05) than Brangus bulls. In addition, Brangus bulls had greater ( < 0.01) DMI per meal and also presented lower ( < 0.01) DM and NDF rumination rates when compared with Nellore bulls. Significant interactions ( < 0.05) between biotype and feed additive were observed for SFA, unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), MUFA, and PUFA concentrations in adipose tissues. When Nellore bulls were fed PAP, fat had greater ( < 0.05) SFA and PUFA contents but less ( < 0.01) UFA and MUFA than Nellore bulls receiving MON. For Brangus bulls, MON led to greater ( < 0.05) SFA and PUFA and less ( < 0.05) UFA and MUFA than Brangus bulls fed PAP. Feeding a spray-dried PAP led to similar feedlot performance compared with that when feeding MON. Spray

  4. IgG-Mediated Immune Suppression to Erythrocytes by Polyclonal Antibodies Can Occur in the Absence of Activating or Inhibitory Fcγ Receptors in a Full Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Yu, Honghui; Amash, Alaa; Zimring, James C; Lazarus, Alan H

    2015-09-01

    Polyclonal anti-D has been used to prevent RhD-negative mothers from becoming immunized against RhD positive fetal erythrocytes, and this mechanism has been referred as Ab or IgG-mediated immune suppression (AMIS). Although anti-D has been highly successful, the inhibitory mechanisms remain poorly understood. Two major theories behind AMIS involve the binding of IgG to activating or inhibitory FcγR, which can induce either erythrocyte clearance or immune inhibition, respectively. In this work, we explored the absolute role of activating and inhibitory FcγR in the AMIS mechanism using the HOD mouse model of RBC immunization. HOD mice contain a RBC-specific recombinant protein composed of hen egg lysozyme (HEL), OVA and human transmembrane Duffy Ag, and erythrocytes from HOD mice can stimulate an immune response to HEL. To assess the contribution of activating and inhibitory FcγR to AMIS, C57BL/6 versus FcRγ-chain(-/-) or FcγRIIB(-/-) mice were used as recipients of HOD-RBC alone or together with anti-HEL Abs (i.e., AMIS) and the resulting immune response to HEL evaluated. We show that anti-HEL polyclonal Abs induce the same degree of AMIS effect in mice lacking these IgG binding receptors as compared with wild-type mice. In agreement with this, F(ab')2 fragments of the AMIS Ab also significantly reduced the Ab response to the HOD cells. In conclusion, successful inhibition of in vivo Ab responses to HOD-RBC by polyclonal IgG can occur independently of activating or inhibitory FcγR involvement. These results may have implications for the understanding of RhD prophylaxis.

  5. IgG-Mediated Immune Suppression to Erythrocytes by Polyclonal Antibodies Can Occur in the Absence of Activating or Inhibitory Fcγ Receptors in a Full Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Yu, Honghui; Amash, Alaa; Zimring, James C; Lazarus, Alan H

    2015-09-01

    Polyclonal anti-D has been used to prevent RhD-negative mothers from becoming immunized against RhD positive fetal erythrocytes, and this mechanism has been referred as Ab or IgG-mediated immune suppression (AMIS). Although anti-D has been highly successful, the inhibitory mechanisms remain poorly understood. Two major theories behind AMIS involve the binding of IgG to activating or inhibitory FcγR, which can induce either erythrocyte clearance or immune inhibition, respectively. In this work, we explored the absolute role of activating and inhibitory FcγR in the AMIS mechanism using the HOD mouse model of RBC immunization. HOD mice contain a RBC-specific recombinant protein composed of hen egg lysozyme (HEL), OVA and human transmembrane Duffy Ag, and erythrocytes from HOD mice can stimulate an immune response to HEL. To assess the contribution of activating and inhibitory FcγR to AMIS, C57BL/6 versus FcRγ-chain(-/-) or FcγRIIB(-/-) mice were used as recipients of HOD-RBC alone or together with anti-HEL Abs (i.e., AMIS) and the resulting immune response to HEL evaluated. We show that anti-HEL polyclonal Abs induce the same degree of AMIS effect in mice lacking these IgG binding receptors as compared with wild-type mice. In agreement with this, F(ab')2 fragments of the AMIS Ab also significantly reduced the Ab response to the HOD cells. In conclusion, successful inhibition of in vivo Ab responses to HOD-RBC by polyclonal IgG can occur independently of activating or inhibitory FcγR involvement. These results may have implications for the understanding of RhD prophylaxis. PMID:26188060

  6. Maintenance of Serological Memory by Polyclonal Activation of Human Memory B Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, Nadia L.; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2002-12-01

    Production of antibodies can last for a lifetime, through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here, we show that human memory B lymphocytes proliferate and differentiate into plasma cells in response to polyclonal stimuli, such as bystander T cell help and CpG DNA. Furthermore, plasma cells secreting antibodies to recall antigens are produced in vivo at levels proportional to the frequency of specific memory B cells, even several years after antigenic stimulation. Although antigen boosting leads to a transient increase in specific antibody levels, ongoing polyclonal activation of memory B cells offers a means to maintain serological memory for a human lifetime.

  7. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  8. Characterization and Formulation of Multiple Epitope-Specific Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies for Passive Immunization against Cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Deborah A.; Auerbach-Dixon, Beth A.; Riggs, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    The coccidian parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes diarrhea in humans, calves, and other mammals. Neither immunization nor parasite-specific pharmaceuticals that are consistently effective against this organism are available. While polyclonal antibodies against whole C. parvum reduce infection, their efficacy and predictability are suboptimal. We hypothesized that passive immunization against cryptosporidiosis could be improved by using neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeting functionally defined antigens on the infective stages. We previously reported that the apical complex and surface-exposed zoite antigens CSL, GP25-200, and P23 are critical in the infection process and are therefore rational targets. In the present study, a panel of 126 MAbs generated against affinity-purified CSL, GP25-200, and P23 was characterized to identify the most efficacious neutralizing MAb formulation targeting each antigen. To identify neutralizing MAbs, sporozoite infectivity following exposure to individual MAbs was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of 126 MAbs evaluated, 47 had neutralizing activity. These were then evaluated individually in oocyst-challenged neonatal mice, and 14 MAbs having highly significant efficacy were identified for further testing in formulations. Epitope specificity assays were performed to determine if candidate MAbs recognized the same or different epitopes. Formulations of two or three neutralizing MAbs, each recognizing distinct epitopes, were then evaluated. A formulation of MAbs 3E2 (anti-CSL [αCSL]), 3H2 (αGP25-200), and 1E10 (αP23) provided highly significant additive efficacy over that of either individual MAbs or combinations of two MAbs and reduced intestinal infection by 86 to 93%. These findings indicate that polyvalent neutralizing MAb formulations targeting epitopes on defined antigens may provide optimal passive immunization against cryptosporidiosis. PMID:10768951

  9. Development and validation of a cell-based SEAP reporter assay for the detection of neutralizing antibodies against an anti-IL-13 therapeutic antibody.

    PubMed

    Liao, Karen; Sikkema, Dan; Wang, Catherine; Chen, Keguan; DeWall, Stephen; Lee, Thomas N

    2012-01-31

    A cell-based bioassay capable of detecting neutralizing antibodies (NAb) specific to a therapeutic anti-IL-13 monoclonal antibody was developed, validated and used to analyze normal human and asthma serum samples. At the time of this study, a neutralizing assay was unavailable for anti-IL-13 antibody therapeutics with sufficient rigor for validation. Thus, we describe here a method and considerations for validation. The assay used IL-13 responsive HEK293 cells transfected with a secreted embryonic alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene. Cells were plated at 5.4×10(4) per assay well due to 90% confluence on the subsequent day. Optimal IL-13 and anti-IL-13 concentrations were determined to be 600 pg/mL and 900 ng/mL respectively. We demonstrated the assay's cut point, sensitivity, specificity/cross reactivity, selectivity/matrix interference, and precision. Also, we demonstrated how the drug inhibitory concentration (IC(50), IC(75), and IC(90)) can affect sensitivity and dynamic range/assay window. We characterized the differences in assay response between serum samples of normal population and asthma population. Asthma samples demonstrated an elevated OD ratio in average compared to normal samples. Thus, separate cut points were needed and calculated to be 1.78 and 2.43 for normal and asthma serum, respectively. The assay sensitivity was 670 ng/mL with the positive control (affinity purified rabbit anti-drug polyclonal antibodies). Potential false positives resulting from endogenous serum cytokines including IL-13, IL-4, and Interferon alpha (INF-α) were evaluated and the results indicated that the interfering concentrations for these cytokines are much higher than the respective physiological concentrations. Based on these data, the risk of false positive by endogenous cytokines was considered to be low. In addition, irrelevant anti-drug positive control antibodies were evaluated for assay specificity and did not demonstrate neutralizing capability. Further

  10. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  11. Use of egg yolk antibody (IgY) as an immunoanalytical tool in the detection of Indian cobra (Naja naja naja) venom in biological samples of forensic origin.

    PubMed

    Brunda, G; Sashidhar, R B; Sarin, R K

    2006-08-01

    An immunoglobulin Y (IgY) based indirect double antibody sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the detection of Indian cobra (Naja naja naja) venom in the biological samples of forensic origin. Polyclonal antibodies were raised and purified from chick egg yolk and rabbit serum. The cobra venom was sandwiched between immobilized affinity purified IgY and the rabbit IgG. The detection concentration of cobra venom was in the range of 0.1 to 300ng. The calibration plot was based on linear regression analysis (y=0.2581x+0.4375, r(2)=0.9886). The limit of detection of the assay was found to be 0.1ng. The coefficient of variation (CV) of different concentrations of working range in inter (n=6) and intra-assay (n=6) was observed to be less than 10%. The recovery of venom was found to be in the range of 80-99%, when different concentrations (0.002, 0.1, 0.2, 1, and 2microg) of cobra venom were spiked to pooled normal human serum (ml(-1)). No cross reactivity was observed with krait and viper venom in the immunoassay system in the concentration range of 0.1-1000ng. The method was initially, validated by analyzing specimens (autopsy) of experimental rats injected with cobra venom (1.2mgkg(-1) body mass). Further, human specimens (autopsy and biopsy) of snake bite victims of forensic origin were also analyzed. The methodology developed may find diagnostic application in forensic laboratories. PMID:16846624

  12. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Design Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Participants Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. Setting The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Main Outcome Measures The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. Results We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. Conclusion This technique can now be extended to the study

  13. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus.

  14. Localization of phospholamban in smooth muscle using immunogold electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Phospholamban, the putative regulator of the Ca2+-ATPase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum, was immunolocalized in canine visceral and vascular smooth muscle. Gently disrupted tissues were labeled with an affinity-purified phospholamban polyclonal antibody and indirect immunogold, using preembedding techniques. The sarcoplasmic reticulum of smooth muscle cells was specifically labeled with patches of immunogold distributed in a nonuniform fashion, while the sarcolemma did not appear to contain any phospholamban. The outer nuclear envelopes were also observed to be heavily labeled with the affinity- purified phospholamban polyclonal antibody. These findings suggest that phospholamban may play a role in the regulation of cytoplasmic and intranuclear calcium levels in smooth muscle cells. PMID:3417762

  15. Effect of cell division inhibitors on polyclonal activation can vary according to the target cell used.

    PubMed

    Löwy, I; Chedid, L

    1979-01-01

    The effects of inhibitors of cell division on polyclonal stimulation induced either by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or by a synthetic adjuvant, MDP, were compared, using different target cells. Doses of colchicine that prevented 3H-thymidine incorporation also prevented the induction of antibodies against TNP and against an altered self antigen: bromelain-treated mouse red blood cells (br-MRBC). Under identical conditions, incubation with cytosine arabinoside (CA) strongly prevented the induction of anti-TNP PFC and to a lesser degree anti-SRBC PFC. However, the number of anti br-MRBC PFC was unchanged even when a dose of CA which inhibits totally the incorporation of 3H-thymidine was used. Our findings indicate that the general term "polyclonal stimulation" may concern at least two different types of cell populations and therefore we strongly stress the importance of choosing similar targets in comparative experiments.

  16. Estimation of polyclonal IgG4 hybrids in normal human serum

    PubMed Central

    Young, Elizabeth; Lock, Emma; Ward, Douglas G; Cook, Alexander; Harding, Stephen; Wallis, Gregg L F

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo or in vitro formation of IgG4 hybrid molecules, wherein the immunoglobulins have exchanged half molecules, has previously been reported under experimental conditions. Here we estimate the incidence of polyclonal IgG4 hybrids in normal human serum and comment on the existence of IgG4 molecules with different immunoglobulin light chains. Polyclonal IgG4 was purified from pooled or individual donor human sera and sequentially fractionated using light-chain affinity and size exclusion chromatography. Fractions were analysed by SDS–PAGE, immunoblotting, ELISA, immunodiffusion and matrix-assisted laser-desorption mass spectrometry. Polyclonal IgG4 purified from normal serum contained IgG4κ, IgG4λ and IgG4κ/λ molecules. Size exclusion chromatography showed that IgG4 was principally present in monomeric form (150 000 MW). SDS–PAGE, immunoblotting and ELISA showed the purity of the three IgG4 samples. Immunodiffusion, light-chain sandwich ELISA and mass spectrometry demonstrated that both κ and λ light chains were present on only the IgG4κ/λ molecules. The amounts of IgG4κ/λ hybrid molecules ranged from 21 to 33% from the five sera analysed. Based on the molecular weight these molecules were formed of two IgG4 heavy chains plus one κ and one λ light chain. Polyclonal IgG (IgG4-depleted) was similarly fractionated according to light-chain specificity. No evidence of hybrid IgG κ/λ antibodies was observed. These results indicate that hybrid IgG4κ/λ antibodies compose a substantial portion of IgG4 from normal human serum. PMID:24512211

  17. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  18. Production, Characterization and Applications for Toxoplasma gondii-Specific Polyclonal Chicken Egg Yolk Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Júnior, Álvaro; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Silva, Murilo V.; Ferreira, Flávia B.; Macêdo Júnior, Arlindo G.; Mota, Caroline M.; Faria, Matheus S.; Filho, Hercílio H. Silva; Silva, Deise A. O.; Cunha-Júnior, Jair P.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Toxoplasma gondii may cause abortions, ocular and neurological disorders in warm-blood hosts. Immunized mammals are a wide source of hyperimmune sera used in different approaches, including diagnosis and the study of host-parasite interactions. Unfortunately, mammalian antibodies present limitations for its production, such as the necessity for animal bleeding, low yield, interference with rheumatoid factor, complement activation and affinity to Fc mammalian receptors. IgY antibodies avoid those limitations; therefore they could be an alternative to be applied in T. gondii model. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we immunized hens with soluble tachyzoite antigens of T. gondii (STAg) and purified egg yolk antibodies (IgY) by an inexpensive and simple method, with high yield and purity degree. IgY anti-STAg antibodies presented high avidity and were able to recognize a broad range of parasite antigens, although some marked differences were observed in reactivity profile between antibodies produced in immunized hens and mice. Interestingly, IgY antibodies against Neospora caninum and Eimeria spp. did not react to STAg. We also show that IgY antibodies were suitable to detect T. gondii forms in paraffin-embedded sections and culture cell monolayers. Conclusions/Significance Due to its cost-effectiveness, high production yield and varied range of possible applications, polyclonal IgY antibodies are useful tools for studies involving T. gondii. PMID:22808150

  19. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  20. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  1. Polyclonal B cell activation, circulating immune complexes and autoimmunity in human american visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Galvão-Castro, B; Sá Ferreira, J A; Marzochi, K F; Marzochi, M C; Coutinho, S G; Lambert, P H

    1984-01-01

    In a prospective study, serum and plasma samples from 17 patients with kala-azar were collected in Rio de Janeiro. High levels of immune complexes (IC) were detected in serum by means of 125I-Clq and conglutinin binding assays. The Clq binding material had a sedimentation coefficient of 19-25S, as determined by ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient. Plasma levels of C3 and C3 breakdown products were measured and the C3d levels were increased in six out of 11 patients. The occurrence of polyclonal B cell activation was suggested by (a) a marked increase of serum IgG and IgM levels and (b) of the presence of antibodies against various proteins and haptens (SRBC, DNP-BSA, FITC-BSA,KLH). There was a close association between the presence of IC and anti-immunoglobulin antibodies. Anti-smooth muscle antibodies were also observed. These data are consistent with a major role of polyclonal B cell activation in the induction of IC during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:6424987

  2. Monoclonal antibodies against the native or denatured forms of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    André, C; Guillet, J G; De Backer, J P; Vanderheyden, P; Hoebeke, J; Strosberg, A D

    1984-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with affinity-purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from calf brain and their splenocytes fused with NS1 myeloma cells. Hybrid cultures were grown and selected for production of antibodies on the basis of enzyme immunoassays on calf and rat forebrain membrane preparations. Thirty-four clones were retained and six of them further subcloned. Two of these subclones produced antibodies that selectively recognized muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-bearing membranes. The M-35b antibodies interacted only with native digitonin-solubilized receptors, and not with denatured receptors. The M-23c antibodies did not react with active digitonin-solubilized receptors but recognized the denatured form. The M-23c antibodies should thus be useful in the purification of the receptor and its precursor translation products, while the M-35b antibodies could be used for the immunocytochemical localization of the receptor in cells and tissues of different species. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6200320

  3. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  4. Detection of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B at Picogram Levels Using Piezoelectric-Excited Millimeter-Sized Cantilever Sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a highly sensitive and rapid method for thhe detection of Staphylocoiccus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB) at picogram levels using a piezolelectric-excited millimeter cantilever (PEMC) sensor. Affinity purified polyclonal antibody to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (anti-SEB) was immobilized on th...

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to the h1 agglutinogen from Staphylococcus aureus 17A. Serological testing with type strains.

    PubMed

    Haaheim, L R; Lund, H

    1984-12-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies to the h1 agglutinogen were produced by conventional means, and slide agglutination of S. aureus type strains was performed with protein A affinity purified IgG1 antibodies. In accordance with Oeding's serotype system the type strains 17A and 670 were strongly and consistently agglutinated. In addition, however, several of the remaining twelve type strains investigated showed varying reaction patterns. Our results indicate that the h1 agglutinogen may be more widely distributed among S. aureus strains than previously assumed. PMID:6532111

  6. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  7. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, S.R.; Lin, C.S.; Potts, J.T. Jr.; Rosenthal, A.S.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen monocloanl antibodies against the aminoterminal portion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were generated by using BALB/c mouse for immunization fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods, and a solid-phase screening assay. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat antimouse immunoglobulins specific for IgG heavy chains and ..mu..(IgM). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background activity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labelled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a radioimmunoassay.

  8. Polyclonality of Parathyroid Tumors in Neonatal Severe Hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Kristin R; Andrade, Simone Caixeta; Bellizzi, Justin; D'Souza-Li, Lilia; Arnold, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) is a rare disorder characterized by major hypercalcemia, elevated parathyroid hormone levels, and marked enlargement of multiple parathyroid glands, usually associated with germline mutations in the calcium receptor gene CASR. However, little is known about the outgrowth of parathyroid tumors in NSHPT, including whether they represent monoclonal or polyclonal expansions. We sought to examine the clonality of parathyroid tissues resected from a patient with NSHPT and biallelic CASR mutations. DNA from two distinct parathyroid tumors resected from a girl with NSHPT, plus polyclonal/monoclonal control samples, were subjected to analyses of clonality by two independent methods, X-chromosome inactivation analysis at the androgen receptor locus (HUMARA) and BAC array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Both parathyroid tumor samples revealed polyclonal patterns by X-inactivation analysis, with polyclonal and monoclonal controls yielding the expected patterns. Similarly, by BAC array CGH, neither parathyroid sample contained monoclonal copy number changes and both appeared identical to the patient-matched polyclonal controls. Our observations provide direct experimental evidence that the markedly enlarged parathyroid tumors in the setting of NSHPT constitute polyclonal, generalized hyperplastic growths rather than monoclonal neoplasms.

  9. Demonstration of anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against IgM rheumatoid factor in the serum of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, W K; Barnett, E V

    1989-01-01

    We have identified the presence of anti-idiotypic activity against IgMRF in the sera of RA patients. Only patients seropositive for IgMRF had significant levels of anti-idiotypic activity, while seronegative patients and normal volunteers did not. When this anti-idiotypic activity was affinity-purified from a single RA patient, two separate binding activities were identified. IgG antibodies were pepsin-digested to F(ab')2 fragments before affinity-purification to remove the Fc portion capable of binding to IgMRF. Anti-idiotypic F(ab')2 fragments of IgG were eluted from an IgMRF-Sepharose 4B column. These F(ab')2 bound preferentially to IgMRF bearing an idiotype recognized by the anti-idiotypic murine monoclonal 17.109. A second anti-idiotypic F(ab')2 was affinity purified using rabbit anti-human Fc antibody bound to Sepharose 4B. These eluted antibodies behaved as the internal image of IgG, binding five out of seven IgMRF's tested. The binding of both anti-idiotypic F(ab')2 was inhibited with human IgG. The presence of both IgMRF and anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against it in the sera of RA patients suggests that anti-idiotypic antibodies alone are not capable of inhibiting the production of rheumatoid factor. PMID:2702773

  10. Autoimmunity, polyclonal B-cell activation and infection.

    PubMed

    Granholm, N A; Cavallo, T

    1992-02-01

    It is widely believed that autoimmunity is an integral part of the immune system, and that genetic, immunologic, hormonal, environmental and other factors contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Thus, autoimmune disease may represent an abnormal expression of immune functions instead of loss of tolerance to self, and it can be organ specific or systemic in its manifestations. We review the various factors that contribute to the development of autoimmune disease; we also review the mechanisms of polyclonal B-cell activation, with emphasis on the role of infectious agents. We consider systemic lupus erythematosus in humans and in experimental animals as prototypic autoimmune disease, and we summarize data to indicate that polyclonal B-cell activation is central to the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disease. The effect of polyclonal B-cell activation, brought about by injections of a B-cell activator-lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria-is sufficient to cause autoimmune disease in an immunologically normal host. In fact, autoimmune disease can be arrested if excessive polyclonal B-cell activation is suppressed; alternatively, autoimmune disease can be exacerbated if polyclonal B-cell activation is enhanced. We explore the mechanism of tissue injury when autoimmune disease is induced or exacerbated, and we consider the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies, immune complexes, complement, the blood cell carrier system, and the mononuclear phagocyte system. Although polyclonal B-cell activation may be the mechanism whereby various factors can cause or exacerbate systemic autoimmune disease, polyclonal B-cell activation may cause autoimmune disease on its own.

  11. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed.

  12. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  13. Data on the characterization of follicle-stimulating hormone monoclonal antibodies and localization in Japanese eel pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Jung; Park, Chae-Won; Byambaragchaa, Munkhzaya; Kim, Shin-Kwon; Lee, Bae-Ik; Hwang, Hyung-Kyu; Myeong, Jeong-In; Hong, Sun-Mee; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Min, Kwan-Sik

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rec-FSH) from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica; rec-FSH was produced in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA Sepharose column chromatography. In support of our recent publication, "Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against recombinant tethered follicle-stimulating hormone from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica" [1], it was important to characterize the specificity of eel follicle-stimulating hormone antibodies. Here, the production and ELISA system of these monoclonal antibodies are presented. The affinity-purified monoclonal antibodies specifically detected eel rec-FSH in ELISA and on western blots of rec-FSH produced from CHO cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that FSH staining was specifically localized in the eel pituitary. PMID:27331121

  14. Multiple myeloma in a dog with multiple concurrent infectious diseases and persistent polyclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Geigy, Caroline; Riond, Barbara; Bley, Carla Rohrer; Grest, Paula; Kircher, Patrick; Lutz, Hans

    2013-03-01

    A 12-year-old, spayed female, mixed-breed dog was presented for acute hematuria, stranguria, polyuria, and polydipsia, as well as lameness for 8 days. Previous medical history included treatment for infection with Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Leishmania infantum, and Dirofilaria immitis 6.5 years prior to presentation. Besides persistently increased antibody titers to E canis and A phagocytophilum, polyclonal gammopathy with a monoclonal spike and moderate hypercalcemia were observed. There was marked hematuria, and Staphylococcus aureus was cultured from urine. Two weeks after successful treatment of the urinary tract infection, radiographs showed an extensive destructive monostotic lesion of the right humerus. Cytologic examination of fine-needle aspirates of this lesion revealed a neoplastic round cell population suggestive of multiple myeloma. The dog was treated with melphalan and prednisolone for suspected multiple myeloma and doxycycline for suspected ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis. Treatments lead to resolution of the clinical signs, hypercalcemia, and monoclonal gammopathy, and there was radiographic improvement of bone lesions; polyclonal gammopathy persisted. About one year after presentation the dog was still in clinical remission. This is a rare report of a dog with suspected multiple myeloma and a history of multiple chronic infectious diseases, suggesting that chronic infection and uncontrolled long-term stimulation of the immune system could contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. PMID:23278475

  15. Detection of Polyclonality among Clinical Isolates from Prosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    De-la-Fuente, Marta; Martinez-Perez, Marta; Gonzalez-Pallares, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is an increasingly important health concern in the Western world due to the rising number of joint arthroplasties. Although most infections are considered to be monomicrobial, the introduction of sonication procedures has led to an increase in the detection of polymicrobial infections. To date, no published studies have investigated the presence of different clones of the same species in the infected patient. The objective of this study was to analyze whether the phenomenon of polyclonality, or the appearance of different clones in the same sample, occurs in PJI. Bacteria isolated by sonication of the retrieved implant from patients with theoretically monomicrobial PJI were included in the study. Two techniques (random amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD] and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight [MALDI-TOF] mass spectrometry) were used to determine the presence of several clones in the same sample. Results were analyzed to determine bacterial species and infection type (acute versus chronic). RAPD showed a predominance of polyclonal cases (16 of 19). However, when performing the analysis with MALDI-TOF, all cases were shown to be polyclonal. We were unable to establish any relationship between the two methodologies. Polyclonality is a common phenomenon in acute and chronic PJI. Further studies are needed to establish the potential implications of this phenomenon on patient outcomes. PMID:26378278

  16. Surface antigens of brain synapses: identification of minor proteins using polyclonal antisera

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Antigenic proteins of brain synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) and postsynaptic densities (PSD) were characterized using antisera raised against SPM. Immunostaining of brain sections showed that the antigens were restricted to synapses, and electron microscopy revealed staining at both presynaptic terminals and PSDs. In primary brain cell cultures the antisera were also neuron-specific but the antigens were distributed throughout the entire neuronal plasma membrane, suggesting that some restrictive influence present in whole tissue is absent when neurons are grown dispersed. The antigenic proteins with which these antisera react were identified using SDS gel immunoblots. SPM and PSD differed from one another in their characteristic antigenic proteins. Comparison with amido-black stained gel blots showed that in both cases most of these did not correspond to known abundant proteins of SPM or PSDs revealed by conventional biochemical techniques. None of the antigens revealed by the polyclonal antisera were detected by any of a large series of monoclonal antibodies against SPM. PMID:6368568

  17. Antibody engineering and therapeutics, The Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society: December 8-12, 2013, Huntington Beach, CA.

    PubMed

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul W H I; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates.

  18. Detection of acute inflammation with /sup 111/In-labeled nonspecific polyclonal IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, A.J.; Rubin, R.H.; Khaw, B.A.; Callahan, R.J.; Wilkinson, R.; Keech, F.; Nedelman, M.; Dragotakes, S.; Kramer, P.B.; LaMuraglia, G.M.

    1988-10-01

    The detection of focal sites of inflammation is an integral part of the clinical evaluation of the febrile patient. When anatomically distinct abscesses are present, lesion detection can be accomplished by standard radiographic techniques, particularly in patients with normal anatomy. At the phlegmon stage, however, and in patients who have undergone surgery, these techniques are considerably less effective. While radionuclide methods, such as Gallium-67 (67Ga)-citrate and Indium-111 (111In)-labeled WBCs have been relatively successful for the detection of early inflammation, neither approach is ideal. In the course of studies addressing the use of specific organism-directed antibodies for imaging experimental infections in animals, we observed that nonspecific polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) localized as well as specific antibodies. Preliminary experiments suggested that the Fc portion of IgG is necessary for effective inflammation localization. Since polyclonal IgG in gram quantities has been safely used for therapy in patients with immune deficiency states, we decided to test whether milligram quantities of radiolabeled IgG could image focal sites of inflammation in humans. Thus far, we have studied a series of 84 patients with suspected lesions in the abdomen, pelvis, vascular grafts, lungs, or bones/joints. In 48 of 52 patients with focal lesions detected by surgery, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound (US), the IgG scan correctly localized the site, while 31 patients without focal inflammation had no abnormal focal localization of the radiopharmaceutical. Four patients had false negative scans and one patient had a false positive scan. For this small series, the overall sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 95%, respectively. In this report, we review our experience with this exciting new agent.

  19. Phosphorylcholine on isologous red blood cells induces polyclonal but not anti-phosphorylcholine plaque-forming cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, E; Bach, M A; Levitt, D

    1984-07-01

    It has been demonstrated in the preceding report (Bach, M. A., Beckmann, E. and Levitt, D., Eur. J. Immunol. 1984. 14: 589) that phosphorylcholine (PC) on the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae R36a stimulated polyclonal as well as anti-PC plaque-forming cells (PFC) in mouse spleen in vivo. In this study, red blood cells from BALB/c mice (MRBC) were either conjugated with PC, 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl (TNP) or treated with phospholipase A2 (PLA2) to expose PC on the cell membrane (determined by hemagglutination with the anti-PC myeloma HOPC8). When BALB/c mice were immunized i.v. with the conjugated or enzyme-treated MRBC, a significant polyclonal antibody response occurred (p less than 0.05) using PC-MRBC or PLA2-treated MRBC, but not with TNP-MRBC or sham-treated MRBC. No anti-PC or anti-MRBC immunoglobulin-secreting cells developed after immunization. Repeated immunization with PC-MRBC resulted in similar levels of protein A PFC after each immunization but no anti-PC, anti-MRBC or anti-PC-MRBC PFC. Thus, PC on R36a or isologous RBC stimulated increased numbers of splenic plaque-forming cells. In the case of R36a, 10-25% of these PFC produced antibodies directed towards PC. In contrast, PC-MRBC or PLA2-treated MRBC, failed to evoke any anti-PC antibody responses.

  20. Polyclonal activation of rat splenic lymphocytes after in vivo administration of Mycoplasma pulmonis and its relation to in vitro response.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, J S; Davis, J K; Cassell, G H

    1986-01-01

    The plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) sensitized with different antigens and a 4-h tritiated thymidine pulse assay were used to determine whether polyclonal activation occurs in rats following in vivo administration of Mycoplasma pulmonis. Injection of M. pulmonis into F344 rats resulted in an increase in the number of splenic immunoglobulin M-secreting PFC that produced antibodies reactive with the trinitrophenyl hapten and with SRBC. This polyclonal response reached a peak by 72 h after injection and returned to normal levels by 96 h, at which time the specific response to M. pulmonis reached its peak. Heat treatment and preopsonization of M. pulmonis with antiserum before injection resulted in reduced numbers of PFC against M. pulmonis-sensitized SRBC, trinitrophenyl hapten-sensitized SRBC, and SRBC. The number of PFC against the three types of target cells also increased in LEW rats after immunization with M. pulmonis. The number of PFC against SRBC and staphylococcal protein A-sensitized SRBC was higher in immunized LEW rats than in immunized F344 rats. Examination of unimmunized animals also revealed that LEW rats had higher initial numbers of PFC than did F344 rats. These results showed that polyclonal activation occurs in rats following in vivo administration of M. pulmonis and that LEW rats have an inherent propensity to develop higher nonspecific responses in vivo than F344 rats. PMID:3486159

  1. Monoclonal versus polyclonal anti-D in the treatment of ITP.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Alan H

    2013-10-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder caused by low numbers of platelets generally due to the production of anti-platelet antibodies. One effective treatment for ITP patients who express the RhD antigen on their red blood cells has been the use of blood donor-derived pooled polyclonal anti-D. Although anti-D has served us well, it needs to be replaced with a recombinant product. While the mechanism of action of anti-D in ITP remains highly speculative, this has not thwarted attempts to replace anti-D with a monoclonal product. Although a single attempt at a monoclonal antibody was not successful in the 1990s for the treatment of ITP, more recent efforts in mouse models of ITP and ITP patients now show that monoclonal antibodies can be successful in ITP. These studies also finally help substantiate the concept that it is unlikely that contaminants in the original donor-derived preparations mediate the major ameliorative activity of anti-D in ITP. PMID:23919777

  2. Specificity of a Polyclonal Fecal Elastase ELISA for CELA3

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Christoph; Lerch, Markus M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Elastase is a proteolytic pancreatic enzyme that passes through the gastrointestinal tract undergoing only limited degradation. ELISA tests to determine stool elastase concentrations have therefore been developed for the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Five different isoforms of pancreatic elastase (CELA1, CELA2A, CELA2B, CELA3A, CELA3B) are encoded in the human genome. We have investigated three different polyclonal antisera that are used in a commercial fecal elastase ELISA to determine their specificity for different pancreatic elastase isoforms. Material and Methods Different polyclonal rabbit antisera against human elastase peptides (BIOSERV Diagnostics GmbH, Germany) were tested by Western blot analysis of human pancreatic juice, in HEK-293 cells expressing Elastase constructs, and in the protein content of porcine pancreatin, used for treatment of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Results In human pancreatic juice the polyclonal antisera detected proteins at the corresponding size of human pancreatic elastase isoforms (~29kDa). Transiently expressed GFP fusion protein of elastase isoform CELA3A (CELA3A-GFP), but not CELA2A (CELA2A-GFP) could be precipitated from HEK-293 cell lysates with the elastase antisera. We detected no cross-reactivity with elastases in the porcine pancreatic extracts (pancreatin) used for enzyme replacement therapy. Conclusion The polyclonal antisera used in a commercial fecal elastase ELISA are specific for the human pancreatic elastase isoform CELA3 and do not cross-react with elastase contained in pig pancreatin. While pancreatic elastase 1 (CELA1) is not expressed in the adult human pancreas, possible differences between the other isoforms regarding their cellular expression, pathophysiological role and relevance in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency deserve further investigation. PMID:27459204

  3. Murine Visceral Leishmaniasis: IgM and Polyclonal B-Cell Activation Lead to Disease Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Deak, Eszter; Jayakumar, Asha; Wing Cho, Ka; Goldsmith-Pestana, Karen; Dondji, Blaise; Lambris, John D.; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2010-01-01

    In visceral leishmaniasis, the draining lymph node (DLN) is the initial site for colonization and establishment of infection after intradermal transmission by the sand fly vector; however, little is known about the developing immune response within this site. Using an intradermal infection model, which allows for parasite visceralization, we have examined the ongoing immune responses in the DLN of BALB/c mice infected with L. infantum. Although not unexpected, at early times post-infection there is a marked B cell expansion in the DLN, which persists throughout infection. However, the characteristics of this response were of interest; as early as day 7 post-infection, polyclonal antibodies (TNP, OVA, chromatin) were observed and the levels appeared comparable to the specific anti-leishmania response. Although B-cell-deficient JHD BALB/c mice are relatively resistant to infection, neither B-cell-derived IL-10 nor B-cell antigen presentation appear to be primarily responsible for the elevated parasitemia. However, passive transfer and reconstitution of JHD BALB/c with secretory immunoglobulins, (IgM or IgG; specific or non-specific immune complexes) results in increased susceptibility to L. infantum infection. Further, JHD BALB/c mice transgenetically reconstituted to secrete IgM demonstrated exacerbated disease in comparison to wild type BALB/c mice as early as 2 days post-infection. Evidence suggests that complement activation (generation of C5a) and signaling via the C5aR (CD88) is related to the disease exacerbation caused by IgM rather than cytokine levels (IL-10 or IFN-γ). Overall these studies indicate that polyclonal B cell activation, which is known to be associated with human visceral leishmaniasis, is an early and intrinsic characteristic of disease and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:20213734

  4. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to the macrocyclic trichothecene roridin A.

    PubMed

    Hack, R; Märtlbauer, E; Terplan, G

    1988-09-01

    Two murine monoclonal antibodies to the macrocyclic trichothecene roridin A are described. Screening for antibody production was performed on absorbed anti-mouse immunoglobulin serum as double-antibody solid phase, and further characterization was done on affinity-purified anti-mouse IgG serum. The antibodies, designated 5G11 and 4H10, had affinity constants for roridin A of 9.25 X 10(7) and 1.7 X 10(7) liters/mol, respectively. In monoclonal antibody-based direct enzyme immunoassays, these IgG1 antibodies had detection limits for roridin A of 0.4 ng/ml (0.02 ng per assay) and 1.8 ng/ml (0.09 ng per assay), respectively. Both antibodies were most specific for the tested macrocyclic trichothecenes. The relative cross-reactivities of antibody 5G11 with roridin A, roridin J, verrucarin A, satratoxin G, and satratoxin H were 100.0, 43.8, 16.7, 3.7, and 18.9%, respectively; for antibody 4H10 they were 100.0, 6.3, 64.0, 4.4, and 4.9%, respectively.

  5. Class-specific effector functions of therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Virginie; Laffleur, Brice; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Physiology usually combines polyclonal antibodies of multiple classes in a single humoral response. Beyond their common ability to bind antigens, these various classes of human immunoglobulins carry specific functions which can each serve specific goals. In many cases, the function of a monoclonal therapeutic antibody may thus be modulated according to the class of its constant domains. Depending on the immunoglobulin class, different functional assays will be used in order to evaluate the functional activity of a monoclonal antibody.

  6. Characterization of rabbit polyclonal sera against recombinant Shiga toxin and its subunits for detection of Stx-producing E. coli.

    PubMed

    Oloomi, Mana; Bouzari, Saeid

    2011-03-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the principal virulence factor of Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC), a food-born pathogen associated disease with uncomplicated diarrhea or the hemolytic-uremic syndrome. In this study, rabbit polyclonal anti recombinant A, B subunits of Shiga toxin and holotoxin antisera were raised and employed for immunological purpose. By immunoblotting, these antisera recognized respective subunit and the holotoxin antiserum recognized both subunits, equally. The raised antisera could also neutralize the cytotoxicity of the shiga toxin on vero cells. The neutralizing ability of the prepared sera was compared for different subunits. The neutralization of toxicity was observed by incubation of raised sera with the rStx or Shiga toxin from wild type strains. The inhibition of cell toxicity was shown by anti-A, anit-B and anti-AB antisera, separately. It was shown that anti-A antibody, more significantly recognized Stx producing strains, comparing to anti-B antibody. These sera from immunized rabbits were also used as specific antibodies in Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA) for detection of Shiga toxin. It was demonstrated that the raised antibodies especially antibody against A subunit could be a useful tool for immunological diagnosis of STEC induced infection.

  7. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  8. The mechanisms of action of intravenous immunoglobulin and polyclonal anti-d immunoglobulin in the amelioration of immune thrombocytopenic purpura: what do we really know?

    PubMed

    Crow, Andrew R; Lazarus, Alan H

    2008-04-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been used for more than 25 years to treat an ever-increasing number of autoimmune diseases including immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Although the exact mechanism of action of IVIg has remained elusive, many theories have been postulated, including mononuclear phagocytic system blockade/inhibition, autoantibody neutralization by anti-idiotype antibodies, pathogenic autoantibody clearance due to competitive inhibition of the neonatal immunoglobulin Fc receptor, cytokine modulation, complement neutralization, and immune complex formation leading to dendritic cell priming. Polyclonal anti-D immunoglobulin is a polyclonal IVIg product enriched for antibodies directed to the RhD antigen on red blood cells and that has also been successfully used to treat immune thrombocytopenia in RhD(+) patients. The primary theory to explain polyclonal anti-D immunoglobulin function has classically been mononuclear phagocytic system blockade, although modulation of Fcgamma receptor expression and/or immunomodulation may also play a role. Work using a murine model of immune thrombocytopenic purpura to further our understanding of the mechanism of action of these 2 therapeutic agents is a focus of this article.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi cytosolic alkaline antigens (FI) induce polyclonal activation in murine normal B cells.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Vottero-Cima, E; Gruppi, A

    1996-08-01

    Several reports have described polyclonal activation in mice acutely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this work was to analyse the participation of one T. cruzi antigenic fraction in this immunological event. The antigen selected was FI, an antigenic fraction of pI 7-9 obtained from T. cruzi cytosol separated by isoelectricfocusing. FI is constituted by molecules with molecular weights of around 60 and 20 KDa. The authors assayed the ability of this antigenic fraction to induce polyclonal activation of spleen mononuclear cells from normal (NSMC) BALB/c mice. NSMC showed a marked lymphoproliferative response measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation after 3 days of culture in presence of FI. The values reached by FI-stimulated cells were 10 times higher than the controls (non-stimulated cells). This effect was dose-dependent. Furthermore, the authors observed that a purified T-cell population in the presence of adherent cells was unaffected by FI. Additionally, in a culture of NSMC, FI stimulated the proliferation of B cells as observed by the increase of the percentage of B220+ cells determined by FACS using FITC-conjugated anti-mouse B220. The authors noticed that the percentage of B220+Ly1+(CD5) populations in the presence of FI did not change with respect to the control (non-stimulated cells), indicating that FI expanded both conventional and CD5+ B cells. The isotypic pattern of the antibodies produced after 6 days of culture of NSMC in the presence of FI was predominantly IgM, which reacted with highly conserved antigens such as actin, myosin, myoglobin, thyroglobulin and carbonic anhydrase, but did not react with FI. A slight increase of IgG1 and IgG3 with respect to the control was observed but no changes on the levels of IgG2 was noticed. These results indicate that FI promotes activation, proliferation and differentiation in antibody-secreting cells of normal murine B lymphocytes.

  10. Dissecting antibodies with regards to linear and conformational epitopes.

    PubMed

    Forsström, Björn; Axnäs, Barbara Bisławska; Rockberg, Johan; Danielsson, Hanna; Bohlin, Anna; Uhlen, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    An important issue for the performance and specificity of an antibody is the nature of the binding to its protein target, including if the recognition involves linear or conformational epitopes. Here, we dissect polyclonal sera by creating epitope-specific antibody fractions using a combination of epitope mapping and an affinity capture approach involving both synthesized peptides and recombinant protein fragments. This allowed us to study the relative amounts of antibodies to linear and conformational epitopes in the polyclonal sera as well as the ability of each antibody-fraction to detect its target protein in Western blot assays. The majority of the analyzed polyclonal sera were found to have most of the target-specific antibodies directed towards linear epitopes and these were in many cases giving Western blot bands of correct molecular weight. In contrast, many of the antibodies towards conformational epitopes did not bind their target proteins in the Western blot assays. The results from this work have given us insights regarding the nature of the antibody response generated by immunization with recombinant protein fragments and has demonstrated the advantage of using antibodies recognizing linear epitopes for immunoassay involving wholly or partially denatured protein targets. PMID:25816293

  11. [Antibody adsorption to tetrodotoxin-sensitive cytoplasmic proteins by murine neuroblastoma cells].

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, G V; Pinchuk, L N; Gerasimenko, O V

    1988-01-01

    The study was aimed to examine properties of polyclonal antibodies elicited after immunization by cytoplasmic nerve cell glycoproteins forming sodium channels in liposomes. It was shown that intact murine neuroblastoma cells can absorb these antibodies. Absorbing cell dose-effect curves were found to have a characteristic form able to shift when the cell culture time or serum concentration in the growth medium varied.

  12. Specific polyclonal antibodies to a mouse liver carcinogen-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, H.A.; Marletta, M.A.

    1987-05-01

    Previously they characterized a mouse liver cytosolic protein termed a carcinogen-binding protein (CBP) by virtue of its ability to reversibly bind polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with high affinity and saturability. Recently, the CBP was purified and found to be a single polypeptide of 29 kDa. A K/sub D/ of 2.7 +/- 0.7 nM was estimated for the pure protein. 2D-electrophoresis resolved the purified protein into six isoelectric variants labeled specifically by (/sup 3/H)-1-azidopyrene. Antisera were prepared from rabbits with a high titer as measured by ELISA. The sera is highly specific for the 29 kDa protein when analyzed by western blotting of both SDS and native acrylamide gels. Immunological screening provides an alternative to the limitations of the ligand-binding charcoal assay. The concentration of CBP is highest in liver followed by lung, kidney and heart which were approximately the same. Lower levels were found in intestine, testes, spleen, thymus and brain. Ligand-binding and immunological assays have identified the CBP in Ah responsive and non-responsive strains. Cross-reactivity studies with the rat and the rabbit are underway.

  13. Naturally Acquired HMW1- and HMW2-Specific Serum Antibodies in Adults and Children Mediate Opsonophagocytic Killing of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Linda E.

    2015-01-01

    The HMW1 and HMW2 proteins are highly immunogenic adhesins expressed by approximately 75% of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) strains, and HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies can mediate opsonophagocytic killing of NTHi. In this study, we assessed the ability of HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies in sera from healthy adults and convalescent-phase sera from children with NTHi otitis media to mediate killing of homologous and heterologous NTHi. The serum samples were examined pre- and postadsorption on HMW1 and HMW2 affinity columns, and affinity-purified antibodies were assessed for ability to mediate killing of homologous and heterologous strains. Adult serum samples mediated the killing of six prototype NTHi strains at titers of <1:10 to 1:1,280. HMW1- and HMW2-adsorbed sera demonstrated unchanged to 8-fold decreased opsonophagocytic titers against the homologous strains. Each affinity-purified antibody preparation mediated the killing of the respective homologous strain at titers of <1:10 to 1:320 and of the five heterologous strains at titers of <1:10 to 1:320, with most preparations killing most heterologous strains to some degree. None of the acute-phase serum samples from children mediated killing, but each convalescent-phase serum sample mediated killing of the infecting strain at titers of 1:40 to 1:640. HMW1- and HMW2-adsorbed convalescent-phase serum samples demonstrated ≥4-fold decreases in titer. Three of four affinity-purified antibody preparations mediated killing of the infecting strain at titers of 1:20 to 1:320, but no killing of representative heterologous strains was observed. HMW1- and HMW2-specific antibodies capable of mediating opsonophagocytic killing are present in the serum from normal adults and develop in convalescent-phase sera of children with NTHi otitis media. Continued investigation of the HMW1 and HMW2 proteins as potential vaccine candidates for the prevention of NTHi disease is warranted. PMID:26512048

  14. Potentiated antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kozlovskaya, L V; Mukhin, N A; Rameev, V V; Sarkisova, I A; Epstein, O I

    2003-01-01

    We studied the efficiency and safety of a new homeopathic preparation Artrofoon containing affinely purified antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Artrofoon produced a positive antiinflammatory effect on the course of rheumatoid arthritis. This preparation reduced the severity of arthralgia (indexes of Li and Ritchie) and morning stiffness and decreased the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and contents of rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein. One-month therapy improved the state of patients. Artrofoon was well tolerable. The preparation did not cause the ulcerogenic and nephrotoxic effects. Artrofoon holds much promise for combination therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (including severe articular-and-visceral forms) and complications after treatment with nonsteroid antiinflammatory preparations.

  15. Induction and detection of antibodies to squalene.

    PubMed

    Matyas, G R; Wassef, N M; Rao, M; Alving, C R

    2000-11-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing antigen coated on hydrophobic polyvinyldiene fluoride (PVDF) membranes is described for detecting antibodies that bind to squalene (SQE). Because of the prior lack of availability of validated antibodies to SQE, positive controls for the assay were made by immunization with formulations containing SQE to create monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that reacted with SQE. Among eight immunogens tested, only two induced detectable murine antibodies to SQE: liposomes containing dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine, dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol, 71% SQE, and lipid A [L(71% SQE+LA)], and, to a much lesser extent, an oil-in-water emulsion containing SQE, Tween 80, Span 85, and lipid A. In each case, lipid A served as an adjuvant, but neither SQE alone, SQE mixed with lipid A, liposomes containing 43% SQE and lipid A, nor several other emulsions containing both SQE and lipid A, induced antibodies that reacted with SQE. Monoclonal antibodies produced after immunizing mice with [L(71% SQE+LA)] served as positive controls for developing the ELISA. Monoclonal antibodies were produced that either recognized SQE alone but did not recognize squalane (SQA, the hydrogenated form of SQE), or that recognized both SQE and SQA. As found previously with other liposomal lipid antigens, liposomes containing lipid A also induced antibodies that reacted with the liposomal phospholipids. However, mAbs were also identified that reacted with SQE on PVDF membranes, but did not recognize either SQA or liposomal phospholipid. The polyclonal antiserum produced by immunizing mice with [L(71% SQE+LA)] therefore contained a mixed population of antibody specificities and, as expected, the ELISA of polyclonal antiserum with PVDF membranes detected antibodies both to SQE and SQA. We conclude that SQE is a weak antigen, but that antibodies that specifically bind to SQE can be readily induced by immunization with [L(71% SQE+LA)] and detected by ELISA with PVDF

  16. Clearance of pathological antibodies using biomimetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Jonathan A.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Luk, Brian T.; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Kang; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Pathological antibodies have been demonstrated to play a key role in type II immune hypersensitivity reactions, resulting in the destruction of healthy tissues and leading to considerable morbidity for the patient. Unfortunately, current treatments present significant iatrogenic risk while still falling short for many patients in achieving clinical remission. In the present work, we explored the capability of target cell membrane-coated nanoparticles to abrogate the effect of pathological antibodies in an effort to minimize disease burden, without the need for drug-based immune suppression. Inspired by antibody-driven pathology, we used intact RBC membranes stabilized by biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle cores to serve as an alternative target for pathological antibodies in an antibody-induced anemia disease model. Through both in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrated efficacy of RBC membrane-cloaked nanoparticles to bind and neutralize anti-RBC polyclonal IgG effectively, and thus preserve circulating RBCs. PMID:25197051

  17. Tc-99m polyclonal human immunoglobulin scintigraphy in brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Kadanali, A; Varoglu, E; Kerek, M; Tasyaran, M A

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of Tc-99m polyclonal human immunoglobulin (HIG) scintigraphy for the diagnosis of brucellosis, and to compare its effectiveness in the diagnosis of osteoarticular involvement in comparison with bone scanning. Of 30 patients with brucellosis, Tc-99m HIG detected osteoarticular involvement in 18 (60%) patients, in whom the sacroiliac joints were affected most commonly (n = 13; 72.2%), with statistically predominant bilateral involvement (p < 0.05). By bone scanning, the rate of osteoarticular involvement was 70% (21 of 30 patients), and the joints affected most commonly were sacroiliac (15 of 21 patients; 71.4%). Although bilateral involvement was observed mostly by bone scanning, there was no significant difference between the rate of bilateral and unilateral involvement. The anatomical distribution of osteoarticular complications, as detected by Tc-99m HIG and bone scintigraphy, did not differ significantly. With Tc-99m HIG, orchitis was detected in two patients and paravertebral abscess in one patient. Since bone scanning did not detect these soft tissue complications, Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy might be useful for the detection of both osteoarticular and soft tissue complications resulting from brucellosis.

  18. Suppression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by intravenously administered polyclonal immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Achiron, A; Mor, F; Margalit, R; Cohen, I R; Lider, O; Miron, S

    2000-11-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in Lewis rats either by active immunization with myelin basic protein (MBP) or by adoptive transfer using anti-MBP specific CD4(+)T cells. Treatment with human polyclonal immunoglobulins (IgG) effectively suppressed active EAE. Time-dependent experiments demonstrated that the effect of IgG was manifested only when treatment was given immediately after immunization; administration from day 7 after disease induction did not suppress the disease. In the adoptive transfer model of EAE, IgG had no effect in vivo. However, pretreatment in vitro of the antigen-specific T-cells with IgG inhibited their ability to mediate adoptive EAE, as it did in active EAE. Similarly, in vitro IgG pretreatment of the antigen-specific T-cells suppressed the proliferative response to MBP. Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter (FACS) analysis demonstrated the binding of IgG to activated T-cell lines that was inhibited by soluble Fc molecules. The differential effects of IgG on active EAE and on the adoptive transfer of EAE suggest that IgG in vivo can suppress disease by acting during the early phase of the immune response which involves naive T cells. The inhibition of T-cell proliferation and adoptive transfer of EAE by incubation of T cells in vitro appears to require higher concentrations of IgG than those obtained in vivo. PMID:11040073

  19. Type 1 diabetes immunotherapy using polyclonal regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Buckner, Jane H; Fitch, Mark; Gitelman, Stephen E; Gupta, Shipra; Hellerstein, Marc K; Herold, Kevan C; Lares, Angela; Lee, Michael R; Li, Kelvin; Liu, Weihong; Long, S Alice; Masiello, Lisa M; Nguyen, Vinh; Putnam, Amy L; Rieck, Mary; Sayre, Peter H; Tang, Qizhi

    2015-11-25

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be defective in the autoimmune disease setting. Thus, efforts to repair or replace Tregs in T1D may reverse autoimmunity and protect the remaining insulin-producing β cells. On the basis of this premise, a robust technique has been developed to isolate and expand Tregs from patients with T1D. The expanded Tregs retained their T cell receptor diversity and demonstrated enhanced functional activity. We report on a phase 1 trial to assess safety of Treg adoptive immunotherapy in T1D. Fourteen adult subjects with T1D, in four dosing cohorts, received ex vivo-expanded autologous CD4(+)CD127(lo/-)CD25(+) polyclonal Tregs (0.05 × 10(8) to 26 × 10(8) cells). A subset of the adoptively transferred Tregs was long-lived, with up to 25% of the peak level remaining in the circulation at 1 year after transfer. Immune studies showed transient increases in Tregs in recipients and retained a broad Treg FOXP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD127(lo) phenotype long-term. There were no infusion reactions or cell therapy-related high-grade adverse events. C-peptide levels persisted out to 2+ years after transfer in several individuals. These results support the development of a phase 2 trial to test efficacy of the Treg therapy. PMID:26606968

  20. Serum-neutralizing, non-precipitating, partially protective monoclonal IgA antibody against VSV-NJ

    SciTech Connect

    Englen, M.D.; Ristow, S.; Yilma, T.

    1986-03-05

    A BALB/c mouse hybridoma that secretes an isotype IgA kappa-antibody specific for the New Jersey serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-NJ) has been cloned. This antibody is serum-neutralizing yet fails to immunoprecipitate /sup 35/S-labeled G glycoprotein from virus-infected cell lysates. To determine if the antibody could protect mice from a lethal challenge dose of VSV-NJ, passive transfer experiments were performed with ascites fluid containing the IgA antibody. Mice given antibody IP or IV 24 hr before challenge all succumbed to progressive encephalitis, as did control mice. The only mice to survive were those given a virus preparation that had been preincubated with the ascites fluid for 1 hr at 37/sup 0/C. To characterize this antibody physically, Coomassie-stained polyacrylamide gels were prepared in which samples of affinity-purified antibody were prepared under reducing and non-reducing conditions. The results indicate that the molecule is composed of a disulfide bonded light-chain dimer and a disulfide bonded heavy-chain dimer.

  1. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  2. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease serotype asial viruses grown in the presence of polyclonal antisera in serology and nucleotide sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Manoj; Sanyal, A; Hemadri, D; Tosh, C; Mohapatra, J K; Bandyopadhyay, S K

    2004-09-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease viruses (FMDV) have a high rate of mutation and spontaneous mutants can be readily. isolated in the laboratory. In this study, plaque purified FMDV Asial vaccine strains (IND 63/72 and IND 491/97) were passaged in-vitro in Baby Hamster Kidney-21 cell monolayers in the presence of sub-neutralizing levels of antiviral polyclonal sera (APS), raised in guinea pigs against the purified and inactivated whole virus particles of IND 63/72, IND 491/97 and IND 13/01. After serial passages under selective immune pressure, the viruses starts growing in the presence of undiluted sera and showed certain characteristics like an increased resistance to neutralization by APS and reduction in plaque counts on titration in plaque assay. Cross-neutralization of these viruses with above-mentioned APS revealed selection of three complete and one partial polyclonal antibody resistant (PAR) viruses based on the 'r' value in micro neutralization test. Alterations were detected at several amino acid residues in the structural protein-coding P1 region. Many of the residues inferred to be positively selected sites in other serotypes of this virus were also prone to substitution under immune selection pressure in Asia1 virus. The present work extends the finding that selection exerted by host antibody also plays a major role in the rapid evolution of FMDV Asia1, as observed in other serotypes.

  3. A Trypanosoma cruzi alkaline antigen induces polyclonal B-cell activation of normal murine spleen cells by T-cell-independent, BCR-directed stimulation.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Zuñiga, E; Minoprio, P; Vottero-Cima, E; Gruppi, A

    1999-08-01

    We have previously reported that a cytosolic alkaline fraction (FI) obtained from epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi promotes the activation, proliferation and differentiation of normal murine B cells into antibody-secreting plasmocytes. Neither the mechanism nor the cells involved in the FI-induced polyclonal B-cell activation were established. In this work we report that accessory cells are required for FI-induced polyclonal B-cell activation as no proliferative responses were obtained following treatment of normal spleen mononuclear cells (NSMC) with L-leucine methyl ester. Furthermore, FI did not induce the expression of CD25 on T cells and it promoted the proliferation of a T-cell-depleted population, indicating that it acts in a T-independent manner. We observed that NSMC were stimulated in vitro by FI-released cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6 and IL-10, which are involved in B-cell proliferation and differentiation. Interestingly, while significant amounts of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were found in culture supernatants we did not observe detectable levels of IL-2. Additionally, we found that B-cell receptor (BCR) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens were involved in the proliferative response induced by FI because antibodies directed against cell-surface immunoglobulin M (IgM), CD45 and MHC class II molecules inhibited the FI-induced B-cell proliferation. CD40 ligand (CD40L) did not participate in such a phenomenon.

  4. Evaluation of the polyclonal ELISA HPV serology assay as a biomarker for HPV exposure

    PubMed Central

    Coseo, Sarah E.; Porras, Carolina; Dodd, Lori E.; Hildesheim, Allan; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Sherman, Mark E.; Jimenez, Silvia; Solomon, Diane; Bougelet, Catherine; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Quint, Wim; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2011-01-01

    Background Seropositivity to HPV16 and 18 antibodies is used as a measure of cumulative HPV exposure and as a stratifier of HPV exposure for vaccine efficacy analyses. Overall performance of these assays, as a measure of HPV exposure, has not been evaluated. Methods Using data from the enrollment phase of the HPV16/18 vaccine trial in Costa Rica, we evaluated the performance of the polyclonal ELISA HPV16 and 18 serological assays as a measure of HPV exposure. Biological (for eg. HPV infection at the cervix) and behavioral characteristics (for eg. lifetime number of sexual partners) with known associations with current and past HPV infection were used to define cases and controls (HPV exposed vs. not exposed). Pre-vaccination serum was measured for antibodies against HPV16 and HPV18 by ELISA; cervical samples were tested for HPV DNA using PCR SPF10/LiPA25. ELISA results were analyzed using receiver-operator-characteristic curves (ROC); performance was evaluated at the manufacturer set cutpoint (HPV16 =8, HPV18 =7) and at cutpoints chosen to optimize sensitivity and specificity (HPV16 =34, HPV18 =60). Results Defining cases as type-specific HPV DNA positive with high-grade abnormal cytolzogy (i.e. combined molecular and microscopic markers of infection), HPV16-ELISA gave sensitivity that was lower at the optimal cutpoint than the manufacturer cutpoint (62.2 compared with 75.7, respectively; p=0.44). However, specificity was higher (85.3 compared with 70.4, respectively; p<0.0001). Similarly, HPV18-ELISA gave sensitivity that was lower at the optimal cutpoint than the manufacturer cutpoint (34.5 compared with 51.7, respectively; p=0.40), with higher specificities (94.9 compared with 72.6, respectively; p<0.0001). Conclusions Modifying cutpoints did not improve the low sensitivity. The low sensitivity of this assay does not support its use for risk stratification or clinical settings. PMID:21934576

  5. Antibodies against the calcium-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Mei; Jensen, K.G.; Sjolund, R.D. ); Krause, K.H.; Campbell, K.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Plant microsomes contain a protein clearly related to a calcium-binding protein, calsequestrin, originally found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, responsible for the rapid release and uptake of Ca{sup 2+} within the cells. The location and role of calsequestrin in plant cells is unknown. To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to plant calsequestrin, mice were immunized with a microsomal fraction from cultured cells of Streptanthus tortuosus (Brassicaceae). Two clones cross-reacted with one protein band with a molecular weight equal to that of calsequestrin (57 kilodaltons) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. This band is able to bind {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} and can be recognized by a polyclonal antibody against the canine cardiac muscle calsequestrin. Rabbit skeletal muscle calsequestrin cross-reacted with the plant monoclonal antibodies. The plant monoclonal antibodies generated here are specific to calsequestrin protein.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies: their importance to surgeons.

    PubMed

    Estabrook, A; Mesa-Tejada, R

    1989-01-01

    A tremendous technological advance occurred in 1975 when a method was developed to fuse two cells producing a "hybridoma" which secretes a single clone of antibody, having one immunoglobulin (Ig) class, one structure, one affinity, and one specificity for an antigenic determinant. Because monoclonal antibodies are more precise reagents than conventional antisera they open new doors to diagnosis and therapy of disease, and they are useful tools in research. The pathologist uses monoclonals in immunocytochemistry to determine tumor type; the surgeon uses monoclonals for immunosuppression in renal transplantation; the immunologist uses monoclonals to decipher cellular and humoral interactions that could not be appreciated with polyclonal reagents. This review outlines the background of monoclonal antibodies and some of their clinically important uses, both in vitro and in vivo. We also project into the future and describe chimeric antibodies and their possible uses.

  7. Use of monoclonal antibodies in an ELISA to detect IgM class antibodies specific for Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Balfour, A H; Harford, J P; Goodall, M

    1987-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies CH6 and C1E3 were used in an antibody class capture assay for the detection of IgM antibodies specific for Toxoplasma gondii. CH6 was used on the solid phase to capture human IgM. After a Toxoplasma gondii antigen had been added, specifically bound material was detected using C1E3 coupled to horseradish peroxidase. The assay was compared with an established system using polyclonal antisera at both the capture and antigen detection stages. A good correlation was found, with 97.3% (125 of 128) of sera giving the same classification in both assays. Three sera were positive only in the polyclonal system. No false positive results were found when 118 negative sera were examined. The two monoclonal antibodies provide a viable alternative to the use of polyclonal sera at the capture and antigen detection stages in the antibody class capture assay for the measurement of specific IgM against T gondii. PMID:3654986

  8. A highly functional synthetic phage display library containing over 40 billion human antibody clones.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marcel; Bujak, Emil; Putelli, Alessia; Villa, Alessandra; Matasci, Mattia; Gualandi, Laura; Hemmerle, Teresa; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Several synthetic antibody phage display libraries have been created and used for the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. The performance of antibody libraries, which is usually measured in terms of their ability to yield high-affinity binding specificities against target proteins of interest, depends both on technical aspects (such as library size and quality of cloning) and on design features (which influence the percentage of functional clones in the library and their ability to be used for practical applications). Here, we describe the design, construction and characterization of a combinatorial phage display library, comprising over 40 billion human antibody clones in single-chain fragment variable (scFv) format. The library was designed with the aim to obtain highly stable antibody clones, which can be affinity-purified on protein A supports, even when used in scFv format. The library was found to be highly functional, as >90% of randomly selected clones expressed the corresponding antibody. When selected against more than 15 antigens from various sources, the library always yielded specific and potent binders, at a higher frequency compared to previous antibody libraries. To demonstrate library performance in practical biomedical research projects, we isolated the human antibody G5, which reacts both against human and murine forms of the alternatively spliced BCD segment of tenascin-C, an extracellular matrix component frequently over-expressed in cancer and in chronic inflammation. The new library represents a useful source of binding specificities, both for academic research and for the development of antibody-based therapeutics.

  9. A Highly Functional Synthetic Phage Display Library Containing over 40 Billion Human Antibody Clones

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Marcel; Bujak, Emil; Putelli, Alessia; Villa, Alessandra; Matasci, Mattia; Gualandi, Laura; Hemmerle, Teresa; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Several synthetic antibody phage display libraries have been created and used for the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. The performance of antibody libraries, which is usually measured in terms of their ability to yield high-affinity binding specificities against target proteins of interest, depends both on technical aspects (such as library size and quality of cloning) and on design features (which influence the percentage of functional clones in the library and their ability to be used for practical applications). Here, we describe the design, construction and characterization of a combinatorial phage display library, comprising over 40 billion human antibody clones in single-chain fragment variable (scFv) format. The library was designed with the aim to obtain highly stable antibody clones, which can be affinity-purified on protein A supports, even when used in scFv format. The library was found to be highly functional, as >90% of randomly selected clones expressed the corresponding antibody. When selected against more than 15 antigens from various sources, the library always yielded specific and potent binders, at a higher frequency compared to previous antibody libraries. To demonstrate library performance in practical biomedical research projects, we isolated the human antibody G5, which reacts both against human and murine forms of the alternatively spliced BCD segment of tenascin-C, an extracellular matrix component frequently over-expressed in cancer and in chronic inflammation. The new library represents a useful source of binding specificities, both for academic research and for the development of antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:24950200

  10. Development and evaluation of an immunochromatographic strip for detection of Streptococcus suis type 2 antibody.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junxing; Jin, Meilin; Chen, Jianfeng; Yang, Ying; Zheng, Pei; Zhang, Anding; Song, Yunfeng; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Huanchun

    2007-07-01

    In this study, an immunochromatographic strip (ICS) was developed for the detection of antibody against Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2). Colloidal gold particles labeled with staphylococcal protein A (SPA), which can bind to the F(C) fragment of mammalian immunoglobulin, were used as the detector reagent. The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of SS2 and affinity-purified IgG from a healthy naive pig were immobilized on test and control regions of a nitrocellulose membrane, respectively. The ICS was used to 1) detect anti-CPS antibody in 14 sera taken from 4 SS2-infected pigs, 24 sera from pigs hyperimmunized with SS2, and 68 sera from pigs inoculated or infected with bacteria other than SS2; 2) determine anti-CPS antibody titers of 20 positive sera for comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); and 3) detect anti-CPS antibody in 226 clinical sera taken from diseased pigs also for comparison with ELISA. An ELISA used as a reference test determined the specificity and sensitivity of the ICS to be 97.1% and 86.3%, respectively. There was excellent agreement between the results obtained by ELISA and the ICS (kappa = 0.843). Additionally, there was strong agreement between the results of bacterial isolation from pig tonsils and ICS test (kappa = 0.658). Because it is rapid and easy to use, the test is suitable for the serological surveillance of SS2 at farms. PMID:17609343

  11. How to assess the binding strength of antibodies elicited by vaccination against HIV and other viruses

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vaccines that protect against viral infections generally induce neutralizing antibodies. When vaccines are evaluated, the need arises to assess the affinity maturation of the antibody responses. Binding titers of polyclonal sera depend not only on the affinities of the constituent antibodies but also on their individual concentrations, which are difficult to ascertain. Therefore an assay based on chaotrope disruption of antibody-antigen complexes was designed for measuring binding strength. This assay works well with many viral antigens but gives differential results depending on the conformational dependence of epitopes on complex antigens such as the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1. Kinetic binding assays might offer alternatives, since they can measure average off-rate constants for polyclonal antibodies in a serum. Here, potentials and fallacies of these techniques are discussed. PMID:26641943

  12. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Alistair P.; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites. PMID:26252765

  13. Characterization of affinity-purified isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively.

  14. Proteomic profiling of tandem affinity purified 14-3-3 protein complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ing-Feng; Curran, Amy; Woolsey, Rebekah; Quilici, David; Cushman, John C; Mittler, Ron; Harmon, Alice; Harper, Jeffrey F

    2009-06-01

    In eukaryotes, 14-3-3 dimers regulate hundreds of functionally diverse proteins (clients), typically in phosphorylation-dependent interactions. To uncover new clients, 14-3-3 omega (At1g78300) from Arabidopsis was engineered with a "tandem affinity purification" tag and expressed in transgenic plants. Purified complexes were analyzed by tandem MS. Results indicate that 14-3-3 omega can dimerize with at least 10 of the 12 14-3-3 isoforms expressed in Arabidopsis. The identification here of 121 putative clients provides support for in vivo 14-3-3 interactions with a diverse array of proteins, including those involved in: (i) Ion transport, such as a K(+) channel (GORK), a Cl(-) channel (CLCg), Ca(2+) channels belonging to the glutamate receptor family (1.2, 2.1, 2.9, 3.4, 3.7); (ii) hormone signaling, such as ACC synthase (isoforms ACS-6, -7 and -8 involved in ethylene synthesis) and the brassinolide receptors BRI1 and BAK1; (iii) transcription, such as 7 WRKY family transcription factors; (iv) metabolism, such as phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase; and (v) lipid signaling, such as phospholipase D (beta and gamma). More than 80% (101) of these putative clients represent previously unidentified 14-3-3 interactors. These results raise the number of putative 14-3-3 clients identified in plants to over 300.

  15. Deconvolution of antibody affinities and concentrations by non-linear regression analysis of competitive ELISA data.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Bobrovnik, S. A.; Biosciences Division; Palladin Inst. Biochemistry

    2007-12-01

    Physiological responses of the adaptive immune system are polyclonal in nature whether induced by a naturally occurring infection, by vaccination to prevent infection or, in the case of animals, by challenge with antigen to generate reagents of research or commercial significance. The composition of the polyclonal responses is distinct to each individual or animal and changes over time. Differences exist in the affinities of the constituents and their relative proportion of the responsive population. In addition, some of the antibodies bind to different sites on the antigen, whereas other pairs of antibodies are sterically restricted from concurrent interaction with the antigen. Even if generation of a monoclonal antibody is the ultimate goal of a project, the quality of the resulting reagent is ultimately related to the characteristics of the initial immune response. It is probably impossible to quantitatively parse the composition of a polyclonal response to antigen. However, molecular regression allows further parameterization of a polyclonal antiserum in the context of certain simplifying assumptions. The antiserum is described as consisting of two competing populations of high- and low-affinity and unknown relative proportions. This simple model allows the quantitative determination of representative affinities and proportions. These parameters may be of use in evaluating responses to vaccines, to evaluating continuity of antibody production whether in vaccine recipients or animals used for the production of antisera, or in optimizing selection of donors for the production of monoclonal antibodies.

  16. Do antibodies to myelin basic protein isolated from multiple sclerosis cross-react with measles and other common virus antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, C C; Townsend, E; Randell, V B; Williamson, H G

    1983-01-01

    Immunological activity to various antigens, including brain components, measles and other viruses, has been associated with IgG in multiple sclerosis (MS). One possible explanation for the presence of anti-viral antibodies and antibody to myelin basic protein (MBP) in MS patients is that there are antigenic determinants common to certain viruses and MBP. To assess this possibility, IgG from individual brains and sera from patients with MS, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and controls was isolated by protein A and MBP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Antibody to MBP was measured with a solid phase radioimmunoassay and antibody to measles and other viruses by immunofluorescence and/or complement fixation. Anti-MBP activity was detected in brain extracts and sera of all MS patients tested. In contrast to the low levels of antibody to MBP in control brains, high levels of anti-MBP antibodies were found in most of the normal sera. There was no correlation between the presence and levels of serum anti-measles antibodies and the anti-MBP activity. None of the anti-MBP antibodies affinity purified from brain and serum of MS patients reacted with any of the viruses tested, including measles. IgG purified from SSPE patients or from a rabbit hyperimmunized with measles antigen had no reactivity to MBP, despite high levels of anti-measles antibody. It is concluded that there is not direct link between the presence of antibody to MBP and antibody to measles and other viruses in MS patients. PMID:6190599

  17. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric P.; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E.; Chan, Ying N.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. PMID:26078040

  18. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain.

  19. Rapid Screening for Potential Epitopes Reactive with a Polycolonal Antibody by Solution-Phase H/D Exchange Monitored by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Noble, Kyle A.; Mao, Yuan; Young, Nicolas L.; Sathe, Shridhar K.; Roux, Kenneth H.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-07-01

    The potential epitopes of a recombinant food allergen protein, cashew Ana o 2, reactive to polyclonal antibodies, were mapped by solution-phase amide backbone H/D exchange (HDX) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Ana o 2 polyclonal antibodies were purified in the serum from a goat immunized with cashew nut extract. Antibodies were incubated with recombinant Ana o 2 (rAna o 2) to form antigen:polyclonal antibody (Ag:pAb) complexes. Complexed and uncomplexed (free) rAna o 2 were then subjected to HDX-MS analysis. Four regions protected from H/D exchange upon pAb binding are identified as potential epitopes and mapped onto a homologous model.

  20. Antiribonucleoprotein antibodies in children with HIV infection: a comparative study with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    González, C M; López-Longo, F J; Samson, J; Monteagudo, I; Grau, R; Rodríguez-Mahou, M; St-Cyr, C; Lapointe, N; Carreño, L

    1998-01-01

    A number of clinical and laboratory features of HIV infection are found in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of this study was to analyze the presence of circulating antibodies to small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNP) in both diseases. Sera from 44 HIV-infected children, from 22 patients with childhood-onset SLE, and from 50 healthy children were studied. Anti-snRNP antibodies were detected by ELISA using recombinant and affinity-purified nuclear antigens, by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE), and by immunoblotting using extractable nuclear antigens. Results included the detection of anti-snRNP antibodies by ELISA in 30 HIV-infected patients (68.1%) and 19 SLE patients (86.3%). These antibodies were directed against U1-RNP (61.3% and 77.2%, respectively), Sm (29.5% and 54.5%, respectively), 60 kDa Ro/SS-A (47.7% and 50%, respectively), and La/SS-B proteins (18.1% and 9%, respectively). None of the HIV-infected children and 11 SLE patients (50%) showed anti-snRNP antibodies by CIE. None of the HIV-infected patients showed anti-70 kDa U1-RNP or anti-D-Sm antibodies by immunoblotting. No differences between the two groups were noted on the presence of nonprecipitating anti-snRNP antibodies. No such reactivities were observed among the normal sera tested. The authors concluded that nonprecipitating anti-snRNP antibodies in HIV-infected children are as frequent as in childhood-onset SLE. The significance of these antibodies is not clear at present. Although polyreactive and low-affinity antibodies and a mechanism of molecular mimicry may explain these results, a specific stimulation of B cells by nuclear antigens could not be excluded.

  1. The expanding role of therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Simonetta; Markovic, Milica; Martini, Gabriella; D'Amelio, Raffaele

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have been used since the end of nineteenth century, but their use is progressively increased and recently, with the availability of monoclonal antibodies, they are successfully employed in a large disease spectrum, which transversally covers different fields of medicine. Hyperimmune polyclonal immune globulin has been used against infectious diseases, in a period in which anti-microbial drugs were not yet available, and it still maintains a relevant place in prophylaxis/therapy. Although immune globulin should be considered life-saving as replacement therapy in humoral immunodeficiencies, its place in the immune-modulating treatment is not usually first-choice, but it should be considered as support to standard approved treatments. Despite therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been lastly introduced in therapy, their extreme potentiality is reflected by the large number of approved molecules, addressed toward different immunological targets and able to heavily influence the prognosis and quality of life of a wide range of different diseases.

  2. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  3. Microinjection of fos-specific antibodies blocks DNA synthesis in fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Riabowol, K.T.; Vosatka, R.J.; Ziff, E.B.; Lamb, N.J.; Feramisco, J.R.

    1988-04-01

    Transcription of the protooncogene c-fos is increased >10-fold within minutes of treatment of fibroblasts with serum or purified growth factors. Recent experiments with mouse 3T3 cell lines containing inducible fos antisense RNA constructs have shown that induced fos antisense RNA transcripts cause either a marked inhibition of growth in continuously proliferating cells or, conversely, a minimal effect except during the transition from a quiescent (G/sub o/) state into the cell cycle. Since intracellular production of large amounts of antisense RNA does not completely block gene expression, the authors microinjected affinity-purified antibodies raised against fos to determine whether and when during the cell cycle c-fos expression was required for cell proliferation. Using this independent method, they found that microinjected fos antibodies efficiently blocked serum-stimulated DNA synthesis when injected up to 6 to 8 h after serum stimulation of quiescent REF-52 fibroblasts. Furthermore, when fos antibodies were injected into asynchronously growing cells, a consistently greater number of cells was prevented from synthesizing DNA than when cells were injected with nonspecific immunoglobulins. Thus, whereas the activity of c-fos may be necessary for transition of fibroblasts from G/sub o/ to G/sub 1/ of the cell cycle, its function is also required during the early G/sub 1/ portion of the cell cycle to allow subsequent DNA synthesis.

  4. Structure of the Malaria Antigen AMA1 in Complex with a Growth-Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Kim, Hanna; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2007-01-01

    Identifying functionally critical regions of the malaria antigen AMA1 (apical membrane antigen 1) is necessary to understand the significance of the polymorphisms within this antigen for vaccine development. The crystal structure of AMA1 in complex with the Fab fragment of inhibitory monoclonal antibody 1F9 reveals that 1F9 binds to the AMA1 solvent-exposed hydrophobic trough, confirming its importance. 1F9 uses the heavy and light chain complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) to wrap around the polymorphic loops adjacent to the trough, but uses a ridge of framework residues to bind to the hydrophobic trough. The resulting 1F9-AMA1–combined buried surface of 2,470 Å2 is considerably larger than previously reported Fab–antigen interfaces. Mutations of polymorphic AMA1 residues within the 1F9 epitope disrupt 1F9 binding and dramatically reduce the binding of affinity-purified human antibodies. Moreover, 1F9 binding to AMA1 is competed by naturally acquired human antibodies, confirming that the 1F9 epitope is a frequent target of immunological attack. PMID:17907804

  5. The localization of indium-111-leukocytes, gallium-67-polyclonal IgG and other radioactive agents in acute focal inflammatory lesions.

    PubMed

    McAfee, J G; Gagne, G; Subramanian, G; Schneider, R F

    1991-11-01

    A variety of radioactive agents, injected directly intravenously have demonstrated foci of inflammation by gamma camera imaging, avoiding the in vitro preparation of labeled leukocytes. This study sought to find out if any of these agents mimicked the biodistribution in abscesses and non-target organs of labeled mixed leukocyte suspensions. Eight different agents were compared with 111In-oxine labeled leukocytes in an acute soft tissue E. coli abscess and an acute arthritic lesion in 24 dogs one day after intravenous administration. These included 67Ga-citrate, human and canine polyclonal immunoglobulin (IgG), rabbit anti-dog polyclonal IgG, serum albumin, monoclonal antibody TNT-1 F(ab')2 against nuclear antigens, 57Co-porphyrin and serum albumin nanocolloid. None of these agents achieved abscess concentrations approaching those obtained with labeled leukocytes, and their abscess/blood and abscess/muscle concentration ratios were considerably lower. No statistically significant differences were found between the different radiolabeled proteins evaluated. The abscess concentration of 99mTc-nanocolloid was much lower than that of other agents, and the results with the oldest agent, 67Ga-citrate, were disappointing in these acute experiments. PMID:1941149

  6. CD4 T cell epitope specificity determines follicular versus non-follicular helper differentiation in the polyclonal response to influenza infection or vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Knowlden, Zackery A. G.; Sant, Andrea J.

    2016-01-01

    Follicular helper T cells (Tfh) are essential for B cell production of high-affinity, class-switched antibodies. Much interest in Tfh development focuses on the priming environment of CD4 T cells. Here we explored the role that peptide specificity plays in the partitioning of the polyclonal CD4 T cell repertoire between Tfh and NonTfh lineages during the response to influenza. Surprisingly, we found that CD4 T cells specific for different epitopes exhibited distinct tendencies to segregate into Tfh or NonTfh. To alter the microenvironment and abundance, viral antigens were introduced as purified recombinant proteins in adjuvant as native proteins. Also, the most prototypical epitopes were expressed in a completely foreign protein. In many cases, the epitope-specific response patterns of Tfh vs. NonTfh persisted. The functional TcR avidity of only a subset of epitope-specific cells correlated with the tendency to drive a Tfh response. Thus, we conclude that in a polyclonal CD4 T cell repertoire, features of TcR-peptide:MHC class II complex have a strong deterministic influence on the ability of CD4 T cells to become a Tfh or a NonTfh. Our data is most consistent with at least 2 checkpoints of Tfh selection that include both TcR affinity and B cell presentation. PMID:27329272

  7. Development of antinuclear antibodies and a genetic linkage in pigs infected with porcine circovirus type 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives. Prominent nuclear immunohistochemical staining of a PCV-2 free porcine kidney cell line (PK-15) was detected with a rabbit polyclonal antibody produced against a conserved PCV2 Rep-protein peptide. This unexpected finding led us to retrospectively test sera from gnotobiotic pigs for the ...

  8. Interaction of periodate-oxidized target cells and cytolytic T lymphocytes: a model system of "polyclonal MHC recognition".

    PubMed

    Keren, Z; Berke, G

    1986-09-01

    In oxidation-dependent cytotoxicity (ODCC), cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) non-specifically recognize, bind to and lyse oxidized target cells (O-TC) but the precise mechanism whereby CTL react with O-TC is far from clear (Berke, G., Immunol. Rev. 1983. 72:5). Here we present evidence that CTL/O-TC interactions are blocked by aldehyde-reactive reagents such as hydroxylamine, adipic acid dihydrazide and thiocarbohydrazide and that preformed CTL/O-TC conjugates dissociate upon reduction with NaBH4, suggesting that active aldehyde groups of O-TC rather than intercellular Schiff bases are involved in the recognition and lysis of O-TC by CTL in ODCC. The aldehydes are bound to trypsin-sensitive, non-H-2 glycoproteins that appear to be different and unique in the three different target cell lines so far examined (EL4, L1210, R1.1). In view of these and previous findings we would like to suggest that in ODCC, active aldehydes react with adjacent major histocompatibility complex and perhaps other cell-surface molecules to create a multitude of modified conformations, responsible for the "polyclonal" (nonspecific) MHC recognition and lysis of O-TC by CTL, as well as for an altered pattern of H-2 antibody binding to O-TC. PMID:3019706

  9. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  11. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  12. Evaluation of commercial antibodies against human sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Talmont, Franck; Moulédous, Lionel

    2014-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1), also called endothelial differentiation gene 1, plays an important role in migration, proliferation, and survival of several types of cells including endothelial cells and lymphocytes and is involved in multiple sclerosis. Two commercial rabbit anti-S1P1 antibodies (polyclonal and monoclonal) were tested on CHO cells expressing S1P1 receptors fused to the green fluorescent protein at the C-terminal end and on Pichia pastoris and HEK cells expressing cmyc-tagged S1P1. Polyclonal antibodies did not give any signal by Western blot, immunofluorescence, and flow cytofluorometry. Monoclonal antibodies were able to reveal an unspecific band by Western blot performed on various cell types. Consequently, in our hands and using our protocols, we show that these antibodies did not specifically detect S1P1 receptors.

  13. Antibodies with specificity to native gp120 and neutralization activity against primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates elicited by immunization with oligomeric gp160.

    PubMed Central

    VanCott, T C; Mascola, J R; Kaminski, R W; Kalyanaraman, V; Hallberg, P L; Burnett, P R; Ulrich, J T; Rechtman, D J; Birx, D L

    1997-01-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccine candidates elicit high antibody binding titers with neutralizing activity against T-cell line-adapted but not primary HIV-1 isolates. Serum antibodies from these human vaccine recipients were also found to be preferentially directed to linear epitopes within gp120 that are poorly exposed on native gp120. Systemic immunization of rabbits with an affinity-purified oligomeric gp160 protein formulated with either Alhydrogel or monophosphoryl lipid A-containing adjuvants resulted in the induction of high-titered serum antibodies that preferentially bound epitopes exposed on native forms of gp120 and gp160, recognized a restricted number of linear epitopes, efficiently bound heterologous strains of monomeric gp120 and cell surface-expressed oligomeric gp120/gp41, and neutralized several strains of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1. Additionally, those immune sera with the highest oligomeric gp160 antibody binding titers had neutralizing activity against some primary HIV-1 isolates, using phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell targets. Induction of an antibody response preferentially reactive with natively folded gp120/gp160 was dependent on the tertiary structure of the HIV-1 envelope immunogen as well as its adjuvant formulation, route of administration, and number of immunizations administered. These studies demonstrate the capacity of a soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein vaccine to elicit an antibody response capable of neutralizing primary HIV-1 isolates. PMID:9151820

  14. Functional Production and Characterization of a Fibrin-Specific Single-Chain Antibody Fragment from Bacillus subtilis: Effects of Molecular Chaperones and a Wall-Bound Protease on Antibody Fragment Production

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sau-Ching; Yeung, Jonathan C.; Duan, Yanjun; Ye, Ruiqiong; Szarka, Steven J.; Habibi, Hamid R.; Wong, Sui-Lam

    2002-01-01

    To develop an ideal blood clot imaging and targeting agent, a single-chain antibody (SCA) fragment based on a fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody, MH-1, was constructed and produced via secretion from Bacillus subtilis. Through a systematic study involving a series of B. subtilis strains, insufficient intracellular and extracytoplasmic molecular chaperones and high sensitivity to wall-bound protease (WprA) were believed to be the major factors that lead to poor production of MH-1 SCA. Intracellular and extracytoplasmic molecular chaperones apparently act in a sequential manner. The combination of enhanced coproduction of both molecular chaperones and wprA inactivation leads to the development of an engineered B. subtilis strain, WB800HM[pEPP]. This strain allows secretory production of MH-1 SCA at a level of 10 to 15 mg/liter. In contrast, with WB700N (a seven-extracellular-protease-deficient strain) as the host, no MH-1 SCA could be detected in both secreted and cellular fractions. Secreted MH-1 SCA from WB800HM[pMH1, pEPP] could be affinity purified using a protein L matrix. It retains comparable affinity and specificity as the parental MH-1 monoclonal antibody. This expression system can potentially be applied to produce other single-chain antibody fragments, especially those with folding and protease sensitivity problems. PMID:12089002

  15. Biological cost of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli implicated in polyclonal infection.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Corvec, S; Guitton, C; Giraudeau, C; Le Gargasson, G; Espaze, E; Drugeon, H

    2007-07-01

    Polyclonal Escherichia coli strains were isolated in a transplanted patient who experienced successive septic shocks. Fluoroquinolone susceptible and resistant strains were corresponding to different PFGE fragment profiles. The gyrA S83L mutation was associated with a reduction in biological fitness. Resistant strain was selected by a long-term single use of ofloxacin.

  16. Biological cost of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli implicated in polyclonal infection.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Corvec, S; Guitton, C; Giraudeau, C; Le Gargasson, G; Espaze, E; Drugeon, H

    2007-07-01

    Polyclonal Escherichia coli strains were isolated in a transplanted patient who experienced successive septic shocks. Fluoroquinolone susceptible and resistant strains were corresponding to different PFGE fragment profiles. The gyrA S83L mutation was associated with a reduction in biological fitness. Resistant strain was selected by a long-term single use of ofloxacin. PMID:16884861

  17. A sensitive and specific ELISA using a monoclonal capture antibody for detection of Tamm-Horsfall urinary glycoprotein in serum.

    PubMed

    Hunt, J S; Peach, R J; Brünisholz, M C; Lynn, K L; McGiven, A R

    1986-07-11

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been established using Nunc polystyrene immunoplates coated with a monoclonal antibody to human Tamm-Horsfall urinary glycoprotein (THP) to detect and measure THP in human serum. Optimal reaction conditions for both the monoclonal capture antibody and the affinity-purified rabbit anti-human THP second antibody were established to produce standard curves which showed linearity between 20-90 ng/ml with a sensitivity of 2-3 ng/ml. The plate-to-plate standard curve mean coefficient of variation (CV) was 5.9 +/- 2.9% on assays performed on the same day while day to day mean CV was 13.3 +/- 2.4%. The specificity of the ELISA was demonstrated by inhibition of binding after preincubation of both urinary THP standards and serum with monoclonal anti-THP antibody. Sera from 195 blood donors tested by the ELISA had a mean concentration of THP antigenic determinants of 260 +/- 105 ng/ml. Results from three control sera run on all plates used in the survey showed mean CV less than 7.6% while no binding was observed with sera from an anephric patient.

  18. Occurrence of autoantibodies to intermediate filament proteins in human visceral leishmaniasis and their induction by experimental polyclonal B-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Böhme, M W; Evans, D A; Miles, M A; Holborow, E J

    1986-01-01

    Fifteen sera of patients with visceral leishmaniasis were investigated for the occurrence of autoantibodies. They were found in high incidence and titre, and with specificity to the intermediate filament (INFIL) proteins vimentin (12 out of 15 with a titre higher than 1:10) and keratin (9 out of 15 with a titre higher than 1:10) as well as to speckled anti-nuclear antigens (ANA). Additionally, supernatants of Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani cultures containing soluble parasite-derived antigens were mitogenic to cultures of mononuclear cells (MNC) obtained from healthy donors without specific antibodies to leishmanial antigens. The activation of MNC resulted in significant immunoglobulin production, some of which demonstrated autoantibody specificity to INFIL. The co-operation of monocytes, T cells and B cells was required in order to obtain maximal stimulation. The importance of polyclonal B-cell activation for the genesis and occurrence of autoantibodies in visceral leishmaniasis is discussed. PMID:3492440

  19. Identification, sequencing and expression of an integral membrane protein of the trans-Golgi network (TGN38).

    PubMed Central

    Luzio, J P; Brake, B; Banting, G; Howell, K E; Braghetta, P; Stanley, K K

    1990-01-01

    Organelle-specific integral membrane proteins were identified by a novel strategy which gives rise to monospecific antibodies to these proteins as well as to the cDNA clones encoding them. A cDNA expression library was screened with a polyclonal antiserum raised against Triton X-114-extracted organelle proteins and clones were then grouped using antibodies affinity-purified on individual fusion proteins. The identification, molecular cloning and sequencing are described of a type 1 membrane protein (TGN38) which is located specifically in the trans-Golgi network. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2204342

  20. Affinity immunoblotting - High resolution isoelectric focusing analysis of antibody clonotype distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knisley, Keith A.; Rodkey, L. Scott

    1986-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method is proposed for the analysis of specific antibody clonotype changes occurring during an immune response and for comparing multiple sera for antibody clonotype similarities. Polyclonal serum antibodies separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF) were analyzed by an affinity immunoblotting method using antigen-coated nitrocellulose membranes. Antibodies present on the surface of the acrylamide gels following IEF bind the antigen on the nitrocellulose when the coated nitrocellulose is laid over the gels. The technique has been used to analyze Ig clonotypes specific for five protein antigens and two carbohydrate antigens. Optimal antigen concentrations for coating the nitrocellulose membranes were found to range from 10-100 microgram/ml.

  1. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  2. Plant pharming of a full-sized, tumour-targeting antibody using different expression strategies.

    PubMed

    Villani, Maria Elena; Morgun, Bogdan; Brunetti, Patrizia; Marusic, Carla; Lombardi, Raffaele; Pisoni, Ivan; Bacci, Camilla; Desiderio, Angiola; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this work were to obtain a human antibody against the tumour-associated antigen tenascin-C (TNC) and to compare the yield and quality of plant-produced antibody in either stable transgenics or using a transient expression system. To this end, the characterization of a full-sized human immunoglobulin G (IgG) [monoclonal antibody H10 (mAb H10)], derived from a selected single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and produced in plants, is presented. The human mAb gene was engineered for plant expression, and Nicotiana tabacum transgenic lines expressing both heavy (HC) and light (LC) chain were obtained and evaluated for antibody expression levels, in vivo assembly and functionality. Affinity-purified H10 from transgenics (yield, 0.6-1.1 mg/kg fresh weight) revealed that more than 90% of HC was specifically degraded, leading to the formation of functional antigen-binding fragments (Fab). Consequently, H10 was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants through an Agrobacterium-mediated gene-transfer system. Moreover, the use of the p19 silencing suppressor gene from artichoke mottled crinkle virus raised antibody expression levels by an order of magnitude (yields of purified H10, 50-100 mg/kg fresh weight). Approximately 75% of purified protein consisted of full-sized antibody functionally binding to TNC (K(D) = 14 nm), and immunohistochemical analysis on tumour tissues revealed specific accumulation around tumour blood vessels. The data indicate that the purification yields of mAb H10, using a transient expression system boosted by the p19 silencing suppressor, are exceptionally high when compared with the results reported previously, providing a technique for the over-expression of anticancer mAbs by a rapid, cost-effective, molecular farming approach.

  3. Plant pharming of a full-sized, tumour-targeting antibody using different expression strategies.

    PubMed

    Villani, Maria Elena; Morgun, Bogdan; Brunetti, Patrizia; Marusic, Carla; Lombardi, Raffaele; Pisoni, Ivan; Bacci, Camilla; Desiderio, Angiola; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this work were to obtain a human antibody against the tumour-associated antigen tenascin-C (TNC) and to compare the yield and quality of plant-produced antibody in either stable transgenics or using a transient expression system. To this end, the characterization of a full-sized human immunoglobulin G (IgG) [monoclonal antibody H10 (mAb H10)], derived from a selected single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and produced in plants, is presented. The human mAb gene was engineered for plant expression, and Nicotiana tabacum transgenic lines expressing both heavy (HC) and light (LC) chain were obtained and evaluated for antibody expression levels, in vivo assembly and functionality. Affinity-purified H10 from transgenics (yield, 0.6-1.1 mg/kg fresh weight) revealed that more than 90% of HC was specifically degraded, leading to the formation of functional antigen-binding fragments (Fab). Consequently, H10 was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants through an Agrobacterium-mediated gene-transfer system. Moreover, the use of the p19 silencing suppressor gene from artichoke mottled crinkle virus raised antibody expression levels by an order of magnitude (yields of purified H10, 50-100 mg/kg fresh weight). Approximately 75% of purified protein consisted of full-sized antibody functionally binding to TNC (K(D) = 14 nm), and immunohistochemical analysis on tumour tissues revealed specific accumulation around tumour blood vessels. The data indicate that the purification yields of mAb H10, using a transient expression system boosted by the p19 silencing suppressor, are exceptionally high when compared with the results reported previously, providing a technique for the over-expression of anticancer mAbs by a rapid, cost-effective, molecular farming approach. PMID:18793269

  4. Feasibility studies of using the Catfish Immune System to produce monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, T.M.

    1987-03-01

    The objective of these studies was to determine the feasibility of using a teleost cell line to produce monoclonal antibodies. Studies were undertaken to demonstrate the production of a polyclonal response of channel catfish (Icatalurus punctatus) challenged with mycotoxins coupled to a protein carrier. Companion studies were also performed to induce a permanent cell line with catfish lymphocytes. Attempts to demonstrate a polyclonal response to haptenized mycotoxins were inconclusive. Tests to induce an immortal, permanent cell line with benzene and x-ray irradiated cells were also inconclusive. 3 refs., 13 tabs.

  5. Introduction to Antigen and Antibody Assays.

    PubMed

    Day, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Serological tests are used widely in veterinary practice; most often in the diagnosis of infectious disease. Such tests may be used to detect antigen from an infectious agent within a biological sample or to detect the presence of serum antibody specific for the pathogen as evidence of immunological exposure. These tests are all based on the fundamental principles of interaction between antigenic epitopes and antibodies of either the immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, IgA, or IgE classes. The relative concentration of specific antibody within a sample is traditionally determined by calculation of the titer of antibody. With few exceptions, the primary interaction between an antigen and antibody in vitro cannot be visualized and so serological tests generally employ a secondary indicator system based on the use of a polyclonal antiserum or monoclonal antibody. A range of such tests has been developed, but many in veterinary medicine are based on the principle of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, which is described in detail in this article. The interpretation of serological tests must be made carefully, taking into consideration the sensitivity and specificity of the test and the possible reasons for false-positive and false-negative outcomes. PMID:27154595

  6. Detection of antibodies to caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus using recombinant gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Rimstad, E; East, N; DeRock, E; Higgins, J; Pedersen, N C

    1994-01-01

    The coding sequences of the core proteins p17 and p28 of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into the plasmid expression vector p-GEX-2T. Both p17 and p28 were expressed as fusion proteins with glutathione S-transferase. The recombinant proteins were affinity purified from induced bacterial lysates using glutathione-agarose beads. The purified proteins were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibodies against CAEV in goat sera and milk samples. Three different ELISA tests were developed based on p17, p28 or the combination of these two recombinant proteins (p17 + p28). A comparison was made to an ELISA based on purified whole virus particles and to agar immunodiffusion test (AGID). Sera with conflicting results in the different ELISA tests were examined by Western blotting. There was a high correlation between the ELISA tests based on p17 + p28 recombinant proteins and whole virus ELISA, with an estimated kappa value of 0.92. Only 72-75% of the sera that tested positive in these two ELISA tests were positive in AGID. Antibodies to CAEV were detected in significantly more animals when serum samples were tested compared to milk samples. Based on the time and materials required to prepare the reagents, the recombinant based ELISA test was less expensive than the whole virus ELISA.

  7. Monoclonal IgM antibody exhibiting high-affinity binding and cryoglobulin properties.

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, D W; Kranz, D M; Voss, E W

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal IgM antibody (18-2-3) derived from cell fusion of (NZB X NZW) F1 splenocytes following secondary immunization with fluorescein-conjugated keyhole limpet hemocyanin was shown to exhibit high intrinsic binding affinity and cryoinsolubility. Affinity-purified preparations were determined to be IgM by immunochemical, electrophoretic, and chromatographic analyses. An intrinsic association constant (Ka) of 2.9 X 10(10) M-1 (at 2 degrees C) was measured by first-order dissociation-rate analysis. Antibody solubility at low concentration (approximately equal to 50 micrograms/ml) was shown, by absorption spectroscopy, to be temperature dependent between 4 degrees C and 32 degrees C. Insolubility at low temperature (4 degrees C) was reversible in the presence of homologous fluorescyl hapten, indicative of active site involvement in the mechanism of cryoglobulin-18-2-3 complex formation. Characteristics of clone 18-2-3 are discussed in terms of (i) its potential use as a model for examining the mechanism of cryoprecipitation and (ii) the proposed relationship between affinity maturation and the IgM to IgG class switch. Images PMID:6348779

  8. Anti-Echis carinatus venom antibodies from chicken egg yolk: isolation, purification and neutralization efficacy.

    PubMed

    Paul, K; Manjula, J; Deepa, E P; Selvanayagam, Z E; Ganesh, K A; Subba Rao, P V

    2007-12-01

    High titer antibodies (IgY) were raised in egg yolk of white leghorn chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) by immunizing with the venom of Echis carinatus (Saw scaled viper or carpet viper), an Indian venomous snake belonging to the family Viperidae. The anti-snake venom antibodies (antivenom) were isolated from egg yolk by the water dilution method, enriched by 19% sodium sulfate precipitation and purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. A single, electrophoretically pure IgY band of 180-200 kDa was obtained on SDS-PAGE. Immunoblot analysis revealed not only the specific binding of the antivenom but also dose-dependent blocking of antivenom by venom proteins. In neutralization studies, a preincubated mixture of both affinity-purified (50 mg/kg body weight) as well as partially purified (210 mg/kg body weight) anti-E. carinatus IgY with 2 LD(50) dose of E. carinatus venom (2 x 6.65 mg/kg body weight) gave 100% protection in mice when administered subcutaneously. PMID:17681579

  9. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies. PMID:27606599

  10. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies.

  11. Considerations in producing preferentially reduced half-antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Makaraviciute, Asta; Jackson, Carolyn D; Millner, Paul A; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2016-02-01

    Half-antibody fragments are a promising reagent for biosensing, drug-delivery and labeling applications, since exposure of the free thiol group in the Fc hinge region allows oriented reaction. Despite the structural variations among the molecules of different IgG subclasses and those obtained from different hosts, only generalized preferential antibody reduction protocols are currently available. Preferential reduction of polyclonal sheep anti-digoxin, rabbit anti-Escherichia coli and anti-myoglobin class IgG antibodies to half-antibody fragments has been investigated. A mild reductant 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA) and a slightly stronger reductant tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) were used and the fragments obtained were quantitatively determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. It has been shown that the yields of half-antibody fragments could be increased by lowering the pH of the reduction mixtures. However, antibody susceptibility to the reductants varied. At pH4.5 the highest yield of sheep anti-digoxin IgG half-antibody fragments was obtained with 1M 2-MEA. Conversely, rabbit IgG half-antibody fragments could only be obtained with the stronger reductant TCEP. Preferential reduction of rabbit anti-myoglobin IgG antibodies was optimized and the highest half-antibody yield was obtained with 35 mM TCEP. Finally, it has been demonstrated that produced anti-myoglobin half-IgG fragments retained their binding activity. PMID:26779832

  12. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies. PMID:27606599

  13. Polyclonality among clinical strains of non-pigmented rapidly growing mycobacteria: phenotypic and genotypic differences and their potential implications.

    PubMed

    García-Pedrazuela, M; Frutos, J M; Muñoz-Egea, M C; Alcaide, F; Tórtola, T; Vitoria, A; Cortés, P; Esteban, J

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the potential implications (especially the implications in clinical significance and antimicrobial susceptibility) of polyclonality among rapidly growing mycobacteria, we performed random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis in 64 clinical isolates of which the clinical significance was established. Phenotypic characteristics (antimicrobial susceptibility test, colony morphology and growth rate) of each clone were studied. Polyclonality was detected in 13 of the isolates (20.3%). There was a relationship between monoclonality and clinical significance (p 0.0096). Monoclonal and polyclonal isolates showed different behaviour in antimicrobial susceptibility. There was a strong relationship between monoclonality and those species that are more pathogenic for humans, and also with clinical significance of the isolates. PMID:25596780

  14. Anti-neurofilament antibodies in neuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance produce experimental motor nerve conduction block.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Evan B; Lawlor, Mike W; Richards, Michael P; Siddiqui, Kiran; Fisher, Morris A; Bhoopalam, Nirmala; Siegel, George J

    2003-02-01

    Elevated levels of serum antibodies to neurofilament proteins have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases, including autoimmune disorders such as neuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). The pathological significance of anti-neurofilament antibodies in sera of affected patients, however, remains unclear. In this study, we report our findings of polyclonal antibodies in sera from 4 of 16 IgG MGUS neuropathy patients that react strongly on immunoblot with a high molecular weight neurofilament protein (NFH). The effect of anti-NFH polyclonal antibody on peripheral nerve function was tested in vivo by intraneural injection. Sera containing anti-NFH antibody, but not sera from age-matched control subjects, injected into the endoneurium of rat sciatic nerve significantly attenuated proximal-evoked motor nerve compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes in a complement-dependent manner. In contrast, ankle-evoked CMAP amplitudes were unaffected by intraneural injection of sera containing anti-NFH antibody. Anti-NFH serum-injected nerves showed changes in both axon caliber (shrinkage) and myelin ultrastructure (vesiculation and ovoid formation), suggestive of intramyelinic edema. Preincubation of sera containing anti-NFH antibody with purified NFH protein abolished immunoreactivity to NFH protein and neutralized the serum-mediated toxicity. The data suggest that anti-NFH polyclonal antibodies occurring in sera of some patients with IgG MGUS neuropathy may elicit peripheral nerve conduction block independent of the patients' IgG paraprotein. Anti-neural polyclonal antibodies in sera of IgG MGUS neuropathy patients may have a greater pathological significance than previously anticipated.

  15. Differential assay reactivity of immunglobulin A anti-ß2 glycoprotein I antibodies: implications for the clinical interpretation of antiphospholipid antibody testing

    PubMed Central

    Hood, David B.; Snyder, Karin R.; Buckner, Tammy R.; Hurley, Beth L.; Pitts, Kelly R.; Lopez, Luis R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The routine measurement of IgA anticardiolipin (aCL) and IgA anti-β2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2 GPI) antibodies remain controversial despite several studies demonstrating an association with thromboembolic disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). This controversy may be a contributing factor for the current under use of IgA antiphospholipid antibodies. We aimed to investigate the nature of discrepant IgA anti-β2 GPI reactivity to help define the diagnostic value of IgA antiphospholipid antibodies. Material and Methods Four sera selected from SLE/APS patients and positive for antiphospholipid antibodies but having discrepant IgA anti-β2 GPI reactivity on two commercial assays were studied. IgA antibodies were affinity purified to investigate anti-β2 GPI reactivity. Column wash through and eluent fractions were tested on both IgA anti-β2 GPI assays. Results were normalized to total protein. Assay conjugates and standards from the discrepant assays were interchanged. Results The diseased samples were strongly positive in one assay [144–388 IgA antiphospholipid (APL) units] and negative or weakly positive in another assay (9.9–53 APL units). IgA eluents from IgA anti-β2 GPI positive samples reacted 10 times stronger on the reactive assay. When normalized to protein content, the eluents showed no cross-reactivity for IgG or IgM anti-β2 GPI antibodies, confirming IgA isotype specificity. Conjugate interchange confirmed that both assays bound IgA anti-β2 GPI antibodies, but the anti-IgA conjugate from the reactive assay was 4 times stronger, suggesting that its ability to detect IgA anti-β2 GPI antibodies was partially dependent on the anti-IgA conjugate and calibration. Conclusion These results confirm not only the presence of IgA anti-β2 GPI antibodies in the selected patient samples but also highlight an IgA conjugate issue for the unreactive assay, causing an underestimation of IgA anti-β2

  16. Detection of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in domesticated ruminants by recombinant truncated SAG2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harkirat; Tewari, Anup Kumar; Mishra, Ashok Kumar; Maharana, Biswaranjan; Sudan, Vikrant; Raina, Opinder Krishan; Rao, Jammi Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    An antibody detection recombinant enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for Toxoplasma gondii was laboratory standardized using recombinant truncated surface antigen 2 (SAG2) protein of T. gondii. A 483-bp sequence coding for truncated tachyzoite stage-specific SAG2 protein was amplified and ligated in pPROExHT-b expression vector to transform Escherichia coli DH5α cells. A high-level expression of the histidine-tagged fusion protein was obtained after 8 h of incubation. The recombinant protein was affinity purified using Ni-NTA agarose column and characterized by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Subsequently, the diagnostic potential of the recombinant protein was assessed with 168 field sera samples from sheep, goats and cattle. Among the small ruminants, 50% (n = 60) sheep sera samples and 41.26% (n = 63) goat samples were detected positive for T. gondii-specific antibodies. As far as seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in cattle is concerned, 64.44% (n = 45) of sera samples assayed were found to be positive. When compared to indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), the sensitivity of the recombinant truncated SAG2 antigen-based ELISA (rec-SAG2-ELISA) ranged from 81.25 to 87.10% while the specificity was 85.71 to 91.43% with substantial agreement between the tests.

  17. Specificity of human anti-carbohydrate IgG antibodies as probed with polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Smorodin, E P; Kurtenkov, O A; Sergeyev, B L; Pazynina, G V; Bovin, N V

    2004-01-01

    The TF, Tn, and SiaTn glycotopes are frequently expressed in cancer-associated mucins. Antibodies to these glycotopes were found in human serum. A set of polyacrylamide (PAA)--based glycoconjugates was applied to the direct and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to characterize the specificity of serum IgG antibodies. The anti-TF, -Tn and -SiaTn IgG were affinity purified from serum of cancer patients and characterized using PAA-conjugates and free saccharides. The anti-TF and -Tn antibodies were shown to be specific. The anti-TF IgG bound both Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha- and Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta-PAA, the latter was three-four times more effective inhibitor of antibody binding. The anti-Tn IgG reacted only with GalNAcalpha-PAA. The anti-SiaTn IgG cross-reacted with Tn-PAA but SiaTn-PAA was five-six times more effective inhibitor in a competitive assay. The IC50 values for PAA-conjugates with the corresponding antibodies typically ranged from 2 to 5 x 10(-8) M. The antibodies display a low specificity to mucin-type glycoconjugates in comparison with PAA-conjugates as was shown for mucins isolated from human malignant tumor tissues, ovine submaxillary mucin (OSM) and asialo-OSM. The unusual IgG-antibody specificity to GalNAcbeta and GalNAcbeta1-3GalNAcbeta ligands was found in human serum.

  18. Specificity of human anti-carbohydrate IgG antibodies as probed with polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Smorodin, E P; Kurtenkov, O A; Sergeyev, B L; Pazynina, G V; Bovin, N V

    2004-01-01

    The TF, Tn, and SiaTn glycotopes are frequently expressed in cancer-associated mucins. Antibodies to these glycotopes were found in human serum. A set of polyacrylamide (PAA)--based glycoconjugates was applied to the direct and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to characterize the specificity of serum IgG antibodies. The anti-TF, -Tn and -SiaTn IgG were affinity purified from serum of cancer patients and characterized using PAA-conjugates and free saccharides. The anti-TF and -Tn antibodies were shown to be specific. The anti-TF IgG bound both Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha- and Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta-PAA, the latter was three-four times more effective inhibitor of antibody binding. The anti-Tn IgG reacted only with GalNAcalpha-PAA. The anti-SiaTn IgG cross-reacted with Tn-PAA but SiaTn-PAA was five-six times more effective inhibitor in a competitive assay. The IC50 values for PAA-conjugates with the corresponding antibodies typically ranged from 2 to 5 x 10(-8) M. The antibodies display a low specificity to mucin-type glycoconjugates in comparison with PAA-conjugates as was shown for mucins isolated from human malignant tumor tissues, ovine submaxillary mucin (OSM) and asialo-OSM. The unusual IgG-antibody specificity to GalNAcbeta and GalNAcbeta1-3GalNAcbeta ligands was found in human serum. PMID:15001840

  19. Uptake of indium-111-labeled human polyclonal immunoglobulin G in pancreatic cancer: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Karanikas, Georgios; Ulrich-Pur, Herbert; Becherer, Alexander; Wiesner, Karoline; Dudczak, Robert; Raderer, Markus; Kletter, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Radiolabeled human non-specific polyclonal immunoglobulin G (HIG), is used for the diagnosis of inflammation/infection. Focal uptake of HIG in malignant lesions has also been reported. We investigated the diagnostic value of In-111-HIG in patients with known pancreatic cancer. Fourteen consecutive patients with histologically verified pancreatic cancer were included in this prospective study. Four of them had undergone potentially curative surgery for their primary cancer. Eight patients had liver metastases. Planar and SPECT images of the abdomen were performed after administration of In-111-HIG (74-92 MBq). Scintigraphic results were compared to conventional imaging by means of CT scanning. In addition, In-111-HIG uptake was investigated in a panel of four representative human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Primary pancreatic tumors were visualized by In-111-HIG in 6 out of 10 patients (sensitivity 60%), while 1 was false positive. In comparison, CT scanning was true positive in 9 out of 10 patients (sensitivity 90%), and no false positive. Visualization of liver lesions by means of In-111-HIG was possible in 6 out of 8 patients (sensitivity 75%), while 1 was false positive. In vitro studies revealed only minimal uptake of In-111-HIG into cells (about 3% of activity). Our data demonstrate that In-111-HIG is able to visualize pancreatic primary cancers as well as liver metastases. However, the minimal uptake into tumor cells, as shown in vitro, suggests non-specific tumor related inflammatory reactions, increased vascular permeability, release of indium from In-111-DTPA-labeled antibody and local retention to be responsible for visualization of the tumor site.

  20. Highly efficient immunodiagnosis of Large cardamom chirke virus using the polyclonal antiserum against Escherichia coli expressed recombinant coat protein.

    PubMed

    Vijayanandraj, S; Yogita, M; Das, Amrita; Ghosh, Amalendu; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-09-01

    Large cardamom chirke virus (LCCV), genus Macluravirus, family Potyviridae is an important constrain in large cardamom production in India. Purification of LCCV from large cardamom tissues is difficult and therefore immunodiagnostic reagents are not available. In the present study, we have successfully expressed coat protein (CP) gene of LCCV in Escherichia coli. The purification of expressed protein by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was inefficient due to precipitation of protein during renaturation. We have optimized a simple, inexpensive and efficient method for purification of the expressed CP through gel extraction with 5 % SDS followed by renaturation in Milli-Q water, which resulted in high yield (4.7 mg/ml) and good quality of the protein. A higher titer (1:256,000) polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the recombinant CP was produced, which strongly recognized LCCV in crude leaf extract and showed minimal background reaction with the healthy leaf extract in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot immunobinding assay (DIBA). The sensitivities of the ELISA and DIBA were 5 and 0.1 ng of expressed protein, respectively. Both the ELISA and DIBA were validated with 100 % accuracy in detecting LCCV in field samples. The PAb differentiated Cardamom mosaic virus, another close relative of LCCV. Our study is first to report highly efficient immunodiagnosis with PAb to E. coli expressed recombinant CP of a virus under the genus Macluravirus. The antigen expression construct and PAb developed in the present study will be useful in production of virus free planting materials of large cardamom. PMID:24426280

  1. Highly efficient immunodiagnosis of Large cardamom chirke virus using the polyclonal antiserum against Escherichia coli expressed recombinant coat protein.

    PubMed

    Vijayanandraj, S; Yogita, M; Das, Amrita; Ghosh, Amalendu; Mandal, Bikash

    2013-09-01

    Large cardamom chirke virus (LCCV), genus Macluravirus, family Potyviridae is an important constrain in large cardamom production in India. Purification of LCCV from large cardamom tissues is difficult and therefore immunodiagnostic reagents are not available. In the present study, we have successfully expressed coat protein (CP) gene of LCCV in Escherichia coli. The purification of expressed protein by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography was inefficient due to precipitation of protein during renaturation. We have optimized a simple, inexpensive and efficient method for purification of the expressed CP through gel extraction with 5 % SDS followed by renaturation in Milli-Q water, which resulted in high yield (4.7 mg/ml) and good quality of the protein. A higher titer (1:256,000) polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the recombinant CP was produced, which strongly recognized LCCV in crude leaf extract and showed minimal background reaction with the healthy leaf extract in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot immunobinding assay (DIBA). The sensitivities of the ELISA and DIBA were 5 and 0.1 ng of expressed protein, respectively. Both the ELISA and DIBA were validated with 100 % accuracy in detecting LCCV in field samples. The PAb differentiated Cardamom mosaic virus, another close relative of LCCV. Our study is first to report highly efficient immunodiagnosis with PAb to E. coli expressed recombinant CP of a virus under the genus Macluravirus. The antigen expression construct and PAb developed in the present study will be useful in production of virus free planting materials of large cardamom.

  2. Infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary R5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inhibited by natural polyreactive anti-CCR5 antibodies purified from cervicovaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Eslahpazir, Jobin; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Bouhlal, Hicham; Hocini, Hakim; Carbonneil, Cédric; Grésenguet, Gérard; Mbopi Kéou, François-Xavier; LeGoff, Jérôme; Saïdi, Héla; Requena, Mary; Nasreddine, Nadine; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Bélec, Laurent

    2008-05-01

    Heterosexual contact is the primary mode of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) transmission worldwide. The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major coreceptor that is associated with the mucosal transmission of R5-tropic HIV-1 during sexual intercourse. The CCR5 molecule is thus a target for antibody-based therapeutic strategies aimed at blocking HIV-1 entry into cells. We have previously demonstrated that polyreactive natural antibodies (NAbs) from therapeutic preparations of immunoglobulin G and from human breast milk contain NAbs directed against CCR5. Such antibodies inhibit the infection of human macrophages and T lymphocytes by R5-tropic isolates of HIV in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that human immunoglobulins from the cervicovaginal secretions of HIV-seronegative or HIV-seropositive women contain NAbs directed against the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. Natural affinity-purified anti-CCR5 antibodies bound to CCR5 expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells and further inhibited the infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary and laboratory-adapted R5-tropic HIV but not with X4-tropic HIV. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies moderately inhibited R5-tropic HIV transfer from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to autologous T cells. Our results suggest that mucosal anti-CCR5 antibodies from healthy immunocompetent donors may hamper the penetration of HIV and may be suitable for use in the development of novel passive immunotherapy regimens in specific clinical settings of HIV infection. PMID:18353923

  3. Development of non-toxic (anti-idiotypic) mucosal vaccines to block the absorption of the chemical carcinogen 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF)

    SciTech Connect

    Silbart, L.K.; Keren, D.F.; McDonald, R.A.; Goslinoski, L.; Brownlee, B.E.; Lash, C.; Smart, J.B. )

    1991-03-15

    One difficulty in developing mucosal vaccines to block carcinogen absorption has been the necessity of using carcinogen, or closely related structural analogs, coupled to carrier proteins in the vaccine preparation. The authors have developed anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) antibodies capable of mimicking the carcinogenic epitope. Anti-AAF antibodies (Ab{sub 1}) were prepared from three different sources. Groups of four female BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with 50 ug of either the rabbit polyclonal IgG anti-AAF, or the most anti-AAF monoclonal IgG{sub 1}-KLH conjugate in a 50:50 emulsion of complete Freund's adjuvant; booster doses were given four weeks later. A third group of two mice was immunized with approximately 1 ug of affinity-purified rat IgG anti-AAF, and boosted four weeks later, then one year later. Retro-orbital blood samples were collected and assayed for anti-Id activity by ELISA. Although all three groups produced anti-idiotypic antibodies, the strongest response was observed in mice receiving the affinity-purified polyclonal rat IgG anti-AAF. Once anti-Id producing hybridoma clones have been isolated, the anti-Id antibodies will replace the carcinogen in vaccine preparations designed to elicit anti-carcinogen antibodies.

  4. Generation of Anti-Boa Immunoglobulin Antibodies for Serodiagnostic Applications, and Their Use to Detect Anti-Reptarenavirus Antibodies in Boa Constrictor.

    PubMed

    Korzyukov, Yegor; Hetzel, Udo; Kipar, Anja; Vapalahti, Olli; Hepojoki, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs), the key effectors of the adaptive immune system, mediate the specific recognition of foreign structures, i.e. antigens. In mammals, IgM production commonly precedes the production of IgG in the response to an infection. The reptilian counterpart of IgG is IgY, but the exact kinetics of the reptilian immune response are less well known. Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD), an often fatal disease of captive boas and pythons has been linked to reptarenavirus infection, and BIBD is believed to be immunosuppressive. However, so far, the study of the serological response towards reptarenaviruses in BIBD has been hampered by the lack of reagents. Thus we set up a purification protocol for boa constrictor IgY and IgM, which should also be applicable for other snake species. We used centrifugal filter units, poly ethylene glycol precipitation and gel permeation chromatography to purify and separate the IgM and IgY fractions from boa constrictor serum, which we further used to immunise rabbits. We affinity purified IgM and IgY specific reagents from the produced antiserum, and labelled the reagents with horseradish peroxidase. Finally, using the sera of snakes with known exposure to reptarenaviruses we demonstrated that the newly generated reagents can be utilised for serodiagnostic purposes, such as immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show reptarenavirus-specific antibodies in boa constrictors.

  5. Generation of Anti-Boa Immunoglobulin Antibodies for Serodiagnostic Applications, and Their Use to Detect Anti-Reptarenavirus Antibodies in Boa Constrictor

    PubMed Central

    Korzyukov, Yegor; Hetzel, Udo; Kipar, Anja; Vapalahti, Olli; Hepojoki, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs), the key effectors of the adaptive immune system, mediate the specific recognition of foreign structures, i.e. antigens. In mammals, IgM production commonly precedes the production of IgG in the response to an infection. The reptilian counterpart of IgG is IgY, but the exact kinetics of the reptilian immune response are less well known. Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD), an often fatal disease of captive boas and pythons has been linked to reptarenavirus infection, and BIBD is believed to be immunosuppressive. However, so far, the study of the serological response towards reptarenaviruses in BIBD has been hampered by the lack of reagents. Thus we set up a purification protocol for boa constrictor IgY and IgM, which should also be applicable for other snake species. We used centrifugal filter units, poly ethylene glycol precipitation and gel permeation chromatography to purify and separate the IgM and IgY fractions from boa constrictor serum, which we further used to immunise rabbits. We affinity purified IgM and IgY specific reagents from the produced antiserum, and labelled the reagents with horseradish peroxidase. Finally, using the sera of snakes with known exposure to reptarenaviruses we demonstrated that the newly generated reagents can be utilised for serodiagnostic purposes, such as immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show reptarenavirus-specific antibodies in boa constrictors. PMID:27355360

  6. Generation of Anti-Boa Immunoglobulin Antibodies for Serodiagnostic Applications, and Their Use to Detect Anti-Reptarenavirus Antibodies in Boa Constrictor.

    PubMed

    Korzyukov, Yegor; Hetzel, Udo; Kipar, Anja; Vapalahti, Olli; Hepojoki, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs), the key effectors of the adaptive immune system, mediate the specific recognition of foreign structures, i.e. antigens. In mammals, IgM production commonly precedes the production of IgG in the response to an infection. The reptilian counterpart of IgG is IgY, but the exact kinetics of the reptilian immune response are less well known. Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD), an often fatal disease of captive boas and pythons has been linked to reptarenavirus infection, and BIBD is believed to be immunosuppressive. However, so far, the study of the serological response towards reptarenaviruses in BIBD has been hampered by the lack of reagents. Thus we set up a purification protocol for boa constrictor IgY and IgM, which should also be applicable for other snake species. We used centrifugal filter units, poly ethylene glycol precipitation and gel permeation chromatography to purify and separate the IgM and IgY fractions from boa constrictor serum, which we further used to immunise rabbits. We affinity purified IgM and IgY specific reagents from the produced antiserum, and labelled the reagents with horseradish peroxidase. Finally, using the sera of snakes with known exposure to reptarenaviruses we demonstrated that the newly generated reagents can be utilised for serodiagnostic purposes, such as immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show reptarenavirus-specific antibodies in boa constrictors. PMID:27355360

  7. Production of Polyclonal Antibodies to the Recombinant Coat Protein of Citrus tristeza virus and Their Effectiveness for Virus Detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The p25 coat protein gene of three Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates, two from Mexico and one from India, was amplified by RT-PCR and further cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The recombinant coat protein (rCP) of the three CTV isolates was injected into rabbits and goats for antibo...

  8. PRODUCTION OF POLYCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST PELARGONIUM ZONATE SPOT VIRUS COAT PROTEIN EXPRESSED IN ESCHERICHIA COLI AND APPLICATION FOR IMMUNODIAGNOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonium zonate spot virus (PZSV), a new emerging disease on tomato in the United States, has been classified as the first member of new proposed genus, Anulavirus, within the family Bromoviridae and characterized as having unstable virions with weakly immunogenic properties. To develop serologic...

  9. Enhanced Follicular Dendritic Cell-B Cell Interaction in HIV and SIV Infections and its Potential Role in Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mark. G.; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie H.

    1998-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections have been characterized by both polyclonal Bcell activation and enhanced responsiveness to B-cell growth factors on one hand and the loss of specific antibody (Ab) responses and refractoriness to the normal signals for B-cell activation on the other. Histopathological studies of lymph node from HIV- and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected individuals have indicated initial follicular hyperplasia and the appearance of large irregular germinal centers that undergo progressive involution concomitant with follicular dendritic-cell (FDC) disruption. During this process, follicular dendritic-cell -enriched lymph-node-cell cultures exhibit increased ability to induce cluster formation (“in vitro germinal centers”), lymphocyte proliferation and antibody production compared to uninfected controls. This paper discusses how enhanced FDC-B-cell interaction within SIV-infected germinal centers may result in a reduced ability to select high-affinity B cells and alter the dynamics of antibodyproducing- cell and memory-cell generation resulting in the observed hyperactivity. PMID:9716906

  10. A general procedure for the production of antibody reagents against eukaryotic ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Giorgio; Bottarelli, Lorena; Ottonello, Simone

    2005-08-01

    Despite recent progress in the structural and functional analysis of bacterial and archaeal ribosomes, the structure and biogenesis of eukaryotic ribosomes still awaits a detailed characterization. Ribosomal protein-specific antibodies would be valuable tools for such studies, but their production is commonly hindered by the poor expression and solubility of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in E. coli. We report here an improved general procedure for the over-production of recombinant eukaryotic ribosomal proteins and for the generation of the corresponding polyclonal antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of detection of the antibodies produced by this procedure are documented.

  11. Engineering Venom’s Toxin-Neutralizing Antibody Fragments and Its Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Larissa M.; Zahid, Muhammad; di Tommaso, Anne; Juste, Matthieu O.; Aubrey, Nicolas; Billiald, Philippe; Muzard, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Serum therapy remains the only specific treatment against envenoming, but anti-venoms are still prepared by fragmentation of polyclonal antibodies isolated from hyper-immunized horse serum. Most of these anti-venoms are considered to be efficient, but their production is tedious, and their use may be associated with adverse effects. Recombinant antibodies and smaller functional units are now emerging as credible alternatives and constitute a source of still unexploited biomolecules capable of neutralizing venoms. This review will be a walk through the technologies that have recently been applied leading to novel antibody formats with better properties in terms of homogeneity, specific activity and possible safety. PMID:25153256

  12. 131-iodine conjugated antibody cell kill enhanced by bromodeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Morstyn, G.; Miller, R.; Russo, A.; Mitchell, J.

    1984-08-01

    /sup 131/I-conjugated monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are being administered in vivo to kill human tumor cells. Although these conjugates deliver relatively large doses of radiation to tumors (10 to 50 Gy), the rate of dose delivery is low (0.05 to 0.2 Gy/hour). To determine whether the cell kill produced by low dose rate radiation is enhanced by a radiation sensitizer (bromodeoxyuridine, BUdR) the authors studied the cell kill produced by an /sup 131/I-conjugated polyclonal antibody against Chinese hamster V79 cells. Cells not containing BUdR were also studied. The /sup 131/I-conjugated antibody produced up to 40% cell kill and BUdR increased the fraction of cells killed to 75%. These studies demonstrate that cells frozen at -196/sup 0/C are useful for the investigation of the cell kill produced by isotopes that deliver radiation at low dose rates and that the cell kill caused by /sup 131/I-conjugated antibodies can be enhanced by BUdR.

  13. Probing Cocaine-Antibody Interactions in Buffer and Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Muthu; Alves De Melo, Fernando; Kinsey, Berma M.; Ladbury, John E.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite progress in cocaine immunotherapy, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of antibodies which bind to cocaine and its metabolites are not well understood. It is also not clear how the interactions between them differ in a complex matrix such as the serum present in the human body. In the present study, we have used microscale thermophoresis (MST), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) we have evaluated the affinity properties of a representative mouse monoclonal (mAb08) as well as those of polyclonal antibodies purified from vaccinated mouse and human patient serum. Results MST analysis of fluorescently tagged mAb08 binding to cocaine reveals an approximately 15 fold decrease in its equilibrium dissociation constant in 20–50% human serum compared with that in saline buffer. A similar trend was also found using enriched polyclonal antibodies purified from vaccinated mice and patient serum, for which we have used fluorescently tagged bovine serum albumin conjugated to succinyl norcocaine (BSA-SNC). This conjugate closely mimics both cocaine and the hapten used to raise these antibodies. The ITC data also revealed that cocaine has a moderate affinity of about 2 µM to 20% human serum and very little interaction with human serum albumin or nonspecific human IgG at that concentration range. In a SPR inhibition experiment, the binding of mAb08 to immobilized BSA-SNC was inhibited by cocaine and benzoylecgonine in a highly competitive manner, whereas the purified polyclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans and mice, revealed preferential selectivity to pharmacologically active cocaine but not to the inactive metabolite benzoylecgonine. We have also developed a simple binding model to simulate the challenges associated with cocaine immunotherapy using the variable quantitative and kinetic properties of the antibodies. Conclusions High sensitivity calorimetric determination of antibody binding to cocaine and its

  14. Surface plasmon resonance biosensing: Approaches for screening and characterising antibodies for food diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yakes, B J; Buijs, J; Elliott, C T; Campbell, K

    2016-08-15

    Research in biosensing approaches as alternative techniques for food diagnostics for the detection of chemical contaminants and foodborne pathogens has increased over the last twenty years. The key component of such tests is the biorecognition element whereby polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies still dominate the market. Traditionally the screening of sera or cell culture media for the selection of polyclonal or monoclonal candidate antibodies respectively has been performed by enzyme immunoassays. For niche toxin compounds, enzyme immunoassays can be expensive and/or prohibitive methodologies for antibody production due to limitations in toxin supply for conjugate production. Automated, self-regenerating, chip-based biosensors proven in food diagnostics may be utilised as rapid screening tools for antibody candidate selection. This work describes the use of both single channel and multi-channel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors for the selection and characterisation of antibodies, and their evaluation in shellfish tissue as standard techniques for the detection of domoic acid, as a model toxin compound. The key advantages in the use of these biosensor techniques for screening hybridomas in monoclonal antibody production were the real time observation of molecular interaction and rapid turnaround time in analysis compared to enzyme immunoassays. The multichannel prototype instrument was superior with 96 analyses completed in 2h compared to 12h for the single channel and over 24h for the ELISA immunoassay. Antibodies of high sensitivity, IC50's ranging from 4.8 to 6.9ng/mL for monoclonal and 2.3-6.0ng/mL for polyclonal, for the detection of domoic acid in a 1min analysis time were selected. Although there is a progression for biosensor technology towards low cost, multiplexed portable diagnostics for the food industry, there remains a place for laboratory-based SPR instrumentation for antibody development for food diagnostics as shown herein. PMID:27260435

  15. Circulating antibodies against nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in chagasic patients

    PubMed Central

    GOIN, J C; VENERA, G; BONINO, M BISCOGLIO DE JIMÉNEZ; STERIN-BORDA, L

    1997-01-01

    Human and experimental Chagas' disease causes peripheral nervous system damage involving neuromuscular transmission alterations at the neuromuscular junction. Additionally, autoantibodies directed to peripheral nerves and sarcolemmal proteins of skeletal muscle have been described. In this work, we analyse the ability of serum immunoglobulin factors associated with human chagasic infection to bind the affinity-purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from electric organs of Discopyge tschudii and to identify the receptor subunits involved in the interaction. The frequency of serum anti-nAChR reactivity assayed by dot-blot was higher in seropositive chagasic patients than in uninfected subjects. Purified IgG obtained from chagasic patients immunoprecipitated a significantly higher fraction of the solubilized nAChR than normal IgG. Furthermore, immunoblotting assays indicated that α and β are the main subunits involved in the interaction. Chagasic IgG was able to inhibit the binding of α-bungarotoxin to the receptor in a concentration-dependent manner, confirming the contribution of the α-subunit in the autoantibody-receptor interaction. The presence of anti-nAChR antibodies was detected in 73% of chagasic patients with impairment of neuromuscular transmission in conventional electromyographical studies, indicating a strong association between seropositive reactivity against nAChR and electromyographical abnormalities in chagasic patients. The chronic binding of these autoantibodies to the nAChR could induce a decrease in the population of functional nAChRs at the neuromuscular junction and consequently contribute to the electrophysiological neuromuscular alterations described in the course of chronic Chagas' disease. PMID:9367405

  16. Brucella fractions behave as nonspecific mitogens and polyclonal B-cell activators for human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, J P; Rabesandratana, H; Huguet, M F; Cannat, A; Serre, A

    1985-01-01

    Two lipid-A-free fractions which were extracted from Brucella melitensis and were designated PI and SF stimulated human unsensitized mononuclear cells to proliferate and to secrete immunoglobulins. Both of these effects were observed in cultures of peripheral blood, tonsils, and cord blood lymphocytes. Neither B cells nor T cells alone proliferated in the presence of these fractions, whereas the proliferative response of T cells plus B cells was largely independent of accessory cells. Polyclonal activation was estimated by counting the cells which secreted immunoglobulins of different isotypes into culture supernatants. This phenomenon was strongly T dependent. PMID:3876286

  17. Individual Plasmodium vivax msp1 Variants within Polyclonal P. vivax Infections Display Different Propensities for Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Jonathan J.; Kharabora, Oksana; Sem, Rithy; Lin, Feng-Chang; Muth, Sinuon; Ménard, Didier; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Rogers, William O.; Meshnick, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Using a newly developed Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 gene (Pvmsp1) heteroduplex tracking assay, we genotyped 107 P. vivax infections in individuals from Cambodia, 45 of whom developed recurrent parasitemia within 42 days. The majority of isolates were polyclonal, but recurrent parasitemias displayed fewer variants compared to initial parasitemias. Two Pvmsp1 gene variants occurred more frequently in the initial genotypes of those who developed recurrent parasitemia, representing the first time P. vivax variants associated with a higher risk of relapse have been described. PMID:22205791

  18. Nuclear localization and hepatic zonation of rat "spot 14" protein: immunohistochemical investigation employing anti-fusion protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kinlaw, W B; Tron, P; Friedmann, A S

    1992-12-01

    S14 protein and mRNA levels are rapidly regulated by hormones and diet. We have purified a 45-Kd fusion protein from lysates of transformed E. coli that includes the entire S14 polypeptide. Affinity-purified rabbit anti-fusion protein antibodies were used in immunohistochemistry to determine the distribution of S14 protein across the hepatic lobule, and to reassess its intracellular location. In hyperthyroid liver, S14 protein clustered near the central venous zone, and was not detectable in the periportal area of the acinus. The signal in perivenous hepatocytes was primarily nuclear in location, in stark contrast to previous subcellular fractionation studies. Visualization of identical hepatic distribution and subcellular localization employing anti-synthetic peptide antiserum provided evidence for the specificity of the immunostaining, as did attenuation of the signal by preincubation of the antibody with its antigen. No staining was observed in sections of heart or hypothyroid liver, as expected from the low levels of S14 protein in those tissues. The data indicate that induction of S14 protein expression by T3 occurs through enhanced expression by perivenous hepatocytes, rather than by recruitment of cells in more peripheral zones of the lobule. Nuclear localization of the S14 protein by immunohistochemistry suggests that it is lost from nuclei during standard fractionation procedures, and prompts consideration of a role for S14 in regulation of nuclear structure and/or function.

  19. Insulin and rabbit anti-insulin receptor antibodies stimulate additively the intrinsic receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ponzio, G; Dolais-Kitabgi, J; Louvard, D; Gautier, N; Rossi, B

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the properties of rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed against purified human insulin receptor which strongly stimulate the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. The stimulatory effect of the antibodies on the kinase activity was obtained on the insulin receptor autophosphorylation as well as on the kinase activity towards a synthetic substrate. This stimulation is additive to that induced by insulin. Moreover, rabbit antibodies do not impair insulin binding. These data strongly suggest that antibodies and insulin act through separate pathways. This conclusion is reinforced by the differences observed on the phosphopeptide maps of the receptor's beta subunit whose phosphorylation was performed either in the presence of insulin or rabbit antibodies. Interestingly, these polyclonal antibodies can also induce an activation of the receptor autophosphorylation by interacting only with extracellular determinants. The anti-insulin receptor antibodies mimic insulin in their stimulatory effect on amino acid (AIB) uptake, but they have a different effect to that found on the kinase activity; the simultaneous addition of the antiserum and insulin failed to stimulate this amino acid transport over the level induced by a saturating concentration of hormone. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3034584

  20. Platelet antibodies of the IgM class in immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Wilson, S.B.; Tomaski, A.; Schreiber, A.D.

    1985-04-01

    The clinical course and response to therapy of patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are not completely determined by the level of IgG present on the platelet surface. It is possible that antibodies of other immunoglobulin classes also play a role in platelet destruction in some of these patients. Therefore, the authors studied 175 patients with ITP for the presence of IgM anti-platelet antibodies using radiolabeled polyclonal or monoclonal anti-IgM. They observed that 57% of patients with clinical ITP had increased levels of IgM on their platelets, compared with normal controls and patients with thrombocytopenia who did not have ITP. They obtained similar results using either radiolabeled polyclonal or monoclonal anti-IgM, reagents whose integrity was first characterized using erythrocytes coated with defined amounts of IgM antibody. Among patients with increased platelet-IgM there was a significant correlation both with the presence of increased platelet-C3 as well as the amount of platelet-C3. The authors demonstrated the presence of warm-reacting IgM anti-platelet antibodies in the plasma of two of these patients who were further studied. These studies demonstrate the presence of warm-reacting IgM anti-platelet antibodies in some patients with ITP. They suggest that the binding of complement to platelets by IgM antibodies may initiate platelet clearance as well as enhance the effect of IgG antibodies in ITP.

  1. Preparation and characterization of specific monoclonal antibodies for the detection of adult worm infections in onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Cho-Ngwa, Fidelis; Daggfeldt, Annika; Titanji, Vincent P K; Grönvik, Kjell-Olov

    2005-12-01

    Suitable molecular tests for monitoring the viability of adult worms of Onchocerca in vivo are required to accelerate the development of new macrofilaricides in river blindness (onchocerciasis). Hence, three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were prepared and evaluated in a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for their abilities to detect circulating adult worm antigens in onchocercal bovine and human sera. The MAbs did not cross-react with a number of control antigens, which included extracts of Ascaris suum, Loa loa, and O. ochengi microfilariae. They were all IgG1 molecules. Their targets in O. ochengi total extract were a set of the same 15 polypeptides with apparent molecular weights of 21-220 Kda. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed their adult worm specificity and showed their binding to the hypodermis of the adult worm. The ELISA could detect as little as 100 pg/mL of the affinity-purified target antigens. It also detected the antigens with 94.1% specificity in 50 out of 56 infected bovine sera (90% sensitivity) and in 21 out of 43 infected human sera (48.8% sensitivity, which could go up to 72.1% on elimination of two skewed control cases). We conclude that the MAbs could be field tested and used in responder populations as described herein or employed as components of more sensitive assays for the evaluation of novel Onchocerca macrofilaricides.

  2. Production and characterization of antibodies against fumigaclavine A.

    PubMed

    Latif, Hadri; Curtui, Valeriu; Ackermann, Yvonne; Groß, Madeleine; Usleber, Ewald

    2009-10-01

    Polyclonal antibodies against fumigaclavine A (FuA) were obtained from rabbits after immunization with a FuA-keyhole limpet hemocyanine conjugate prepared by formaldehyde condensation. Using these antibodies and a FuA-bovine serum albumine conjugate, a competitive indirect enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was established. The antiserum obtained from one rabbit enabled highly sensitive detection of FuA, with an IC50 level and detection limit of the standard curve of 3.3 ng/ml and approx. 1 ng/ml, respectively. The EIA was very specific for FuA, with 1.3% cross-reactivity with FuB. Several other lysergic acid derivatives (ergonovine, ergotamine, alpha-ergocryptine) were tested but did not cross-react in the FuA EIA. This is the first description of antibodies against FuA and the first development of an EIA for FuA. PMID:23605095

  3. Polyclonal breast cancer metastases arise from collective dissemination of keratin 14-expressing tumor cell clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Kevin J.; Padmanaban, Veena; Silvestri, Vanesa; Schipper, Koen; Cohen, Joshua D.; Fairchild, Amanda N.; Gorin, Michael A.; Verdone, James E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Bader, Joel S.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic studies challenge the conventional model that each metastasis must arise from a single tumor cell and instead reveal that metastases can be composed of multiple genetically distinct clones. These intriguing observations raise the question: How do polyclonal metastases emerge from the primary tumor? In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to demonstrate that polyclonal seeding by cell clusters is a frequent mechanism in a common mouse model of breast cancer, accounting for >90% of metastases. We directly observed multicolored tumor cell clusters across major stages of metastasis, including collective invasion, local dissemination, intravascular emboli, circulating tumor cell clusters, and micrometastases. Experimentally aggregating tumor cells into clusters induced a >15-fold increase in colony formation ex vivo and a >100-fold increase in metastasis formation in vivo. Intriguingly, locally disseminated clusters, circulating tumor cell clusters, and lung micrometastases frequently expressed the epithelial cytoskeletal protein, keratin 14 (K14). RNA-seq analysis revealed that K14+ cells were enriched for desmosome and hemidesmosome adhesion complex genes, and were depleted for MHC class II genes. Depletion of K14 expression abrogated distant metastases and disrupted expression of multiple metastasis effectors, including Tenascin C (Tnc), Jagged1 (Jag1), and Epiregulin (Ereg). Taken together, our findings reveal K14 as a key regulator of metastasis and establish the concept that K14+ epithelial tumor cell clusters disseminate collectively to colonize distant organs. PMID:26831077

  4. A deep sequencing tool for partitioning clearance rates following antimalarial treatment in polyclonal infections

    PubMed Central

    Mideo, Nicole; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Hathaway, Nicholas J.; Ngasala, Billy; Saunders, David L.; Lon, Chanthap; Kharabora, Oksana; Jamnik, Andrew; Balasubramanian, Sujata; Björkman, Anders; Mårtensson, Andreas; Meshnick, Steven R.; Read, Andrew F.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Current tools struggle to detect drug-resistant malaria parasites when infections contain multiple parasite clones, which is the norm in high transmission settings in Africa. Our aim was to develop and apply an approach for detecting resistance that overcomes the challenges of polyclonal infections without requiring a genetic marker for resistance. Methodology: Clinical samples from patients treated with artemisinin combination therapy were collected from Tanzania and Cambodia. By deeply sequencing a hypervariable locus, we quantified the relative abundance of parasite subpopulations (defined by haplotypes of that locus) within infections and revealed evolutionary dynamics during treatment. Slow clearance is a phenotypic, clinical marker of artemisinin resistance; we analyzed variation in clearance rates within infections by fitting parasite clearance curves to subpopulation data. Results: In Tanzania, we found substantial variation in clearance rates within individual patients. Some parasite subpopulations cleared as slowly as resistant parasites observed in Cambodia. We evaluated possible explanations for these data, including resistance to drugs. Assuming slow clearance was a stable phenotype of subpopulations, simulations predicted that modest increases in their frequency could substantially increase time to cure. Conclusions and implications: By characterizing parasite subpopulations within patients, our method can detect rare, slow clearing parasites in vivo whose phenotypic effects would otherwise be masked. Since our approach can be applied to polyclonal infections even when the genetics underlying resistance are unknown, it could aid in monitoring the emergence of artemisinin resistance. Our application to Tanzanian samples uncovers rare subpopulations with worrying phenotypes for closer examination. PMID:26817485

  5. Expression, purification and antibody preparation of PCV2 Rep and ORF3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhiyuan; Ma, Teng; Pang, Daxin; Su, Dan; Chen, Fuwang; Chen, Xinrong; Guo, Ning; Ouyang, Ting; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Ren, Linzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rep and ORF3 proteins are important functional proteins of porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2). Here, Rep and ORF3 genes were cloned, expressed and used to raise polyclonal antibodies. The result showed the recombinant plasmids of Rep and ORF3 genes constructed in this study were expressed efficiently in the prokaryotic system, and the recombinant proteins had antigenicity and immunogenicity. Furthermore, reactivity and specificity of the antiserums were characterized by western blot and indirect immunofluorescent assays. The results elucidated that polyclonal antiserum prepared with Rep or ORF3 had good reactivity and specificity against PCV2, or the Rep and ORF3 expressed in PK-15 cells, respectively. The Rep protein is promising for PCV2 antibody and vaccine development. These results will be helpful for further studies focusing on pathogenesis of PCV2 and serology diagnostic test or vaccine development against PCV2. PMID:26812108

  6. Isolated Liver Gap Junctions: Gating of Transjunctional Currents is Similar to That in Intact Pairs of Rat Hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spray, D. C.; Saez, J. C.; Brosius, D.; Benneti, M. V. L.; Hertzberg, E. L.

    1986-08-01

    We have shown previously that conductance of rat liver gap junctions is blocked by an affinity-purified polyclonal antibody generated against rat liver junctional membranes, is not affected by moderate transjunctional or transmembrane potentials, and is reversibly decreased by cytoplasmic acidification and perfusion with octanol. We have now recorded currents from isolated liver gap junctions using patch electrodes dipped through a layer of mixed lipids whose concentrations match those of isolated liver appositional membranes. These currents are blocked by the same polyclonal antibody, are insensitive to moderate voltages imposed across the pipette tip, and are reversibly blocked by similar concentrations of H ions and octanol as are junctions in situ. The currents are likely to be gap junctional in origin; their block by low pH and other agents indicates that the gating mechanisms are intrinsic to the gap junctions themselves and presumably result from conformational change in the channel-forming protein.

  7. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  8. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today.

  9. Double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for cellobiohydrolase I

    SciTech Connect

    Riske, F.J.; Eveleigh, D.E.; MacMillan, J.D. )

    1990-11-01

    A double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for quantifying cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) in crude preparations of the cellulase complex from Trichoderma reesei. The other enzymes (endoglucanase and {beta}-glucosidase) in this complex and other ingredients in culture broth did not interfere with this assay. The antibody configuration that resulted in the highest specificity for the assay of CBH I employed a monoclonal antibody to coat wells in polystyrene plates and peroxidase-labeled polyclonal antibody to detect cellobiohydrolase bound to the immobilized monoclonal antibody. Previously, procedures have not been available for the direct assay of CBH I activity in the presence of the other enzymes in the complex, and current indirect procedures are cumbersome and inaccurate. The direct procedure described here is highly specific for CBH I and useful for quantifying this enzyme in the range of 0.1 to 0.8 {mu}g/ml.

  10. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  11. Comparison between scintigraphy with polyclonal immunoglobulin (99Tcm-HIG) and physical examination in polyarthritic disease.

    PubMed

    Vesterskiöld, L; Schnell, P O; Jacobsson, H

    1996-01-01

    99Tcm-labelled polyclonal human immunoglobulin 99Tcm-HIG scintigraphy has been suggested as a technique to detect joint inflammation in arthritic disorders. Scintigraphy was performed in fifteen patients with active polyarthritis. All joints except the hips were scored clinically for swelling and pain by a rheumatologist and scintigraphic images were obtained at 30 minutes and four hours after injection of 350MBq 99Tcm-HIG. The images were assessed by a nuclear medicine physician according to a four grade scale. The images were easy to assess. There was a highly significant correlation between swelling and scan score, but no correlation between pain and scan score. The mechanism for the accumulation of activity to inflamed synovial tissue remains unclear. The mean values of the scan score however increased significantly between 30 minutes and 4 hours, indicating an active binding mechanism. The method has a potential as an objective tool in monitoring rheumatic diseases.

  12. Legionella micdadei and Legionella dumoffii monoclonal antibodies for laboratory diagnosis of Legionella infections.

    PubMed Central

    Cercenado, E; Edelstein, P H; Gosting, L H; Sturge, J C

    1987-01-01

    Two different monoclonal antibodies directed against Legionella micdadei and L. dumoffii (Genetic Systems Corp., Seattle, Wash.) were evaluated for their specificity and ability to detect L. micdadei and L. dumoffii in human and animal clinical samples and bacterial isolates in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. All three frozen sputum samples and all three Formalin-fixed sputum and liver samples from patients with culture-documented L. micdadei pneumonia were positive when tested with the L. micdadei monoclonal antibody. A Formalin-preserved lung sample from a patient with culture-documented L. dumoffii pneumonia was positive with its homologous monoclonal antibody. No cross-staining reactions were found with either monoclonal antibody on any of 25 human sputum samples tested from patients without Legionella infections. A total of 66 Legionella strains and 56 non-Legionella strains including 22 Pseudomonas strains and 34 other bacterial strains were studied. No cross-staining reactions were found except in Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 ATCC 12598. The lower limit of detection in seeded sputum samples was about 7 X 10(4) cells per ml for both monoclonal antibodies. Lung and tracheal lavage specimens from L. micdadei- or L. dumoffii-infected guinea pigs showed specific staining only with their respective monoclonal antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies stained homologous bacteria slightly less intensely than did the polyclonal antisera, but the signal-to-noise ratio was considerably higher for the monoclonal antibodies. No differences in sensitivity of staining of clinical specimens or bacterial isolates were noted between the monoclonal antibodies and the polyclonal reagents for L. micdadei and L. dumoffii (Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga., and BioDx, Denville, N.J. These monoclonal antibodies ae sensitive and specific, making them good candidates for laboratory diagnostic purposes. PMID:3320084

  13. Engineered Antibody Fragments for Immunodiagnosis of Papaya ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Yogita; Verma, H N; Jain, R K; Mandal, Bikash

    2015-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to clone and express the genes encoding antibody to the recombinant coat protein (rCP) of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and to assess the engineered antibody for the detection of PRSV. A 33-kDa rCP of PRSV, which was produced in Escherichia coli, generated PRSV specific antibody in immunized mouse. The heavy and light chain variable domain genes (VH and VL) of 351 and 360 nucleotides, respectively, were cloned from the mRNA isolated from the spleen of the immunized mouse with rCP of PRSV. The VH and VL belong to the family IgG1 and kappa chain, respectively, and contained the framework regions and complementarity determining regions. The VH and VL genes were individually used to develop the expression constructs in pET28a (+) vector and 14-kDa proteins were obtained in E. coli. The amount of purified VH and VL proteins was 3-4 mg/l of bacterial culture. Both the antibody fragments recognized PRSV in the crude sap; however, the VL antibody fragment showed higher affinity to PRSV. The mixture of VH and VL detected PRSV as effectively as polyclonal antibody. The recombinant antibody fragments mixture detected PRSV in the field samples with 100 % accuracy in dot immunobinding assay (DIBA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The sensitivity of the detection of PRSV using antibody fragments was 1.0 and 10.0 ng in DIBA and ELISA, respectively. The results showed successful isolation of functional single-domain antibody encoding genes to PRSV directly from the immunized spleen cells of mouse. This study for the first time demonstrates application of bacterial expressed recombinant antibody fragments in immunodiagnosis of PRSV.

  14. Diacylglycerol-induced translocation of diacylglycerol kinase: use of affinity-purified enzyme in a reconstitution system.

    PubMed

    Besterman, J M; Pollenz, R S; Booker, E L; Cuatrecasas, P

    1986-12-01

    Diacylglycerol-induced translocation of diacylglycerol kinase (ATP:1,2-diacylglycerol 3-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.107) from the soluble to the membrane-bound compartments was demonstrated both in crude tissue homogenates and in a reconstituted enzyme-membrane model system. In homogenates of either rat brain or liver, incubation with diacylglycerol or phospholipase C, but not phospholipase A2 or phospholipase D, resulted in the translocation of diacylglycerol kinase activity from the soluble to the particulate fraction. This observation formed the basis for the first step in a two-step purification of diacylglycerol kinase. Enzyme extracted in 1 M salt from membranes of rat brain homogenates made in the presence of phospholipase C was purified further by affinity chromatography on a column containing phosphatidylserine, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol immobilized in polyacrylamide. This step yielded an enzyme preparation (step 2 enzyme) that was 500- to 750-fold purified (relative to the tissue homogenate) and required phosphatidylserine for stability. All other lipids tested failed to stabilize the enzyme. The properties of the enzyme preparation were similar to those of mammalian diacylglycerol kinases described by others. Reconstitution experiments showed that the soluble step 2 enzyme bound to inside-out vesicles of human erythrocytes only in the presence of diacylglycerol or phospholipase C but not phospholipase A2 or D. Redistribution of the kinase from soluble to vesicle-bound forms occurred rapidly and was dependent on the concentration of phospholipase C used to treat the vesicles. Physiological concentrations of calcium (50-1000 nM) did not enhance the phospholipase C-mediated translocation of the kinase. Thus, diacylglycerol kinase can translocate from cytosol to membranes in a manner dependent on the content of membrane-bound diacylglycerol but independent of the ambient concentration of calcium.

  15. Noncanonical Amino Acid Labeling in Vivo to Visualize and Affinity Purify Newly Synthesized Proteins in Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein expression in the nervous system undergoes regulated changes in response to changes in behavioral states, in particular long-term memory formation. Recently, methods have been developed (BONCAT and FUNCAT), which introduce noncanonical amino acids bearing small bio-orthogonal functional groups into proteins using the cells’ own translational machinery. Using the selective “click reaction”, this allows for the identification and visualization of newly synthesized proteins in vitro. Here we demonstrate that noncanonical amino acid labeling can be achieved in vivo in an intact organism capable of simple learning behavior, the larval zebrafish. We show that azidohomoalanine is metabolically incorporated into newly synthesized proteins, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, but has no apparent toxic effect and does not influence simple behaviors such as spontaneous swimming and escape responses. This enables fluorescent labeling of newly synthesized proteins in whole mount larval zebrafish. Furthermore, stimulation with a GABA antagonist that elicits seizures in the larval zebrafish causes an increase in protein synthesis throughout the proteome, which can also be visualized in intact larvae. PMID:22347535

  16. Enzyme immunoassay of mumps virus in cell culture with peroxidase-labelled virus specific monoclonal antibodies and its application for determination of antibodies.

    PubMed

    van Tiel, F H; Kraaijeveld, C A; Baller, J; Harmsen, T; Oosterlaken, T A; Snippe, H

    1988-10-01

    Mumps neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAs) were purified and labelled with horseradish peroxidase and used to detect virus-infected Vero cells, which were seeded as monolayers in wells of 96-well plates. This direct enzyme immunoassay (EIA) in cell culture proved to be a sensitive method for detection and titration of mumps virus and it may be useful for diagnostic purposes. The EIA is also suitable for the rapid determination of neutralizing antibodies. Neutralization of mumps virus by preincubation with either monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies was indicated by inhibition of the absorbance at 450 nm as measured with a multichannelled photometer. The EIA (duration 2 days) for determination of mumps neutralizing antibodies is an attractive alternative for the plaque reduction test (duration 6 days).

  17. Anti-La (SS-B) but not anti-Ro52 (SS-A) antibodies cross-react with laminin--a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart block?

    PubMed Central

    Li, J M; Horsfall, A C; Maini, R N

    1995-01-01

    Cross-reactions between maternally derived autoantibodies and fetal cardiac antigens have been postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart block (CHB). We have explored the cross-reactivity of autoantibodies to the small ribonuclear autoantigens, La/SS-B and Ro/SS-A, with laminin, the major component of cardiac sarcolemmal membrane using affinity-purified antibodies from patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Anti-La antibodies purified from eight of 10 patients cross-reacted significantly with mouse laminin by ELISA. In contrast, purified antibodies to Ro52 from the same 10 patients showed little or no binding to laminin. Laminin inhibited up to 70% binding of anti-La antibodies to La antigen, and La inhibited up to 65% binding of anti-La antibodies to laminin. The cross-reaction was further examined on cryosections of 10 human fetal hearts aged from 8.7 to 14.9 weeks of gestation, two normal adult hearts, and one pathological adult heart with a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Anti-Ro52 antibodies did not bind to the surface of cardiac cells. However, anti-La antibodies from seven of 10 patients tested bound to the surface of fetal myocytes from hearts aged 9.4 to 14.9 weeks of gestation, and also to the myocytes from the pathological adult heart but not to normal adult hearts. Preincubation with La antigen abolished the binding of anti-La antibodies to the surface of adult heart myocytes with dilated cardiomyopathy, and pre-incubation with mouse laminin could partially block this binding. These results suggest that molecular mimicry between laminin and La, but not Ro52, may act as a target for specific maternal autoantibodies, and contribute to the pathogenesis of CHB at a critical stage during fetal cardiac development. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7882552

  18. Anti-La (SS-B) but not anti-Ro52 (SS-A) antibodies cross-react with laminin--a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart block?

    PubMed

    Li, J M; Horsfall, A C; Maini, R N

    1995-03-01

    Cross-reactions between maternally derived autoantibodies and fetal cardiac antigens have been postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart block (CHB). We have explored the cross-reactivity of autoantibodies to the small ribonuclear autoantigens, La/SS-B and Ro/SS-A, with laminin, the major component of cardiac sarcolemmal membrane using affinity-purified antibodies from patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Anti-La antibodies purified from eight of 10 patients cross-reacted significantly with mouse laminin by ELISA. In contrast, purified antibodies to Ro52 from the same 10 patients showed little or no binding to laminin. Laminin inhibited up to 70% binding of anti-La antibodies to La antigen, and La inhibited up to 65% binding of anti-La antibodies to laminin. The cross-reaction was further examined on cryosections of 10 human fetal hearts aged from 8.7 to 14.9 weeks of gestation, two normal adult hearts, and one pathological adult heart with a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Anti-Ro52 antibodies did not bind to the surface of cardiac cells. However, anti-La antibodies from seven of 10 patients tested bound to the surface of fetal myocytes from hearts aged 9.4 to 14.9 weeks of gestation, and also to the myocytes from the pathological adult heart but not to normal adult hearts. Preincubation with La antigen abolished the binding of anti-La antibodies to the surface of adult heart myocytes with dilated cardiomyopathy, and pre-incubation with mouse laminin could partially block this binding. These results suggest that molecular mimicry between laminin and La, but not Ro52, may act as a target for specific maternal autoantibodies, and contribute to the pathogenesis of CHB at a critical stage during fetal cardiac development. PMID:7882552

  19. Ability of the xid gene to prevent autoimmunity in (NZB X NZW)F1 mice during the course of their natural history, after polyclonal stimulation, or following immunization with DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, B J; Smathers, P A; Frederiksen, K; Steinberg, A D

    1982-01-01

    F1 hybrid offspring of New Zealand Black mothers and New Zealand White fathers [(NZB X NZW)F1] female mice develop antibodies to single-stranded (ss) and native DNA, immune complex glomerulonephritis, massive proteinuria, and premature death with renal failure. By a series of matings, congenic (NZB X NZW)F1 . xid/xid mice were prepared. These mice were different from (NZB X NZW)F1 mice in having the X chromosome-linked immune deficiency gene, xid, in homozygous form. Such congenic (NZB X NZW)F1 . xid/xid females failed to develop antibodies to single-stranded or native DNA. They also failed to develop fatal renal disease as measured by proteinuria, glomerular histology, glomerular immunofluorescence, and survival. To control for unknown genetic factors, studies were performed with littermates that were derived by mating NZB . xid/+ females with NZW . xid/Y males such that the resulting offspring were either (NZB X NZW)F1 . xid/xid (and therefore "defective") or (NZB X NZW)F1 . xid/+ [phenotypically like (NZB X NZW)F1]. In these and in additional studies, mice were housed in the same cages and identified by ear tagging so as to avoid possible environmental variations from cage to cage. In these studies, xid/xid mice failed to develop the characteristic signs of autoimmunity, whereas the controls did. Similar results were also obtained with (NZW X NZB)F1 xid/xid mice compared with (NZW X NZB)F1 xid/+ mice. The effect of xid/xid upon (NZB X NZW)F1 mice was further investigated by assessing responses to immunization and polyclonal B cell activation in vivo. The xid/xid mice failed to produce anti-ssDNA following immunization with ssDNA complexed to a protein carrier in fluid form or even emulsified in adjuvant. Finally, the xid/xid mice failed to produce antiDNA in response to multiple injections of the polyclonal activator, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or the polyclonal activator, polyribose inosinic acid . polyribose cytidylic acid. However, the xid/xid mice

  20. Antiphospholipid Antibodies Bind ATP: A putative Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Neuronal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J.; Soloveichick, L.; Shavit, S.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Korczyn, A. D.

    2005-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) generated in experimental animals cross-react with ATP. We therefore examined the possibility that aPL IgG from human subjects bind to ATP by affinity column and an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sera with high levels of aPL IgG were collected from 12 patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). IgG fractions from 10 of 12 APS patients contained aPL that could be affinity-bound to an ATP column and completely eluted with NaCl 0.5 M. A significant (>50%) inhibition of aPL IgG binding by ATP 5 mM was found in the majority. Similar inhibition was obtained with ADP but not with AMP or cAMP. All the affinity purified anti-ATP antibodies also bound β2-glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI, also known as apolipoprotein H) suggesting that, similar to most pathogenic aPL, their binding depends on this serum cofactor. We further investigated this possibility and found that the binding of β2-GPI to the ATP column was similar to that of aPL IgG in that most was reversed by NaCl 0.5 M. Furthermore, addition of β2-GPI to aPL IgG significantly increased the amount of aPL binding to an ATP column. We conclude that aPL IgG bind ATP, probably through β2-GPI. This binding could interfere with the normal extracellular function of ATP and similar neurotransmitters. PMID:16295522

  1. Vaccination for invasive canine meningioma induces in situ production of antibodies capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Brian M; Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Seiler, Charles E; Goulart, Michelle R; SantaCruz, Karen S; Schutten, Melissa M; Meints, Joyce P; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Bentley, R Timothy; Packer, Rebecca A; Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Faissler, Dominik; Chen, Wei; Hunt, Matthew A; Olin, Michael R; Ohlfest, John R

    2013-05-15

    Malignant and atypical meningiomas are resistant to standard therapies and associated with poor prognosis. Despite progress in the treatment of other tumors with therapeutic vaccines, this approach has not been tested preclinically or clinically in these tumors. Spontaneous canine meningioma is a clinically meaningful but underutilized model for preclinical testing of novel strategies for aggressive human meningioma. We treated 11 meningioma-bearing dogs with surgery and vaccine immunotherapy consisting of autologous tumor cell lysate combined with toll-like receptor ligands. Therapy was well tolerated, and only one dog had tumor growth that required intervention, with a mean follow up of 585 days. IFN-γ-elaborating T cells were detected in the peripheral blood of 2 cases, but vaccine-induced tumor-reactive antibody responses developed in all dogs. Antibody responses were polyclonal, recognizing both intracellular and cell surface antigens, and HSP60 was identified as one common antigen. Tumor-reactive antibodies bound allogeneic canine and human meningiomas, showing common antigens across breed and species. Histologic analysis revealed robust infiltration of antibody-secreting plasma cells into the brain around the tumor in posttreatment compared with pretreatment samples. Tumor-reactive antibodies were capable of inducing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity to autologous and allogeneic tumor cells. These data show the feasibility and immunologic efficacy of vaccine immunotherapy for a large animal model of human meningioma and warrant further development toward human trials.

  2. Study of rat kidney transamidinase structure and regulation with monoclonal antibodies and the purification and characterization of human kidney transamidinase

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of monoclonal antibodies to transamidinase made possible the development of an immunosorbent inhibition assay for transamidinase protein using a /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibody. This assay is a more direct measurement of transamidinase protein than the determination of the amount of polyclonal antibody required to precipitate the transamidinase activities. Rats were fed diets supplemented with creatine and/or glycine, and the amounts of transamidinase protein were determined with the assay using the monoclonal antibody. The transamidinase activities of kidneys from the rats fed the various supplemented diets ranged from 10 to 40% of the control values, whereas, the amounts of transamidinase protein were, in all instances no lower than 66% of the control values. Purified homogeneous rat kidney transamidinase and rat kidney supernatants were subjected to isoelectric focussing and four to five fractions of the enzyme were obtained. Polyclonal antibodies, but not the monoclonal antibodies were found by Western blotting experiments to recognize all the forms of the enzyme obtained by the isoelectric focussing. The author concluded that the monoclonal antibodies recognized forms of the enzyme that changed very little in amount, relative to the alterations in enzyme activities, when rats were fed a diet containing creatine.

  3. The antiperinuclear factor and the so-called antikeratin antibodies are the same rheumatoid arthritis-specific autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Sebbag, M; Simon, M; Vincent, C; Masson-Bessière, C; Girbal, E; Durieux, J J; Serre, G

    1995-01-01

    The so-called antikeratin antibodies (AKA) and the antiperinuclear factor (APF) are the most specific serological markers of RA. Using indirect immunofluorescence, AKA label the stratum corneum of various cornified epithelia and APF the keratohyalin granules of human buccal mucosa epithelium. We recently demonstrated that AKA recognize human epidermal filaggrin. Here, we report the identification of the major APF antigen as a diffuse protein band of 200-400 kD. This protein is seen to be closely related to human epidermal (pro) filaggrin since it was recognized by four antifilaggrin mAbs specific for different epitopes, and since the APF titers of RA sera were found to be correlated to their AKA titers and to their immunoblotting reactivities to filaggrin. Immunoabsorption of RA sera on purified epidermal filaggrin abolished their reactivities to the granules of buccal epithelial cells and to the 200-400-kD antigen. Moreover, antifilaggrin autoantibodies, i.e., AKA, affinity purified from RA sera, were shown to immunodetect the 200-400-kD antigen and to stain these granules. These results indicate that AKA and APF are largely the same autoantibodies. They recognize human epidermal filaggrin and (pro) filaggrin-related proteins of buccal epithelial cells. Identification of the epitopes recognized by these autoantibodies, which we propose to name antifilaggrin autoantibodies, will certainly open new paths of research into the pathophysiology of RA. Images PMID:7539459

  4. Functional Activity of Antibodies Directed towards Flagellin Proteins of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Girish; Tennant, Sharon M; Boyd, Mary A; Wang, Jin Y; Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Pasetti, Marcela F; Levine, Myron M; Simon, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are major causes of invasive bacterial infections in children under 5 years old in sub-Saharan Africa, with case fatality rates of ~20%. There are no licensed NTS vaccines for humans. Vaccines that induce antibodies against a Salmonella Typhi surface antigen, Vi polysaccharide, significantly protect humans against typhoid fever, establishing that immune responses to Salmonella surface antigens can be protective. Flagella proteins, abundant surface antigens in Salmonella serovars that cause human disease, are also powerful immunogens, but the functional capacity of elicited anti-flagellar antibodies and their role in facilitating bacterial clearance has been unclear. We examined the ability of anti-flagellar antibodies to mediate microbial killing by immune system components in-vitro and assessed their role in protecting mice against invasive Salmonella infection. Polyclonal (hyperimmune sera) and monoclonal antibodies raised against phase 1 flagellin proteins of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium facilitated bacterial uptake and killing of the homologous serovar pathogen by phagocytes. Polyclonal anti-flagellar antibodies accompanied by complement also achieved direct bacterial killing. Serum bactericidal activity was restricted to Salmonella serovars expressing the same flagellin used as immunogen. Notably, individual anti-flagellin monoclonal antibodies with complement were not bactericidal, but this biological activity was restored when different monoclonal anti-flagellin antibodies were combined. Passive transfer immunization with a monoclonal IgG antibody specific for phase 1 flagellin from S. Typhimurium protected mice against lethal challenge with a representative African invasive S. Typhimurium strain. These findings have relevance for the use of flagellin proteins in NTS vaccines, and confirm the role of anti-flagellin antibodies as mediators of protective immunity. PMID:26998925

  5. Understanding the Cellular Function of TRPV2 Channel through Generation of Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Huynh, Kevin W.; Cawley, Daniel; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is a Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channel proposed to play a critical role in a wide array of cellular processes. Although TRPV2 surface expression was originally determined to be sensitive to growth factor signaling, regulated trafficking of TRPV2 has remained controversial. TRPV2 has proven difficult to study due to the lack of specific pharmacological tools to modulate channel activity; therefore, most studies of the cellular function of TRPV2 rely on immuno-detection techniques. Polyclonal antibodies against TRPV2 have not been properly validated and characterized, which may contribute to conflicting results regarding its function in the cell. Here, we developed monoclonal antibodies using full-length TRPV2 as an antigen. Extensive characterization of these antibodies and comparison to commonly used commercially available TRPV2 antibodies revealed that while monoclonal antibodies generated in our laboratory were suitable for detection of endogenous TRPV2 by western blot, immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry, the commercially available polyclonal antibodies we tested were not able to recognize endogenous TRPV2. We used our newly generated and validated TRPV2 antibodies to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on TRPV2 surface expression in heterologous and endogenous expression systems. We found that IGF-1 had little to no effect on trafficking and plasma membrane expression of TRPV2. Overall, these new TRPV2 monoclonal antibodies served to dispel the controversy of the effects of IGF-1 on TRPV2 plasma membrane expression and will clarify the role TRPV2 plays in cellular function. Furthermore, our strategy of using full-length tetrameric TRP channels may allow for the generation of antibodies against other TRP channels of unclear function. PMID:24392006

  6. Functional Activity of Antibodies Directed towards Flagellin Proteins of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Girish; Tennant, Sharon M; Boyd, Mary A; Wang, Jin Y; Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Pasetti, Marcela F; Levine, Myron M; Simon, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are major causes of invasive bacterial infections in children under 5 years old in sub-Saharan Africa, with case fatality rates of ~20%. There are no licensed NTS vaccines for humans. Vaccines that induce antibodies against a Salmonella Typhi surface antigen, Vi polysaccharide, significantly protect humans against typhoid fever, establishing that immune responses to Salmonella surface antigens can be protective. Flagella proteins, abundant surface antigens in Salmonella serovars that cause human disease, are also powerful immunogens, but the functional capacity of elicited anti-flagellar antibodies and their role in facilitating bacterial clearance has been unclear. We examined the ability of anti-flagellar antibodies to mediate microbial killing by immune system components in-vitro and assessed their role in protecting mice against invasive Salmonella infection. Polyclonal (hyperimmune sera) and monoclonal antibodies raised against phase 1 flagellin proteins of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium facilitated bacterial uptake and killing of the homologous serovar pathogen by phagocytes. Polyclonal anti-flagellar antibodies accompanied by complement also achieved direct bacterial killing. Serum bactericidal activity was restricted to Salmonella serovars expressing the same flagellin used as immunogen. Notably, individual anti-flagellin monoclonal antibodies with complement were not bactericidal, but this biological activity was restored when different monoclonal anti-flagellin antibodies were combined. Passive transfer immunization with a monoclonal IgG antibody specific for phase 1 flagellin from S. Typhimurium protected mice against lethal challenge with a representative African invasive S. Typhimurium strain. These findings have relevance for the use of flagellin proteins in NTS vaccines, and confirm the role of anti-flagellin antibodies as mediators of protective immunity.

  7. Antibody against the C-terminal portion of dystrophin crossreacts with the 400 kDa protein in the pia mater of dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ishiura, S; Arahata, K; Tsukahara, T; Koga, R; Anraku, H; Yamaguchi, M; Kikuchi, T; Nonaka, I; Sugita, H

    1990-04-01

    The mdx mouse is an animal model for X-linked Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A polyclonal antibody against a synthetic peptide IV equivalent to the C-terminal portion (amino acids 3495-3544) of dystrophin crossreacted with a 400 kDa protein in the brain and the spinal cord of mdx mouse, as well as in the control B10 mouse. However, the protein did not crossreact with the polyclonal antibody raised against the N-terminal portion of dystrophin peptide I (amino acids 215-264). Immunofluorescent micrography revealed that the outside of the small arteries and the pia mater of the brain strongly reacted with the anti-peptide IV antibody. These results strongly suggest the presence of a crossreactive protein other than dystrophin, possibly a dystrophin-related autosomal gene product, in the pia mater.

  8. Polyclonal Intestinal Colonization with Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporin-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae upon Traveling to India

    PubMed Central

    Pires, João; Kuenzli, Esther; Kasraian, Sara; Tinguely, Regula; Furrer, Hansjakob; Hilty, Markus; Hatz, Christoph; Endimiani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess the intestinal colonization dynamics by multiple extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (ESC-R-Ent) clones in Swiss travelers to India, a country with high prevalence of these multidrug-resistant pathogens. Fifteen healthy volunteers (HVs) colonized with ESC-R-Ent after traveling to India who provided stools before, after, and at 3- and 6-month follow-up are presented in this study. Stools were enriched in a LB broth containing 3 mg/L cefuroxime and plated in standard selective media (BLSE, ChromID ESBL, Supercarba) to detect carbapenem- and/or ESC-R-Ent. At least 5 Enterobacteriaceae colonies were analyzed for each stool provided. All strains underwent phenotypic tests (MICs in microdilution) and molecular typing to define bla genes (microarray, PCR/sequencing), clonality (MLST, rep-PCR), and plasmid content. While only three HVs were colonized before the trip, all participants had positive stools after returning, but the colonization rate decreased during the follow-up period (i.e., six HVs were still colonized at both 3 and 6 months). More importantly, polyclonal acquisition (median of 2 clones, range 1–5) was identified at return in all HVs. The majority of the Escherichia coli isolates belonged to phylogenetic groups A and B1 and to high diverse non-epidemic sequence types (STs); however, 15% of them belonged to clonal complex 10 and mainly possessed blaCTX−M−15 genes. F family plasmids were constantly found (~80%) in the recovered ESC-R-Ent. Our results indicate a possible polyclonal acquisition of the ESC-R-Ent via food-chain and/or through an environmental exposure. For some HVs, prolonged colonization in the follow-up period was observed due to clonal persistence or presence of the same plasmid replicon types in a new bacterial host. Travel medicine practitioners, clinicians, and clinical microbiologists who are facing the returning travelers and their samples for different reasons should be aware of this

  9. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  10. A murine monoclonal antibody based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for almond (Prunus dulcis L.) detection.

    PubMed

    Su, Mengna; Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Liu, Changqi; Zhang, Ying; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2013-11-13

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using anti-almond soluble protein rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and murine monoclonal antibody 4C10 as the detection antibodies was developed. The assay is specific and sensitive (3-200 ng almond protein/mL) for almond detection. The standardized assay is accurate (<15% CV) and reproducible (intra- and inter assay variability <15% CV). The assay did not register any cross-reactivity with the tested food matrices, suggesting the assay to be almond amandin specific. The assay could detect the presence of declared almond in the tested matched commercial samples. Further, the assay reliably detected the presence of almonds in the laboratory prepared food samples spiked with almond flour. PMID:24099349

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Hapten-Protein Conjugates for Antibody Production against Cyanogenic Glycosides.

    PubMed

    Bolarinwa, Islamiyat Folashade

    2015-07-01

    Consumption of cyanogenic plants can cause serious health problems for humans. The ability to detect and quantify cyanogenic glycosides, capable of generating cyanide, could contribute to prevention of cyanide poisoning from the consumption of improperly processed cyanogenic plants. Hapten-protein conjugates were synthesized with amygdalin and linamarin by using a novel approach. Polyclonal antibodies were generated by immunizing four New Zealand White rabbits with synthesized amygdalin-bovine serum albumin and linamarin-bovine serum albumin immunogen. This is the first time an antibody was produced against linamarin. Antibody titer curves were obtained from all the four rabbits by using a noncompetitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. High antibody titer was obtained at dilutions greater than 1:50,000 from both immunogens. This new method is an important step forward in preventing ingestion of toxic cyanogenic glycosides. PMID:26197297

  12. A murine monoclonal antibody based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for almond (Prunus dulcis L.) detection.

    PubMed

    Su, Mengna; Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Liu, Changqi; Zhang, Ying; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2013-11-13

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using anti-almond soluble protein rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and murine monoclonal antibody 4C10 as the detection antibodies was developed. The assay is specific and sensitive (3-200 ng almond protein/mL) for almond detection. The standardized assay is accurate (<15% CV) and reproducible (intra- and inter assay variability <15% CV). The assay did not register any cross-reactivity with the tested food matrices, suggesting the assay to be almond amandin specific. The assay could detect the presence of declared almond in the tested matched commercial samples. Further, the assay reliably detected the presence of almonds in the laboratory prepared food samples spiked with almond flour.

  13. 2-D Western blotting for evaluation of antibodies developed for detection of host cell protein.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom; Harbers, Adriana; Bandhakavi, Sricharan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins generated for therapeutic use must be substantially free of residual host cell protein (HCP). The presence of host cell protein (HCP) is usually assayed by ELISA using a polyclonal antibody mixture raised against a population of proteins derived from the host cell background. This antibody should recognize as high a proportion as possible of the potential HCPs in a given sample. A recommended method for evaluating the assay involves two-dimensional electrophoretic separation followed by Western blotting.We present here a method using commercial anti-HCP antibody and samples derived from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The 2-D electrophoresis procedure gives highly reproducible spot patterns and entire procedure can be completed in less than 2 days. Software analysis enables the straightforward generation of percent coverage values for the antibody when used to probe HCP-containing samples. PMID:25820736

  14. 2-D Western blotting for evaluation of antibodies developed for detection of host cell protein.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom; Harbers, Adriana; Bandhakavi, Sricharan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins generated for therapeutic use must be substantially free of residual host cell protein (HCP). The presence of host cell protein (HCP) is usually assayed by ELISA using a polyclonal antibody mixture raised against a population of proteins derived from the host cell background. This antibody should recognize as high a proportion as possible of the potential HCPs in a given sample. A recommended method for evaluating the assay involves two-dimensional electrophoretic separation followed by Western blotting.We present here a method using commercial anti-HCP antibody and samples derived from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The 2-D electrophoresis procedure gives highly reproducible spot patterns and entire procedure can be completed in less than 2 days. Software analysis enables the straightforward generation of percent coverage values for the antibody when used to probe HCP-containing samples.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies as blood grouping reagents.

    PubMed

    Voak, D

    1990-04-01

    The large volume requirements for high quality ABO and Rh(D) typing reagents can now be supplied by selected monoclonal antibodies. Superior anti-A and anti-B monoclonal reagents can be prepared, from blends of at least two antibodies, to optimize the intensity of agglutination for slide tests and the potency for the detection of the weaker sub-groups, including Ax and Bw, by tube techniques. New quality control steps have been described for some highly sensitive anti-A/anti-B antibodies to avoid the detection of traces of A on B cells or traces of B on A1 cells, which results from the non-specific activity of A and B transferases. Excellent anti-A,B reagents may also be made by blends of at least two antibodies to optimize both A and B reactions, but the need for their continued use is now debatable. The development of high titre IgM monoclonal anti-D reagents offers simple rapid saline Rh(D) typing of both patients and donors, but they cannot reliably detect weak D (Du) and some D variants, e.g. the epitopes on D category VI cells. However, this can be achieved by blending an IgM anti-D with IgG (polyclonal) anti-D which can detect these types after conversion of negative saline tests to an antiglobulin phase. In addition, high grade Du, D categories and variants can be reliably detected (for typing donors) by selected monoclonal IgM and IgG anti-Ds by use of suitably enhanced tests without the use of an antiglobulin test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. CD4 T cells in murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: polyclonal progression to anergy

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the kinetics of changes that occur in the helper T cell subset during murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which occurs after infection with the mix of viruses known as BM5. We find that there is expansion of the CD4 T cells by 2 wk, 50% of the CD4 T cells become large as the disease progresses, and the CD4 T cell population is increasingly comprised of cells with a memory/activated phenotype. These effects are apparent by 2 wk postinfection, and the change is nearly complete by 6-8 wk. The phenotypic shift is paralleled by the loss of the ability of the CD4 T cells to proliferate or to produce interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-3, IL-4, and interferon gamma in response to stimulation with mitogens, superantigen, or anti-CD3. There is no obvious expansion or deletion of CD4 T cells expressing particular V beta genes, as might be expected if a conventional superantigen were driving the changes. The results suggest, however, that the total CD4 population has been driven to anergy by some potent polyclonal stimulus directly associated with viral infection. PMID:1588283

  17. Polyclonal Expansion of NKG2C+ NK Cells in TAP-Deficient Patients

    PubMed Central

    Béziat, Vivien; Sleiman, Marwan; Goodridge, Jodie P.; Kaarbø, Mari; Liu, Lisa L.; Rollag, Halvor; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Zimmer, Jacques; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive natural killer (NK) cell responses to human cytomegalovirus infection are characterized by the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells expressing self-specific inhibitory killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Here, we set out to study the HLA class I dependency of such NKG2C+ NK cell expansions. We demonstrate the expansion of NKG2C+ NK cells in patients with transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) deficiency, who express less than 10% of normal HLA class I levels. In contrast to normal individuals, expanded NKG2C+ NK cell populations in TAP-deficient patients display a polyclonal KIR profile and remain hyporesponsive to HLA class I-negative target cells. Nonetheless, agonistic stimulation of NKG2C on NK cells from TAP-deficient patients yielded significant responses in terms of degranulation and cytokine production. Thus, while interactions with self-HLA class I molecules likely shape the KIR repertoire of expanding NKG2C+ NK cells during adaptive NK cell responses in normal individuals, they are not a prerequisite for NKG2C+ NK cell expansions to occur. The emergence of NKG2C-responsive adaptive NK cells in TAP-deficient patients may contribute to antiviral immunity and potentially explain these patients’ low incidence of severe viral infections. PMID:26500647

  18. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  19. A Novel Polyclonal Antiserum against Toxoplasma gondii Sodium Hydrogen Exchanger 1

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bin; Kuang, Zhenzhan; Zhan, Yanli; Chen, Daxiang; Gao, Yang; Li, Ming; Luo, Shuhong; Hao, Wenbo

    2016-01-01

    The sodium hydrogen exchanger 1 (NHE1), which functions in maintaining the ratio of Na+ and H+ ions, is widely distributed in cell plasma membranes. It plays a prominent role in pH balancing, cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. However, its exact subcellular location and biological functions in Toxoplasma gondii are largely unclear. In this study, we cloned the C-terminal sequence of T. gondii NHE1 (TgNHE1) incorporating the C-terminal peptide of NHE1 (C-NHE1) into the pGEX4T-1 expression plasmid. The peptide sequence was predicted to have good antigenicity based on the information obtained from an immune epitope database. After induction of heterologous gene expression with isopropyl-b-D-thiogalactoside, the recombinant C-NHE1 protein successfully expressed in a soluble form was purified by glutathione sepharose beads as an immunogen for production of a rabbit polyclonal antiserum. The specificity of this antiserum was confirmed by western blotting and immunofluorescence. The antiserum could reduce T. gondii invasion into host cells, indicated by the decreased TgNHE1 expression in T. gondii parasites that were pre-incubated with antiserum in the process of cell entry. Furthermore, the antiserum reduced the virulence of T. gondii parasites to host cells in vitro, possibly by blocking the release of Ca2+. In this regard, this antiserum has potential to be a valuable tool for further studies of TgNHE1. PMID:26951975

  20. Glycation of polyclonal IgGs: Effect of sugar excipients during stability studies.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Y; Bihoreau, N; Jube, M; Andre, M-H; Tellier, Z; Chevreux, G

    2016-05-01

    A number of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations are stabilized with sugar additives that may lead over time to undesirable glycation reactions especially in liquid formulation. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of sugar excipients on such preparations in condition of temperature, formulation and concentration commonly used for pharmaceutical products. Through an innovative LC-MS method reported to characterize post-translational modifications of IgGs Fc/2 fragments, a stability study of IVIg formulated with reducing and non-reducing sugars has been undertaken. The rate of polyclonal IgGs glycation was investigated during 6months at 5, 25, 30 and 40°C. High levels of glycation were observed with reducing sugars such as glucose and maltose in the first months of the stability study from 25°C. Non-reducing sugars presented a low reactivity even at the highest tested temperature (40°C). Furthermore, a site by site analysis was performed by MS/MS to determine the glycation sites which were mainly identified at Lys246, Lys248 and Lys324. This work points out the high probability of glycation reactions in some commercialized products and describes a useful method to characterize IVIg glycated products issued from reducing sugar excipients. PMID:26992291

  1. Tolerance is established in polyclonal CD4(+) T cells by distinct mechanisms, according to self-peptide expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Deepali; Linehan, Jonathan L; Dileepan, Thamotharampillai; Lee, You Jeong; Purtha, Whitney E; Lu, Jennifer V; Nelson, Ryan W; Fife, Brian T; Orr, Harry T; Anderson, Mark S; Hogquist, Kristin A; Jenkins, Marc K

    2016-02-01

    Studies of repertoires of mouse monoclonal CD4(+) T cells have revealed several mechanisms of self-tolerance; however, which mechanisms operate in normal repertoires is unclear. Here we studied polyclonal CD4(+) T cells specific for green fluorescent protein expressed in various organs, which allowed us to determine the effects of specific expression patterns on the same epitope-specific T cells. Peptides presented uniformly by thymic antigen-presenting cells were tolerated by clonal deletion, whereas peptides excluded from the thymus were ignored. Peptides with limited thymic expression induced partial clonal deletion and impaired effector T cell potential but enhanced regulatory T cell potential. These mechanisms were also active for T cell populations specific for endogenously expressed self antigens. Thus, the immunotolerance of polyclonal CD4(+) T cells was maintained by distinct mechanisms, according to self-peptide expression patterns. PMID:26726812

  2. Comparison of type 2 and type 6 fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis by using agglutinating monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z M; Brennan, M J; David, J L; Carter, P H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1988-01-01

    Two types of fimbriae have been identified on the pathogenic gram-negative organism Bordetella pertussis. Monoclonal antibodies to these fimbriae were produced to better understand the role of fimbriae as serotype-specific agglutinogens and to investigate the antigenic relationship between these fimbriae. Three monoclonal antibodies were identified that specifically agglutinated B. pertussis cells containing the U.S. Reference Factor 2 agglutinogen, and six monoclonal antibodies were produced that agglutinated only those strains containing the U.S. Reference Factor 6 agglutinogen. Indirect immunofluorescence studies and immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that these monoclonal antibodies bind to an outer membrane component on serotype-specific strains of B. pertussis. All of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with native or partially assembled type-specific fimbriae but not with monomeric fimbrial subunits as indicated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The fimbrial agglutinogens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies were also uniquely reactive with either U.S. Reference Factor 2 or 6 antiserum (Eldering agglutinogen 2 or 6 polyclonal antiserum) in an indirect ELISA. No cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with the unrelated fimbriae was observed in any of the comparative immunological studies. Some of the monoclonal antibodies agglutinated certain strains of B. bronchiseptica, suggesting that this closely related species can contain antigenically similar fimbriae. These monoclonal antibodies should prove useful for further structural and functional analysis of Bordetella fimbriae and for studies on the role that these antigens play in prevention of infection and disease. Images PMID:2903125

  3. Comparison of type 2 and type 6 fimbriae of Bordetella pertussis by using agglutinating monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Z M; Brennan, M J; David, J L; Carter, P H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1988-12-01

    Two types of fimbriae have been identified on the pathogenic gram-negative organism Bordetella pertussis. Monoclonal antibodies to these fimbriae were produced to better understand the role of fimbriae as serotype-specific agglutinogens and to investigate the antigenic relationship between these fimbriae. Three monoclonal antibodies were identified that specifically agglutinated B. pertussis cells containing the U.S. Reference Factor 2 agglutinogen, and six monoclonal antibodies were produced that agglutinated only those strains containing the U.S. Reference Factor 6 agglutinogen. Indirect immunofluorescence studies and immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that these monoclonal antibodies bind to an outer membrane component on serotype-specific strains of B. pertussis. All of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with native or partially assembled type-specific fimbriae but not with monomeric fimbrial subunits as indicated by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The fimbrial agglutinogens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies were also uniquely reactive with either U.S. Reference Factor 2 or 6 antiserum (Eldering agglutinogen 2 or 6 polyclonal antiserum) in an indirect ELISA. No cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibodies with the unrelated fimbriae was observed in any of the comparative immunological studies. Some of the monoclonal antibodies agglutinated certain strains of B. bronchiseptica, suggesting that this closely related species can contain antigenically similar fimbriae. These monoclonal antibodies should prove useful for further structural and functional analysis of Bordetella fimbriae and for studies on the role that these antigens play in prevention of infection and disease. PMID:2903125

  4. High-resolution Mapping of Linear Antibody Epitopes Using Ultrahigh-density Peptide Microarrays*

    PubMed Central

    Buus, Søren; Rockberg, Johan; Forsström, Björn; Nilsson, Peter; Uhlen, Mathias; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies empower numerous important scientific, clinical, diagnostic, and industrial applications. Ideally, the epitope(s) targeted by an antibody should be identified and characterized, thereby establishing antibody reactivity, highlighting possible cross-reactivities, and perhaps even warning against unwanted (e.g. autoimmune) reactivities. Antibodies target proteins as either conformational or linear epitopes. The latter are typically probed with peptides, but the cost of peptide screening programs tends to prohibit comprehensive specificity analysis. To perform high-throughput, high-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against linear epitopes of the human proteome and obtained very detailed descriptions of the involved specificities. The epitopes identified ranged from 4 to 12 amino acids in size. In general, the antibodies were of exquisite specificity, frequently disallowing even single conservative substitutions. In several cases, multiple distinct epitopes could be identified for the same target protein, suggesting an efficient approach to the generation of paired antibodies. Two alternative epitope mapping approaches identified similar, although not necessarily identical, epitopes. These results show that ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays can be used for linear epitope mapping. With an upper theoretical limit of 2,000,000 individual peptides per array, these peptide microarrays may even be used for a systematic validation of antibodies at the proteomic level. PMID:22984286

  5. Characterization of Antibodies for Grain-Specific Gluten Detection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Girdhari M; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Williams, Kristina M; Pahlavan, Autusa

    2016-03-01

    Gluten ingestion causes immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergy or celiac disease in sensitive individuals, and a strict gluten-free diet greatly limits food choices. Immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are used to quantify gluten to ensure labeling compliance of gluten-free foods. Anti-gluten antibodies may not exhibit equal affinity to gluten from wheat, rye, and barley. Moreover, because wheat gluten is commonly used as a calibrator in ELISA, accurate gluten quantitation from rye and barley contaminated foods may be compromised. Immunoassays utilizing grain-specific antibodies and calibrators may help improve gluten quantitation. In this study, polyclonal antibodies raised against gluten-containing grain-specific peptides were characterized for their immunoreactivity to gluten from different grain sources. Strong immunoreactivity to multiple gluten polypeptides from wheat, rye, and barley was observed in the range 34 to 43 kDa with anti-gliadin, 11 to 15 and 72 to 95 kDa with anti-secalin, and 30 to 43 kDa with anti-hordein peptide antibodies, respectively. Minimal or no cross-reactivity with gluten from other grains was observed among these antibodies. The anti-consensus peptide antibody raised against a repetitive amino acid sequence of proline and glutamine exhibited immunoreactivity to gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and oat. The antibodies exhibited similar immunoreactivity with most of the corresponding grain cultivars by ELISA. The high specificity and minimal cross-reactivity of grain-specific antibodies suggest their potential use in immunoassays for accurate gluten quantitation.

  6. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  7. Antibodies Against Glycolipids Enhance Antifungal Activity of Macrophages and Reduce Fungal Burden After Infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Renata A.; Thomaz, Luciana; Muñoz, Julian E.; da Silva, Cássia J.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Pinto, Márcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Taborda, Carlos P.

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease endemic in Latin America. Polyclonal antibodies to acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis opsonized yeast forms in vitro increasing phagocytosis and reduced the fungal burden of infected animals. Antibodies to GSL were active in both prophylactic and therapeutic protocols using a murine intratracheal infection model. Pathological examination of the lungs of animals treated with antibodies to GSL showed well-organized granulomas and minimally damaged parenchyma compared to the untreated control. Murine peritoneal macrophages activated by IFN-γ and incubated with antibodies against acidic GSLs more effectively phagocytosed and killed P. brasiliensis yeast cells as well as produced more nitric oxide compared to controls. The present work discloses a novel target of protective antibodies against P. brasiliensis adding to other well-studied mediators of the immune response to this fungus. PMID:26870028

  8. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  9. Enhancing Blockade of Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Invasion: Assessing Combinations of Antibodies against PfRH5 and Other Merozoite Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Choudhary, Prateek; Murungi, Linda M.; Furze, Julie M.; Diouf, Ababacar; Miotto, Olivo; Crosnier, Cécile; Wright, Gavin J.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Long, Carole A.; Draper, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    No vaccine has yet proven effective against the blood-stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. We recently found that PfRH5, a P. falciparum-specific protein expressed in merozoites, is efficiently targeted by broadly-neutralizing, vaccine-induced antibodies. Here we show that antibodies against PfRH5 efficiently inhibit the in vitro growth of short-term-adapted parasite isolates from Cambodia, and that the EC50 values of antigen-specific antibodies against PfRH5 are lower than those against PfAMA1. Since antibody responses elicited by multiple antigens are speculated to improve the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines, we conducted detailed assessments of parasite growth inhibition by antibodies against PfRH5 in combination with antibodies against seven other merozoite antigens. We found that antibodies against PfRH5 act synergistically with antibodies against certain other merozoite antigens, most notably with antibodies against other erythrocyte-binding antigens such as PfRH4, to inhibit the growth of a homologous P. falciparum clone. A combination of antibodies against PfRH4 and basigin, the erythrocyte receptor for PfRH5, also potently inhibited parasite growth. This methodology provides the first quantitative evidence that polyclonal vaccine-induced antibodies can act synergistically against P. falciparum antigens and should help to guide the rational development of future multi-antigen vaccines. PMID:23144611

  10. A simple and rapid colloidal gold-based immunochromatogarpic strip test for detection of FMDV serotype A.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Liang, Zhong; Ren, Wei-wei; Chen, Juan; Zhi, Xiao-ying; Qi, Guang-yu; Liu, Xiang-tao; Cai, Xue-peng

    2011-02-01

    A sandwich format immunochromatographic assay for detecting foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotypes was developed. In this rapid test, affinity purified polyclonal antibodies from Guinea pigs which were immunized with sucking-mouse adapted FMD virus (A/AV88(L) strain) were conjugated to colloidal gold beads and used as the capture antibody, and affinity purified polyclonal antibodies from rabbits which were immunized with cell-culture adapted FMD virus (A/CHA/09 strain) were used as detector antibody. On the nitrocellulose membrane of the immunochromatographic strip, the capture antibody was laid on a sample pad, the detector antibody was printed at the test line(T) and goat anti-guinea pigs IgG antibodies were immobilized to the control line(C). The lower detection limit of the test for a FMDV 146S antigen is 11.7 ng/ml as determined in serial tests after the strip device was assembled and the assay condition optimization. No cross reactions were found with FMDV serotype C, Swine vesicular disease (SVD), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and vesicular exanthema of swine virus (VES) viral antigens with this rapid test. Clinically, the diagnostic sensitivity of this test for FMDV serotypes A was 88.7% which is as same as an indirect-sandwich ELISA. The specificity of this strip test was 98.2% and is comparable to the 98.7% obtained with indirect-sandwich ELISA. This rapid strip test is simple, easy and fast for clinical testing on field sites; no special instruments and skills are required, and the result can be obtained within 15 min. To our knowledge, this is the first rapid immunochromatogarpic assay for serotype A of FMDV. PMID:21331888

  11. Food allergen detection with biosensor immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Yman, Ingrid Malmheden; Eriksson, Anders; Johansson, M Annette; Hellenäs, Karl-Erik

    2006-01-01

    An optical biosensor was used to develop both direct and sandwich immunoassays for the detection of proteins from milk, egg, hazelnut, peanut, shellfish, and sesame in food samples. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies raised against the proteins were immobilized on the biosensor chip. Food samples were injected and the proteins that bound to the antibodies on the surface were detected by a shift in the resonance angle. By adding a second antibody in a sandwich assay, matrix effects could be overcome and the sensitivity and selectivity enhanced. Detection of allergen levels down to 1-12.5 microg/g in food samples was demonstrated for the various assays. Good agreement of results was also obtained from parallel analysis with alternative immunoassays, including rocket immunoelectrophoresis, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoblotting. The present study demonstrates that the sensitivity of the described biosensor technique is comparable to the most sensitive enzymed-linked immunosorbent assays.

  12. A fibrin antibody binding to fibronectin induces potent inhibition of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    El-Ayoubi, Fida; Amiral, Jean; Pascaud, Juliette; Charrin, Stéphanie; Tassel, Bénédicte; Uzan, Georges; Gurewich, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Antiserum from rabbits immunised with pure human fibrinogen was affinity purified on immobilised fibrin fragment E (FFE). This FFE antibody (Ab) induced significant growth inhibition of a human cancer xenograft in mice and suppression of tumour angiogenesis, leaving no formed vessels and only CD31-staining endothelial fragments in place. Tubule formation of HUVEC on MatrigelTM was also significantly inhibited by FFE Ab. Since MatrigelTM is fibrin-free, this effect implicated a different FFE Ab binding site than FFE. Flow cytometry of HUVEC showed that FFE Ab bound to HUVEC, but with a broad range of 55-98 %. Immunofluorescent staining of HUVEC explained this range, since FFE Ab was seen not to bind to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) directly but instead to a matrix protein variably adherent to HUVEC. This protein was identified as fibronectin (FN) by appearance, staining with FN Ab, and by a FN knockdown study. Neither HUVEC nor matrix reacted with fibrin D-dimer (DD) Ab. Immunofluorescent stains of HUVEC matrix with FFE and FN Ab's showed that these Ab's bound to the same epitopes on FN, as also seen on Western blots of purified FN. These findings indicate the presence of an antigenic determinant in fibrinogen/FFE that is homologous with an epitope(s) in FN recognised by FFE Ab, and critical for angiogenesis in this xenograft. The FN epitope(s) remains to be identified, but the present findings can be used for the selection of the appropriate clones from mice immunised with fibrinogen which can facilitate this identification, and which may also be of clinical use. PMID:25252851

  13. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A.; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J.; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Townsend, Alain R.

    2015-01-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses. PMID:26011643

  14. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W; Daniels, Rodney S; Townsend, Alain R

    2015-07-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses. PMID:26011643

  15. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Guillen, Eduardo; Love, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for any particular antigen remains limited. Microengraving is a soft lithographic technique that provides a rapid and efficient alternative for discovering new mAbs. This protocol describes how to use microengraving to screen mouse hybridomas to establish new cell lines producing unique mAbs. Single cells from a polyclonal population are isolated into an array of microscale wells (~105 cells per screen). The array is then used to print a protein microarray, where each element contains the antibodies captured from individual wells. The antibodies on the microarray are screened with antigens of interest, and mapped to the corresponding cells, which are then recovered from their microwells by micromanipulation. Screening and retrieval require approximately 1–3 d (9–12 d including the steps for preparing arrays of microwells). PMID:19528952

  16. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W; Daniels, Rodney S; Townsend, Alain R

    2015-07-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses.

  17. Effects of Environmental Factors on Soluble Expression of a Humanized Anti-TNF-α scFv Antibody in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sina, Mohammad; Farajzadeh, Davoud; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The bacterial cultivation conditions for obtaining anti-TNF-α single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody as the soluble product in E. coli was investigated. Methods: To avoid the production of inclusion bodies, the effects of lactose, IPTG, incubation time, temperature, shaking protocol, medium additives (Mg+2, sucrose), pH, osmotic and heat shocks were examined. Samples from bacterial growth conditions with promising results of soluble expression of GST-hD2 scFv were affinity purified and quantified by SDS-PAGE and image processing for further evaluation. Results: The results showed that cultivation in LB medium under induction by low concentrations of lactose and incubation at 10 °C led to partial solubilization of the expressed anti-TNF-α scFv (GST-hD2). Other variables which showed promising increase in soluble expression of GST-hD2 were osmotic shock and addition of magnesium chloride. Furthermore, addition of sucrose to medium suppressed the expression of scFv completely. The other finding was that the addition of sorbitol decreased the growth rate of bacteria. Conclusion: It can be concluded that low cultivation temperature in the presence of low amount of inducer under a long incubation time or addition of magnesium chloride are the most effective environmental factors studied for obtaining the maximum solubilization of GST-hD2 recombinant protein. PMID:26819916

  18. Characterization of MARCKS (Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) identified by a monoclonal antibody generated against chick embryo neural retina.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, F R; Hellman, U; Baz, A; Arruti, C

    1999-04-13

    To identify molecular markers of cell differentiation in developing nervous tissue, monoclonal antibodies against chick embryo neural retina were made. One of them, 3C3mAb, recognized a developmentally regulated antigen present in several organs of the CNS. Data from MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and peptide sequencing of the immuno-affinity purified protein indicated identity of the antigen with MARCKS. The immunoreactive material was always found as a unique polypeptide (Mr 71 kDa) in SDS-PAGE, however isoelectrofocusing revealed the existence of several bands (pI ranging from 4.0 to 4.5). Interestingly some retinal cell types, as photoreceptors, exhibited an extremely significant decrease in the intensity of the immunoreactive material during the final phases of terminal differentiation while others, as some retinal neurons, maintained the immunoreactivity when fully differentiated. Taken together these results indicate that MARCKS, a protein susceptible of several posttranslational modifications as myristoylation and phosphorylation at variable extent, may act differently in neural retina cell types.

  19. Characterization of MARCKS (Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) identified by a monoclonal antibody generated against chick embryo neural retina.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, F R; Hellman, U; Baz, A; Arruti, C

    1999-04-13

    To identify molecular markers of cell differentiation in developing nervous tissue, monoclonal antibodies against chick embryo neural retina were made. One of them, 3C3mAb, recognized a developmentally regulated antigen present in several organs of the CNS. Data from MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and peptide sequencing of the immuno-affinity purified protein indicated identity of the antigen with MARCKS. The immunoreactive material was always found as a unique polypeptide (Mr 71 kDa) in SDS-PAGE, however isoelectrofocusing revealed the existence of several bands (pI ranging from 4.0 to 4.5). Interestingly some retinal cell types, as photoreceptors, exhibited an extremely significant decrease in the intensity of the immunoreactive material during the final phases of terminal differentiation while others, as some retinal neurons, maintained the immunoreactivity when fully differentiated. Taken together these results indicate that MARCKS, a protein susceptible of several posttranslational modifications as myristoylation and phosphorylation at variable extent, may act differently in neural retina cell types. PMID:10198238

  20. A plasmid containing the human metallothionein II gene can function as an antibody-assisted electrophoretic biosensor for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Dennis C; Starr, Clarise R; Lyon, Wanda J

    2016-01-01

    Different forms of heavy metals affect biochemical systems in characteristic ways that cannot be detected with typical metal analysis methods like atomic absorption spectrometry. Further, using living systems to analyze interaction of heavy metals with biochemical systems can be laborious and unreliable. To generate a reliable easy-to-use biologically-based biosensor system, the entire human metallothionein-II (MT-II) gene was incorporated into a plasmid (pUC57-MT) easily replicated in Escherichia coli. In this system, a commercial polyclonal antibody raised against human metal-responsive transcription factor-1 protein (MTF-1 protein) could modify the electrophoretic migration patterns (i.e. cause specific decreases in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility) of the plasmid in the presence or absence of heavy metals other than zinc (Zn). In the study here, heavy metals, MTF-1 protein, and polyclonal anti-MTF-1 antibody were used to assess pUC57-MT plasmid antibody-assisted electrophoretic mobility. Anti-MTF-1 antibody bound both MTF-1 protein and pUC57-MT plasmid in a non-competitive fashion such that it could be used to differentiate specific heavy metal binding. The results showed that antibody-inhibited plasmid migration was heavy metal level-dependent. Zinc caused a unique mobility shift pattern opposite to that of other metals tested, i.e. Zn blocked the antibody ability to inhibit plasmid migration, despite a greatly increased affinity for DNA by the antibody when Zn was present. The Zn effect was reversed/modified by adding MTF-1 protein. Additionally, antibody inhibition of plasmid mobility was resistant to heat pre-treatment and trypsinization, indicating absence of residual DNA extraction-resistant bacterial DNA binding proteins. DNA binding by anti-DNA antibodies may be commonly enhanced by xenobiotic heavy metals and elevated levels of Zn, thus making them potentially effective tools for assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in aqueous solutions and

  1. Measurement of lymphatic function with technetium-99m-labelled polyclonal immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Svensson, W; Glass, D M; Bradley, D; Peters, A M

    1999-05-01

    A reliable method for measuring lymph flow in physiological units would be valuable, especially in conditions in which it is uncertain whether lymph flow is increased or decreased. The requirements of a radiopharmaceutical for such measurement include stable radionuclide labelling and rapid access to lymphatic vessels following tissue injection but no access to blood vessels. A soluble macromolecule is likely to come closest to meeting these requirements. Technetium-99m-labelled human polyclonal immunoglobulin (HIG) was therefore investigated firstly in comparison with 99mTc-labelled human serum albumin (HSA) in patients undergoing routine lymphoscintigraphy and secondly with respect to injection site in a group of volunteers with post-mastectomy oedema (PMO). Subcutaneous injection of 99mTc-HIG into the web space of a distal extremity gave images in which lymphatic vessels were more clearly defined compared with images obtained after injection of 99mTc-HSA. Lymph nodes were also more clearly defined, suggesting specific retention of HIG, possibly through Fc-mediated binding. Peripheral blood sampling showed a delayed arrival in blood of radioactivity after 99mTc-HIG compared with 99mTc-HSA, although ultimately, the blood recovery of 99mTc-HIG was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of 99mTc-HSA. Clearance rates of radioactivity from the injection site were not significantly different, however, between the two agents. In patients with PMO, web space injection of 99mTc-HIG gave excellent images of normal lymphatic vessels, of lymph nodes and of abnormal lymph drainage such as dermal backflow in swollen arms. In contrast, neither lymphatic vessels nor lymph nodes were visualised after injection into the skin of the dorsum of the distal forearm. Although there was no difference in clearance rates from the injection sites between normal and swollen arms with either agent in PMO, clearance was significantly faster following injection into the web space (0.11% per

  2. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts.

  3. Presynaptic injection of syntaxin-specific antibodies blocks transmission in the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, M; Tong, C K; Fukuda, M; Moreira, J E; Kojima, T; Mikoshiba, K; Llinás, R

    1998-09-01

    A polyclonal antibody, raised against the squid (Loligo pealei) syntaxin I, inhibited Ca2+-dependent interaction of syntaxin with synaptotagmin C2A domain in vitro. Presynaptic injection of the anti-Loligo syntaxin IgG into the squid giant synapse blocked synaptic transmission without affecting the presynaptic action potential or the voltage-gated calcium current responsible for transmitter release. Repetitive presynaptic stimulation produced a gradual decrease in the amplitude of the postsynaptic potential as the synaptic block progressed, indicating that the antibody interferes with vesicular fusion. Confocal microscopy of the fluorescein-labelled anti-Loligo syntaxin IgG showed binding at the synaptic active zone, while ultrastructurally, an increase in synaptic vesicular numbers in synapses blocked when this antibody was observed. These results implicate syntaxin in the vesicular fusion step of transmitter release in concert with synaptotagmin.

  4. Production, characterization and use of monoclonal antibodies to grapevine virus A.

    PubMed

    Boscia, D; Aslouj, E; Elicio, V; Savino, V; Castellano, M A; Martelli, G P

    1992-01-01

    Four stable hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies to grapevine closterovirus A (GVA) were obtained by fusing spleen cells of immunized BALB/c mice with mouse myeloma cell line Sp2/0-Ag 14. In ELISA all MAbs reacted with virus in leaf extracts from Nicotiana benthamiana, glass-house-, field-, or in vitro-grown grapevines, or with cortical shavings from mature grape canes. In IEM tests, only one of the MAbs (PA3.F5) decorated virus particles on the entire surface. This MAb was likely induced by a surface antigenic determinant, whereas the other three MAbs (PA3.D 11, PA3.C 6, and PA3.B 9) were originated by cryptotopes. Coupling polyclonal antibodies for coating protein A-sensitized plates, and monoclonal antibody conjugates for antigen detection, gave highly efficient and reproducible results for identification of GVA in field-grown grapevines.

  5. Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for the Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Diana V.; Pumphrey, Katherine A.; Çuburu, Nicolas; Schowalter, Rachel M.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) has been implicated as a causative agent in Merkel cell carcinoma. Robust polyclonal antibody responses against MCV have been documented in human subjects, but monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for the VP1 capsid protein have not yet been characterized. We generated 12 mAbs capable of binding recombinant MCV virus-like particles. The use of a short immunogenic priming schedule was important for production of the mAbs. Ten of the 12 mAbs were highly effective for immunofluorescent staining of cells expressing capsid proteins. An overlapping set of 10 mAbs were able to neutralize the infectivity of MCV-based reporter vectors, with 50% effective doses in the low picomolar range. Three mAbs interfered with the binding of MCV virus-like particles to cells. This panel of anti-capsid antibodies should provide a useful set of tools for the study of MCV. PMID:20598728

  6. Analysis of the quantity of antiviral antibodies from mink infected with different Aleutian disease virus strains.

    PubMed

    Aasted, B; Tierney, G S; Bloom, M E

    1984-05-01

    Mink persistently infected with Aleutian disease virus (ADV) develop hypergammaglobulinaemia and immune complex disease. Radiolabelled antibodies from mink infected with ADV-G, DK, Pullman , and Utah I strains of ADV were reacted against all four ADV strains in radioimmunoassay (RIA). The amount of anti-ADV antibody in two equally hypergammaglobulinaemic serum pools varied from 13% (anti- Pullman ) to 57% (anti-Utah I). Serum pools from two other sources (anti-DK and anti-ADV-G), although less hypergammaglobulinaemic , had 5% and 13%, respectively, indicating that 43-95% of the Ig in the sera of mink with AD was not specific antibody to ADV structural antigens. The possibility of a general polyclonal activation of the humoral immune system is being discussed. Comparison of plateau RIA binding levels for the four serum pools against the four viral antigens suggested three patterns of reactivity: DK and Utah I reacted similarly, but Pullman and ADV-G reacted serologically different.

  7. Extremely sensitive and selective antibodies against the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by rational design of a structurally optimized hapten.

    PubMed

    Ramin, Steffen; Weller, Michael G

    2012-02-01

    Antibodies are a promising tool for the fast and selective trace detection of explosives. Unfortunately, the production of high-quality antibodies is not trivial and often expensive. Therefore, excellent antibodies are a rare and limiting resource in fields such as biosensing, environmental analysis, diagnostics, cancer therapy, and proteomics. Here, we report the synthesis, bioconjugation, and application of the structurally optimized hapten 6-(2,4,6-trinitro)-phenylhexanoic acid to improve the selectivity and sensitivity of antibodies for the detection of one of the most important explosives, trinitrotoluene. With a conjugate of bovine serum albumin and a highly purified N-hydroxy-succinimide (NHS)-activated hapten, two rabbits were immunized to obtain polyclonal antibodies. The immunization process was monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to gain information about the progress of antibody titer and affinity. Finally, the polyclonal antibodies reached an affinity constant of (5.1 ± 0.6) × 10(9) l/mol (rabbit R1) and (2.3 ± 0.2) × 10(9) l/mol (rabbit R2). The respective assays show a minimum test midpoint (IC(50) value) of 0.1 ± 0.01 µg/l (R1) and 0.2 ± 0.02 µg/l (R2) and a working range of 0.005 to 150 µg/l (R1) and 0.007 to 200 µg/l (R2), which corresponds to more than four orders of magnitude for both. This is quite remarkable for a competitive immunoassay, which is often believed to have a narrow dynamic range. The limit of detection was calculated to 0.6 ng/l (R1) and 1.5 ng/l (R2), which is up to 100 times improvement in relation to the assay of Zeck et al. (1999) on the basis of a monoclonal antibody. The excellent selectivity of the polyclonal antibodies was comprehensively examined by determining the cross-reactivity to common explosives and other nitroaromatics including nitro musk components. The widely held belief that polyclonal antibodies generally display higher cross-reactivities than monoclonals could be disproved.

  8. Immunoglobulin G subclasses secreted by human B cells in vitro in response to interleukin-2 and polyclonal activators.

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, J E; Johnstone, R; Duggan-Keen, M F; Bird, P

    1990-01-01

    The IgG subclasses secreted by human B cells in vitro in response to IL-2 have been analysed. B cells were prepared from tonsil, blood and spleen, and cultured with recombinant IL-2 in the presence or absence of two polyclonal activators: Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 (SAC) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Secretion of all four subclasses and of IgM was stimulated by IL-2, but the relative amounts varied according to (i) the tissue source of the B cells, and (ii) which polyclonal activator was used. The amount of IgG1 tended to be higher and IgG2 tended to be lower when SAC was the polyclonal activator (compared to LPS). This difference was most marked for tonsil B cells, and it was found that SAC had a negative effect on secretion of IgM and IgG2 in these cultures, whilst synergizing with IL-2 to stimulate the production of IgG1, 3 and 4. When the degree of stimulation of different pairs of isotypes was analysed, several interesting positive correlations emerged. In tonsil B-cell cultures, stimulation of IgM and IgG2 was linked with each other, but not with IgG1, whilst in blood B-cell cultures all isotypes appeared to be stimulated co-ordinately. Stimulation of IgG1 and IgG3 were positively correlated in cultures of B cells from all tissues. The results emphasize that the effects of a single cytokine on immunoglobulin isotype production can be influenced by the source of the B cells, and by other signals delivered to the cells. PMID:2373516

  9. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  10. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2016-06-30

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  11. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating antibodies from an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial target multiple epitopes and preferentially use the VH1 gene family.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Pollara, Justin; Moody, M Anthony; Alpert, Michael D; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kozink, Daniel M; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Lewis, George K; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2012-11-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs. PMID:22896626

  12. Novel monoclonal antibodies against Pdx1 reveal feedback regulation of Pdx1 protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Galbo, T.; Pedersen, I.L.; Fløyel, T.; Bang-Berthelsen, C.H.; Serup, P.; Madsen, O.D.; Hald, J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize two monoclonal antibodies (F6A11 and F109-D12) generated against Pdx1 (pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1), a homeodomain transcription factor, which is critical for pancreas formation as well as for normal pancreatic beta cell function. For production of monoclonal antibodies, we immunized Robertsonian POSF (RBF)mice with a GST-Pdx1 fusion protein containing a 68-amino acid C-terminal fragment of rat Pdx1. These monoclonal antibodies detect Pdx1 by western blotting and allow immunohistochemical detection of Pdx1 in both mouse and rat tissue. F6A11 and F109-D12 produce IHC staining patterns indistinguishable from that obtained with highly specific polyclonal Pdx1 antisera raised in rabbits and goats, when applied to embryonic or adult mouse pancreatic tissue. In contrast to previously generated polyclonal anti-Pdx1 antisera, we also demonstrate that F6A11 works for intracellular fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) staining of Pdx1. By using F6A11, we characterize the induction of Pdx1 in the Doxycycline (DOX) inducible insulinoma cell line INSrαβ-Pdx1 and follow the reduction of Pdx1 after removing Dox. Finally, we show that induction of exogenous Pdx1 leads to a reduction in endogenous Pdx1 levels, which suggests that a negative feedback loop is involved in maintaining correct levels of Pdx1 in the cell. PMID:20558340

  13. Radioimmunoassay of digoxin in serum using monoclonal antibodies and assessment of interference by digoxin-like immunoreactive substances

    SciTech Connect

    Loucari-Yiannakou, E.; Yiannakou, L.; Souvatzoglou, A.; Diamandis, E.P. )

    1990-03-01

    We used 7 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and one polyclonal antibody to develop radioimmunoassays (RIAs) for digoxin in serum or plasma. These RIAs were tested for measuring apparent digoxin concentrations in serum from patients receiving the drug, from normal individuals, and in cord blood plasma. We found that two MoAbs cross-reacted significantly with substances in cord blood. The magnitude of cross-reactivity was dependent on the incubation time and temperature. Under equilibrium conditions, one antibody gave apparent digoxin values in cord blood plasma averaging 2.15 ng/ml. We suggest that this cross-reactivity is partially due to progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone in cord blood plasma. The antibody that shows high cross-reactivity with digoxin-like immunoreactive substances may prove a useful tool for studies dealing with characterization of the cross-reacting compounds.

  14. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  15. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page ... Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content ...

  16. Murine carcinoma expressing carcinoembryonic antigen-like protein is restricted by antibody against neem leaf glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Das, Arnab; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Roy, Soumyabrata; Biswas, Jaydip; Baral, Rathindranath; Pal, Smarajit

    2014-11-01

    We have generated a polyclonal antibody against a novel immunomodulator, neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP) that can react to a specific 47 kDa subunit of NLGP. Generated anti-NLGP antibody (primarily IgG2a) was tested for its anti-tumor activity in murine carcinoma (EC, CT-26), sarcoma (S180) and melanoma (B16Mel) tumor models. Surprisingly, tumor growth restriction was only observed in CT-26 carcinoma models, without any alteration in other tumor systems. Comparative examination of antigenicity between four different tumor models revealed high expression of CEA-like protein on the surface of CT-26 tumors. Subsequent examination of the cross-reactivity of anti-NLGP antibody with purified or cell bound CEA revealed prominent recognition of CEA by anti-NLGP antibody, as detected by ELISA, Western Blotting and immunohistochemistry. This recognition seems to be responsible for anti-tumor function of anti-NLGP antibody only on CEA-like protein expressing CT-26 tumor models, as confirmed by ADCC reaction in CEA(+) tumor systems where dependency to anti-NLGP antibody is equivalent to anti-CEA antibody. Obtained result with enormous therapeutic potential for CEA(+) tumors may be explained in view of the epitope spreading concept, however, further investigation is crucial.

  17. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  18. Purification of antibodies to O antigen of Salmonella Typhimurium from human serum by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Goodall, Margaret; Cobbold, Mark; Saul, Allan; Maclennan, Calman A

    2013-01-31

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS) are a common cause of bacteraemia in children and HIV-infected adults in Sub-Saharan Africa. We have previously shown that antibodies play a key role in both bactericidal and cellular mechanisms of immunity to NTS, but found that high concentrations of antibody to Salmonella Typhimurium O antigen (OAg) in the serum of some HIV-infected African adults is associated with impaired killing of NTS. To further investigate the function of antibodies to the OAg of NTS, we developed a method to purify these antibodies from human serum by affinity chromatography. Purified Salmonella Typhimurium OAg was activated with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) via two different chemistries before linking to N-hydroxysuccinamide-Sepharose resin: one ADH molecule was introduced per OAg chain on its terminal 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid sugar (OAg-ADH), or multiple ADH molecules were attached along the OAg chain after oxidation with sodium periodate (OAgoxADH). Both resulting columns worked well when tested with commercial polyclonal anti-O:4,5 antibodies from rabbit serum. Over 90% of the applied antibodies bound to the resin and 89% of these antibodies were then eluted as detected by ELISA. OAg-ADH was preferred as the method for OAg derivatisation as it does not modify the saccharide chain and can be applied to OAg from different bacteria. Both columns were able to bind OAg-specific antibodies in human serum, but antibody recovery was initially low. Different elution buffers were tested and different amounts of OAg-ADH were linked to the resin to improve the yield. Optimal recovery (51%) was obtained by loading 1mg of activated OAg per ml of resin and eluting with 0.1M glycine, 0.1M NaCl pH2.4. The column matrix could be regenerated following elution with no detectable loss in performance for over ten uses. This method offers the potential to purify antibodies to Salmonella OAg from polyclonal serum following vaccination or natural exposure to Salmonella

  19. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  20. Virus-induced polyclonal B cell activation improves protective CTL memory via retained CD27 expression on memory CTL.

    PubMed

    Matter, Matthias; Mumprecht, Sabine; Pinschewer, Daniel D; Pavelic, Viktor; Yagita, Hideo; Krautwald, Stefan; Borst, Jannie; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2005-11-01

    Different viruses elicit distinct phenotypes of memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). This is reflected in differential expression of homing receptors and costimulatory molecules like CD27. Memory CTL retained CD27 following lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, but not after immunization with recombinant vaccinia virus or tumor cells expressing LCMV glycoprotein. Stable CD27 expression on memory CTL required ligation by CD70 expressed on polyclonally activated B cells during the contraction phase. The functional consequence of CD27 expressed on virus-specific CTL was analyzed in CD27-deficient mice. LCMV infection of CD27(-/-) mice revealed that primary CTL activation and expansion as well as elimination of the virus were independent of CD27 expression. In contrast, ligation of CD27 on memory CTL upon secondary antigen encounter increased clonal expansion and improved protection against re-infection. This points to novel B cell-CTL interactions during viral infection and to a beneficial role of polyclonal B cell activation that represents a characteristic of murine LCMV, human immunodeficiency virus and human hepatitis B and C virus infection. PMID:16231287

  1. Defective disposal of immune complexes and polyclonal B cell activation persist long after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, N.A.; Cavallo, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus experience clinical exacerbation during superimposed bacterial infection. Previous studies in mice indicated that heightened immune phenomena during exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) appear to be related, in part, to polyclonal B cell activation, to abnormal disposal of immune complexes (IC), and to increased localization of IC in tissues. To investigate whether such effects were reversible, we administered bacterial LPS to C57BL/6 mice for 5 weeks. Control mice received vehicle alone. We then discontinued LPS, and 6 weeks later LPS and control mice were challenged with a subsaturating dose of radiolabeled IC; the removal of IC from the circulation, their localization in the liver, spleen, and kidney were determined. In comparison to values in control mice, in mice previously exposed to LPS, serologic features of polyclonal B cell activation persisted; liver uptake of pathogenic IC (greater than Ag2Ab2) was normal, but removal of small size IC (less than or equal to Ag2Ab2) from the circulation was delayed; localization of IC in the kidneys was enhanced, and pathologic proteinuria developed. The effects of repeated exposure to bacterial LPS are partially reversible, but they last long after LPS is discontinued and may contribute to altered disposal of IC, enhanced organ localization of IC, and organ dysfunction.

  2. Liver-expressed Igkappa superantigen induces tolerance of polyclonal B cells by clonal deletion not kappa to lambda receptor editing.

    PubMed

    Ota, Takayuki; Ota, Miyo; Duong, Bao Hoa; Gavin, Amanda L; Nemazee, David

    2011-03-14

    Little is know about the nature of peripheral B cell tolerance or how it may vary in distinct lineages. Although autoantibody transgenic studies indicate that anergy and apoptosis are involved, some studies claim that receptor editing occurs. To model peripheral B cell tolerance in a normal, polyclonal immune system, we generated transgenic mice expressing an Igκ-light chain-reactive superantigen targeted to the plasma membrane of hepatocytes (pAlb mice). In contrast to mice expressing κ superantigen ubiquitously, in which κ cells edit efficiently to λ, in pAlb mice, κ B cells underwent clonal deletion. Their κ cells failed to populate lymph nodes, and the remaining splenic κ cells were anergic, arrested at a semi-mature stage without undergoing receptor editing. In the liver, κ cells recognized superantigen, down-regulated surface Ig, and expressed active caspase 3, suggesting ongoing apoptosis at the site of B cell receptor ligand expression. Some, apparently mature, κ B1 and follicular B cells persisted in the peritoneum. BAFF (B cell-activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family) overexpression rescued splenic κ B cell maturation and allowed κ cells to populate lymph nodes. Our model facilitates analysis of tissue-specific autoimmunity, tolerance, and apoptosis in a polyclonal B cell population. The results suggest that deletion, not editing, is the major irreversible pathway of tolerance induction among peripheral B cells.

  3. The characterization of the first anti-mouse Muc6 antibody shows an increased expression of the mucin in pancreatic tissue of Cftr-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gouyer, Valérie; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Tetaert, Daniel; Liu, Yamin; Gottrand, Frédéric; Harris, Ann; Desseyn, Jean-Luc

    2010-05-01

    Gel-forming mucins are large high-molecular weight secreted O-glycoproteins responsible for the gel-properties of the mucus blanket. Five orthologous gel-forming mucins have been cloned in human and mouse. Among them, the mucin MUC6 has been less studied, particularly in rodents and no anti rodent-Muc6 antibody has been reported yet. In order to further study Muc6 in mice, our aims were to obtain a specific Muc6 antibody, to validate it and to test it in Cftr deficient mice. A polyclonal serum named CP4 was isolated from a rabbit immunized by a mouse Muc6 peptide. In Western blot experiments, the antibody detected a high-molecular weight molecule secreted by the gastric tissue. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that the antibody reacted strongly with deep glands of duodenum and ileum and mucous neck cells of gastric body. CP4 also recognized Muc6 protein secreted at the surface of the stomach and renal collecting tubules. The centroacinar cells of pancreatic tissue also reacted with the antibody. Cftr-/- mice showed a higher expression of Muc6 at both protein and RNA levels compared with their control Cftr+/+ littermates suggesting that as in the human disease, Muc6 may contribute to the formation of materials that block pancreatic acini and ducts in mouse models of cystic fibrosis. The rabbit anti-mouse Muc6 polyclonal antibody seems highly specific to the mouse mucin and will be useful to study pancreatic pathology in cystic fibrosis.

  4. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  5. Advances in Antibody Design.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Kathryn E; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody-drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  6. Anti-11[E]-pyroglutamate-modified amyloid β antibodies cross-react with other pathological Aβ species: relevance for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garmendia, Roxanna; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Vanessa; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Govezensky, Tzipe; Acero, Gonzalo; Manoutcharian, Karen; Cribbs, David H; Gevorkian, Goar

    2010-12-15

    N-truncated/modified forms of amyloid beta (Aß) peptide are found in diffused and dense core plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome patients as well as animal models of AD, and represent highly desirable therapeutic targets. In the present study we have focused on N-truncated/modified Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 11 (AβN11(pE)). We identified two B-cell epitopes recognized by rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies. Interestingly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies bound also to full-length Aβ1-42 and N-truncated/modified AβN3(pE), suggesting that the three peptides may share a common B-cell epitope. Importantly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) antibodies bound to naturally occurring Aβ aggregates present in brain samples from AD patients. These results are potentially important for developing novel immunogens for targeting N-truncated/modified Aβ aggregates as well, since the most commonly used immunogens in the majority of vaccine studies have been shown to induce antibodies that recognize the N-terminal immunodominant epitope (EFRH) of the full length Aβ, which is absent in N-amino truncated peptides.

  7. ANTI-11[E]-PYROGLUTAMATE-MODIFIED AMYLOID β ANTIBODIES CROSS-REACT WITH OTHER PATHOLOGICAL Aβ SPECIES: RELEVANCE FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Garmendia, Roxanna; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Vanessa; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Govezensky, Tzipe; Acero, Gonzalo; Manoutcharian, Karen; Cribbs, David H.; Gevorkian, Goar

    2010-01-01

    N-truncated/modified forms of amyloid beta (Aß) peptide are found in diffused and dense core plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome patients as well as animal models of AD, and represent highly desirable therapeutic targets. In the present study we have focused on Ntruncated/modified Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 11 (AβN11(pE)). We identified two B-cell epitopes recognized by rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies. Interestingly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) polyclonal antibodies bound also to full-length Aβ1-42 and N-truncated/modified AβN3(pE), suggesting that the three peptides may share a common B-cell epitope. Importantly, rabbit anti-AβN11(pE) antibodies bound to naturally occurring Aβ aggregates present in brain samples from AD patients. These results are potentially important for developing novel immunogens for targeting N-truncated/modified Aβ aggregates as well, since the most commonly used immunogens in the majority of vaccine studies have been shown to induce antibodies that recognize the N-terminal immunodominant epitope (EFRH) of the full length Aβ, which is absent in N-amino truncated peptides. PMID:20864186

  8. Influence of unlabeled monoclonal anti-mouse antibody on the clearance rate of radiolabeled mouse monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Laino, L.; Jackson, G.; Fisher, S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-05-01

    High blood background levels of intact radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) after intravenous (iv) injection are problematic. The injection of unlabeled polyclonal antimouse Abs following injection with labeled MoAbs produces accelerated MoAb clearance. This study evaluates a Mo antimouse Ab for efficacy of accelerating radio MoAb clearance. HB-58 is a rat/mouse MoAb which binds strongly to mouse kappa light chains present in 95% of murine monoclonals. It is unreactive with rat, rabbit or human kappa chains. Six rats were injected iv with 30 ..mu..Ci (approximately 6 ..mu..g) of I-125 UPC-10, a non-specific IgG2ak MoAb that is bound to well by HB-58. No alteration was seen in the clearance of UPC-10 in any of the animals, regardless of the injection type or amount on the second day. In addition, no increase in liver or spleen activity was seen in those rats that received HB-58. The lack of change in rate of clearance and biodistribution of UPC-10 after the iv injection of a purified, specific, anti-mouse MoAb is in marked contrast to the accelerated clearance reported following polyclonal anti-mouse antibody administration. This may be due to the inability of MoAbs to cross link. These preliminary studies suggest that Mo anti-mouse Abs, at these dose levels, are not useful in achieving increased rates of radiolabeled murine MoAb clearance.

  9. Characterization of antibodies against ferret immunoglobulins, cytokines and CD markers.

    PubMed

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent

    2009-12-15

    Ferret IgG and IgM were purified from normal serum, while ferret IgA was purified from bile. The estimated molecular weights of the immunoglobulin gamma, alpha and mu heavy chains were found to be 54kDa, 69kDa and 83kDa, respectively. For immunological (ELISA) quantification of ferret immunoglobulins, we identified and characterized polyclonal antibodies towards ferret IgG, IgM and IgA. We also identified 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised mostly against human CD markers which cross-reacted with ferret leukocytes. These antibodies were originally specific against human CD8, CD9, CD14, CD18, CD25, CD29, CD32, CD44, CD61, CD71, CD79b, CD88, CD104, CD172a and mink CD3. Finally, we identified 4 cross-reacting mAbs with specificities against ferret interferon-gamma, TNF-alpha, interleukin-4 and interleukin-8.

  10. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests. PMID:25163614

  11. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests.

  12. Development of a stable phosphoarginine analog for producing phosphoarginine antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Han; Fu, Chuan; Fu, Songsen; Ji, Zhe; Sun, Ying; Deng, Peiran; Zhao, Yufen

    2016-02-14

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common and extensively studied post-translational modifications (PTMs). Compared to the O-phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr residues, our understanding of arginine phosphorylation is relatively limited, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, due to the intrinsic instability of phosphoarginine (pArg) and the lack of a feasible method to produce anti-pArg antibodies. We report the design and synthesis of a stable pArg analog, in which the labile N-P bond is replaced with a non-hydrolyzable C-P bond. Significantly, this analog was successfully used as a hapten to raise an immune response and the first mouse polyclonal antibody that specifically recognizes pArg-containing peptides and proteins was produced using analog-KLH conjugated as the immunogen. The generated antibody shows excellent specificity towards pArg-containing peptides and proteins, and could be used for a variety of biological detection methods. This provides us an invaluable tool to unravel the mystery of the biological function of pArg.

  13. An active immunization approach to generate protective catalytic antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Han, Y; Wilkinson, M F

    2001-01-01

    We report that mice immunized with a phosphate immunogen produced polyclonal catalytic antibodies (PCAbs) that catalysed the hydrolysis of carbaryl, a widely used broad-spectrum carbamate insecticide that exerts toxic effects in animals and humans. The reaction catalysed by the PCAbs (IgGs) obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in vitro with the following values at pH 8.0 and 25 degrees C: K(m) approximately 8.0 microM, k(cat)=4.8x10(-3)-5.8x10(-1), k(cat)/k(non-cat)=5.6x10(1)-6.8x10(3) (where k(non-cat) is the rate constant of the reaction in the absence of added catalyst). The PCAbs were also active in whole sera under physiological conditions in vitro. The PCAbs induced in vivo were also active in vivo, as immunization with the phosphate immunogen decreased the mouse blood concentration of carbaryl. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that active immunization generates antibodies possessing therapeutic catalytic function in vivo. We propose that active immunization schemes that induce enzymically active antibodies may provide a highly specific therapeutic approach for degrading toxic substances. PMID:11696002

  14. The influence of diisocyanate antigen preparation methodology on monoclonal and serum antibody recognition.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, Lauren M; Law, Brandon F; Bledsoe, Toni A; Hettick, Justin M; Kashon, Michael L; Lemons, Angela R; Wisnewski, Adam V; Siegel, Paul D

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to diisocyanates (dNCOs), such as methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) can cause occupational asthma (OA). Currently, lab tests for dNCO specific IgE are specific, but not sensitive, which limits their utility in diagnosing dNCO asthma. This may be due to variable preparation and poor characterization of the standard antigens utilized in these assays. The aim of this study was to produce and characterize a panel of antigens prepared using three different commonly employed methods and one novel method. The conjugates were examined for recognition by anti-MDI monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in varying enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) formats, extent of crosslinking, total amount of MDI, the sites of MDI conjugation, relative shape/charge, and reactivity with human serum with antibodies from sensitized, exposed workers. Results indicate that while there are minimal differences in the total amount of MDI conjugated, the extent of crosslinking, and the conjugation sites, there are significant differences in the recognition of differently prepared conjugates by mAbs. Native and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrate differences in the mobility of different conjugates, indicative of structural changes that are likely important for antigenicity. While mAbs exhibited differential binding to different conjugates, polyclonal serum antibodies from MDI exposed workers exhibited equivalent binding to different conjugates by ELISA. While differences in the recognition of the different conjugates exist by mAb detection, differences in antigenicity could not be detected using human serum from MDI-sensitized individuals. Thus, although dNCO conjugate preparation can, depending on the immunoassay platform, influence binding of specific antibody clones, serologic detection of the dNCO-exposure-induced polyclonal antibody response may be less sensitive to these differences.

  15. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  16. Specific cross-reactivity of antibodies raised against two major stress proteins, stress 70 and chaperonin 60, in diverse species

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, B.M.; Martin, L.S.; Nakagawa, P.A. ); Hunter, D.A. . Biologisk Inst.); Miller, S. ); Ullrich, S.J. . National Cancer Inst.)

    1994-08-01

    Immunoblot analysis using several antibodies raised against two major families of stress proteins, stress 70 and chaperonin 60 (cpn60), which are highly conserved in mammals, was carried out in diverse species often used in environmental research, including molluscs, annelids, crustaceans, echinoderms, and fish. The study revealed surprisingly different patterns of antibody cross-reactivity among species. The monoclonal anti-stress 70 antibody (mAb) C92 was the least cross-reactive for all species tested. The mAbs anti-stress 70 N27, BRM-22, and 3a3 were more broadly cross-reactive, but their binding specifities to stress 70 isoforms in the diverse species tested did not correlate with one another or follow taxonomic lines. The polyclonal anti-stress 70 antibody reacted to proteins in the 70 to 74 kDa range in all fish examined and in most invertebrates. When a polyclonal antibody (pAb) raised against cpn60 from a moth was used as a probe, specific binding was observed with proteins in the 60 to 64 kDa range in all fish examined and in most invertebrates. However, the size and number of isoforms that reacted with the pAb were species specific. These data suggest that these two major stress protein families are less highly conserved in invertebrates and fish than in mammals. Therefore, to minimize misinterpretation when using antibodies in heterologous assays with species in which the stress response has not been well characterized, it is important to determine which isoforms of stress 70 react with a particular antibody and to take into account the differential regulation of each member of this multigene family.

  17. A polyclonal antibody based immunoassay detects seven subtypes of Shiga toxin 2 produced by escherichia coli in human and environmental samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase of outbreaks and illnesses linked to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) has necessitated the development of effective detection methods for these pathogens in various matrices. The best way to determine if a bacterial strain is a STEC is to examine the production of Shiga tox...

  18. Prokaryotic expression, polyclonal antibody preparation of the stilbene synthase gene from grape berry and its different expression in fruit development and under heat acclimation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wan, Si-Bao; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Hui-Ling; Zhan, Ji-Cheng; Huang, Wei-Dong

    2008-12-01

    Stilbene synthase (STS, EC 2.3.1.95) leads to the production of resveratrol compounds, which are major components of the phytoalexin response against fungal pathogens of the plant and are highly bioactive substances of pharmaceutical interest. STS expression and regulation are important. Temperature is one of the main external factors affecting phytoalexin accumulation in plant tissues, the effect of temperature on resveratrol synthesis and stilbene synthase expression in grape berries has not been reported before. Here we cloned the full-length sts cDNA with 1179bp from grape berry via PCR, and then introduced into an expressed plasmid pET-30a(+) vector at the EcoRI and XhoI restriction sites. With the isopropyl-beta-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) induced, the pET-sts was highly expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS cells. A fusion protein with the His-Tag was purified by Ni-NTA His.Bind Resin and then used as the antigen to immunize a New Zealand rabbit. Furthermore, the antiserum was precipitated by 50% saturated ammonium sulfate and DEAE-Sephadex A-50 chromatography to obtain the immunoglobulin G (IgG) fraction. These results provide a substantial basis for the further studies of the STS in grape berry as well as in other species of plants. The sts expression in fruit development and in response to heat acclimation was then assayed. The results indicated STS was regulated in fruits depending on the developmental stage and significantly accumulation of STS mRNA and synthesis of new STS protein during the early of heat acclimation, this work offers an important basis for further investigating the mechanism of post-harvest fruit adaptation to environmental stresses.

  19. Chemoradiotherapy of cancer using boronated monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, December 1, 1982-November 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Soloway, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility was established of using antibodies for the delivery of /sup 10/B. Problems faced included 1) preservation of antibody activity following boronation, 2) antigenic receptor site density of the target cells, and 3) delivery of a critical number of /sup 10/B atoms per cell. The linkage of a heavily boronated polymeric species to antibody by means of a single functional group allow for the delivery of a large number /sup 10/B atoms per antibody molecule without a significant reduction in affinity. Both the polyclonally derived anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and the monoclonal anti-colorectal carcinoma antibody (17-1A) recognize antigens that are expressed with a density of approximately 10/sup 6/ epitopes per cell. The major concept that we advance is that just as effective cancer chemotherapy is based on the use of a combination of drugs, similarly a combination of compounds could be employed to deliver the requisite amount of /sup 10/B to tumor target cells. This could include compounds such as Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/Sh together with boronated antibodies directed against tumor associated antigens. (DT)

  20. Distinct oligoclonal band antibodies in multiple sclerosis recognize ubiquitous self-proteins.

    PubMed

    Brändle, Simone M; Obermeier, Birgit; Senel, Makbule; Bruder, Jessica; Mentele, Reinhard; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Kristoferitsch, Wolfgang; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Wekerle, Hartmut; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Dornmair, Klaus

    2016-07-12

    Oligoclonal Ig bands (OCBs) of the cerebrospinal fluid are a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), a disabling inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). OCBs are locally produced by clonally expanded antigen-experienced B cells and therefore are believed to hold an important clue to the pathogenesis. However, their target antigens have remained unknown, mainly because it was thus far not possible to isolate distinct OCBs against a background of polyclonal antibodies. To overcome this obstacle, we copurified disulfide-linked Ig heavy and light chains from distinct OCBs for concurrent analysis by mass spectrometry and aligned patient-specific peptides to corresponding transcriptome databases. This method revealed the full-length sequences of matching chains from distinct OCBs, allowing for antigen searches using recombinant OCB antibodies. As validation, we demonstrate that an OCB antibody from a patient with an infectious CNS disorder, neuroborreliosis, recognized a Borrelia protein. Next, we produced six recombinant antibodies from four MS patients and identified three different autoantigens. All of them are conformational epitopes of ubiquitous intracellular proteins not specific to brain tissue. Our findings indicate that the B-cell response in MS is heterogeneous and partly directed against intracellular autoantigens released during tissue destruction. In addition to helping elucidate the role of B cells in MS, our approach allows the identification of target antigens of OCB antibodies in other neuroinflammatory diseases and the production of therapeutic antibodies in infectious CNS diseases. PMID:27325759

  1. Monoclonal antibodies directed against human Rh antigens in tests with the red cells of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Ruffie, J

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against Rh related antigens on human red cells often crossreact with the red cells of the highest subhuman primate species. Depending on specificity of antibody, the species tested, and technique used, these reactions can be either species-specific or type specific. In tests with chimpanzee red cells, some of the latter type reactions have specificities related to the R antigen of the R-C-E-F blood group system of chimpanzee; specificities of some others seem to be unrelated to any known chimpanzee blood groups. Monoclonal anti-D reagents that give uniformly positive reactions with human D-positive (common and rare types) red cells, display wide individual differences in tests with chimpanzee blood. This indicates that there are minute structural variations of antibody molecules from one monoclonal anti-D antibodies apparently have no bearing on recognition of the D combining site on the human red cells, but come into play when in contact with chimpanzee rbcs. Some of the monoclonal antibodies directed against Rh and LW molecules are distinguished by unusually strong reactions with the red cells of the Old World monkeys (macaques and baboons), which is in contrast with negative or weak reactions of the same antibodies with the red cells of anthropoid apes and human bloods. One may recall, that polyclonal anti-Rh sera do not react with the blood of rhesus monkeys, the phenomenon that was the source of controversy surrounding the discovery of the rhesus factor of the human blood.

  2. An antibody toolkit for the study of membrane traffic in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Falko; Gillingham, Alison K.; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Galindo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism has been pivotal to understanding the developmental processes of metazoans. However, the use of flies for studying subcellular organization is hampered by a paucity of reliable reagents to label specific organelles. Here, we describe the generation of mouse monoclonal antibodies against a set of markers of the secretory and endocytic pathways, along with goat polyclonal antibodies against two Golgi proteins. We show that the monoclonal antibodies are highly specific and sufficiently sensitive to detect endogenous proteins in crude extracts by immunoblotting with little background staining. By immunofluorescence the major compartments of the membrane traffic system (including the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi, and early and late endosomes) are labeled by at least one antibody. Moreover, the antibodies can be used to label organelles in fly tissues including salivary glands and wing imaginal discs. We anticipate that these antibodies will provide a useful tool kit to facilitate the investigation of how the endomembrane system functions and varies in the diverse tissue types of metazoans. PMID:27256406

  3. Mice are actively immunized after passive monoclonal antibody prophylaxis and ricin toxin challenge. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Lemley, P.V.; Wright, D.C.

    1992-12-31

    Mice passively immunized by a protective, anti-ricin A-chain monoclonal antibody, then challenged intravenously with ricin, were protected from a subsequent ricin challenge, and were actively immunized. Two significant advantages accrued from this experiment: the monoclonal antibody neutralized the toxicity of the ricin immunogen, and active immunization was achieved with very low antigen load (approx. 0.5 micrograms/mouse). We ruled out the possibility that residual monoclonal antibody provided the protection by using three independent criteria. There was significant (four orders of magnitude) enhancement of the immune response in the presence of the monoclonal antibody; control immunizations of mice with ricin A-chain, ricin B-chain or either chain with the monoclonal antibody did not induce active immunity; and the active immunization could not be replicated when protective goat polyclonal antibody was substituted for the monoclonal antibody. Because high titers were achieved rapidly without any adjuvant, we are currently investigating haptenized ricin to determine if anti-hapten monoclonal antibodies can be produced by this refined procedure.

  4. Aqueous two-phase system patterning of detection antibody solutions for cross-reaction-free multiplex ELISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, John P.; White, Joshua B.; Simon, Arlyne B.; Tsuei, Michael; Paczesny, Sophie; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-05-01

    Accurate disease diagnosis, patient stratification and biomarker validation require the analysis of multiple biomarkers. This paper describes cross-reactivity-free multiplexing of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) using aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) to confine detection antibodies at specific locations in fully aqueous environments. Antibody cross-reactions are eliminated because the detection antibody solutions are co-localized only to corresponding surface-immobilized capture antibody spots. This multiplexing technique is validated using plasma samples from allogeneic bone marrow recipients. Patients with acute graft versus host disease (GVHD), a common and serious condition associated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, display higher mean concentrations for four multiplexed biomarkers (HGF, elafin, ST2 and TNFR1) relative to healthy donors and transplant patients without GVHD. The antibody co-localization capability of this technology is particularly useful when using inherently cross-reactive reagents such as polyclonal antibodies, although monoclonal antibody cross-reactivity can also be reduced. Because ATPS-ELISA adapts readily available antibody reagents, plate materials and detection instruments, it should be easily transferable into other research and clinical settings.

  5. Stereospecific recognition and quantitative structure-activity relationship between antibodies and enantiomers: ofloxacin as a model hapten.

    PubMed

    Mu, Hongtao; Wang, Baoling; Xu, Zhenlin; Sun, Yuanming; Huang, Xinan; Shen, Yudong; Eremin, Sergei A; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B; Lei, Hongtao

    2015-02-21

    In this study, ofloxacin stereoisomers were chosen as a simple model to investigate the stereospecific recognition of chiral haptens and antibodies. Three polyclonal antibodies were studied and showed a relatively high enantioselectivity and an excellent sensitivity. Comparative molecular field analysis and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis were employed to investigate the chiral recognition between the antibody and the ofloxacin enantiomer, and all the models yielded high correlation and predictive ability. It was found that the chiral discrimination was probably caused by steric hindrance; the antibody stereospecificity could be ascribed to the variation of the R1 and R3 groups of quinolones; the common structure of the quinolones is also essential in the hapten-antibody recognition. The recognition between the chiral haptens and the antibodies was co-affected by multiple interaction forces, and those forces were defined explicitly at the sub-structural level. An illustrative enhanced model with good simplicity and universality was also developed for a better understanding of the stereospecific recognition of ofloxacin enantiomers and antibodies for the first time. This work provides insights into the stereospecific recognition of chiral haptens and antibodies.

  6. Aqueous two-phase system patterning of detection antibody solutions for cross-reaction-free multiplex ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, John P.; White, Joshua B.; Simon, Arlyne B.; Tsuei, Michael; Paczesny, Sophie; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Accurate disease diagnosis, patient stratification and biomarker validation require the analysis of multiple biomarkers. This paper describes cross-reactivity-free multiplexing of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) using aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) to confine detection antibodies at specific locations in fully aqueous environments. Antibody cross-reactions are eliminated because the detection antibody solutions are co-localized only to corresponding surface-immobilized capture antibody spots. This multiplexing technique is validated using plasma samples from allogeneic bone marrow recipients. Patients with acute graft versus host disease (GVHD), a common and serious condition associated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, display higher mean concentrations for four multiplexed biomarkers (HGF, elafin, ST2 and TNFR1) relative to healthy donors and transplant patients without GVHD. The antibody co-localization capability of this technology is particularly useful when using inherently cross-reactive reagents such as polyclonal antibodies, although monoclonal antibody cross-reactivity can also be reduced. Because ATPS-ELISA adapts readily available antibody reagents, plate materials and detection instruments, it should be easily transferable into other research and clinical settings. PMID:24786974

  7. Antibodies to prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, M L

    2012-06-01

    Research on antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and the thrombotic manifestations associated with these antibodies has grown since the description of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) by Harris and colleagues in the early 1980s. Antiprothrombin (aPT) antibodies are commonly detected by ELISA, using irradiated plates (aPT) or prothrombin in complex with phosphatidylserine (aPS/PT). Although aPT and/or aPS/PT are associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) -related clinical features and these antibodies correlate with each other, aPT and aPS/PT belong to different populations of autoantibodies even though they can both be present in the same patient. Early studies suggested that these antibodies might be the antigenic target of lupus anticoagulant (LA) and their correlation and clinical significance is being investigated. PMID:22635215

  8. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  9. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  10. Matrix effects in applying mono- and polyclonal ELISA systems to the analysis of weathered oils in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Pollard, S J T; Farmer, J G; Knight, D M; Young, P J

    2002-01-01

    Commercial mono- and polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems were applied to the on-site analysis of weathered hydrocarbon-contaminated soils at a former integrated steelworks. Comparisons were made between concentrations of solvent extractable matter (SEM) determined gravimetrically by Soxhlet (dichloromethane) extraction and those estimated immunologically by ELISA determination over a concentration range of 2000-330,000 mg SEM/kg soil dry weight. Both ELISA systems tinder-reported for the more weathered soil samples. Results suggest this is due to matrix effects in the sample rather than any inherent bias in the ELISA systems and it is concluded that, for weathered hydrocarbons typical of steelworks and coke production sites, the use of ELISA requires careful consideration as a field technique. Consideration of the target analyte relative to the composition of the hydrocarbon waste encountered appears critical.

  11. Determination of the membrane topology of the phenobarbital-inducible rat liver cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme PB-4 using site-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Fifteen peptides, ranging in length from 6 to 31 amino acids and corresponding in sequence to portions of the major phenobarbital- inducible form of rat liver cytochrome P-450 (P-450 PB-4), were previously synthesized chemically and used to prepare site-specific rabbit antibodies (Frey, A. B., D.J. Waxman, and G. Kreibich, 1985, J. Biol. Chem., 260:15253-15265). The antipeptide antibodies were affinity purified using Sepharose resins derivatized with the respective peptides and 14 preparations were obtained that in an ELISA assay showed affinities to immobilized P-450 judged to be adequate for binding studies on intact rat liver microsomes. The binding of these antibodies to rough microsomes from the livers of phenobarbital treated rats was assessed using 125I-labeled IgG and by immunoelectron microscopy employing protein A-gold as a marker. It was found that many of the antibodies bound to the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane but none bound to the luminal face of ruptured or inverted microsomal vesicles or to contaminating membranes of other organelles present in the preparations. These observations eliminate previously proposed models for the transmembrane disposition of P-450 that postulate the existence of multiple transmembrane domains and the exposure of several polar segments of the polypeptide on the luminal side of the membrane. The fact that an antibody raised to the first 31 residues of P-450 bound well to the purified P-450 but very poorly to rough microsomes, whereas an antibody to a peptide comprising residues 24-38 showed relatively strong binding to intact microsomes, is consistent with the proposal that the amino terminal segment of P-450 extending approximately to residue 20 is embedded in the phospholipid bilayer and the immediately following segment is exposed on the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane. All these results favor a model in which the cytochrome P-450 molecule is largely exposed on the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic

  12. Antibodies to cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, G M; Gentry, M K; Amende, L M; Blanchette-Mackie, E J; Alving, C R

    1988-01-01

    Cholesterol-dependent complement activation has been proposed as a factor that might influence the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although antibodies to cholesterol conjugates have been reported, cholesterol is widely regarded as a poorly immunogenic substance. Monoclonal IgM complement-fixing antibodies to cholesterol were obtained in the present study after immunizing mice with liposomes containing high amounts of cholesterol (71 mol % relative to phosphatidylcholine) and lipid A as an adjuvant. Clones were selected for the ability of secreted antibodies to react with liposomes containing 71% cholesterol but not with liposomes containing 43% cholesterol. The antibodies also reacted with crystalline cholesterol in a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to the surface of crystalline cholesterol was demonstrated by electron microscopy by utilizing a second antibody (anti-IgM) labeled with colloidal gold. The immunization period required to induce monoclonal antibodies was very short (3 days) and a high fraction of the hybrid cells (at least 70%) were secreting detectable antibodies to cholesterol. The results demonstrate that cholesterol can be a highly immunogenic molecule and that complement-fixing antibodies to cholesterol can be readily obtained. Images PMID:3162316

  13. A simple nonradioactive method for the determination of the binding affinities of antibodies induced by hapten bioconjugates for drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Torres, Oscar B; Antoline, Joshua F G; Li, Fuying; Jalah, Rashmi; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C; Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R

    2016-02-01

    The accurate analytical measurement of binding affinities of polyclonal antibody in sera to heroin, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), and morphine has been a challenging task. A simple nonradioactive method that uses deuterium-labeled drug tracers and equilibrium dialysis (ED) combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to measure the apparent dissociation constant (K d) of antibodies to 6-AM and morphine is described. The method can readily detect antibodies with K d in the low nanomolar range. Since heroin is rapidly degraded in sera, esterase inhibitors were included in the assay, greatly reducing heroin hydrolysis. MS/MS detection directly measured the heroin in the assay after overnight ED, thereby allowing the quantitation of % bound heroin in lieu of K d as an alternative measurement to assess heroin binding to polyclonal antibody sera. This is the first report that utilizes a solution-based assay to quantify heroin-antibody binding without being confounded by the presence of 6-AM and morphine and to measure K d of polyclonal antibody to 6-AM. Hapten surrogates 6-AcMorHap, 6-PrOxyHap, MorHap, DiAmHap, and DiPrOxyHap coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) were used to generate high affinity antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In comparison to competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS which gave K d values in the nanomolar range, the commonly used competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measured the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values in the micromolar range. Despite the differences in K d and IC50 values, similar trends in affinities of hapten antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine were observed by both methods. Competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS revealed that among the five TT-hapten bioconjugates, TT-6-AcMorHap and TT-6-PrOxyHap induced antibodies that bound heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In contrast, TT-MorHap induced antibodies that poorly bound heroin, while TT-DiAmHap and TT-DiPrOxyHap induced antibodies either did not

  14. Antibody produced against isolated Rh(D) polypeptide reacts with other Rh-related antigens.

    PubMed

    Suyama, K; Goldstein, J

    1988-11-01

    Rh(D) antigen-containing polypeptide was prepared by immune precipitation of intact cDE/cDE erythrocytes by using a high-titer preparation of polyclonal anti-D. when isolated Rh(D) polypeptide was administered to rabbits, antibody was produced that was unresponsive toward Rh-positive and -negative cells but reacted strongly with the immunogen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type immunobinding and Western blot immunostaining assays. Rabbit antibody also immunostains isolated Rh(c) polypeptide as well as the Rh antigen-containing components of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated membrane proteins from Rh(D)-positive (cDE/cDE,CDe/CDe), Rh(D)-negative (cde/cde,Cde/Cde), and -D-/-D- cells. It does not react with any membrane protein from Rh-null regulator type cells, thus indicating a specificity for Rh-related proteins. We have also been able to demonstrate that polyclonal and monoclonal anti-D preparations that do not immunostain isolated Rh(D) polypeptide will react with it in our immunobinding assay.

  15. Novel sandwich ELISAs for rat DMP1: age-related decrease of circulatory DMP1 levels in male rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Sunao; Hashimoto, Jun; Usami, Yu; Ohyama, Kaname; Isogai, Yukihiro; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Maruyama, Nobuhiro; Komori, Toshihisa; Kuroda, Tatsuhiko; Toyosawa, Satoru

    2013-12-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), a noncollagenous bone matrix protein produced by osteocytes, regulates matrix mineralization and phosphate homeostasis. The lack of a precise assay for circulating DMP1 levels impairs further investigation of the protein's biological significance. Because full-length precursor DMP1 is cleaved into NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments during the secretory process, we developed two new sandwich ELISAs for the NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments of rat DMP1. One of these ELISAs, ELISA 1-2, is based on two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against the DMP1-1 and DMP1-2 peptides of the NH2-terminal fragment, whereas the other, ELISA 4-3, is based on two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against the DMP1-3 and DMP1-4 peptides of the COOH-terminal fragment. The polyclonal antibodies were characterized in immunohistochemical and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) studies. Immunohistochemical analyses of rat bone using these polyclonal antibodies revealed DMP1 immunoreactivity in osteocytes and pericanalicular matrix, consistent with the previously reported osteocyte-specific expression of DMP1. LC-MS/MS analyses of rat plasma-derived immunoreactive products affinity-extracted with these antibodies revealed the presence of DMP1 in circulating blood. The ELISAs established with these antibodies met accepted standards for reproducibility, repeatability, precision, and accuracy. Circulating DMP1 and levels of other biochemical markers (osteocalcin, Trap5b, Dkk-1, and SOST) were measured in 2-, 4-, 8-, 12-, 18-, 24-, 72-, and 96-week-old Wistar male rats. Circulating DMP1 levels determined by ELISAs 1-2 and 4-3 significantly decreased with age. During rapid skeletal growth (2-12weeks), DMP1 levels measured by ELISA 4-3 were over three times higher than those measured by ELISA 1-2; however, DMP1 levels in old animals (72 and 96weeks) were almost the same when measured by either ELISA. DMP1 levels

  16. Preparation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies recognizing unique epitopes on sexually differentiated rat liver cytochrome P-450 isozymes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, E T; Rönnholm, M; Gustafsson, J A

    1987-07-14

    Cytochrome P-450 isozymes P-450(16 alpha), P-450(15 beta), and P-450DEa are immunochemically related, as indicated by mutual cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibody preparations. We have isolated five monoclonal antibodies to P-450(15 beta) and one antibody to P-450(16 alpha) that show selectivity for the respective antigens. High frequencies of cross-reactivity were observed, indicating a high degree of homology among P-450(16 alpha), P-450(15 beta), and P-450DEa. All of the P-450(15 beta-specific antibodies bound to the same epitope, or closely grouped epitopes, supporting this conclusion. The specificity of each monoclonal antibody was characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western immunoblotting, and antibody-Sepharose immunoadsorption of solubilized rat liver microsomes. Antibodies F22 and F23, which were apparently identical, were specific for P-450(15 beta) by these criteria. However, the apparent specificities of antibodies F3 and F20 for P-450(15 beta), and of M16 for P-450(16 alpha), were highly dependent on the analytical technique used. The five anti-P-450(15 beta) antibodies all inhibited the catalytic activity of microsomal P-450(15 beta), by a maximum of 70%. However, they also produced a similar inhibition of microsomal P-450(16 alpha-specific antibody M16 and F23 have a low-affinity interaction with an epitope on P-450(16 alpha). The P-450(16 alpha)-specific antibody M16 was not inhibitory. The results indicate that the apparent specificity of a monoclonal antibody for an antigen determined by, e.g., Western blotting does not allow the conclusive identification of a protein in another system, e.g., immunoprecipitation of in vitro translation reaction products.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Protective activities in mice of monoclonal antibodies against pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Sato, Y

    1990-10-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) protein, which is the most important protective antigen of Bordetella pertussis, has a hexameric structure composed of five subunits, designated S1 through S5. Immunoprotective activity of 20 different mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against pertussis toxin, 10 anti-S1, 1 anti-S2, 2 anti-S3, 4 anti-S23, and 3 anti-S4 antibodies, were investigated by aerosol and intracerebral challenges with virulent B. pertussis organisms in mice. Four anti-S1, named 1B7, 1D7, 3F11, and 10D6, and three anti-S23 antibodies, named 11E6, 10B5, and 10C9, showed the highest, and almost complete, protectivity against the aerosol challenge. Mouse protectivity against the intracerebral challenge was significant for these four anti-S1 MAbs but not for any of the three anti-S23 MAbs. Four anti-S1 and two anti-S4 MAbs did not protect the mice against either challenge. The other seven MAbs also showed dose-dependent moderate but significant protection against the aerosol challenge. In the aerosol challenge system, bacterial numbers and amounts of PT detected in the lung and the number of peripheral leukocytes were lower in the mice given the protective MAbs. All mice surviving 5 weeks after the infection produced high titers of antibodies against PT, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and agglutinogens from the challenge organisms. A combination of the protective MAbs 1B7 and 11E6 strongly suppressed the disease and mortality of the mice at smaller amounts than with the anti-PT polyclonal antibody. Although combinations of one of the protective MAb and anti-FHA or anti-agglutinogen 2 also showed extremely high mouse protection without development of symptoms of the disease, antibody titers of the survivors against PT, FHA, and agglutinogens were significantly low. The foregoing results suggest that some important protective epitopes should be in S1 and S2 and/or S3, although there are both differences and similarities in the protective roles between anti-S1 and anti-S23

  18. Protective activities in mice of monoclonal antibodies against pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Sato, Y

    1990-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) protein, which is the most important protective antigen of Bordetella pertussis, has a hexameric structure composed of five subunits, designated S1 through S5. Immunoprotective activity of 20 different mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against pertussis toxin, 10 anti-S1, 1 anti-S2, 2 anti-S3, 4 anti-S23, and 3 anti-S4 antibodies, were investigated by aerosol and intracerebral challenges with virulent B. pertussis organisms in mice. Four anti-S1, named 1B7, 1D7, 3F11, and 10D6, and three anti-S23 antibodies, named 11E6, 10B5, and 10C9, showed the highest, and almost complete, protectivity against the aerosol challenge. Mouse protectivity against the intracerebral challenge was significant for these four anti-S1 MAbs but not for any of the three anti-S23 MAbs. Four anti-S1 and two anti-S4 MAbs did not protect the mice against either challenge. The other seven MAbs also showed dose-dependent moderate but significant protection against the aerosol challenge. In the aerosol challenge system, bacterial numbers and amounts of PT detected in the lung and the number of peripheral leukocytes were lower in the mice given the protective MAbs. All mice surviving 5 weeks after the infection produced high titers of antibodies against PT, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and agglutinogens from the challenge organisms. A combination of the protective MAbs 1B7 and 11E6 strongly suppressed the disease and mortality of the mice at smaller amounts than with the anti-PT polyclonal antibody. Although combinations of one of the protective MAb and anti-FHA or anti-agglutinogen 2 also showed extremely high mouse protection without development of symptoms of the disease, antibody titers of the survivors against PT, FHA, and agglutinogens were significantly low. The foregoing results suggest that some important protective epitopes should be in S1 and S2 and/or S3, although there are both differences and similarities in the protective roles between anti-S1 and anti-S23

  19. Structural basis for quinine-dependent antibody binding to platelet integrin αIIbβ3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianghai; Zhu, Jieqing; Bougie, Daniel W; Aster, Richard H; Springer, Timothy A

    2015-10-29

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is caused by antibodies that react with specific platelet-membrane glycoproteins when the provoking drug is present. More than 100 drugs have been implicated as triggers for this condition, quinine being one of the most common. The cause of DITP in most cases appears to be a drug-induced antibody that binds to a platelet membrane glycoprotein only when the drug is present. How a soluble drug promotes binding of an otherwise nonreactive immunoglobulin to its target, leading to platelet destruction, is uncertain, in part because of the difficulties of working with polyclonal human antibodies usually available only in small quantities. Recently, quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies were developed that recognize a defined epitope on the β-propeller domain of the platelet integrin αIIb subunit (GPIIb) only when the drug is present and closely mimic the behavior of antibodies found in human patients with quinine-induced thrombocytopenia in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of quinine to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of these antibodies and define in crystal structures the changes induced in the CDR by this interaction. Because no detectable binding of quinine to the target integrin could be demonstrated in previous studies, the findings indicate that a hybrid paratope consisting of quinine and reconfigured antibody CDR plays a critical role in recognition of its target epitope by an antibody and suggest that, in this type of drug-induced immunologic injury, the primary reaction involves binding of the drug to antibody CDRs, causing it to acquire specificity for a site on a platelet integrin.

  20. A peptide mimic blocks the cross-reaction of anti-DNA antibodies with glomerular antigens.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Eryilmaz, E; Der, E; Pawar, R D; Guo, X; Cowburn, D; Putterman, C

    2016-03-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with renal antigens. Previously, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to self-antigens is isotype-dependent. Furthermore, significant variability in renal pathogenicity was seen among a panel of anti-DNA isotypes [derived from a single murine immunoglobulin (Ig)G3 monoclonal antibody, PL9-11] that share identical variable regions. In this study, we sought to select peptide mimics that effectively inhibit the binding of all murine and human anti-DNA IgG isotypes to glomerular antigens. The PL9-11 panel of IgG anti-DNA antibodies (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3) was used for screening a 12-mer phage display library. Binding affinity was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry and glomerular binding assays were used for the assessment of peptide inhibition of antibody binding to nuclear and kidney antigens. We identified a 12 amino acid peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP, or 'ALW') which binds to all PL9-11 IgG isotypes. Preincubation with the ALW peptide reduced the binding of the PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies to DNA, laminin, mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli significantly. Furthermore, we confirmed the specificity of the amino acid sequence in the binding of ALW to anti-DNA antibodies by alanine scanning. Finally, ALW inhibited the binding of murine and human lupus sera to dsDNA and glomeruli significantly. In conclusion, by inhibiting the binding of polyclonal anti-DNA antibodies to autoantigens in vivo, the ALW peptide (or its derivatives) may potentially be a useful approach to block anti-DNA antibody binding to renal tissue.

  1. Structural basis for quinine-dependent antibody binding to platelet integrin αIIbβ3

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianghai; Zhu, Jieqing; Bougie, Daniel W.; Aster, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is caused by antibodies that react with specific platelet-membrane glycoproteins when the provoking drug is present. More than 100 drugs have been implicated as triggers for this condition, quinine being one of the most common. The cause of DITP in most cases appears to be a drug-induced antibody that binds to a platelet membrane glycoprotein only when the drug is present. How a soluble drug promotes binding of an otherwise nonreactive immunoglobulin to its target, leading to platelet destruction, is uncertain, in part because of the difficulties of working with polyclonal human antibodies usually available only in small quantities. Recently, quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies were developed that recognize a defined epitope on the β-propeller domain of the platelet integrin αIIb subunit (GPIIb) only when the drug is present and closely mimic the behavior of antibodies found in human patients with quinine-induced thrombocytopenia in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of quinine to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of these antibodies and define in crystal structures the changes induced in the CDR by this interaction. Because no detectable binding of quinine to the target integrin could be demonstrated in previous studies, the findings indicate that a hybrid paratope consisting of quinine and reconfigured antibody CDR plays a critical role in recognition of its target epitope by an antibody and suggest that, in this type of drug-induced immunologic injury, the primary reaction involves binding of the drug to antibody CDRs, causing it to acquire specificity for a site on a platelet integrin. PMID:26282540

  2. Establishment of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for lipoprotein lipase with newly developed antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, M; Gotoda, T; Mori, N; Shimano, H; Kozaki, K; Harada, K; Shimada, M; Inaba, T; Watanabe, Y; Yazaki, Y

    1994-09-01

    We developed eight new antibodies against lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which included polyclonal antibodies raised against recombinant human LPL produced by transformant cells and two synthetic peptides corresponding to either amino (N)- or carboxy (C)-terminus of human LPL. With these antibodies, we established three effective sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for LPL, which enabled us to examine LPL mass not only in the postheparin plasma from human, rat, mouse, and guinea pig but also in the media and lysates of cultured cells. All of the developed antibodies showed high affinities for LPL, but their binding to LPL did not always influence the lipolytic activity of the enzyme. Interestingly, although the anti-C-terminus antibody should bind to a common epitope of human and mouse LPL, its binding selectively suppressed only human LPL activity. Because amino acid sequence surrounding the epitope is common to both LPLs, difference in the sequence outside the epitope will contribute to the selective suppression of LPL activity by the antibody. Our results also suggested that both termini of LPL would be exposed on the surface of the molecule because they were fully accessible to antibodies and that the N-terminus of LPL would be functionally less important because binding of the anti-N-terminus antibody did not affect human LPL activity. The ELISAs were further utilized to demonstrate the presence of C-terminus truncated LPL protein in the postheparin plasma of an LPL-deficient patient, to map an epitope of the anti-C-terminus antibody within residues 433-436, and to gain insight into the structure-function relationship of the LPL molecule.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Localization and synthesis of an antigenic determinant of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D that stimulates the production of neutralizing antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, G.H.; Dietzschold, B.; Ponce de Leon, M.; Long, D.; Golub, E.; Varrichio, A.; Pereira, L.; Eisenberg, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    An antigenic determinant capable of inducing type-common herpes simplex virus (HSV)-neutralizing antibodies has been located on glycoprotein D (gD) of HSV type 1 (HSV-1). A peptide of 16 amino acids corresponding to residues 8 to 23 of the mature glycoprotein (residues 33 to 48 of the predicted gD-1 sequence) was synthesized. This peptide reacted with an anti-gD monoclonal antibody (group VII) previously shown to neutralize the infectivity of HSV-1 and HSV-2. The peptide was also recognized by polyclonal antibodies prepared against purified gD-1 but was less reactive with anti-gD2 sera. Sera from animals immunized with the synthetic peptide reacted with native gD and neutralized both HSV-1 and HSV-2.

  4. Purification of allantoinase from soybean seeds and production and characterization of anti-allantoinase antibodies.

    PubMed

    Webb, M A; Lindell, J S

    1993-12-01

    Allantoinase catalyzes the hydrolysis of allantoin to allantoic acid, a reaction important in both biogenesis and degradation of ureides. Ureide production in cotyledons of germinating soybean (Glycine max L.) seeds has not been studied extensively but may be important in mobilizing nitrogen reserves. Allantoinase was purified approximately 2500-fold from a crude extract of soybean seeds by differential centrifugation, heat treatment, ammonium sulfate fractionation, ethanol fractionation, and fast protein liquid chromatography (Pharmacia) with Mono-Q and Superose columns. The purified enzyme had a subunit size of 30 kD. Polyclonal antibodies produced against the purified protein titrated allantoinase activity in a crude extract of seed proteins. Antibodies recognized the 30-kD band in western blot analysis of crude seed extracts, indicating that they were specific for allantoinase.

  5. The IgG subclass distribution of thyroglobulin antibody synthesized in culture.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P M; McLachlan, S M; Parkes, A; Clark, F; Howel, D; Rees Smith, B

    1983-08-01

    Thyroglobulin autoantibodies synthesized by Hashimoto lymphocytes in culture and present in serum have been analysed in terms of their IgG subclass distribution. The autoantibodies produced in vitro were frequently IgG4 or IgG1, whether pokeweed mitogen or Epstein-Barr virus was used to stimulate the cultures, and the subclass distribution of these thyroglobulin antibodies was similar to that observed in the patients' serum. It appears therefore that the antibodies synthesized in vitro in response to polyclonal B-cell activators resemble those produced in vivo, and it seems likely that both pokeweed mitogen and Epstein-Barr virus influence the same B-cell precursors of autoantibody-synthesizing cells, albeit by different mechanisms.

  6. A historical essay on detection of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Niels; Wiik, Allan; Jayne, David R

    2015-04-01

    In this essay we describe a number of the known and not so known experiences of the early anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) days, explaining why and how we reached consensus on the standard indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) techniques, the naming of the two principal C- and P-ANCA patterns, why we chose to use IIF as the standard technique, how the solid phase assays have developed and where we stand today, the use of ANCA for diagnosis and the importance of using several techniques for that purpose, how ANCA titres are related to disease activity and the clinical impact of this, and finally the implications of ANCA being a natural, polyclonal antibody response against various epitopes in relation to diagnostics and disease patterns.

  7. Bovine antibody against Cryptosporidium parvum elicits a circumsporozoite precipitate-like reaction and has immunotherapeutic effect against persistent cryptosporidiosis in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, M W; Cama, V A; Leary, H L; Sterling, C R

    1994-01-01

    , the defined antigens can be evaluated as subunit immunogens to produce better-characterized polyclonal antibody for control of cryptosporidiosis or as targets for monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. Images PMID:8168959

  8. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  9. Antibodies as natural adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies in complex with specific antigen can dramatically change the antibody response to this antigen. Depending on antibody class and type of antigen, >99 % suppression or >100-fold enhancement of the response can take place. IgM and IgG3 are efficient enhancers and operate via the complement system. In contrast, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b enhance antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to protein antigens via activating Fcγ-receptors. IgE also enhances antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to small proteins but uses the low-affinity receptor for IgE, CD23. Most likely, IgM and IgG3 work by increasing the effective concentration of antigen on follicular dendritic cells in splenic follicles. IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgE probably enhance antibody responses by increasing antigen presentation by dendritic cells to T helper cells. IgG antibodies of all subclasses have a dual effect, and suppress antibody responses to particulate antigens such as erythrocytes. This capacity is used in the clinic to prevent immunization of Rhesus-negative women to Rhesus-positive fetal erythrocytes acquired via transplacental hemorrage. IgG-mediated suppression in mouse models can take place in the absence of Fcγ-receptors and complement and to date no knock-out mouse strain has been found where suppression is abrogated.

  10. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  11. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  12. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  13. Affinity Purification of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M; McGarvey, Jeffery A

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that include antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant, or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facilitate assay reproducibility, economy, and reduced interference of nonspecific components as well as improved storage, stability, and bio-conjugation. Although not always necessary, the relative simplicity of antibody purification using commercially available protein-A, protein-G, or protein-L resins with basic chromatographic principles warrants purification when antibody source material is available in sufficient quantity. Here, we define three simple methods using immobilized (1) protein-A, (2) protein-G, and (3) protein-L agarose beads to yield highly purified antibody. PMID:26160561

  14. Cross-reactivity of antibodies to actin- depolymerizing factor/cofilin family proteins and identification of the major epitope recognized by a mammalian actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin antibody.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alisa E; Minamide, Laurie S; Bill, Christine L; Funk, Janel D; Maiti, Sankar; Bamburg, James R

    2004-08-01

    Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family of proteins are expressed in all eukaryotic cells. In higher vertebrates, cells often express as many as three different ADF/cofilin genes and each of these proteins may be phosphorylated on serine 3, giving rise to up to six different species. Also, many avian, amphibian, and invertebrate systems have been useful in studying different aspects of ADF/cofilin function. Antibodies have been prepared against different members of the ADF/cofilin family, but no systematic examination of their cross-reactivity has been reported. Although ADF and cofilins within a single vertebrate species have about a 70% sequence homology, antibodies often differentiate between these proteins. Here, Western blotting was used with chemiluminescence substrates of different sensitivities to determine the relative immunoreactivities of different polyclonal rabbit antibodies and a mouse monoclonal antibody to purified ADF/cofilins from plants, protists, nematodes, insects, echinoderms, birds, and mammals. From immunocross-reactivities and sequence alignments, the principal epitope in mammalian ADF and cofilin-1 recognized by an antibody raised against avian ADF was identified. The specificity of an antibody to the phosphopeptide epitope of metazoan ADF/cofilins was confirmed by two-dimensional (2-D) immunoblot analysis. Futhermore, this bank of antibodies was used to identify by Western blotting a putative member of the ADF/cofilin family in the sea slug, Aplysia californica.

  15. Generation and purification of highly-specific antibodies for detecting post-translationally modified proteins in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arur, Swathi; Schedl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications alter protein structure, affecting activity, stability, localization and/or binding partners. Antibodies that specifically recognize post-translationally modified proteins have a number of uses including immuno-cytochemistry and immuno-precipitation of the modified protein to purify protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid complexes. However, antibodies directed at modified sites on individual proteins are often non-specific. Here we describe a protocol to purify polyclonal antibodies that specifically detect the modified protein of interest. The approach uses iterative rounds of subtraction and affinity purification, using stringent washes to remove antibodies that recognize the unmodified protein and low sequence complexity epitopes containing the modified amino acid. Dot and western blots assays are employed to assess antibody preparation specificity. The approach is designed to overcome the common occurrence that a single round of subtraction and affinity purification is not sufficient to obtain a modified protein specific antibody preparation. One full round of antibody purification and specificity testing takes 6 days of discontinuous time. PMID:24457330

  16. Development and utilization of camelid VHH antibodies from alpaca for 2,2',4,4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether detection.

    PubMed

    Bever, Candace R S; Majkova, Zuzana; Radhakrishnan, Rajeswaran; Suni, Ian; McCoy, Mark; Wang, Yanru; Dechant, Julie; Gee, Shirley; Hammock, Bruce D

    2014-08-01

    An antibody-based analytical method for the detection of a chemical flame retardant using antibody fragments isolated from an alpaca has been developed. One specific chemical flame retardant congener, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47), is often the major poly-BDE (PBDE) congener present in human and environmental samples and that which is the most frequently detected. An alpaca was immunized with a surrogate of BDE-47 covalently attached to a carrier protein. The resulting mRNA coding for the variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH) were isolated, transcribed to cDNA, and cloned into a phagemid vector for phage display library construction. Selection of VHHs recognizing BDE-47 was achieved by panning under carefully modified conditions. The assay sensitivity for detecting BDE-47 was down to the part-per-billion (microgram per liter) level. Cross-reactivity analyses confirmed that this method was highly selective for BDE-47 and selected hydroxylated metabolites. When exposed to elevated temperatures, the camelid VHH antibodies retained more reactivity than a polyclonal antibody developed to the same target analyte. The use of this VHH antibody reagent immobilized onto a Au electrode for impedance biosensing demonstrates the increased versatility of VHH antibodies.

  17. Characterization of serum antibody responses to natural rotavirus infections in children by VP7-specific epitope-blocking assays.

    PubMed Central

    Matson, D O; O'Ryan, M L; Pickering, L K; Chiba, S; Nakata, S; Raj, P; Estes, M K

    1992-01-01

    Knowledge of the immune response to rotavirus is crucial for vaccine development. We compared an epitope-blocking assay (EBA) that uses VP7-specific monoclonal antibodies with neutralization assays (NAs) with polyclonal antisera for detecting serum antibody responses after natural rotavirus infection in children. Twenty-six serum pairs from children living in an orphanage with and without symptoms during two rotavirus outbreaks were evaluated for VP7 type 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-specific antibody responses. In the first outbreak, which was caused by a VP7 type 3 strain, homotypic antibody responses were detected in 11 of 11 symptomatic children by NA and in 10 of 11 symptomatic children by EBA. Heterotypic antibody responses were detected more frequently (12 of 15 children) by NA than by EBA, and the heterotypic epitope-blocking antibody responses occurred in children older than 14 months of age. Antibody responses in asymptomatic children were more commonly detected by EBA than by NA. EBA results from the sera of children in the second outbreak indicated that it was caused by VP7 type 4, whereas NA results suggested it was caused by VP7 type 3. Our results confirm that EBA is a sensitive and specific method for determining VP7 type-specific immune responses after natural rotavirus infections. PMID:1374761

  18. Triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI): phage display and antibodies as tools for finding target regions to inhibit catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Ayala, Víctor; Belmont, Iaraset; Abraham, Landa

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antibodies against triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI) can alter its enzymatic catalysis. In the present study, we used antibodies produced against the NH2-terminal region of TTPI (1/3NH2TTPI) and the phage display technology to find target regions to inhibit TTPI activity. As a first step, we obtained polyclonal antibodies against non-conserved regions from the 1/3NH2TTPI, which had an inhibitory effect of about 74 % on catalytic activity. Afterward, they were used to screen a library of phage-displayed dodecapeptides; as a result, 41 phage mimotope clones were isolated and grouped according to their amino acid sequence, finding the consensus A1 (VPTXPI), A2 (VPTXXI), B (LTPGQ), and D (DPLPR). Antibodies against selected phage mimotope clones were obtained by rabbit's immunization; these ones clearly recognized TTPI by both Western blot and ELISA. However, only the mimotope PDTS16 (DSVTPTSVMAVA) clone, which belongs to the VPTXXI consensus, raised antibodies capable of inhibiting the TTPI catalytic activity in 45 %. Anti-PDTS16 antibodies were confronted to several synthetic peptides that encompass the 1/3NH2TTPI, and they only recognized three, which share the motif FDTLQK belonging to the helix-α1 in TTPI. This suggests that this motif is the main part of the epitope recognized by anti-PDTS16 antibodies and revealed its importance for TTPI catalysis.

  19. An Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor Based on Gold-Magnetic Nanoparticles and Phage Displayed Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xihui; Tong, Zhaoyang; Huang, Qibin; Liu, Bing; Liu, Zhiwei; Hao, Lanqun; Dong, Hua; Zhang, Jinping; Gao, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Using the multiple advantages of the ultra-highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) technique, Staphylococcus protein A (SPA) functionalized gold-magnetic nanoparticles and phage displayed antibodies, and using gold-magnetic nanoparticles coated with SPA and coupled with a polyclonal antibody (pcAb) as magnetic capturing probes, and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody as a specific luminescence probe, this study reports a new way to detect ricin with a highly sensitive and specific ECL immunosensor and amplify specific detection signals. The linear detection range of the sensor was 0.0001~200 µg/L, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.0001 µg/L, which is 2500-fold lower than that of the conventional ELISA technique. The gold-magnetic nanoparticles, SPA and Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibody displayed different amplifying effects in the ECL immunosensor and can decrease LOD 3-fold, 3-fold and 20-fold, respectively, compared with the ECL immunosensors without one of the three effects. The integrated amplifying effect can decrease the LOD 180-fold. The immunosensor integrates the unique advantages of SPA-coated gold-magnetic nanoparticles that improve the activity of the functionalized capturing probe, and the amplifying effect of the Ru(bpy)32+-labeled phage displayed antibodies, so it increases specificity, interference-resistance and decreases LOD. It is proven to be well suited for the analysis of trace amounts of ricin in various environmental samples with high recovery ratios and reproducibility. PMID:26927130

  20. Induction of CD4 suppressor T cells with anti-Leu-8 antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Kanof, M.E.; Strober, W.; James, S.P.

    1987-07-01

    To characterize the conditions under which CD4 T cells suppress polyclonal immunoglobulin synthesis, we investigated the capacity of CD4 T cells that coexpress the surface antigen recognized by the monoclonal antibody anti-Leu-8 to mediate suppression. In an in vitro system devoid of CD8 T cells, CD4, Leu-8+ T cells suppressed pokeweed mitogen-induced immunoglobulin synthesis. Similarly, suppressor function was induced in unfractionated CD4 T cell populations after incubation with anti-Leu-8 antibody under cross-linking conditions. This induction of suppressor function by anti-Leu-8 antibody was not due to expansion of the CD4, Leu-8+ T cell population because CD4 T cells did not proliferate in response to anti-Leu-8 antibody. However, CD4, Leu-8+ T cell-mediated suppression was radiosensitive. Finally, CD4, Leu-8+ T cells do not inhibit immunoglobulin synthesis when T cell lymphokines were used in place of helper CD4 T cells (CD4, Leu-8- T cells), suggesting that CD4 T cell-mediated suppression occurs at the T cell level. We conclude that CD4 T cells can be induced to suppress immunoglobulin synthesis by modulation of the membrane antigen recognized by anti-Leu-8 antibody.

  1. Functional characterization of a monoclonal antibody epitope using a lambda phage display-deep sequencing platform

    PubMed Central

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described a method, named PROFILER, for the identification of antigenic regions preferentially targeted by polyclonal antibody responses after vaccination. To test the ability of the technique to provide insights into the functional properties of monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes, we used here a well-characterized epitope of meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp), which is recognized by mAb 12C1. An fHbp library, engineered on a lambda phage vector enabling surface expression of polypeptides of widely different length, was subjected to massive parallel sequencing of the phage inserts after affinity selection with the 12C1 mAb. We detected dozens of unique antibody-selected sequences, the most enriched of which (designated as FrC) could largely recapitulate the ability of fHbp to bind mAb 12C1. Computational analysis of the cumulative enrichment of single amino acids in the antibody-selected fragments identified two overrepresented stretches of residues (H248-K254 and S140-G154), whose presence was subsequently found to be required for binding of FrC to mAb 12C1. Collectively, these results suggest that the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify, in the context of complex conformational epitopes, discrete “hot spots” with a crucial role in antigen-antibody interactions, thereby providing useful clues for the functional characterization of the epitope. PMID:27530334

  2. Double-antibody based immunoassay for the detection of β-casein in bovine milk samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Song, F; Li, Y S; Liu, J Q; Lu, S Y; Ren, H L; Liu, Z S; Zhang, Y Y; Yang, L; Li, Z H; Zhang, J H; Wang, X R

    2013-11-01

    The concentration of casein (CN) is one of the most important parameters for measuring the quality of bovine milk. Traditional approach to CN concentration determination is Kjeldahl, which is an indirect method for determination of total nitrogen content. Here, we described a double-antibody based direct immunoassay for the detection of β-CN in bovine milk samples. Monoclonal antibody (McAb) was used as capture antibody and polyclonal antibody (PcAb) labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as detection antibody. With the direct immunoassay format, the linear range of the detection was 0.1-10.0 μg mL(-1). The detection limit was 0.04 μg mL(-1). In addition, the concentration of β-CN in real bovine milk samples has been detected by the developed immunoassay. There was a good correlation between the results obtained by the developed technique and Kjeldahl method from commercial samples. Compared to the traditional approach, the advantage of the assay is no need of time-consuming sample pretreatment.

  3. Antibodies for Growth Hormone and Prolactin Using Multiple Antigen Peptide Immunogens.

    PubMed

    González-Villaseñor; Chen

    1999-05-01

    : Antibodies elicited by novel synthetic peptide antigens derived from a highly conserved domain of the growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) of vertebrates were developed using the multiple antigen peptide approach. The sequence of the antigens is located near the carboxy-terminus in the D domain of the GH and PRL in a cluster of 11 and 10 conserved amino acids, respectively, within a sequence of 18 residues. The synthetic peptides were manually synthesized, purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the corresponding antibodies, elicited in rabbits, were cross-reacted with the GH and PRL of a variety of mammalian (human, bovine, ovine, pig, and equine) and nonmammalian (chicken, coho salmon, chum salmon, rainbow trout, catfish and striped bass) vertebrates. The cross-reactivity between the immunogen and its corresponding antigen was tested by immunobloting using either GH or PRL. The GH and PRL of the organisms tested cross-reacted specifically with the corresponding antibody. Chicken and fish GH and PRL showed stronger antibody cross-reactivity than that observed in mammalian sources. These results demonstrate the utility of peptide-derived polyclonal antibodies in the detection of native and recombinant GH and PRL of a variety of vertebrates.

  4. Domain specificity of the human antibody response to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Reason, Donald C; Ullal, Anuska; Liberato, Justine; Sun, Jinying; Keitel, Wendy; Zhou, Jianhui

    2008-07-29

    Protective antigen (PA) is the cell surface recognition moiety of the Bacillus anthracis A-B toxin system, and the active immunogenic component in the currently licensed human anthrax vaccine (BioThrax, or AVA). The serum antibody response to the PA protein is polyclonal and complex both in terms of the antibody combining sites utilized to bind PA and the PA-associated epitopes recognized. We have cloned, sequenced, and expressed a large panel of PA-specific human monoclonal antibodies from seven AVA-immunized donors. Dot blots, Western blots, and radiolabeled antigen capture assays employing both proteolytic fragments of PA and engineered PA sub-domain fusion proteins were used to determine the region (domain) of the PA monomer to which each of the cloned human antibodies bound. The domain specificity of the isolated monoclonals was highly biased towards the amino-terminal 20kDa fragment of PA (PA(20)), with the majority (62%) of independently arising antibody clones reacting with determinants located on this PA fragment. A similar bias in domain specificity was also demonstrated in the serum response of AVA-vaccinated donors. Since PA(20) is cleaved from the remainder of the monomer rapidly following cell surface binding and has no known role in the intoxication process, the immunodominance of PA(20)-associated epitopes may directly affect the efficacy of PA-based anthrax vaccines.

  5. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  6. Polyclonal B Cell Responses to Conserved Neutralization Epitopes in a Subset of HIV-1-Infected Individuals▿†

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Georgia D.; Binley, James M.; Gray, Elin S.; Crooks, Emma T.; Osawa, Keiko; Moore, Penny L.; Tumba, Nancy; Tong, Tommy; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L.; Decker, Julie; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gao, Feng; Alam, S. Munir; Easterbrook, Philippa; Abdool Karim, Salim; Kamanga, Gift; Crump, John A.; Cohen, Myron; Shaw, George M.; Mascola, John R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Montefiori, David C.; Morris, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    A small proportion of HIV-infected individuals generate a neutralizing antibody (NAb) response of exceptional magnitude and breadth. A detailed analysis of the critical epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies should help to define optimal targets for vaccine design. HIV-1-infected subjects with potent cross-reactive serum neutralizing antibodies were identified by assaying sera from 308 subjects against a multiclade panel of 12 “tier 2” viruses (4 each of subtypes A, B, and C). Various neutralizing epitope specificities were determined for the top 9 neutralizers, including clade A-, clade B-, clade C-, and clade A/C-infected donors, by using a comprehensive set of assays. In some subjects, neutralization breadth was mediated by two or more antibody specificities. Although antibodies to the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) were identified in some subjects, the subjects with the greatest neutralization breadth targeted gp120 epitopes, including the CD4 binding site, a glycan-containing quaternary epitope formed by the V2 and V3 loops, or an outer domain epitope containing a glycan at residue N332. The broadly reactive HIV-1 neutralization observed in some subjects is mediated by antibodies targeting several conserved regions on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. PMID:21849452

  7. Purification and determination of C-reactive protein and inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 in dogs after major surgery through generation of specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Soler, L; García, N; Unzueta, A; Piñeiro, M; Álava, M A; Lampreave, F

    2016-10-15

    Inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been isolated from acute phase dog sera by affinity chromatography with insolubilized polyclonal antibodies anti pig Major Acute phase Protein (Pig-MAP) and with p-Aminophenyl Phosphoryl Choline, respectively. Isolated proteins were used to prepare specific polyclonal rabbit antisera that have allowed quantifying their concentration in serum samples by single radial immunodifussion. Both proteins were quantified in sera from female dogs that had undergone ovariohysterectomy (OVH, n=9) or mastectomy (n=10). The observed increases in CRP concentrations showed that surgical traumas induced an acute phase response of a great magnitude in the dogs. In both surgeries a four-fold increase of ITIH4 concentrations was detected. It can be concluded that ITIH4 is a new positive acute phase protein in dogs, as reported in other species.

  8. Purification and determination of C-reactive protein and inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 in dogs after major surgery through generation of specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Soler, L; García, N; Unzueta, A; Piñeiro, M; Álava, M A; Lampreave, F

    2016-10-15

    Inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been isolated from acute phase dog sera by affinity chromatography with insolubilized polyclonal antibodies anti pig Major Acute phase Protein (Pig-MAP) and with p-Aminophenyl Phosphoryl Choline, respectively. Isolated proteins were used to prepare specific polyclonal rabbit antisera that have allowed quantifying their concentration in serum samples by single radial immunodifussion. Both proteins were quantified in sera from female dogs that had undergone ovariohysterectomy (OVH, n=9) or mastectomy (n=10). The observed increases in CRP concentrations showed that surgical traumas induced an acute phase response of a great magnitude in the dogs. In both surgeries a four-fold increase of ITIH4 concentrations was detected. It can be concluded that ITIH4 is a new positive acute phase protein in dogs, as reported in other species. PMID:27590422

  9. Polyclonal anti-T-cell globulin as part of the preparative regimen for pediatric allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Remberger, M; Mattsson, J; Ringdén, O

    2001-08-01

    To prevent graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (ASCT), 56 children were given polyclonal anti-T-cell globulin (ATG) as part of the conditioning regimen. Of the 56 children in the cohort, 27 had a non-malignant disease and 29 had different hematological malignancies. Eight were in first remission of leukemia and the remainder in later stages. Donors were in 16 cases a human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling and in 40 a matched unrelated donor (MUD). The control group comprised 16 patients with an HLA-identical donor; the children in this group were not treated with ATG. Side-effects related to the ATG treatment occurred in 63% of the patients and included fever, chills, headache, dyspnoea, nausea/vomiting, body pain, fall in blood pressure, and transient respiratory arrest. Engraftment occurred in 55 (98%) of the ATG-treated patients at a median of 17 (11-27) days after ASCT. One rejection occurred at 23 days post-SCT. The probabilities of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) of grades II-IV were 6% for patients with an HLA-identical donor, 12% for controls, and 26% for the MUD group. Chronic GvHD occured in 20%, 50%, and 50% of patients in the three groups, respectively. Transplant-related mortality rates at 100 days were 6%, 6%, and 7%, respectively. The 5-yr survival rate was 94% and 81% using sibling donors, with and without ATG respectively, and 53% using unrelated donors (p = 0.002). Disregarding donor type, among the ATG-treated patients 5-yr survival rates were 46% in patients with a malignant disease and 77% in non-malignant disorders. Relapse and relapse-free survival rates were 42% and 46%, respectively. Five out of 12 patients who showed an early full donor chimerism in the T-cell lineage developed acute GvHD of grades II-IV, compared to none out of 13 patients being mixed chimeras (p = 0.01). Hence, the use of polyclonal ATG as part of conditioning prior to ASCT in children is safe

  10. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) activity in response to different immune stimuli in haemocytes of the common periwinkle Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, Nadya V; Gorbushin, Alexander M; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-09-01

    The modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in haemocytes of the common periwinkle (Littorina littorea) in response to immune challenges by lipopolysaccharide from Echerichia coli (LPS), mannan from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and secretory-excretory products (SEP) of trematodes Himasthla elongata (Echinostomatidae) or after the treatment with phorbol ester (PMA) has been studied by Western blotting using affinity purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Exposure of the cells in suspension to PMA, LPS and mannan triggered an activation of p38 and ERK2. The JNK-mediated cascade was modulated differently by the elicitors examined. PMA treatment caused a transient activation of the JNK54 isoform, LPS exposure resulted in a decrease in activity of JNK46, and mannan had no effect on JNK phosphorylation status. Incubation of periwinkle haemocytes in culture medium containing trematode SEP did not affect the activity of any MAPK. PMID:16533608

  11. Validation of a recombinant integrin αvβ6/monoclonal antibody based antigen ELISA for the diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Nigel P; Grazioli, Santina; Hutchings, Geoffrey H; Brocchi, Emiliana

    2011-08-01

    A sandwich ELISA using recombinant integrin αvβ6 as a capture ligand and serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) as detecting reagents has been compared with a polyclonal antibody based ELISA (using type-specific rabbit antibodies as capture and guinea pig antibodies as detectors), which is employed routinely at the FAO World Reference Laboratory for Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD), for the identification and serotyping of FMD virus (FMDV). The study used cell culture grown antigens (1351 FMDV positive) derived from suspected cases of vesicular disease collected from 86 countries between 1924 and 2011, those positive for the other vesicular diseases of swine vesicular disease (n = 25) and vesicular stomatitis (n = 45) and negative samples collected from uninfected cell cultures (n = 36). The diagnostic sensitivity of the assays was similar at 98.1% (polyclonal ELISA) compared to 97.9% (integrin/Mab ELISA) but the serotypic-specificity of the latter was vastly superior (96%) to that of the former (61.5%). Reactions with the viruses of swine vesicular disease and vesicular stomatitis, which produce clinically indistinguishable syndromes in pigs and cattle, did not occur. The integrin/Mab ELISA recognized FMDV strains of wide antigenic and molecular diversity of all seven serotypes and although some FMDV isolates were not detected, the greater specificity of the assay, while retaining test sensitivity comparable to the conventional assay, warrants its consideration for adoption for routine diagnostic use. PMID:21635921

  12. Mining human antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become drugs of choice for the management of an increasing number of human diseases. Human antibody repertoires provide a rich source for human mAbs. Here we review the characteristics of natural and non-natural human antibody repertoires and their mining with non-combinatorial and combinatorial strategies. In particular, we discuss the selection of human mAbs from naïve, immune, transgenic and synthetic human antibody repertoires using methods based on hybridoma technology, clonal expansion of peripheral B cells, single-cell PCR, phage display, yeast display and mammalian cell display. Our reliance on different strategies is shifting as we gain experience and refine methods to the efficient generation of human mAbs with superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:20505349

  13. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  14. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-01-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change. Images Fig. 1 PMID:389957

  15. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... despite the fact that the person is infected ( false negative ). If an HIV antibody test is negative ... infection (around 28 days) and may give a false-negative result. ^ Back to top Is there anything ...

  16. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  17. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  18. Engineering antibodies for therapy.

    PubMed

    Adair, J R

    1992-12-01

    Success in the generation of an antibody-based therapeutic requires careful consideration of the binding site, to achieve specificity and high affinity; of the effector, to produce the desired therapeutic effect; of the means of attachment of the effector to the binding site; production of the end product; and the response made by the patient to the administered compound. Each of these areas is receiving attention by antibody-engineering techniques. The number of potentially useful monoclonal antibodies developed over the last 10 years, and currently in clinical trials or preregistration, is now being increased by these engineered newcomers. It will be interesting to see over the next few years how many of these antibodies, and of which kind, emerge as products.

  19. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  20. Anti-chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4-specific antibodies modify the effects of vemurafenib on melanoma cells differentially in normoxia and hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    PUCCIARELLI, DANIELA; LENGGER, NINA; TAKACOVA, MARTINA; CSADEROVA, LUCIA; BARTOSOVA, MARIA; BREITENEDER, HEIMO; PASTOREKOVA, SILVIA; HAFNER, CHRISTINE

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4), a highly immunogenic melanoma tumor antigen, is a potential target for antibody-based immunotherapy. The mechanism by which CSPG4 affects melanoma progression is only partly understood, in particular the involvement of other receptor tyrosine kinases and the tumor microenvironment. We have previously reported on a mimotope-based vaccine against CSPG4 in a human melanoma xenograft model that resulted in reduction of tumor growth. Herein we describe the influence of hypoxia on the response to polyclonal anti-CSPG4-antibodies induced by this vaccine in combination with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib to enhance therapeutic efficacy by simultaneously targeting multiple signaling pathways. Melanoma cells were treated with polyclonal anti-CSPG4-antibodies and vemurafenib. Proliferation, migration and invasion were evaluated in a real-time setting in the impedance-based x-CELLigence® system. Western blotting and quantitative PCR arrays were used to determine protein and mRNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α), carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and signaling pathway proteins. A melanoma xenograft model was used to detect HIF1α and CAIX expression in vivo. Hypoxia enhanced the antiproliferative response to vemurafenib. The migration and invasion capacities of vemurafenib-treated melanoma cells were increased, in spite of vemurafenib-decreased expression of HIF1α and CAIX. Polyclonal anti-CSPG4-antibodies reduced the Transwell migration of vemurafenib-treated, BRAF V600E-mutant and CSPG4-expressing melanoma cells in hypoxia. This was associated with the downregulation of phosphorylated AKT, a kinase contributing to tumor cell migration. Our results highlight CSPG4 as a potential target for modulating treatment resistance to vemurafenib induced by the hypoxic microenvironment. PMID:25997619

  1. Expansion of polyclonal B-cell precursors in bone marrow from children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Duval, M; Fenneteau, O; Cave, H; Gobillot, C; Rohrlich, P; Guidal, C; Lescoeur, B; Legac, S; Schlegel, N; Sterkers, G; Vilmer, E

    1997-06-01

    In a series of 12 patients (mean age: 3 years at diagnosis) receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, bone marrow examinations performed during hematopoietic recovery following treatment-induced agranulocytosis or completion of maintenance treatment showed at least 15% of non malignant immature cells which were sometimes hardly distinguishable from leukemic cells. No comparable data was observed in patients treated with G-CSF. The cytological features of these cells as well as their immunophenotyping were defined. Results showed that the majority of cells expressed HLA-DR, CD19, CD10 and cytoplasmic IgM but not the CD34 markers. This predominant and homogeneous pre-B cell population which likely represents the expansion of a minor population detectable in normal bone marrow is phenotypically indistinguishable from leukemic cells. The pattern of IgH gene rearrangements studied by PCR amplification of the CDRIII region showed that these cells were polyclonal. Except in one patient, minimal residual disease was not detected using probes specific for IgH or TCR gene rearrangement of the malignant clone. In children during the hematopoietic recovery after chemotherapy, immature marrow cells in great numbers, even with an highly homogeneous immunophenotype identical to the malignant clone's, are not sufficient for the diagnosis of relapse.

  2. Detection of a local staphylococcal infection in mice with technetium-99m-labeled polyclonal human immunoglobulin

    SciTech Connect

    Calame, W.; Feitsma, H.I.; Ensing, G.J.; Goedemans, W.T.; Camps, J.A.; van Furth, R.; Pauwels, E.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate both the ability of 99mTc-labeled polyclonal human immunoglobulin (HIG) to localize an infection and the modes of action involved in this process. Mice, infected with Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 in a thigh muscle, received HIG intravenously. Scintigrams were made 1, 4, and 24 hr later; subsequently the mice were killed and the activity in several organs and thighs was determined. The radiopharmaceutical demonstrated a time-dependent accumulation at the site of infection. It was found that vascular permeability or Fc binding alone could not account for the mode of action of HIG. Neither the origin of Ig (human versus murine) nor the total amount of protein (0.01-1.0 mg Ig per mouse) affected the target-to-background (T/B) ratios. Ratios were not different for leukocytopenic animals. A correlation (p less than 0.001) was demonstrated between the number of bacteria at the site of infection and the T/B ratio. This was also found after antibiotic treatment (p less than 0.02).

  3. Large-scale in vitro expansion of polyclonal human CD4(+)CD25high regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Petra; Eder, Ruediger; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Andreesen, Reinhard; Edinger, Matthias

    2004-08-01

    CD4(+)CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are pivotal for the maintenance of self-tolerance, and their adoptive transfer gives protection from autoimmune diseases and pathogenic alloresponses after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation in murine model systems. In vitro, human CD4(+)CD25+ Treg cells display phenotypic and functional characteristics similar to those of murine CD4(+)CD25+ Treg cells: namely, hyporesponsiveness to T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and suppression of CD25- T cells. Thus far, the detailed characterization and potential clinical application of human CD4(+)CD25+ Treg cells have been hampered by their paucity in peripheral blood and the lack of appropriate expansion protocols. Here we describe the up to 40 000-fold expansion of highly purified human CD4(+)CD25high T cells in vitro through the use of artificial antigen-presenting cells for repeated stimulation via CD3 and CD28 in the presence of high-dose interleukin 2 (IL-2). Expanded CD4(+)CD25high T cells were polyclonal, maintained their phenotype, exceeded the suppressive activity of freshly isolated CD4(+)CD25high T cells, and maintained expression of the lymph node homing receptors L-selectin (CD62L) and CCR7. The ability to rapidly expand human CD4(+)CD25high Treg cells on a large scale will not only facilitate their further exploration but also accelerate their potential clinical application in T cell-mediated diseases and transplantation medicine. PMID:15090447

  4. Accurate Point-of-Care Detection of Ruptured Fetal Membranes: Improved Diagnostic Performance Characteristics with a Monoclonal/Polyclonal Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda C.; Scott, Laurie; Block, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of membranes (ROM) is imperative to allow for gestational age-specific interventions. This study compared the diagnostic performance characteristics between two methods used for the detection of ROM as measured in the same patient. METHODS Vaginal secretions were evaluated using the conventional fern test as well as a point-of-care monoclonal/polyclonal immunoassay test (ROM Plus®) in 75 pregnant patients who presented to labor and delivery with complaints of leaking amniotic fluid. Both tests were compared to analytical confirmation of ROM using three external laboratory tests. Diagnostic performance characteristics were calculated including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy. RESULTS Diagnostic performance characteristics uniformly favored ROM detection using the immunoassay test compared to the fern test: sensitivity (100% vs. 77.8%), specificity (94.8% vs. 79.3%), PPV (75% vs. 36.8%), NPV (100% vs. 95.8%), and accuracy (95.5% vs. 79.1%). CONCLUSIONS The point-of-care immunoassay test provides improved diagnostic accuracy for the detection of ROM compared to fern testing. It has the potential of improving patient management decisions, thereby minimizing serious complications and perinatal morbidity. PMID:27199579

  5. Autoantibodies to the thyroid microsomal/thyroid peroxidase antigen are polyclonal and directed to several distinct antigenic sites.

    PubMed Central

    Doble, N D; Banga, J P; Pope, R; Lalor, E; Kilduff, P; McGregor, A M

    1988-01-01

    A detailed examination of the epitopes recognized by autoantibodies (aAbs) to the thyroid microsomal antigen/thyroid peroxidase (TMA/TPO) in patients with thyroid autoimmune disease has been made using a combination of immunochemical and enzymatic techniques. Our results demonstrate the the autoimmune response to thyroid microsomal antigen/thyroid peroxidase (TMA/TPO) is multifocal and far more heterogeneous than hitherto recognized. By immunoblotting with aAbs, antigenic determinants on the TMA/TPO have been recognized that are either susceptible to polypeptide denaturation and/or sensitive to the effects of reducing agents. Furthermore, these aAbs can inhibit, to varying degrees, the enzymatic activity of solubilized preparations of TPO in microsomes, as ascertained by peroxidation of guaiacol and iodide. A large proportion of the autoimmune response is directed to the guaiacol peroxidation site. The data support the view that the autoimmune reactivity to the TMA/TPO is a specific polyclonal response with a minimum of six distinct, independent determinants that are recognized by aAbs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2454886

  6. Direct reduction of antigen receptor expression in polyclonal B cell populations developing in vivo results in light chain receptor editing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shixue; Manser, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Secondary Ab V region gene segment rearrangement, termed receptor editing, is a major mechanism contributing to B lymphocyte self-tolerance. However, the parameters that determine whether a B cell undergoes editing are a current subject of debate. We tested the role that the level of BCR expression plays in the regulation of receptor editing in a polyclonal population of B cells differentiating in vivo. Expression of a short hairpin RNA for κ L chain RNA in B cells resulted in reduction in levels of this RNA and surface BCRs. Strikingly, fully mature and functional B cells that developed in vivo and efficiently expressed the short hairpin RNA predominantly expressed BCRs containing λ light chains. This shift in L chain repertoire was accompanied by inhibition of development, increased Rag gene expression, and increased λ V gene segment-cleavage events at the immature B cell stage. These data demonstrated that reducing the translation of BCRs that are members of the natural repertoire at the immature B cell stage is sufficient to promote editing.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  8. Engineering antibodies for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Boder, Eric T; Jiang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The advent of modern antibody engineering has led to numerous successes in the application of these proteins for cancer therapy in the 13 years since the first Food and Drug Administration approval, which has stimulated active interest in developing more and better drugs based on these molecules. A wide range of tools for discovering and engineering antibodies has been brought to bear on this challenge in the past two decades. Here, we summarize mechanisms of monoclonal antibody therapeutic activity, challenges to effective antibody-based treatment, existing technologies for antibody engineering, and current concepts for engineering new antibody formats and antibody alternatives as next generation biopharmaceuticals for cancer treatment.

  9. Identification of Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus Capsid Sequences Mediating Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Infection, Virus Neutralization, and Immune Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Marshall E.; Best, Sonja M.; Hayes, Stanley F.; Wells, Richard D.; Wolfinbarger, James B.; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2001-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) causes a persistent infection associated with circulating immune complexes, immune complex disease, hypergammaglobulinemia, and high levels of antiviral antibody. Although antibody can neutralize ADV infectivity in Crandell feline kidney cells in vitro, virus is not cleared in vivo, and capsid-based vaccines have proven uniformly ineffective. Antiviral antibody also enables ADV to infect macrophages, the target cells for persistent infection, by Fc-receptor-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The antibodies involved in these unique aspects of ADV pathogenesis may have specific targets on the ADV capsid. Prominent differences exist between the structure of ADV and other, more-typical parvoviruses, which can be accounted for by short peptide sequences in the flexible loop regions of the capsid proteins. In order to determine whether these short sequences are targets for antibodies involved in ADV pathogenesis, we studied heterologous antibodies against several peptides present in the major capsid protein, VP2. Of these antibodies, a polyclonal rabbit antibody to peptide VP2:428-446 was the most interesting. The anti-VP2:428-446 antibody aggregated virus particles into immune complexes, mediated ADE, and neutralized virus infectivity in vitro. Thus, antibody against this short peptide can be implicated in key facets of ADV pathogenesis. Structural modeling suggested that surface-exposed residues of VP2:428-446 are readily accessible for antibody binding. The observation that antibodies against a single target peptide in the ADV capsid can mediate both neutralization and ADE may explain the failure of capsid-based vaccines. PMID:11602751

  10. [[Virus-like particle-based immunoglobulin M capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of IgM antibodies against Chikungunya virus].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-dong; Zhang, Quan-fu; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Chuan; Liu, Qin-zhi; Liang, Mi-fang; Li, De-xin

    2014-11-01

    To establish a MacELISA method for the detection of IgM antibodies against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), we prepared virus like particle (VLP) antigens of CHIKV using the whole structural protein C-E3-E2-6K-E1 encoding gene with a baculovirus expression system in Sf9 insect cells. The VLPs were purified and used to immunize Kunming mice. Then, polyclonal antibodies were purified from the samples of ascites with a protein G HiTrap SP column and labeled with horseradish peroxidase. A MacELISA method for the detection of IgM antibodies against CHIKV was assembled with goat anti-human IgM antibody, VLP antigens and an enzyme-labeled polyclonal antibody. The results were evaluated with a serum panel containing serum samples from laboratory-confirmed CHIK, HFRS patients, healthy donors, and commercially available CHIKV IgM as a quality control. It was shown that the MacELISA had a specificity of 99% (99/100), the coefficients of variation (CoV) within a plate were <10%, and the CoV of different ELISA plates in terms of the plate variation coefficient was <15%. A comparative analysis was performed to compare the current method against a commercial CHIKV IgM antibody detection kit for IIFA-IgM. The detection limit of MacELISA was significantly lower than that of the IIFA-IgM commercial kit (P< 0.0001). Here, we demonstrate that the VLP-based MacELISA is a promising tool for the early diagnosis and epidemiological investigation of CHIKV infection, with a high level of sensitivity and specificity for the detection of IgM antibodies against CHIKV.

  11. Evaluation of an in vitro method for the measurement of specific IgE antibody responses: the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell assay.

    PubMed

    Dearman, R J; Skinner, R A; Deakin, N; Shaw, D; Kimber, I

    2005-01-15

    The evaluation of allergenic potential is a key parameter in the safety assessment of novel proteins, including those expressed in genetically modified crops and foodstuffs. The majority of allergic reactions to food proteins are immediate type hypersensitivity reactions in which the principal biological effector is IgE antibody; the accurate measurement of specific IgE antibody is therefore a critical factor in experimental systems designed to characterize protein allergenic potential. Due to the presence of much higher concentrations of other immunoglobulin isotypes, the assessment of specific serum IgE antibody poses substantial technical challenges. We have examined the utility of the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell line for the measurement of murine IgE responses. RBL cells were sensitized with mouse monoclonal anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody and challenged with DNP-albumin conjugates with various hapten substitution ratios (SR). Polyclonal anti-OVA IgE antisera were also assessed for activity in the RBL assay. Results were compared with titers measured in homologous passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) assay. Marked degranulation of RBL cells was induced by conjugates with SRs of between 16 and 32, whereas conjugates with lower SRs (of 10 or 3) failed to elicit significant serotonin release. All conjugates were able to induce mast cell degranulation in vivo in a PCA assay. Anti-OVA antisera with PCA titers of 1/32 to 1/64 failed to stimulate RBL cell degranulation, whereas high titer antibody (1/2048 to 1/4096 by PCA) induced a positive RBL cell response. Successful stimulation of RBL cell degranulation requires not only appropriate epitope densities but also high affinity antibody. These data indicate that this assay is inappropriate for the routine analysis of specific polyclonal IgE antibody responses such as those that are induced by exposure to complex protein allergens.

  12. Survival of athymic (nu/nu) mice after Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection by passive administration of neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Fujinami, R S; Rosenthal, A; Lampert, P W; Zurbriggen, A; Yamada, M

    1989-01-01

    Little or no antiviral immune response is mounted in athymic nude mice infected with the Daniels strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus. In these athymic mice, increasing levels of infectious virus could be detected in the central nervous system. Seventy-five percent (9 of 12) of the nude mice were moribund or dead by 4 weeks postinfection. In contrast, treatment of Theiler's virus-infected nude mice with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (H7-2) against the viral protein VP-1 resulted in a dramatic reduction of infectious virus within the central nervous system. All antibody-treated nude animals survived beyond 4 weeks postinfection. Monoclonal antibody titers could be maintained by passive transfer in treated nude mice at levels comparable to those of polyclonal antibody titers found in heterozygous infected nu/+ littermates. Areas of demyelination were detected in the untreated animals as early as 7 days after infection with little or no remyelination present. In approximately one-half of the antibody-treated nude animals, no demyelinating lesions were found. However, the rest of these treated mice were found to have areas of both demyelination and remyelination. Thus, anti-Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus antibody against VP-1 can play a dramatic role in the survival of mice, clearance of virus, limiting viral spread, and altering the pattern of disease in the absence of a functional T-cell response. Images PMID:2539504

  13. Survival of athymic (nu/nu) mice after Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection by passive administration of neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, R S; Rosenthal, A; Lampert, P W; Zurbriggen, A; Yamada, M

    1989-05-01

    Little or no antiviral immune response is mounted in athymic nude mice infected with the Daniels strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus. In these athymic mice, increasing levels of infectious virus could be detected in the central nervous system. Seventy-five percent (9 of 12) of the nude mice were moribund or dead by 4 weeks postinfection. In contrast, treatment of Theiler's virus-infected nude mice with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (H7-2) against the viral protein VP-1 resulted in a dramatic reduction of infectious virus within the central nervous system. All antibody-treated nude animals survived beyond 4 weeks postinfection. Monoclonal antibody titers could be maintained by passive transfer in treated nude mice at levels comparable to those of polyclonal antibody titers found in heterozygous infected nu/+ littermates. Areas of demyelination were detected in the untreated animals as early as 7 days after infection with little or no remyelination present. In approximately one-half of the antibody-treated nude animals, no demyelinating lesions were found. However, the rest of these treated mice were found to have areas of both demyelination and remyelination. Thus, anti-Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus antibody against VP-1 can play a dramatic role in the survival of mice, clearance of virus, limiting viral spread, and altering the pattern of disease in the absence of a functional T-cell response.

  14. Human immune response to allergens of house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. IV. Occurrence of natural autologous anti-idiotypic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Saint-Remy, J M; Lebecque, S J; Lebrun, P M; Jacquemin, M G

    1988-01-01

    IgG isolated from the plasma of seven individuals hypersensitive to the common house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DPT) was exhaustively adsorbed onto insolubilized DPT. The unbound fraction was found by radioimmunoassay to contain antibodies recognizing the variable region of both anti-DPT IgG and IgE antibodies. This recognition was idiotype (Id)-specific as it persisted after passage over insolubilized polyclonal IgG of unrelated specificity. Most of these anti-Id IgG carried the internal image of the initial antigen in that they competitively inhibited the binding of anti-DPT antibodies to DPT. Immunoadsorption of anti-Id IgG onto insolubilized anti-DPT IgG antibodies from the same individual completely eliminated their reaction with anti-DPT IgG but not with anti-DPT IgE, suggesting that idiotopes included in the antigen-binding site of specific IgG and IgE antibodies were not identical. Anti-Id IgG recognizing idiotopes located outside the antigen-binding site (bystander idiotopes) were also completely removed by passage over insolubilized anti-DPT IgG; in this case the reaction of the anti-Id IgG with both anti-DPT IgG and anti-DPT IgE was inhibited, indicating that, for a given individual, bystander idiotopes were shared between anti-DPT antibodies pertaining to these two isotypes.

  15. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium’s Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Aribam, Swarmistha Devi; Harada, Tomoyuki; Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kanehira, Katsushi; Hikono, Hirokazu; Matsui, Hidenori; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb)-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria. PMID:26986057

  16. Quinine-dependent, platelet-reactive monoclonals mimic antibodies found in patients with quinine-induced immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Birenbaum, Jessica; Rasmussen, Mark; Poncz, Mortimer; Aster, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is caused by drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) that are nonreactive in themselves but bind tightly to specific platelet membrane glycoproteins (GP) when soluble drug is present at pharmacologic concentrations. This reaction takes place without covalent linkage of drug to the target, indicating that drug does not function as a classical hapten to promote antibody binding. Studies to define other mechanism(s) responsible for this interaction have been frustrated by the polyclonal nature of human DDAbs and limited quantities of antibody usually available. We produced 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 314.1 and 314.3, from a mouse immunized with purified human GPIIb/IIIa and quinine that recognize the N terminus of the GPIIb β propeller domain only when soluble quinine is present. Both monoclonals closely mimic the behavior of antibodies from patients with quinine-induced immune thrombo-cytopenia in their reactions at various concentrations of quinine and quinine congeners. Sequencing studies showed that the 2 mAbs are closely related structurally and that mAb 314.3 probably evolved from mAb 314.1 in the course of the immune response. These monoclonal reagents are the first of their kind and should facilitate studies to define the molecular basis for drug-dependent antibody binding and platelet destruction in DITP. PMID:18948570

  17. Human Regulatory T Cells with Alloantigen Specificity Are More Potent Inhibitors of Alloimmune Skin Graft Damage than Polyclonal Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, Pervinder; Ali, Niwa; Garg, Garima; Nestle, Frank O.; Lechler, Robert I.; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Graft rejection by the immune system is a major cause of transplant failure. Lifelong immunosuppression decreases the incidence of graft rejection; however, nonspecific immunosuppression results in increased susceptibly to infection and cancer. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which suppress the activation of the immune system and induce tolerance, are currently under evaluation for use in clinical transplantation. Ex vivo expanded polyclonal Tregs that are introduced into transplant recipients alter the balance of T effector cells to Tregs; however, experimental data suggest that alloantigen-specific Tregs would be more effective at preventing graft rejection. We have developed a method to enrich alloantigen-specific human Tregs based on the coexpression of activation markers, CD69 and CD71. These Tregs could be readily expanded in vitro and demonstrated potent antigen-specific suppression. In a humanized mouse model of alloimmune-mediated injury of human skin grafts, alloantigen-specific Tregs resulted in a significant reduction in clinically relevant indicators of dermal tissue injury when compared with polyclonal Tregs, restoring a histology comparable to healthy skin. This method of human allospecific Treg selection should be scalable to the clinic. The improved in vivo efficacy of alloantigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal Tregs shown here suggests that generating “customized” Tregs with defined anti-donor allospecificities may improve current practice in clinical immunotherapy. PMID:21593402

  18. Characterization of anti-idiotypic antibodies and their use as probes for determination of shared idiotopes expressed on murine and human IgE anti-rye I antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, W; Pelletier, G; Hébert, J

    1988-01-01

    This study describes the production and characterization of rabbit anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-ID Abs) against three idiotypes of three mAbs with different specificities. The anti-ID Abs were rendered idiotype specific by appropriate adsorption. Binding of labelled mAb to homologous anti-ID Ab bound to a polystyrene matrix was completely inhibited when the same mAb was added. In contrast, addition of other mAbs sharing the same isotype and the same light chain but with different specificity did not affect the binding reaction. Each anti-ID Ab inhibited completely and selectively the reaction between the allergen and the homologous mAb idiotype. Labelled rye I binding to a given polystyrene-bound mAb idiotype was completely blocked if the relevant anti-ID Ab was used as an inhibitor. Murine polyclonal anti-rye I antisera inhibited the reaction between all three mAbs and the antigens, as well as the reaction between all three mAb idiotypes and their homologous anti-ID Abs. On another hand, goat polyclonal anti-rye I antisera only inhibited the reaction between the mAbs and the antigens. These results suggest that the anti-ID Abs produced are directed against idiotopes located within the paratopes and such idiotopes are shared by murine monoclonal and polyclonal Abs. Human rye I-specific IgE and murine anti-rye I mAbs could share common idiotopes, since human IgE binding to the antigen was inhibited by the anti-ID Abs. These observations imply structural similarity in the V gene coding for the variable region of the antibody of two different species. PMID:3258278

  19. Anti-platelet antibodies associated with the Canale–Smith syndrome bind to the same platelet glycoprotein complexes as those of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura patients

    PubMed Central

    GRODZICKY, T; BUSSEL, J B; ELKON, K B

    2002-01-01

    The Canale–Smith syndrome (CSS) is an inherited disease characterized by massive lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and systemic autoimmunity to erythrocytes and platelets. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease in which approximately 60–80% of patients have anti-platelet antibodies directed against specific platelet glycoprotein complexes (GPCs) located on their membrane: GP IIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX, and GPIa/IIa. Almost all (95–100%) of the antibody-positive patients have antibodies directed against GPIIb/IIIa alone, or in combination with other glycoprotein targets. Our objective was to determine the specificities of the anti-platelet antibodies in CSS patients. The detection of anti-platelet antibodies was performed using a commercially available ELISA, the Pak-AUTO (GTI, Brookfield, WI), in which highly purified GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX, and GPIa/IIa are immobilized on microtitre plates, incubated with serum or plasma, and subsequently developed with an antihuman polyclonal immunoglobulin. Of 14 CSS patients tested, 11 (79%) had anti-platelet antibodies in their serum directed toward at least one of the three major GPC, nine (82%) of which were against GPIIb/IIIa alone or in combination. Antibodies detected in the sera of ITP patients had similar specificities. No such antibodies were detected in samples from 25 consecutive normal controls. These results demonstrate that a genetically defined defect in lymphocyte apoptosis results in a humoral autoimmune response with anti-platelet specificities very similar to the common idiopathic form of autoimmune thrombocytopenia. PMID:11876752

  20. RIA of thyroglobulin using monoclonal antibodies: Minimal interference by anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Sakahara, H.; Ohta, H.; Kohsaka, T.; Misaki, T.; Iida, Y.; Kasagi, K.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.

    1985-05-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is considered to be secreted from the thyroid gland with the stimulation of TSH and/or thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins. However its use as a prognostic marker for Graves' disease is hampered by anti-Tg autoantibodies in patients' serum. In order to resolve this drawback, the authors have developed monoclonal antibodies to human Tg with very little cross-reactivities with autoantiobodies. Nine monoclonal antibodies were produced by the immunization with Tg prepared from Graves' thyroid and one of them (IgGl), designated as 59A, showed the highest affinity to Tg (3.6 x 10/sup 40/M/sup -1/) and the least cross-reactivity with anti-Tg autoantibodies. The binding of I-125 labeled 59A to beads coated with Tg was not inhibited by the addition of purified IgG obtained from various thyroid diseases except a few Hashimoto's patients with very high titer of anti-Tg antibodies, although the binding of other monoclonal antibodies to Tg was greatly influenced even in the presence of Graves' IgG. The sensitivity of the assay using 59A was enough to detect 20ng Tg/ml and Tg concentrations, in patients with no detectable anti-Tg antibodies, were comparable to those determined by the conventional RIA kit (Eiken), using radioiodinated Tg and polyclonal rabbit anti-Tg antiserum. Further, the shelf-life of I-125 labeled monoclonal antibody was much longer than the radioiodinated Tg. These results indicated that RIA of Tg using monoclonal antibodies would be useful for measuring Tg values not only in patients with thyroid cancer but also in Graves' disease with anti-Tg autoantibodies.

  1. Characterization of anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies that bind antigen and an anti-idiotype

    PubMed Central

    Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Velikovsky, C. Alejandro; Dall’Acqua, William; Fossati, Carlos A.; Fields, Barry A.; Braden, Bradford C.; Poljak, Roberto J.; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    1997-01-01

    Two mouse monoclonal anti-anti-idiotopic antibodies (anti-anti-Id, Ab3), AF14 and AF52, were prepared by immunizing BALB/c mice with rabbit polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id, Ab2) raised against antibody D1.3 (Ab1) specific for the antigen hen egg lysozyme. AF14 and AF52 react with an “internal image” monoclonal mouse anti-Id antibody E5.2 (Ab2), previously raised against D1.3, with affinity constants (1.0 × 109 M−1 and 2.4 × 107 M−1, respectively) usually observed in secondary responses against protein antigens. They also react with the antigen but with lower affinity (1.8 × 106 M−1 and 3.8 × 106 M−1). This pattern of affinities for the anti-Id and for the antigen also was displayed by the sera of the immunized mice. The amino acid sequences of AF14 and AF52 are very close to that of D1.3. In particular, the amino acid side chains that contribute to contacts with both antigen and anti-Id are largely conserved in AF14 and AF52 compared with D1.3. Therapeutic immunizations against different pathogenic antigens using anti-Id antibodies have been proposed. Our experiments show that a response to an anti-Id immunogen elicits anti-anti-Id antibodies that are optimized for binding the anti-Id antibodies rather than the antigen. PMID:9238040

  2. Anti-CD2 antibodies induce T cell unresponsiveness in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The CD2 receptor functions as an adhesion and signal molecule in T cell recognition. Multimeric binding of CD2 on T cells to its physiologic ligand LFA-3 on cognate partner cells in vitro efficiently augments the antigen-specific T cell signal delivered by the T cell receptor/CD3 complex. The precise contribution of the antigen-nonspecific CD2-LFA-3 interactions to T cell immune responses in vivo, however, has been difficult to assess. Here we analyzed the role of CD2 in the murine immune response using a nondepleting anti-CD2 monoclonal antibody that induces a marked, reversible modulation of CD2 expression on murine T and B cells in situ. This modulation is dose and time dependent, specific for CD2, and does not require the Fc portion of the antibody. Anti-CD2 antibodies [rat IgG1 or F(ab')2] significantly inhibit the CD4+ T cell-mediated response to hen egg lysozyme and the cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response to a syngeneic tumor cell line. In both cases, anti-CD2 antibodies are only effective when administered before or within 24 h after antigen priming. The suppression of the antitumor response corresponds to a sixfold reduction of specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor cells and results in the abrogation of protective antitumor immunity. Anti-CD2 antibodies also affect the humoral immune response to oxazolone: the isotype switch from specific IgM to IgG1 antibodies is delayed, whereas the IgM response is unaltered. In addition, a single antibody injection results in sustained polyclonal unresponsiveness of T cells irrespective of antigen priming and CD2 modulation. These results document that CD2-mediated signals induce a state of T cell unresponsiveness in vivo. PMID:1682413

  3. Reactivities of serotyping monoclonal antibodies with culture-adapted human rotaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, R L; McNeal, M M; Clemens, J D; Sack, D A; Rao, M; Huda, N; Green, K Y; Kapikian, A Z; Coulson, B S; Bishop, R F

    1991-01-01

    Rotaviruses collected in Bangladesh during 1985 to 1986 were culture adapted and used in a comparative serotyping study with three groups of monoclonal antibodies, all of which reacted with the major neutralization protein (VP7) of serotype 1, 2, 3, or 4. The goals were to determine which monoclonal antibodies most accurately predicted the serotype and why large variations in serotyping efficiencies have occurred with these monoclonal antibodies in previous studies. The 143 rotavirus isolates used in this study belonged to 69 different electropherotypes; and 44, 23, 21, and 55 isolates were identified as serotype 1 through 4, respectively, by neutralization with serotype-specific hyperimmune antisera. Serotyping specificity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with monoclonal antibodies was 100% consistent with results found by neutralization with polyclonal antisera, but large differences were observed in the sensitivities of the different monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies 5E8 (serotype 1), 1C10 (serotype 2), 159 (serotype 3), RV3:1 (serotype 3), ST-3:1 (serotype 4), and ST-2G7 (serotype 4) reacted with all the isolates of the corresponding serotype for which there were sufficient infectious particles. Monoclonal antibody 2F1 (serotype 2) was much less sensitive and reacted with only five serotype 2 isolates, but these were among those with the highest titers. Monoclonal antibodies RV4:2 (serotype 1), KU6BG (serotype 1), RV5:3 (serotype 2), and S2-2G10 (serotype 2), on the other hand, failed to react with between one and three isolates of the corresponding serotypes which had high titers, apparently because of epitope changes in these isolates. Effects of epitope variation were, however, most apparent with monoclonal antibodies 2C9 (serotype 1) and YO-1E2 (serotype 3), which reacted with one and no isolates of the corresponding serotypes, respectively. Cross-neutralization of escape mutants indicated that the serotype 1 monoclonal antibodies 5E8, 2C9

  4. Monoclonal antibodies that inhibit mitogenic activity of Mycoplasma pulmonis.

    PubMed Central

    Lapidot, Z; Siman-Tov, R; Naot, Y

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested a correlation between mitogenic, polyclonal activation of host lymphocytes and the respiratory tract inflammatory diseases induced by Mycoplasma pulmonis. This study describes the generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to M. pulmonis membrane antigens with different capacities to inhibit stimulation of cultured rat lymphocytes by mycoplasmal membranes and with variable effects on M. pulmonis growth. We show that the inhibitory effects exerted on mitogenesis by purified MAbs are inversely related to the effects of MAbs on M. pulmonis growth. Immunoblotting of electrophoretically separated membrane proteins, with both growth- and mitogenesis-inhibiting antibodies, revealed significant changes in the reactions obtained with both types of MAb following short exposure of membranes to heat. Growth-inhibiting MAbs strongly react with heat-labile antigenic complexes with molecular weights of 65,000 to 75,000. Inhibition of mitogenesis is mainly associated with recognition of membrane complexes of 84 to 113 kDa that exhibit disperse smears and variable heat sensitivities. Following brief heating of membranes, more distinct bands of 103, 90, and 84 kDa are obtained with MAbs that inhibit mitogenesis. Experiments with other mitogenic mycoplasma species and MAb 3.3.10.2, a potent inhibitor of mitogenesis reveal that whereas the antigenic epitope recognized by this antibody is present on unheated membranes from different mycoplasmas, with heated membranes the MAb yields reactions only with M. pulmonis and M. arthritidis. Our studies suggest that M. pulmonis mitogens are unique membrane complexes of variable molecular weights, highly susceptible to heat and less sensitive to reducing agents. PMID:7806349

  5. A nanofluidic bioarray chip for fast and high-throughput detection of antibodies in biological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonathan; Gulzar, Naveed; Scott, Jamie K.; Li, Paul C. H.

    2012-10-01

    Immunoassays have become a standard in secretome analysis in clinical and research analysis. In this field there is a need for a high throughput method that uses low sample volumes. Microfluidics and nanofluidics have been developed for this purpose. Our lab has developed a nanofluidic bioarray (NBA) chip with the goal being a high throughput system that assays low sample volumes against multiple probes. A combination of horizontal and vertical channels are produced to create an array antigens on the surface of the NBA chip in one dimension that is probed by flowing in the other dimension antibodies from biological fluids. We have tested the NBA chip by immobilizing streptavidin and then biotinylated peptide to detect the presence of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) that is specific for the peptide. Bound antibody is detected by an AlexaFluor 647 labeled goat (anti-mouse IgG) polyclonal antibody. Using the NBA chip, we have successfully detected peptide binding by small-volume (0.5 μl) samples containing 50 attomoles (100 pM) MAb.

  6. Catabolism of homologous murine monoclonal hybridoma IgG antibodies in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, P J; Buchmeier, M J

    1987-01-01

    Two neutralizing monoclonal hybridoma antibodies to the surface spike glycoprotein E2 of the JHM strain of murine hepatitis virus were injected into homologous BALB/c mice, and their biological half-lives were determined by sequential titration of plasma samples in a virus-specific enzyme immunoassay. Intravascular half-lives of monomeric immunoglobulins were estimated at 8.0 +/- 1.5 days for antibody 5B19.3, an IgG1, and 12.7 +/- 2.4 days for antibody 4B11.6, an IgG2a. These catabolic rates are statistically different from each other (P less than 0.001) and significantly higher than previously reported values, which were all obtained with radiolabelled polyclonal or myeloma immunoglobulins of unknown specificities. Failure to remove aggregated 4B11.6 antibodies by high-speed centrifugation yielded a statistically significant acceleration of biological turnover (half-life 9.9 +/- 1.6 days; P less than 0.01). PMID:3034767

  7. Plasmonic measurements of monoclonal antibody self-association using self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Jayapriya; Wu, Jiemin; Brunelle, Molly C; Cruz, Anna Marie M; Goldberg, Deborah S; Lobo, Brian; Shah, Ambarish; Tessier, Peter M

    2014-02-20

    One of the most significant challenges in developing therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is their unpredictable solubilities and viscosities at the high concentrations required for subcutaneous delivery. This challenge has motivated the development of screening assays that rapidly identify mAb variants with minimal self-association propensities and/or formulation conditions that suppress mAb self-association. Here we report an improved version of self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy (SINS) capable of characterizing both repulsive and attractive self-interactions between diverse mAbs. The basis of SINS is that self-interactions between mAbs immobilized on gold nanoparticles increase (repulsion) or decrease (attraction) interparticle distances, which shift the wavelength of maximum absorbance (plasmon wavelength) in opposite directions. We find that the robustness of SINS is improved by varying the amount of immobilized mAb by co-adsorbing a polyclonal antibody. The slopes of the plasmon wavelength shifts as a function of the amount of immobilized mAb (0.01-0.1 mg/mL) are correlated with diffusion interaction parameters measured at two to three orders of magnitude higher antibody concentrations. The ability of SINS to rapidly screen mAb self-association in a microplate format using dilute mAb solutions makes it well suited for use in diverse settings ranging from antibody discovery to formulation. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;9999: 1-8. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25367343

  8. Detection of Aichi virus with antibody targeting of conserved viral protein 1 epitope.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Bao-Chen; Lin, You-Sheng; Chang, Jenn-Tzong; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chen, Jih-Jung; Chang, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-10-01

    Aichi virus (AiV) is an emerging single-stranded, positive-sense, non-enveloped RNA virus in the Picornaviridae that causes acute gastroenteritis in humans. The first case of AiV infection in Taiwan was diagnosed in a human neonate with enterovirus-associated symptoms; the virus was successfully isolated and propagated. To establish a method to detect AiV, we analyzed the antigen epitope and generated a polyclonal antibody against AiV viral protein 1 (VP1). This peptide-purified anti-AiV VP1 antibody showed high specificity against AiV VP1 without cross-reaction to nine other tested strains of Picornaviruses. The anti-AiV VP1 antibody was used in immunofluorescence analysis, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to elucidate the cell tropism and replication kinetics of AiV. Use of the anti-AiV VP1 antibody also revealed AiV infection restriction with interferon type I and polyI/C antiviral treatment. The AiV infection and detection system may provide an in vitro platform for AiV virology study.

  9. Catabolism of homologous murine monoclonal hybridoma IgG antibodies in mice.

    PubMed

    Talbot, P J; Buchmeier, M J

    1987-04-01

    Two neutralizing monoclonal hybridoma antibodies to the surface spike glycoprotein E2 of the JHM strain of murine hepatitis virus were injected into homologous BALB/c mice, and their biological half-lives were determined by sequential titration of plasma samples in a virus-specific enzyme immunoassay. Intravascular half-lives of monomeric immunoglobulins were estimated at 8.0 +/- 1.5 days for antibody 5B19.3, an IgG1, and 12.7 +/- 2.4 days for antibody 4B11.6, an IgG2a. These catabolic rates are statistically different from each other (P less than 0.001) and significantly higher than previously reported values, which were all obtained with radiolabelled polyclonal or myeloma immunoglobulins of unknown specificities. Failure to remove aggregated 4B11.6 antibodies by high-speed centrifugation yielded a statistically significant acceleration of biological turnover (half-life 9.9 +/- 1.6 days; P less than 0.01).

  10. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against P60-katanin.

    PubMed

    Akkor, Meray; Karabay, Arzu

    2010-12-01

    Katanin is a microtubule severing protein composed of two subunits, P60 and P80. The P60 subunit severs microtubules and P80 controls the microtubule severing activity of P60. Katanin promotes spindle shortening and severing processes in mitotic and meiotic spindles. In neurons, the level of P60-katanin was found to be very high in actively growing axons and at the tips of growing neuronal processes and in dendritogenesis. Inhibition of P60-katanin increases microtubule length throughout the neuronal cell body and mitotic/meiotic spindles, indicating that katanin is one of the key proteins for organizing microtubular structure in a variety of cell types. In this study, we produced 1G6, the first monoclonal antibody against P60-katanin. Recombinant P60-katanin (RecP60) protein, which was produced based on a specific region of rat P60-katanin, was expressed in Escherichia coli and used as antigen. 1G6 recognized the endogenous P60-katanin in Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry in which monoclonal antibody would increase the range of applications. Since P60-katanin polyclonal antibodies have been used in studies until now, obtaining the hybridoma cell, the unlimited source of a monoclonal antibody against P60, results in an advantage in investigating P60-katanin functions.

  11. Polyclonal expansion of cervical cytobrush-derived T cells to investigate HIV-specific responses in the female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Bere, Alfred; Denny, Lynette; Burgers, Wendy A; Passmore, Jo-Ann S

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -specific T-cell responses are detectable in the female genital tract of HIV-infected women but little is known about their frequency or the factors that influence their detection. We investigated the feasibility of polyclonal in vitro expansion of cervical cytobrush-derived T cells to investigate HIV-specific responses in the female genital tract in HIV-infected women. Cytobrush-derived cervical cells were isolated from 22 HIV-infected women and expanded with anti-CD3 and recombinant interleukin-2. Cervical T-cell lines were investigated for Gag-specific responses by interferon-γ ELISPOT and compared with those detected in matched blood samples. Cervical T-cell lines were established from 16/22 (72·7%) participants. Although the absolute number of CD3± cells recovered after expansion was positively associated with the number of cells isolated ex vivo (P = 0·01; R = 0·62), we observed a significant negative correlation between fold expansion and ex vivo cell number (P = 0·004; R = −0·68). We show that both the magnitude (P = 0·002; R = 0·7) and specific Gag regions targeted by cervical T-cell lines (P < 0·0001; R = 0·5) correlated significantly with those detected in blood. With one exception, cervical interferon-γ T-cell responses to Gag were detected only in HIV-infected women with blood Gag-specific response > 1000 spot-forming units/106 cells. We conclude that cervical Gag-specific T-cell responses in expanded lines are most easily detectable in women who have corresponding high-magnitude Gag-specific T-cell responses in blood. PMID:20201983

  12. Polyreactive Antibodies: Function and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2015-07-15

    Polyreactive antibodies, a major component of the natural antibody repertoire, bind with low affinity to a variety of structurally unrelated antigens. Many of these antibodies are germline or near germline in sequence. Little is known, however, about the function of these antibodies. In the present mini-review we show: (1) that the broad antibacterial activity of the natural antibody repertoire is largely due to polyreactive antibodies, which in the presence of complement lyse bacteria and enhance phagocytosis; (2) that polyreactive antibodies bind to UV- or human immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptotic cells and with complement enhance the phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages; and (3) that dinitrophenol can be used as a surrogate for quantitating the level of polyreactive antibodies in serum. We conclude that polyreactive antibodies protect the host against both foreign invaders and its own damaged/apoptotic cells.

  13. ANTIBODY FORMATION IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, M.

    1961-01-01

    Neutralizing activity against T2 bacteriophage appeared in cultures of lymph node cells from normal rats in response to their in vitro stimulation with a cell-free filtrate derived from homogenized rat macrophages which had been incubated with T2 bacteriophage. This activity was specifically directed against T2 bacteriophage. It resided in a fraction of the culture fluid which had the salting-out properties of serum globulin. Phage neutralization was inhibited by antibody specific for rat serum gamma globulin. Antibody production against T2 bacteriophage in cultures of lymph node cells from normal animals failed to occur if (a) T2 bacteriophage alone was added, (b) if the incubation period of macrophages and T2 phage was unduly shortened, (c) if the cell-free filtrate was heated at 80–100°C for 15 minutes, (d) if more than an optimal amount of T2 bacteriophage was added to the macrophages. Additional factors which prevented the formation of antibody were the heat inactivation of the lymph node cells or the addition to the culture medium of either streptomycin or ribonuclease. Finally, it was found that macrophages and lymph node cells had to be obtained from animals of one and the same species. All essential findings on the production of antibody to T2 bacteriophage in vitro could be confirmed by substitution of the chick embryo for the tissue culture medium. The results are discussed in terms of a possible mechanism of antibody production in which an RNAse-sensitive substance resulting from the interaction of macrophages and antigen is capable of stimulating antibody synthesis in lymphocytic cells. PMID:13893304

  14. Generation of equine TSLP-specific antibodies and their use for detection of TSLP produced by equine keratinocytes and leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Janda, Jozef; Plattet, Philippe; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjörg; Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Marti, Eliane

    2012-06-30

    Allergic horses react to innocuous environmental substances by activation of Th2 cells and production of allergen-specific IgE antibodies. The mechanisms leading to Th2 differentiation are not well understood. In humans and mice, epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays a central role in this process. Little is known about equine TSLP (eqTSLP) and its role in allergic diseases and our current knowledge is limited to the assessment of TSLP mRNA expression. In order to be able to study eqTSLP at the protein level, the aim of the present study was to produce recombinant eqTSLP protein and generate TSLP-specific antibodies. EqTSLP was cloned from a skin biopsy sample from a horse with chronic urticaria and eqTSLP protein was expressed in E.coli and in mammalian cells. Recombinant proteins were designed to include C-terminal Histag, which allowed subsequent purification and detection by Histag-specific Ab. Polyclonal and monoclonal eqTSLP-specific Ab were generated after immunization of mice with E.coli-expressed TSLP. Their specificity was tested by western blotting and ELISA. In addition, a commercially available polyclonal human TSLP-specific antibody was tested for cross-reactivity with eqTSLP. Expression of TSLP protein was confirmed by western blotting using Histag-specific Ab. E.coli-expressed TSLP appears as a band of ∼13 kDa, whereas mammalian cell-expressed TSLP showed several bands at 20-25 kDa, probably representing several glycosylation forms. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies generated in this study, as well as commercially available human TSLP-specific Ab reacted with both E.coli- and mammalian cell-expressed TSLP in western blotting and ELISA. A capture ELISA was established to quantitate TSLP in cell supernatants and validated using supernatants from primary equine keratinocytes and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). Increased TSLP concentrations were found after stimulation of keratinocytes with PMA+ionomycine and with

  15. Limited efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccine in elderly individuals is associated with decreased production of vaccine-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Sanae; Sullivan, Meghan; Narvaez, Carlos F.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Furman, David; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Nishtala, Madhuri; Wrammert, Jens; Smith, Kenneth; James, Judith A.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Davis, Mark M.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Greenberg, Harry B.; He, Xiao-Song

    2011-01-01

    During seasonal influenza epidemics, disease burden is shouldered predominantly by the very young and the elderly. Elderly individuals are particularly affected, in part because vaccine efficacy wanes with age. This has been linked to a reduced ability to induce a robust serum antibody response. Here, we show that this is due to reduced quantities of vaccine-specific antibodies, rather than a lack of antibody avidity or affinity. We measured levels of vaccine-specific plasmablasts by ELISPOT 1 week after immunization of young and elderly adults with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine. Plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibodies (PPAbs) were generated from bulk-cultured B cells, while recombinant monoclonal antibodies (re-mAbs) were produced from single plasmablasts. The frequency of vaccine-specific plasmablasts and the concentration of PPAbs were lower in the elderly than in young adults, whereas the yields of secreted IgG per plasmablast were not different. Differences were not detected in the overall vaccine-specific avidity or affinity of PPAbs and re-mAbs between the 2 age groups. In contrast, reactivity of the antibodies induced by the inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine toward the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, which was not present in the vaccine, was higher in the elderly than in the young. These results indicate that the inferior antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly is primarily due to reduced quantities of vaccine-specific antibodies. They also suggest that exposure history affects the cross-reactivity of vaccination-induced antibodies. PMID:21785218

  16. Anti-Mouse Properdin TSR 5/6 Monoclonal Antibodies Block Complement Alternative Pathway-dependent Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Paula; Akk, Antonina M.; Zhou, Hui-fang; Mitchell, Lynne M.; Pham, Christine T.N.

    2015-01-01

    The complement alternative pathway (AP) is a major contributor to a broad and growing spectrum of diseases that includes age-related macular degeneration, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and preeclampsia. As a result, there is much interest in the therapeutic disruption of AP activity. Properdin, the only positive regulator of the AP, is a particularly promising AP target. Several issues need to be clarified before the potential for properdin-directed therapy can be realized. In this report we use a portion of the mouse properdin protein, expressed in a bacterial system, to raise rabbit polyclonal and hamster monoclonal antibodies that block properdin-dependent pathogenesis. These antibodies, when employed with AP-dependent mouse disease models, can help evaluate the feasibility of properdin-directed therapy. PMID:25723276

  17. A novel 95-kilodalton antigen of Wuchereria bancrofti infective larvae identified by species-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Burkot, T R; Kwan-Lim, G E; Maizels, R M

    1996-01-01

    CBA and BALB/c mice produced polyspecific and monospecific polyclonal antibody responses, respectively, following immunization with Wuchereria bancrofti stage-3 larvae. Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced from the immunized BALB/c mouse. These MAbs (both isotype M) recognized a previously undescribed highly expressed W. bancrofti antigen present in stage-3 larvae. The epitopes bound by the MAbs appear to be species specific for W. bancrofti since the MAbs did not bind to antigens of either nine other nematode species or two vector species in Western blots (immunoblots). Phosphorylcholine epitopes, responsible for immunological cross-reactivity among nematodes, were identified only on a 200-kDa antigen and not on the 95-kDa molecule. The targets of these immunoglobulin M MAbs are not carbohydrate epitopes. PMID:8550196

  18. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with MF59-adjuvanted H5 vaccines promotes antibody affinity maturation towards the hemagglutinin HA1 domain and broad H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Dimitrova, Milena; Castellino, Flora; Nicholson, Karl; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Golding, Hana

    2014-01-01

    In an open label clinical study (2007), MF59-adjuvanted hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine from H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1) was administered to subjects previously vaccinated (primed) with clade 0 H5N3 (A/duck/Singapore/97) vaccine at least 6 years earlier (in 1999 or 2001). The primed individuals responded rapidly and generated high neutralizing antibody titers against the H5N1-Vietnam strain within 7 days of a single booster vaccination. Furthermore, significant cross-neutralization titers were measured against H5N1 clade 0, 1, and 2 viruses. In the current study, the impact of MF59 adjuvant during heterologous priming on the quality of humoral polyclonal immune response in different vaccine arms were further evaluated using real time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Total anti-H5N1 HA1 polyclonal sera antibody binding from the heterologous prime-boost groups after a single MF59-H5N1 boost was significantly higher compared with sera from unprimed individuals that received two MF59-H5N1 vaccinations. The antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (surrogate for antibody affinity) of the polyclonal sera against HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 from the MF59-H5N3 primed groups were significantly higher compared to sera from unadjuvanted primed groups or unprimed individuals that received two MF59-H5N1 vaccines. Furthermore, strong inverse correlations were observed between the antibody dissociation off-rates of the immune sera against HA1 (but not HA2) and the virus neutralization titers against H5 vaccine strains and heterologous H5N1 strains. These findings supports the use of oil-in-water-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccines to elicit long term memory B cells with high affinity BCR capable of responding to potential variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions.

  19. Antibodies to inactive conformations of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inactivate the apo- and holoforms of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Arutiunova, E I; Pleten, A P; Nagradova, N K; Muronetz, V I

    2006-06-01

    Polyclonal antibodies produced after the immunization of a rabbit with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Bacillus stearothermophilus were used to isolate two types of antibodies interacting with different non-native forms of the antigen. Type I antibodies were purified using Sepharose-bound apo-GAPDH that was treated with glutaraldehyde to stabilize the enzyme in the tetrameric form. Type II antibodies were isolated using immobilized denatured monomers of the enzyme. It was shown that the type I antibodies bound to the native holo- and apoforms of the enzyme with the ratio of one antibody molecule per GAPDH tetramer. While interacting with the native holoenzyme, the type I antibodies induce a time-dependent decrease in its activity by 80-90%. In the case of the apoenzyme, the decrease in the activity constitutes only 25%, this indicating that only one subunit of the tetramer is inactivated. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments showed that the formation of the complex between both forms of the enzyme and the type I antibodies resulted in a shift of the maximum of the thermal capacity curves (T(m) value) to lower temperatures. The extremely stable holoenzyme was affected to the greatest extent, the shift of the T(m) value constituting approximately 20 degrees C. We assume that the formation of the complex between the holo- or apo-GAPDH and the type I antibody results in time-dependent conformational changes in the enzyme molecule. Thus, the antibodies induce the structural rearrangements yielding the conformation that is identical to the structure of the antigen used for the selection of the antibodies (i.e., inactive). The interaction of the antibodies with the apo-GAPDH results in the inactivation of the subunit directly bound to the antibody. Virtually complete inactivation of the holoenzyme by the antibodies is likely due to the transmission of the conformational changes through the intersubunit contacts. The type II antibodies, which

  20. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody<