Science.gov

Sample records for affordable type energy

  1. Energy efficient affordable housing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    In 1994, the Southface Energy Institute, working with support from US DOE, initiated a program to provide technical assistance to nonprofit organizations developing affordable housing in the Olympic target communities of Atlanta. The specific project goals were: Identify the barriers that nonprofit affordable housing providers face in increasing the energy and resource efficiency of affordable housing; Assist them in developing the resources to overcome these barriers; Develop specific technical materials and program models that will enable these affordable housing groups to continue to improve the energy efficiency of their programs; and, To transfer the program materials to other affordable housing providers. This report summarizes the progress made in each of these areas.

  2. Clinton Foundation - Home Energy Affordability Loan (HEAL)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Home Energy Affordability Loan (HEAL) provides the infrastructure that allows employers to offer Energy Upgrades in a turnkey manner. This document will breakdown the different models of HEAL, financing, etc.

  3. Energy Servers Deliver Clean, Affordable Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    K.R. Sridhar developed a fuel cell device for Ames Research Center, that could use solar power to split water into oxygen for breathing and hydrogen for fuel on Mars. Sridhar saw the potential of the technology, when reversed, to create clean energy on Earth. He founded Bloom Energy, of Sunnyvale, California, to advance the technology. Today, the Bloom Energy Server is providing cost-effective, environmentally friendly energy to a host of companies such as eBay, Google, and The Coca-Cola Company. Bloom's NASA-derived Energy Servers generate energy that is about 67-percent cleaner than a typical coal-fired power plant when using fossil fuels and 100-percent cleaner with renewable fuels.

  4. Affordable Energy-Efficient New Housing Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subrato; Widder, Sarah H.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; McIlvaine, Janet; Chasar, David; Beal, David; Sutherland, Karen; Abbott, , K.; Fonorow, Ken; Eklund, Ken; Lubliner, Michael; Salzberg, Emily; Peeks, B.; Hewes, T.; Kosar, D.

    2012-05-31

    Since 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America has sponsored research at PNNL to investigate cost-effective, energy-saving home-building technologies and to demonstrate how high-performance homes can deliver lower utility bills, increased comfort, and improved indoor air quality, while maintaining accessibility for low-income homeowners. PNNL and its contractors have been investigating 1) cost-effective whole-house solutions for Habitat for Humanity International (HFHI) and specific HFH affiliates in hot-humid and marine climates; 2) cost-effective energy-efficiency improvements for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in new, stick-built and manufactured homes; and 3) energy-efficient domestic hot-water systems.

  5. Affordable comfort 95 - investing in our energy future

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This report describes the topics from the conference on Affordable Comfort, held March 26-31, 1995. Topics are concerned with energy efficiency in homes, retrofitting, weatherization, and monitoring of appliances, heating, and air conditioning systems for performance, as well as topics on electric utilities.

  6. DOE-HUD Initiative: Making Housing Affordable Through Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    A new collaborative program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is a significant step toward making HUD-aided housing more comfortable and affordable through greater energy efficiency. The initiative on Energy Efficiency in Housing combines DOE's technical capabilities and HUD's experience in housing assistance. Over the next decade, the energy savings potential of this initiative is estimated to be 150 trillion Btu (0.15 quad) per year, or nearly $1.5 billion in annual energy costs.

  7. Issaquah Highlands Zero Energy Affordable Housing (WA) - YWCA

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, Vincent; DeRobbio, Wendy; Hall, Linda

    2012-04-30

    The YWCA Family Village at Issaquah, Net Zero Energy Approach Project provides a compelling model for how the nation can seriously respond to the critical need for affordable housing while advancing environmental standards and reducing economic inequities. Affordable housing developments for vulnerable members of the community and in today's workforce cannot overlook issues, such as climate impact, energy security and water conservation. This project's advanced building design was based on the goal of creating a 100 year building that could achieve net zero energy usage if funding had been available to support the final pieces of energy generation. The team worked closely with community stakeholders to ensure the baseline components of high quality and efficient building envelopes along with efficient systems were in place to set the stage for future incorporation of energy generating systems such as solar panels. As built, these 146 homes, large child care center and community services areas are proving the value of investing upfront for the benefit of future generations by reducing ongoing utility and maintenance costs with an eye toward environmental stewardship and community/resident education. The DOE award helped fund two critical energy conservation features for the YWCA Family Village at Issaquah campus: 1) super-insulated roof assembly with a continuous air barrier and 2) domestic hot water preheat system. The roof system at the YWCA Family Village at Issaquah project was built to include 6" of Polyiso rigid insulation (R-38) on top of the roof sheathing to provide a super-insulated roof in line with the other green features of the project. Placing the rigid insulation on top of the roof sheathing allows the building to have a continuous layer of insulation and provides a continuous air barrier. The domestic hot water preheat system includes flat panel arrays on roofs of the buildings that heat the water using solar power, which reduces the amount of

  8. SunShot Initiative: Making Solar Energy Affordable for All Americans (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    Through SunShot, DOE supports efforts by private companies, universities, and national laboratories to drive down the cost of solar electricity to $0.06 per kilowatt-hour, making solar energy affordable for more American families and businesses.

  9. Beyond the Light Touch: Next Steps for Improving Energy Efficiency in Multi-Family Affordable Housing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This 90-minute webinar explored the specific challenges and opportunities faced by programs that aim to improve energy efficiency in multifamily affordable housing, with an emphasis on achieving multiple benefits through deeper retrofits.

  10. Understanding Affordances and Challenges of Three Types of Video for Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Meilan; Lundeberg, Mary; Koehler, Matthew J.; Eberhardt, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Although researchers have reported positive effects on teacher learning from observing published video, teachers' own video, and their colleagues' video, very few professional development programs have integrated all three types of video to improve teacher learning. In this study, we examined the affordances and challenges of the three types of…

  11. Massive affordable computing using ARM processors in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. W.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-05-01

    High Performance Computing is relevant in many applications around the world, particularly high energy physics. Experiments such as ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHCb generate huge amounts of data which need to be stored and analyzed at server farms located on site at CERN and around the world. Apart from the initial cost of setting up an effective server farm the cost of power consumption and cooling are significant. The proposed solution to reduce costs without losing performance is to make use of ARM® processors found in nearly all smartphones and tablet computers. Their low power consumption, low cost and respectable processing speed makes them an interesting choice for future large scale parallel data processing centers. Benchmarks on the CortexTM-A series of ARM® processors including the HPL and PMBW suites will be presented as well as preliminary results from the PROOF benchmark in the context of high energy physics will be analyzed.

  12. Self-organization, free energy minimization, and optimal grip on a field of affordances.

    PubMed

    Bruineberg, Jelle; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we set out to develop a theoretical and conceptual framework for the new field of Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience. This framework should be able to integrate insights from several relevant disciplines: theory on embodied cognition, ecological psychology, phenomenology, dynamical systems theory, and neurodynamics. We suggest that the main task of Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience is to investigate the phenomenon of skilled intentionality from the perspective of the self-organization of the brain-body-environment system, while doing justice to the phenomenology of skilled action. In previous work, we have characterized skilled intentionality as the organism's tendency toward an optimal grip on multiple relevant affordances simultaneously. Affordances are possibilities for action provided by the environment. In the first part of this paper, we introduce the notion of skilled intentionality and the phenomenon of responsiveness to a field of relevant affordances. Second, we use Friston's work on neurodynamics, but embed a very minimal version of his Free Energy Principle in the ecological niche of the animal. Thus amended, this principle is helpful for understanding the embeddedness of neurodynamics within the dynamics of the system "brain-body-landscape of affordances." Next, we show how we can use this adjusted principle to understand the neurodynamics of selective openness to the environment: interacting action-readiness patterns at multiple timescales contribute to the organism's selective openness to relevant affordances. In the final part of the paper, we emphasize the important role of metastable dynamics in both the brain and the brain-body-environment system for adequate affordance-responsiveness. We exemplify our integrative approach by presenting research on the impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on affordance responsiveness of OCD patients.

  13. Self-organization, free energy minimization, and optimal grip on a field of affordances

    PubMed Central

    Bruineberg, Jelle; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we set out to develop a theoretical and conceptual framework for the new field of Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience. This framework should be able to integrate insights from several relevant disciplines: theory on embodied cognition, ecological psychology, phenomenology, dynamical systems theory, and neurodynamics. We suggest that the main task of Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience is to investigate the phenomenon of skilled intentionality from the perspective of the self-organization of the brain-body-environment system, while doing justice to the phenomenology of skilled action. In previous work, we have characterized skilled intentionality as the organism's tendency toward an optimal grip on multiple relevant affordances simultaneously. Affordances are possibilities for action provided by the environment. In the first part of this paper, we introduce the notion of skilled intentionality and the phenomenon of responsiveness to a field of relevant affordances. Second, we use Friston's work on neurodynamics, but embed a very minimal version of his Free Energy Principle in the ecological niche of the animal. Thus amended, this principle is helpful for understanding the embeddedness of neurodynamics within the dynamics of the system “brain-body-landscape of affordances.” Next, we show how we can use this adjusted principle to understand the neurodynamics of selective openness to the environment: interacting action-readiness patterns at multiple timescales contribute to the organism's selective openness to relevant affordances. In the final part of the paper, we emphasize the important role of metastable dynamics in both the brain and the brain-body-environment system for adequate affordance-responsiveness. We exemplify our integrative approach by presenting research on the impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on affordance responsiveness of OCD patients. PMID:25161615

  14. Assessing the engineering performance of affordable net-zero energy housing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallpe, Jordan P.

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate affordable technologies that are capable of providing attractive, cost-effective energy savings to the housing industry. The research did so by investigating the 2011 Solar Decathlon competition, with additional insight from the Purdue INhome. Insight from the Purdue INhome verified the importance of using a three step design process to design a net-zero energy building. In addition, energy consumption values of the INhome were used to compare and contrast different systems used in other houses. Evaluation of unbiased competition contests gave a better understanding of how a house can realistically reach net-zero. Upon comparison, off-the-shelf engineering systems such as super-efficient HVAC units, heat pump hot water heaters, and properly designed photovoltaic arrays can affordably enable a house to become net-zero. These important and applicable technologies realized from the Solar Decathlon will reduce the 22 percent of all energy consumed through the residential sector in the United States. In conclusion, affordable net-zero energy buildings can be built today with commitment from design professionals, manufacturers, and home owners.

  15. Cold-Climate Case Study for Affordable Zero Energy Homes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, P.; Christensen, C.

    2006-07-01

    This project, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Program, is a case study in reaching zero energy within the affordable housing sector in cold climates. The design of the 1200 square foot, 3-bedroom Denver zero energy home carefully combines envelope efficiency, efficient equipment, appliances and lighting, and passive and active solar features to reach the zero energy goal. The home was designed using an early version of the BEOpt building optimization software with additional analysis using DOE2. This engineering approach was tempered by regular discussions with Habitat construction staff and volunteers. These discussions weighed the applicability of the optimized solutions to the special needs and economics of a Habitat house--moving the design towards simple, easily maintained mechanical systems and volunteer-friendly construction techniques.

  16. Affordable housing through energy conservation: A guide to designing and constructing energy efficient homes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    PEAR is an interactive program for residential building energy analysis utilizing a comprehensive DOE-2.1 data base for residential buildings. This data base was compiled using over 10,000 computer simulations covering five residential buildings in 45 geographical locations. This extensive data base is used by PEAR to estimate the annual energy use of houses with typical conservation measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation, different window types and glazing layers, infiltration levels, and equipment efficiency. It also allows the user to include the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heat absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night setback. Regression techniques in PEAR permit adjustments for different building geometries, window areas and orientations, wall construction, and extension of the data to over 800 US locations based on climate parameters. PEAR is designed as a user-friendly program that can be used both as a research tool by energy policy analysts, and as a nontechnical energy calculation method by architects, homebuilders, homeowners, and others in the building industry. Technical documentation of the PEAR program and the database is given elsewhere (see References). 3 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Kaupuni Village: A Closer Look at the First Net-Zero Energy Affordable Housing Community in Hawai'i (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-05-01

    This is the first of four Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative community brochures focused on HCEI success stories. This brochure focuses on the first LEED Platinum net-zero energy affordable housing community in Hawaii. Our lead NREL contact for HCEI is Ken Kelly.

  18. Location representation in enclosed spaces: what types of information afford young children an advantage?

    PubMed

    Lourenco, Stella F; Addy, Dede; Huttenlocher, Janellen

    2009-11-01

    It has been suggested that young children can only reorient, locating a target object, when the geometry of an enclosed space provides distinctive shape information [e.g., Hermer, L., & Spelke, E. (1994). A geometric process for spatial reorientation in young children. Nature, 370, 57-59]. Recently, however, young children were shown to specify location in a square-shaped space, where geometry is uninformative, so long as scale-like information was available on the walls of the space [Huttenlocher, J., & Lourenco, S. F. (2007a). Coding location in enclosed spaces: Is geometry the principle? Developmental Science, 10, 741-746]. Here we build on this work by examining more closely what types of cues afford 18- to 24-month-olds an advantage in locating a target object following disorientation. Their performance was assessed when linear scale-like information was presented either in isolation or in composite form. It was found that, even in isolation, young children searched at the appropriate locations, with added benefit when presented as a composite. We suggest that linear scale-like dimensions, especially when available in composite form, play a critical role in supporting location representation in young children.

  19. Development of an affordable typing method for Meyerozyma guilliermondii using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2016-01-18

    Despite previously published methods, there is still a lack of rapid and affordable methods for genotyping the Meyerozyma guilliermondii yeast species. The development of microsatellite markers is a useful genotyping method in several yeast species. Using the Tandem Repeat Finder Software, a total of 19 microsatellite motifs (di-, tri-, and tetra- repetition) were found in silico in seven of the nine scaffolds published so far. Primer pairs were designed for all of them, although only four were used in this work. All microsatellite amplifications showed size polymorphism, and the results were identical when repeated. The combination of three microsatellite markers (sc15F/R, sc32 F/R and sc72 F/R) produced a different pattern for each of the Type Culture Collection strains of M. guilliermondii used to optimize the method. The three primer pairs can be used in the same PCR reaction, which reduces costs, in tandem with the fluorescent labeling of only the forward primer in each primer pair. Microsatellite typing was applied on 40 more M. guilliermondii strains. The results showed that no pattern is repeated between the different environmental niches. Four M. guilliermondii strains were only amplified with primer pair sc32 F/R, and subsequently identified as Meyerozyma caribbica by Taq I-RFLP of the 5.8S ITS rDNA. Most out-group species gave negative results even for physiologically similarly species such as Debaryomyces hansenii. The microsatellite markers used in this work were stable over time, which enables their use as a traceability tool.

  20. Energy from Water and Sunlight: Affordable Energy from Water and Sunlight

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Sun Catalytix is developing wireless energy-storage devices that convert sunlight and water into renewable fuel. Learning from nature, one such device mimics the ability of a tree leaf to convert sunlight into storable energy. It is comprised of a silicon solar cell coated with catalytic materials, which help speed up the energy conversion process. When this cell is placed in a container of water and exposed to sunlight, it splits the water into bubbles of oxygen and hydrogen. The hydrogen and oxygen can later be recombined to create electricity, when the sun goes down for example. The Sun Catalytix device is novel in many ways: it consists primarily of low-cost, earth-abundant materials where other attempts have required more expensive materials like platinum. Its operating conditions also facilitate the use of less costly construction materials, whereas other efforts have required extremely corrosive conditions.

  1. LNG: Clean affordable energy for power and town gas in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.F.; Grant, C.W.; King, N.

    1998-02-01

    Some Asian countries such as Myanmar, Vietnam, and Indonesia are still at very low electricity consumption rates per capita, while others, such as Malaysia and Taiwan, are at much higher rates. What all Asian countries have in common is rapid growth in the demand for electricity. If the rising demand for additional electricity is not met, economic growth will be curtailed. However, all Asian countries face a major challenge in funding and constructing the required additional generating capacity fast enough to meet demand. Finding this amount of new capital is not going to be easy, and there will be much competition for scarce funds. The environmental challenge may be even greater than the financing hurdle. To date, most generation capacity in Asia has been coal based, and a significant amount of that is low technology and without flue gas desulfurization. The effect on the environment is already apparent. One argument has been that developing countries cannot afford the same standards of environmental performance as developed countries. With the levels of pollution that exist today, the question should be, can they afford not to? It has been estimated that pollution in China costs US$100 billion/a and that US$20 billion has to be spent over the next decade just to prevent worsening of pollution.

  2. Final Report for Clean, Reliable, Affordable Energy that Reflects the Values of the Pinoleville Pomo Nation

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Lenora; Sampsel, Zachary N

    2014-07-21

    This report aims to present and analyze information on the potential of renewable energy power systems and electric vehicle charging near the Pinoleville Pomo Nation in Ukiah, California to provide an environmentally-friendly, cost-effective energy and transportation options for development. For each renewable energy option we examine, solar, wind, microhydro, and biogas in this case, we compiled technology and cost information for construction, estimates of energy capacity, and data on electricity exports rates.

  3. Performance Results from a Cold Climate Case Study for Affordable Zero Energy Homes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, P.; Christensen, C.

    2007-11-01

    The design of this 1280 square foot, 3-bedroom Denver zero energy home carefully combines envelope efficiency, efficient equipment, appliances and lighting, a photovoltaic system, and passive and active solar thermal features to exceed the net zero energy goal. In January 2006, a data acquisition system was installed in the home to monitor its performance over the course of a year. This paper presents full year of energy performance data on the home.

  4. Touch Affordances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slegers, Karin; de Roeck, Dries; Arnall, Timo

    The workshop “Touch Affordances” addresses a concept relevant to human computer interactions based on touch. The main topic is the challenge of applying the notion of affordances to domains related to touch interactions (e.g. (multi)touch screens, RFID & NFC, ubiquitous interfaces). The goals of this workshop are to launch a community of researchers, designers, etc. interested in this topic, to create a common understanding of the field of touch affordances and to generate ideas for new research areas for intuitive touch interactions. The workshop will be highly interactive and will have a creative, generative character.

  5. Energy-efficiency design and inspection guides for affordable housing construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.; Livengood, S.E.; Wendt, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    This paper focuses on the general methods used in guides developed for the energy efficient design and inspection of new and revitalized housing projects for military family housing. The methods and guides can also benefit the wider market of public and other housing. Inspections performed on military and public housing units were used to identify energy deficiencies. The most common problems found were related to disconnected and deteriorated forced air distribution duct work and poor system design resulting in significant air leakage. Design and inspection guides are summarized for new construction and revitalization projects. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Identifying perceived barriers and benefits to reducing energy consumption in an affordable housing complex using the Community-Based Social Marketing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaves, Daniel

    Energy production and consumption has a negative impact on both environmental and human health. Energy consumption can be directly impacted by human behavior, especially in the residential sector. As a result, this sector has been studied significantly; however, energy reducing behavior change research focusing on the affordable housing sector has not been studied thoroughly to date. This study seeks to implement the first two phases of the Community Based Social Marketing (CBSM) framework in an affordable housing setting. The goals were to identify the optimal behaviors for energy reduction based on phase one survey results and to identify the perceived benefits and barriers associated with those behaviors. Additionally, this study identified nuances in the CBSM process that researchers should take into consideration when implementing CBSM in an affordable housing environment.

  7. FC vehicle hybridisation: an affordable solution for an energy-efficient FC powered drive train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pede, G.; Iacobazzi, A.; Passerini, S.; Bobbio, A.; Botto, G.

    Fuel cells (FCs) have potential as clean and efficient energy sources for automotive applications without sacrifice in performance or driving range. However, the complete FC system must operate as efficiently as possible over the range of driving conditions that may be encountered while maintaining a low cost. To achieve this target, a storage unit can be introduced in the FC system to reduce the size of the fuel cell that is the most expensive component. This "hybrid" concept would not only reduce the drive train total cost but it also allow the recover of the braking energy and the operation at the voltage-current point of maximum efficiency for the FC system. Pro-and-cons of the "full-power" versus the "hybrid" configuration are shown in this work. The "Hybridisation rate" or "Hybridisation degree", a parameter expressed by the relationship between two installed powers, the generation power and the traction power, is also introduced and it is demonstrated that for each category of hybrid vehicles there is an optimal value of hybridisation degree. The storage systems considered are based on high power batteries or ultra capacitors (UCs) or a combination of them. A preliminary design of a sport utility vehicle (SUV) using a combined storage system and a FC energy source (called Triple Hybrid), is proposed. Finally, the experience of the Italian industry in this field is also reviewed.

  8. Obtaining the lattice energy of the anthracene crystal by modern yet affordable first-principles methods.

    PubMed

    Sancho-García, J C; Aragó, J; Ortí, E; Olivier, Y

    2013-05-28

    The non-covalent interactions in organic molecules are known to drive their self-assembly to form molecular crystals. We compare, in the case of anthracene and against experimental (electronic-only) sublimation energy, how modern quantum-chemical methods are able to calculate this cohesive energy taking into account all the interactions between occurring dimers in both first-and second-shells. These include both O(N(6))- and O(N(5))-scaling methods, Local Pair Natural Orbital-parameterized Coupled-Cluster Single and Double, and Spin-Component-Scaled-Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at second-order, respectively, as well as the most modern family of conceived density functionals: double-hybrid expressions in several variants (B2-PLYP, mPW2-PLYP, PWPB95) with customized dispersion corrections (-D3 and -NL). All-in-all, it is shown that these methods behave very accurately producing errors in the 1-2 kJ/mol range with respect to the experimental value taken into account the experimental uncertainty. These methods are thus confirmed as excellent tools for studying all kinds of interactions in chemical systems.

  9. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, James; Moore, Mike; Thompson, Margo

    2013-08-01

    Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place deep energy retrofit (DER) at the Bay Ridge multifamily development in Annapolis, Maryland. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a "base scope" retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a "DER scope" which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

  10. Affordable Care?

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Adam O

    2015-01-01

    Once a year, Stuart, a long-haul truck driver, visited a physician to get a signature on the forms that allowed him to continue driving his 18-wheeler. Over 8 years, he had never seen the same physician twice, in large part because of a lack of health insurance. Upon seeing him for the first time, I assured him that we could make financial arrangements, and he subsequently became my continuity patient. Two years later, we both looked forward to his impending 65th birthday, allowing Medicare to ease his fiscal health care burdens. His unexpected death made me ponder how a lack of access to affordable health care profoundly affects patients and their clinicians.

  11. NREL/Habitat for Humanity Zero Energy Home: A Cold-Climate Case Study for Affordable Zero Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, P.; Christensen, C.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

    2008-06-01

    The design of this 1,280-square-foot, three-bedroom Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver zero energy home carefully combines envelope efficiency, efficient equipment, appliances and lighting, and passive and active solar features to reach the zero energy goal. The home was designed with an early version (July 22, 2004) of the BEOpt building optimization software; DOE2 and TRNSYS were used to perform additional analysis. This engineering approach was tempered by regular discussions with Habitat construction staff and volunteers. These discussions weighed the applicability of the optimized solutions to the special needs and economics of a Habitat house--moving the design toward simple, easily maintained mechanical systems and volunteer-friendly construction techniques. A data acquisition system was installed in the completed home to monitor its performance.

  12. Immunogenicity and Cross Protection in Mice Afforded by Pandemic H1N1 Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Containing Wild-Type Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Petukhova, Galina; Korenkov, Daniil; Losev, Igor; Smolonogina, Tatiana; Tretiak, Tatiana; Donina, Svetlana; Shcherbik, Svetlana; Bousse, Tatiana; Rudenko, Larisa

    2017-01-01

    Since conserved viral proteins of influenza virus, such as nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 protein, are the main targets for virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), we hypothesized that introduction of the NP gene of wild-type virus into the genome of vaccine reassortants could lead to better immunogenicity and afford better protection. This paper describes in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies of two new reassortants of pandemic H1N1 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) candidates. One had the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from A/South Africa/3626/2013 H1N1 wild-type virus on the A/Leningrad/134/17/57 master donor virus backbone (6 : 2 formulation) while the second had the HA, NA, and NP genes of the wild-type virus on the same backbone (5 : 3 formulation). Although both LAIVs induced similar antibody immune responses, the 5 : 3 LAIV provoked greater production of virus-specific CTLs than the 6 : 2 variant. Furthermore, the 5 : 3 LAIV-induced CTLs had higher in vivo cytotoxic activity, compared to 6 : 2 LAIV. Finally, the 5 : 3 LAIV candidate afforded greater protection against infection and severe illness than the 6 : 2 LAIV. Inclusion in LAIV of the NP gene from wild-type influenza virus is a new approach to inducing cross-reactive cell-mediated immune responses and cross protection against pandemic influenza. PMID:28210631

  13. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Under this project, the BA-PIRC research team evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost-effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place deep energy retrofit at the Bay Ridge multifamily development in Annapolis, Maryland. The design and construction phase of the Bay Ridge project was completed in August 2012. This case study summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete.

  14. MHD energy fluxes for late type dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1987-01-01

    The efficiency of MHD wave generation by turbulent motions in stratified stellar atmospheres with embedded uniform magnetic fields is calculated. In contradiction with previous results, it is shown that there is no significant increase in the efficiency of wave generation because of the presence of magnetic fields, at least within the theory's limits of applicability. It is shown that MHD energy fluxes for late-type stars are less than those obtained for acoustic waves in a magnetic-field-free atmosphere, and do not vary enough for a given spectral type in order to explain observed UV and X-ray fluxes. Thus, the results show that MHD energy fluxes obtained if stellar surface magnetic fields are uniform cannot explain the observed stellar coronal emissions.

  15. An energy harvesting type ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangqing; Xu, Wentan; Gao, Shuaishuai; Yang, Binqiang; Lu, Guoli

    2017-03-01

    An energy harvesting type ultrasonic motor is presented in this work. The novel motor not only can drive and/or position the motion mechanism, but also can harvest and convert the vibration-induced energy of the stator into electric energy to power small electronic devices. In the new motor, the stator is a sandwich structure of two PZT rings and an elastic metal body. The PZT ring bonded on the bottom surface is used to excite the stator metal body to generate a traveling wave with converse piezoelectric effect, and the other PZT ring bonded on top surface is used to harvest and convert the vibration-induced energy of the stator into electric energy with direct piezoelectric effect. Finite element method is adopted to analyze the vibration characteristics and the energetic characteristic. After the fabrication of a prototype, the mechanical output and electric energy output abilities are measured. The maximum no-load speed and maximum output torque of the prototype are 117rpm and 0.65Nm at an exciting voltage with amplitude of 134 Vp-p and frequency of 40kHz, and the maximum harvesting output power of per sector area of the harvesting PZT is 327mW under an optimal equivalent load resistance of 6.9kΩ.

  16. Home Energy Affordability Loan Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Little Rock, Arkansas, is an EPA Climate Showcase Community. EPA’s Climate Showcase Communities Program helps local governments and tribal nations pilot innovative, cost-effective and replicable community-based greenhouse gas reduction projects.

  17. Affordable Vehicle Avionics Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Public and private launch vehicle developers are reducing the cost of propulsion for small commercial launchers, but conventional high-performance, high-reliability avionics remain the disproportionately high cost driver for launch. AVA technology performs as well or better than conventional launch vehicle avionics, but with a fraction of the recurring costs. AVA enables small launch providers to offer affordable rides to LEO to nano-satellites as primary payloads meaning, small payloads can afford to specify their own launch and orbit parameters

  18. Affordable Vehicle Avionics Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Public and private launch vehicle developers are reducing the cost of propulsion for small commercial launchers, but conventional high-performance, high-reliability avionics remain the disproportionately high cost driver for launch. AVA technology performs as well or better than conventional launch vehicle avionics, but with a fraction of the recurring costs. AVA enables small launch providers to offer affordable rides to LEO to nano-satellites as primary payloads meaning, small payloads can afford to specify their own launch and orbit parameters.

  19. Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Rak, Sofija; Coffin, Janis

    2013-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA), although a subject of much debate in the Unites States, was enacted on March 23, 2010, and upheld by the Supreme Court on June 28, 2012. This act advocates that "healthcare is a right, not a privilege." The main goals of PPACA are to minimize the number of uninsured Americans and make healthcare available to everyone at an affordable price. The Congressional Budget Office has determined that 94% of Americans will have healthcare coverage while staying under the $900 billion limit that President Barack Obama established by bending the healthcare cost curve and reducing the deficit over the next 10 years.

  20. Achieving Sustainable Construction in Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Barcik, M.K.; Creech, D.B.; Ternes, M.P.

    1998-12-07

    An energy-efficient design and construction checklist and information sheets on energy-efficient design and construction are two products being developed. These products will help affordable housing providers take the first steps toward a whole-house approach to the design and implementation of energy-efficient construction practices. The checklist presents simple and clear guidance on energy improvements that can be readily addressed now by most affordable housing providers. The information sheets complement the checklist by providing installation instructions and material specifications that are accompanied by detailed graphics. The information sheets also identify benefits of recommended energy-efficiency measures and procedures including cost savings and impacts on health and comfort. This paper presents details on the checklist and information sheets and discusses their use in two affordable housing projects.

  1. Affordances: Ten Years On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jill P.; Stillman, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Ten years ago the construct, affordance, was rising in prominence in scholarly literature. A proliferation of different uses and meanings was evident. Beginning with its origin in the work of Gibson, we traced its development and use in various scholarly fields. This paper revisits our original question with respect to its utility in mathematics…

  2. "Affordable" Private Schools in South Africa. Affordable for Whom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Languille, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The paper sets out to challenge the notions of "affordable" private schools in the context of South Africa. It is guided by one main question: "affordable private schools for whom?" It argues that, contrary to claims by its public and private proponents, affordable private schools in South Africa do not cater for poor children.…

  3. Energy efficiency in California laboratory-type facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, E.; Bell, G.; Sartor, D.

    1996-07-31

    The central aim of this project is to provide knowledge and tools for increasing the energy efficiency and performance of new and existing laboratory-type facilities in California. We approach the task along three avenues: (1) identification of current energy use and savings potential, (2) development of a {ital Design guide for energy- Efficient Research Laboratories}, and (3) development of a research agenda for focused technology development and improving out understanding of the market. Laboratory-type facilities use a considerable amount of energy resources. They are also important to the local and state economy, and energy costs are a factor in the overall competitiveness of industries utilizing laboratory-type facilities. Although the potential for energy savings is considerable, improving energy efficiency in laboratory-type facilities is no easy task, and there are many formidable barriers to improving energy efficiency in these specialized facilities. Insufficient motivation for individual stake holders to invest in improving energy efficiency using existing technologies as well as conducting related R&D is indicative of the ``public goods`` nature of the opportunity to achieve energy savings in this sector. Due to demanding environmental control requirements and specialized processes, laboratory-type facilities epitomize the important intersection between energy demands in the buildings sector and the industrial sector. Moreover, given the high importance and value of the activities conducted in laboratory-type facilities, they represent one of the most powerful contexts in which energy efficiency improvements stand to yield abundant non-energy benefits if properly applied.

  4. Energy Distribution of the Bianchi Type i Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radinschi, Irina

    We calculate the energy of an anisotropic model of universe based on the Bianchi type I metric in the Mo ller prescription. The total energy due to the matter and gravitational field is zero. This result supports the importance of the energy-momentum complexes in the localization of energy.

  5. The Energy - Water Connection: Can We Sustain Critical Resources and Make them Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound?(LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    McMahon, Jim

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Jim McMahon of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) is head of the Energy Analysis Department in EETD, which provides technical analysis to the Department of Energy on things like energy efficiency appliance standards. McMahon and his colleagues helped the nation save tens of billions of dollars in energy costs since the standards program began. Now his Water-Energy Technology Team (WETT) is applying its expertise to the linked problem of energy and water. Each of us requires more than 500 gallons per person per day for food production, plus an additional 465 gallons to produce household electricity. WETT hopes to mine some of the numerous opportunities to save energy and water by applying new technologies.

  6. Affordability of Defense Acquisition Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    the Office of Director, Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation (CAPE). The DPP is a particularly useful tool for assessing the affordability of DOD...within the Service programming communities. • The Defense Program Projection is a valuable tool for DOD’s use in assessing affordability; however, in... tool for assessing the affordability of future acquisition in the spirit of the Better Buying Power initiative. A. Ground Rules, Assumptions, and

  7. Chimeric adenovirus type 5/35 vector encoding SIV gag and HIV env genes affords protective immunity against the simian/human immunodeficiency virus in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Someya, Kenji; Xin, Ke-Qin; Ami, Yasushi; Izumi, Yasuyuki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Shinrai; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo; Okuda, Kenji

    2007-10-25

    Replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector-based vaccines are widely known to induce strong immunity against immunodeficiency viruses. To exploit this immunogenicity while overcoming the potential problem of preexisting immunity against human adenoviruses type 5, we developed a recombinant chimeric adenovirus type 5 with type 35 fiber vector (rAd5/35). We initially produced a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag DNA plasmid (rDNA-Gag), a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 89.6 env DNA plasmid (rDNA-Env) and a recombinant Ad5/35 vector encoding the SIV gag and HIV env gene (rAd5/35-Gag and rAd5/35-Env). Prime-boost vaccination with rDNA-Gag and -Env followed by high doses of rAd5/35-Gag and -Env elicited higher levels of cellular immune responses than did rDNAs or rAd5/35s alone. When challenged with a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV), animals receiving a prime-boost regimen or rAd5/35s alone maintained a higher number of CD4(+) T cells and remarkably suppressed plasma viral RNA loads. These findings suggest the clinical promise of an rAd5/35 vector-based vaccine.

  8. (m, n)-TYPE Holographic Dark Energy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yi; Pan, Wen-Jian

    2013-09-01

    We construct (m, n)-type holographic dark energy models at a phenomenological level, which can be viewed as a generalization of agegraphic models with the conformal-like age as the holographic characteristic size. For some values of (m, n) the holographic dark energy can automatically evolve across ω = -1 into a phantom phase even without introducing an interaction between the dark energy and background matter. Our construction is also applicable to the holographic dark energy with generalized future event horizon as the characteristic size. Finally, we address the issue on the stability of our model and show that they are generally stable under the scalar perturbation.

  9. Collection and concentration of solar energy using Fresnel type lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency of collecting solar energy using a Fresnel type lens was measured for two different collectors. A flow collector utilizes the temperature difference and heat capacity in water measurements to determine the amount of absorbed energy retained from sun rays passing through the Fresnel lens. A static collector is a hollow copper box filled with vegetable heating oil for absorption of focused solar radiation.

  10. Energy Expenditure in Obese Children with Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type 1a

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Ashley H.; Lomenick, Jefferson P.; Saville, Benjamin R.; Wang, Wenli; Buchowski, Maciej S.; Cone, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Context Patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP-1a) develop early-onset obesity. The abnormality in energy expenditure and/or energy intake responsible for this weight gain is unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate energy expenditure in children with PHP-1a compared with obese controls. Patients We studied 6 obese females with PHP-1a and 17 obese female controls. Patients were recruited from a single academic center. Measurements Resting energy expenditure and thermogenic effect of a high fat meal were measured using whole room indirect calorimetry. Body composition was assessed using whole body dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Fasting glucose, insulin and hemoglobin A1C were measured. Results Children with PHP-1a had decreased resting energy expenditure compared with obese controls (P <0.01). After adjustment for fat free mass, the PHP-1a group’s resting energy expenditure was 346.4 kcals/day less than obese controls (95% CI [−585.5 to −106.9], P <0.01). The thermogenic effect of food, expressed as percent increase in postprandial energy expenditure over resting energy expenditure, was lower in PHP-1a patients than obese controls but did not reach statistical significance (absolute reduction of 5.9%, 95% CI [−12.2% to 0.3%], P = 0.06). Conclusions Our data indicate that children with PHP-1a have decreased resting energy expenditure compared with obese controls and that may contribute to the development of obesity in these children. These patients may also have abnormal diet-induced thermogenesis in response to a high fat meal. Understanding the causes of obesity in PHP-1a may allow for targeted nutritional or pharmacologic treatments in the future. PMID:23229731

  11. Lean, Mean and Green: An Affordable Net Zero School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    From its conception, Richardsville Elementary was designed to be an affordable net zero facility. The design team explored numerous energy saving strategies to dramatically reduce energy consumption. By reducing energy use to 19.31 kBtus annually, the net zero goal could be realized through the implementation of a solar array capable of producing…

  12. Visual object affordances: object orientation.

    PubMed

    Symes, Ed; Ellis, Rob; Tucker, Mike

    2007-02-01

    Five experiments systematically investigated whether orientation is a visual object property that affords action. The primary aim was to establish the existence of a pure physical affordance (PPA) of object orientation, independent of any semantic object-action associations or visually salient areas towards which visual attention might be biased. Taken together, the data from these experiments suggest that firstly PPAs of object orientation do exist, and secondly, the behavioural effects that reveal them are larger and more robust when the object appears to be graspable, and is oriented in depth (rather than just frontally) such that its leading edge appears to point outwards in space towards a particular hand of the viewer.

  13. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS CROSS-CUTTING R&D ON ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR MORE EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE USE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN BUILDINGS AND HYBRID PHOTOBIOREACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Byard D. Wood; Jeff D. Muhs

    2004-08-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports daylight from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a bundle of small core or a large core polymer fiber optics. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of daylighting and electric lighting for space/task lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. For the second generation (alpha) system, the secondary mirror is an ellipsoidal mirror that directs the visible light into a bundle of small-core fibers. The IR spectrum is filtered out to minimize unnecessary heating at the fiber entrance region. This report describes the following investigations of various aspects of the system. Taken as a whole, they confirm significant progress towards the technical feasibility and commercial viability of this technology. (1) TRNSYS Modeling of a Hybrid Lighting System: Building Energy Loads and Chromaticity Analysis; (2) High Lumens Screening Test Setup for Optical Fibers; (3) Photo-Induced Heating in Plastic Optical Fiber Bundles; (4) Low-Cost Primary Mirror Development; (5) Potential Applications for Hybrid Solar Lighting; (6) Photobioreactor Population Experiments and Productivity Measurements; and (7) Development of a Microalgal CO2-Biofixation Photobioreactor.

  14. Affordable Hybrid Heat Pump Clothes Dryer

    SciTech Connect

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Butterfield, Andrew; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Crook, Alexander

    2016-06-30

    This project was successful in demonstrating the feasibility of a step change in residential clothes dryer energy efficiency by demonstrating heat pump technology capable of 50% energy savings over conventional standard-size electric dryers with comparable drying times. A prototype system was designed from off-the-shelf components that can meet the project’s efficiency goals and are affordable. An experimental prototype system was built based on the design that reached 50% energy savings. Improvements have been identified that will reduce drying times of over 60 minutes to reach the goal of 40 minutes. Nevertheless, the prototype represents a step change in efficiency over heat pump dryers recently introduced to the U.S. market, with 30% improvement in energy efficiency at comparable drying times.

  15. High-Energy Waves in Superpolynomial FPU-Type Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Michael

    2017-02-01

    We consider periodic traveling waves in FPU-type chains with superpolynomial interaction forces and derive explicit asymptotic formulas for the high-energy limit as well as bounds for the corresponding approximation error. In the proof we adapt twoscale techniques that have recently been developed by Herrmann and Matthies for chains with singular potential and provide an asymptotic ODE for the scaled distance profile.

  16. Emerging Affordances in Telecollaborative Multimodal Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dey-Plissonneau, Aparajita; Blin, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on Gibson's (1977) theory of affordances, Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) affordances are a combination of technological, social, educational, and linguistic affordances (Blin, 2016). This paper reports on a preliminary study that sought to identify the emergence of affordances during an online video conferencing session between…

  17. A study of low-energy type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisakov, Sergey M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2015-08-01

    All stars with an initial mass greater than 8Msun, but not massive enough to encounter the pair-production instability, eventually form a degenerate core and collapse to form a compact object, either a neutron star or a black hole.At the lower mass end, these massive stars die as red-supergiant stars and give rise to Type II supernovae (SNe). The diversity of observed properties of SNe II suggests a range of progenitor mass, radii, but also explosion energy.We have performed a large grid simulations designed to cover this range of progenitor and explosion properties. Using MESA STAR, we compute a set of massive star models (12-30Msun) from the main sequence until core collapse. We then generate explosions with V1D to produce ejecta with a range of explosion energies and yields. Finally, all ejecta are evolved with CMFGEN to generate multi-band light curves and spectra.In this poster, we focus our attention on the properties of low-energy explosions that give rise to low-luminosity Type II Plateau (II-P) SNe. In particular, we present a detailed study of SN 2008bk, but also include other notorious low-energy SNe II-P like 2005cs, emphasising their non-standard properties by comparing to models that match well events like SN 1999em. Such low-energy explosions, characterised by low ejecta expansion rates, are more suitable for reliable spectral line identifications.Based on our models, we discuss the distinct signatures of low-energy explosions in lower and higher mass models. One important goal is to identify whether there is a progenitor-mass bias leading to such events.

  18. Developing Strategies for Affordable Bandwidth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educause Quarterly, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Written by Educause's Net@EDU Broadband Pricing Working Group, this article discusses what institutions of higher education can do to develop good partnerships with broadband vendors in order to negotiate affordable pricing for increased bandwidth. Describes problems with the marketplace, examples from a few universities, and points to remember…

  19. Global affordability of fluoride toothpaste

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ann S; Yee, Robert; Holmgren, Christopher J; Benzian, Habib

    2008-01-01

    Objective Dental caries remains the most common disease worldwide and the use of fluoride toothpaste is a most effective preventive public health measure to prevent it. Changes in diets following globalization contribute to the development of dental caries in emerging economies. The aim of this paper is to compare the cost and relative affordability of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries. The hypothesis is that fluoride toothpaste is not equally affordable in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Methods Data on consumer prices of fluoride toothpastes were obtained from a self-completion questionnaire from 48 countries. The cost of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries was compared and related to annual household expenditure as well as to days of work needed to purchase the average annual usage of toothpaste per head. Results The general trend seems to be that the proportion of household expenditure required to purchase the annual dosage of toothpaste increases as the country's per capita household expenditure decreases. While in the UK for the poorest 30% of the population only 0.037 days of household expenditure is needed to purchase the annual average dosage (182.5 g) of the lowest cost toothpaste, 10.75 days are needed in Kenya. The proportion of annual household expenditure ranged from 0.02% in the UK to 4% in Zambia to buy the annual average amount of lowest cost toothpaste per head. Conclusion Significant inequalities in the affordability of this essential preventive care product indicate the necessity for action to make it more affordable. Various measures to improve affordability based on experiences from essential pharmaceuticals are proposed. PMID:18554382

  20. 77 FR 36272 - SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Affordable Rooftop rules at eere.energy.gov/solar/sunshot/prize.html . DATES: DOE will accept comments... ``America's Most Affordable Rooftop'' in the Subject line Mail: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Solar....S. Department of Energy, Solar Program, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585....

  1. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons.

  2. Estimating transportation energy consumption of residential land types. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    To estimate the transportation energy implications of residential development, the vehicle miles traveled (VMT) from that development was calculated for each individual unit of government in Dane County. The VMT incorporates the trip frequency and the associated trip length for vehicular trips made by occupants of single and multi-family dwelling units for any given location in the county. The methodology involved ten basic steps which included: defining the overall study area, defining subareas, determining the average number of household trips by dwelling unit type in each subarea, determining the average trip length for each household type, calculating the resulting VMT, applying the VMT factors to the existing fleet of vehicles and the estimated miles per gallon (MPG) rating, estimating the gallons of fuel consumed, converting gallons to Btu's, determining density and transportation energy relationships, and developing a system for tracking transportation energy consumption trends from residential development. The results available include trip frequency rates, average trip length, annual vehicle miles traveled, the resulting gallons of fuel consumed and costs of that fuel. These factors are provided for single-family and multi-family units. The data are presented in two different categories: community class and geographic area.

  3. Resting Energy Expenditure Is Decreased in Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type 1A

    PubMed Central

    Danzig, Jennifer; Groleau, Veronique; McCormack, Shana; Casella, Alex; Harrington, Jennifer; Sochett, Etienne; Tershakovec, Andrew; Zemel, Babette S.; Stallings, Virginia A.; Levine, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1A (PHP1A) is caused by loss-of-function mutations on the maternally inherited GNAS allele and is associated with early-onset obesity, neurocognitive defects, and resistance to multiple hormones. The role of energy intake vs central regulation of energy expenditure in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate resting energy expenditure (REE) in participants with PHP1A. Design: We assessed REE, biochemical, endocrine, and auxological status of 12 participants with PHP1A who had normal or elevated body mass index; controls were a cohort of 156 obese participants. Setting: This study took place at Children's Hospital in Philadelphia and Sick Children's Hospital in Toronto. Main Outcome Measures: REE as a percent of predicted REE was the outcome measure. Results: PHP1A participants had normal endocrine status while receiving appropriate hormone replacement therapy, but had significantly decreased REE as a percent of predicted REE (using the modified Schofield equation). Conclusion: Our results are consistent with REE being the principal cause of obesity in PHP1A rather than it being caused by excessive energy intake or endocrine dysfunction. PMID:26709970

  4. The absolute energy flux envelopes of B type stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute energy flux envelopes covering the region of 1100 to 6000 A for main-sequence stars of types B3, B7 and A0 derived from published, ground-based observations and from spectrum scans with OAO-II are presented. These flux envelopes are compared with the predicted flux envelopes from lightly line-blanketed model atmospheres. The line blanketing at wavelengths shorter than 3000 A is severe, about one-half the predicted light being observed at 1600 A. These results demonstrate that a model which represents well the observed visible spectrum of a star may fail seriously for representing the ultraviolet spectrum.

  5. Absolute energy curves from late B-type supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.

    1981-01-01

    Energy curves were determined for six late B and early A type supergiants using IUE data and other ultraviolet and ground based photometry. Effective temperatures and angular diameters are presented as well as estimates of the outflow velocity of the wind. All six stars show a strong Balmer continuum in emission; the Ia supergiants also show an infrared excess which reaches into the visible range. Evidence is found for the presence of a warm mantle as well as for wind from the Ia stars.

  6. Optics learning through affordable kit

    SciTech Connect

    P, Anusha N E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com Shaji, Chitra E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com Sharan, Alok E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    An affordable kit which helps to understand some of the optical phenomena qualitatively and quantitatively is presented in this paper. It supplements optics taught in classes. The kit consists of equipments which are available in the market at nominal cost such as laser pointer, lenses, glass plates, razor blades, coins, ball bearing etc. Experiments which come under wave optics (interference and diffraction) and ray optics (reflection and refraction) are explained using this kit.

  7. Consequences of BBPs Affordability Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    extending programming from five years in the future to the full life of each acquisition program—typically in excess of 25 years—and discussing the full ...concepts that are fundamental to the affordability vision. The memo text begins with the example of a program that the Army decided to cancel (thus...reducing spending. This is a laudable goal, but it cannot be the DoD’s only one. BBP 3.0’s full title includes the words Achieving Dominant

  8. Perceiving Affordances for Fitting through Apertures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishak, Shaziela; Adolph, Karen E.; Lin, Grace C.

    2008-01-01

    Affordances--possibilities for action--are constrained by the match between actors and their environments. For motor decisions to be adaptive, affordances must be detected accurately. Three experiments examined the correspondence between motor decisions and affordances as participants reached through apertures of varying size. A psychophysical…

  9. Parametric study of tornado-type wind-energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ayad, S.S.

    1981-10-01

    The tornado-type wind energy system uses the pressure drop created by an intense vortex. The vortex is generated in a tower mounted at the turbine exit. The tower serves as a low pressure exhaust for the turbine. In a previous work, the author provided a numerical solution, using the two-equation (k-epsilon) turbulence model, of the tower flow with a uniform wind flow. Results compared favorably with measured values of pressure and showed a turbine diameter of approx. 0.4 times that of the tower to be optimum. In the present work, the author provides results to show the effects of embedding the tower in an atmospheric boundary layer, varying the tower height to diameter ratio, and varying tower diameter using the same system geometry and approach flow conditions. The results indicate a reduction of approx. 28% in power output

  10. Perceiving affordances in rugby union.

    PubMed

    Passos, Pedro; Cordovil, Rita; Fernandes, Orlando; Barreiros, João

    2012-01-01

    To succeed in competitive environments, players need to continuously adjust their decisions and actions to the behaviour of relevant others. Players' interactions demand ongoing decisions that are constrained by what is previously defined (e.g., coaches' prescriptions that establish 'what' to do) and by information that is available in the context and specifies not only 'what' the player should do, but also 'how', 'when' and 'where'. We describe what affordances emerge to the ball carrier as a consequence of changes in kinematic variables, such as interpersonal distances or distances to the nearest sideline. Changes in these variables determine whether and when different actions are possible. The ball carrier tended to perform a pass when the tackler was farthest from the sideline and the velocity of approach to the tackler did not seem to effect the ball carrier's decision. In the few episodes where the ball carrier moved forward instead of passing the ball, he was mainly influenced by contextual information, such as the variability of the players' distance to the nearest sideline. In sum, actors must be aware of the affordances of others that are specified by particular variables that become available just before decision-making.

  11. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    The Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators to measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion history of the Universe. (SNAP's weak-lensing program is described in a separate White Paper.) The experiment exploits supernova distance measurements up to their fundamental systematic limit; strict requirements on the monitoring of each supernova's properties leads to the need for a space-based mission. Results from pre-SNAP experiments, which characterize fundamental SN Ia properties, will be used to optimize the SNAP observing strategy to yield data, which minimize both systematic and statistical uncertainties. With early R&D funding, we have achieved technological readiness and the collaboration is poised to begin construction. Pre-JDEM AO R&D support will further reduce technical and cost risk. Specific details on the SNAP mission can be found in Aldering et al. (2004, 2005). The primary goal of the SNAP supernova program is to provide a dataset which gives tight constraints on parameters which characterize the dark-energy, e.g. w{sub 0} and w{sub a} where w(a) = w{sub 0} + w{sub a}(1-a). SNAP data can also be used to directly test and discriminate among specific dark energy models. We will do so by building the Hubble diagram of high-redshift supernovae, the same methodology used in the original discovery of the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe that established the existence of dark energy (Perlmutter et al. 1998; Garnavich et al. 1998; Riess et al. 1998; Perlmutter et al. 1999). The SNAP SN Ia program focuses on minimizing the systematic floor of the supernova method through the use of characterized supernovae that can be sorted into subsets based on subtle signatures of heterogeneity. Subsets may be defined based on host-galaxy morphology, spectral-feature strength and velocity, early-time behavior, inter alia. Independent cosmological analysis of each subset of ''like'' supernovae can be

  12. Affordable In-Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, L. A.; VanDyke, M. K.; Lajoie, R. M.; Woodcock, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    Current and proposed launch systems will provide access to low-Earth orbit (LEO), and destinations beyond LEO, but the cost of delivering payloads will preclude the use of these services by many users. To develop and encourage revolutionary commercial utilization of geosynchronous orbit (GEO) and to provide an affordable means to continue NASA space science and exploration missions, the transportation costs to in-space destinations must be reduced. The principal objective of this study was to conceptually define three to four promising approaches to in-space transportation for delivery of satellites and other payloads, 3,000- to 10,000-lb class, to GEO destinations. This study established a methodology for evaluating in-space transportation systems based on life-cycle cost. The reusable concepts seemed to fare better in the evaluation than expendable, since a major driver in the life-cycle cost was the stage production cost.

  13. Dopamine, Affordance and Active Inference

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl J.; Shiner, Tamara; FitzGerald, Thomas; Galea, Joseph M.; Adams, Rick; Brown, Harriet; Dolan, Raymond J.; Moran, Rosalyn; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Bestmann, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal) cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions) about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order) in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal) model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors) to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level. PMID:22241972

  14. Managing Requirements for Acquisition Program Affordability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-14

    to buy weapon systems at a lower cost and higher quality by leveraging commercial technology. He also directed program managers (PMs) and... Managing Requirements for Acquisition Program Affordability by Colonel James O. Winbush, Jr. United States Army...2011 to 11-04-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Managing Requirements for Acquisition Program Affordability 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  15. College Affordability: Implications for College Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Laura W.; Li, Chunyan

    2006-01-01

    By examining trends in college affordability, this article explores the extent to which the public perception that college is not affordable is justified. First, the article describes trends in national indicators that contribute to ability to pay, including income growth, health care costs, debt burden, and personal savings rates. Trends in…

  16. Section 8: Affordable Housing for Exceptional Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Wesley E.

    2009-01-01

    Shelter is a basic human need. Unfortunately, affordable housing is a need that low income families who are caring for children and adults with disabilities can rarely afford without assistance. Because participating families generally pay rent of no more than 30 percent of their adjusted monthly income, the Section 8 program can provide…

  17. 78 FR 41074 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Innovation in Affordable Housing Design Student...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Innovation in Affordable Housing...: Innovation in Affordable Housing Design Student Competition. OMB Approval Number: N/A. Type of Request: New. Form Number: N/A. Description of the need for the information and proposed use: The Innovation...

  18. Obstacles and Affordances for Integer Reasoning: An Analysis of Children's Thinking and the History of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Jessica Pierson; Lamb, Lisa L.; Philipp, Randolph A.; Whitacre, Ian; Schappelle, Bonnie P.; Lewis, Melinda L.

    2014-01-01

    We identify and document 3 cognitive obstacles, 3 cognitive affordances, and 1 type of integer understanding that can function as either an obstacle or affordance for learners while they extend their numeric domains from whole numbers to include negative integers. In particular, we highlight 2 key subsets of integer reasoning: understanding or…

  19. A New Measure of Medication Affordability

    PubMed Central

    BRIESACHER, BECKY; ROSS-DEGNAN, DENNIS; ADAMS, ALYCE; WAGNER, ANITA; GURWITZ, JERRY; SOUMERAI, STEPHAN

    2010-01-01

    This study developed a new measure of medication affordability that examines out-of-pocket drug expenses relative to available household resources. The authors assessed the spending patterns of ~2.1 million poor households (≤100% federal poverty level) of adults aged 51 and older by Medicaid status. The data were drawn from the 2000–2001 Health and Retirement Study. Household spending was categorized into three broad types: basic living, health care, and discretionary. Older (aged 51 or older) poor households without Medicaid allocated about 72% of their total resources ($17,421, SE $783) to basic living needs. In comparison, those with Medicaid had scarcer total resources ($12,498, SE $423) and allocated 85% to basic living needs. Medication costs consumed the largest proportion of health care expenses for both types of poor households (Medicaid: $463, SE $67; non-Medicaid: $970, SE $102). After paying for basic living needs and health care costs, these families had, on average, only $16 left each week. Poor families have very few resources available for anything beyond basic living needs, even when they have Medicaid coverage. There is no great reservoir of discretionary funds to pay for increases in cost-sharing under Medicaid and Medicare Part D. PMID:19821195

  20. Affordability Approaches for Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holladay, Jon; Smith, David Alan

    2012-01-01

    The design and development of historical NASA Programs (Apollo, Shuttle and International Space Station), have been based on pre-agreed missions which included specific pre-defined destinations (e.g., the Moon and low Earth orbit). Due to more constrained budget profiles, and the desire to have a more flexible architecture for Mission capture as it is affordable, NASA is working toward a set of Programs that are capability based, rather than mission and/or destination specific. This means designing for a performance capability that can be applied to a specific human exploration mission/destination later (sometime years later). This approach does support developing systems to flatter budgets over time, however, it also poses the challenge of how to accomplish this effectively while maintaining a trained workforce, extensive manufacturing, test and launch facilities, and ensuring mission success ranging from Low Earth Orbit to asteroid destinations. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in support of Exploration Systems Directorate (ESD) in Washington, DC has been developing approaches to track affordability across multiple Programs. The first step is to ensure a common definition of affordability: the discipline to bear cost in meeting a budget with margin over the life of the program. The second step is to infuse responsibility and accountability for affordability into all levels of the implementing organization since affordability is no single person s job; it is everyone s job. The third step is to use existing data to identify common affordability elements organized by configuration (vehicle/facility), cost, schedule, and risk. The fourth step is to analyze and trend this affordability data using an affordability dashboard to provide status, measures, and trends for ESD and Program level of affordability tracking. This paper will provide examples of how regular application of this approach supports affordable and therefore sustainable human space exploration

  1. Energy and Momentum in Spacetime Homogeneous GÖDEL-TYPE Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.

    Using Einstein and Papapetrou energy-momentum complexes, we explicitly calculate the energy and momentum distribution associated with spacetime homogeneous Gödel-type metrics. We obtain that the two definitions of energy-momentum complexes do not provide the same result for these type of metrics. However, it is shown that the results obtained are reduced to the energy-momentum densities of Gödel metric already available in the literature.

  2. Options for Affordable Planetary Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; Gaddis, Steve; Porter, Ron; VanDyke, Melissa; Martin, Jim; Godfroy, Tom; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Garber, Anne; Pearson, Boise

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear fission systems could serve as "workhorse" power plants for the Vision for Space Exploration. In this context, the "workhorse" power plant is defined as a system that could provide power anywhere on the surface of the moon or Mars, land on the moon using a Robotic Lunar Exploration Program (RLEP)-developed lander, and would be a viable, affordable option once power requirements exceed that which can be provided by existing energy systems.

  3. Pedagogical Affordances of Multiple External Representations in Scientific Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsin-Kai; Puntambekar, Sadhana

    2012-12-01

    Multiple external representations (MERs) have been widely used in science teaching and learning. Theories such as dual coding theory and cognitive flexibility theory have been developed to explain why the use of MERs is beneficial to learning, but they do not provide much information on pedagogical issues such as how and in what conditions MERs could be introduced and used to support students' engagement in scientific processes and develop competent scientific practices (e.g., asking questions, planning investigations, and analyzing data). Additionally, little is understood about complex interactions among scientific processes and affordances of MERs. Therefore, this article focuses on pedagogical affordances of MERs in learning environments that engage students in various scientific processes. By reviewing literature in science education and cognitive psychology and integrating multiple perspectives, this article aims at exploring (1) how MERs can be integrated with science processes due to their different affordances, and (2) how student learning with MERs can be scaffolded, especially in a classroom situation. We argue that pairing representations and scientific processes in a principled way based on the affordances of the representations and the goals of the activities is a powerful way to use MERs in science education. Finally, we outline types of scaffolding that could help effective use of MERs including dynamic linking, model progression, support in instructional materials, teacher support, and active engagement.

  4. Does energy of type IIP supernovae depend on progenitor mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugai, Nikolai

    The oxygen [O I] 6300 A emission doublet, seen in nebular spectra of core-collapse supernovae, is used to obtain oxygen density in central zone of a sample of SN IIP. The inferred values of the oxygen density on day 300 turn out to fall into rather narrow range. This result does not depend on the distance, extinction, or model assumptions. The found density distribution led us to conclude that the SN IIP explosion energy monotonically increases with the progenitor mass.

  5. MISSE-X: Affordable Space Environment Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    MISSE–X is a robotically serviceable ISS external facility providing government, industry and academia experimenters with affordable access to space for materials durability testing of potential ...

  6. Modulation of visual attention by object affordance

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Vásquez, Patricia; Schubö, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Some objects in our environment are strongly tied to motor actions, a phenomenon called object affordance. A cup, for example, affords us to reach out to it and grasp it by its handle. Studies indicate that merely viewing an affording object triggers motor activations in the brain. The present study investigated whether object affordance would also result in an attention bias, that is, whether observers would rather attend to graspable objects within reach compared to non-graspable but reachable objects or to graspable objects out of reach. To this end, we conducted a combined reaction time and motion tracking study with a table in a virtual three-dimensional space. Two objects were positioned on the table, one near, the other one far from the observer. In each trial, two graspable objects, two non-graspable objects, or a combination of both was presented. Participants were instructed to detect a probe appearing on one of the objects as quickly as possible. Detection times served as indirect measure of attention allocation. The motor association with the graspable object was additionally enhanced by having participants grasp a real object in some of the trials. We hypothesized that visual attention would be preferentially allocated to the near graspable object, which should be reflected in reduced reaction times in this condition. Our results confirm this assumption: probe detection was fastest at the graspable object at the near position compared to the far position or to a non-graspable object. A follow-up experiment revealed that in addition to object affordance per se, immediate graspability of an affording object may also influence this near-space advantage. Our results suggest that visuospatial attention is preferentially allocated to affording objects which are immediately graspable, and thus establish a strong link between an object’ s motor affordance and visual attention. PMID:24567725

  7. Dietary energy intake is associated with type 2 diabetes risk markers in children.

    PubMed

    Donin, Angela S; Nightingale, Claire M; Owen, Christopher G; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Jebb, Susan A; Ambrosini, Gina L; Stephen, Alison M; Cook, Derek G; Whincup, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Energy intake, energy density, and nutrient intakes are implicated in type 2 diabetes risk in adults, but little is known about their influence on emerging type 2 diabetes risk in childhood. We examined these associations in a multiethnic population of children. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study of 2,017 children predominantly of white European, South Asian, and black African-Caribbean origin aged 9-10 years who had a detailed 24-h dietary recall and measurements of body composition and provided a fasting blood sample for measurements of plasma glucose, HbA1c, and serum insulin; homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was also derived. RESULTS Energy intake was positively associated with insulin resistance. After the removal of 176 participants with implausible energy intakes (unlikely to be representative of habitual intake), energy intake was more strongly associated with insulin resistance and was also associated with glucose and fat mass index. Energy density was also positively associated with insulin resistance and fat mass index. However, in mutually adjusted analyses, the associations for energy intake remained while those for energy density became nonsignificant. Individual nutrient intakes showed no associations with type 2 diabetes risk markers. CONCLUSIONS Higher total energy intake was strongly associated with high levels of insulin resistance and may help to explain emerging type 2 diabetes risk in childhood. Studies are needed to establish whether reducing energy intake produces sustained favorable changes in insulin resistance and circulating glucose levels.

  8. Motivational Affordance and Risk-Taking Across Decision Domains.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xi; Scholer, Abigail A

    2016-03-01

    We propose a motivational affordance account to explain both stability and variability in risk-taking propensity in major decision domains. We draw on regulatory focus theory to differentiate two types of motivation (prevention, promotion) that play a key role in predicting risk-taking. Study 1 demonstrated that prevention motivation is negatively associated with risk-taking across six key decision domains, including health/safety, ethics, recreation, gambling, investment, and social. In contrast, promotion motivation is positively associated with risk-taking in the social and investment domains. Study 2 replicated the same pattern and provided direct evidence that promotion motivation is a strong predictor of risk-taking only in domains where there is true potential for gains. Study 3 manipulated promotion (vs. prevention) motivation experimentally to demonstrate that motivational affordance is a critical mechanism for understanding risk-taking behaviors.

  9. Momentum and energy balance in late-type stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, K. B.

    1981-01-01

    Observations at ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths indicate that the classical picture of a static stellar atmosphere containing a radiative equilibrium temperature distribution is inapplicable to the majority of late type stars. Mass loss and the presence of atmospheric regions characterized by gas temperatures in excess of the stellar effective temperature appear to be almost ubiquitous throughout the HR diagram. Evidence pertaining to the thermal and dynamical structure of the outer envelopes of cool stars is summarized. These results are compared with the predictions of several theoretical models which were proposed to account for mass loss from latetype stars. Models in which the outflow is thermally radiatively, or wave driven are considered for identification of the physical processes responsible for the observed wind properties. The observed variation of both the wind, thermal and dynamical structure as one proceeds from the supergiant branch toward the main sequence in the cool portion of the HR diagram give consideration to potential mechanisms for heating and cooling the flow from low gravity stars.

  10. Acylation type determines ghrelin's effects on energy homeostasis in rodents.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Kristy M; Chaudhary, Nilika; Müller, Timo D; Kirchner, Henriette; Habegger, Kirk M; Ottaway, Nickki; Smiley, David L; Dimarchi, Richard; Hofmann, Susanna M; Woods, Stephen C; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Holst, Birgitte; Pfluger, Paul T; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2012-10-01

    Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal polypeptide that acts through the ghrelin receptor (GHSR) to promote food intake and increase adiposity. Activation of GHSR requires the presence of a fatty-acid (FA) side chain on amino acid residue serine 3 of the ghrelin molecule. However, little is known about the role that the type of FA used for acylation plays in the biological action of ghrelin. We therefore evaluated a series of differentially acylated peptides to determine whether alterations in length or stability of the FA side chain have an impact on the ability of ghrelin to activate GHSR in vitro or to differentially alter food intake, body weight, and body composition in vivo. Fatty acids principally available in the diet (such as palmitate C16) and therefore representing potential substrates for the ghrelin-activating enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) were used for dose-, time-, and administration/route-dependent effects of ghrelin on food intake, body weight, and body composition in rats and mice. Our data demonstrate that altering the length of the FA side chain of ghrelin results in the differential activation of GHSR. Additionally, we found that acylation of ghrelin with a long-chain FA (C16) delays the acute central stimulation of food intake. Lastly, we found that, depending on acylation length, systemic and central chronic actions of ghrelin on adiposity can be enhanced or reduced. Together our data suggest that modification of the FA side-chain length can be a novel approach to modulate the efficacy of pharmacologically administered ghrelin.

  11. The Transformation of Ergonomic Affordances into Cultural Affordances: The Case of the Alnuset System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappini, Giampaolo

    2012-01-01

    Is it possible to study the ergonomic affordances offered by a system designed for educational aims and their transformation into cultural affordances? To this purpose, what references can we adopt? This work describes the theoretical framework used to realise this study referring to AlNuSet, a system realised within the EC ReMath project to…

  12. Affordance Templates for Shared Robot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Stephen; Dinh, Paul; Hambuchen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the Affordance Template framework used to supervise task behaviors on the NASA-JSC Valkyrie robot at the 2013 DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) Trials. This framework provides graphical interfaces to human supervisors that are adjustable based on the run-time environmental context (e.g., size, location, and shape of objects that the robot must interact with, etc.). Additional improvements, described below, inject degrees of autonomy into instantiations of affordance templates at run-time in order to enable efficient human supervision of the robot for accomplishing tasks.

  13. Access To Care And Affordability Have Improved Following Affordable Care Act Implementation; Problems Remain.

    PubMed

    Shartzer, Adele; Long, Sharon K; Anderson, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that millions of adults have gained insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act, but less is known about how access to and affordability of care may be changing. This study used data from the Health Reform Monitoring Survey to describe changes in access and affordability for nonelderly adults from September 2013, just prior to the first open enrollment period in the Marketplace, to March 2015, after the end of the second open enrollment period. Overall, we found strong improvements in access to care for all nonelderly adults and across income and state Medicaid expansion groups. We also found improvements in the affordability of care for all adults and for low- and moderate-income adults. Despite this progress, there were still large gaps in access and affordability in March 2015, particularly for low-income adults.

  14. Chamberlain Heights Redevelopment: A Large Scale, Cold Climate Study of Affordable Housing Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, K.; Mahle, M.

    2012-03-01

    The City of Meriden Housing Authority (MHA) collaborated with affordable housing developer Jonathon Rose Companies (JRC) to complete a gut renovation of 124 residential units in the Chamberlain Heights retrofit project. The affordable housing community is made up of 36 buildings in duplex and quad configurations located on 22 acres within two miles of downtown Meriden, CT. The final post-retrofit analysis showed 40-45% source energy savings over the existing pre-retrofit conditions.

  15. A New Type of Multifunctional Polar Binder: Toward Practical Application of High Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Qian, Tao; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Na; Liu, Xuejun; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Jinqiu; Shen, Xiaowei; Yang, Tingzhou; Chen, Yu; Yan, Chenglin

    2017-03-01

    A new type of amino polar binder with 3D network flexibility structure for high energy Li-S batteries is synthesized and successfully used with commercial sulfur powder cathodes. The binder shows significant performance improvement in capacity retention and high potential for practical application, which arouse the battery community's interest in the commercial application of high energy Li-S battery.

  16. Electrostatic energy analyzer measurements of low energy zirconium beam parameters in a plasma sputter-type negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Malapit, Giovanni M.; Mahinay, Christian Lorenz S.; Poral, Matthew D.; Ramos, Henry J.

    2012-02-15

    A plasma sputter-type negative ion source is utilized to produce and detect negative Zr ions with energies between 150 and 450 eV via a retarding potential-type electrostatic energy analyzer. Traditional and modified semi-cylindrical Faraday cups (FC) inside the analyzer are employed to sample negative Zr ions and measure corresponding ion currents. The traditional FC registered indistinct ion current readings which are attributed to backscattering of ions and secondary electron emissions. The modified Faraday cup with biased repeller guard ring, cut out these signal distortions leaving only ringings as issues which are theoretically compensated by fitting a sigmoidal function into the data. The mean energy and energy spread are calculated using the ion current versus retarding potential data while the beam width values are determined from the data of the transverse measurement of ion current. The most energetic negative Zr ions yield tighter energy spread at 4.11 eV compared to the least energetic negative Zr ions at 4.79 eV. The smallest calculated beam width is 1.04 cm for the negative Zr ions with the highest mean energy indicating a more focused beam in contrast to the less energetic negative Zr ions due to space charge forces.

  17. Electrostatic energy analyzer measurements of low energy zirconium beam parameters in a plasma sputter-type negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Malapit, Giovanni M; Mahinay, Christian Lorenz S; Poral, Matthew D; Ramos, Henry J

    2012-02-01

    A plasma sputter-type negative ion source is utilized to produce and detect negative Zr ions with energies between 150 and 450 eV via a retarding potential-type electrostatic energy analyzer. Traditional and modified semi-cylindrical Faraday cups (FC) inside the analyzer are employed to sample negative Zr ions and measure corresponding ion currents. The traditional FC registered indistinct ion current readings which are attributed to backscattering of ions and secondary electron emissions. The modified Faraday cup with biased repeller guard ring, cut out these signal distortions leaving only ringings as issues which are theoretically compensated by fitting a sigmoidal function into the data. The mean energy and energy spread are calculated using the ion current versus retarding potential data while the beam width values are determined from the data of the transverse measurement of ion current. The most energetic negative Zr ions yield tighter energy spread at 4.11 eV compared to the least energetic negative Zr ions at 4.79 eV. The smallest calculated beam width is 1.04 cm for the negative Zr ions with the highest mean energy indicating a more focused beam in contrast to the less energetic negative Zr ions due to space charge forces.

  18. 12 CFR 1807.400 - Affordable housing-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Affordable housing-general. 1807.400 Section... TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.400 Affordable housing—general. Each Awardee that uses CMF funding to support Affordable Housing Activities shall ensure that...

  19. 12 CFR 1807.401 - Affordable housing-rental housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Affordable housing-rental housing. 1807.401... TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.401 Affordable housing—rental housing. To qualify as Affordable Housing, a rental Multi-family housing project financed with a CMF...

  20. 12 CFR 1807.401 - Affordable housing-rental housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Affordable housing-rental housing. 1807.401... TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.401 Affordable housing—rental housing. To qualify as Affordable Housing, a rental Multi-family housing project financed with a CMF...

  1. 12 CFR 1807.400 - Affordable housing-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Affordable housing-general. 1807.400 Section... TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.400 Affordable housing—general. Each Awardee that uses CMF funding to support Affordable Housing Activities shall ensure that...

  2. 12 CFR 1807.400 - Affordable housing-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Affordable housing-general. 1807.400 Section... TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.400 Affordable housing—general. Each Awardee that uses CMF funding to support Affordable Housing Activities shall ensure that...

  3. 12 CFR 1807.401 - Affordable housing-rental housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Affordable housing-rental housing. 1807.401... TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.401 Affordable housing—rental housing. To qualify as Affordable Housing, a rental Multi-family housing project financed with a CMF...

  4. 12 CFR 1807.401 - Affordable housing-rental housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Affordable housing-rental housing. 1807.401... TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.401 Affordable housing—rental housing. To qualify as Affordable Housing, a rental Multi-family housing project financed with a CMF...

  5. No Role for Motor Affordances in Visual Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecher, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Motor affordances have been shown to play a role in visual object identification and categorization. The present study explored whether working memory is likewise supported by motor affordances. Use of motor affordances should be disrupted by motor interference, and this effect should be larger for objects that have motor affordances than for…

  6. Options for Affordable Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; Gaddis, Steve; Porter, Ron; VanDyke, Melissa; Martin Jim; Godfroy, Tom; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Garber, Anne; Pearson, Boise

    2006-01-01

    Fission surface power systems could provide abundant power anywhere on free surface of the moon or Mars. Locations could include permanently shaded regions on the moon and high latitudes on Mars. To be fully utilized; however, fission surface power systems must be safe, have adequate performance, and be affordable. This paper discusses options for the design and development of such systems.

  7. 9 Tips for Affordable Student Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The trick to having a successful and affordable trip is planning ahead and planning thoroughly. Keep the spirits high and the costs low by following a well-traveled ensemble director's suggestions as presented in this article. These tips include finding local attractions that are unique to the city that the group will be visiting, looking at…

  8. Actions and Affordances in Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Craig G.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.; Magnuson, James S.

    2004-01-01

    In 2 experiments, eye movements were monitored as participants followed instructions containing temporary syntactic ambiguities (e.g., "Pour the egg in the bowl over the flour"). The authors varied the affordances of task-relevant objects with respect to the action required by the instruction (e.g., whether 1 or both eggs in the visual workspace…

  9. Diabetes and the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Schade, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Affordable Care Act—“Obamacare”—is the most important federal medical legislation to be enacted since Medicare. Although the goal of the Affordable Care Act is to improve healthcare coverage, access, and quality for all Americans, people with diabetes are especially poised to benefit from the comprehensive reforms included in the act. Signed into law in 2010, this massive legislation will slowly be enacted over the next 10 years. In the making for at least a decade, it will affect every person in the United States, either directly or indirectly. In this review, we discuss the major changes in healthcare that will take place in the next several years, including (1) who needs to purchase insurance on the Web-based exchange, (2) the cost to individuals and the rebates that they may expect, (3) the rules and regulations for purchasing insurance, (4) the characteristics of the different “metallic” insurance plans that are available, and (5) the states that have agreed to participate. With both tables and figures, we have tried to make the Affordable Care Act both understandable and appreciated. The goal of this comprehensive review is to highlight aspects of the Affordable Care Act that are of importance to practitioners who care for people with diabetes by discussing both the positive and the potentially negative aspects of the program as they relate to diabetes care. PMID:24927108

  10. Housing Affordability And Children's Cognitive Achievement.

    PubMed

    Newman, Sandra; Holupka, C Scott

    2016-11-01

    Housing cost burden-the fraction of income spent on housing-is the most prevalent housing problem affecting the healthy development of millions of low- and moderate-income children. By affecting disposable income, a high burden affects parents' expenditures on both necessities for and enrichment of their children, as well as investments in their children. Reducing those expenditures and investments, in turn, can affect children's development, including their cognitive skills and physical, social, and emotional health. This article summarizes the first empirical evidence of the effects of housing affordability on children's cognitive achievement and on one factor that appears to contribute to these effects: the larger expenditures on child enrichment by families in affordable housing. We found that housing cost burden has the same relationship to both children's cognitive achievement and enrichment spending on children, exhibiting an inverted U shape in both cases. The maximum benefit occurs when housing cost burden is near 30 percent of income-the long-standing rule-of-thumb definition of affordable housing. The effect of the burden is stronger on children's math ability than on their reading comprehension and is more pronounced with burdens above the 30 percent standard. For enrichment spending, the curve is "shallower" (meaning the effect of optimal affordability is less pronounced) but still significant.

  11. Can the US afford a lunar base

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    Establishing a lunar base will require steady funding for a decade or two. The question addressed here is whether such a large space project is affordable at this time. The relevant facts and methodology are presented so that the reader may formulate independent answers. It is shown that a permanent lunar base can be financed without increasing NASA's historical budgetary trends.

  12. Are Selective Private and Public Colleges Affordable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karikari, John A.; Dezhbakhsh, Hashem

    2013-01-01

    We examine college affordability under the existing pricing and financial aid system that awards both non need-based and need-based aid. Using data of freshmen attending a large number of selective private and public colleges in the USA, we find that the prices students actually pay for college have increased over time. Need-based grant aid has…

  13. Special audit report on the Department of Energy`s Arms and military-type equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, J.C.

    1996-02-01

    Based on the activities associated with the recent recovery of the eight armored personnel carriers, a review was conducted of the Department`s controls over arms and military-type equipment in its possession. The objects were to determine whether (1) the quantity of arms and military-type equipment on hand was justified by mission needs, (2) inventory listings of arms were accurate, (3) property disposals were properly controlled and executed, and (4) loans and borrowed equipment were appropriate and accounted for accurately. The purpose of this report is to summarize the most significant issues identified and point out where the Department needs stronger controls over its inventory of arms and military-type property.

  14. Climate impacts on extreme energy consumption of different types of buildings.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingcai; Shi, Jun; Guo, Jun; Cao, Jingfu; Niu, Jide; Xiong, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Exploring changes of building energy consumption and its relationships with climate can provide basis for energy-saving and carbon emission reduction. Heating and cooling energy consumption of different types of buildings during 1981-2010 in Tianjin city, was simulated by using TRNSYS software. Daily or hourly extreme energy consumption was determined by percentile methods, and the climate impact on extreme energy consumption was analyzed. The results showed that days of extreme heating consumption showed apparent decrease during the recent 30 years for residential and large venue buildings, whereas days of extreme cooling consumption increased in large venue building. No significant variations were found for the days of extreme energy consumption for commercial building, although a decreasing trend in extreme heating energy consumption. Daily extreme energy consumption for large venue building had no relationship with climate parameters, whereas extreme energy consumption for commercial and residential buildings was related to various climate parameters. Further multiple regression analysis suggested heating energy consumption for commercial building was affected by maximum temperature, dry bulb temperature, solar radiation and minimum temperature, which together can explain 71.5 % of the variation of the daily extreme heating energy consumption. The daily extreme cooling energy consumption for commercial building was only related to the wet bulb temperature (R2= 0.382). The daily extreme heating energy consumption for residential building was affected by 4 climate parameters, but the dry bulb temperature had the main impact. The impacts of climate on hourly extreme heating energy consumption has a 1-3 hour delay in all three types of buildings, but no delay was found in the impacts of climate on hourly extreme cooling energy consumption for the selected buildings.

  15. Climate Impacts on Extreme Energy Consumption of Different Types of Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingcai; Shi, Jun; Guo, Jun; Cao, Jingfu; Niu, Jide; Xiong, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Exploring changes of building energy consumption and its relationships with climate can provide basis for energy-saving and carbon emission reduction. Heating and cooling energy consumption of different types of buildings during 1981-2010 in Tianjin city, was simulated by using TRNSYS software. Daily or hourly extreme energy consumption was determined by percentile methods, and the climate impact on extreme energy consumption was analyzed. The results showed that days of extreme heating consumption showed apparent decrease during the recent 30 years for residential and large venue buildings, whereas days of extreme cooling consumption increased in large venue building. No significant variations were found for the days of extreme energy consumption for commercial building, although a decreasing trend in extreme heating energy consumption. Daily extreme energy consumption for large venue building had no relationship with climate parameters, whereas extreme energy consumption for commercial and residential buildings was related to various climate parameters. Further multiple regression analysis suggested heating energy consumption for commercial building was affected by maximum temperature, dry bulb temperature, solar radiation and minimum temperature, which together can explain 71.5 % of the variation of the daily extreme heating energy consumption. The daily extreme cooling energy consumption for commercial building was only related to the wet bulb temperature (R2= 0.382). The daily extreme heating energy consumption for residential building was affected by 4 climate parameters, but the dry bulb temperature had the main impact. The impacts of climate on hourly extreme heating energy consumption has a 1-3 hour delay in all three types of buildings, but no delay was found in the impacts of climate on hourly extreme cooling energy consumption for the selected buildings. PMID:25923205

  16. Thermophotovoltaic energy conversion system having a heavily doped n-type region

    DOEpatents

    DePoy, David M.; Charache, Greg W.; Baldasaro, Paul F.

    2000-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion semiconductor device is provided which incorporates a heavily doped n-type region and which, as a consequence, has improved TPV conversion efficiency. The thermophotovoltaic energy conversion device includes an emitter layer having first and second opposed sides and a base layer in contact with the first side of the emitter layer. A highly doped n-type cap layer is formed on the second side of the emitter layer or, in another embodiment, a heavily doped n-type emitter layer takes the place of the cap layer.

  17. Gravitational Energy-Momentum Density in Bianchi Type II Space-Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogdu, Oktay

    In this paper, using Einstein, Landau and Lifshitz's energy-momentum complexes both in general relativity and teleparallel gravity, we calculate the total energy distribution (due to matter and fields, including gravitation) associated with locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type II cosmological models. We show that energy densities in these different gravitation theories are the same, so they agree with each other. We obtain the result that the total energy is zero. This result agrees with previous works of Cooperstock and Israelit, Rosen, Johri et al., Banerjee and Sen, Vargas, Aydogdu and Saltı. Moreover, our result supports the viewpoints of Albrow and Tryon.

  18. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 224.64 How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources... develop that type of energy resource and will trigger the public notice and opportunity for...

  19. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 224.64 How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources... develop that type of energy resource and will trigger the public notice and opportunity for...

  20. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 224.64 How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources... develop that type of energy resource and will trigger the public notice and opportunity for...

  1. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 224.64 How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources... develop that type of energy resource and will trigger the public notice and opportunity for...

  2. 25 CFR 224.64 - How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... different types of energy resources? 224.64 Section 224.64 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... Requirements § 224.64 How may a tribe assume management of development of different types of energy resources... develop that type of energy resource and will trigger the public notice and opportunity for...

  3. Main energy paths and energy cascade processes of the two types of persistent heavy rainfall events over the Yangtze River-Huaihe River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanchun; Sun, Jianhua; Fu, Shenming

    2017-02-01

    Two types of persistent heavy rainfall events (PHREs) over the Yangtze River-Huaihe River Basin were determined in a recent statistical study: type A, whose precipitation is mainly located to the south of the Yangtze River; and type B, whose precipitation is mainly located to the north of the river. The present study investigated these two PHRE types using a newly derived set of energy equations to show the scale interaction and main energy paths contributing to the persistence of the precipitation. The main results were as follows. The available potential energy (APE) and kinetic energy (KE) associated with both PHRE types generally increased upward in the troposphere, with the energy of the type-A PHREs stronger than that of the type-B PHREs (except for in the middle troposphere). There were two main common and universal energy paths of the two PHRE types: (1) the baroclinic energy conversion from APE to KE was the dominant energy source for the evolution of large-scale background circulations; and (2) the downscaled energy cascade processes of KE and APE were vital for sustaining the eddy flow, which directly caused the PHREs. The significant differences between the two PHRE types mainly appeared in the lower troposphere, where the baroclinic energy conversion associated with the eddy flow in type-A PHREs was from KE to APE, which reduced the intensity of the precipitation-related eddy flow; whereas, the conversion in type-B PHREs was from APE to KE, which enhanced the eddy flow.

  4. Alternatives to the ACA's Affordability Firewall

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Sarah A.; Saltzman, Evan; Cordova, Amado

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was designed to increase health insurance coverage while limiting the disruption to individuals with existing sources of insurance coverage, particularly those with employer-sponsored insurance (ESI). To limit disruption to those with coverage, the ACA implements the employer mandate, which requires firms with more than 50 employees to offer health insurance or face penalties, and the individual “affordability firewall,” which limits subsidies to individuals lacking access to alternative sources of coverage that are “affordable.” This article examines the policy impacts of the affordability firewall and investigates two potential modifications. Option 1, which is the “entire family” scenario, involves allowing an exception to the firewall for anyone in a family where the family ESI premium contribution exceeds 9.5 percent of the worker's household income. In Option 2, the “dependents only” scenario, only dependents (and not the worker) become eligible for Marketplace subsidies when the ESI premium contribution exceeds 9.5 percent of the worker's household income. Relative to the ACA, RAND researchers estimate that nongroup enrollment will increase by 4.1 million for Option 1 and by 1.4 million for Option 2. However, the number without insurance only declines by 1.5 million in Option 1 and 0.7 million in Option 2. The difference between the increase in nongroup enrollment and the decrease in uninsurance is primarily due to ESI crowd-out, which is more pronounced for Option 1. Researchers also estimated that about 1.3 million families who have ESI and unsubsidized nongroup coverage under current ACA policy would receive Marketplace subsidies under the alternative affordability firewall scenarios. For these families, health insurance coverage would become substantially more affordable; these families' risk of spending at least 20 percent of income on health care would drop by more than two thirds. We additionally

  5. Alternatives to the ACA's Affordability Firewall.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Sarah A; Saltzman, Evan; Cordova, Amado

    2016-05-09

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was designed to increase health insurance coverage while limiting the disruption to individuals with existing sources of insurance coverage, particularly those with employer-sponsored insurance (ESI). To limit disruption to those with coverage, the ACA implements the employer mandate, which requires firms with more than 50 employees to offer health insurance or face penalties, and the individual "affordability firewall," which limits subsidies to individuals lacking access to alternative sources of coverage that are "affordable." This article examines the policy impacts of the affordability firewall and investigates two potential modifications. Option 1, which is the "entire family" scenario, involves allowing an exception to the firewall for anyone in a family where the family ESI premium contribution exceeds 9.5 percent of the worker's household income. In Option 2, the "dependents only" scenario, only dependents (and not the worker) become eligible for Marketplace subsidies when the ESI premium contribution exceeds 9.5 percent of the worker's household income. Relative to the ACA, RAND researchers estimate that nongroup enrollment will increase by 4.1 million for Option 1 and by 1.4 million for Option 2. However, the number without insurance only declines by 1.5 million in Option 1 and 0.7 million in Option 2. The difference between the increase in nongroup enrollment and the decrease in uninsurance is primarily due to ESI crowd-out, which is more pronounced for Option 1. Researchers also estimated that about 1.3 million families who have ESI and unsubsidized nongroup coverage under current ACA policy would receive Marketplace subsidies under the alternative affordability firewall scenarios. For these families, health insurance coverage would become substantially more affordable; these families' risk of spending at least 20 percent of income on health care would drop by more than two thirds. We additionally estimated that federal

  6. A Bootstrap Approach to an Affordable Exploration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the potential to build an affordable sustainable exploration program by adopting an approach that requires investing in technologies that can be used to build a space infrastructure from very modest initial capabilities. Human exploration has had a history of flight programs that have high development and operational costs. Since Apollo, human exploration has had very constrained budgets and they are expected be constrained in the future. Due to their high operations costs it becomes necessary to consider retiring established space facilities in order to move on to the next exploration challenge. This practice may save cost in the near term but it does so by sacrificing part of the program s future architecture. Human exploration also has a history of sacrificing fully functional flight hardware to achieve mission objectives. An affordable exploration program cannot be built when it involves billions of dollars of discarded space flight hardware, instead, the program must emphasize preserving its high value space assets and building a suitable permanent infrastructure. Further this infrastructure must reduce operational and logistics cost. The paper examines the importance of achieving a high level of logistics independence by minimizing resource consumption, minimizing the dependency on external logistics, and maximizing the utility of resources available. The approach involves the development and deployment of a core suite of technologies that have minimum initial needs yet are able expand upon initial capability in an incremental bootstrap fashion. The bootstrap approach incrementally creates an infrastructure that grows and becomes self sustaining and eventually begins producing the energy, products and consumable propellants that support human exploration. The bootstrap technologies involve new methods of delivering and manipulating energy and materials. These technologies will exploit the space environment, minimize dependencies, and

  7. Effects of Infant-Parent Play with a Technology-Enhanced Toy: Affordance-Related Actions and Communicative Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Doris; Hutchinson, Kathleen; Nolan, Joan T.; Weber, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Infant-parent play with toys is an early form of social communication, and the toy features (i.e., affordances), as well as the child's language competence, contribute to the developmental level of the play and the types of play actions that occur. This research, conducted in cooperation with a toy manufacturer, investigated how the affordances of…

  8. Energy Storage Opportunities and Capabilities in a Type 3 Wind Turbine Generator: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, Eduard; Gevorgian, Vahan; Hoke, Andy

    2016-09-01

    Wind power plants and other renewable power plants with power electronic interfaces are capable of delivering frequency response (both governor and/or inertial response) to the grid by a control action; thus, the reduction of available online inertia as conventional power plants are retired can be compensated by designing renewable power plant controls to include frequency response. The source of energy to be delivered as inertial response is determined by the type of generation and control strategy chosen. The cost of energy storage is expected to drop over time, and global research activities on energy storage are very active, funded both by the private industry and governments. Different industry sectors (e.g., transportation, energy) are the major drivers of the recent storage research and development. This work investigates the opportunities and capabilities of deploying energy storage in renewable power plants. In particular, we focus on wind power plants with doubly-fed induction generators, or Type 3 wind turbine generator (WTGs). We find that the total output power of a system with Type 3 WTGs with energy storage can deliver a power boost during inertial response that is up to 45% higher than one without energy storage without affecting the torque limit, thus enabling an effective delivery of ancillary services to the grid.

  9. The visual encoding of tool-object affordances.

    PubMed

    Natraj, N; Pella, Y M; Borghi, A M; Wheaton, L A

    2015-12-03

    The perception of tool-object pairs involves understanding their action-relationships (affordances). Here, we sought to evaluate how an observer visually encodes tool-object affordances. Eye-movements were recorded as right-handed participants freely viewed static, right-handed, egocentric tool-object images across three contexts: correct (e.g. hammer-nail), incorrect (e.g. hammer-paper), spatial/ambiguous (e.g. hammer-wood), and three grasp-types: no hand, functional grasp-posture (grasp hammer-handle), non-functional/manipulative grasp-posture (grasp hammer-head). There were three areas of interests (AOI): the object (nail), the operant tool-end (hammer-head), the graspable tool-end (hammer-handle). Participants passively evaluated whether tool-object pairs were functionally correct/incorrect. Clustering of gaze scanpaths and AOI weightings grouped conditions into three distinct grasp-specific clusters, especially across correct and spatial tool-object contexts and to a lesser extent within the incorrect tool-object context. The grasp-specific gaze scanpath clusters were reasonably robust to the temporal order of gaze scanpaths. Gaze was therefore automatically primed to grasp-affordances though the task required evaluating tool-object context. Participants also primarily focused on the object and the operant tool-end and sparsely attended to the graspable tool-end, even in images with functional grasp-postures. In fact, in the absence of a grasp, the object was foveally weighted the most, indicative of a possible object-oriented action priming effect wherein the observer may be evaluating how the tool engages on the object. Unlike the functional grasp-posture, the manipulative grasp-posture caused the greatest disruption in the object-oriented priming effect, ostensibly as it does not afford tool-object action due to its non-functional interaction with the operant tool-end that actually engages with the object (e.g., hammer-head to nail). The enhanced attention

  10. Affordances and the musically extended mind

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Joel

    2014-01-01

    I defend a model of the musically extended mind. I consider how acts of “musicking” grant access to novel emotional experiences otherwise inaccessible. First, I discuss the idea of “musical affordances” and specify both what musical affordances are and how they invite different forms of entrainment. Next, I argue that musical affordances – via soliciting different forms of entrainment – enhance the functionality of various endogenous, emotion-granting regulative processes, drawing novel experiences out of us with an expanded complexity and phenomenal character. I argue that music therefore ought to be thought of as part of the vehicle needed to realize these emotional experiences. I appeal to different sources of empirical work to develop this idea. PMID:24432008

  11. An Affordable Open-Source Turbidimeter

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Christopher D.; Krolick, Alexander; Brunner, Logan; Burklund, Alison; Kahn, Daniel; Ball, William P.; Weber-Shirk, Monroe

    2014-01-01

    Turbidity is an internationally recognized criterion for assessing drinking water quality, because the colloidal particles in turbid water may harbor pathogens, chemically reduce oxidizing disinfectants, and hinder attempts to disinfect water with ultraviolet radiation. A turbidimeter is an electronic/optical instrument that assesses turbidity by measuring the scattering of light passing through a water sample containing such colloidal particles. Commercial turbidimeters cost hundreds or thousands of dollars, putting them beyond the reach of low-resource communities around the world. An affordable open-source turbidimeter based on a single light-to-frequency sensor was designed and constructed, and evaluated against a portable commercial turbidimeter. The final product, which builds on extensive published research, is intended to catalyze further developments in affordable water and sanitation monitoring. PMID:24759114

  12. System Concepts for Affordable Fission Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee; Poston, David; Qualls, Louis

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an affordable Fission Surface Power (FSP) system that could be used for NASA applications on the Moon and Mars. The proposed FSP system uses a low temperature, uranium dioxide-fueled, liquid metal-cooled fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The concept was determined by a 12 month NASA/DOE study that examined design options and development strategies based on affordability and risk. The system is considered a low development risk based on the use of terrestrial-derived reactor technology, high efficiency power conversion, and conventional materials. The low-risk approach was selected over other options that could offer higher performance and/or lower mass.

  13. Affordable Heavy Lift Capability: 2000-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This custom bibliography from the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program lists a sampling of records found in the NASA Aeronautics and Space Database. The scope of this topic includes technologies to allow robust, affordable access of cargo, particularly to low-Earth orbit. This area of focus is one of the enabling technologies as defined by NASA s Report of the President s Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy, published in June 2004.

  14. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Rangel, Charles B. [D-NY-15

    2009-09-17

    03/23/2010 Became Public Law No: 111-148. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: H.R.4872 makes a number of health-related financing and revenue changes to this bill. Read together, this bill and the health care-related provisions of H.R.4872 are commonly referred to as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Information Dominance: Can We Afford It

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    dominate all campaign areas such as air and fire superiority. This paper focuses on information warfare (IW) and its subset, information dominance (ID...the U.S. need information dominance , especially offensively, against second and third world countries, or should it put resources into active defense...Does the U.S. need defensive and offensive modes of information dominance ; can we afford both? Are we headed for information ’overkill’ to gain

  16. Affordability of medicines in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    Zaprutko, Tomasz; Kopciuch, Dorota; Kus, Krzysztof; Merks, Piotr; Nowicka, Monika; Augustyniak, Izabela; Nowakowska, Elżbieta

    2017-01-01

    Background Medications and their prices are key issues for healthcare. Although access to medicines at affordable prices had been specified as a key objective of the European Health Policy, it seems that these goals have not been achieved. Therefore, we attempted an evaluation of affordability of selected medicines at full prices. Methods The analysis concerned 2012 and was conducted between 2013 and 2015 in all the European Union (EU) countries divided into 3 groups depending on the date of their accession to the EU. Finally, we considered 9 originators used in the treatment of schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Information on drug prices were collected from pharmacies. Participation in the study was voluntary and anonymous in order to avoid accusations of advertising. To evaluate affordability, several factors were used (e.g. minimum earnings and Gini coefficient). Due to unavailability in some countries, the exact number of analyzed medicines varies. Results Drug prices vary significantly between EU Member States. Almost eleven fold difference was observed between Germany (EUR 1451.17) and Croatia (EUR 132.77) in relation to Interferone beta-1a 22 μg. Generally, prices were the highest in Germany. The cheapest drugs were found in various countries but never in the poorest ones like Bulgaria or Romania. Discrepancies in wages were observed too (the smallest minimum wage was EUR 138.00 in Bulgaria and the highest EUR 1801.00 in Luxembourg). Full price of olanzapine 5mg, however, was higher in Bulgaria (EUR 64.53) than, for instance, in Belgium (EUR 37.26). Conclusions Analyzed medications are still unaffordable for many citizens of the EU. Besides, access to medicines is also impaired e.g. due to parallel trade. Unaffordability of medications may lead to the patients’ non-compliance and therefore to increased direct and indirect costs of treatment. Common European solutions are needed to achieve a real affordability and accessibility of medications. PMID

  17. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Rangel, Charles B. [D-NY-15

    2009-09-17

    03/23/2010 Became Public Law No: 111-148. (PDF) (All Actions) Notes: H.R.4872 makes a number of health-related financing and revenue changes to this bill. Read together, this bill and the health care-related provisions of H.R.4872 are commonly referred to as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Rangel, Charles B. [D-NY-15

    2009-09-17

    03/23/2010 Became Public Law No: 111-148. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: H.R.4872 makes a number of health-related financing and revenue changes to this bill. Read together, this bill and the health care-related provisions of H.R.4872 are commonly referred to as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. America's Affordable Health Choices Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Dingell, John D. [D-MI-15

    2009-07-14

    10/14/2009 Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 168. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3590, which became Public Law 111-148 on 3/23/2010. H.R.3590, often referred to as the Affordable Care Act, is the bill that became the health care reform law. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Energy distributions of Bianchi type-VI h Universe in general relativity and teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkurt, Şeref; Aygün, Sezg&idot; n.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the energy and momentum density distributions for the inhomogeneous generalizations of homogeneous Bianchi type-VI h metric with Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson, Landau-Lifshitz, Papapetrou, Tolman and Møller prescriptions in general relativity (GR) and teleparallel gravity (TG). We have found exactly the same results for Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and Landau-Lifshitz energy-momentum distributions in Bianchi type-VI h metric for different gravitation theories. The energy-momentum distributions of the Bianchi type- VI h metric are found to be zero for h = -1 in GR and TG. However, our results agree with Tripathy et al, Tryon, Rosen and Aygün et al.

  1. Different Approaches for MØLLER'S Energy in the Kasner-Type Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salti, Mustafa

    Considering the Møller energy definition in both Einstein's theory of general relativity and tele-parallel theory of gravity, we find the energy of the universe based on viscous Kasner-type metrics. The energy distribution which includes both the matter and gravitational field is found to be zero in both of these different gravitation theories and this result agrees with previous works of Cooperstock and Israelit et al., Banerjee-Sen, Vargas who investigated the problem of the energy in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe in Einstein's theory of general relativity and Aydogdu-Saltı who considered the same problem in tele-parallel gravity. In all of these works, they found that the energy of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime is zero. Our result is the same as that obtained in the studies of Saltı and Havare. They used the viscous Kasner-type metric and found the total energy and momentum by using Bergmann-Thomson energy-momentum formulation in both general relativity and tele-parallel gravity. The result that the total energy and momentum components of the universe is zero supports the viewpoints of Albrow and Tryon.

  2. Robust segment-type energy harvester and its application to a wireless sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soobum; Youn, Byeng D.; Jung, Byung C.

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents an innovative design platform of a piezoelectric energy harvester (EH), called a segment-type EH, and its application to a wireless sensor. Energy harvesting technology is motivated to minimize battery replacement cost for wireless sensors, which aims at developing self-powered sensors by utilizing ambient energy sources. Vibration energy is one of the widely available ambient energy sources which can be converted into electrical energy using piezoelectric material. The current state-of-the-art in piezoelectric EH technology mainly utilizes a single natural frequency, which is less effective when utilizing a random ambient vibration with multi-modal frequencies. This research thus proposes a segment-type harvester to generate electric power efficiently which utilizes multiple modes by separating the piezoelectric material. In order to reflect the random nature of ambient vibration energy, a stochastic design optimization is solved to determine the optimal configuration in terms of energy efficiency and durability. A prototype is manufactured and mounted on a heating, ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC) system to operate a temperature wireless sensor. It shows its excellent performance to generate sufficient power for real-time temperature monitoring for building automation.

  3. Generalization of the Time-Energy Uncertainty Relation of Anandan-Aharonov Type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirayama, Minoru; Hamada, Takeshi; Chen, Jin

    1996-01-01

    A new type of time-energy uncertainty relation was proposed recently by Anandan and Aharonov. Their formula, to estimate the lower bound of time-integral of the energy-fluctuation in a quantum state is generalized to the one involving a set of quantum states. This is achieved by obtaining an explicit formula for the distance between two finitely separated points in the Grassman manifold.

  4. Enhancement of high-energy cosmic-ray spectrum by type-II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Miyaji, S.; Parnell, T. A.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    The cosmic-ray spectrum has an intensity enhancement in the energy range 10 to the 14th to 10 to the 16th eV per nucleus. Recent observations of heavy cosmic rays in this energy range indicate that the Ca/Fe ratio may be as large as 10 times the solar value. It is suggested that pulsars in type-II supernova remnants are the origin of this component of the cosmic-ray spectrum.

  5. Least energy sign-changing solutions for a class of nonlocal Kirchhoff-type problems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bitao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the existence of least energy sign-changing solutions for a class of Kirchhoff-type problem [Formula: see text]where [Formula: see text] is a bounded domain in [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], with a smooth boundary [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. By using variational approach and some subtle analytical skills, the existence of the least energy sign-changing solutions of [Formula: see text] is obtained successfully. Moreover, we prove that the energy of any sign-changing solutions is larger than twice that of the ground state solutions of [Formula: see text].

  6. 75 FR 60482 - Proposed Extension of Information Collection Request Submitted for Public Comment; Affordable...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Comment; Affordable Care Act Enrollment Opportunity Notice Relating to Dependent Coverage; Affordable Care Act Grandfathered Health Plan Disclosure and Recordkeeping Requirement; Affordable Care Act Rescission Notice; Affordable Care Act Patient Protections Notice; Affordable Care Act Enrollment Opportunity...

  7. Type of Plan and Provider Network (Affordable Care Act)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Using This Site | Plain Writing 中文 | Kreyòl | Français | Deutsch | ગુજરાતી | हिंदी | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Polski | ... Using This Site | Plain Writing 中文 | Kreyòl | Français | Deutsch | ગુજરાતી | हिंदी | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Polski | ...

  8. Inference for the dark energy equation of state using Type IA supernova data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Christopher; Freeman, Peter; Wasserman, Larry; Nichol, Robert; Miller, Christopher

    The surprising discovery of an accelerating universe led cosmologists to posit the existence of "dark energy" - a mysterious energy field that permeates the universe. Understanding dark energy has become the central problem of modern cosmology. After describing the scientific background in depth, we formulate the task as a nonlinear inverse problem that expresses the comoving distance function in terms of the dark-energy equation of state. We present two classes of methods for making sharp statistical inferences about the equation of state from observations of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe). First, we derive a technique for testing hypotheses about the equation of state that requires no assumptions about its form and can distinguish among competing theories. Second, we present a framework for computing parametric and nonparametric estimators of the equation of state, with an associated assessment of uncertainty. Using our approach, we evaluate the strength of statistical evidence for various competing models of dark energy. Consistent with current studies, we find that with the available Type Ia SNe data, it is not possible to distinguish statistically among popular dark-energy models, and that, in particular, there is no support in the data for rejecting a cosmological constant. With much more supernova data likely to be available in coming years (e.g., from the DOE/NASA Joint Dark Energy Mission), we address the more interesting question of whether future data sets will have sufficient resolution to distinguish among competing theories.

  9. Measurement and analysis of energy flow in Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Taekyung; Jeong, Sangkwon; Seo, Mansu; Park, Inmyong

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of energy flow is a useful method for understanding a system. This paper focuses on the instantaneous measurement of physical conditions and analysis of energy flow in the Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator. For measuring physical conditions of the working fluid such as the mass flow rate, the temperature, and the pressure, several cryogenic sensors are installed in the Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator optimally designed in the operating condition of 60 Hz and 2.5 MPa. The physical conditions of the working fluid in the Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator are carefully measured as varying the operating frequency and the charging pressure. From the measured results, the enthalpy, the PV work, and the loss are quantified in each location of the PTR and the conversion of energy flows is experimentally confirmed. The results of this paper can be used for understanding the optimal operating condition and modifying correlations of various losses in the Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator. KEYWORDS: Energy flow, Loss, Pulse tube refrigerator

  10. Life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission impacts of different corn ethanol plant types.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-04-01

    Since the United States began a program to develop ethanol as a transportation fuel, its use has increased from 175 million gallons in 1980 to 4.9 billion gallons in 2006. Virtually all of the ethanol used for transportation has been produced from corn. During the period of fuel ethanol growth, corn farming productivity has increased dramatically, and energy use in ethanol plants has been reduced by almost by half. The majority of corn ethanol plants are powered by natural gas. However, as natural gas prices have skyrocketed over the last several years, efforts have been made to further reduce the energy used in ethanol plants or to switch from natural gas to other fuels, such as coal and wood chips. In this paper, we examine nine corn ethanol plant types--categorized according to the type of process fuels employed, use of combined heat and power, and production of wet distiller grains and solubles. We found that these ethanol plant types can have distinctly different energy and greenhouse gas emission effects on a full fuel-cycle basis. In particular, greenhouse gas emission impacts can vary significantly--from a 3% increase if coal is the process fuel to a 52% reduction if wood chips are used. Our results show that, in order to achieve energy and greenhouse gas emission benefits, researchers need to closely examine and differentiate among the types of plants used to produce corn ethanol so that corn ethanol production would move towards a more sustainable path.

  11. Final Technical Report: Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Saurabh W. Jha

    2012-10-03

    The final technical report from the project "Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae" led at Rutgers the State University of New Jersey by Prof. Saurabh W. Jha is presented, including all publications resulting from this award.

  12. Energy efficient hopping with Hill-type muscle properties on segmented legs.

    PubMed

    Rosendo, Andre; Iida, Fumiya

    2016-04-12

    The intrinsic muscular properties of biological muscles are the main source of stabilization during locomotion, and superior biological performance is obtained with low energy costs. Man-made actuators struggle to reach the same energy efficiency seen in biological muscles. Here, we compare muscle properties within a one-dimensional and a two-segmented hopping leg. Different force-length-velocity relations (constant, linear, and Hill) were adopted for these two proposed models, and the stable maximum hopping heights from both cases were used to estimate the cost of hopping. We then performed a fine-grained analysis during landing and takeoff of the best performing cases, and concluded that the force-velocity Hill-type model is, at maximum hopping height, the most efficient for both linear and segmented models. While hopping at the same height the force-velocity Hill-type relation outperformed the linear relation as well. Finally, knee angles between 60° and 90° presented a lower energy expenditure than other morphologies for both Hill-type and constant relations during maximum hopping height. This work compares different muscular properties in terms of energy efficiency within different geometries, and these results can be applied to decrease energy costs of current actuators and robots during locomotion.

  13. Membrane-type vibrational energy harvester based on a multi-layered piezoelectric membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Seunghwan; Kim, Jonghun; Park, Suk-in; Jang, Cheol-Yong; Jeong, Hakgeun

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we fabricated a membrane-type vibrational energy harvester by using a conventional micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) method. The membrane-type vibrational energy harvester consists of a multi-layered diaphragm for stable and flexible vibration, a piezoelectric ZnO film for responding to the vibrational energy and for generating electric power, and a vibrator connected to the bottom of multi-layered diaphragm for enhancing the vibrational displacement of the diaphragm. First, we characterized the quality of a ZnO film through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), which showed a preferred c-axis orientation, a hexagonal rod shape and a quite smooth surface. After the membrane-type vibrational energy harvester had been fabricated, we integrated it into a printing circuit board to realize piezoelectric generation and confirm its performance. Finally, under vibrational motion, we obtained a useful output voltage of 400 mV, and we estimated that the energy harvester generated an actual output voltage of about 200 uV.

  14. Perceiving Affordances for Different Motor Skills

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Whitney G.; Chan, Gladys L. Y.; Vereijken, Beatrix; Adolph, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    We examined several factors that affect people’s ability to perceive possibilities for action. In Experiment 1, 24 participants crossed expanses of various sizes in three conditions: leaping, a familiar, launching action system; arm-swinging on monkey bars, an unpracticed skill that uses the arms rather than the legs; and crawling on hands and knees, a disused skill that involves all four limbs. Before and after performing each action, participants gave verbal judgments about the largest gap they could cross. Participants scaled initial judgments to their actual abilities in all three conditions. But they considerably underestimated their abilities for leaping, a launching action, and for arm-swinging when it was performed as a launching action; judgments about crawling, a non-launching action, and arm-swinging when it was performed as a non-launching action were more accurate. Thus, launching actions appear to produce a deficit in perceiving affordances that is not ameliorated by familiarity with the action. However, after performing the actions, participants partially corrected for the deficiency and more accurately judged their abilities for launching actions—suggesting that even brief action experience facilitates the perception of affordances. In Experiment 2, we confirmed that the deficit was due to the launching nature of the leaping and arm-swinging actions in Experiment 1. We asked an additional 12 participants to cross expanses using two non-launching actions using the legs (stepping across an expanse) and the arms (reaching across an expanse). Participants were highly accurate when judging affordances for these actions, supporting launching as the cause of the underestimation reported in Experiment 1. PMID:23411672

  15. Energy Density Associated with the Bianchi Type-II Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogdu, O.; Salti, M.

    2006-01-01

    To calculate the total energy distribution (due to both matter and fields including gravitation) associated with locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type-II space-times. We use the Bergmann-Thomson energy-momentum complex in both general relativity and teleparallel gravity. We find that the energy density in these different gravitation theories is vanishing at all times. This result is the same as that obtained by one of the present authors who solved the problem of finding the energy-momentum in LRS Bianchi type-II by using the energy-momentum complexes of Einstein and Landau and Lifshitz. The results of this paper also are consistent with those given in the previous works of Cooperstock and Israelit, Rosen, Johri et al., Banerjee-Sen, Vargas, and Salti et al. In this paper, we perform the calculations for a non-diagonal expanding space-time to determine whether the Bergmann-Thomson energy momentum prescription is consistent with the other formulations. (We previously considered diagonal and expanding space-time models.) Our result supports the viewpoints of Albrow and Tryon.

  16. Improving assessment of daily energy expenditure by identifying types of physical activity with a single accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, A G; Plasqui, G; Goris, A H C; Westerterp, K R

    2009-09-01

    Accelerometers are often used to quantify the acceleration of the body in arbitrary units (counts) to measure physical activity (PA) and to estimate energy expenditure. The present study investigated whether the identification of types of PA with one accelerometer could improve the estimation of energy expenditure compared with activity counts. Total energy expenditure (TEE) of 15 subjects was measured with the use of double-labeled water. The physical activity level (PAL) was derived by dividing TEE by sleeping metabolic rate. Simultaneously, PA was measured with one accelerometer. Accelerometer output was processed to calculate activity counts per day (AC(D)) and to determine the daily duration of six types of common activities identified with a classification tree model. A daily metabolic value (MET(D)) was calculated as mean of the MET compendium value of each activity type weighed by the daily duration. TEE was predicted by AC(D) and body weight and by AC(D) and fat-free mass, with a standard error of estimate (SEE) of 1.47 MJ/day, and 1.2 MJ/day, respectively. The replacement in these models of AC(D) with MET(D) increased the explained variation in TEE by 9%, decreasing SEE by 0.14 MJ/day and 0.18 MJ/day, respectively. The correlation between PAL and MET(D) (R(2) = 51%) was higher than that between PAL and AC(D) (R(2) = 46%). We conclude that identification of activity types combined with MET intensity values improves the assessment of energy expenditure compared with activity counts. Future studies could develop models to objectively assess activity type and intensity to further increase accuracy of the energy expenditure estimation.

  17. Breastfeeding and the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Summer Sherburne; Dow-Fleisner, Sarah; Noble, Alice

    2015-10-01

    Mothers who receive or qualify for the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program or have lower income are less likely to start and continue breastfeeding than their more advantaged counterparts. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires employers to provide break time and space to express breast milk and requires insurance companies to cover breastfeeding support, supplies, and counseling at no cost to mothers. This ACA benefit does not extend to all Medicaid recipients or women in the WIC program. Legislative and regulatory efforts are needed to provide comprehensive coverage for all women and reduce disparities in breastfeeding.

  18. Technologies for affordable access to space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.; Sadin, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    NASA plans for advanced research and technology programs aimed at reducing operating costs and extending the capability of future space systems are described. The evolution of an almost entirely space-based mode is discussed, including the role of earth launch, servicing, fabrication and assembly and communications. The development of technology for affordable access to space is examined, taking into account progress in the areas of telerobotics, machine autonomy, human autonomy, space-based manufacturing and construction, electric power, and space-based propulsion.

  19. 12 CFR 1807.402 - Affordable housing-homeownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Affordable housing-homeownership. 1807.402... TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.402 Affordable housing—homeownership. (a) Acquisition with or without rehabilitation. Housing that is for Homeownership purchase...

  20. 12 CFR 1291.12 - Affordable Housing Reserve Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Affordable Housing Reserve Fund. 1291.12 Section 1291.12 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY HOUSING GOALS AND MISSION FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS' AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAM § 1291.12 Affordable Housing Reserve Fund. (a) Deposits. If...

  1. 12 CFR 1291.12 - Affordable Housing Reserve Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Affordable Housing Reserve Fund. 1291.12 Section 1291.12 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY HOUSING GOALS AND MISSION FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS' AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAM § 1291.12 Affordable Housing Reserve Fund. (a) Deposits. If...

  2. 12 CFR 1807.402 - Affordable housing-homeownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Affordable housing-homeownership. 1807.402... TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.402 Affordable housing—homeownership. (a) Acquisition with or without rehabilitation. Housing that is for Homeownership purchase...

  3. 12 CFR 1291.12 - Affordable Housing Reserve Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Affordable Housing Reserve Fund. 1291.12 Section 1291.12 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY HOUSING GOALS AND MISSION FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS' AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAM § 1291.12 Affordable Housing Reserve Fund. (a) Deposits. If...

  4. 12 CFR 1807.402 - Affordable housing-homeownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Affordable housing-homeownership. 1807.402... TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.402 Affordable housing—homeownership. (a) Acquisition with or without rehabilitation. Housing that is for Homeownership purchase...

  5. 12 CFR 1291.12 - Affordable Housing Reserve Fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Affordable Housing Reserve Fund. 1291.12 Section 1291.12 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY HOUSING GOALS AND MISSION FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS' AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAM § 1291.12 Affordable Housing Reserve Fund. (a) Deposits. If...

  6. 12 CFR 1807.400 - Affordable housing-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Affordable housing-general. 1807.400 Section 1807.400 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.400 Affordable...

  7. 12 CFR 1807.402 - Affordable housing-homeownership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Affordable housing-homeownership. 1807.402 Section 1807.402 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL MAGNET FUND Qualification as Affordable Housing § 1807.402 Affordable...

  8. Affordable access to care for the undocumented.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    How do you tell a sick kid that nobody cares if he gets better? That's an exaggeration, of course, but it is the fundamental message our society sends when we tell him that, because he and his family are undocumented immigrants, we are unwilling to extend them access to affordable and reliable health insurance. One major shortcoming of the Affordable Care Act is its specific exclusion of the almost twelve million undocumented immigrants-including millions of children-in this country from access to the state and federal insurance exchanges where coverage can be purchased. It is true that providing undocumented immigrants access to the exchanges and subsidies mandated by the ACA would require additional funding. However, a recent analysis in California has found that the costs of expanding state-supported care to include undocumented immigrants would largely be offset by the increased state sales tax revenue paid by managed care organizations and by reduced spending at the county level on emergency-room and hospital care of the uninsured.

  9. Spatial compatibility and affordance compatibility in patients with chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kume, Yu; Sato, Fumiyasu; Hiraoka, Yuya; Suzuki, Shingo; Niyama, Yoshitsugu

    2016-12-01

    A deterioration in information-processing performance is commonly recognized in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Although the enhancement of cognitive skills in patients with schizophrenia is important, the types of external stimuli that influence performance have not received much attention. The aim of present study was to clarify the effects of spatial and affordance compatibility in patients with schizophrenia, compared with those in healthy people. The subjects (25 patients with schizophrenia and 25 healthy controls) participated in two experiment examining the effects of the spatial location of stimuli and the action-relevance of objects. The results showed that the effect of spatial compatibility was similar in both the patients and the controls, whereas the influence of action-relevant objects was not highlighted in either patients with chronic schizophrenia or healthy controls. These findings provide important evidence of a normal spatial compatibility effect in patients with chronic schizophrenia. However, further research examining the affordance compatibility effect is needed, taking into consideration the symptomatology and the severity of the social functioning level in patients with schizophrenia.

  10. Strategies for energy benchmarking in cleanrooms and laboratory-type facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sartor, Dale; Piette, Mary Ann; Tschudi, William; Fok, Stephen

    2000-06-01

    Buildings with cleanrooms and laboratories are growing in terms of total floor area and energy intensity. This building type is common in institutions such as universities and in many industries such as microelectronics and biotechnology. These buildings, with high ventilation rates and special environmental considerations, consume from 4 to 100 times more energy per square foot than conventional commercial buildings. Owners and operators of such facilities know they are expensive to operate, but have little way of knowing if their facilities are efficient or inefficient. A simple comparison of energy consumption per square foot is of little value. A growing interest in benchmarking is also fueled by: A new U.S. Executive Order removing the exemption of federal laboratories from energy efficiency goals, setting a 25% savings target, and calling for baseline guidance to measure progress; A new U.S. EPA and U.S. DOE initiative, Laboratories for the 21st Century, establishing voluntary performance goals and criteria for recognition; and A new PG and E market transformation program to improve energy efficiency in high tech facilities, including a cleanroom energy use benchmarking project. This paper identifies the unique issues associated with benchmarking energy use in high-tech facilities. Specific options discussed include statistical comparisons, point-based rating systems, model-based techniques, and hierarchical end-use and performance-metrics evaluations.

  11. Free Energy-Based Conformational Search Algorithm Using the Movable Type Sampling Method.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li-Li; Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Ting; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-12-08

    In this article, we extend the movable type (MT) sampling method to molecular conformational searches (MT-CS) on the free energy surface of the molecule in question. Differing from traditional systematic and stochastic searching algorithms, this method uses Boltzmann energy information to facilitate the selection of the best conformations. The generated ensembles provided good coverage of the available conformational space including available crystal structures. Furthermore, our approach directly provides the solvation free energies and the relative gas and aqueous phase free energies for all generated conformers. The method is validated by a thorough analysis of thrombin ligands as well as against structures extracted from both the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). An in-depth comparison between OMEGA and MT-CS is presented to illustrate the differences between the two conformational searching strategies, i.e., energy-based versus free energy-based searching. These studies demonstrate that our MT-based ligand conformational search algorithm is a powerful approach to delineate the conformational ensembles of molecular species on free energy surfaces.

  12. Bianchi Type-I Anisotropic Dark Energy Model with Constant Deceleration Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anirudh; Amirhashchi, H.; Saha, Bijan

    2011-09-01

    A new dark energy model in anisotropic Bianchi type-I (B-I) space-time with time dependent equation of state (EoS) parameter and constant deceleration parameter has been investigated in the present paper. The Einstein's field equations have been solved by applying a variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter (Berman in Il Nuovo Cimento B 74:182, 1983) which generates two types of solutions, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential form. The existing range of the dark energy EoS parameter ω for derived model is found to be in good agreement with the three recent observations (i) SNe Ia data (Knop et al. in Astrophys. J. 598:102, 2003), (ii) SNe Ia data collaborated with CMBR anisotropy and galaxy clustering statistics (Tegmark et al. in Astrophys. J. 606:702, 2004) and (iii) a combination of cosmological datasets coming from CMB anisotropies, luminosity distances of high redshift type Ia supernovae and galaxy clustering (Hinshaw et al. in Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 180:225, 2009 and Komatsu et al. in Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 180:330, 2009). The cosmological constant Λ is found to be a decreasing function of time and it approaches a small positive value at the present epoch which is corroborated by results from recent supernovae Ia observations. It has also been suggested that the dark energy that explains the observed accelerating universe may arise due to the contribution to the vacuum energy of the EoS in a time dependent background. Geometric and kinematic properties of the model and the behaviour of the anisotropy of the dark energy have been carried out.

  13. Porous nanoarchitectures of spinel-type transition metal oxides for electrochemical energy storage systems.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Jeonghun; Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Jong-Won; Kim, Jung Ho; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2015-12-14

    Transition metal oxides possessing two kinds of metals (denoted as AxB3-xO4, which is generally defined as a spinel structure; A, B = Co, Ni, Zn, Mn, Fe, etc.), with stoichiometric or even non-stoichiometric compositions, have recently attracted great interest in electrochemical energy storage systems (ESSs). The spinel-type transition metal oxides exhibit outstanding electrochemical activity and stability, and thus, they can play a key role in realising cost-effective and environmentally friendly ESSs. Moreover, porous nanoarchitectures can offer a large number of electrochemically active sites and, at the same time, facilitate transport of charge carriers (electrons and ions) during energy storage reactions. In the design of spinel-type transition metal oxides for energy storage applications, therefore, nanostructural engineering is one of the most essential approaches to achieving high electrochemical performance in ESSs. In this perspective, we introduce spinel-type transition metal oxides with various transition metals and present recent research advances in material design of spinel-type transition metal oxides with tunable architectures (shape, porosity, and size) and compositions on the micro- and nano-scale. Furthermore, their technological applications as electrode materials for next-generation ESSs, including metal-air batteries, lithium-ion batteries, and supercapacitors, are discussed.

  14. [Endocavitary ablation for arrhythmias. New modalities of radiofrequency applications. New energy types].

    PubMed

    Cauchemez, B; Lavergne, Th; Extramiana, F; Siliste, C; Leenhardt, A; Coumel, Ph

    2002-04-01

    Radiofrequency remains the reference energy type for catheter ablation of rhythm disorders. In the classic indications, which are atrial flutter or tachycardia, nodal re-entry and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, this energy source has the best cost-efficiency-safety ratio, subject to strict conditions of use. Some new modalities of application have further improved performance, especially active irrigation of the electrode which allows induction of deeper lesions which is very useful for the ablation of difficult atrial flutters, epicardial fascicles of Kent and ischaemic ventricular tachycardias. The only emerging alternative energy type, in the framework of classical ablation, is cold, for which the principal advantages are the homogenous and slightly thrombogenic character for the lesion involved, and the possibility of reversible applications tests which are especially useful in the ablation of structures at risk. The situation is more open-ended concerning research on ablation for atrial fibrillation or the so-called new energy types, such as ultrasound and laser, whilst recognising a renewal in interest, especially for circumferential ablation of the pulmonary veins to isolate the ectopic venous foci. Mechanical energy such as luminous energy is emitted across a catheter balloon deployed at the orifice of the vein, perpendicular to its axis, aiming to reach a continuous circumferential lesion with a minimum of applications. Equally radiofrequency has been undergoing significant evolution for this application, such as by the development of porous catheter balloons with a liquid electrode, as well as by the development of deployable circumferential catheters. Ablation is use for atrial fibrillation, by endocavity atrial segmentation remains a field of research in which radiofrequency retains an important place. It is delivered via multi-electrode catheters according to the new application modalities, either pulsed or by phase interval, which secure better

  15. Energy Expenditure and Enjoyment during Video Game Play: Differences by Game Type

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Tate, Deborah F.; Ward, Dianne S.; Bowling, J. Michael; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Kalyararaman, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Play of physically active video games may be a way to increase physical activity and/or decrease sedentary behavior, but games are not universally active or enjoyable. Active games may differ from traditional games on important attributes, which may affect frequency and intensity of play. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in energy expenditure and enjoyment across four game types: shooter (played with traditional controllers), band simulation (guitar or drum controller), dance simulation (dance mat controller), and fitness (balance board controller). Methods Energy expenditure (metabolic equivalents [METs]) and enjoyment were measured across ten games in 100 young adults aged 18 to 35 (50 females). Results All games except shooter games significantly increased energy expenditure over rest (P < .001). Fitness and dance games increased energy expenditure by 322 (mean [SD] 3.10 [0.89] METs) and 298 (2.91 [0.87] METs) percent, which was greater than that produced by band simulation (73%, 1.28 [0.28] METs) and shooter games (23%, 0.91 [0.16] METs). However, enjoyment was higher in band simulation games than in other types (P < .001). Body mass-corrected energy expenditure was greater in normal weight than overweight participants in the two most active game types (P < .001). Conclusions Active video games can significantly increase energy expended during screen time, but these games are less enjoyable than other more sedentary games, suggesting that they may be less likely to be played over time. Less active but more enjoyable video games may be a promising method for decreasing sedentary behavior. PMID:21364477

  16. Stress fields and energy of disclination-type defects in zones of localized elastic distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, Ivan I.; Tyumentsev, Alexander N.; Ditenberg, Ivan A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper studies theoretically the elastically deformed state and analyzes deformation mechanisms in nanocrystals in the zones of localized elastic distortions and related disclination-type defects, such as dipole, quadrupole and multipole of partial disclinations. Significant differences in the energies of quadrupole and multipole configurations in comparison with nanodipole are revealed. The mechanism of deformation localization in the field of elastic distortions is proposed, which is a quasi-periodic sequence of formation and relaxation of various disclination ensembles with a periodic change in the energy of the defect.

  17. Efficient Solar Concentrators: Affordable Energy from Water and Sunlight

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Teledyne is developing a liquid prism panel that tracks the position of the sun to help efficiently concentrate its light onto a solar cell to produce power. Typically, solar tracking devices have bulky and expensive mechanical moving parts that require a lot of power and are often unreliable. Teledyne’s liquid prism panel has no bulky and heavy supporting parts—instead it relies on electrowetting. Electrowetting is a process where an electric field is applied to the liquid to control the angle at which it meets the sunlight above and to control the angle of the sunlight to the focusing lensthe more direct the angle to the focusing lens, the more efficiently the light can be concentrated to solar panels and converted into electricity. This allows the prism to be tuned like a radio to track the sun across the sky and steer sunlight into the solar cell without any moving mechanical parts. This process uses very little power and requires no expensive supporting hardware or moving parts, enabling efficient and quiet rooftop operation for integration into buildings.

  18. Social affordances and the possibility of ecological linguistics.

    PubMed

    Kono, Tetsuya

    2009-12-01

    This paper includes an effort to extend the notion of affordance from a philosophical point of view the importance of ecological approach for social psychology, ethics, and linguistics. Affordances are not always merely physical but also interpersonal and social. I will conceptualize affordance in general and social affordance in particular, and will elucidate the relation between intentional action and affordances, and that between affordances and free will. I will also focus on the relation between social institution and affordance. An extended theory of affordances can provide a way to analyze in concrete ways how social institution works as an implicit background of interpersonal interactions. Ecological approach considers social institution as the producer and maintainer of affordances. Social institutions construct the niches for human beings. Finally, I will argue the possibility of the ecological linguistics. Language is a social institution. The system of signs is the way to articulate and differentiate interpersonal affordances. Language acquires its meaning, i.e. communicative power in the interpersonal interactions, and interpersonal interactions, in turn, develop and are elaborated through the usage of signs. Communication is seen as never aimed to transmit inner ideas to others, but to guide and adjust the behaviors of others thorough articulating the affordance of responsible-ness.

  19. Piecing Together the College Affordability Puzzle: Student Characteristics and Patterns of (Un)Affordability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welbeck, Rashida; Diamond, John; Mayer, Alexander; Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn

    2014-01-01

    The cost of attending college has risen sharply over the last 40 years. Although more credit and grant aid have been made available to students, there are still major gaps between aid and the cost of attendance for many students in the United States, all of whom are left to figure out whether they can afford the remaining costs associated with…

  20. All-Elastomer-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator as a Keyboard Cover To Harvest Typing Energy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengming; Peng, Wenbo; Wang, Jie; Lin, Long; Zi, Yunlong; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-08-23

    The drastic expansion of consumer electronics (like personal computers, touch pads, smart phones, etc.) creates many human-machine interfaces and multiple types of interactions between human and electronics. Considering the high frequency of such operations in our daily life, an extraordinary amount of biomechanical energy from typing or pressing buttons is available. In this study, we have demonstrated a highly flexible triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) solely made from elastomeric materials as a cover on a conventional keyboard to harvest biomechanical energy from typing. A dual-mode working mechanism is established with a high transferred charge density of ∼140 μC/m(2) due to both structural and material innovations. We have also carried out fundamental investigations of its performance dependence on various structural factors for optimizing the electric output in practice. The fully packaged keyboard-shaped TENG is further integrated with a horn-like polypyrrole-based supercapacitor as a self-powered system. Typing in normal speed for 1 h, ∼8 × 10(-4) J electricity could be stored, which is capable of driving an electronic thermometer/hydrometer. Our keyboard cover also performs outstanding long-term stability, water resistance, as well as insensitivity to surface conditions, and the last feature makes it useful to research the typing behaviors of different people.

  1. Comparative characteristics of electron energy spectrum in PIG and arc type discharge plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanyuk, L. I.; Suavilnyy, N. Y.

    1978-01-01

    The electron distribution functions relative to the velocity component directed along the magnetic field are compared for PIG and arc type discharges. The identity of these functions for the plasma region pierced by the primary electron beam and their difference in the peripheral part of the discharge are shown. It is concluded that the electron distribution function in the PIG type discharge is formed during one transit of the primary electron through the discharge gap. The mechanisms of electron energy spectrum formation in both the axis region and the peripheral region of the discharge are discussed.

  2. NASA's Space Launch System: Affordability for Sustainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Todd A.; Creech, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center, is charged with delivering a new capability for human exploration beyond Earth orbit in an austere economic climate. But the SLS value is clear and codified in United States (U.S.) budget law. The SLS Program knows that affordability is the key to sustainability and will provide an overview of initiatives designed to fit within the funding guidelines by using existing engine assets and hardware now in testing to meet a first launch by 2017 within the projected budget. It also has a long-range plan to keep the budget flat, yet evolve the 70-tonne (t) initial lift capability to 130-t lift capability after the first two flights. To achieve the evolved configuration, advanced technologies must offer appropriate return on investment to be selected through the competitive process. For context, the SLS will be larger than the Saturn V that took 12 men on 6 trips for a total of 11 days on the lunar surface some 40 years ago. Astronauts train for long-duration voyages on platforms such as the International Space Station, but have not had transportation to go beyond Earth orbit in modern times, until now. To arrive at the launch vehicle concept, the SLS Program conducted internal engineering and business studies that have been externally validated by industry and reviewed by independent assessment panels. In parallel with SLS concept studies, NASA is now refining its mission manifest, guided by U.S. space policy and the Global Exploration Roadmap, which reflects the mutual goals of a dozen member nations. This mission planning will converge with a flexible heavy-lift rocket that can carry international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they need for extended trips to asteroids and Mars. In addition, the SLS capability will accommodate very large science instruments and other payloads, using a series of modular fairings and

  3. Phased array ultrasonic processing for enhanced and affordable diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, N.; Rougeron, G.; Leberre, S.; Pautel, R.

    2013-01-01

    Phased array ultrasonic reconstruction techniques are often presented as a prospect for better and enhanced diagnosis. However to date few applications of these techniques can be found in the industry, partly because of questions on sizing but also because they often require heavy acquisitions. A way forward is then to propose techniques requiring less intensive data acquisition to make them broadly affordable in practice. Several approaches ranging from full matrix capture to paintbrush acquisitions are presented in this paper in combination with associated reconstruction processing like the Total Focusing Method (TFM) and the Time Domain Topological Energy (TDTE) techniques. Emphasis is given to their relative relevancies and practical applicability on typical configurations of interest for industries. The paper also presents recent efforts made on the acceleration of processing computation times, in particular through the use of GPU architectures.

  4. The association between different types of exercise and energy expenditure in young nonoverweight and overweight adults

    PubMed Central

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Hand, Gregory A.; Shook, Robin P.; Jakicic, John M.; Hebert, James R.; Burgess, Stephanie; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    With decades of trends for decreasing activity during work and travel, exercise becomes an important contributor to total physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of different types of exercise to the variability in energy expenditure and time spent at different PA intensities in young adults. Four hundred and seventeen adults (49.9% male; 46.2 overweight/obese) between 21 and 36 years of age provided valid objective PA and energy expenditure data, assessed via the SenseWear Armband (BodyMedia Inc.). Frequency and duration of participation in various exercise types was self-reported. Weight status was based on body mass index (BMI) (kg/m2) with body weight and height being measured according to standard procedures. Eighty-four percent of the participants reported regular exercise engagement with no difference in participation rate by sex or BMI category. Exercise time along with sex and ethnicity explained roughly 60% of the variability in total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) while the association between exercise and time spent in moderate to vigorous PA or being sedentary was low or nonsignificant. Engagement in endurance exercise and sports contributed predominantly to the variability in energy expenditure and PA in nonoverweight participants. In overweight/obese participants engagement in resistance exercise and swimming contributed significantly to variability in TDEE. Current exercise recommendations focus primarily on aerobic exercise, but results of the present study suggest that nonweight-bearing exercises, such as resistance exercise and swimming, contribute significantly to the variability in TDEE in overweight/obese adults, which would make these types of activities viable options for exercise interventions. PMID:25647557

  5. Affordable Laser Communication in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Constance E.; Sparks, R.; Pompea, S.

    2006-12-01

    Several companies sell systems that illustrate laser communication such as Arbor Scientific1. These systems can be too expensive for classroom use. We will demonstrate a technique to modulate a standard diode laser using a microphone or other sound source that is capable of transmitting voice and music. This affordable system can transmit over 350 feet using simple, inexpensive parts readily available at your local electronics store. We will provide a list of parts necessary for assembly, detailed assembly instructions, as well as some suggested investigations using the laser communication system. This system can be used in the classroom either as a demonstration or hands-on activity to explore the physics and technology involved, citing more sophisticated laser communication systems on board spacecraft such as the Mercury Messenger Mission and the Mars Telecommunications Orbiter. 1http://www.arborsci.com

  6. Affordable Care Act and Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qian; Nellans, Frank P; Shi, Lizheng

    2015-12-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has the potential for great impact on U.S. health care, especially for chronic disease patients requiring long-term care and management. The act was designed to improve insurance coverage, health care access, and quality of care for all Americans, which will assist patients with diabetes mellitus in acquiring routine monitoring and diabetes-related complication screening for better health management and outcomes. There is great potential for patients with diabetes to benefit from the new policy mandating health insurance coverage and plan improvement, Medicaid expansion, minimum coverage guarantees, and free preventative care. However, policy variability among states and ACA implementation present challenges to people with diabetes in understanding and optimizing ACA impact. This paper aims to select the most influential components of the ACA as relates to people with diabetes and discuss how the ACA may improve health care for this vulnerable population.

  7. Why epidemiologists cannot afford to ignore poverty.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Nancy

    2007-11-01

    Epidemiologists cannot afford to ignore poverty. To do so would, first, wrongly obscure the devastating impact of poverty on population health, and, second, undercut our commitment to scientific rigor. At issue is doing correct science, not "politically correct" science. Blot poverty and inequity from view, and not only will we contribute to making suffering invisible but our understanding of disease etiology and distribution will be marred. To make this case, I address current debates about the causal relationships between poverty and health, and provide examples of how failing to consider the impact of socioeconomic position has biased epidemiologic knowledge and harmed the public's health. By definition, the people we study are simultaneously social beings and biologic organisms-and we cannot study the latter without taking into account the former. It is the responsibility of all epidemiologists, and not only social epidemiologists, to keep in mind the connections between poverty and health.

  8. Similarity dark energy models in Bianchi type-I space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmad T.; Kumar Yadav, Anil; Alzahrani, Abdulah K.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate some new similarity inhomogeneous solutions of anisotropic dark energy and perfect fluid in Bianchi type-I space-time. Three different equation-of-state (EoS) parameters along the spatial directions are introduced to quantify the deviation of pressure from isotropy. We consider the case when the dark energy is minimally coupled to the perfect fluid as well as the direct interaction with it. The Lie symmetry generators that leave the equation invariant are identified and we generate an optimal system of one-dimensional sub-algebras. Each element of the optimal system is used to reduce the partial differential equation to an ordinary differential equation which is further analyzed. We solve the Einstein field equations, described by a system of non-linear partial differential equations (NLPDEs), by using the Lie point symmetry analysis method. The geometrical and kinematic features of the models and the behavior of the anisotropy of dark energy are examined in detail.

  9. The Type II NADPH Dehydrogenase Facilitates Cyclic Electron Flow, Energy-Dependent Quenching, and Chlororespiratory Metabolism during Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to Nitrogen Deprivation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    When photosynthetic organisms are deprived of nitrogen (N), the capacity to grow and assimilate carbon becomes limited, causing a decrease in the productive use of absorbed light energy and likely a rise in the cellular reduction state. Although there is a scarcity of N in many terrestrial and aquatic environments, a mechanistic understanding of how photosynthesis adjusts to low-N conditions and the enzymes/activities integral to these adjustments have not been described. In this work, we use biochemical and biophysical analyses of photoautotrophically grown wild-type and mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to determine the integration of electron transport pathways critical for maintaining active photosynthetic complexes even after exposure of cells to N deprivation for 3 d. Key to acclimation is the type II NADPH dehydrogenase, NDA2, which drives cyclic electron flow (CEF), chlororespiration, and the generation of an H+ gradient across the thylakoid membranes. N deprivation elicited a doubling of the rate of NDA2-dependent CEF, with little contribution from PGR5/PGRL1-dependent CEF. The H+ gradient generated by CEF is essential to sustain nonphotochemical quenching, while an increase in the level of reduced plastoquinone would promote a state transition; both are necessary to down-regulate photosystem II activity. Moreover, stimulation of NDA2-dependent chlororespiration affords additional relief from the elevated reduction state associated with N deprivation through plastid terminal oxidase-dependent water synthesis. Overall, rerouting electrons through the NDA2 catalytic hub in response to photoautotrophic N deprivation sustains cell viability while promoting the dissipation of excess excitation energy through quenching and chlororespiratory processes. PMID:26858365

  10. Macro creatine kinase: determination and differentiation of two types by their activation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, W.; Bohner, J.; Steinhart, R.; Eggstein, M.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase in patients with acute myocardial infarction may be disturbed by the presence of macro creatine kinase. The relative molecular mass of this form of creatine kinase in human serum is at least threefold that of the ordinary enzyme, and it is more thermostable. Here we describe our method for determination of macro creatine kinases and an easy-to-perform test for differentiating two forms of macro creatine kinase, based on their distinct activation energies. The activation energies of serum enzymes are mostly in the range of 40-65 kJ/mol of substrate. Unlike normal cytoplasmatic creatine kinases and IgG-linked CK-BB (macro creatine kinase type 1) a second form of macro creatine kinase (macro creatine kinase type 2) shows activation energies greater than 80 kJ/mol of substrate. The exact composition of macro creatine kinase type 2 is still unknown, but there is good reason to believe that it is of mitochondrial origin.

  11. Energy cost of intracellular metal and metalloid detoxification in wild-type eukaryotic phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Michel; Raven, John A; Jones, Oliver A H; Qian, Haifeng

    2016-10-01

    Microalgae use various cellular mechanisms to detoxify both non-essential and excess essential metals or metalloids. There exists however, a threshold in intracellular metal(loid) concentrations beyond which detoxification mechanisms are no longer effective and inhibition of cell division inevitably occurs. It is therefore important to determine whether the availability of energy in the cell could constrain metal(loid) detoxification capacity and to better define the thresholds beyond which a metal(loid) becomes toxic. To do this we performed the first extensive bioenergetics analysis of intracellular metal(loid) detoxification mechanisms (e.g., metal-binding peptides, polyphosphate granules, metal efflux, metal and metalloid reduction, metalloid methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants) in wild-type eukaryotic phytoplankton based on the biochemical mechanisms of each detoxification strategy and on experimental measurements of detoxifying biomolecules in the literature. The results show that at the onset of metal(loid) toxicity to growth, all the detoxification strategies considered required only a small fraction of the total cellular energy available for growth indicating that intracellular detoxification ability in wild-type eukaryotic phytoplankton species is not constrained by the availability of cellular energy. The present study brings new insights into metal(loid) toxicity mechanisms and detoxification strategies in wild-type eukaryotic phytoplankton.

  12. Energy-efficiency comparison of advanced ammonia heat-exchanger types

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.; Rabas, T.

    1990-01-01

    Ammonia is the most cost-effective working fluid for many Rankine power cycles and is widely utilized in industrial refrigeration applications. For example, it was selected as the most advantageous working fluid for the comprehensive closed-cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion investigations where the heat source and sink are the warm, surface seawater and the cold, deep seawater, respectively. An essential part of this investigation was to measure the performance of many advanced heat-exchanger types using ammonia as the working fluid and to compare these results with those for conventional shell-and-tube designs. This paper presents an overview of these experiments and their potential significance for improved energy efficiency for industrial refrigeration applications. The heat exchangers used for industrial refrigeration systems account for about 50% of the equipment cost. However, current practice is to use state-of-the-art designs -- the shell-and-tube type without enhanced tubes. Substantial energy savings are possible through the use of advanced ammonia evaporator and condenser heat-exchanger types. 31 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Superflare occurrence and energies on G-, K-, and M-type dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Candelaresi, S.; Hillier, A.; Maehara, H.; Shibata, K.; Brandenburg, A.

    2014-09-01

    Kepler data from G-, K-, and M-type stars are used to study conditions that lead to superflares with energies above 10{sup 34} erg. From the 117,661 stars included, 380 show superflares with a total of 1690 such events. We study whether parameters, like effective temperature or rotation rate, have any effect on the superflare occurrence rate or energy. With increasing effective temperature we observe a decrease in the superflare rate, which is analogous to the previous findings of a decrease in dynamo activity with increasing effective temperature. For slowly rotating stars, we find a quadratic increase of the mean occurrence rate with the rotation rate up to a critical point, after which the rate decreases linearly. Motivated by standard dynamo theory, we study the behavior of the relative starspot coverage, approximated as the relative brightness variation. For faster rotating stars, an increased fraction of stars shows higher spot coverage, which leads to higher superflare rates. A turbulent dynamo is used to study the dependence of the Ohmic dissipation as a proxy of the flare energy on the differential rotation or shear rate. The resulting statistics of the dissipation energy as a function of dynamo number is similar to the observed flare statistics as a function of the inverse Rossby number and shows similarly strong fluctuations. This supports the idea that superflares might well be possible for solar-type G stars.

  14. Utilizing Fission Technology to Enable Rapid and Affordable Access to any Point in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; Bonometti, Joe; Morton, Jeff; Hrbud, Ivana; Bitteker, Leo; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, T.; Pedersen, K.; Dobson, C.; Patton, B.; Martin, J.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2000-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. Potential fission-based transportation options include bimodal nuclear thermal rockets, high specific energy propulsion systems, and pulsed fission propulsion systems. In-space propellant re-supply enhances the effective performance of all systems, but requires significant infrastructure development. Safe, timely, affordable utilization of first-generation space fission propulsion systems will enable the development of more advanced systems. First generation systems can build on over 45 years of US and international space fission system technology development to minimize cost.

  15. Respective capabilities of affordable Coronagraphs and Interferometers searching for Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, Alain M.

    2015-12-01

    We describe an analytic model to estimate the capabilities of space missions dedicated to the search for biosignatures in the atmosphere of rocky planets located in the Habitable Zone of nearby stars. Relations between performance and parameters such as mirror diameter, distance to target, stellar properties, are obtained.Two types of instruments are considered: Coronagraphs observing in the visible, and Nulling Interferometers observing in the thermal infrared. Missions considered as affordable are single-pupil coronagraphs with a 2.4 m primary mirror, and formation flying interferometers with 4 x 0.75 m collecting mirrors with baselines ranging from a few decameters to a few hectometers.The numbers of accessible planets are calculated as a function of ηearth, the mean number of Earth analogues and super-Earths in stellar Habitable Zones.Based on current estimates, ηearth=10% around FGK stars and 20% around M stars, the built-in coronagraph and starshade could study only ~2.0 relevant planets, and the interferometer ~14. These numbers are obtained under the major assumption that the exozodiacal light around the target stars is not an issue for any of these instruments.For the coronagraphs, our estimates are in agreement with the values recently published by Stark et al. (2014), but these authors did not consider the case of interferometers.For the long-term future, building both types of spectroscopic instruments, and using them on the same targets, will be the optimal solution because they provide complementary information. But as a first affordable space mission, the interferometer looks the more promising in term of biosignature harvest.

  16. The potential of modified type 310 stainless steel for advanced fossil energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1992-03-01

    An evaluation was undertaken to determine the potential of modified type 310 stainless steel for fossil energy applications. First, alloy performance criteria for components in several emerging technologies were identified. Then, a brief review of existing alloy technology was undertaken relative to performance criteria. Key issues were the tendency for type 310 stainless steel to embrittle due to the formation of intermetallic phases, the poor resistance of type 310 stainless steel to highly sulfidizing environments, the need to examine the strength and ductility of weldments, and the lack of a long-time data base and criteria for setting allowable stress at temperatures in excess of 800{degrees}C. An activity was outlined that would address several of the key issues.

  17. Polyimide Based Nanocomposites for Affordable Space Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Derrick; Islam, Mohsina; Small, Sharee; Aldridge, Brandon; Campbell, Sandra G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In setting forth its strategic plan, NASA has indicated that low-cost access to space is the key to unleashing the commercial potential of space and greatly expanding space research and exploration. The development of advanced materials will be an enabling technology for this quest for low-cost space access. In this research program, we are attempting to address the need for new advanced materials by developing high-performance nanodispersed inorganic/organic and organic/organic polyimide composites utilizing specific interactions. Our goal is to systematically manipulate these interactions and investigate the resulting processing morphology-property relationships. Specifically, we will investigate three main parameters on these relationships. These include (1) the type of polyimide; (2) the structure of the inorganic nanoparticle being used; and (3) manipulation of the interfacial energy. During the first year of this effort, we have demonstrated the successful synthesis of PMR-15/layered silicate nanocomposites. Morphological studies indicate that exfoliated structures were obtained in most instances, with a mixture of exfoliated and intercalated structures being observed also. Significant enhancements of the onset of decomposition were obtained by varying the strength of the interaction between the nanoparticle and the polymer. Varying the amount of a specific nanoparticle also affected the decomposition temperatures. A slight catalytic effect of the nanoparticles on both the imidization and crosslinking reaction has been observed and will be presented. In addition, incorporation of the nanoparticles was found to increase the glass transition temperature and slightly broaden the breadth of this relaxation.

  18. Dynamical structure of solar radio burst type III as evidence of energy of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Zety Sharizat Binti

    2013-11-01

    Observations of low frequency solar type III radio bursts associated with the ejection of plasma oscillations localized disturbance is due to excitation atoms in the plasma frequency incoherent radiations play a dominant role at the meter and decimeter wavelengths. Here, we report the results of the dynamical structure of solar flare type III that occurred on 9th March 2012 at National Space Centre, Sg Lang, Selangor, Malaysia by using the CALLISTO system. These bursts are associated with solar flare type M6 which suddenly ejected in the active region AR 1429 starting at 03:32 UT and ending at 05:00 UT with the peak at 04:12 UT. The observation showed an initial strong burst occurred due to strong signal at the beginning of the phase. We also found that both solar burst and flares tend to be a numerous on the same day and probability of chance coincidence is high. It is clearly seen that an impulsive lace burst was detected at 4:24 UT and it is more plausible that the energies are confined to the top of the loop when we compared with X-ray results. Associated with this event was type II with velocities 1285 km/s and type IV radio sweeps along with a full halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) first seen in SOHO/LASCO C2 imagery at 09/0426 Z. We concluded that the significance of study solar burst type III lies in the fact that the emission at decimetric wavelength comes from the role of magnetic field in active region that may provide the key to the energy release mechanism in a flare.

  19. Student Engagement and Affordances for Interaction with Diverse Peers: A Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Kimberly; Glass, Chris R.; Lynch, R. Jason

    2016-01-01

    This study utilized a network model in order to explore the relationship between patterns of student engagement and affordances for interaction with diverse peers for 12,852 students at 7 universities. The institutions are similar in type and size, with relatively moderate levels of structural racial diversity, and a range of overall…

  20. Microcalorimeter-type energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Keiichi; Maehata, Keisuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ohsaki, Mitsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Yu, Xiuzhen; Ito, Takuji; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    A new energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) with a microcalorimeter detector equipped with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been developed for high- accuracy compositional analysis in the nanoscale. A superconducting transition-edge-sensor-type microcalorimeter is applied as the detector. A cryogen-free cooling system, which consists of a mechanical and a dilution refrigerator, is selected to achieve long-term temperature stability. In order to mount these detector and refrigerators on a TEM, the cooling system is specially designed such that these two refrigerators are separated. Also, the detector position and arrangement are carefully designed to avoid adverse affects between the superconductor detector and the TEM lens system. Using the developed EDS system, at present, an energy resolution of 21.92 eV full-width-at-half maximum has been achieved at the Cr K alpha line. This value is about seven times better than that of the current typical commercial Si(Li) detector, which is usually around 140 eV. The developed microcalorimeter EDS system can measure a wide energy range, 1-20 keV, at one time with this high energy resolution that can resolve peaks from most of the elements. Although several further developments will be needed to enable practical use, highly accurate compositional analysis with high energy resolution will be realized by this microcalorimeter EDS system.

  1. 41 CFR 102-73.185 - What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 102-73.185 What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease? The Department of... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease? 102-73.185 Section 102-73.185 Public Contracts...

  2. 41 CFR 102-73.185 - What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 102-73.185 What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease? The Department of... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease? 102-73.185 Section 102-73.185 Public Contracts...

  3. 41 CFR 102-73.185 - What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 102-73.185 What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease? The Department of... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease? 102-73.185 Section 102-73.185 Public Contracts...

  4. 41 CFR 102-73.185 - What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 102-73.185 What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease? The Department of... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease? 102-73.185 Section 102-73.185 Public Contracts...

  5. 41 CFR 102-73.185 - What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 102-73.185 What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease? The Department of... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What types of special purpose space may the Department of Energy lease? 102-73.185 Section 102-73.185 Public Contracts...

  6. Estimating food portions. Influence of unit number, meal type and energy density.

    PubMed

    Almiron-Roig, Eva; Solis-Trapala, Ivonne; Dodd, Jessica; Jebb, Susan A

    2013-12-01

    Estimating how much is appropriate to consume can be difficult, especially for foods presented in multiple units, those with ambiguous energy content and for snacks. This study tested the hypothesis that the number of units (single vs. multi-unit), meal type and food energy density disrupts accurate estimates of portion size. Thirty-two healthy weight men and women attended the laboratory on 3 separate occasions to assess the number of portions contained in 33 foods or beverages of varying energy density (1.7-26.8 kJ/g). Items included 12 multi-unit and 21 single unit foods; 13 were labelled "meal", 4 "drink" and 16 "snack". Departures in portion estimates from reference amounts were analysed with negative binomial regression. Overall participants tended to underestimate the number of portions displayed. Males showed greater errors in estimation than females (p=0.01). Single unit foods and those labelled as 'meal' or 'beverage' were estimated with greater error than multi-unit and 'snack' foods (p=0.02 and p<0.001 respectively). The number of portions of high energy density foods was overestimated while the number of portions of beverages and medium energy density foods were underestimated by 30-46%. In conclusion, participants tended to underestimate the reference portion size for a range of food and beverages, especially single unit foods and foods of low energy density and, unexpectedly, overestimated the reference portion of high energy density items. There is a need for better consumer education of appropriate portion sizes to aid adherence to a healthy diet.

  7. Estimating food portions. Influence of unit number, meal type and energy density☆☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Almiron-Roig, Eva; Solis-Trapala, Ivonne; Dodd, Jessica; Jebb, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating how much is appropriate to consume can be difficult, especially for foods presented in multiple units, those with ambiguous energy content and for snacks. This study tested the hypothesis that the number of units (single vs. multi-unit), meal type and food energy density disrupts accurate estimates of portion size. Thirty-two healthy weight men and women attended the laboratory on 3 separate occasions to assess the number of portions contained in 33 foods or beverages of varying energy density (1.7–26.8 kJ/g). Items included 12 multi-unit and 21 single unit foods; 13 were labelled “meal”, 4 “drink” and 16 “snack”. Departures in portion estimates from reference amounts were analysed with negative binomial regression. Overall participants tended to underestimate the number of portions displayed. Males showed greater errors in estimation than females (p = 0.01). Single unit foods and those labelled as ‘meal’ or ‘beverage’ were estimated with greater error than multi-unit and ‘snack’ foods (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001 respectively). The number of portions of high energy density foods was overestimated while the number of portions of beverages and medium energy density foods were underestimated by 30–46%. In conclusion, participants tended to underestimate the reference portion size for a range of food and beverages, especially single unit foods and foods of low energy density and, unexpectedly, overestimated the reference portion of high energy density items. There is a need for better consumer education of appropriate portion sizes to aid adherence to a healthy diet. PMID:23932948

  8. Duluth Energy Efficiency Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The City of Duluth developed the Duluth Energy Efficiency Program (DEEP) to create jobs, lessen the energy affordability gap faced by Duluth families, retain energy dollars currently exported from the city, and reduce Duluth's carbon footprint.

  9. Ecological models of human performance based on affordance, emotion and intuition.

    PubMed

    Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Karwowski, Waldemar

    2003-01-15

    This paper proposes a complementary approach to Rasmussen's taxonomy of the human skill-, rule-, and knowledge-based performance models by combining the ecological concept of affordances with the neural concepts of human emotion and intuition. The classical cognitive engineering framework is extended through the neuro-ecological approach, including personal human attributes important in exercising control over the work environment. The proposed affordance-, emotion-, and intuition-based models correspond to the three types of human performance, namely: learning, adaptive and tuning control, respectively. The new framework is not a predictive model of the operator behaviour, but rather it describes the processes of neuro-ecological control of the human environment.

  10. Data mining of space heating system performance in affordable housing

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xiaoxin; Yan, Da; Hong, Tianzhen

    2015-02-16

    The space heating in residential buildings accounts for a considerable amount of the primary energy use. Therefore, understanding the operation and performance of space heating systems becomes crucial in improving occupant comfort while reducing energy use. This study investigated the behavior of occupants adjusting their thermostat settings and heating system operations in a 62-unit affordable housing complex in Revere, Massachusetts, USA. The data mining methods, including clustering approach and decision trees, were used to ascertain occupant behavior patterns. Data tabulating ON/OFF space heating states was assessed, to provide a better understanding of the intermittent operation of space heating systems in terms of system cycling frequency and the duration of each operation. The decision tree was used to verify the link between room temperature settings, house and heating system characteristics and the heating energy use. The results suggest that the majority of apartments show fairly constant room temperature profiles with limited variations during a day or between weekday and weekend. Data clustering results revealed six typical patterns of room temperature profiles during the heating season. Space heating systems cycled more frequently than anticipated due to a tight range of room thermostat settings and potentially oversized heating capacities. In conclusion, from this study affirm data mining techniques are an effective method to analyze large datasets and extract hidden patterns to inform design and improve operations.

  11. Data mining of space heating system performance in affordable housing

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Xiaoxin; Yan, Da; Hong, Tianzhen

    2015-02-16

    The space heating in residential buildings accounts for a considerable amount of the primary energy use. Therefore, understanding the operation and performance of space heating systems becomes crucial in improving occupant comfort while reducing energy use. This study investigated the behavior of occupants adjusting their thermostat settings and heating system operations in a 62-unit affordable housing complex in Revere, Massachusetts, USA. The data mining methods, including clustering approach and decision trees, were used to ascertain occupant behavior patterns. Data tabulating ON/OFF space heating states was assessed, to provide a better understanding of the intermittent operation of space heating systems inmore » terms of system cycling frequency and the duration of each operation. The decision tree was used to verify the link between room temperature settings, house and heating system characteristics and the heating energy use. The results suggest that the majority of apartments show fairly constant room temperature profiles with limited variations during a day or between weekday and weekend. Data clustering results revealed six typical patterns of room temperature profiles during the heating season. Space heating systems cycled more frequently than anticipated due to a tight range of room thermostat settings and potentially oversized heating capacities. In conclusion, from this study affirm data mining techniques are an effective method to analyze large datasets and extract hidden patterns to inform design and improve operations.« less

  12. The effect of cloud type on earth's energy balance - Results for selected regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockert-Bell, Maureen E.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) C1 cloud information is compared with planetary albedo, outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), and net radiation measured at the top of the atmosphere by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). Principal component analysis indicates that the day-to-day variations of the abundances of the 35 cloud types of the C1 data are correlated with each other, so that for many purposes the data set can be well represented by about five cloud types. Using stepwise multiple regression, the ISCCP C1 data can be used to predict the day-to-day variations of the energy balance measured by ERBE for 2.5-deg regions. Total fractional area coverage of cloudiness is a relatively poor predictor of radiation budget quantities. If the total fractional area coverage by clouds is divided into contributions from several distinct cloud types, the fractional coverages by these several cloud types will together form a much better prediction of radiation budget quantities than the single variable of total fractional-area cloud coverage. The regression equations can be used to estimate the net effect of clouds on the radiation balance and the contributions from particular types of clouds to albedo, OLR, and net radiation.

  13. Electrochemical synthesis and potential electrochemical energy storage performance of nodule-type polyaniline.

    PubMed

    Navale, Y H; Navale, S T; Chougule, M A; Ingole, S M; Stadler, F J; Mane, Rajaram S; Naushad, Mu; Patil, V B

    2017-02-01

    Nodule-type polyaniline (PAni) has been successfully electrosynthesized onto conducting substrate and envisaged in electrochemical supercapacitor (ES) application as a potential energy storage electrode. Various bands are confirmed from the X-ray photoelectron and Fourier transform infrared spectra. Each nodule is of ∼100-200nminlength and 20-80nmindiameter. The ∼45° surface water contact angle with water of PAni surface can be beneficial for accessing an entire electrode area with minimum interfacial resistance loss when is in contact with the aqueous electrolyte for ES application. The PAni nodule-type electrode when electrochemically characterized using cyclic-voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements has demonstrated a specific capacitance of ∼508Fg(-1), a specific energy of 32.12Whkg(-1), a specific power of 13.39kWkg(-1) and a Coulombic efficiency of 100% in 1MH2SO4 electrolyte solution. An occurrence of 70% retention of initial capacity even after 5000 cycles is supporting for energy-storage application. Two separate redox reaction behaviors are confirmed in the discharge measurement.

  14. Wavelet Types Comparison for Extracting Iris Feature Based on Energy Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizal Isnanto, R.

    2015-06-01

    Human iris has a very unique pattern which is possible to be used as a biometric recognition. To identify texture in an image, texture analysis method can be used. One of method is wavelet that extract the image feature based on energy. Wavelet transforms used are Haar, Daubechies, Coiflets, Symlets, and Biorthogonal. In the research, iris recognition based on five mentioned wavelets was done and then comparison analysis was conducted for which some conclusions taken. Some steps have to be done in the research. First, the iris image is segmented from eye image then enhanced with histogram equalization. The features obtained is energy value. The next step is recognition using normalized Euclidean distance. Comparison analysis is done based on recognition rate percentage with two samples stored in database for reference images. After finding the recognition rate, some tests are conducted using Energy Compaction for all five types of wavelets above. As the result, the highest recognition rate is achieved using Haar, whereas for coefficients cutting for C(i) < 0.1, Haar wavelet has a highest percentage, therefore the retention rate or significan coefficient retained for Haaris lower than other wavelet types (db5, coif3, sym4, and bior2.4)

  15. Cell type-specific transcriptomics of hypothalamic energy-sensing neuron responses to weight-loss.

    PubMed

    Henry, Fredrick E; Sugino, Ken; Tozer, Adam; Branco, Tiago; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-09-02

    Molecular and cellular processes in neurons are critical for sensing and responding to energy deficit states, such as during weight-loss. Agouti related protein (AGRP)-expressing neurons are a key hypothalamic population that is activated during energy deficit and increases appetite and weight-gain. Cell type-specific transcriptomics can be used to identify pathways that counteract weight-loss, and here we report high-quality gene expression profiles of AGRP neurons from well-fed and food-deprived young adult mice. For comparison, we also analyzed Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, an intermingled population that suppresses appetite and body weight. We find that AGRP neurons are considerably more sensitive to energy deficit than POMC neurons. Furthermore, we identify cell type-specific pathways involving endoplasmic reticulum-stress, circadian signaling, ion channels, neuropeptides, and receptors. Combined with methods to validate and manipulate these pathways, this resource greatly expands molecular insight into neuronal regulation of body weight, and may be useful for devising therapeutic strategies for obesity and eating disorders.

  16. Cell type-specific transcriptomics of hypothalamic energy-sensing neuron responses to weight-loss

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Fredrick E; Sugino, Ken; Tozer, Adam; Branco, Tiago; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    Molecular and cellular processes in neurons are critical for sensing and responding to energy deficit states, such as during weight-loss. Agouti related protein (AGRP)-expressing neurons are a key hypothalamic population that is activated during energy deficit and increases appetite and weight-gain. Cell type-specific transcriptomics can be used to identify pathways that counteract weight-loss, and here we report high-quality gene expression profiles of AGRP neurons from well-fed and food-deprived young adult mice. For comparison, we also analyzed Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, an intermingled population that suppresses appetite and body weight. We find that AGRP neurons are considerably more sensitive to energy deficit than POMC neurons. Furthermore, we identify cell type-specific pathways involving endoplasmic reticulum-stress, circadian signaling, ion channels, neuropeptides, and receptors. Combined with methods to validate and manipulate these pathways, this resource greatly expands molecular insight into neuronal regulation of body weight, and may be useful for devising therapeutic strategies for obesity and eating disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09800.001 PMID:26329458

  17. First determination of the (re)crystallization activation energy of an irradiated olivine-type silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouadi, Z.; D'Hendecourt, L.; Leroux, H.; Jones, A. P.; Borg, J.; Deboffle, D.; Chauvin, N.

    2005-09-01

    To study the evolution of silicate dust in different astrophysical environments we simulate, in the laboratory, interstellar and circumstellar ion irradiation and thermal annealing processes. An experimental protocol that follows different steps in the dust life-cycle was developed. Using the silicate 10 μm band as an indicator, the evolution of the structural properties of an ion-irradiated olivine-type silicate sample, as a function of temperature, is investigated and an activation energy for crystallization is determined. The obtained value of {E_a}/k = 41 700 ± 2400 K is in good agreement with previous determinations of the activation energies of crystallization reported for non-ion-irradiated, amorphous silicates. This implies that the crystallization process is independent of the history of the dust. In particular, the defect concentration due to irradiation appears not to play a major role in stimulating, or hindering, crystallization at a given temperature. This activation energy is an important thermodynamical parameter that must be used in theoretical models which aim to explain the dust evolution from its place of birth in late type stars to its incorporation into young stellar environments, proto-stellar discs and proto-planetary systems after long passage through the interstellar medium.

  18. Life comparative analysis of energy consumption and CO₂ emissions of different building structural frame types.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangyong; Moon, Joon-Ho; Shin, Yoonseok; Kim, Gwang-Hee; Seo, Deok-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to quantitatively measure and compare the environmental load and construction cost of different structural frame types. Construction cost also accounts for the costs of CO₂ emissions of input materials. The choice of structural frame type is a major consideration in construction, as this element represents about 33% of total building construction costs. In this research, four constructed buildings were analyzed, with these having either reinforced concrete (RC) or steel (S) structures. An input-output framework analysis was used to measure energy consumption and CO₂ emissions of input materials for each structural frame type. In addition, the CO₂ emissions cost was measured using the trading price of CO₂ emissions on the International Commodity Exchange. This research revealed that both energy consumption and CO₂ emissions were, on average, 26% lower with the RC structure than with the S structure, and the construction costs (including the CO₂ emissions cost) of the RC structure were about 9.8% lower, compared to the S structure. This research provides insights through which the construction industry will be able to respond to the carbon market, which is expected to continue to grow in the future.

  19. Life Comparative Analysis of Energy Consumption and CO2 Emissions of Different Building Structural Frame Types

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangyong; Moon, Joon-Ho; Shin, Yoonseok; Kim, Gwang-Hee; Seo, Deok-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to quantitatively measure and compare the environmental load and construction cost of different structural frame types. Construction cost also accounts for the costs of CO2 emissions of input materials. The choice of structural frame type is a major consideration in construction, as this element represents about 33% of total building construction costs. In this research, four constructed buildings were analyzed, with these having either reinforced concrete (RC) or steel (S) structures. An input-output framework analysis was used to measure energy consumption and CO2 emissions of input materials for each structural frame type. In addition, the CO2 emissions cost was measured using the trading price of CO2 emissions on the International Commodity Exchange. This research revealed that both energy consumption and CO2 emissions were, on average, 26% lower with the RC structure than with the S structure, and the construction costs (including the CO2 emissions cost) of the RC structure were about 9.8% lower, compared to the S structure. This research provides insights through which the construction industry will be able to respond to the carbon market, which is expected to continue to grow in the future. PMID:24227998

  20. A general protocol to afford enantioenriched linear homoprenylic amines.

    PubMed

    Bosque, Irene; Foubelo, Francisco; Gonzalez-Gomez, Jose C

    2013-11-21

    The reaction of a readily obtained chiral branched homoprenylamonium salt with a range of aldehydes, including aliphatic substrates, affords the corresponding linear isomers in good yields and enantioselectivities.

  1. Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology (ARCJoint) Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Gynelle C.

    2001-01-01

    Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology (ARCJoint) is a method for joining high temperature- resistant ceramic pieces together, establishing joints that are strong, and allowing joining to be done in the field. This new way of joining allows complex shapes to be formed by joining together geometrically simple shapes. The joining technology at NASA is one of the enabling technologies for the application of silicon-carbide-based ceramic and composite components in demanding and high-temperature applications. The technology is being developed and tested for high-temperature propulsion parts for aerospace use. Commercially, it can be used for joining ceramic pieces used for high temperature applications in the power-generating and chemical industries, as well as in the microelectronics industry. This innovation could yield big payoffs for not only the power-generating industry but also the Silicon Valley chipmakers. This technology, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center by Dr. Mrityunjay Singh, is a two-step process involving first using a paste to join together ceramic pieces and bonding them by heating the joint to 110 to 120 C for between 10 and 20 min. This makes the joint strong enough to be handled for the final joining. Then, a silicon-based substance is applied to the joint and heated to 1400 C for 10 to 15 min. The resulting joint is as strong as the original ceramic material and can withstand the same high temperatures.

  2. Partnerships for affordable and equitable disaster insurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysiak, J.; Pérez-Blanco, C. D.

    2015-08-01

    Extreme events are becoming more frequent and intense, inflating the economic damages and social hardship set-off by natural catastrophes. Amidst budgetary cuts, there is a growing concern on societies' ability to design solvent disaster recovery strategies, while addressing equity and affordability concerns. The participation of private sector along with public one through Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) has gained on importance as a means to address these seemingly conflicting objectives through the provision of (catastrophic) natural hazard insurance. This is the case of many OECD countries, notably some EU Member States such as the United Kingdom and Spain. The EU legislator has adapted to this new scenario and recently produced major reforms in the legislation and regulation that govern the framework in which PPPs for (catastrophic) natural hazard insurance develop. This paper has a dual objective: (1) review the complex legal background that rules the provision of insurance against natural catastrophes in the EU after these major reforms, (2) assess the implications of the reforms and offer concise Policy Guiding Principles.

  3. Affordable underwater wireless optical communication using LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, Vladimir; Arnon, Shlomi

    2013-09-01

    In recent years the need for high data rate underwater wireless communication (WC) has increased. Nowadays, the conventional technology for underwater communication is acoustic. However, the maximum data rate that acoustic technology can provide is a few kilobits per second. On the other hand, emerging applications such as underwater imaging, networks of sensors and swarms of underwater vehicles require much faster data rates. As a result, underwater optical WC, which can provide much higher data rates, has been proposed as an alternative means of communication. In addition to high data rates, affordable communication systems become an important feature in the development requirements. The outcome of these requirements is a new system design based on off-the-shelf components such as blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs). This is due to the fact that LEDs offer solutions characterized by low cost, high efficiency, reliability and compactness. However, there are some challenges to be met when incorporating LEDs as part of the optical transmitter, such as low modulation rates and non linearity. In this paper, we review the main challenges facing the incorporation of LEDs as an integral part of underwater WC systems and propose some techniques to mitigate the LED limitations in order to achieve high data rate communication

  4. Robust, affordable, semi-direct Mars mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salotti, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    A new architecture is proposed for the first manned Mars mission, based on current NASA developments (SLS and Orion), chemical propulsion for interplanetary transit, aerocapture for all vehicles, a split strategy, and a long stay on the surface. Two important choices make this architecture affordable and appropriate for the first mission. The first is splitting the Earth return vehicle into two parts that are launched separately and dock in Mars orbit. This is necessary to make aerocapture feasible and efficient, which considerably reduces mass. The second is reducing the crew to 3 astronauts. This simplifies the mission and reduces the SLS payload mass under the 45-metric ton limit for a direct TMI (trans-Mars injection) burn without LEO assembly. Only 4 SLS launches are required. The first takes the Mars ascent vehicle and in situ resource utilization systems to the planet's surface. The second takes the first part of the Earth return vehicle, the habitat, into Mars orbit. Two years later, two further SLS launches take a dual-use habitat (outbound trip and surface), Orion, and an enhanced service module to LEO, and then into Mars orbit, followed by the landing of the habitat on the surface. Transit time is demonstrated to be easily reduced to less than 6 months, with relatively low impact on propellant mass and none at all on the architecture.

  5. Efficiency improvement of a cantilever-type energy harvester using torsional vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In-Ho; Jang, Seon-Jun; Koo, Jeong-Hoi; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric vibrational energy harvester utilizing coupled bending and torsional vibrations is investigated. The proposed system consists of a cantilever-type substrate covered by the piezoelectric ceramic and a proof mass which is perpendicularly connected to the free end of the cantilever beam by a rigid bar. While the natural frequency and output voltage of the conventional system are affected by bending deformation of the piezoelectric plate, the proposed system makes use of its twisting deformation. The natural frequency of the device can be significantly decreased by manipulating the location of the proof mass on the rigid bar. In order to validate the performance of the proposed energy harvester, numerical simulations and vertical shaker tests are carried out. It is demonstrated that the proposed energy harvester can shift down its resonant frequency considerably and generate much higher output power than the conventional system. It is, therefore, concluded that the proposed energy harvester utilizing the coupled bending and torsional vibrations can be effectively applied to low-frequency vibration situations.

  6. The effect of cloud type on Earth's energy balance - Global analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.; Ockert-Bell, Maureen E.; Michelsen, Marc L.

    1992-01-01

    The role of fractional area coverage by cloud types in the energy balance of the earth is investigated through joint use of International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) C1 cloud data and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) broadband energy flux data for the one-year period March 1985 through February 1986. Multiple linear regression is used to relate the radiation budget data to the cloud data. Comparing cloud forcing estimates obtained from the ISCCP-ERBE regression with those derived from the ERBE scene identification shows generally good agreement except over snow, in tropical convective regions, and in regions that are either nearly cloudless or always overcast. It is suggested that a substantial fraction of the disagreement in longwave cloud forcing in tropical convective regions is associated with the fact that the ERBE scene identification does not take into account variations in upper-tropospheric water vapor. On a global average basis, low clouds make the largest contribution to the net energy balance of the Earth, because they cover such a large area and because their albedo effect dominates their effect on emitted thermal radiation. High, optically thick clouds can also very effectively reduce the energy balance, however, because their very high albedos overcome their low emission temperatures.

  7. Energy dissipation drives the gradient signal amplification through an incoherent type-1 feed-forward loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ganhui

    2015-09-01

    We present here the analytical relation between the gain of eukaryotic gradient sensing network and the associated thermodynamic cost. By analyzing a general incoherent type-1 feed-forward loop, we derive the gain function (G ) through the reaction network and explicitly show that G depends on the nonequilibrium factor (0 ≤γ ≤1 with γ =0 and 1 representing irreversible and equilibrium reaction systems, respectively), the Michaelis constant (KM), and the turnover ratio (rcat) of the participating enzymes. We further find the maximum possible gain is intrinsically determined by KM/Gmax=(1 /KM+2 ) /4 . Our model also indicates that the dissipated energy (measured by -lnγ ), from the intracellular energy-bearing bioparticles (e.g., ATP), is used to generate a force field Fγ∝(1 -√{γ }) that reshapes and disables the effective potential around the zero gain region, which leads to the ultrasensitive response to external chemical gradients.

  8. Intermittent energy restriction in type 2 diabetes: A short discussion of medication management

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Sharayah; Clifton, Peter M; Keogh, Jennifer B

    2016-01-01

    AIM To discuss type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) medication changes required during the popular 5:2 intermittent energy restriction (IER) diet. METHODS A search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL and Cochrane library for original research articles investigating the use of very low calorie diets (VLCD) in people with T2DM. The search terms used included “VLCD” or “very low energy diet” or “very low energy restriction” or “IER” or “intermittent fasting” or “calorie restriction” or “diabetes mellitus type 2” and “type 2 diabetes”. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened for relevant publications. Only research articles written in English, which also included an explanation of medication changes were included. A recent pilot trial using the 5:2 IER method, conducted by our research group, will also be summarized. RESULTS A total of 8 studies were found that investigated the use of VLCD in T2DM and discussed medication management. Overall these studies indicate that the use of a VLCD for people with T2DM usually require the cessation of medication to prevent hypoglycemia. Therefore, the 5:2 IER method will also require medication changes, but as seen in our pilot trial, may not require total cessation of medication, rather a cessation on the 2 IER days only. CONCLUSION Guidelines outlined here can be used in the initial stages of a 2-d IER diet, but extensive blood glucose monitoring is still required to make the necessary individual reductions to medications in response to weight loss. PMID:28031781

  9. Production of Spirulina sp by utilization of wastewater from the powder type energy drinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumantri, Indro; Priyambada, Ika Bagus

    2015-12-01

    Wastewater of energy drink type of powder produced when the the production equipment required cleaning treatment to produce one taste to others. These equipments washed by water, so that, it produced wastewater. It contains high organic substances and classified as high degradable due to food product. The content of wastewater is high carbon and nitrogen substances. Microalgae is an autotrophic microorganism, live without carbon presence, utilized to digest the substances in wastewater especially for nitrogen substances. Spirulina sp is the type of microalgae selected to utilize the wastewater of energy drink, the selection criteria is the size of Spirulina sp is relatively large and easy to separated from its solution. The experiment conducted by cultivate the seeding microalgae with certain nutrients until the certain volume. The synthetic wastewater obtained from one of energy drink type of powder with commercial brand as Kuku Bima Ener-G, the wastewater concentration selected under the close to the real condition of wastewater as basis of COD measurement (6 sachet/L or COD of 12.480mg/L) and aqueous concentration (1 sachet/L or COD of 2080mg/L). The batch experiments with 1L volume conducted and with variable of percent volume of wastewater added in order to observe the growth of microlagae. The response of the microalgae growth obtained by increasing the optical density of the microalgae solution and continued by calculation for the growth rate of microalgae. The result of the experiments indicated that for the aqueous concentration (1 sachet/L or COD of 2080mg/L) the optimum added of wastewater is 40 % with growrate of 0.55/day while for the concentrated wastewater (6 sachet/L or COD of 12.480mg/L), the optimum condition is 25 % wastewater added with growth rate of 0.43/day.

  10. Enabling Dedicated, Affordable Space Access Through Aggressive Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jonathan; Kibbey, Tim; Lampton, Pat; Brown, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A recent explosion in nano-sat, small-sat, and university class payloads has been driven by low cost electronics and sensors, wide component availability, as well as low cost, miniature computational capability and open source code. Increasing numbers of these very small spacecraft are being launched as secondary payloads, dramatically decreasing costs, and allowing greater access to operations and experimentation using actual space flight systems. While manifesting as a secondary payload provides inexpensive rides to orbit, these arrangements also have certain limitations. Small, secondary payloads are typically included with very limited payload accommodations, supported on a non interference basis (to the prime payload), and are delivered to orbital conditions driven by the primary launch customer. Integration of propulsion systems or other hazardous capabilities will further complicate secondary launch arrangements, and accommodation requirements. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center has begun work on the development of small, low cost launch system concepts that could provide dedicated, affordable launch alternatives to small, risk tolerant university type payloads and spacecraft. These efforts include development of small propulsion systems and highly optimized structural efficiency, utilizing modern advanced manufacturing techniques. This paper outlines the plans and accomplishments of these efforts and investigates opportunities for truly revolutionary reductions in launch and operations costs. Both evolution of existing sounding rocket systems to orbital delivery, and the development of clean sheet, optimized small launch systems are addressed. A launch vehicle at the scale and price point which allows developers to take reasonable risks with new propulsion and avionics hardware solutions does not exist today. Establishing this service provides a ride through the proverbial "valley of death" that lies between

  11. On the Energy-Momentum Flux in GÖDEL-TYPE Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulhoa, S. C.; Santos, A. F.; Amorim, R. G. G.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we work in the context of Teleparallelism Equivalent to General Relativity (TEGR) in order to construct the energy-momentum flux for Gödel-type solutions of Einstein's equations. We use an stationary observer, which is settled by the tetrad choice, to obtain the gravitational pressure for each direction of space in cartesian coordinates. Then, we write down the total pressure for each direction in terms of the pressure of the fluid, thus we are able to identify the role of the gravitational pressure.

  12. High power mode-locked rod-type fiber femtosecond laser with micro-joule energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhiguo; Teng, Hao; Wang, Lina; Wang, Rui; Wang, Junli; Wei, Zhiyi

    2016-07-01

    We report a high power all-normal-dispersion (ANDi) mode-locked laser based on nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) technique using rod-type fiber with polarization maintaining (PM) characteristic. With 85 μm gain core diameter, 31 W of average power at repetition rates of 57.93 MHz, which corresponds to the pulse energy of 0.53 μJ, is demonstrated under a pump power of 93 W. The pulse duration of 124 fs after compressor is obtained at the central wavelength of 1033 nm as well as the measured power jitter of 0.3% over a period of 2 h.

  13. Global existence and energy decay rates for a Kirchhoff-type wave equation with nonlinear dissipation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daewook; Kim, Dojin; Hong, Keum-Shik; Jung, Il Hyo

    2014-01-01

    The first objective of this paper is to prove the existence and uniqueness of global solutions for a Kirchhoff-type wave equation with nonlinear dissipation of the form Ku'' + M(|A (1/2) u|(2))Au + g(u') = 0 under suitable assumptions on K, A, M(·), and g(·). Next, we derive decay estimates of the energy under some growth conditions on the nonlinear dissipation g. Lastly, numerical simulations in order to verify the analytical results are given.

  14. Global Existence and Energy Decay Rates for a Kirchhoff-Type Wave Equation with Nonlinear Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dojin; Hong, Keum-Shik; Jung, Il Hyo

    2014-01-01

    The first objective of this paper is to prove the existence and uniqueness of global solutions for a Kirchhoff-type wave equation with nonlinear dissipation of the form Ku′′ + M(|A1/2u|2)Au + g(u′) = 0 under suitable assumptions on K, A, M(·), and g(·). Next, we derive decay estimates of the energy under some growth conditions on the nonlinear dissipation g. Lastly, numerical simulations in order to verify the analytical results are given. PMID:24977217

  15. Perceiving the affordance of string tension for power strokes in badminton: expertise allows effective use of all string tensions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Affordances mean opportunities for action. These affordances are important for sports performance and relevant to the abilities developed by skilled athletes. In racquet sports such as badminton, different players prefer widely different string tension because it is believed to provide opportunities for effective strokes. The current study examined whether badminton players can perceive the affordance of string tension for power strokes and whether the perception of affordance itself changed as a function of skill level. The results showed that string tension constrained the striking performance of both novice and recreational players, but not of expert players. When perceptual capability was assessed, perceptual mode did not affect perception of the optimal string tension. Skilled players successfully perceived the affordance of string tension, but only experts were concerned about saving energy. Our findings demonstrated that perception of the affordance of string tension in badminton was determined by action abilities. Furthermore, experts could adjust the action to maintain a superior level of performance based on the perception of affordance.

  16. Momentum and energy deposition in late-type stellar atmospheres and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, L.; Macgregor, K. B.

    1980-01-01

    The present study calculates the response of the outer atmospheres of cool low-gravity stars to the passage of the mechanical energy fluxes of solar magnitude in the form of acoustic waves and Alfven waves. It is shown that Alfven waves are efficient in generating outflow, and can account for the order of magnitude of observed mass loss in late-type luminous stars. However, unless these magnetic waves undergo some dissipation within several stellar radii of the surface, the predicted terminal velocities of the resulting stellar winds are far too high. Alfven wave dissipation should give rise to extended warm chromospheres in low-gravity late-type stars, a prediction which can be observationally tested.

  17. 24 CFR 572.120 - Affordability standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES HOPE FOR HOMEOWNERSHIP OF SINGLE FAMILY HOMES PROGRAM (HOPE 3... at reasonable terms, energy conservation, and improvements that will entail low-cost maintenance....

  18. Ion target impact energy during Type I edge localized modes in JET ITER-like Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horacek, J.; Autricque, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Giroud, C.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Moulton, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER baseline scenario, with 500 MW of DT fusion power and Q = 10, will rely on a Type I ELMy H-mode, with ΔW = 0.7 MJ mitigated edge localized modes (ELMs). Tungsten (W) is the material now decided for the divertor plasma-facing components from the start of plasma operations. W atoms sputtered from divertor targets during ELMs are expected to be the dominant source under the partially detached divertor conditions required for safe ITER operation. W impurity concentration in the plasma core can dramatically degrade its performance and lead to potentially damaging disruptions. Understanding the physics of plasma-wall interaction during ELMs is important and a primary input for this is the energy of incoming ions during an ELM event. In this paper, coupled Infrared thermography and Langmuir Probe (LP) measurements in JET-ITER-Like-Wall unseeded H-mode experiments with ITER relevant ELM energy drop have been used to estimate the impact energy of deuterium ions (D+) on the divertor target. This analysis gives an ion energy of several keV during ELMs, which makes D+ responsible for most of the W sputtering in unseeded H-mode discharges. These LP measurements were possible because of the low electron temperature (Te) during ELMs which allowed saturation of the ion current. Although at first sight surprising, the observation of low Te at the divertor target during ELMs is consistent with the ‘Free-Streaming’ kinetic model which predicts a near-complete transfer of parallel energy from electrons to ions in order to maintain quasi-neutrality of the ELM filaments while they are transported to the divertor targets.

  19. Ground Processing Affordability for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, John; Scott, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles and most of their payloads spend the majority of their time on the ground. The cost of ground operations is very high. So, why so often is so little attention given to ground processing during development? The current global space industry and economic environment are driving more need for efficiencies to save time and money. Affordability and sustainability are more important now than ever. We can not continue to treat space vehicles as mere science projects. More RLV's (Reusable Launch Vehicles) are being developed for the gains of reusability which are not available for ELV's (Expendable Launch Vehicles). More human-rated vehicles are being developed, with the retirement of the Space Shuttles, and for a new global space race, yet these cost more than the many unmanned vehicles of today. We can learn many lessons on affordability from RLV's. DFO (Design for Operations) considers ground operations during design, development, and manufacturing-before the first flight. This is often minimized for space vehicles, but is very important. Vehicles are designed for launch and mission operations. You will not be able to do it again if it is too slow or costly to get there. Many times, technology changes faster than space products such that what is launched includes outdated features, thus reducing competitiveness. Ground operations must be considered for the full product Lifecycle, from concept to retirement. Once manufactured, launch vehicles along with their payloads and launch systems require a long path of processing before launch. Initial assembly and testing always discover problems to address. A solid integration program is essential to minimize these impacts, as was seen in the Constellation Ares I-X test rocket. For RLV's, landing/recovery and post-flight turnaround activities are performed. Multi-use vehicles require reconfiguration. MRO (Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul) must be well-planned--- even for the unplanned problems. Defect limits and

  20. Affordable Space Tourism: SpaceStationSim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    For over 5 years, people have been living and working in space on the International Space Station (ISS), a state-of-the-art laboratory complex orbiting high above the Earth. Offering a large, sustained microgravity environment that cannot be duplicated on Earth, the ISS furthers humankind s knowledge of science and how the body functions for extended periods of time in space all of which will prove vital on long-duration missions to Mars. On-orbit construction of the station began in November 1998, with the launch of the Russian Zarya Control Module, which provided battery power and fuel storage. This module was followed by additional components and supplies over the course of several months. In November 2000, the first ISS Expedition crew moved in. Since then, the ISS has continued to change and evolve. The space station is currently 240 feet wide, measured across the solar arrays, and 171 feet long, from the NASA Destiny Laboratory to the Russian Zvezda Habitation Module. It is 90 feet tall, and it weighs approximately 404,000 pounds. Crews inhabit a living space of about 15,000 cubic feet. To date, 90 scientific investigations have been conducted on the space station. New results from space station research, from basic science to exploration research, are being published each month, and more breakthroughs are likely to come. It is not all work on the space station, though. The orbiting home affords many of the comforts one finds on Earth. There is a weightless "weight room" and even a musical keyboard alongside research facilities. Holidays are observed, and with them, traditional foods such as turkey and cobbler are eaten, with lemonade to wash them down

  1. Affordable WDM components: the polymer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.; Yin, Shing; Norwood, Robert A.; Yardley, James T.

    1998-02-01

    An advanced polymeric waveguide technology was developed for affordable WDM components that address the needs of both the Telecom and the Datacom industries. We engineered high- performance organic polymers that can be readily made into both multimode and single-mode optical waveguide structures of controlled numerical aperture and geometry. These materials are formed from highly-crosslinked acrylate monomers with specific linkages that determine properties such as flexibility, toughness, loss, and environmental stability. These monomers are intermiscible, providing for precise adjustment of the refractive index from 1.3 to 1.6. In polymer form, they exhibit state-of-the-art loss values, high thermal stability, high humidity resistance, low dispersion and low birefringence. Waveguides are formed photolithographically, with the liquid monomer mixture polymerizing upon illumination in the UV via either mask exposure or laser direct writing. A wide range of rigid and flexible substrates can be used, including glass, quartz, oxidized silicon, glass-filled epoxy printed circuit board substrate, and flexible polyimide film. Waveguiding structures measuring tens of inches in length can be produced on computer boards, and guides that are meters long can be printed on rolls of plastic. We describe the fabrication of both Bragg gratings and waveguide grating routes in our polymers for filtering and demultiplexing applications in Telecom WDM systems. In Datacom, we describe polymeric components that we produced for aerospace WDM sensor systems. The importance of CAD tools in designing WDM devices is emphasized in this work. We further discuss the low-cost manufacturing of WDM components in an industrial environment.

  2. Commercial Platforms Allow Affordable Space Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    At an altitude of about 240 miles, its orbital path carries it over 90 percent of the Earth s population. It circles the Earth in continuous free fall; its crew of six and one Robonaut pass the days, experiencing 16 sunrises and 16 sunsets every 24 hours, in microgravity, an environment in which everything from bodily functions to the physical behavior of materials changes drastically from what is common on the ground. Outside its shielded confines, temperatures cycle from one extreme to the other, radiation is rampant, and atomic oxygen corrodes everything it touches. A unique feat of engineering, the International Space Station (ISS) also represents the most remarkable platform for scientific research ever devised. In 2005, anticipating the space station s potential for NASA and non-NASA scientists alike, the NASA Authorization Act designated the US segment of the ISS as a national laboratory, instructing the Agency to "increase the utilization of the ISS by other Federal entities and the private sector." With the ISS set to maintain operations through at least 2020, the station offers an unprecedented long-term access to space conditions, enabling research not previously possible. "There will be new drug discoveries, new pharmaceuticals, a better understanding of how we affect the planet and how we can maintain it," says Marybeth Edeen, the ISS National Laboratory manager, based at Johnson Space Center. The ISS, she says, represents a major example of the government s role in making such advancements possible. "The government is key in that researchers cannot afford to build the kind of infrastructure that the government can provide. But we then have to make that infrastructure available at a reasonable cost." Enter Jeff Manber, who saw in the ISS National Lab an extraordinary opportunity to advance science, education, and business in ways never before seen.

  3. A New Type of Transient High-Energy Source in the Direction of the Galactic Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.; VanParadijs, J.; Fishman, G. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Kommers, J.; Harmon, B. A.; Meegan, C. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1996-01-01

    Sources of high-energy (greater than 20 keV) bursts fall into two distinct types: the non-repeating gamma-ray bursters, several thousand of which have been detected but whose origin remains unknown, and the soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), of which there are only three. The SGRs are known to be associated with supernova remnants, suggesting that the burst events most probably originate from young neutron stars. Here we report the detection of a third type of transient high-energy source. On 2 December 1995, we observed the onset of a sequence of hard X-ray bursts from a direction close to that of the Galactic Center. The interval between bursts was initially several minutes, but after two days, the burst rate had dropped to about one per hour and has been largely unchanged since then. More than 1,000 bursts have now been detected, with remarkably similar light curves and intensities; this behaviour is unprecendented among transient X-ray and gamma-ray sources. We suggest that the origin of these bursts might be related to the spasmodic accretion of material onto a neutron star.

  4. Single molecule studies of a ladder type conjugated polymer: vibronic spectra, line widths, and energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Zickler, Martin F; Feist, Florian A; Jacob, Josemon; Müllen, Klaus; Basché, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy are employed to investigate single poly(ladder-type pentaphenylene) (LPPentP) molecules dispersed in thin poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films at 1.2 K. Emission spectra of single chains show single as well as multi-chromophore emission indicating variegated communication along the chains. The vibronic structure in the emission spectra resembles the one found for other ladder-type polymers. Purely electronic zero-phonon lines in emission are substantially broadened, most probably due to fast spectral diffusion. By surmounting the limitations of emission spectroscopy, nonemitting donor chromophores, which transfer their excitation energy in a radiationless manner to emitting chromophores, are accessed by excitation spectroscopy. Remarkably, by comparing the data of emitting and nonemitting chromophores a contribution to the zero-phonon excitation line width has to be considered which places a lower limit on the estimated energy transfer time of several picoseconds between adjacent chromophores. Finally, the data indicate qualitatively a restricted flexibility of LPPentP compared to poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV).

  5. One Hand, Two Objects: Emergence of Affordance in Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borghi, Anna M.; Flumini, Andrea; Natraj, Nikhilesh; Wheaton, Lewis A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies on affordances typically focus on single objects. We investigated whether affordances are modulated by the context, defined by the relation between two objects and a hand. Participants were presented with pictures displaying two manipulable objects linked by a functional (knife-butter), a spatial (knife-coffee mug), or by no relation. They…

  6. Affordance Analysis--Matching Learning Tasks with Learning Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Matt

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a design methodology for matching learning tasks with learning technologies. First a working definition of "affordances" is provided based on the need to describe the action potentials of the technologies (utility). Categories of affordances are then proposed to provide a framework for analysis. Following this, a…

  7. 12 CFR 1282.14 - Special Affordable Housing Goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special Affordable Housing Goal. 1282.14 Section 1282.14 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY HOUSING GOALS AND MISSION ENTERPRISE HOUSING GOALS AND MISSION Housing Goals § 1282.14 Special Affordable Housing Goal. (a) Purpose of the...

  8. The Influence of Affordability in Strategic Enrollment Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Susan L.; Thompson, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    In state houses around the country, one of the common higher education themes is affordability. As tuition costs have increased at rates exceeding that of inflation, students and families have pressed their legislative representatives to examine these increases. Affordability is a term used by various constituent groups, and its definition varies…

  9. Affordability Tradeoffs Under Uncertainty Using Epoch-Era Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    exploration and change-related “ilities.” Dr. Ross holds a dual A.B. in Physics and Astronomy and Astrophysics from Harvard University, S.M. in Aeronautics...1  Introduction of Affordability in Defense Acquisition................................................. 2  Recent Definitions of Affordability...20  Introduction and Background ............................................................................... 20  Application

  10. What Are the Affordances of Information and Communication Technologies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conole, Grainne; Dyke, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The paper examines the notion that Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have affordances that epitomize the features of our late modern age (Giddens, 1991) and explores whether these affordances (Salomon, 1993, p. 51) can be used to facilitate particular approaches to educational practice. It argues that a clear articulation of these…

  11. Nurturing Opportunities for Educational Leadership: How Affordance and Leadership Interconnect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolin, Ilana

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative ethnographic study focused on the affordances that facilitated the emergence of leadership, capturing a range of perspectives on leadership and leadership development of four groups: district superintendents; teacher-educators; mentor-teachers and graduates. The term "affordances" implies a reciprocal relationship…

  12. Construction of a new type of low-energy scanning electron microscope with atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastham, D. A.; Edmondson, P.; Donnelly, S.; Olsson, E.; Svensson, K.; Bleloch, A.

    2009-05-01

    We describe a new type of scanning electron microscope which works by directly imaging the electron field-emission sites on a nanotip. Electrons are extracted from the nanotip through a nanoscale aperture, accelerated in a high electric field and focussed to a spot using a microscale einzel lens. If the whole microscope (accelerating section and lens) and the focal length are both restricted in size to below 10 microns, then computer simulations show that the effects of aberration are extremely small and it is possible to have a system with approximately unit magnification, at electron energies as low as 300 eV. Thus a typical emission site of 1 nm diameter will produce an image of the same size and an atomic emission site with give a resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm (1-2 Å), and because the beam is not allowed to expand beyond 100nm in diameter the depth of field is large and the contribution to the beam spot size from chromatic aberrations is less than 0.02 nm (0.2 Å) for 500 eV electrons. Since it is now entirely possible to make stable atomic sized emitters (nanopyramids) it is expected that this instrument will have atomic resolution. Furthermore the brightness of the beam is determined only by the field-emission and can be up to a million times larger than in a typical (high-energy) electron microscope. The construction of this microscope, based on using a nanotip electron source which is mounted on a nanopositioner so that it can be positioned at the correct point adjacent to the microscope, entrance aperture, is described. In this geometry the scanning is achieved by moving the sample using piezos. Two methods for the construction of the microscope column are reviewed and the results of preliminary tests are described. The advantages of this low energy, bright-beam, electron microscope with atomic resolution are described. It can be used in either scanning mode or diffraction mode. The major advantage over existing microscopes is that because it works at very low

  13. 'Energy expenditure genes' or 'energy absorption genes': a new target for the treatment of obesity and Type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Braud, Sandrine; Ciufolini, Marco; Harosh, Itzik

    2010-12-01

    Several hundred genes associated or linked to obesity have been described in the scientific literature. Whereas many of these genes are potential targets for the treatment of obesity and associated conditions, none of them have permitted the developement of an efficient drug therapy. As proposed by the 'thrifty genotype' theory, obesity genes may have conferred an evolutionary advantage in times of food shortage through efficient energy exploitation, while 'lean' or 'energy expenditure' genes may have become very rare during the same periods. It is therefore a challenge to identify 'energy expenditure genes' or 'energy absorption genes,' whose mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms do result in reduced energy intake. We submit that such 'energy absorption' or 'energy expenditure' genes (crucial genes) are potential new targets for the treatment of obesity. These genes can be identified in rare genetic diseases that produce a lean, failure-to-thrive, energy malabsorption or starvation phenotype.

  14. Structural Defects Energies in CoPt-type Alloys and the Effects of Processing Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, Brent; Johnson, Duane J.; Smirnov, Andrei V.

    2003-03-01

    L10 CoPt and FePt alloys serve in magnetic drive technologies and are being explored for use as nano-scale bits. Micromagnetics simulations of their magnetic domain structures rely on calculated atomic-scale parameters and predicted low-energy defects, which can serve as pinning sites for the domain walls. We calculate a number of structural defect energies (e.g., antiphase boundaries, twins and stacking faults) versus state of chemical and magnetic order using Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) method and the coherent-potential approximation (CPA). As processing typically occurs between the ordering and Curie temperatures, we find the paramagnetic state alters the types of defects that are kinetically locked in at low temperatures due to changes in defect energies by factors 1/4 to 2, so defects are not those predicted from T=0 K ferromagnetic calculations. Funding is by DOE at the Frederick Seitz MRL (DEFG02-91ER45439) and DOE-CMSN-Simpson Project, and by NSF via an FRG (DMR-99-76550) at the Materials Computation Center and an ITR (DMR-0121695).

  15. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Composite Energy-Absorbing Keel Beams for General Aviation Type Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A lightweight energy-absorbing keel-beam concept was developed and retrofitted in a general aviation type aircraft to improve crashworthiness performance. The energy-absorbing beam consisted of a foam-filled cellular structure with glass fiber and hybrid glass/kevlar cell walls. Design, analysis, fabrication and testing of the keel beams prior to installation and subsequent full-scale crash testing of the aircraft are described. Factors such as material and fabrication constraints, damage tolerance, crush stress/strain response, seat-rail loading, and post crush integrity, which influenced the course of the design process are also presented. A theory similar to the one often used for ductile metal box structures was employed with appropriate modifications to estimate the sustained crush loads for the beams. This, analytical tool, coupled with dynamic finite element simulation using MSC.Dytran were the prime design and analysis tools. The validity of the theory as a reliable design tool was examined against test data from static crush tests of beam sections while the overall performance of the energy-absorbing subfloor was assessed through dynamic testing of 24 in long subfloor assemblies.

  16. Embodied Perception: A Proposal to Reconcile Affordance and Spatial Perception

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proffitt's embodied approach to perception is deeply indebted to Gibson's ecological approach to visual perception, in particular the idea that the primary objects of perception are affordances or what the environment offers for action. Yet, rather than directly addressing affordance perception, most of the empirical work evaluating Proffitt's approach focuses on the perception of spatial properties of the environment. We propose that theoretical and empirical efforts should be directed toward an understanding of the relationship between affordance perception and spatial perception, keeping in mind that this relationship is nontrivial because affordance perception is dichotomous, whereas the perception of spatial properties is gradual. We argue that the perception of spatial properties of the environment is enslaved by affordance perception, most notably at the critical boundaries for action. To empirically scrutinize this proposition, and to solve issues raised regarding the validity of several empirical findings, we call for joint research efforts to further understanding of embodied perception.

  17. An Affordability Comparison Tool (ACT) for Space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCleskey, C. M.; Bollo, T. R.; Garcia, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    NASA bas recently emphasized the importance of affordability for Commercial Crew Development Program (CCDP), Space Launch Systems (SLS) and Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). System architects and designers are challenged to come up with architectures and designs that do not bust the budget. This paper describes the Affordability Comparison Tool (ACT) analyzes different systems or architecture configurations for affordability that allows for a comparison of: total life cycle cost; annual recurring costs, affordability figures-of-merit, such as cost per pound, cost per seat, and cost per flight, as well as productivity measures, such as payload throughput. Although ACT is not a deterministic model, the paper develops algorithms and parametric factors that use characteristics of the architectures or systems being compared to produce important system outcomes (figures-of-merit). Example applications of outcome figures-of-merit are also documented to provide the designer with information on the relative affordability and productivity of different space transportation applications.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW TYPE A(F)RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2008-09-14

    In a coordinated effort, the Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proposed the elimination of the Specification Packaging from 49 CFR 173.[1] In accordance with the Federal Register, issued on October 1, 2004, new fabrication of Specification Packages would no longer be authorized. In accordance with the NRC final rulemaking published January 26, 2004, Specification Packagings are mandated by law to be removed from service no later than October 1, 2008. This coordinated effort and resulting rulemaking initiated a planned phase out of Specification Type B and Type A fissile (F) material transportation packages within the Department of Energy (DOE) and its subcontractors. One of the Specification Packages affected by this regulatory change is the UN1A2 Specification Package, per DOT 49 CFR 173.417(a)(6). To maintain continuing shipments of DOE materials currently transported in UN1A2 Specification Package after the existing authorization expires, a replacement Type A(F) material packaging design is under development by the Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper presents a summary of the prototype design effort and testing of the new Type A(F) Package development for the DOE. This paper discusses the progress made in the development of a Type A Fissile Packaging to replace the expiring 49 CFR UN1A2 Specification Fissile Package. The Specification Package was mostly a single-use waste disposal container. The design requirements and authorized radioactive material contents of the UN1A2 Specification Package were defined in 49 CFR. A UN1A2 Specification Package was authorized to ship up to 350 grams of U-235 in any enrichment and in any non-pyrophoric form. The design was specified as a 55-gallon 1A2 drum overpack with a body constructed from 18 gauge steel with a 16 gauge drum lid. Drum closure was specified as a standard 12-gauge ring closure. The inner product container size was not specified but was listed as any

  19. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R; Olson, Eric N; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure.

  20. C-type natriuretic peptide as a new regulator of food intake and energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Inuzuka, Megumi; Tamura, Naohisa; Yamada, Nobuko; Katsuura, Goro; Oyamada, Naofumi; Taura, Daisuke; Sonoyama, Takuhiro; Fukunaga, Yasutomo; Ohinata, Kousaku; Sone, Masakatsu; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2010-08-01

    The physiological implication of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) including energy metabolism has not been elucidated, because of markedly short stature in CNP-null mice. In the present study we analyzed food intake and energy expenditure of CNP-null mice with chondrocyte-targeted CNP expression (CNP-Tg/Nppc(-/-) mice), in which marked skeletal dysplasia was rescued, to investigate the significance of CNP under minimal influences of skeletal phenotypes. In CNP-Tg/Nppc(-/-) mice, body weight and body fat ratio were reduced by 24% and 32%, respectively, at 20 wk of age, and decreases of blood glucose levels during insulin tolerance tests were 2-fold exaggerated at 17 wk of age, as compared with CNP-Tg/Nppc(+/+) mice. Urinary noradrenalin excretion of CNP-Tg/Nppc(-/-) mice was greater than that of CNP-Tg/Nppc(+/+) mice by 28%. In CNP-Tg/Nppc(-/-) mice, rectal temperature at 1600 h was higher by 1.1 C, and uncoupling protein-1 mRNA expression in the brown adipose tissue was 2-fold increased, which was canceled by propranolol administration, as compared with CNP-Tg/Nppc(+/+) mice. Oxygen consumption was significantly increased in CNP-Tg/Nppc(-/-) mice compared with that in CNP-Tg/Nppc(+/+) mice. Food intake of CNP-Tg/Nppc(-/-) mice upon ad libitum feeding and refeeding after 48 h starvation were reduced by 21% and 61%, respectively, as compared with CNP-Tg/Nppc(+/+) mice. This study unveiled a new aspect of CNP as a molecule regulating food intake and energy expenditure. Further analyses on precise mechanisms of CNP actions would lead to the better understanding of the significance of the CNP/guanylyl cyclase-B system in food intake and energy expenditure.

  1. The Effect of Breakfast Type on Total Daily Energy Intake and Body Mass Index Among Thai School Children.

    PubMed

    Purttiponthanee, Sasiumphai; Rojroongwasinkul, Nipa; Wimonpeerapattana, Wanphen; Thasanasuwan, Wiyada; Senaprom, Sayamon; Khouw, Ilse; Deurenberg, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The study investigated the association between breakfast types consumed, daily energy intake, and body mass index for age Z-score (BAZ). Cross-sectional data from 1258 children aged 7 to 12.9 years were analyzed for breakfast type, nutrient intakes, BAZ, and proportion of overweight or obesity. Analysis of covariance was used to compare energy and nutrient intakes, BAZ, and proportion of overweight/obese children between breakfast groups. Only 19% of children had adequate energy intake from breakfast. Those consuming snacks had a significantly lower BAZ (Z = -0.73), with 5% of them being overweight/obese. Those consuming beverages and desserts had the lowest total daily energy intake (1314 kcal) and lowest protein intake (8.4 g). The results suggest that breakfast type is associated with daily energy intake and BAZ. Most breakfasts are not adequate. School-based nutrition education programs involving families, teachers, and health professionals can contribute to improve this situation.

  2. The Affording Mars Workshop: Background and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Carberry, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    . The workshop was organized around three topical breakout sessions: 1. The ISS and the path to Mars: The critical coming decade 2. Affordability and sustainability: what does it mean and what are its implications within guidelines established at the start of the workshop? 3. Notional sequence(s) of cost-achievable missions for the 2020s to 2030s, including capability objectives at each stage and opportunities for coordinated robotic partnerships.

  3. Affordable Earth Observatories for Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurer, R. H.

    Traditionally high cost has been the principal impediment to developing nations desiring to pursue space programs. More particularly, the benefits derivable from a space system have been less than adequate to justify the investment required. Chief among the causes has been the inability of the system to produce results with sufficient direct economic value to the peoples of their countries. Over the past 15 years, however, "the Microspace Revolution" has resulted in dramatic reductions in the cost of space systems, while at the same time technology has improved to provide greater capabilities in the smallest micro- and nano-class1 satellites. Because of these advances, it behooves developing nations to reevaluate space as an option for their national development. This paper summarizes two new micro-satellite concepts - NanoObservatoryTM and MicroObservatoryTM that offer the prom- ise of a dedicated Earth remote sensing capability at costs comparable to or less than simply buying data from the best known large systems, Landsat and SPOT. Each system is defined both by its observation capabilities and technical parameters of the system's design. Moreover, the systems are characterized in terms of the other potential benefits to developing economies, i.e., education of a technical workforce or applications of Earth imagery in solving national needs. Comparisons are provided with more traditional Earth observing satellites. NanoObservatoryTM is principally intended to serve as a developmental system to build general technical expertise space technology and Earth observation. MicroObservatoryTM takes the next step by focusing on a more sophisticated optical imag- ing camera while keeping the spacecraft systems simple and affordable. For both programs, AeroAstro is working with non- profit institutions to develop a corresponding program of technical participation with the nations that elect to pursue such programs. Dependent upon current capabilities, this might include

  4. Crashworthy Seats Would Afford Superior Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gohmert, Dustin

    2009-01-01

    Seats to prevent or limit crash injuries to astronauts aboard the crew vehicle of the Orion spacecraft are undergoing development. The design of these seats incorporates and goes beyond crash-protection concepts embodied in prior spacecraft and racing-car seats to afford superior protection against impacts. Although the seats are designed to support astronauts in a recumbent, quasi-fetal posture that would likely not be suitable for non-spacecraft applications, parts of the design could be adapted to military and some civilian aircraft seats and to racing car seats to increase levels of protection. The main problem in designing any crashworthy seat is to provide full support of the occupant against anticipated crash and emergency-landing loads so as to safely limit motion, along any axis, of any part of the occupant s body relative to (1) any other part of the occupant s body, (2) the spacecraft or other vehicle, and (3) the seat itself. In the original Orion spacecraft application and in other applications that could easily be envisioned, the problem is complicated by severe limits on space available for the seat, a requirement to enable rapid egress by the occupant after a crash, and a requirement to provide for fitting of the seat to a wide range of sizes and shapes of a human body covered by a crash suit, space suit, or other protective garment. The problem is further complicated by other Orion-application-specific requirements that must be omitted here for the sake of brevity. To accommodate the wide range of crewmember body lengths within the limits on available space in the original Orion application, the design provides for taller crewmembers to pull their legs back closer toward their chests, while shorter crewmembers can allow their legs to stretch out further. The range of hip-support seat adjustments needed to effect this accommodation, as derived from NASA s Human Systems Integration Standard, was found to define a parabolic path along which the knees

  5. Balancing adequacy and affordability?: Essential Health Benefits under the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Haeder, Simon F

    2014-12-01

    The Essential Health Benefits provisions under the Affordable Care Act require that eligible plans provide coverage for certain broadly defined service categories, limit consumer cost-sharing, and meet certain actuarial value requirements. Although the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) was tasked with the regulatory development of these EHB under the ACA, the department quickly devolved this task to the states. Not surprisingly, states fully exploited the leeway provided by HHS, and state decision processes and outcomes differed widely. However, none of the states took advantage of the opportunity to restructure fundamentally their health insurance markets, and only a very limited number of states actually included sophisticated policy expertise in their decisionmaking processes. As a result, and despite a major expansion of coverage, the status quo ex ante in state insurance markets was largely perpetuated. Decisionmaking for the 2016 revisions should be transparent, included a wide variety of stakeholders and policy experts, and focus on balancing adequacy and affordability. However, the 2016 revisions provide an opportunity to address these previous shortcomings.

  6. Predicting hydration free energies of amphetamine-type stimulants with a customized molecular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jipeng; Fu, Jia; Huang, Xing; Lu, Diannan; Wu, Jianzhong

    2016-09-01

    Amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) are a group of incitation and psychedelic drugs affecting the central nervous system. Physicochemical data for these compounds are essential for understanding the stimulating mechanism, for assessing their environmental impacts, and for developing new drug detection methods. However, experimental data are scarce due to tight regulation of such illicit drugs, yet conventional methods to estimate their properties are often unreliable. Here we introduce a tailor-made multiscale procedure for predicting the hydration free energies and the solvation structures of ATS molecules by a combination of first principles calculations and the classical density functional theory. We demonstrate that the multiscale procedure performs well for a training set with similar molecular characteristics and yields good agreement with a testing set not used in the training. The theoretical predictions serve as a benchmark for the missing experimental data and, importantly, provide microscopic insights into manipulating the hydrophobicity of ATS compounds by chemical modifications.

  7. Enhancement in open circuit voltage through a cascade-type energy band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sista, Srinivas; Yao, Yan; Yang, Yang; Tang, Ming Lee; Bao, Zhenan

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we report a method to increase the open-circuit voltage (VOC) of an organic solar cell by inserting an interfacial layer between the donor and acceptor layers to form a cascade-type energy band structure. We demonstrate its feasibility using a recently reported asymmetric pentacene derivative, tetraceno[2,3-b]thiophene (TT) as a donor material, C60 as an acceptor material, and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) as the sandwich layer. The VOC was increased from 0.3V for the device with no CuPc sandwich layer to 0.56V for 13nm thick CuPc layer. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the device with 13nm CuPc layer was 1.53% and the fill factor (FF) was 0.64, in comparison to TT /C60 device which had a PCE of 0.78% and a FF of 0.52.

  8. Discovery of a Fanaroff-Riley type 0 radio galaxy emitting at γ-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandi, Paola; Capetti, Alessandro; Baldi, Ranieri D.

    2016-03-01

    We present supporting evidence for the first association of a Fermi source, 3FGLJ1330.0-3818, Acero et al. (2015) with the Fanaroff-Riley type 0 (FR 0) radio galaxy Tol1326-379. FR 0s represent the majority of the local population of radio-loud active galactic nuclei but their nature is still unclear. They share the same nuclear and host properties as FR Is, but they show a large deficit of extended radio emission. Here we show that FR 0s can emit photons at very high energies. Tol1326-379 has a GeV luminosity of L>1 GeV ˜ 2 × 1042 erg s-1, typical of FR Is, but with a steeper γ-ray spectrum (Γ = 2.78 ± 0.14). This could be related to the intrinsic jet properties but also to a different viewing angle.

  9. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-01

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d31 mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  10. Experimental study on load characteristics in a floating type pendulum wave energy converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tengen; Imai, Yasutaka; Nagata, Shuichi

    2014-10-01

    A floating type pendulum wave energy converter (FPWEC) with a rotary vane pump as the power take-off system was proposed by Watabe et al. in 1998. They showed that this device had high energy conversion efficiency. In the previous research, the authors conducted 2D wave tank tests in regular waves to evaluate the generating efficiency of FPWEC with a power take-off system composed of pulleys, belts and a generator. As a result, the influence of the electrical load on the generating efficiency was shown. Continuously, the load characteristics of FPWEC are pursued experimentally by using the servo motors to change the damping coefficient in this paper. In a later part of this paper, the motions of the model with the servo motors are compared with that of the case with the same power take-off system as the previous research. From the above experiment, it may be concluded that the maximum primary conversion efficiency is achieved as high as 98% at the optimal load.

  11. On the modular structure of the genus-one Type II superstring low energy expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hoker, Eric; Green, Michael B.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    The analytic contribution to the low energy expansion of Type II string amplitudes at genus-one is a power series in space-time derivatives with coefficients that are determined by integrals of modular functions over the complex structure modulus of the world-sheet torus. These modular functions are associated with world-sheet vacuum Feynman diagrams and given by multiple sums over the discrete momenta on the torus. In this paper we exhibit exact differential and algebraic relations for a certain infinite class of such modular functions by showing that they satisfy Laplace eigenvalue equations with inhomogeneous terms that are polynomial in non-holomorphic Eisenstein series. Furthermore, we argue that the set of modular functions that contribute to the coefficients of interactions up to order are linear sums of functions in this class and quadratic polynomials in Eisenstein series and odd Riemann zeta values. Integration over the complex structure results in coefficients of the low energy expansion that are rational numbers multiplying monomials in odd Riemann zeta values.

  12. THE INTEGRAL HIGH-ENERGY CUT-OFF DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Malizia, A.; Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Stephen, J. B.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.; Bird, A. J.

    2014-02-20

    In this Letter we present the primary continuum parameters, the photon index Γ, and the high-energy cut-off E {sub c} of 41 type-1 Seyfert galaxies extracted from the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We performed broadband (0.3-100 keV) spectral analysis by simultaneously fitting the soft and hard X-ray spectra obtained by XMM and INTEGRAL/IBIS-Swift/BAT, respectively, in order to investigate the general properties of these parameters, in particular their distribution and mean values. We find a mean photon index of 1.73 with a standard deviation of 0.17 and a mean high-energy cut-off of 128 keV with a standard deviation of 46 keV for the whole sample. This is the first time that the cut-off energy is constrained in such a large number of AGNs. We have 26 measurements of the cut-off, which corresponds to 63% of the entire sample, distributed between 50 and 200 keV. There are a further 11 lower limits mostly below 300 keV. Using the main parameters of the primary continuum, we have been able to obtain the actual physical parameters of the Comptonizing region, i.e., the plasma temperature kT {sub e} from 20 to 100 keV and the optical depth τ < 4. Finally, with the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra starting to come from NuSTAR it will soon be possible to better constrain the cut-off values in many AGNs, allowing the determination of more physical models and thus better understand the continuum emission and geometry of the region surrounding black holes.

  13. Evolution of High-energy Particle Distribution in Mature Shell-type Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Houdun; Xin, Yuliang; Liu, Siming; Jokipii, J. R.; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuinai

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wavelength observations of mature supernova remnants (SNRs), especially with recent advances in γ-ray astronomy, make it possible to constrain energy distribution of energetic particles within these remnants. In consideration of the SNR origin of Galactic cosmic rays and physics related to particle acceleration and radiative processes, we use a simple one-zone model to fit the nonthermal emission spectra of three shell-type SNRs located within 2° on the sky: RX J1713.7‑3946, CTB 37B, and CTB 37A. Although radio images of these three sources all show a shell (or half-shell) structure, their radio, X-ray, and γ-ray spectra are quite different, offering an ideal case to explore evolution of energetic particle distribution in SNRs. Our spectral fitting shows that (1) the particle distribution becomes harder with aging of these SNRs, implying a continuous acceleration process, and the particle distributions of CTB 37A and CTB 37B in the GeV range are harder than the hardest distribution that can be produced at a shock via the linear diffusive shock particle acceleration process, so spatial transport may play a role; (2) the energy loss timescale of electrons at the high-energy cutoff due to synchrotron radiation appears to be always a bit (within a factor of a few) shorter than the age of the corresponding remnant, which also requires continuous particle acceleration; (3) double power-law distributions are needed to fit the spectra of CTB 37B and CTB 37A, which may be attributed to shock interaction with molecular clouds.

  14. NON-EQUIPARTITION OF ENERGY, MASSES OF NOVA EJECTA, AND TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Yaron, Ofer; Prialnik, Dina; Kovetz, Attay

    2010-04-01

    The total masses ejected during classical nova (CN) eruptions are needed to answer two questions with broad astrophysical implications: can accreting white dwarfs be 'pushed over' the Chandrasekhar mass limit to yield type Ia supernovae? Are ultra-luminous red variables a new kind of astrophysical phenomenon, or merely extreme classical novae? We review the methods used to determine nova ejecta masses. Except for the unique case of BT Mon (nova 1939), all nova ejecta mass determinations depend on untested assumptions and multi-parameter modeling. The remarkably simple assumption of equipartition between kinetic and radiated energy (E {sub kin} and E {sub rad}, respectively) in nova ejecta has been invoked as a way around this conundrum for the ultra-luminous red variable in M31. The deduced mass is far larger than that produced by any CN model. Our nova eruption simulations show that radiation and kinetic energy in nova ejecta are very far from being in energy equipartition, with variations of 4 orders of magnitude in the ratio E {sub kin}/E {sub rad} being commonplace. The assumption of equipartition must not be used to deduce nova ejecta masses; any such 'determinations' can be overestimates by a factor of up to 10,000. We data-mined our extensive series of nova simulations to search for correlations that could yield nova ejecta masses. Remarkably, the mass ejected during a nova eruption is dependent only on (and is directly proportional to) E {sub rad}. If we measure the distance to an erupting nova and its bolometric light curve, then E {sub rad} and hence the mass ejected can be directly measured.

  15. The INTEGRAL High-energy Cut-off Distribution of Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malizia, A.; Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Stephen, J. B.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.; Bird, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    In this Letter we present the primary continuum parameters, the photon index Γ, and the high-energy cut-off E c of 41 type-1 Seyfert galaxies extracted from the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We performed broadband (0.3-100 keV) spectral analysis by simultaneously fitting the soft and hard X-ray spectra obtained by XMM and INTEGRAL/IBIS-Swift/BAT, respectively, in order to investigate the general properties of these parameters, in particular their distribution and mean values. We find a mean photon index of 1.73 with a standard deviation of 0.17 and a mean high-energy cut-off of 128 keV with a standard deviation of 46 keV for the whole sample. This is the first time that the cut-off energy is constrained in such a large number of AGNs. We have 26 measurements of the cut-off, which corresponds to 63% of the entire sample, distributed between 50 and 200 keV. There are a further 11 lower limits mostly below 300 keV. Using the main parameters of the primary continuum, we have been able to obtain the actual physical parameters of the Comptonizing region, i.e., the plasma temperature kT e from 20 to 100 keV and the optical depth τ < 4. Finally, with the high signal-to-noise ratio spectra starting to come from NuSTAR it will soon be possible to better constrain the cut-off values in many AGNs, allowing the determination of more physical models and thus better understand the continuum emission and geometry of the region surrounding black holes.

  16. The Value of Full Correction: Achieving Excellent and Affordable Results.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2016-01-01

    Patients often come to medical aesthetic offices with hopes to fully correct lost facial volume and achieve a natural appearance. Unfortunately, the cost per syringe of dermal filler can be a barrier to desired outcomes. Many aesthetic practitioners do the best they can with the amount of product the patient can afford, often falling short of the "wow" effect for the patient. This article describes what one office implemented to solve the conundrum of affordability while still allowing offices to cover its own financial realities. This tool can help patients achieve beautiful, natural, and affordable outcomes while helping offices advance in manufacturer's tiers, improve word-of-mouth advertising, and increase job satisfaction.

  17. Study of Flare Energy Release Using Events with Numerous Type III-like Bursts in Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkina, N. S.; Altyntsev, A. T.; Zhdanov, D. A.; Lesovoi, S. V.; Kochanov, A. A.; Yan, Y. H.; Tan, C. M.

    2012-10-01

    The analysis of narrowband drifting of type III-like structures in radio bursts dynamic spectra allows one to obtain unique information about the primary energy release mechanisms in solar flares. The SSRT (Siberian Solar Radio Telescope) spatially resolved images and its high spectral and temporal resolution allow for direct determination not only of the source positions but also of the exciter velocities along the flare loop. Practically, such measurements are possible during some special time intervals when SSRT is observing the flare region in two high-order fringes near 5.7 GHz; thus, two 1D brightness distributions are recorded simultaneously at two frequency bands. The analysis of type III-like bursts recorded during the flare 14 April 2002 is presented. Using multiwavelength radio observations recorded by the SSRT, the Huairou Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS), the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP), and the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), we study an event with series of several tens of drifting microwave pulses with drift rates in the range from -7 to 13 GHz s-1. The sources of the fast-drifting bursts were located near the top of a flare loop in a volume of a few Mm in size. The slow drift of the exciters along the flare loop suggests a high pitch anisotropy of the emitting electrons.

  18. Skill transfer, affordances and dexterity in different climbing environments.

    PubMed

    Seifert, L; Wattebled, L; L'hermette, M; Bideault, G; Herault, R; Davids, K

    2013-12-01

    This study explored how skills in one region of a perceptual-motor landscape of performance, created in part by previous experience in rock climbing, can shape those that emerge in another region (ice climbing). Ten novices in rock climbing and five intermediate rock climbers were observed climbing an icefall. Locations of right and left ice tools and crampons were videotaped from a frontal camera. Inter-individual variability of upper and lower limb couplings and types of action regarding icefall properties were assessed by cluster hierarchical analysis, distinguishing three clusters. Pelvis vertical displacement, duration and number of pelvis pauses were also analyzed. Experienced rock climbers were grouped in the same cluster and showed the highest range and variability of limb angular locations and coordination patterns, the highest vertical displacement and the shortest pelvis plateaux durations. Non-fluent climbers (clusters 2 and 3) showed low range and variability of limb angular locations and coordination patterns. In particular, climbers of cluster 3 exhibited the lowest vertical displacement, the longest plateaux durations and the greatest ratio between tool swinging and definitive anchorage. Our results exemplified the positive influence of skills in rock climbing on ice climbing performance, facilitated by the detection of affordances from environmental properties.

  19. Developing affordable multi-touch technologies for use in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Mark; Ilie, Carolina; Schofield, Damian; Vampola, David

    2012-02-01

    Physics is one of many areas which has the ability to benefit from a number of different teaching styles and sophisticated instructional tools due to it having both theoretical and practical applications which can be explored. The purpose of this research is to develop affordable large scale multi-touch interfaces which can be used within and outside of the classroom as both an instruction technology and a computer supported collaborative learning tool. Not only can this technology be implemented at university levels, but also at the K-12 level of education. Pedagogical research indicates that kinesthetic learning is a fundamental, powerful, and ubiquitous learning style [1]. Through the use of these types of multi-touch tools and teaching methods which incorporate them, the classroom can be enriched to allow for better comprehension and retention of information. This is due in part to a wider range of learning styles, such as kinesthetic learning, which are being catered to within the classroom. [4pt] [1] Wieman, C.E, Perkins, K.K., Adams, W.K., ``Oersted Medal Lecture 2007: Interactive Simulations for teaching physics: What works, what doesn't and why,'' American Journal of Physics. 76 393-99.

  20. Can Consumers Make Affordable Care Affordable? The Value of Choice Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric J.; Hassin, Ran; Baker, Tom; Bajger, Allison T.; Treuer, Galen

    2013-01-01

    Tens of millions of people are currently choosing health coverage on a state or federal health insurance exchange as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. We examine how well people make these choices, how well they think they do, and what can be done to improve these choices. We conducted 6 experiments asking people to choose the most cost-effective policy using websites modeled on current exchanges. Our results suggest there is significant room for improvement. Without interventions, respondents perform at near chance levels and show a significant bias, overweighting out-of-pocket expenses and deductibles. Financial incentives do not improve performance, and decision-makers do not realize that they are performing poorly. However, performance can be improved quite markedly by providing calculation aids, and by choosing a “smart” default. Implementing these psychologically based principles could save purchasers of policies and taxpayers approximately 10 billion dollars every year. PMID:24367484

  1. PHEX Mimetic (SPR4-Peptide) Corrects and Improves HYP and Wild Type Mice Energy-Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zelenchuk, Lesya V.; Hedge, Anne-Marie; Rowe, Peter S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Context PHEX or DMP1 mutations cause hypophosphatemic-rickets and altered energy metabolism. PHEX binds to DMP1-ASARM-motif to form a complex with α5β3 integrin that suppresses FGF23 expression. ASARM-peptides increase FGF23 by disrupting the PHEX-DMP1-Integrin complex. We used a 4.2 kDa peptide (SPR4) that binds to ASARM-peptide/motif to study the DMP1-PHEX interaction and to assess SPR4 for the treatment of energy metabolism defects in HYP and potentially other bone-mineral disorders. Design Subcutaneously transplanted osmotic pumps were used to infuse SPR4-peptide or vehicle (VE) into wild-type mice (WT) and HYP-mice (PHEX mutation) for 4 weeks. Results SPR4 partially corrected HYP mice hypophosphatemia and increased serum 1.25(OH)2D3. Serum FGF23 remained high and PTH was unaffected. WT-SPR4 mice developed hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia with increased PTH, FGF23 and 1.25(OH)2D3. SPR4 increased GAPDH HYP-bone expression 60× and corrected HYP-mice hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. HYP-VE serum uric-acid (UA) levels were reduced and SPR4 infusion suppressed UA levels in WT-mice but not HYP-mice. SPR4 altered leptin, adiponectin, and sympathetic-tone and increased the fat mass/weight ratio for HYP and WT mice. Expression of perlipin-2 a gene involved in obesity was reduced in HYP-VE and WT-SPR4 mice but increased in HYP-SPR4 mice. Also, increased expression of two genes that inhibit insulin-signaling, ENPP1 and ESP, occurred with HYP-VE mice. In contrast, SPR4 reduced expression of both ENPP1 and ESP in WT mice and suppressed ENPP1 in HYP mice. Increased expression of FAM20C and sclerostin occurred with HYP-VE mice. SPR4 suppressed expression of FAM20C and sclerostin in HYP and WT mice. Conclusions ASARM peptides and motifs are physiological substrates for PHEX and modulate osteocyte PHEX-DMP1-α5β3-integrin interactions and thereby FGF23 expression. These interactions also provide a nexus that regulates bone and energy metabolism. SPR4 suppression of

  2. Lake Hill Administrative Site Affordable Housing Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Udall, Mark [D-CO

    2013-07-16

    11/20/2013 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests, and Mining. Hearings held. With printed Hearing: S.Hrg. 113-342. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2337, which became Public Law 113-141 on 7/25/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Affordable and personalized lighting using inverse modeling and virtual sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Chandrayee; Chen, Benjamin; Richards, Jacob; Dhinakaran, Aparna; Agogino, Alice; Martin, Rodney

    2014-03-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have great potential to enable personalized intelligent lighting systems while reducing building energy use by 50%-70%. As a result WSN systems are being increasingly integrated in state-ofart intelligent lighting systems. In the future these systems will enable participation of lighting loads as ancillary services. However, such systems can be expensive to install and lack the plug-and-play quality necessary for user-friendly commissioning. In this paper we present an integrated system of wireless sensor platforms and modeling software to enable affordable and user-friendly intelligent lighting. It requires ⇠ 60% fewer sensor deployments compared to current commercial systems. Reduction in sensor deployments has been achieved by optimally replacing the actual photo-sensors with real-time discrete predictive inverse models. Spatially sparse and clustered sub-hourly photo-sensor data captured by the WSN platforms are used to develop and validate a piece-wise linear regression of indoor light distribution. This deterministic data-driven model accounts for sky conditions and solar position. The optimal placement of photo-sensors is performed iteratively to achieve the best predictability of the light field desired for indoor lighting control. Using two weeks of daylight and artificial light training data acquired at the Sustainability Base at NASA Ames, the model was able to predict the light level at seven monitored workstations with 80%-95% accuracy. We estimate that 10% adoption of this intelligent wireless sensor system in commercial buildings could save 0.2-0.25 quads BTU of energy nationwide.

  4. Structures and free energy landscapes of the wild-type and A30P mutant-type α-synuclein proteins with dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wise-Scira, Olivia; Aloglu, Ahmet Kemal; Dunn, Aquila; Sakallioglu, Isin Tuna; Coskuner, Orkid

    2013-03-20

    The genetic missense A30P mutation of the wild-type α-synuclein protein results in the replacement of the 30th amino acid residue from alanine (Ala) to proline (Pro) and was initially found in the members of a German family who developed Parkinson's disease. Even though the structures of these proteins have been measured before, detailed understanding about the structures and their relationships with free energy landscapes is lacking, which is of interest to provide insights into the pathogenic mechanism of Parkinson's disease. We report the secondary and tertiary structures and conformational free energy landscapes of the wild-type and A30P mutant-type α-synuclein proteins in an aqueous solution environment via extensive parallel tempering molecular dynamics simulations along with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, we present the residual secondary structure component transition stabilities at the atomic level with dynamics in terms of free energy change calculations using a new strategy that we reported most recently. Our studies yield new interesting results; for instance, we find that the A30P mutation has local as well as long-range effects on the structural properties of the wild-type α-synuclein protein. The helical content at Ala18-Gly31 is less prominent in comparison to the wild-type α-synuclein protein. The β-sheet structure abundance decreases in the N-terminal region upon A30P mutation of the wild-type α-synuclein, whereas the NAC and C-terminal regions possess larger tendencies for β-sheet structure formation. Long-range intramolecular protein interactions are less abundant upon A30P mutation, especially between the NAC and C-terminal regions, which is linked to the less compact and less stable structures of the A30P mutant-type rather than the wild-type α-synuclein protein. Results including the usage of our new strategy for secondary structure transition stabilities show that the A30P mutant-type α-synuclein tendency toward

  5. Object Affordances Potentiate Responses but Do Not Guide Attentional Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Yamani, Yusuke; Ariga, Atsunori; Yamada, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Handled objects automatically activate afforded responses. The current experiment examined whether objects that afford a response are also prioritized for attentional processing in visual search. Targets were pictures of coffee cups with handles oriented either to the right or the left. Subjects searched for a target, a right-handled vs. left-handled coffee cup, among a varying number of distractor cups oriented in the opposite direction. Responses were faster when the direction of target handle and the key press were spatially matched than mismatched (stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) effect), but object affordance did not moderate slopes of the search functions, indicating the absence of attentional prioritization effect. These findings imply that handled objects prime afforded responses without influencing attentional prioritization. PMID:26793077

  6. Reducing costs in aircraft: The metals affordability initiative consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rick; Evans, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    Emerging metallic materials, processing, and manufacturing technologies offer an important opportunity to meet current aircraft-airframe and jet-engine affordability goals, due to their inherent low material costs and excellent producibility characteristics. But to successfully meet systems goals within this new affordability-driven scenario, a consolidation ofindustry and military-agency development resources and technology-implementation activities is necessary to positively impact the military-aircraft production and sustainment infrastructure. To address this need, a consortium of aircraft and engine manufacturers and key material-and engine manufacturers and key material-and component-supplier companies has been formed to identify critical affordable metal technologies, develop a strategic roadmap for accelerated development and insertion of these technologies, and oversee execution of development activities by integrated industry teams. the goal of the Metals Affordability Initiative is to reduce the cost of metallic components by 50 percent while accelerating the implementation time.

  7. The influence of the types of marine fuel over the Energy Efficiency Operational Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acomi, Nicoleta; Acomi, Ovidiu

    2014-05-01

    One of the main concerns of our society is certainly the environment protection. The international efforts for maintaining the environment clean are various and this paper refers to the efforts in the maritime transport field. Marine pollution consists of the water pollution and also the air pollution. Regardless of the delay in recognizing the later type of pollution, it rapidly gains many organizations to argue on it. The first step was including a dedicated annex (Annex VI) in the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, in 1997, which seeks to minimize the airborne emissions from ships. In order to control and minimize the air pollution, the International Maritime Organization has also developed a series of measures for monitoring the emissions. These measures are grouped in three main directions: technical, operational and management related. The subject of our study is the concept of Energy Efficiency Operational Index (EEOI), developed to provide ship-owners with assistance in the process of establishing the emissions from ships in operation, and to suggest the methods for achieving their reduction. As a monitoring tool, EEOI represents the mass of CO2 emitted per unit of transport work. The actual CO2 emission from combustion of fuel on board a ship during each voyage is calculated by multiplying total fuel consumption for each type of fuel (e.g. diesel oil, gas oil, light fuel oil, heavy fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas, liquefied natural gas) with the carbon to CO2 conversion factor for the fuel in question. The performed transport work is calculated by multiplying mass of cargo (tonnes, number of TEU/cars, or number of passengers) with the distance in nautical miles corresponding to the transport work done. Using the software developed by the author it will be emphasized the variation of the EEOI value for one vessel using different types of fuel for the voyage's legs (distance to discharge port, distance to loading port, the

  8. Why the affordable care act needs a better name: 'Americare'.

    PubMed

    Sage, William M

    2010-08-01

    The culmination of a century's effort to enact universal coverage in the United States is a law with an uninspiring title, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and an even more awkward acronym, PPACA. The Obama administration has decided to call the legislation the Affordable Care Act, but the expansion of health coverage that the law sets in motion has no name, and therefore no identity. It badly needs one.

  9. Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae -- Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Filippenko, Alexei Vladimir

    2014-05-09

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia; exploding white-dwarf stars) were the key to the Nobel-worthy 1998 discovery and subsequent verification that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, driven by the effects of dark energy. Understanding the nature of this mysterious, yet dominant, component of the Universe is at the forefront of research in cosmology and fundamental physics. SNe Ia will continue to play a leading role in this enterprise, providing precise cosmological distances that improve constraints on the nature of dark energy. However, for this effort to succeed, we need to more thoroughly understand relatively nearby SNe Ia, because our conclusions come only from comparisons between them and distant (high-redshift) SNe Ia. Thus, detailed studies of relatively nearby SNe Ia are the focus of this research program. Many interesting results were obtained during the course of this project; these were published in 32 refereed research papers that acknowledged the grant. A major accomplishment was the publication of supernova (SN) rates derived from about a decade of operation of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) with the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT). We have determined the most accurate rates for SNe of different types in large, nearby galaxies in the present-day Universe, and these can be compared with SN rates far away (and hence long ago in the past) to set constraints on the types of stars that explode. Another major accomplishment was the publication of the light curves (brightness vs. time) of 165 SNe Ia, along with optical spectroscopy of many of these SNe as well as other SNe Ia, providing an extensive, homogeneous database for detailed studies. We have conducted intensive investigations of a number of individual SNe Ia, including quite unusual examples that allow us to probe the entire range of SN explosions and provide unique insights into these objects and the stars before they explode. My team's studies have also led

  10. Lunch energy density and the metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Menegotto, Giovana; Moraes Silva, Flávia; de Azevedo, Mirela Jobim; de Almeida, Jussara Carnevale

    2013-11-14

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible associations between dietary energy density (ED) and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in patients with type 2 diabetes. In the present case-control study, the dietary ED of 125 patients with type 2 diabetes (seventy-eight with (cases) the MetS and forty-seven without (controls) the MetS; mean age 62·0 (SD 9·4) years, mean diabetes duration 12·5 (SD 8·4) years and mean glycated Hb 7·2 (SD 1·3) %) was assessed by weighed diet records. The MetS was defined according to the 2009 Joint Interim Statement and ED by the amount of energy (kJ) in a given weight of food. Data are expressed as means (standard deviations) or medians (interquartile ranges). Patients with the MetS reported lower intakes of total energy and fibre, and a higher total food amount than the controls; the total ED did not differ, but the cases had a higher ED at lunch (mean 6·3 (SD 1·3) v. 5·9 (SD 0·8) kJ/g; P= 0·017). In this meal, patients with the MetS had lower intakes of beans (median 0·7 (interquartile range 0·4-1·1) v. 1·1 (interquartile range 0·6-1·6) g/kg; P= 0·020), vegetables (median 1·2 (interquartile range 0·6-1·7) v. 1·4 (interquartile range 1·0-2·0) g/kg; P= 0·046) and total meat (median 1·3 (interquartile range 1·0-1·6) v. 1·4 (interquartile range 1·2-1·8) g/kg; P= 0·034) than patients without the MetS. The associations between lunch ED (kJ/g) and food groups (g/kg) were confirmed for vegetables (r - 0·584; P< 0·001), fruits (r - 0·233; P= 0·070), beans (r - 0·189; P= 0·037) and oils (r 0·323; P< 0·001). In a multivariate logistic regression model, a high lunch ED was associated with the MetS (OR 6·89, 95 % CI 1·35, 35·15; P =0·020) after adjusting for confounders. In conclusion, a high ED at lunch increased the odds of the presence of the MetS in patients with type 2 diabetes. Beans and vegetables may be the major contributors to this association and their consumption might be

  11. Affordable Exploration of Mars: Recommendations from a Community Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Carberry, Chris; Cassady, R. Joseph; Cooke, Doug; Kirkpatrick, Jim; Perino, Maria Antonietta; Raftery, Michael; Westenberg, Artemis; Zucker, Richard

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing opinion that within two decades initial human missions to Mars are affordable under plausible budget scenarios, with sustained international participation, and --- especially --- without requiring those first missions to achieve a burdensome number of goals. In response to this view, a group of experts from the Mars exploration stakeholder communities attended the "Affording Mars" workshop at George Washington University in December 2013. Participants reviewed scenarios for proposed affordable and sustainable human and robotic exploration of Mars, the role of the International Space Station as the essential early step toward humans to Mars, possible "bridge" or "transition" missions in the 2020s, key capabilities required for affordable initial missions, international partnerships, and usable definitions of affordability and sustainability. We report here the findings, observations, and recommendations that were agreed to at that workshop. In the context of affordable early missions to Mars, we also discuss the recent report of the National Research Council on human space flight and a pair of recent scenarios that appear to promise reduced costs.

  12. Reform Americans Can Afford Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Herger, Wally [R-CA-2

    2010-05-27

    08/10/2010 Motion to Discharge Committee filed by Mr. Herger. Petition No: 111-12. (Discharge petition text with signatures.) (All Actions) Notes: On 8/10/2010, a motion was filed to discharge the Committees on Energy and Commerce, Appropriations, Ways and Means, Education and Labor, the Judiciary, Natural Resources, House Administration, and Rules from consideration of H.R.5424. A discharge petition requires 218 signatures for... Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Microphysics and energy and water fluxes of various fog types at SIRTA, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degefie, D. T.; El-Madany, T.-S.; Hejkal, J.; Held, M.; Dupont, J.-C.; Haeffelin, M.; Klemm, O.

    2015-01-01

    During the PARISFOG campaign in winter 2012/2013, microphysical properties and turbulent fluxes of fog droplets (liquid water), water vapor, and energy were characterized and quantified during fog events of various types that occurred at the SIRTA (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphérique) atmospheric observatory outside Paris. The eddy covariance technique was applied, employing a fast (10 Hz) fog droplet spectrometer, a three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer, and a fast response gas analyzer, which were operated at an altitude of 2.5 m above ground. A visibility meter was used to detect the occurrence and density of fog. A total of twenty-one fog events were measured during the field campaign. After applying quality criteria, six events remained. For this study, two fog events out of the six, representing a radiation fog and stratus lowering fog, respectively, are analyzed in detail. The two fog events exhibited very distinct patterns in terms of fog droplet size distribution, fog number concentration, and liquid water content. The evolution of these microphysical properties is elucidated through combined analysis of the turbulent fluxes of fog droplets (liquid water), water vapor and energy as well as reasoning of microphysical processes like, condensation, collision-coalescence, and droplet evaporation. Downward droplet number fluxes and liquid water fluxes were mostly observed in stratus lowering fog, however, upward fluxes were also observed in response to downward water vapor fluxes. In radiation fog, both upward and downward droplet number fluxes and liquid water fluxes were observed depending on the position at which the microphysical process was observed with respect to the measurement height. Bi-directional fog droplet fluxes with different flux directions of smaller and larger droplets were observed. In both fog events, the downward water vapor fluxes were the major cause for (I) the broadening of the fog droplet size

  14. Chemomechanical Coupling in Hexameric Protein-Protein Interfaces Harnesses Energy within V-Type ATPases.

    PubMed

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Chipot, Christophe; Moradi, Mahmoud; Schulten, Klaus

    2017-01-11

    ATP synthase is the most prominent bioenergetic macromolecular motor in all life forms, utilizing the proton gradient across the cell membrane to fuel the synthesis of ATP. Notwithstanding the wealth of available biochemical and structural information inferred from years of experiments, the precise molecular mechanism whereby vacuolar (V-type) ATP synthase fulfills its biological function remains largely fragmentary. Recently, crystallographers provided the first high-resolution view of ATP activity in Enterococcus hirae V1-ATPase. Employing a combination of transition-path sampling and high-performance free-energy methods, the sequence of conformational transitions involved in a functional cycle accompanying ATP hydrolysis has been investigated in unprecedented detail over an aggregate simulation time of 65 μs. Our simulated pathways reveal that the chemical energy produced by ATP hydrolysis is harnessed via the concerted motion of the protein-protein interfaces in the V1-ring, and is nearly entirely consumed in the rotation of the central stalk. Surprisingly, in an ATPase devoid of a central stalk, the interfaces of this ring are perfectly designed for inducing ATP hydrolysis. However, in a complete V1-ATPase, the mechanical property of the central stalk is a key determinant of the rate of ATP turnover. The simulations further unveil a sequence of events, whereby unbinding of the hydrolysis product (ADP + Pi) is followed by ATP uptake, which, in turn, leads to the torque generation step and rotation of the center stalk. Molecular trajectories also bring to light multiple intermediates, two of which have been isolated in independent crystallography experiments.

  15. Exercise intolerance in Glycogen Storage Disease Type III: weakness or energy deficiency?

    PubMed

    Preisler, Nicolai; Pradel, Agnès; Husu, Edith; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt; Becquemin, Marie-Hélène; Mollet, Alix; Labrune, Philippe; Petit, Francois; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Jardel, Claude; Maillot, Francois; Vissing, John; Laforêt, Pascal

    2013-05-01

    Myopathic symptoms in Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa (GSD IIIa) are generally ascribed to the muscle wasting that these patients suffer in adult life, but an inability to debranch glycogen likely also has an impact on muscle energy metabolism. We hypothesized that patients with GSD IIIa can experience exercise intolerance due to insufficient carbohydrate oxidation in skeletal muscle. Six patients aged 17-36-years were studied. We determined VO 2peak (peak oxygen consumption), the response to forearm exercise, and the metabolic and cardiovascular responses to cycle exercise at 70% of VO 2peak with either a saline or a glucose infusion. VO 2peak was below normal. Glucose improved the work capacity by lowering the heart rate, and increasing the peak work rate by 30% (108 W with glucose vs. 83 W with placebo, p=0.018). The block in muscle glycogenolytic capacity, combined with the liver involvement caused exercise intolerance with dynamic skeletal muscle symptoms (excessive fatigue and muscle pain), and hypoglycemia in 4 subjects. In this study we combined anaerobic and aerobic exercise to systematically study skeletal muscle metabolism and exercise tolerance in patients with GSD IIIa. Exercise capacity was significantly reduced, and our results indicate that this was due to a block in muscle glycogenolytic capacity. Our findings suggest that the general classification of GSD III as a glycogenosis characterized by fixed symptoms related to muscle wasting should be modified to include dynamic exercise-related symptoms of muscle fatigue. A proportion of the skeletal muscle symptoms in GSD IIIa, i.e. weakness and fatigue, may be related to insufficient energy production in muscle.

  16. Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, P.; Podorson, D.; Varshney, K.

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques -- manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  17. Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, Parker; Podorson, David; Varshney, Kapil

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques, manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multiunit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder are two story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  18. Shrub morpho-types as indicator for the water flow energy - Tivoli travertine case (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erthal, Marcelle Marques; Capezzuoli, Enrico; Mancini, Alessandro; Claes, Hannes; Soete, Jeroen; Swennen, Rudy

    2017-01-01

    Travertines from Tivoli area (Central Italy) possess abundant shrub-like fabrics that are laterally continuous over hundreds of square meters. They occur dominantly in horizontal layers with aggradational and progradational stacking patterns. Their fabrics and morphologies are remarkably similar to the shrubs lithotypes reported in literature for the Pre-Salt reservoirs, offshore Brazil and Angola, with huge oil accumulations. Petrographic and micro-computer tomography analyses allowed the identification of six shrub morpho-types (i.e., narrow dendriform, wide dendriform, fili dendriform, arborescent, arbustiform and pustular). Dendriform shrubs are the most common lithotype in Tivoli area, and three different subtypes could be distinguished according to the arrangement of their branches. The shrubs consist largely of peloidal micritic aggregates engulfed in spar calcite, ranging in average from 1 to 3 cm in height. The shrubs are interpreted to have developed in very shallow extensive waterlogged slightly inclined flat areas, changing laterally into a slope system with crusts as the main lithotype. Changes in the hydrodynamic conditions with episodes of stagnancy influenced the shrub morpho-types making them very variegated. Shrub morphologies likely reflect specific (micro-) environments that are controlled by water flow rates, evaporation and microbial activity. The latter processes influenced shrub fabric and morphology. Under high flow conditions, CO2 degassing is the main process leading to carbonate precipitation. Consequently, denser and tightly packed morphologies will precipitate, composing mainly the crust lithotype. In this scenario microbes are less dominant. Dendriform shrubs, with narrow, wide and fili morphologies are interpreted to occur in moderate to low energy water flows. Narrow dendriform shrubs reflect faster flowing conditions, with decreasing impact of flow on the morphological aspects from wide dendriform shrubs to fili dendriform shrubs

  19. Implantable control, telemetry, and solar energy system in the moving actuator type total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J M; Lee, J H; Choi, S W; Kim, W E; Omn, K S; Park, S K; Kim, W G; Roh, J R; Min, B G

    1998-03-01

    The moving actuator type total artificial heart (TAH) developed in the Seoul National University has numerous design improvements based upon the digital signal processor (DSP). These improvements include the implantability of all electronics, an automatic control algorithm, and extension of the battery run-time in connection with an amorphous silicon solar system (SS). The implantable electronics consist of the motor drive, main processor, intelligent Li ion battery management (LIBM) based upon the DSP, telemetry system, and transcutaneous energy transmission (TET) system. Major changes in the implantable electronics include decreasing the temperature rise by over 21 degrees C on the motor drive, volume reduction (40 x 55 x 33 mm, 7 cell assembly) of the battery pack using a Li ion (3.6 V/cell, 900 mA.h), and improvement of the battery run-time (over 40 min) while providing the cardiac output (CO) of 5 L/min at 100 mm Hg afterload when the external battery for testing is connected with the SS (2.5 W, 192.192, 1 kg) for the external battery recharge or the partial TAH drive. The phase locked loop (PLL) based telemetry system was implemented to improve stability and the error correction DSP algorithm programmed to achieve high accuracy. A field focused light emitting diode (LED) was used to obtain low light scattering along the propagation path, similar to the optical property of the laser and miniature sized, mounted on the pancake type TET coils. The TET operating resonance frequency was self tuned in a range of 360 to 410 kHz to provide enough power even at high afterloads. An automatic cardiac output regulation algorithm was developed based on interventricular pressure analysis and carried out in several animal experiments successfully. All electronics have been evaluated in vitro and in vivo and prepared for implantation of the TAH. Substantial progress has been made in designing a completely implantable TAH at the preclinical stage.

  20. Energy partitioning and environmental influence factors in different vegetation types in the GEWEX Asian Monsoon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fengshan; Tao, Fulu; Li, Shenggong; Zhang, Shuai; Xiao, Dengpan; Wang, Meng

    2014-12-01

    Environmental influences upon energy balance in areas of different vegetation types (i.e., forest at Kog-Ma in Thailand and at Yakutsk in Russia, grassland at Amdo in Chinese Tibet and at Arvaikheer in Mongolia, and mixed farmland at Tak in Thailand) in the GEWEX Asian Monsoon Experiment were investigated. The sites we investigated are geographically and climatologically different; and consequently had quite large variations in temperature ( T), water vapor pressure deficit (VPD), soil moisture (SM), and precipitation (PPT). During May-October, the net radiation flux ( R n) (in W·m-2) was 406.21 at Tak, 365.57 at Kog-Ma, 390.97 at Amdo, 316.65 at Arvaikheer, and 287.10 at Yakutsk. During the growing period, the R n partitioned into latent heat flux ( λE/ R n) was greater than that partitioned into sensible heat flux ( H/ R n) at Tak and at Kog-Ma. In contrast, λE/ R n was lower than H/ R n at Arvaikheer, H/ R n was less than λE/ R n between DOY 149 and DOY 270 at Amdo, and between DOY 165 and DOY 235 at Yakutsk. The R n partitioned into ground heat flux was generally less than 0.15. The short-wave albedo was 0.12, 0.18, and 0.20 at the forest, mixed land, and grass sites, respectively. At an hourly scale, energy partitions had no correlation with environmental factors, based on average summer halfhourly values. At a seasonal scale energy partitions were linearly correlated (usually p<0.05) with T, VPD, and SM. The λE/ R n increased with increases in SM, T, and VPD at forest areas. At mixed farmlands, λE/ R n generally had positive correlations with SM, T, and VPD, but was restrained at extremely high values of VPD and T. At grasslands, λE/ R n was enhanced with increases of SM and T, but was decreased with VPD.

  1. Localization, time histories, and energy spectra of a new type of recurrent high-energy transient source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atteia, J.-L.; Boer, M.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Kouveliotou, C.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of a recurrent high-energy transient source which is neither a classical X-ray nor a gamma-ray burster, but whose properties are intermediate between the two, is reported. The energy spectra of 12 recurrent events are found to be soft, characterized by kT's of 34-56 keV. The time histories are short with rise and fall times as fast as about 10 ms. The source location is a 0.12 sq deg region about 10 deg from the Galactic center.

  2. Interference energy in C-H and C-C bonds of saturated hydrocarbons: dependence on the type of chain and relationship to bond dissociation energy.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Francisco Senna; Fantuzzi, Felipe; Cardozo, Thiago Messias; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer

    2013-05-16

    Interference energy for C-H and C-C bonds of a set of saturated hydrocarbons is calculated by the generalized product function energy partitioning (GPF-EP) method in order to investigate its sensitivity to the type of chain and also its contribution to the bond dissociation energy. All GPF groups corresponding to chemical bonds are calculated by use of GVB-PP wave functions to ensure the correct description of bond dissociation. The results show that the interference energies are practically the same for all the C-H bonds, presenting only small variations (0.5 kcal.mol(-1)) due to the structural changes in going from linear to branched and cyclic chains. A similar trend is verified for the C-C bonds, the sole exception being the cyclopropane molecule, for which only the C-C bond exhibits a more significant variation. On the other hand, although the interference energy is quantitatively the most important contribution to the bond dissociation energy (DE), one cannot predict DE only from the bond interference energy. Differences in the dissociation energies of C-C and C-H bonds due to structural changes in the saturated hydrocarbons can be mainly attributed to quasi-classical effects.

  3. Structure–performance relationships for cantilever-type piezoelectric energy harvesters

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kyung-Hoon E-mail: spriya@vt.edu; Park, Hwi-Yeol; Heo, Jin S.; Priya, Shashank E-mail: spriya@vt.edu

    2014-05-28

    This study provides comprehensive analysis of the structure–performance relationships in cantilever-type piezoelectric energy harvesters. It provides full understanding of the effect of all the practical global control variables on the harvester performance. The control variables considered for the analysis were material parameters, areal and volumetric dimensions, and configuration of the inactive and active layers. Experimentally, the output power density of the harvester was maximum when the shape of the beam was close to a square for a constant bending stiffness and a fixed beam area. Through analytical modeling of the effective stiffness for the piezoelectric bimorph, the conditions for enhancing the bending stiffness within the same beam volume as that of a conventional bimorph were identified. The harvester configuration with beam aspect ratio of 0.86 utilizing distributed inactive layers exhibited an giant output power of 52.5 mW and power density of 28.5 mW cm{sup −3} at 30 Hz under 6.9 m s{sup −2} excitation. The analysis further indicates that the trend in the output power with varying damping ratio is dissimilar to that of the efficiency. In order to realize best performance, the harvester should be designed with respect to maximizing the magnitude of output power.

  4. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Affordable Development Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doughty, Glen E.; Gerrish, H. P.; Kenny, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of nuclear power for space use in nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems will involve significant expenditures of funds and require major technology development efforts. The development effort must be economically viable yet sufficient to validate the systems designed. Efforts are underway within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage Project (NCPS) to study what a viable program would entail. The study will produce an integrated schedule, cost estimate and technology development plan. This will include the evaluation of various options for test facilities, types of testing and use of the engine, components, and technology developed. A "Human Rating" approach will also be developed and factored into the schedule, budget and technology development approach.

  5. Availability, accessibility, and affordability of neurodiagnostic tests in 37 countries

    PubMed Central

    McLane, Hannah C.; Berkowitz, Aaron L.; Patenaude, Bryan N.; McKenzie, Erica D.; Wolper, Emma; Wahlster, Sarah; Fink, Günther

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the availability, accessibility, and affordability of EEG, EMG, CSF analysis, head CT, and brain MRI for neurologic disorders across countries. Methods: An online, 60-question survey was distributed to neurology practitioners in 2014 to assess the presence, wait time, and cost of each test in private and public health sectors. Data were stratified by World Bank country income group. Affordability was calculated with reference to the World Health Organization's definition of catastrophic health expenditure as health-related out-of-pocket expenditure of >40% of disposable household income, and assessment of providers' perceptions of affordability to the patient. Results: Availability of EEG and EMG is correlated with higher World Bank income group (correlation coefficient 0.38, test for trend p = 0.046; 0.376, p = 0.043); CSF, CT, and MRI did not show statistically significant associations with income groups. Patients in public systems wait longer for neurodiagnostic tests, especially MRI, EEG, and urgent CT (p < 0.0001). The mean cost per test, across all tests, was lower in the public vs private sector (US $55.25 vs $214.62, p < 0.001). Each drop in World Bank income group is associated with a 29% decrease in the estimated share of the population who can afford a given test (95% confidence interval −33.4, 25.2; p < 0.001). In most low-income countries surveyed, only the top 10% or 20% of the population was able to afford tests below catastrophic levels. In surveyed lower-middle-income countries, >40% of the population, on average, could not afford neurodiagnostic tests. Conclusions: Neurodiagnostic tests are least affordable in the lowest income settings. Closing this “diagnostic gap” for countries with the lowest incomes is essential. PMID:26446063

  6. Object affordance and spatial-compatibility effects in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Galpin, Adam; Tipper, Steven P; Dick, Jeremy P R; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2011-03-01

    Movement in Parkinson's disease (PD) is strongly influenced by sensory stimuli. Here, we investigated two features of visual stimuli known to affect response times in healthy individuals; the spatial location of an object (the spatial effect) and its action-relevance (the 'affordance' effect). Poliakoff et al. (2007) found that while PD patients show normal spatial effects, they do not show an additional affordance effect. Here we investigated whether these effects are driven by facilitation or inhibition, and whether the affordance effect emerges over a longer time-course in PD. Participants (24 PD and 24 controls) viewed either a lateralised door handle (affordance condition), a lateralised abstract stimulus (spatial condition), or a centrally presented baseline stimulus (baseline condition), and responded to a colour change in the stimulus occurring after 0 msec, 500 msec or 1000 msec. The colour change indicated whether to respond with the left or right hand, which were either spatially compatible or incompatible with the lateralised stimulus orientation in the affordance and spatial conditions. The baseline condition allowed us to assess whether compatibility effects were driven by facilitation of the compatible response or inhibition of the incompatible response. The results indicate that stimulus orientation elicited faster responses from the nearest hand. For controls, the affordance effect was stronger and driven by facilitation, whilst the spatial condition was driven by inhibition. In contrast, the affordance and spatial-compatibility effects did not differ between conditions in the PD group and both were driven by facilitation. This suggests that the PD group responded as if all stimuli were action-relevant, and may have implications for understanding the cueing of movement in PD.

  7. Irreducible specific energy of new surfaces creation in materials with crack-type macro defects under pulse action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivosheev, S. I.; Magazinov, S. G.

    2016-11-01

    The study of destruction of samples with crack-type macro defects in shockwave microsecond duration range mode with amplitude up to 1 GPa was carried out using the magnetic pulse method of pressure pulse creation. The result analysis held on the basis of computer modeling of stressed condition and thermodynamic approach. The relation between the surface fracture energy and the material parameter, such as the energy accumulation time required for destruction, was revealed.

  8. Comparison of lymphomononuclear cell energy metabolism between healthy, impaired glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Ozsari, L; Karadurmus, N; Sahin, M; Uckaya, G; Ural, A U; Kutlu, M

    2010-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex disease that affects many systems. The most important cells of the immune system are lymphomononuclear (LMN) cells. Here, we aimed to evaluate the energy metabolism of LMN cells in patients with diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. We measured LMN cell energy metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and healthy subjects. Cells were freshly isolated from peripheral blood and the subgroups were determined by flow cytometric method. Lactate production and glycogen utilization were significantly increased in the LMN cells of patients with type 2 DM and IGT when compared with healthy volunteers. No statistical difference was observed between the patients with type 2 DM and IGT. There was a significant correlation between fasting plasma glucose and lactate production in LMN cells. LMN cells changed their energy pathway in a diabetic state and preferred anaerobic glycolysis. Prediabetic range also affected energy metabolism in LMN cells. This abnormal energy production might cause dysfunction in LMN cells and the immune system in diabetic and prediabetic patients. In conclusion, we concluded that impaired glucose metabolism could change energy metabolism.

  9. 78 FR 13575 - Coverage of Certain Preventive Services Under the Affordable Care Act; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Affordable Care Act; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Correction to... Health Service Act, as added by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended,...

  10. Grazing behavior and energy costs of activity: a comparison between two types of cattle.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Y; Henkin, Z; Ezra, A; Dolev, A; Shabtay, A; Orlov, A; Yehuda, Y; Brosh, A

    2009-08-01

    The grazing behavior, diet intake, and energy costs of activity of 2 types of cows grazing a Mediterranean pasture were compared. Fifteen large-frame Beefmaster x Simford (BM) cross cows and 13 small Baladi (Ba) mature cows were allocated to the paddock and monitored during 3 seasons throughout 2006; spring (April), summer (June), and autumn (September). Cows were not given supplemental feed during the spring and summer, but had free access to a poultry litter supplement (25% CP, DM basis) during the autumn. Fecal output and digesta kinetics and feed intake were estimated using indigestible double-marker technique. Cows were fitted for 3 to 4 d in each season with global positioning system (GPS) monitors, with activity monitors attached to one of their hind legs, and with heart rate (HR) monitors harnessed to their chests. Oxygen consumption per heart beat was determined for each cow during each season to enable conversion of the diurnal HR patterns to heat production (HP) units. All the GPS data of cattle locations and the activity, HR, and HP data were synchronized to produce a simultaneous record at 5-min intervals. Partition of time spent by the cows lying down, standing, grazing, and walking without grazing, the horizontal and vertical distances walked per day, and the number of steps taken per day were summed from these records. Multiple regression models were adjusted to refer these activities to the HP and to estimate the specific HP costs per unit of each activity. Accordingly, the daily energy costs of activity were calculated for the 2 cattle breeds on each season as the product of the specific activity and the number of units of each activity per day. Feed intake by Ba cows per unit of metabolic BW was greater (P < 0.001) than that of BM cows in both spring and summer and their apparent selection of greater-quality herbage in spring was greater (P < 0.1) than that of BM cows. The smaller framed Ba cows grazed more hours per day and walked longer

  11. Affordability Engineering: Bridging the Gap Between Design and Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, J. D.; DePasquale, Dominic; Lim, Evan

    2010-01-01

    Affordability is a commonly used term that takes on numerous meanings depending on the context used. Within conceptual design of complex systems, the term generally implies comparisons between expected costs and expected resources. This characterization is largely correct, but does not convey the many nuances and considerations that are frequently misunderstood and underappreciated. In the most fundamental sense, affordability and cost directly relate to engineering and programmatic decisions made throughout development programs. Systems engineering texts point out that there is a temporal aspect to this relationship, for decisions made earlier in a program dictate design implications much more so than those made during latter phases. This paper explores affordability engineering and its many sub-disciplines by discussing how it can be considered an additional engineering discipline to be balanced throughout the systems engineering and systems analysis processes. Example methods of multidisciplinary design analysis with affordability as a key driver will be discussed, as will example methods of data visualization, probabilistic analysis, and other ways of relating design decisions to affordability results.

  12. The Affordable Care Act: a primer for plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jenny T; Israel, Jacqueline S; Poore, Samuel O; Rao, Venkat K

    2014-11-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, sometimes referred to as Obamacare, was signed into law on March 23, 2010. It represents the most extensive overhaul of the country's health care system since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. The Affordable Care Act has two goals. The first goal is to reduce the uninsured population in the United States. Key elements to covering the uninsured include the following: (1) expanding Medicaid coverage for low-income individuals and (2) establishing health insurance marketplaces for moderate-income individuals with subsidies and tax cuts in an effort to make health insurance more affordable. The second goal of the Affordable Care Act is to address concerns about quality and the overall cost of U.S. health care. It is imperative that plastic surgeons thoroughly understand the impact that the Affordable Care Act will undoubtedly have on the country, on our patients, and on our clinical practices. Plastic surgery will see many changes in the future. This will include an overall increase in the number of insured patients, a push toward joining accountable care organizations, and a shift in payment systems to bundled reimbursement for episodes of care. In this article, the authors describe how these changes are likely to occur and what plastic surgeons must do to be part of the change.

  13. The Affordance Template ROS Package for Robot Task Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Stephen; Dinh, Paul; Hambuchen, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the Affordance Template ROS package for quickly programming, adjusting, and executing robot applications in the ROS RViz environment. This package extends the capabilities of RViz interactive markers by allowing an operator to specify multiple end-effector waypoint locations and grasp poses in object-centric coordinate frames and to adjust these waypoints in order to meet the run-time demands of the task (specifically, object scale and location). The Affordance Template package stores task specifications in a robot-agnostic XML description format such that it is trivial to apply a template to a new robot. As such, the Affordance Template package provides a robot-generic ROS tool appropriate for building semi-autonomous, manipulation-based applications. Affordance Templates were developed by the NASA-JSC DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) team and have since successfully been deployed on multiple platforms including the NASA Valkyrie and Robonaut 2 humanoids, the University of Texas Dreamer robot and the Willow Garage PR2. In this paper, the specification and implementation of the affordance template package is introduced and demonstrated through examples for wheel (valve) turning, pick-and-place, and drill grasping, evincing its utility and flexibility for a wide variety of robot applications.

  14. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of "Energy," and describes several educational resources (Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, activities, and other resources). Sidebars offer features on alternative energy, animal energy, internal combustion engines, and energy from food. Subthemes include harnessing energy, human energy, and…

  15. An innovative type of rockfall protection fence on forested slopes specially designed for low energy events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot, C.; Berger, F.; Lambert, S.

    2009-04-01

    Forest management in mountainous regions implies sylvicultural interventions on slopes. But in such forested areas, engines, workers or falling trees can initiate rock falls and the site can temporarily turn to a potentially dangerous site. This presentation deals with a type of fence specifically developed for this context. In particular, this type of fence requires no heavy interventions neither than heavy engines such as for soil-moving or nailing. Moreover, it is a temporary structure, supposed to act for the duration of the interventions or as long as it is necessary to counterbalance the lack of protection within the growing period of the trees. The fence is composed of a wire mesh, three cables and two rigid rods. This fence is tightened between existing trees. The first real size experiments have been made during summer 2008. It consisted in impacting successively the fence in its centre with rocks of varying mass (from 30kg to 500kg) with the aim of evaluating its capacities. For this purpose, a cable was tightened between two trees. This cable allowed conveying a trolley supporting the rock. The rock was dropped just before the impact thanks to a snap shackle. The system allowed reaching a maximal rock velocity before impact of 17m/s. This velocity was calculated thanks to image analysis obtained with a numerical video camera and a numerical high speed camera. The main continuous measurement made was tension in the upper cable. In addition, an accelerometer was nailed on one of the fence supporting trees. A total of 17 impact experiments were performed on for different fences. The first results showed that (i) angular blocks can cut wires even for low mass rocks, (ii) the wire rupture hardly propagates in the mesh during another impact, (iii) supporting cables can be cut during the impact, (iv) the fence is not perforated by the direct impact even for rocks 500kg in mass, and (v) a reparation of a perforated mesh consisting in placing a patch is perfectly

  16. Prevailing Photocurrent Generation of D-π-A Type Oligo(phenyleneethynylene) in Contact with Gold over Dexter-Type Energy-Transfer Quenching.

    PubMed

    Uji, Hirotaka; Ito, Taichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuaki; Kimura, Shunsaku

    2016-03-03

    Photocurrent generation is observed with D-π-A type oligo(phenyleneethynylene) (OPE) physically contacting gold substrate. The OPE is conjugated with helical peptides, which helps the OPE moiety orient vertically on gold surface. This configuration makes the Dexter energy transfer difficult to occur even though one end of the D-π-A type OPE physically contacts gold. The anodic photocurrent continuously increases with increment of applying bias voltage from -0.3 to 0.5 V. The first principle calculations reveal that the increase in photocurrent generation is attributed partly to the change in the electron distributions of HOMO and LUMO of the D-π-A type OPE to be more localized with applying the positive potential.

  17. Acceleration of type 2 spicules in the solar chromosphere. II. Viscous braking and upper bounds on coronal energy input

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Michael L.

    2014-04-20

    A magnetohydrodynamic model is used to determine conditions under which the Lorentz force accelerates plasma to type 2 spicule speeds in the chromosphere. The model generalizes a previous model to include a more realistic pre-spicule state, and the vertical viscous force. Two cases of acceleration under upper chromospheric conditions are considered. The magnetic field strength for these cases is ≤12.5 and 25 G. Plasma is accelerated to terminal vertical speeds of 66 and 78 km s{sup –1} in 100 s, compared with 124 and 397 km s{sup –1} for the case of zero viscosity. The flows are localized within horizontal diameters ∼80 and 50 km. The total thermal energy generated by viscous dissipation is ∼10 times larger than that due to Joule dissipation, but the magnitude of the total cooling due to rarefaction is ≳ this energy. Compressive heating dominates during the early phase of acceleration. The maximum energy injected into the corona by type 2 spicules, defined as the energy flux in the upper chromosphere, may largely balance total coronal energy losses in quiet regions, possibly also in coronal holes, but not in active regions. It is proposed that magnetic flux emergence in intergranular regions drives type 2 spicules.

  18. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.

  19. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus.

    PubMed

    Mohammadnejad, M; Pestehe, S J; Mohammadi, M A

    2013-07-01

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.

  20. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2013-07-15

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.

  1. Assessment of the DARPA Affordable Polymer Matrix Composites Programs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    and CATM Aft-aft center fuselage structure IATA PR500/IM7 plus CATB RTM bulkhead PR500/IM7 plus CATC 5ftx5ftx5ft wing section VARTM keelson Upper...Institute of Standards and Technology National Science Foundation OHC OPvNL OUSD(A&T) PMC R&D RaPat RAPTECH RTM S&T SAMPE SPF/DB TRP VARTM ...Affordability (IATA) ü-4 C. Cure-Form Processing ü-4 D. Rapid RTM Tooling Project (RaPat) II-6 E. Induction Hearing II-7 F. Affordable

  2. Approach to an Affordable and Sustainable Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCleskey, Caey M.; Rhodes, R. E.; Robinson, J. W.; Henderson, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an approach and a general procedure for creating space transportation architectural concepts that are at once affordable and sustainable. Previous papers by the authors and other members of the Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST) focused on a functional system breakdown structure for an architecture and definition of high-payoff design techniques with a technology integration strategy. This paper follows up by using a structured process that derives architectural solutions focused on achieving life cycle affordability and sustainability. Further, the paper includes an example concept that integrates key design techniques discussed in previous papers. !

  3. What does the Affordable Care Act mean for nursing?

    PubMed

    Luther, Brenda; Hart, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Nurses are ethically bound to engage in efforts of improving health and healthcare delivery and, even more important, nurses recently have been called out as key leaders in the reform of healthcare delivery, including many components of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, its history, and what healthcare will look like during and after implementation are addressed in this article. A discussion of the role and value of nurses in healthcare reform accompanies knowledge-building and action-oriented resources available to nurses and clients.

  4. Rhythm as an affordance for the entrainment of movement.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Fred

    2009-01-01

    A general account of rhythm in human behaviour is provided, according to which rhythm inheres in the affordance that a signal provides for the entrainment of movement on the part of a perceiver. This generic account is supported by an explication of the central concepts of affordance and entrainment. When viewed in this light, rhythm appears as the correct explanandum to account for coordinated behaviour in a wide variety of situations, including such core senses as dance and the production of music. Speech may appear to be only marginally rhythmical under such an account, but several experimental studies reveal that speech, too, has the potential to entrain movement.

  5. Bianchi type-I and -III modified holographic Ricci Dark energy models in Saez-Ballester theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. U. M.; Divya Prasanthi, U. Y.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we study the spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-III (B-III) and locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Binachi type-I (B-I) models filled with matter and dark energy in the framework of the Saez-Ballester (1986) scalar-tensor theory of gravitation. Here, we consider the modified holographic Ricci dark energy as the viable candidate to dark energy. To obtain a deterministic solution we consider the time-varying deceleration parameter, which leads to the average scale factor a(t)=[sinh(α t)]^{1/k}. This average scale factor describes a model which generates a smooth transition of the universe from the early decelerating phase to the recent accelerating phase. The physical and kinematical aspects of the models are discussed through figures and also found to be in good agreement with recent astrophysical observations under suitable conditions.

  6. The TELEC - A plasma type of direct energy converter. [Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter for electric power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter (TELEC) is a high-power density plasma device designed to convert a 10.6-micron CO2 laser beam into electric power. Electromagnetic radiation is absorbed in plasma electrons, creating a high-electron temperature. Energetic electrons diffuse from the plasma and strike two electrodes having different areas. The larger electrode collects more electrons and there is a net transport of current. An electromagnetic field is generated in the external circuit. A computer program has been designed to analyze TELEC performance allowing parametric variation for optimization. Values are presented for TELEC performance as a function of cesium pressure and for current density and efficiency as a function of output voltage. Efficiency is shown to increase with pressure, reaching a maximum over 45%.

  7. Method for enhancing low frequency output of impulsive type seismic energy sources and its application to a seismic energy source for use while drilling

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P; Stokes, Robert H; Glowka, David A

    2014-12-02

    A method for operating an impulsive type seismic energy source in a firing sequence having at least two actuations for each seismic impulse to be generated by the source. The actuations have a time delay between them related to a selected energy frequency peak of the source output. One example of the method is used for generating seismic signals in a wellbore and includes discharging electric current through a spark gap disposed in the wellbore in at least one firing sequence. The sequence includes at least two actuations of the spark gap separated by an amount of time selected to cause acoustic energy resulting from the actuations to have peak amplitude at a selected frequency.

  8. Recent progress in understanding the processes underlying the triggering of and energy loss associated with type I ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, A.; Dunai, D.; Dunne, M.; Huijsmans, G.; Pamela, S.; Becoulet, M.; Harrison, J. R.; Hillesheim, J.; Roach, C.; Saarelma, S.

    2014-11-01

    The type I ELMy H-mode is the baseline operating scenario for ITER. While it is known that the type I edge-localized mode (ELM) ultimately results from the peeling-ballooning instability, there is growing experimental evidence that a mode grows up before the ELM crash that may modify the edge plasma, which then leads to the ELM event due to the peeling-ballooning mode. The triggered mode results in the release of a large number of particles and energy from the core plasma but the precise mechanism by which these losses occur is still not fully understood and hence makes predictions for future devices uncertain. Recent progress in understanding the processes that trigger type I ELMs and the size of the resultant energy loss are reviewed and compared to experimental data and ideas for further development are discussed.

  9. Improved Dark Energy Constraints From ~ 100 New CfA Supernova Type Ia Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Hicken, Malcolm; Wood-Vasey, W.Michael; Blondin, Stephane; Challis, Peter; Jha, Saurabh; Kelly, Patrick L.; Rest, Armin; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-04-06

    We combine the CfA3 supernovae Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with samples from the literature to calculate improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. The CfA3 sample is added to the Union set of Kowalski et al. to form the Constitution set and, combined with a BAO prior, produces 1 + w = 0.013{sub -0.068}{sup +0.066} (0.11 syst), consistent with the cosmological constant. The CfA3 addition makes the cosmologically useful sample of nearby SN Ia between 2.6 and 2.9 times larger than before, reducing the statistical uncertainty to the point where systematics play the largest role. We use four light-curve fitters to test for systematic differences: SALT, SALT2, MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 3.1), and MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 1.7). SALT produces high-redshift Hubble residuals with systematic trends versus color and larger scatter than MLCS2k2. MLCS2k2 overestimates the intrinsic luminosity of SN Ia with 0.7 < {Delta} < 1.2. MLCS2k2 with R{sub V} = 3.1 overestimates host-galaxy extinction while R{sub V} {approx} 1.7 does not. Our investigation is consistent with no Hubble bubble. We also find that, after light-curve correction, SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts are intrinsically fainter than those in E/S0 hosts by 2{sigma}, suggesting that they may come from different populations. We also find that SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts have low scatter (0.1 mag) and reddening. Current systematic errors can be reduced by improving SN Ia photometric accuracy, by including the CfA3 sample to retrain light-curve fitters, by combining optical SN Ia photometry with near-infrared photometry to understand host-galaxy extinction, and by determining if different environments give rise to different intrinsic SN Ia luminosity after correction for light-curve shape and color.

  10. A theoretical description of charge reorganization energies in molecular organic P-type semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Charlotte; Engels, Bernd

    2016-06-05

    Charge transport properties of materials composed of small organic molecules are important for numerous optoelectronic applications. A material's ability to transport charges is considerably influenced by the charge reorganization energies of the composing molecules. Hence, predictions about charge-transport properties of organic materials deserve reliable statements about these charge reorganization energies. However, using density functional theory which is mostly used for the predictions, the computed reorganization energies depend strongly on the chosen functional. To gain insight, a benchmark of various density functionals for the accurate calculation of charge reorganization energies is presented. A correlation between the charge reorganization energies and the ionization potentials is found which suggests applying IP-tuning to obtain reliable values for charge reorganization energies. According to benchmark investigations with IP-EOM-CCSD single-point calculations, the tuned functionals provide indeed more reliable charge reorganization energies. Among the standard functionals, ωB97X-D and SOGGA11X yield accurate charge reorganization energies in comparison with IP-EOM-CCSD values. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Energy Distributions in Szekeres Type I and II Space-Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayguen, S.; Ayguen, M.; Tarhan, I.

    2006-10-01

    In this study, in context of general relativity we consider Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson, M{o}ller and Landau-Lifshitz energy-momentum definitions and we compute the total energy distribution (due to matter and fields including gravitation) of the universe based on Szekeres class I and class II space-times. We show that Einstein and Bergmann-Thomson definitions of the energy-momentum complexes give the same results, while M{o}ller's and Landau-Lifshitz's energy-momentum definition does not provide same results for Szekeres class II space. The definitions of Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and M{o}ller definitions of the energy-momentum complexes give similar results in Szekeres class I space-time.

  12. 76 FR 20354 - Notice of Intent To Award Supplemental Affordable Care Act Funding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Affordable Care Act Funding Notice of Intent to award supplemental Affordable Care Act funding to support...: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice provides public announcement of CDC's intent to use Affordable Care Act (ACA....'' Funding is appropriated under the Affordable Care Act (Pub. L. 111-148), Title IV, Section...

  13. A Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer for characterizing ion energy distributions in a coaxial plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieker, G. B.; Poehlmann, F. R.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    Measurements of ion energy distribution are performed in the accelerated plasma of a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode at relatively low discharge energy (900 J) and discharge potential (4 kV). The measurements are made using a Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer with a gated microchannel plate and phosphor screen as the ion sensor. The parabolic ion trajectories are captured from the sensor screen with an intensified charge-coupled detector camera. The spectrometer was designed and calibrated using the Geant4 toolkit, accounting for the effects on the ion trajectories of spatial non-uniformities in the spectrometer magnetic and electric fields. Results for hydrogen gas puffs indicate the existence of a class of accelerated protons with energies well above the coaxial discharge potential (up to 24 keV). The Thomson analyzer confirms the presence of impurities of copper and iron, also of relatively high energies, which are likely erosion or sputter products from plasma-electrode interactions.

  14. A Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer for characterizing ion energy distributions in a coaxial plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode.

    PubMed

    Rieker, G B; Poehlmann, F R; Cappelli, M A

    2013-07-01

    Measurements of ion energy distribution are performed in the accelerated plasma of a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode at relatively low discharge energy (900 J) and discharge potential (4 kV). The measurements are made using a Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer with a gated microchannel plate and phosphor screen as the ion sensor. The parabolic ion trajectories are captured from the sensor screen with an intensified charge-coupled detector camera. The spectrometer was designed and calibrated using the Geant4 toolkit, accounting for the effects on the ion trajectories of spatial non-uniformities in the spectrometer magnetic and electric fields. Results for hydrogen gas puffs indicate the existence of a class of accelerated protons with energies well above the coaxial discharge potential (up to 24 keV). The Thomson analyzer confirms the presence of impurities of copper and iron, also of relatively high energies, which are likely erosion or sputter products from plasma-electrode interactions.

  15. A Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer for characterizing ion energy distributions in a coaxial plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode

    SciTech Connect

    Rieker, G. B.; Poehlmann, F. R.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2013-07-15

    Measurements of ion energy distribution are performed in the accelerated plasma of a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode at relatively low discharge energy (900 J) and discharge potential (4 kV). The measurements are made using a Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer with a gated microchannel plate and phosphor screen as the ion sensor. The parabolic ion trajectories are captured from the sensor screen with an intensified charge-coupled detector camera. The spectrometer was designed and calibrated using the Geant4 toolkit, accounting for the effects on the ion trajectories of spatial non-uniformities in the spectrometer magnetic and electric fields. Results for hydrogen gas puffs indicate the existence of a class of accelerated protons with energies well above the coaxial discharge potential (up to 24 keV). The Thomson analyzer confirms the presence of impurities of copper and iron, also of relatively high energies, which are likely erosion or sputter products from plasma-electrode interactions.

  16. A Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer for characterizing ion energy distributions in a coaxial plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode

    PubMed Central

    Rieker, G. B.; Poehlmann, F. R.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of ion energy distribution are performed in the accelerated plasma of a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun operating in a gas-puff mode at relatively low discharge energy (900 J) and discharge potential (4 kV). The measurements are made using a Thomson-type mass and energy spectrometer with a gated microchannel plate and phosphor screen as the ion sensor. The parabolic ion trajectories are captured from the sensor screen with an intensified charge-coupled detector camera. The spectrometer was designed and calibrated using the Geant4 toolkit, accounting for the effects on the ion trajectories of spatial non-uniformities in the spectrometer magnetic and electric fields. Results for hydrogen gas puffs indicate the existence of a class of accelerated protons with energies well above the coaxial discharge potential (up to 24 keV). The Thomson analyzer confirms the presence of impurities of copper and iron, also of relatively high energies, which are likely erosion or sputter products from plasma-electrode interactions. PMID:23983449

  17. 7 CFR 3565.352 - Preservation of affordable housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Preservation of affordable housing. 3565.352 Section 3565.352 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Project Management § 3565.352...

  18. 7 CFR 3565.352 - Preservation of affordable housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Preservation of affordable housing. 3565.352 Section 3565.352 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Project Management § 3565.352...

  19. 7 CFR 3565.352 - Preservation of affordable housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Preservation of affordable housing. 3565.352 Section 3565.352 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Project Management § 3565.352...

  20. 7 CFR 3565.352 - Preservation of affordable housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preservation of affordable housing. 3565.352 Section 3565.352 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Project Management § 3565.352...

  1. 7 CFR 3565.352 - Preservation of affordable housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Preservation of affordable housing. 3565.352 Section 3565.352 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Project Management § 3565.352...

  2. Affordances for Second Language Learning in "World of Warcraft"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rama, Paul S.; Black, Rebecca W.; van Es, Elizabeth; Warschauer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    What are the affordances of online gaming environments for second language learning and socialization? To answer this question, this qualitative study examines two college-age Spanish learners' experiences participating in the Spanish language version of the massively multi-player online game "World of Warcraft." Using data culled from participant…

  3. Learning Affordances of Language and Communication National Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, David

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the learning affordances of different language and communication curricula in the world. For reasons of space, only two national education systems (Finland and Singapore) and their language and communication curricula are referred to. The accounts of national education systems consist of the identification of mechanisms…

  4. 24 CFR 81.14 - Special Affordable Housing Goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... MAE) AND THE FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION (FREDDIE MAC) Housing Goals § 81.14 Special..., as a Special Affordable Housing Home Purchase Subgoal, 17 percent of the total number of home purchase mortgages in metropolitan areas financed by each GSE's mortgage purchases shall be home...

  5. 24 CFR 1000.101 - What is affordable housing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What is affordable housing? 1000.101 Section 1000.101 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  6. 24 CFR 81.14 - Special Affordable Housing Goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special Affordable Housing Goal. 81.14 Section 81.14 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... MAE) AND THE FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION (FREDDIE MAC) Housing Goals § 81.14...

  7. 24 CFR 81.14 - Special Affordable Housing Goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special Affordable Housing Goal. 81.14 Section 81.14 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... MAE) AND THE FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION (FREDDIE MAC) Housing Goals § 81.14...

  8. 24 CFR 1006.201 - Eligible affordable housing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Eligible affordable housing activities. 1006.201 Section 1006.201 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  9. Disengaged Students and Dialogic Learning: The Role of CSCL Affordances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slakmon, Benzi; Schwarz, Baruch B.

    2014-01-01

    Only a few studies have dealt with the challenge of bridging the linguistic gap between the dialogic realm and the talk of disengaged students. Bridging this gap is particularly relevant to the CSCL community since one of its utmost aims is to promote the dialogic. This study aims to articulate how to harness the CSCL design and affordances to…

  10. Teaching Text Structure: Examining the Affordances of Children's Informational Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cindy D.; Clark, Sarah K.; Reutzel, D. Ray

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the affordances of informational texts to serve as model texts for teaching text structure to elementary school children. Content analysis of a random sampling of children's informational texts from top publishers was conducted on text structure organization and on the inclusion of text features as signals of text…

  11. The Weight of Time: Affordances for an Integrated Magnitude System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Aitao; Mo, Lei; Hodges, Bert H.

    2011-01-01

    In five experiments we explored the effects of weight on time in different action contexts to test the hypothesis that an integrated magnitude system is tuned to affordances. Larger magnitudes generally seem longer; however, Lu and colleagues (2009) found that if numbers were presented as weights in a range heavy enough to affect lifting, the…

  12. 24 CFR 81.14 - Special Affordable Housing Goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special Affordable Housing Goal. 81.14 Section 81.14 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development THE SECRETARY OF HUD'S REGULATION OF THE FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION...

  13. Affordances of Learning Technologies in Higher Education Multicultural Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arenas, Edilson

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of research has been conducted in higher education to investigate the affordances (action possibilities) and the influence information and communication technologies (ICT) may have on students' learning experiences and outcomes. Such studies have given rise to the implementation of a wide range of educational frameworks with a great deal…

  14. Can Canadian Seniors on Public Pensions Afford a Nutritious Diet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Rebecca J.; Williams, Patricia L.; Johnson, C. Shanthi; Blum, Ilya

    2008-01-01

    This study examined whether Canada's public pensions (Old Age Security and Canada Pension Plan) provided adequate income for seniors living in Nova Scotia in 2005 to afford a basic nutritious diet. Monthly incomes were compared to essential monthly expenses for four household scenarios: (a) married couple, 80 years and 78 years, in urban Nova…

  15. Ubiquitous Knowledge and Experiences to Foster EFL Learning Affordances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Sánchez, Soraya; Luján-García, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the implementation of experiential learning affordances to improve skills in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in higher education. The administration of an online anonymous survey to 100 students of different undergraduate degrees presents current learning reflections from EFL students at the Universidad de Las Palmas de…

  16. Monitoring the price and affordability of foods and diets globally.

    PubMed

    Lee, A; Mhurchu, C N; Sacks, G; Swinburn, B; Snowdon, W; Vandevijvere, S; Hawkes, C; L'abbé, M; Rayner, M; Sanders, D; Barquera, S; Friel, S; Kelly, B; Kumanyika, S; Lobstein, T; Ma, J; Macmullan, J; Mohan, S; Monteiro, C; Neal, B; Walker, C

    2013-10-01

    Food prices and food affordability are important determinants of food choices, obesity and non-communicable diseases. As governments around the world consider policies to promote the consumption of healthier foods, data on the relative price and affordability of foods, with a particular focus on the difference between 'less healthy' and 'healthy' foods and diets, are urgently needed. This paper briefly reviews past and current approaches to monitoring food prices, and identifies key issues affecting the development of practical tools and methods for food price data collection, analysis and reporting. A step-wise monitoring framework, including measurement indicators, is proposed. 'Minimal' data collection will assess the differential price of 'healthy' and 'less healthy' foods; 'expanded' monitoring will assess the differential price of 'healthy' and 'less healthy' diets; and the 'optimal' approach will also monitor food affordability, by taking into account household income. The monitoring of the price and affordability of 'healthy' and 'less healthy' foods and diets globally will provide robust data and benchmarks to inform economic and fiscal policy responses. Given the range of methodological, cultural and logistical challenges in this area, it is imperative that all aspects of the proposed monitoring framework are tested rigorously before implementation.

  17. The ICCE Framework: Framing Learning Experiences Afforded by Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Aroutis; Shah, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for game-based learning frameworks that provide a lens for understanding learning experiences afforded in digital games. These frameworks should aim to facilitate game analyses, identification of learning opportunities, and support for learner experiences. This article uses the inquiry, communication, construction, and expression…

  18. Material Affordances: The Potential of Scrapbooks in the Composition Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Kara Poe

    2013-01-01

    A multiliteracies pedagogy has renewed our interest in materiality, or how the physical text interacts with the author's choices and the context to contribute to the message, yet little attention has been paid to materiality in analog texts, such as the scrapbook, even though this medium contains affordances (capabilities and limitations) that…

  19. A Few Reflections on Accountability, Affordability, and Access Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toma, J. Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Considering accountability, affordability, and access through the experiences in Chile, East Asia, Australia, Croatia, and the United States offers a clear reminder that trends and issues in higher education are often more similar across national contexts than they are distinct. Across higher education, institutions and systems are responding to…

  20. Can the United States afford a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keaton, Paul W.

    1988-01-01

    Establishing a lunar base will require steady funding for a decade or two. The question addressed is whether such a large space project is affordable at this time. The relevant facts and methodology are presented so that the reader may formulate independent answers. It is shown that a permanent lunar base can be financed without increasing NASA's historical budgetary trend.

  1. 24 CFR 81.14 - Special Affordable Housing Goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special Affordable Housing Goal. 81.14 Section 81.14 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development THE SECRETARY OF HUD'S REGULATION OF THE FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION...

  2. Toward Affordability: Policy Recommendations for Virginia Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In its 2007-13 strategic plan, Advancing Virginia: Access, Alignment, Investment, the State Council highlighted 12 strategic higher education initiatives that it believed were necessary to ensure Virginia's future. Key among these goals was improvement of the affordability of a college education in the Commonwealth. Recent events have reinforced…

  3. Learning at Work: Organisational Affordances and Individual Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Jane; Pajo, Karl; Ward, Robyn; Mallon, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to explore the interaction between organisational affordances for the development of individuals' capability, and the engagement of workers at various levels with those opportunities. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of a large New Zealand wine company, using in-depth interviews. Interviews were…

  4. Reinventing Financial Aid: Charting a New Course to College Affordability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Andrew P., Ed.; Goldrick-Rab, Sara, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    In this provocative volume, two experts with very different points of view address the growing concern that student loan programs are not a sustainable solution to the problem of mounting college costs. They argue that the time has come to reform the financial aid system so that it is more effective in promoting college affordability, access, and…

  5. Affordance, Learning Opportunities, and the Lesson Plan Pro Forma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jason

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that the most commonly used lesson plan pro formas in language teacher education are inappropriately premised on an outcomes-based approach to teaching, one that is in conflict with what we know about how languages are learnt and how experienced teachers teach. It proposes an alternative, affordance-based approach to lesson…

  6. Diagnosing physical conditions near the flare energy-release sites from observations of solar microwave type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bao-Lin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Huang, Guang-Li

    2016-05-01

    In the physics of solar flares, it is crucial to diagnose the physical conditions near the flare energy-release sites. However, so far it is unclear how to diagnose these physical conditions. A solar microwave type III burst is believed to be a sensitive signature of primary energy release and electron accelerations in solar flares. This work takes into account the effect of the magnetic field on the plasma density and develops a set of formulas which can be used to estimate the plasma density, temperature, magnetic field near the magnetic reconnection site and particle acceleration region, and the velocity and energy of electron beams. We apply these formulas to three groups of microwave type III pairs in an X-class flare, and obtained some reasonable and interesting results. This method can be applied to other microwave type III bursts to diagnose the physical conditions of source regions, and provide some basic information to understand the intrinsic nature and fundamental processes occurring near the flare energy-release sites.

  7. Early Visual Perception Potentiated by Object Affordances: Evidence From a Temporal Order Judgment Task

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yuki; Yamani, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Perceived objects automatically potentiate afforded action. Object affordances also facilitate perception of such objects, and this occurrence is known as the affordance effect. This study examined whether object affordances facilitate the initial visual processing stage, or perceptual entry processes, using the temporal order judgment task. The onset of the graspable (right-handled) coffee cup was perceived earlier than that of the less graspable (left-handled) cup for right-handed participants. The affordance effect was eliminated when the coffee cups were inverted, which presumably conveyed less affordance information. These results suggest that objects preattentively potentiate the perceptual entry processes in response to their affordances. PMID:27698991

  8. First-principles effective Hamiltonian simulation of ABO3-type perovskite ferroelectrics for energy storage application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bingcheng; Wang, Xiaohui; Tian, Enke; Wu, Longwen; Li, Longtu

    2016-08-01

    Dielectric materials with high power density and energy density are eagerly desired for the potential application in advanced pulsed capacitors. Here, we present the first-principles effective Hamiltonian simulation of perovskite ferroelectrics BaTiO3, PbTiO3, and KNbO3 in order to better predict and design materials for energy storage application. The lattice constant, dielectric constant and ferroelectric hysteresis, and energy-storage density of BaTiO3, PbTiO3, and KNbO3 were calculated with the consideration of the effects of temperature and external electric field.

  9. Comparative evaluation of features and techniques for identifying activity type and estimating energy cost from accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Kate, Rohit J; Swartz, Ann M; Welch, Whitney A; Strath, Scott J

    2016-03-01

    Wearable accelerometers can be used to objectively assess physical activity. However, the accuracy of this assessment depends on the underlying method used to process the time series data obtained from accelerometers. Several methods have been proposed that use this data to identify the type of physical activity and estimate its energy cost. Most of the newer methods employ some machine learning technique along with suitable features to represent the time series data. This paper experimentally compares several of these techniques and features on a large dataset of 146 subjects doing eight different physical activities wearing an accelerometer on the hip. Besides features based on statistics, distance based features and simple discrete features straight from the time series were also evaluated. On the physical activity type identification task, the results show that using more features significantly improve results. Choice of machine learning technique was also found to be important. However, on the energy cost estimation task, choice of features and machine learning technique were found to be less influential. On that task, separate energy cost estimation models trained specifically for each type of physical activity were found to be more accurate than a single model trained for all types of physical activities.

  10. Optical and piezoelectric properties of p-type ZnO nanowires on transparent flexible substrate for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guocheng; Tam, Man Chun; Hu, Lilei; EI-Rayes, Karim; Guo, Qiuquan; Yang, Jun; Mrad, Nezih; Ban, Dayan

    2014-09-01

    High quality, controlled-structure nanowires (NWs), grown on a transparent flexible substrate, have attracted great interest as a mean of harvesting solar and mechanical energy. Clarifying their optical and piezoelectric properties is essential for this application. In this paper, vertically aligned lithium (Li) doped p-type ZnO NWs were grown, on a micro-patterned transparent flexible polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrate, by electrochemical deposition at 88 °C. The substrate was coated with aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) thin layer, which served as a good seed layer and a transparent conductive oxide layer. Varying the seed layer thickness gave control of the individual NWs' diameter, density and alignment. The effect of doping on the optical band-gap, crystalline quality and Schottky barrier were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy and piezoelectric characterization. The piezoelectric polarization induced piezo-potential in strained ZnO NWs can drive the flow of electrons without an applied electric bias, thus can be used to harvest mechanical energy and convert it into electricity. To prove this concept, flexible piezoelectric energy harvesters based on an array of ZnO NWs were fabricated. Results show that the patterned p-type NW-based energy harvester produces 26-fold output voltage and 19-fold current compared to the conventional un-doped ZnO NW energy harvester from the same acceleration input.

  11. Elastic energy storage in an unmineralized collagen type I molecular model with explicit solvation and water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Kwansa, Albert L; Freeman, Joseph W

    2010-02-21

    Collagen type I is a structural protein that provides tensile strength to tendons and ligaments. Type I collagen molecules form collagen fibers, which are viscoelastic and can therefore store energy elastically via molecular elongation and dissipate viscous energy through molecular rearrangement and fibrillar slippage. The ability to store elastic energy is important for the resiliency of tendons and ligaments, which must be able to deform and revert to their initial lengths with changes in load. In an earlier paper by one of the present authors, molecular modeling was used to investigate the role of mineralization upon elastic energy storage in collagen type I. Their collagen model showed a similar trend to their experimental data but with an over-estimation of elastic energy storage. Their simulations were conducted in vacuum and employed a distance-dependent dielectric function. In this study, we performed a re-evaluation of Freeman and Silver's model data incorporating the effects of explicit solvation and water infiltration, in order to determine whether the model data could be improved with a more accurate representation of the solvent and osmotic effects. We observed an average decrease in the model's elastic energy storage of 45.1%+/-6.9% in closer proximity to Freeman and Silver's experimental data. This suggests that although the distance-dependent dielectric implicit solvation approach was favored for its increased speed and decreased computational requirements, an explicit representation of water may be necessary to more accurately model solvent interactions in this particular system. In this paper, we discuss the collagen model described by Freeman and Silver, the present model building approach, the application of the present model to that of Freeman and Silver, and additional assumptions and limitations.

  12. Bianchi type I Universe and interacting ghost scalar fields models of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossienkhani, H.

    2016-04-01

    We suggest a correspondence between interacting ghost dark energy model with the quintessence, tachyon and K-essence scalar field in a non-isotropic universe. This correspondence allows to reconstruct the potential and the dynamics for the scalar field of the interacting ghost dark energy model, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe. Our numerical result show the effects of the interaction and anisotropic on the evolutionary behavior the ghost scalar field models.

  13. Measurement capabilities of a compact thermal-type standard of energy unit of pulse laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech

    2001-08-01

    New instrument for measurements of laser pulse energy is described. Due to its parameters it can be used as a standard for unit of energy of pulse laser radiation. The instrument consists of a control unit, three sources of laser radiation, two receivers of optical signal, and a laptop. The whole system can be easily transported enabling one to carry out measurements in situ, at customer's, not only in laboratory conditions. This is a very important feature of the instrument because it allows inexpensive calibration and testing of large industrial laser installations and interesting laboratory intercomparisons as well. A method of measurement used in operation of the standard is presented. Main characteristics of the standard are shown. Methods of calculation of uncertainties of measurement during laser energy meters calibration by means of the standard of energy unit of pulse laser radiation are also presented. An alternative measurement option of the standard operating as an energy calibrator for unknown pulse optical radiation source is also available. Some results of testing of laser energy meters at eye-safe wavelength (1.54 micrometer) are presented.

  14. Comparative dosimetric characterization for different types of detectors in high-energy electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Yeol; Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Hun Jeong; Huh, Hyun Do; Park, Seungwoo; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum Bae; Min, Chul Kee; Kim, Seong Hoon; Shin, Dong Oh

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform a comparison and on analysis of measured dose factor values by using various commercially available high-energy electron beam detectors to measure dose profiles and energy property data. By analyzing the high-energy electron beam data from each detector, we determined the optimal detector for measuring electron beams in clinical applications. The dose linearity, dose-rate dependence, percentage depth dose, and dose profile of each detector were measured to evaluate the dosimetry characteristics of high-energy electron beams. The dose profile and the energy characteristics of high-energy electron beams were found to be different when measured by different detectors. Through comparison with other detectors based on the analyzed data, the microdiamond detector was found to have outstanding dose linearity, a low dose-rate dependency, and a small effective volume. Thus, this detector has outstanding spatial resolution and is the optimal detector for measuring electron beams. Radiation therapy results can be improved and related medical accidents can be prevented by using the procedure developed in this research in clinical practice for all beam detectors when measuring the electron beam dose.

  15. Conducting nanosponge electroporation for affordable and high-efficiency disinfection of bacteria and viruses in water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Xie, Xing; Zhao, Wenting; Liu, Nian; Maraccini, Peter A; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Boehm, Alexandria B; Cui, Yi

    2013-09-11

    High-efficiency, affordable, and low energy water disinfection methods are in great need to prevent diarrheal illness, which is one of the top five leading causes of death over the world. Traditional water disinfection methods have drawbacks including carcinogenic disinfection byproducts formation, energy and time intensiveness, and pathogen recovery. Here, we report an innovative method that achieves high-efficiency water disinfection by introducing nanomaterial-assisted electroporation implemented by a conducting nanosponge filtration device. The use of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials allows electroporation to occur at only several volts, which is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than that in traditional electroporation applications. The disinfection mechanism of electroporation prevents harmful byproduct formation and ensures a fast treatment speed of 15,000 L/(h·m(2)), which is equal to a contact time of 1 s. The conducting nanosponge made from low-cost polyurethane sponge coated with carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires ensures the device's affordability. This method achieves more than 6 log (99.9999%) removal of four model bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica Typhimirium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacillus subtilis, and more than 2 log (99%) removal of one model virus, bacteriophage MS2, with a low energy consumption of only 100 J/L.

  16. Estimation of the Binding Free Energy of AC1NX476 to HIV-1 Protease Wild Type and Mutations Using Free Energy Perturbation Method.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Son Tung; Mai, Binh Khanh; Hiep, Dinh Minh; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-10-01

    The binding mechanism of AC1NX476 to HIV-1 protease wild type and mutations was studied by the docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The binding free energy was calculated using the double-annihilation binding free energy method. It is shown that the binding affinity of AC1NX476 to wild type is higher than not only ritonavir but also darunavir, making AC1NX476 become attractive candidate for HIV treatment. Our theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data as the correlation coefficient between calculated and experimentally measured binding free energies R = 0.993. Residues Asp25-A, Asp29-A, Asp30-A, Ile47-A, Gly48-A, and Val50-A from chain A, and Asp25-B from chain B play a crucial role in the ligand binding. The mutations were found to reduce the receptor-ligand interaction by widening the binding cavity, and the binding propensity is mainly driven by the van der Waals interaction. Our finding may be useful for designing potential drugs to combat with HIV.

  17. Few-Layer MoS₂ p-Type Devices Enabled by Selective Doping Using Low Energy Phosphorus Implantation.

    PubMed

    Nipane, Ankur; Karmakar, Debjani; Kaushik, Naveen; Karande, Shruti; Lodha, Saurabh

    2016-02-23

    P-type doping of MoS2 has proved to be a significant bottleneck in the realization of fundamental devices such as p-n junction diodes and p-type transistors due to its intrinsic n-type behavior. We report a CMOS compatible, controllable and area selective phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process for p-type doping of MoS2. Physical characterization using SIMS, AFM, XRD and Raman techniques was used to identify process conditions with reduced lattice defects as well as low surface damage and etching, 4X lower than previous plasma based doping reports for MoS2. A wide range of nondegenerate to degenerate p-type doping is demonstrated in MoS2 field effect transistors exhibiting dominant hole transport. Nearly ideal and air stable, lateral homogeneous p-n junction diodes with a gate-tunable rectification ratio as high as 2 × 10(4) are demonstrated using area selective doping. Comparison of XPS data from unimplanted and implanted MoS2 layers shows a shift of 0.67 eV toward lower binding energies for Mo and S peaks indicating p-type doping. First-principles calculations using density functional theory techniques confirm p-type doping due to charge transfer originating from substitutional as well as physisorbed phosphorus in top few layers of MoS2. Pre-existing sulfur vacancies are shown to enhance the doping level significantly.

  18. A new type of modular dryer combining solar energy and producer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hirunlabh, J.; Paraboon, T.; Pairintra, R.; Namprakai, P.; Khedari, J.

    1997-03-01

    The main concept of this research is to develop a flexible modular dryer that combines two different sources of non-conventional energy. In this study, solar energy and producer gas generated by an up-flow charcoal gasifier were considered. The drying system was set out by using a 0.6 m{sup 3} modular cabinet supporting a solar collector of 2.5 m{sup 2} surface area. 16 kg of charcoal was used in each batch to feed the gasifier. The experiment was performed for drying beef that required two different stages of drying temperature: the first, which used producer gas requires approximately 60 C for four hours and the second used solar energy at 40 C for six hours. The energy consumed for drying 16 kg of beef was 7.57 MJ/kg H{sub 2}O evaporated which obtained from solar energy, producer gas and blowers in percentages of 8.72%, 31.44% and 59.84%, respectively.

  19. Analysis of Pumped Storage Plants (PSP) viability associated with other types of intermittent renewable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, J. G. P.; Barbosa, P. S. F.; Luvizotto, E., Jr.; Zuculin, S.; Pinto, Marrc; Tiago Filho, G. L.

    2014-03-01

    The energy generated by wind or solar photovoltaic (PV system) can be used by PSP to accumulate water in the upper reservoir, in the form of potential energy to be used later, during periods of high energy demand. This procedure offers the advantage of enabling the use of intermittent renewable energy source in times of growing needs of the electric power supply. The location of the PSP, the environmental aspects involved, their possible use for various purposes (stability of the power system at peak times, associate the turbine water for public supply purposes, among others) and the discussion of regulatory issues needs to be debated in the current context, where environmental issues require reliable sources of power generation and demand shows strong growth rates. A dynamic model is used to analyze the behavior of a PSP proposal for a site in Brazil, analyzing a complete cycle of its operation as a pump or turbine. The existing difficulties to use this proposal based on existing regulatory policies are also discussed, and a list of recommended adjustments is provided to allow the penetrations of PSP projects in the Brazilian institutional framework, coupled with other intermittent energy sources.

  20. Energy production estimation for Kosh-Agach grid-tie photovoltaic power plant for different photovoltaic module types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabderakhmanova, T. S.; Kiseleva, S. V.; Frid, S. E.; Tarasenko, A. B.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to calculation of yearly energy production, demanded area and capital costs for first Russian 5 MW grid-tie photovoltaic (PV) plant in Altay Republic that is named Kosh-Agach. Simple linear calculation model, involving average solar radiation and temperature data, grid-tie inverter power-efficiency dependence and PV modules parameters is proposed. Monthly and yearly energy production, equipment costs and demanded area for PV plant are estimated for mono-, polycrystalline and amorphous modules. Calculation includes three types of initial radiation and temperature data—average day for every month from NASA SSE, average radiation and temperature for each day of the year from NASA POWER and typical meteorology year generated from average data for every month. The peculiarities for each type of initial data and their influence on results are discussed.

  1. Shock stability in systems that change type. Final grant report to the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Keyfitz, B.L.

    1995-11-10

    The aim of the original project was to investigate systems of conservation laws that change type. Progress was made on this problem. During the last period of the grant, the author began an investigation of a multidimensional system related to Mach reflection which goes beyond the original work proposed. This has been fruitful direction in which to apply expertise on change of type. Some basic theoretical results have been found.

  2. Measuring the skin dose protection afforded by protective apparel with a beta spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, D.E.; Rich, B.L.; Johnson, L.O. )

    1986-10-01

    This paper reports that the protective apparel worn by radiation workers to avoid skin contamination also provides measurable protection against external beta sources. The beta contribution to the skin dose rate depends on the residual energy spectrum of the beta particles after they have penetrated the protective apparel. The shift in the beta energy spectra and consequent reduction in the shallow dose rates afforded by various items of protective apparel were investigated for a few laboratory beta sources using a beta spectrometer that is capable of dose calculations. The results presented here indicate that significant dose rates to the skin can occur despite the presence of protective apparel if high energy beta emitting isotopes are present.

  3. Dynamics of Bianchi type-VI0 holographic dark energy models in general relativity and Lyra's geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katore, S. D.; Kapse, D. V.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have studied the anisotropic and homogeneous Bianchi type-VI 0 Universe filled with dark matter and holographic dark energy components in the framework of general relativity and Lyra's geometry. The Einstein's field equations have been solved exactly by taking the expansion scalar ( 𝜃) in the model is proportional to the shear scalar ( σ). Some physical and kinematical properties of the models are also discussed.

  4. Identification of types of businesses with potential interest in operating and/or exporting ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    This study describes the characteristics of three selected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)-based lines of business, examines other lines of business and identifies those with similar characteristics, and indicates the types of businesses/corporations that could be expected to have potential interest in operating and/or exporting OTEC plants. An OTEC line of business model is developed to assist companies in making an internal corporate assessment as to whether OTEC should be in their business plan.

  5. Different types of maximum power point tracking techniques for renewable energy systems: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammad Junaid; Shukla, Praveen; Mustafa, Rashid; Chatterji, S.; Mathew, Lini

    2016-03-01

    Global demand for electricity is increasing while production of energy from fossil fuels is declining and therefore the obvious choice of the clean energy source that is abundant and could provide security for development future is energy from the sun. In this paper, the characteristic of the supply voltage of the photovoltaic generator is nonlinear and exhibits multiple peaks, including many local peaks and a global peak in non-uniform irradiance. To keep global peak, MPPT is the important component of photovoltaic systems. Although many review articles discussed conventional techniques such as P & O, incremental conductance, the correlation ripple control and very few attempts have been made with intelligent MPPT techniques. This document also discusses different algorithms based on fuzzy logic, Ant Colony Optimization, Genetic Algorithm, artificial neural networks, Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm Firefly, Extremum seeking control method and hybrid methods applied to the monitoring of maximum value of power at point in systems of photovoltaic under changing conditions of irradiance.

  6. In vivo dosimetry: intercomparison between p-type based and n-type based diodes for the 16-25 MV energy range.

    PubMed

    Jornet, N; Ribas, M; Eudaldo, T

    2000-06-01

    This paper compares two different types of diodes designed to cover the energy range from 16 to 25 MV, one n-type (diode-A) and the other p-type (diode-B). A 18 MV x-ray beam has been used for all tests. Signal stability postirradiation, intrinsic precision and linearity of response with dose, front-back symmetry, and dose decrease under the diode were studied. Also, the water equivalent thickness of the build up caps was determined. Both types of diodes were calibrated to give entrance dose. Entrance correction factors for field size, tray, source skin distance, angle, and wedge were determined. Finally, the effect of dose rate, temperature and accumulated dose on the diode's response were studied. Only diode-A had full build-up for 18 MV x rays and standard irradiation conditions. Field size correction factor was about 2%-4% for field sizes bigger than 20 x 20 cm2 for both diodes. Tray correction factor was negligible for diode-A while diode-B would overestimate the dose by a 2% for a 40 x 40 cm2 field size if the correction factor was not applied. Wedge correction factors are only relevant for the 60 degrees wedge, being the correction factor for diode-A significantly higher than for diode-B. Diode-A showed less temperature dependence than diode-B. Sensitivity dependence on dose per pulse was a 1.5% higher for diode-A than for diode-B and therefore a higher SSD dependence was found for diode-A. The loss of sensitivity with accumulated radiation dose was only about 0.3% for diode-A, after 300 Gy, while it amounted to 8% for diode-B. Weighing the different correction factors for both types of diodes no conclusions about which type is better can be driven. From these results it can be also seen that the dependence of the diode response on dose rate in a pulsed beam does not seem to be associated with the fact of being n-type or p-type but could be related to the doping level of the diodes.

  7. Comparative investigation of the performances of 10 kW power type wind energy plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, S.; Bruegmann, J.; Petersen, G.; Mengelkamp, H. T.

    A test field for wind energy converters, its technical equipment, and nine different wind energy converters are described. Operating experience and results of the first 2 years of operation of the Aeroman and the Windmatic plants are summarized. Performances vary between 0.42 kW and 23.01 kW (Windmatic) and 1.59 kW to 11.07kW (Man) for average wind velocities 5.5 m/sec to 15.5 m/sec.

  8. Investigation of the cerebral energy status in patients with glutaric aciduria type I by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Möller, H E; Koch, H G; Weglage, J; Freudenberg, F; Ullrich, K

    2003-04-01

    In vivo phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to investigate markers of the cerebral energy status in two patients with glutaric aciduria type I (GA-I). Besides an increased concentration of phosphomonoesters in one patient, no other significant alterations from controls were found. This might indicate increased resynthesis of dendritic processes secondary to preceding metabolic crises. In contrast to previous cell-culture studies, no cerebral depletion of phosphocreatine (PCr) was observed. In conclusion, a severe global and permanent depletion of cerebral energy supplies must be ruled out. The benefit of a permanent creatine substitution to stabilize mitochondrial energy metabolism seems thus questionable. However, as MRS was performed during stable clinical conditions, the possibility of a PCr decrease during acute metabolic crises cannot be assessed.

  9. Effects of deposited nuclear and electronic energy on the hardness of R7T7-type containment glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peuget, S.; Noël, P.-Y.; Loubet, J.-L.; Pavan, S.; Nivet, P.; Chenet, A.

    2006-05-01

    The effects of elastic and inelastic interactions induced by cumulative alpha decay on the hardness of R7T7-type nuclear containment glass were investigated on actinide-doped glass specimens and by external irradiation of inactive glass by light and heavy ions. Vickers microindentation and nanoindentation hardness measurements showed that in the deposited energy range investigated (below 3 × 10 22 keV/cm 3) inelastic effects have no influence on the plastic response of the glass. Conversely, identical hardness variations versus the nuclear energy deposited in the material were observed on curium-doped glass and on glass irradiated by ion bombardment. The observed hardness variation stabilized after the deposited energy reached about 3 × 10 20 keV nucl/cm 3. These findings indicate that the change in the plastic response of the glass is a consequence of ballistic effects.

  10. Energy for wild-type acetylcholine receptor channel gating from different choline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bruhova, Iva; Gregg, Timothy; Auerbach, Anthony

    2013-02-05

    Agonists, including the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), bind at two sites in the neuromuscular ACh receptor channel (AChR) to promote a reversible, global change in protein conformation that regulates the flow of ions across the muscle cell membrane. In the synaptic cleft, ACh is hydrolyzed to acetate and choline. Replacement of the transmitter's ester acetyl group with a hydroxyl (ACh→choline) results in a + 1.8 kcal/mol reduction in the energy for gating generated by each agonist molecule from a low- to high-affinity change of the transmitter binding site (ΔG(B)). To understand the distinct actions of structurally related agonist molecules, we measured ΔG(B) for 10 related choline derivatives. Replacing the hydroxyl group of choline with different substituents, such as hydrogen, chloride, methyl, or amine, increased the energy for gating (i.e., it made ΔG(B) more negative relative to choline). Extending the ethyl hydroxide tail of choline to propyl and butyl hydroxide also increased this energy. Our findings reveal the amount of energy that is available for the AChR conformational change provided by different, structurally related agonists. We speculate that a hydrogen bond between the choline hydroxyl and the backbone carbonyl of αW149 positions this agonist's quaternary ammonium group so as to reduce the cation-π interaction between this moiety and the aromatic groups at the binding site.

  11. SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop Solar: A Competition To Spur Low-Cost Rooftop Solar Installations Across The Nation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    The SunShot Prize encourages novel public-private partnerships, original business models, and innovative approaches to installing clean, renewable solar energy. The sustainable business strategies developed by participants will provide transferable lessons that can be applied nationwide to hasten America's transition to affordable clean energy in a post-subsidy market.

  12. Industrial-type sweet potatoes: a renewable energy source for Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.R.; Smittle, D.A.

    1983-06-01

    Screening sweet potato breeding lines and cultivars for high content of fermentables was more easily accomplished when percent dry weight, rather than percent sugar and starch, was used as the measurement criterion. A regression equation was established to estimate the percent fermentables from dry weight determinations. Percent fermentables and biomass yield can then be used to estimate alcohol-production potential. Considerable variations in alcohol-production potential and biomass yield occurred among genotypes. High biomass yield should be combined with high fermentable carbohydrate content to maximize alcohol-production potential. Many of the high starch-containing industrial-type sweet potatoes meet these requirement better than the table types which were developed for human consumption. Industrial-type sweet potatoes may also be better suited than some other crops for biomass farming if alcohol production becomes a part of Georgia agriculture and if sweet potato production costs can be reduced.

  13. Small businesses and the Affordable Care Act of 2010.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sara R; Davis, Karen; Nicholson, Jennifer L; Stremikis, Kristof

    2010-09-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes several short- and long-term provisions designed to help small businesses pay for and maintain health insurance for their workers, and to allow workers without employer coverage to gain access to affordable, comprehensive health insurance. Provisions include a small business tax credit to offset premium costs for firms that offer coverage starting this taxable year, establishment of state-based insurance exchanges that promise to lower administrative costs and pool risk more broadly, and creation of new market rules and an essential benefit standard to protect small firms and their workers. Analysis shows that up to 16.6 million workers are in firms that would be eligible for the tax credit in 2010 to 2013. Over the next 10 years, small businesses and organizations could receive an estimated $40 billion in federal support through the premium credit program.

  14. Affordable ART in Kenya: The only hope for involuntary childlessness

    PubMed Central

    Ndegwa, SW

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The reported overall subfertility rate in Kenia is 26.1% with 50% attributed to tubal factors and 15% due to male factors. This is probably an underestimation taking into consideration that due to the stigma and myths of the disease, many couples are seeking alternative care from religious sects, witchdoctors, herbalists. Because the costs associated with IVF in private centres are only affordable for the happy few, the only true hope for most Kenyans struggling with unintended childlessness lies in the introduction of affordable ART services. The major challenge is to reduce the costs of ovarian stimulation medication and the equipment set-up cost of the ART laboratory. An important foreseeable barrier to low-cost ART is adequately trained personnel. PMID:27909571

  15. The Affordable Care Act: A Prescription for Homeland Security Preparedness?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    purchase health insurance  Correct the inequity of Medicaid preventive coverage for new beneficiaries vs. existing beneficiaries  Design and...might incentivize choosing health insurance over penalties. D. ADDRESS MEDICAID PREVENTIVE COVERAGE INEQUITY As noted in Chapter V, § 1001 of the...Affordable Care Act (ACA), tens of millions of U.S. citizens were without health insurance coverage. Without health insurance, health care can be

  16. Assessment of Thermal Protection Afforded by Hot Water Diving Suits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-03

    Assessment of Thermal Protect! " Afforded by Hot Water Diving Suits A AA L. A. Kuehn Diver thermal comfort in cold water is presently only...with proper control oj inlet suit water flow% and temperature, as well as heating of inspired gas, this suit technology suffices for thermal comfort for...technology provides in part to the convective heat loss that it prpsents, sustained long-term thermal comfort in cold water, Webb (W) has defined a

  17. Setting the price of essential drugs: necessity and affordability.

    PubMed

    Litvack, J I; Shepard, D S; Quick, J D

    1989-08-12

    A method has been developed for fine tuning the selection of drugs to improve cost recovery, to promote appropriate drug use, and to make more drugs more affordable. This scheme is based on a classification of drug necessity (vital, essential, non-essential) and on the relative cost of complete courses of treatment so that expensive drugs can be subsidised by marking up inexpensive ones.

  18. Promoting Prevention Through the Affordable Care Act: Workplace Wellness

    PubMed Central

    Roffenbender, Jason S.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Millard, Francois; Wildenhaus, Kevin; DeSantis, Charles; Novelli, William

    2012-01-01

    Public health in the United States can be improved by building workplace “cultures of health” that support healthy lifestyles. The Affordable Care Act (ACA), which includes the Prevention and Public Health Fund, will support a new focus on prevention and wellness, offering opportunities to strengthen the public’s health through workplace wellness initiatives. This article describes the opportunity the ACA provides to improve worker wellness. PMID:23237245

  19. Simple, Affordable and Sustainable Borehole Observatories for Complex Monitoring Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, A.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Davis, E.; Saffer, D.; Wheat, G.; LaBonte, A.; Meldrum, R.; Heesemann, M.; Villinger, H.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Renken, J.; Bergenthal, M.; Wefer, G.

    2012-04-01

    Around 20 years ago, the scientific community started to use borehole observatories, so-called CORKs or Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits, which are installed inside submarine boreholes, and which allow the re-establishment and monitoring of in situ conditions. From the first CORKs which allowed only rudimentary fluid pressure and temperature measurements, the instruments evolved to multi-functional and multi-level subseafloor laboratories, including, for example, long-term fluid sampling devices, in situ microbiological experiments or strainmeter. Nonetheless, most boreholes are still left uninstrumented, which is a major loss for the scientific community. In-stallation of CORKs usually requires a drillship and subsequent ROV assignments for data download and instru-ment maintenance, which is a major logistic and financial effort. Moreover, the increasing complexity of the CORK systems increased not only the expenses but led also to longer installation times and a higher sensitivity of the in-struments to environmental constraints. Here, we present three types of Mini-CORKs, which evolved back to more simple systems yet providing a wide range of possible in situ measurements. As a regional example the Nankai Trough is chosen, where repeated subduction thrust earthquakes with M8+ occurred. The area has been investigated by several drilling campaigns of the DSDP, ODP and IODP, where boreholes were already instrumented by different CORKs. Unfortunately, some of the more complex systems showed incomplete functionality, and moreover, the increased ship time forced IODP to rely on third party funds for the observatories. Consequently, the need for more affordable CORKs arose, which may be satisfied by the systems presented here. The first type, the so-called SmartPlug, provides two pressure transducers and four temperature sensors, and monitors a hydrostatic reference section and an isolated zone of interest. It was already installed at the Nankai Trough accretionary

  20. The effects of incretins on energy homeostasis: physiology and implications for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity.

    PubMed

    Karras, Spyridon; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Mintziori, Gesthimani; Katsiki, Niki; Tzotzas, Themistoklis

    2012-11-01

    Energy homeostasis in mammalians is a teleological process regulated by the interplay between caloric intake and energy expenditure. Incretins are a significant component of the complex homeostatic network regulating the metabolic state in humans. This narrative review will focus on the basic concepts regarding incretins physiology and their regulatory feedback mechanisms affecting energy homeostasis. In this context, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) promotes satiety and weight loss through centrally and peripherally mediated pathways. On the other hand, gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP) is implicated in energy storage by its actions on adipose tissue. Understanding this biological model requires a holistic approach, since it is dually manifested by promoting weight reduction, in the case of GLP-1, or favoring lipid accumulation, in the case of GIP. The complete spectrum of incretin actions related to energy homeostasis is yet to be fully elucidated. Currently, new drugs based on incretin physiology are available for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas the implication of similar drugs in the treatment of obesity is under investigation. These agents exert several beneficial effects that minimize cardiovascular risk.

  1. Correspondence effects with torches: grasping affordance or visual feature asymmetry?

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaolei; Chen, Jing; Proctor, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine whether an object-based correspondence effect for torch (flashlight) stimuli reported by Pellicano et al. [( 2010 ). Simon-like and functional affordance effects with tools: The effects of object perceptual discrimination and object action state. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 63, 2190-2201] is due to a grasping affordance provided by the handle or asymmetry of feature markings on the torch. In Experiment 1 the stimuli were the same as those from Pellicano et al.'s Experiment 2, whereas in Experiments 2 and 3 the stimuli were modified versions with the graspable handle removed. Participants in all experiments performed upright/inverted orientation judgements on the torch stimuli. The results of Experiment 1 replicated those of Pellicano et al.: A small but significant object-based correspondence effect was evident, mainly when the torch was in an active state. With the handle of the torch removed in Experiment 2, making the barrel markings more asymmetric in the display, the correspondence effect was larger. Experiment 3 directly demonstrated an effect of barrel-marking asymmetry on the correspondence effect: When only the half of the markings nearest the light end of the torch was included, the correspondence effect reversed to favour the light end. The results are in agreement with a visual feature-asymmetry account and are difficult to reconcile with a grasping-affordance account.

  2. Approach to an Affordable and Productive Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCleskey, Carey M.; Rhodes, Russel E.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Henderson, Edward M.; Robinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for creating space transportation architectures that are affordable, productive, and sustainable. The architectural scope includes both flight and ground system elements, and focuses on their compatibility to achieve a technical solution that is operationally productive, and also affordable throughout its life cycle. Previous papers by the authors and other members of the Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST) focused on space flight system engineering methods, along with operationally efficient propulsion system concepts and technologies. This paper follows up previous work by using a structured process to derive examples of conceptual architectures that integrate a number of advanced concepts and technologies. The examples are not intended to provide a near-term alternative architecture to displace current near-term design and development activity. Rather, the examples demonstrate an approach that promotes early investments in advanced system concept studies and trades (flight and ground), as well as in advanced technologies with the goal of enabling highly affordable, productive flight and ground space transportation systems.

  3. Energy and transportationtype="corresp" rid="FN1">(*)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, J.

    2015-08-01

    Transportation takes a considerable and increasing fraction of the energy use worldwide, and more than half the oil consumption. By far the largest part is used by cars powered by internal combustion engines. The advantage of using internal combustion engines is that the energy density of liquid fuels is extremely high. The disadvantage is that gasoline and diesel engines have a poor performance: 20 to 25% only. How does this compare with electric cars? What are the alternative transportation systems and their efficiencies anyway? In this lecture we analyse the efficiency of various transport systems, using elementary physics principles. We will look at cars, buses, trains and TGVs, ships and aircraft. In addition, the efficiency of human powered vehicles will be considered. New and promising developments in the field of Intelligent Transportation Systems, like Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control, are also discussed.

  4. Thermodynamics of Interacting new Agegraphic Dark Energy and Dark Matter Due to Bianchi Type I Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossienkhani, Hossien

    2016-11-01

    We study a thermodynamical description of the interaction between new agegraphic dark energy (NADE) and dark matter (DM) in an anisotropic universe. We find expressions for the entropy changes of these dark energy (DE) candidates. In addition, considering thermal fluctuations, thermodynamics of the DE component interacting with a DM sector is addressed. We also show that if one wants to solve the coincidence problem by using this mutual interaction, then the coupling constants of the interaction will be constrained. Finally, we obtain a physical expression for the interaction which is consistent with phenomenological descriptions and passes reasonably well the observational tests. Our study shows that, with the local equilibrium assumption, the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon.

  5. Interannual variability of fisheries economic returns and energy ratios is mostly explained by gear type.

    PubMed

    Trenkel, Verena M; Daurès, Fabienne; Rochet, Marie-Joëlle; Lorance, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    According to portfolio theory applied to fisheries management, economic returns are stabilised by harvesting in a portfolio stocks of species whose returns are negatively correlated and for which the portfolio economic return variance is smaller than the sum of stock specific return variances. Also, variability is expected to decrease with portfolio width. Using a range of indicators, these predictions were tested for the French fishing fleets in the Bay of Biscay (Northeast Atlantic) during the period 2001-2009. For this, vessels were grouped into eight fishing fleets based on the gears used and exploited species were grouped into five functional groups. The portfolio width of fleets ranged from 1-3 functional groups, or 4-19 species. Economic fleet returns (sale revenues minus fishing costs) varied strongly between years; the interannual variability was independent of portfolio width (species or functional groups). Energy ratio expressed by the ratio between fuel energy used for fishing and energy contained in landings varied from 0.3 for purse seines to 9.7 for trawlers using bottom trawls alone or in combination with pelagic trawls independent of portfolio width. Interannual variability in total sale revenues was larger than the sum of species specific sales revenue variability, except for fleets using hooks and pelagic trawlers; it increased with the number of species exploited. In conclusion, the interannual variability of economic returns or energy ratios of French fisheries in the Bay of Biscay did not decrease with the number of species or functional groups exploited, though it varied between fleets.

  6. Cambridge Homes Increases Energy Efficiency in a Mix of Housing Types

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.; Anderson, R.

    2001-06-12

    New houses designed by Cambridge Homes in Crest Hill, Illinois, with technical support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Program, save their homeowners money by applying the principles of ''whole-building'' design to the entire home product line. Regardless of the model chosen, home buyers can enjoy consistently high levels of comfort and performance with the added benefit of reduced operating costs.

  7. Interannual Variability of Fisheries Economic Returns and Energy Ratios Is Mostly Explained by Gear Type

    PubMed Central

    Trenkel, Verena M.; Daurès, Fabienne; Rochet, Marie-Joëlle; Lorance, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    According to portfolio theory applied to fisheries management, economic returns are stabilised by harvesting in a portfolio stocks of species whose returns are negatively correlated and for which the portfolio economic return variance is smaller than the sum of stock specific return variances. Also, variability is expected to decrease with portfolio width. Using a range of indicators, these predictions were tested for the French fishing fleets in the Bay of Biscay (Northeast Atlantic) during the period 2001–2009. For this, vessels were grouped into eight fishing fleets based on the gears used and exploited species were grouped into five functional groups. The portfolio width of fleets ranged from 1–3 functional groups, or 4–19 species. Economic fleet returns (sale revenues minus fishing costs) varied strongly between years; the interannual variability was independent of portfolio width (species or functional groups). Energy ratio expressed by the ratio between fuel energy used for fishing and energy contained in landings varied from 0.3 for purse seines to 9.7 for trawlers using bottom trawls alone or in combination with pelagic trawls independent of portfolio width. Interannual variability in total sale revenues was larger than the sum of species specific sales revenue variability, except for fleets using hooks and pelagic trawlers; it increased with the number of species exploited. In conclusion, the interannual variability of economic returns or energy ratios of French fisheries in the Bay of Biscay did not decrease with the number of species or functional groups exploited, though it varied between fleets. PMID:23922951

  8. Distribution of type I Fc epsilon-receptors on the surface of mast cells probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Kubitscheck, U; Schweitzer-Stenner, R; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M; Pecht, I

    1993-01-01

    The aggregation state of type I Fc epsilon-receptors (Fc epsilon RI) on the surface of single living mast cells was investigated by resonance fluorescence energy transfer. Derivatization of Fc epsilon RI specific ligands, i.e., immunoglobulin E or Fab fragments of a Fc epsilon RI specific monoclonal antibody, with donor and acceptor fluorophores provided a means for measuring receptor clustering through energy transfer between the receptor probes. The efficiency of energy transfer between the ligands carrying distinct fluorophores was determined on single cells in a microscope by analyzing the photobleaching kinetics of the donor fluorophore in the presence and absence of receptor ligands labeled with acceptor fluorophores. To rationalize the energy transfer data, we developed a theoretical model describing the dependence of the energy transfer efficiency on the geometry of the fluorescently labeled macromolecular ligands and their aggregation state on the cell surface. To this end, the transfer process was numerically calculated first for one pair and then for an ensemble of Fc epsilon RI bound ligands on the cell surface. The model stipulates that the aggregation state of the Fc epsilon RI is governed by an attractive lipid-protein mediated interaction potential. The corresponding pair-distribution function characterizes the spatial distribution of the ensemble. Using this approach, the energy transfer efficiency of the ensemble was calculated for different degrees of receptor aggregation. Comparison of the theoretical modeling results with the experimental energy transfer data clearly suggests that the Fc epsilon RI are monovalent, randomly distributed plasma membrane proteins. The method provides a novel approach for determining the aggregation state of cell surface components. PMID:8431535

  9. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2015-11-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18-39, 40-64, 65 +  years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of -0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of -0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81-1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed.

  10. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age

    PubMed Central

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18–39, 40–64, 65 + years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of −0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of −0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81–1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed. PMID:26449155

  11. Are Marketplace Plans Affordable? Consumer Perspectives from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March-May 2015.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sara R; Gunja, Munira; Rasmussen, Petra W; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    Most employers who provide health insurance to employees subsidize their premiums and provide a comprehensive benefit package. Before the Affordable Care Act, people who lacked health insurance through a job and purchased it on their own paid the full cost of their plans, which often came with skimpy benefit packages and high deductibles. Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March--May 2015, indicate that the law's tax credits have made premium costs in health plans sold through the marketplaces roughly comparable to employer plans, at least for people with low and moderate incomes. At higher incomes, the phase-out of the subsidies means that adults in marketplace plans have higher premium costs than those in employer plans. Overall, larger shares of adults in marketplace plans reported deductibles of $1,000 or more, compared with those in employer plans, though these differences were narrower among low-and moderate-income adults.

  12. Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Canada, Britain, and Spain. We found that the energy industry is not in crisis ; however, U.S. government policies, laws, dollars, and even public...CEIMAT (Centro de Investagaciones Energeticas , Medioambeintales y Tecnologicas) Research and development Page 3 of 28ENERGY 8/10/04http://www.ndu.edu...procurement or storage of standard, common use fuels. NATURAL GAS Natural gas, abundant globally and domestically, offers energy versatility among

  13. Conceptual Design of a 100kW Energy Integrated Type Bi-Directional Tidal Current Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Pyoung; Ahmed, M. Rafiuddin; Lee, Young Ho

    2010-06-01

    The development of a tidal current turbine that can extract maximum energy from the tidal current will be extremely beneficial for supplying continuous electric power. The present paper presents a conceptual design of a 100kW energy integrated type tidal current turbine for tidal power generation. The instantaneous power density of a flowing fluid incident on an underwater turbine is proportional to the cubic power of current velocity which is approximately 2.5m/s. A cross-flow turbine, provided with a nozzle and a diffuser, is designed and analyzed. The potential advantages of ducted and diffuser-augmented turbines were taken into consideration in order to achieve higher output at a relatively low speed. This study looks at a cross-flow turbine system which is placed in an augmentation channel to generate electricity bi-directionally. The compatibility of this turbine system is verified using a commercial CFD code, ANSYSCFX. This paper presents the results of the numerical analysis in terms of pressure, streaklines, velocity vectors and performance curves for energy integrated type bi-directional tidal current turbine (BDT) with augmentation.

  14. A new type of repetitive behavior in a high-energy transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laros, J. G.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Atteia, J.-L.; Boer, M.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Kane, S. R.; Kouveliotou, C.

    1987-01-01

    The high-energy burster GB 790107 has been observed to repeat, on the order of 100 times, between August 13, 1978 and June 27, 1986, with most repetitions occurring in the latter part of 1983. Here, these activities are described, discussing intensity and time-of-occurrence information covering a seven-year span of International Cometary Explorer (ICE) data. Arguments for the reality of this activity and its association with the GB 790107 source are presented. A moderately precise location derived from ICE, SMM, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, and Venera 13 Signe data is given and related to the published GB 790107 location.

  15. Theory of the Carrier Fermi Energy and Density of States of n- and p-TYPE SnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, R. K.; Mohapatro, S.

    In the present work we theoretically develop a kṡπ model to calculate the carrier electronic structure for both n- and p-type SnTe. Here π is the momentum operator in the presence of the spin-orbit interaction. The work is an extension of the theory developed for n- and p-PbTe earlier by one of the authors to evaluate the Fermi energy and the density of states (DOS). We consider a six-level energy basis for SnTe, as proposed by Bernick and Kleinman. One set of calculations was done by diagonalizing the kṡπ Hamiltonian matrix for the band-edge states and treating the far bands using perturbation theory. In the second set we have rediagonalized the kṡπ Hamiltonian matrix for the band edge states, treating the first diagonalization as the basis. The far bands are, as usual, included through perturbation. We have compared the results of both the sets. Results obtained for n- and p-type SnTe are also compared with that of n- and p-type PbTe. The similarities and contrasts are discussed. An indirect comparison with the DOS of the metallic tin suggests that the calculations are fairly reasonable. The results are also compared with some recent results for SnTe.

  16. Freestanding Flag-Type Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting High-Altitude Wind Energy from Arbitrary Directions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenfu; Pu, Xiong; Du, Chunhua; Li, Linxuan; Jiang, Chunyan; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-02-23

    Wind energy at a high altitude is far more stable and stronger than that near the ground, but it is out of reach of the wind turbine. Herein, we develop an innovative freestanding woven triboelectric nanogenerator flag (WTENG-flag) that can harvest high-altitude wind energy from arbitrary directions. The wind-driven fluttering of the woven unit leads to the current generation by a coupled effect of contact electrification and electrostatic induction. Systematic study is conducted to optimize the structure/material parameters of the WTENG-flag to improve the power output. This 2D WTENG-flag can also be stacked in parallel connections in many layers for a linearly increased output. Finally, a self-powered high-altitude platform with temperature/humidity sensing/telecommunicating capability is demonstrated with the WTENG-flag as a power source. Due to the light weight, low cost, and easy scale-up, this WTENG-flag has great potential for applications in weather/environmental sensing/monitoring systems.

  17. Wireless sensors linked to climate financing for globally affordable clean cooking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Tara; Ramanathan, Nithya; Mohanty, Jeevan; Rehman, Ibrahim H.; Graham, Eric; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    2017-01-01

    Three billion of the world’s poorest people mostly rely on solid biomass for cooking, with major consequences to health and environment. We demonstrate the untapped potential of wireless sensors connected to the `internet of things’ to make clean energy solutions affordable for those at the bottom of the energy pyramid. This breakthrough approach is demonstrated by a 17-month field study with 4,038 households in India. Major findings include: self-reported data on cooking duration have little correlation with actual usage data from sensors; sensor data revealed that the distribution of high and low users varied over time, and the actual mitigation of climate pollution was only 25% of the projected mitigation; climate credits were shown to significantly incentivize the use of cleaner technologies.

  18. Evaluation of Bianchi type VI0 magnetized anisotropic dark energy models with constant deceleration parameter in bimetric theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, M. S.; Ameen, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Bianchi type VI0 magnetized anisotropic dark energy models with constant deceleration parameter have been studied by solving the Rosen's field equations in Bimetric theory of gravitation. The models corresponding to power law expansion and exponential law expansion have been evaluated and studied their nature geometrically and physically. It is seen that there is real visible matter (baryonic matter) suddenly appeared only for small interval of time 0.7 ≤ t < 0.7598 and for the remaining whole range of time t, there is dark energy matter in the universe. Our investigations are supported to the observational fact that the usual matter described by known particle theory is about 4% and the dark energy cause the accelerating expansion of the universe and several high precision observational experiments, especially the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropic Probe (WMAP) satellite experiment (see [C. L. Bennett et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 148 (2003) 1; WMAP Collab. (D. N. Spergel et al.), Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 148 (2003) 175; D. N. Spergel et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. 170 (2007) 377; WMAP Collab. (E. Komastu et al.), Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180 (2009) 330; WMAP Collab. (G. Hinshaw et al.), Astrophys. J. Suppl. 208 (2013) 19; Plank Collab. (P. A. R. Ade), arXiv:1303.5076; arXiv:1303.5082]) conclude that the dark energy occupies near about 73% of the energy of the universe and dark matter is about 23%. In exponential law of expansion, our model is fully occupied by real visible matter and there is no chance of dark energy and dark matter.

  19. Housing affordability and mental health: does the relationship differ for renters and home purchasers?

    PubMed

    Mason, Kate E; Baker, Emma; Blakely, Tony; Bentley, Rebecca J

    2013-10-01

    There is increasing evidence of a direct association between unaffordable housing and poor mental health, over and above the effects of general financial hardship. Type of housing tenure may be an important factor in determining how individuals experience and respond to housing affordability problems. This study investigated whether a relationship exists between unaffordable housing and mental health that differs for home purchasers and private renters among low-income households. Data from 2001 to 2010 of the longitudinal Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey were analysed using fixed-effects linear regression to examine change in the SF-36 Mental Component Summary (MCS) score of individuals aged 25-64 years, associated with changes in housing affordability, testing for an interaction with housing tenure type. After adjusting for age, survey year and household income, among individuals living in households in the lower 40% of the national income distribution, private renters in unaffordable housing experienced somewhat poorer in mental health than when their housing was affordable (difference in MCS = -1.18 or about 20% of one S.D. of the MCS score; 95% CI: -1.95,-0.41; p = 0.003) while home purchasers experienced no difference on average. The statistical evidence for housing tenure modifying the association between unaffordable housing and mental health was moderate (p = 0.058). When alternatives to 40% were considered as income cut-offs for inclusion in the sample, evidence of a difference between renters and home purchasers was stronger amongst households in the lowest 50% of the income distribution (p = 0.020), and between the 30th and 50th percentile (p = 0.045), with renters consistently experiencing a decline in mental health while mean MCS scores of home purchasers did not change. In this study, private renters appeared to be more vulnerable than home purchasers to mental health effects of unaffordable housing. Such a modified

  20. FABRICATION AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE 9979 TYPE AF RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGING FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2013-10-10

    This paper summarizes the development, testing, and certification of the 9979 Type A Fissile Packaging that replaces the UN1A2 Specification Shipping Package eliminated from Department of Transportation (DOT) 49 CFR 173. The DOT Specification Package was used for many decades by the U.S. nuclear industry as a fissile waste container until its removal as an authorized container by DOT. This paper will discuss stream lining procurement of high volume radioactive material packaging manufacturing, such as the 9979, to minimize packaging production costs without sacrificing Quality Assurance. The authorized content envelope (combustible and non-combustible) as well as planned content envelope expansion will be discussed.

  1. Estimation of Energy Expenditure Using a Patch-Type Sensor Module with an Incremental Radial Basis Function Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meina; Kwak, Keun-Chang; Kim, Youn Tae

    2016-01-01

    Conventionally, indirect calorimetry has been used to estimate oxygen consumption in an effort to accurately measure human body energy expenditure. However, calorimetry requires the subject to wear a mask that is neither convenient nor comfortable. The purpose of our study is to develop a patch-type sensor module with an embedded incremental radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) for estimating the energy expenditure. The sensor module contains one ECG electrode and a three-axis accelerometer, and can perform real-time heart rate (HR) and movement index (MI) monitoring. The embedded incremental network includes linear regression (LR) and RBFNN based on context-based fuzzy c-means (CFCM) clustering. This incremental network is constructed by building a collection of information granules through CFCM clustering that is guided by the distribution of error of the linear part of the LR model. PMID:27669249

  2. Estimation of Energy Expenditure Using a Patch-Type Sensor Module with an Incremental Radial Basis Function Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Li, Meina; Kwak, Keun-Chang; Kim, Youn Tae

    2016-09-22

    Conventionally, indirect calorimetry has been used to estimate oxygen consumption in an effort to accurately measure human body energy expenditure. However, calorimetry requires the subject to wear a mask that is neither convenient nor comfortable. The purpose of our study is to develop a patch-type sensor module with an embedded incremental radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) for estimating the energy expenditure. The sensor module contains one ECG electrode and a three-axis accelerometer, and can perform real-time heart rate (HR) and movement index (MI) monitoring. The embedded incremental network includes linear regression (LR) and RBFNN based on context-based fuzzy c-means (CFCM) clustering. This incremental network is constructed by building a collection of information granules through CFCM clustering that is guided by the distribution of error of the linear part of the LR model.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds for photovoltaic applications and solar energy conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Murugesan, Sankaran

    2014-04-29

    The present invention relates to formation of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds, such as bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, via a hydrothermal synthesis process, with the resulting compound(s) having multifunctional properties such as being useful in solar energy conversion, environmental remediation, and/or energy storage, for example. In one embodiment, a hydrothermal method is disclosed that transforms nanoparticles of TiO.sub.2 to bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, optionally loaded with palladium nanoparticles. The method includes reacting titanium dioxide nanotubes with a bismuth salt in an acidic bath at a temperature sufficient and for a time sufficient to form bismuth titanate crystals, which are subsequently annealed to form bismuth titanate nanocubes. After annealing, the bismuth titanate nanocubes may be optionally loaded with nano-sized metal particles, e.g., nanosized palladium particles.

  4. Characterization of particulate-bound PAHs in rural households using different types of domestic energy in Henan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuyong; Liu, Xueping; Wang, Wei; Man, Yu Bon; Chan, Chuen Yu; Liu, Wenxin; Tao, Shu; Wong, Ming Hung

    2015-12-01

    The concentrations and composition of sixteen PAHs adsorbed to respirable particulate matter (PM10≤10 μm) and inhalable particulate matter (PM2.5≤2.5 μm) were determined during autumn and winter in rural households of Henan Province, China, which used four types of domestic energy [crop residues, coal, liquid petroleum gas (LPG) and electricity] for cooking and heating. The present results show that there were significantly (p<0.05) seasonal variations of particulate-bound PAHs in the rural households. The daily mean concentrations of particulate-bound PAHs in the kitchens, sitting rooms and outdoors were apparently higher in winter than those in autumn, except those in the kitchens using coal. The present study also shows that there were obvious variations of particulate-bound PAHs among the four types of domestic energy used in the rural households. The households using LPG for cooking can, at least in some circumstances, have higher concentrations of PAHs in the kitchens than using crop residues or electricity. In addition, using coal in the sitting rooms seemed to result in apparently higher concentrations of particulate-bound PAHs than using the other three types of domestic energy during winter. The most severe contamination occurred in the kitchens using LPG in winter, where the daily mean concentrations of PM2.5-bound PAHs were up to 762.5±931.2 ng m(-3), indicating that there was serious health risk of inhalation exposure to PAHs in the rural households of Henan Province. Rural residents' exposure to PM2.5-bound PAHs in kitchens would be roughly reduced by 69.8% and 85.5% via replacing coal or crop residues with electricity in autumn. The pilot research would provide important supplementary information to the indoor air pollution studies in rural area.

  5. Inverse Design of p-Type Transparent Conducting Oxides for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, Arpun Ramaiah

    The Inverse Design approach to materials discovery was applied to developing materials that exhibit simultaneous p-type conductivity and optical transparency. Theoretical calculations predicted that Rh2ZnO4 and Cr2MnO4, well-known compounds with the spinel crystal structure, had the potential to be p-type transparent conducting oxides (p-TCOs). Bulk samples of these materials were synthesized, and their structural, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. Theory predicted that Rh2ZnO4 was largely a line compound, with slight deviations toward Zn-excess at higher temperatures. This off-stoichiometry was predicted to be the source of excess holes and thus p-type conductivity in Rh2ZnO4. Additionally, new methods in density functional theory predicted that hole conduction in Rh 2ZnO4 occurred via band transport, instead of small polaron hopping. In this work, experimental X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed that Rh2ZnO4 exhibits small off-stoichiometry toward Zn-rich compositions at 975°C. High temperature electrical measurements confirmed p-type conductivity, and room temperature Hall effect measurements yielded a hole mobility of 0.18 cm2/Vs for a bulk polycrystalline sample. In order to distinguish between band and polaron conduction, a revised analysis for high temperature electrical data was developed. This new analysis combines conductivity and thermopower data with theoretical calculations of the effective density of states in order to determine the behavior of the mobility with temperature. This method can be applied in the absence of a direct measurement of the temperature-dependence of the mobility. The results of this new method indicate that the behavior of Rh2ZnO4 is consistent with band conduction. Although intrinsic Cr2MnO4 is electrically insulating, lithium was predicted to be an effective p-type dopant, occupying the tetrahedral (Mn) site. Combined neutron/X-ray measurements of a doped specimen confirmed the predicted site

  6. A new type of vanadium carbide V5C3 and its hardening by tuning Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Wandong; Meng, Fanyan; Yu, Rong

    2016-03-01

    Transition metal compounds usually have various stoichiometries and crystal structures due to the coexistence of metallic, covalent, and ionic bonds in them. This flexibility provides a lot of candidates for materials design. Taking the V-C binary system as an example, here we report the first-principles prediction of a new type of vanadium carbide, V5C3, which has an unprecedented stoichiometry in the V-C system, and is energetically and mechanically stable. The material is abnormally much harder than neighboring compounds in the V-C phase diagram, and can be further hardened by tuning the Fermi energy.

  7. A new type of vanadium carbide V5C3 and its hardening by tuning Fermi energy

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Wandong; Meng, Fanyan; Yu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal compounds usually have various stoichiometries and crystal structures due to the coexistence of metallic, covalent, and ionic bonds in them. This flexibility provides a lot of candidates for materials design. Taking the V-C binary system as an example, here we report the first-principles prediction of a new type of vanadium carbide, V5C3, which has an unprecedented stoichiometry in the V-C system, and is energetically and mechanically stable. The material is abnormally much harder than neighboring compounds in the V-C phase diagram, and can be further hardened by tuning the Fermi energy. PMID:26928719

  8. Adaptive algorithms of position and energy reconstruction in Anger-camera type detectors: experimental data processing in ANTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Defendi, I.; Engels, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Gongadze, A.; Guerard, B.; Jurkovic, M.; Kemmerling, G.; Manzin, G.; Margato, L. M. S.; Niko, H.; Pereira, L.; Petrillo, C.; Peyaud, A.; Piscitelli, F.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N. J.; Sacchetti, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Solovov, V.; Van Esch, P.; Zeitelhack, K.

    2013-05-01

    The software package ANTS (Anger-camera type Neutron detector: Toolkit for Simulations), developed for simulation of Anger-type gaseous detectors for thermal neutron imaging was extended to include a module for experimental data processing. Data recorded with a sensor array containing up to 100 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) in a custom configuration can be loaded and the positions and energies of the events can be reconstructed using the Center-of-Gravity, Maximum Likelihood or Least Squares algorithm. A particular strength of the new module is the ability to reconstruct the light response functions and relative gains of the photomultipliers from flood field illumination data using adaptive algorithms. The performance of the module is demonstrated with simulated data generated in ANTS and experimental data recorded with a 19 PMT neutron detector. The package executables are publicly available at http://coimbra.lip.pt/~andrei/

  9. A new class of LRS Bianchi type-II dark energy models with variable EoS parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anirudh; Amirhashchi, Hassan; Jaiswal, Rekha

    2011-08-01

    A new class of dark energy models in a Locally Rotationally Symmetric Bianchi type-II (LRS B-II) space-time with variable equation of state (EoS) parameter and constant deceleration parameter have been investigated in the present paper. The Einstein's field equations have been solved by applying a variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter given by Berman: Nuovo Cimento 74:182 (1983) which generates two types of solutions for the average scale factor, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential-law form. Using these two forms, Einstein's field equations are solved separately that correspond to expanding singular and non-singular models of the universe respectively. The dark energy EoS parameter ω is found to be time dependent and its existing range for both models is in good agreement with the three recent observations of (i) SNe Ia data (Knop et al.: Astrophys. J. 598:102 (2003)), (ii) SNe Ia data collaborated with CMBR anisotropy and galaxy clustering statistics (Tegmark et al.: Astrophys. J. 606:702 (2004)) and latest (iii) a combination of cosmological datasets coming from CMB anisotropies, luminosity distances of high redshift type Ia supernovae and galaxy clustering (Hinshaw et al.: Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180:225 (2009); Komatsu et al. Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180:330 (2009)). The cosmological constant Λ is found to be a positive decreasing function of time and it approaches a small positive value at late time (i.e. the present epoch) which is corroborated by results from recent supernovae Ia observations. The physical and geometric behaviour of the universe have also been discussed in detail.

  10. Alteration of inflammatory cytokines, energy metabolic regulators, and muscle fiber type in the skeletal muscle of postweaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Li, F; Li, Y; Tan, B; Wang, J; Duan, Y; Guo, Q; Liu, Y; Kong, X; Li, T; Tang, Y; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the alterations of inflammatory cytokines, energy metabolic regulators, and muscle fiber type in the LM of the piglets postweaning. Crossbred piglets (Landrace × Large White) weaned at 14 d age were randomly selected from 8 litters and slaughtered at 0 (W0), 1 (W1), 3 (W3), 5 (W5), or 7 (W7) days postweaning. The glycogen content, free glucose concentration, and enzyme activities, including ATPase (Na/K, Ca/Mg), creatine kinase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), were detected in the skeletal muscle tissue. Concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), were measured in serum. The mRNA abundance of the above cytokines, energy metabolic regulators, and muscle fiber type related genes were determined via real-time quantitative PCR analysis. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) signaling was measured by Western blot analysis. Our results showed ATPase activities were lower on W7 d but LDH activity was higher on W3 d after weaning ( < 0.05). Serum TNF-α concentration was markedly increased on W1 d, then returned to the value of preweaning ( < 0.05), and almost all the values of inflammatory cytokines were reduced to a low point on W5 d after weaning. Additionally, the IL-6 mRNA abundance was upregulated during W3 to W7 d, but cytokine TNF-α was upregulated just on W7 d ( < 0.05). The mRNA abundance of AMPKα and uncoupling protein (UCP) 3 were both higher on W1 and W3 d, and UCP2 was higher on W7 d postweaning ( < 0.05). Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) I and MyHC IIx-type fibers were enhanced on W1 d, then returned to the value of preweaning, and the MyHC IIb-type fiber was significantly increased on W5 and W7 d ( < 0.05). Meanwhile, the value of P-AMPKα/T-AMPKα increased on W3 d postweaning ( < 0.05) compared with that on W0 d. These results indicate

  11. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6 min bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE.

  12. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6-minute bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE. PMID:25340969

  13. Plastic modes of listening: affordance in constructed sound environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjolin, Anders

    This thesis is concerned with how the ecological approach to perception with the inclusion of listening modes, informs the creation of sound art installation, or more specifically as referred to in this thesis as constructed sound environments. The basis for the thesis has been a practiced based research where the aim and purpose of the written part of this PhD project has been to critically investigate the area of sound art, in order to map various approaches towards participating in and listening to a constructed sound environment. The main areas has been the notion of affordance as coined by James J. Gibson (1986), listening modes as coined by Pierre Schaeffer (1966) and further developed by Michel Chion (1994), aural architects as coined by Blesser and Salter (2007) and the holistic approach towards understanding sound art developed by Brandon LaBelle (2006). The findings within the written part of the thesis, based on a qualitative analysis, have informed the practice that has resulted in artefacts in the form of seven constructed sound environments that also functions as case studies for further analysis. The aim of the practice has been to exemplify the methodology, strategy and progress behind the organisation and construction of sound environments The research concerns point towards the acknowledgment of affordance as the crucial factor in understanding a constructed sound environment. The affordance approach govern the idea that perceiving a sound environment is a top-down process where the autonomic quality of a constructed sound environment is based upon the perception of structures of the sound material and its relationship with speaker placement and surrounding space. This enables a researcher to side step the conflicting poles of musical/abstract and non-musical/realistic classification of sound elements and regard these poles as included, not separated elements in the analysis of a constructed sound environment.

  14. Studies on electrochemically constructed n- and p-type photoelectrodes for use in solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Donghyeon

    Among several pathways to harvest solar energy, solar water splitting is one of the most efficient methods to convert solar light to hydrogen, which is a clean and easy to store chemical that has the potential to be used as a fuel source. Solar water splitting can be achieved primarily by photoelectrochemical cells (PECs), which utilize semiconductors as photoelectrodes for the water splitting reaction. Photoelectrodes play the crucial role of generating hydrogen but, to date, very few photoelectrodes have been developed that can produce hydrogen in a stable and efficient manner. Thus, development and modification of efficient, stable photoelectrodes are highly desirable to improve performance of solar water splitting PECs. This dissertation demonstrates the development of semiconductors as photoelectrodes and their modifications to advance solar energy conversion performance by newly established electrochemical synthetic routes. To improve the photoelectrochemical performance of photoelectrodes, various strategies were introduced, such as, morphology control, extrinsic doping, and the integration of catalysts. After successfully demonstrating the electrochemical synthesis of photoelectrodes, photoelectrochemical and electrochemical properties of electrodeposited photoelectrodes in PECs are discussed. The chapters can be categorized into three major themes. The first theme is the preparation of Bi-based photoanodes for the water oxidation reaction. Chapter 2 presents a study of Mo-doping into the BiVO4 photoanode to enhance charge separation properties. After Mo-doping was achieved successfully, a FeOOH oxygen evoltuion catalyst was integrated into the Mo-doped BiVO 4 photoanode to increase the water oxidation performance. Chapter 3 introduces another electrochemical synthesis method to control the morphology of Bi-based oxide photoanode materials. The second theme of this dissertation is the preparation of photocathode materials for the water reduction reaction

  15. Enabling Dedicated, Affordable Space Access Through Aggressive Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jonathan E.; Kibbey, Timothy P.; Cobb, C. Brent; Harris, Lawanna L.

    2014-01-01

    A launch vehicle at the scale and price point which allows developers to take reasonable risks with high payoff propulsion and avionics hardware solutions does not exist today. Establishing this service provides a ride through the proverbial technology "valley of death" that lies between demonstration in laboratory and flight environments. NASA's NanoLaunch effort will provide the framework to mature both earth-to-orbit and on-orbit propulsion and avionics technologies while also providing affordable, dedicated access to low earth orbit for cubesat class payloads.

  16. New affordable options for infrastructure and asset protection

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-15

    Securitas is one of the leaders evolving with technology and delivering new forms of affordable security for mining facilities. It was called in to protect a large mothballed coal mine in the central USA, the victim of repeated thefts. First, Mobile Surveillance Units (MSUs) were installed but thefts continued. Later, a new wireless video security system called Videofied which used MotionViewers which use infrared detectors to detect movement and send a 10 second clip of the intrusion to an operator. This led to the thieves being caught. 2 photos.

  17. Climate stability for a Sellers-type model. [atmospheric diffusive energy balance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghil, M.

    1976-01-01

    We study a diffusive energy-balance climate model governed by a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation. Three positive steady-state solutions of this equation are found; they correspond to three possible climates of our planet: an interglacial (nearly identical to the present climate), a glacial, and a completely ice-covered earth. We consider also models similar to the main one studied, and determine the number of their steady states. All the models have albedo continuously varying with latitude and temperature, and entirely diffusive horizontal heat transfer. The diffusion is taken to be nonlinear as well as linear. We investigate the stability under small perturbations of the main model's climates. A stability criterion is derived, and its application shows that the 'present climate' and the 'deep freeze' are stable, whereas the model's glacial is unstable. A variational principle is introduced to confirm the results of this stability analysis. For a sufficient decrease in solar radiation (about 2%) the glacial and interglacial solutions disappear, leaving the ice-covered earth as the only possible climate.

  18. Nuclear Infrared Spectral Energy Distribution of Type II Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videla, Liza; Lira, Paulina; Andrews, Heather; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin

    2013-02-01

    We present near- and mid-IR observations of a sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 μm Galaxy sample. The sample was observed in the J, H, K, L, M and N bands. Galaxy surface brightness profiles are modeled using nuclear, bulge, bar (when necessary), and disk components. To check the reliability of our findings, the procedure was tested using Spitzer observations of M 31. Nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are determined for 34 objects, and optical spectra are presented for 38, including analysis of their stellar populations using the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code. Emission line diagnostic diagrams are used to discriminate between genuine active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and H II nuclei. Combining our observations with those found in the literature, we have a total of 40 SEDs. It is found that about 40% of the SEDs are characterized by an upturn in the near-IR, which we have quantified as a NIR slope α < 1 for an SED characterized as λf λvpropλα. The three objects with an H II nucleus and two Seyfert nuclei with strong contamination from a circumnuclear also show an upturn. For genuine AGNs, this component could be explained as emission from the accretion disk, a jet, or from a very hot dust component leaking from the central region through a clumpy obscuring structure. The presence of a very compact nuclear starburst as the origin for this NIR excess emission is not favored by our spectroscopic data for these objects.

  19. Ion-conduction mechanisms in NaSICON-type membranes for energy storage and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, Anthony H.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Bartelt, Norman Charles

    2015-10-01

    Next generation metal-ion conducting membranes are key to developing energy storage and utilization technologies like batteries and fuel ce lls. Sodium super-ionic conductors (aka NaSICON) are a class of compounds with AM 1 M 2 (PO 4 ) 3 stoichiometry where the choice of "A" and "M" cation varies widely. This report, which de scribes substitutional derivatives of NZP (NaZr 2 P 3 O 12 ), summarizes the accomplishments of a Laboratory D irected Research and Development (LDRD) project to analyze transport mec hanisms using a combination of in situ studies of structure, composition, and bonding, com bined with first principles theory and modeling. We developed an experimental platform and applied methods, such as synchrotron- based X-ray spectroscopies, to probe the electronic structure of compositionally well-controlled NaSICON films while in operation ( i.e ., conducting Na ions exposed to oxygen or water va por atmospheres). First principles theory and modeling were used to interpret the experimental observations and develop an enhanced understanding of atomistic processes that give rise to, and affect, ion conduction.

  20. Affordable Development and Demonstration of a Small NTR Engine and Stage: How Small is Big Enough?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Sefcik, Robert J.; Fittje, James E.; McCurdy, David R.; Qualls, Arthur L.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Werner, James E.; Weitzberg (Abraham); Joyner, Claude R.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) derives its energy from fission of uranium-235 atoms contained within fuel elements that comprise the engine's reactor core. It generates high thrust and has a specific impulse potential of approximately 900 seconds - a 100% increase over today's best chemical rockets. The Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) project, funded by NASA's AES program, includes five key task activities: (1) Recapture, demonstration, and validation of heritage graphite composite (GC) fuel (selected as the "Lead Fuel" option); (2) Engine Conceptual Design; (3) Operating Requirements Definition; (4) Identification of Affordable Options for Ground Testing; and (5) Formulation of an Affordable Development Strategy. During FY'14, a preliminary DDT&E plan and schedule for NTP development was outlined by GRC, DOE and industry that involved significant system-level demonstration projects that included GTD tests at the NNSS, followed by a FTD mission. To reduce cost for the GTD tests and FTD mission, small NTR engines, in either the 7.5 or 16.5 klbf thrust class, were considered. Both engine options used GC fuel and a "common" fuel element (FE) design. The small approximately 7.5 klbf "criticality-limited" engine produces approximately 157 megawatts of thermal power (MWt) and its core is configured with parallel rows of hexagonal-shaped FEs and tie tubes (TTs) with a FE to TT ratio of approximately 1:1. The larger approximately 16.5 klbf Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE), developed by LANL at the end of the Rover program, produces approximately 367 MWt and has a FE to TT ratio of approximately 2:1. Although both engines use a common 35 inch (approximately 89 cm) long FE, the SNRE's larger diameter core contains approximately 300 more FEs needed to produce an additional 210 MWt of power. To reduce the cost of the FTD mission, a simple "1-burn" lunar flyby mission was considered to reduce the LH2 propellant loading, the stage size and complexity. Use of existing and

  1. Teacher Perceptions of Learning Affordances of Multi-User Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamage, Vimani; Tretiakov, Alexei; Crump, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    While the affordances of multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) for teaching and learning are a subject of numerous experience reports, there is little research on educators' perceptions of various MUVE affordances claimed in the literature. We investigate the educators' perceptions of claimed MUVE affordances for learning by conducting in-depth…

  2. 24 CFR 954.306 - Rental housing: qualification as affordable housing and income targeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... affordable housing and income targeting. 954.306 Section 954.306 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... Affordability § 954.306 Rental housing: qualification as affordable housing and income targeting. (a) Rent...: (1) Bears rents not greater than the lesser of— (i) The section 8 fair market rent for...

  3. Learning Outcomes Afforded by Self-Assessed, Segmented Video-Print Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koumi, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Learning affordances of video and print are examined in order to assess the learning outcomes afforded by hybrid video-print learning packages. The affordances discussed for print are: navigability, surveyability and legibility. Those discussed for video are: design for constructive reflection, provision of realistic experiences, presentational…

  4. 78 FR 15553 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... 45 CFR Parts 155 and 156 RIN 0938-AR76 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of... of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act) related to the Small Business...

  5. 77 FR 18309 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ...This final rule will implement the new Affordable Insurance Exchanges (``Exchanges''), consistent with title I of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, referred to collectively as the Affordable Care Act. The Exchanges will provide competitive marketplaces for individuals and small employers to directly......

  6. 76 FR 41865 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Establishment of Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ...This proposed rule would implement the new Affordable Insurance Exchanges (``Exchanges''), consistent with title I of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-148) as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-152), referred to collectively as the Affordable Care Act. The Exchanges will provide competitive marketplaces for......

  7. 77 FR 28790 - Medical Loss Ratio Requirements Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... Protection and Affordable Care Act AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Final... Care Act (Pub. L. 111-148) was enacted on March 23, 2010; the Health Care and Education Reconciliation... collectively as the Affordable Care Act. The Affordable Care Act reorganizes, amends, and adds to...

  8. 78 FR 20581 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Exchange Functions: Standards for Navigators and Non...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 155 RIN 0938-AR75 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Exchange... state or Exchange must not prevent the application of the provisions of title I of the Affordable Care.... Introduction The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Pub. L. 111-148) was enacted on March 23,...

  9. 76 FR 59702 - Notice of Intent To Award Affordable Care Act (ACA) Funding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Notice of Intent To Award Affordable Care Act... Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice. Overview Information Notice of Intent to Award Affordable Care Act (ACA...: This notice provides public announcement of CDC's intent to award Affordable Care Act...

  10. 77 FR 16501 - Certain Preventive Services Under the Affordable Care Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ...-AR42 Certain Preventive Services Under the Affordable Care Act AGENCIES: Internal Revenue Service... regarding certain preventive health services under provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Affordable Care Act). The proposed amendments would establish alternative ways to fulfill...

  11. 78 FR 65045 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Program Integrity: Exchange, Premium Stabilization...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ...This final rule implements provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act). Specifically, this final rule outlines financial integrity and oversight standards with respect to Affordable Insurance Exchanges, qualified health plan (QHP) issuers in Federally-facilitated......

  12. 77 FR 17143 - Medicaid Program; Eligiblity Changes Under the Affordable Care Act of 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ...This final rule implements several provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act). The Affordable Care Act expands access to health insurance coverage through improvements to the Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance (CHIP) programs, the establishment of......

  13. Thermodynamic properties of micellization of Sulfobetaine-type Zwitterionic Gemini Surfactants in aqueous solutions--a free energy perturbation study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoyu; Gu, Daming; Liu, Haiyan; Ding, Wei; Luan, Huoxin; Lou, Yanmin

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the validity and accuracy of the free energy perturbation (FEP) model used in a previous article for ionic liquid-type Gemini imidazolium surfactants (ILGISs) is further evaluated by using it to model the Enthalpy-entropy compensation of Sulfobetaine-type Zwitterionic Gemini Surfactants (SZGSs), with different carbon atoms of the hydrophobic group or the spacer chain length, in aqueous solutions. In the FEP model, the Gibbs free energy contributions to the driving force for micelle formation are computed using hydration data obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. According to the pseudo-phase separation model, the thermodynamic properties of micellization in aqueous solutions for SZGS were discussed. The results show that the micellization of SZGS in aqueous solutions is a spontaneous and entropy-driven process. It is linearly Enthalpy-entropy compensated and different from the micelle formation of ILGIS but similar to anionic surfactants. The compensation temperature was found to be (302±3)K which was lower than ILGIS. As the temperature rises, the micellization is easy initially but then becomes difficult with the unusual changes of enthalpy values from positive to negative. The contribution of entropy change to the micellization tends to decrease but the contribution of enthalpy change tends to increase. In particular, as the number carbon atoms in the alkyl chains and spacer chains are increased, the thermodynamic favorability and stability of the micelles both increase.

  14. Holographic dark energy with linearly varying deceleration parameter and escaping big rip singularity of the Bianchi type-V universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sanjay

    2014-08-01

    The present work deals with the accretion of two minimally interacting fluids: dark matter and a hypothetical isotropic fluid as the holographic dark energy components onto black hole and wormhole in a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-V universe. To obtain an exact solution of the Einstein's field equations, we use the assumption of linearly varying deceleration parameter. Solution describes effectively the actual acceleration and indicates a big rip type future singularity of the universe. We have studied the evolution of the mass of black hole and the wormhole embedded in this anisotropic universe in order to reproduce a stable universe protected against future-time singularity. It is observed that the accretion of these dark components leads to a gradual decrease and increase of black hole and wormhole mass respectively. Finally, we have found that contrary to our previous case (Sarkar in Astrophys. Space. Sci. 341:651, 2014a), the big rip singularity of the universe with a divergent Hubble parameter of this dark energy model may be avoided by a big trip.

  15. Environmental assessment of food waste valorization in producing biogas for various types of energy use based on LCA approach.

    PubMed

    Woon, Kok Sin; Lo, Irene M C; Chiu, Sam L H; Yan, Dickson Y S

    2016-04-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the environmental impacts of valorizing food waste for three types of energy use, namely electricity and heat, city gas, and biogas fuel as a petrol, diesel, and liquefied petroleum gas substitute for vehicle use, with reference to the Hong Kong scenario. The life cycle based environmental assessment is conducted from bin-to-cradle system boundary via SimaPro 7.2.4 with ReCiPe 1.04. All of the inventory data of included processes is based on reports of government and industrial sectors. The results show that biogas fuel as a petrol substitute for vehicle use is advantageous over other types of energy use in regard to human health and ecosystems, and it is also the best considering the government's future emission reduction targets set out for the power and transport sectors in Hong Kong. By turning 1080 tonnes per day of food waste into biogas vehicle fuel as petrol substitute, it reduces 1.9% of greenhouse gas emissions in the transport sectors, which results a larger decrease of GHG emissions than the achieved mitigation in Hong Kong from 2005 to 2010.

  16. Gas hydrates as potential resource of energy and pathfinders for conventional type hydrocarbon deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Krason, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Solid compounds of water and gaseous hydrocarbons are known as gas hydrates, clathrates, or cryohydrates. They occur naturally in offshore and terrestrial environments, in the areas where temperature is at least seasonally low (i.e. close to or below freezing), bathymetric, geostatic, ice, or permafrost pressure is sufficiently high, and the source of hydrocarbons is available. These factors (regional and local geological conditions of 21 locations grouped into 13 study regions worldwide offshore and one in permafrost environments with proven, reported, and inferred presence of gas hydrates) have been recently researched by Geoexplorers International, Inc. Conservative estimations from Geoexplorers International suggest that the world's total gas hydrates may contain 7,000 to 50,000 tcf of natural gas. Although at this time exploitation of gas trapped in the hydrate zone and below is not economically viable, because estimated reserves are enormous, they should be seriously considered as potential energy resource. Smaller, but less dispersed massive gas hydrate deposits associated with fault zones may be the first offshore gas resource to become economic. This research, particularly of the Messoyakh gas field, has proved that the presence of gas hydrates provides very useful information in exploration for conventional oil and gas deposits. Gas hydrates indicate ongoing hydrocarbon generation in the sediments. Hydrates are valuable to assess the present heat flow and thermal history of a region. Since gas hydrates exist only under a very limited range of pressure and temperature, deviation in patterns of their occurrence can be related to changes in pore water chemistry, hydrocarbon composition, or pressure and temperature gradient anomalies.

  17. Potential of mean force calculation of the free energy of adsorption of Type I winter flounder antifreeze protein on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Keith; Alan Salter, E.; Wesley Edmunds, R.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej

    2010-04-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that inhibit ice growth without changing the melting point of ice. In this work, we study the detailed molecular mechanism of interactions between the hydrophobic side of the winter flounder (WF) AFP and two mutants, AAAA and SSSS, in which threonine residues are substituted by serines and alanines, respectively. Umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations of the separation of the proteins from the (2 0 1) surface in an explicit water box is carried out to calculate the potential of mean force free energies of adsorption using AMBER10i. We estimate wild-type WF's free energy of adsorption to ice to be about -12.0 kcal/mol. Gas-phase pseudopotential plane-wave calculations of methane adsorption onto select surfaces of ice are also carried out under periodic boundary conditions to address the possible enthalpic role of WF's methyl groups in binding. The contributions of hydrophobic residues to the free energy of adsorption are discussed.

  18. Energy consumption in terms of shear stress for two types of membrane bioreactors used for municipal wastewater treatment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas; Bentzen, Thomas R.; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2012-10-01

    Two types of submerged membrane bioreactors (MBR): hollow fiber (HF) and hollow sheet (HS), have been studied and compared in terms of energy consumption and average shear stress over the membrane wall. The analysis of energy consumption was made using the correlation to determine the blower power and the blower power demand per unit of permeate volume. Results showed that for the system geometries considered, in terms the of the blower power, the HF MBR requires less power compared to HS MBR. However, in terms of blower power per unit of permeate volume, the HS MBR requires less energy. The analysis of shear stress over the membrane surface was made using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. Experimental measurements for the HF MBR were compared with the CFD model and an error less that 8% was obtained. For the HS MBR, experimental measurements of velocity profiles were made and an error of 11% was found. This work uses an empirical relationship to determine the shear stress based on the ratio of aeration blower power to tank volume. This relationship is used in bubble column reactors and it is extrapolate to determine shear stress on MBR systems. This relationship proved to be overestimated by 28% compared to experimental measurements and CFD results. Therefore, a corrective factor is included in the relationship in order to account for the membrane placed inside the bioreactor.

  19. Measurement of the Energy of Nitrogen Ions Produced in Filippov Type Plasma Focus Used for the Nitriding of Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghareshabani, E.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper the nitrogen ion properties (maximum energy, current density and the most probable energy) are investigated by using Faraday cup in a time of flight method. These ions are produced in a Filippov type plasma focus (Sahand Facility) device and the Faraday cup was placed in a distance range of 18-24 cm from the top of the anode. Maximum and minimum most probable ion energies are 76 and 8.5 keV for the distance range of 18 and 24 cm, respectively. The displacement from 18 to 24 cm at top of the anode the ion current density varies from 4.5 × 106 to 3.2 × 105 (A m-2). For the investigation of the effect of ions bombardment of materials at different positions, at the optimum working conditions of 14 kV as a working voltage, and 0.25 Torr as a gas pressure, titanium samples are placed in a distance of 21, 22, 23 and 24 cm from the top of the anode (θ = 0) and each sample is put under irradiation for 30 plasma shots. The structure of the nitrided surfaces and their morphologies are characterized by X-ray diffractometry and by scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The average crystallite size deduced for (200) and (222) planes of TiN deposited with 30 shots in different distances are estimate to be from ~13 to ~38 nm.

  20. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis reveals dysregulation of energy-related metabolism in insulin-sensitive tissues of type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Wang, X C; Zhao, L; Zhang, Y; Yao, L L; Lin, Y; Peng, Y D; Hu, R M

    2014-06-17

    Impaired insulin action within skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the liver is an important characteristic of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In order to identify common underlying defects in insulin-sensitive tissues that may be involved in the pathogenesis of T2D, the gene expression profiles of skeletal muscle, visceral adipose tissue, and liver from autopsy donors with or without T2D were examined using oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. Compared with controls, 691 genes were commonly dysregulated in these three insulin-sensitive tissues of humans with T2D. These co-expressed genes were enriched within the mitochondrion, with suggested involvement in energy metabolic processes such as glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, fatty acid beta oxidative, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and electron transport. Genes related to energy metabolism were mostly downregulated in diabetic skeletal muscle and visceral adipose tissue, while they were upregulated in the diabetic liver. This observed dysregulation in energy-related metabolism may be the underlying factor leading to the molecular mechanisms responsible for the insulin resistance of patients with T2D.

  1. Energy-positive nitrogen removal from reject water using a tide-type biocathode microbial electrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiman; Liu, Jia; He, Weihua; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Feng, Yujie

    2016-12-01

    A tide-type biocathode microbial electrochemical system (TBMES) employing intermittent air accessible method was constructed for simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal. The nitrification and denitrification processes occurred in cathode chamber were enhanced by raising frequency of catholyte feeding-draining process and lowering external resistance. At external resistance of 5Ω and frequency of 8cph, the TBMES removed 99.3±0.3% of COD and 57.7±1.1% of total nitrogen when treating synthetic medium with COD/N ratio of 3.0, concomitantly, a maximum power density of 10.6Wm(-3) was achieved. Comparable performances were obtained for reject water treatment with a relatively lower COD/N ratio of 2.5, which were 88.6±1.3%, 53.2±3.8% and 8.9±0.2Wm(-3) for COD removal, total nitrogen removal and maximum power density. The feeding-draining process consumed 14.3% of the total energy produced, and thus obviated energy-intensive aeration and achieved net energy output.

  2. Hydration free energies using semiempirical quantum mechanical Hamiltonians and a continuum solvent model with multiple atomic-type parameters.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Victor M; Cavasotto, Claudio N

    2011-06-23

    To build the foundation for accurate quantum mechanical (QM) simulation of biomacromolecules in an aqueous environment, we undertook the optimization of the COnductor-like Screening MOdel (COSMO) atomic radii and atomic surface tension coefficients for different semiempirical Hamiltonians adhering to the same computational conditions recently followed in the simulation of biomolecular systems. This optimization was achieved by reproducing experimental hydration free energies of a set consisting of 507 neutral and 99 ionic molecules. The calculated hydration free energies were significantly improved by introducing a multiple atomic-type scheme that reflects different chemical environments. The nonpolar contribution was treated according to the scaled particle Claverie-Pierotti formalism. Separate radii and surface tension coefficient sets have been developed for AM1, PM3, PM5, and RM1 semiempirical Hamiltonians, with an average unsigned error for neutral molecules of 0.64, 0.66, 0.73, and 0.71 kcal/mol, respectively. Free energy calculation of each molecule took on average 0.5 s on a single processor. The new sets of parameters will enhance the quality of semiempirical QM calculations using COSMO in biomolecular systems. Overall, these results further extend the utility of QM methods to chemical and biological systems in the condensed phase.

  3. Cellular compartmentation of energy metabolism: creatine kinase microcompartments and recruitment of B-type creatine kinase to specific subcellular sites.

    PubMed

    Schlattner, Uwe; Klaus, Anna; Ramirez Rios, Sacnicte; Guzun, Rita; Kay, Laurence; Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata

    2016-08-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence for local circuits of ATP generation and consumption that are largely independent of global cellular ATP levels. These are mostly based on the formation of multiprotein(-lipid) complexes and diffusion limitations existing in cells at different levels of organization, e.g., due to the viscosity of the cytosolic medium, macromolecular crowding, multiple and bulky intracellular structures, or controlled permeability across membranes. Enzymes generating ATP or GTP are found associated with ATPases and GTPases enabling the direct fueling of these energy-dependent processes, and thereby implying that it is the local and not the global concentration of high-energy metabolites that is functionally relevant. A paradigm for such microcompartmentation is creatine kinase (CK). Cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of CK constitute a well established energy buffering and shuttling system whose functions are very much based on local association of CK isoforms with ATP-providing and ATP-consuming processes. Here we review current knowledge on the subcellular localization and direct protein and lipid interactions of CK isoforms, in particular about cytosolic brain-type CK (BCK) much less is known compared to muscle-type CK (MCK). We further present novel data on BCK, based on three different experimental approaches: (1) co-purification experiments, suggesting association of BCK with membrane structures such as synaptic vesicles and mitochondria, involving hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, respectively; (2) yeast-two-hybrid analysis using cytosolic split-protein assays and the identifying membrane proteins VAMP2, VAMP3 and JWA as putative BCK interaction partners; and (3) phosphorylation experiments, showing that the cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is able to phosphorylate BCK at serine 6 to trigger BCK localization at the ER, in close vicinity of the highly energy-demanding Ca(2+) ATPase pump. Thus

  4. Interaction between affordance and handedness recognition: a chronometric study.

    PubMed

    Lameira, A P; Pereira, A; Conde, E; Gawryszewski, L G

    2015-04-01

    The visualization of tools and manipulable objects activates motor-related areas in the cortex, facilitating possible actions toward them. This pattern of activity may underlie the phenomenon of object affordance. Some cortical motor neurons are also covertly activated during the recognition of body parts such as hands. One hypothesis is that different subpopulations of motor neurons in the frontal cortex are activated in each motor program; for example, canonical neurons in the premotor cortex are responsible for the affordance of visual objects, while mirror neurons support motor imagery triggered during handedness recognition. However, the question remains whether these subpopulations work independently. This hypothesis can be tested with a manual reaction time (MRT) task with a priming paradigm to evaluate whether the view of a manipulable object interferes with the motor imagery of the subject's hand. The MRT provides a measure of the course of information processing in the brain and allows indirect evaluation of cognitive processes. Our results suggest that canonical and mirror neurons work together to create a motor plan involving hand movements to facilitate successful object manipulation.

  5. Reference Reactor Module for the Affordable Fission Surface Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Dixon, David D.; Amiri, Benjamin W.; Marcille, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The requirements of many surface power applications allow the consideration of systems with much less development risk than most other space reactor applications, because of modest power (10s of kWe) and no driving need for minimal mass (allowing temperatures <1000 K). The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. This paper describes the reference AFSPS reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based, UO2-fueled, liquid metal-cooled fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. One of the important ``affordability'' attributes is that the concept has been designed to minimize both the technical and programmatic safety risk.

  6. Interaction between affordance and handedness recognition: a chronometric study

    PubMed Central

    Lameira, A.P.; Pereira, A.; Conde, E.; Gawryszewski, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The visualization of tools and manipulable objects activates motor-related areas in the cortex, facilitating possible actions toward them. This pattern of activity may underlie the phenomenon of object affordance. Some cortical motor neurons are also covertly activated during the recognition of body parts such as hands. One hypothesis is that different subpopulations of motor neurons in the frontal cortex are activated in each motor program; for example, canonical neurons in the premotor cortex are responsible for the affordance of visual objects, while mirror neurons support motor imagery triggered during handedness recognition. However, the question remains whether these subpopulations work independently. This hypothesis can be tested with a manual reaction time (MRT) task with a priming paradigm to evaluate whether the view of a manipulable object interferes with the motor imagery of the subject's hand. The MRT provides a measure of the course of information processing in the brain and allows indirect evaluation of cognitive processes. Our results suggest that canonical and mirror neurons work together to create a motor plan involving hand movements to facilitate successful object manipulation. PMID:25714894

  7. Demonstrating the Viability and Affordability of Nuclear Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandyke, Melissa K.

    2006-01-01

    A set of tasks have been identified to help demonstrate the viability, performance, and affordability of surface fission systems. Completion of these tasks will move surface fission systems closer to reality by demonstrating affordability and performance potential. Tasks include fabrication and test of a 19-pin section of a Surface Power Unit Demonstrator (SPUD); design, fabrication, and utilization of thermal simulators optimized for surface fission' applications; design, fabrication, and utilization of GPHS module thermal simulators; design, fabrication, and test of a fission surface power system shield; and work related to potential fission surface power fuel/clad systems. Work on the SPUD will feed directly into joint NASA MSFC/NASA GRC fabrication and test of a surface power plant Engineering Development Unit (EDU). The goal of the EDU will be to perform highly realistic thermal, structural, and electrical testing on an integrated fission surface power system. Fission thermal simulator work will help enable high fidelity non-nuclear testing of pumped NaK surface fission power systems. Radioisotope thermal simulator work will help enable design and development of higher power radioisotope systems (power ultimately limited by Pu-238 availability). Shield work is designed to assess the potential of using a water neutron shield on the surface of the moon. Fuels work is geared toward assessing the current potential of using fuels that have already flown in space.

  8. Reference Reactor Module for the Affordable Fission Surface Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Dixon, David D.; Amiri, Benjamin W.; Marcille, Thomas F.

    2008-01-21

    Surface fission power systems on the Moon and Mars may provide the first US application of fission reactor technology in space since 1965. The requirements of many surface power applications allow the consideration of systems with much less development risk than most other space reactor applications, because of modest power (10s of kWe) and no driving need for minimal mass (allowing temperatures <1000 K). The Affordable Fission Surface Power System (AFSPS) study was completed by NASA/DOE to determine the cost of a modest performance, low-technical risk surface power system. This paper describes the reference AFSPS reactor module concept, which is designed to provide a net power of 40 kWe for 8 years on the lunar surface; note, the system has been designed with technologies that are fully compatible with a Martian surface application. The reactor concept uses stainless-steel based, UO{sub 2}-fueled, liquid metal-cooled fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The reactor shielding approach utilizes both in-situ and launched shielding to keep the dose to astronauts much lower than the natural background radiation on the lunar surface. One of the important 'affordability' attributes is that the concept has been designed to minimize both the technical and programmatic safety risk.

  9. Influence of Accelerometer Type and Placement on Physical Activity Energy Expenditure Prediction in Manual Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Tom Edward; Walhin, Jean-Philippe; Thompson, Dylan; Bilzon, James Lee John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the validity of two accelerometer devices, at two different anatomical locations, for the prediction of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in manual wheelchair users (MWUs). Methods Seventeen MWUs (36 ± 10 yrs, 72 ± 11 kg) completed ten activities; resting, folding clothes, propulsion on a 1% gradient (3,4,5,6 and 7 km·hr-1) and propulsion at 4km·hr-1 (with an additional 8% body mass, 2% and 3% gradient) on a motorised wheelchair treadmill. GT3X+ and GENEActiv accelerometers were worn on the right wrist (W) and upper arm (UA). Linear regression analysis was conducted between outputs from each accelerometer and criterion PAEE, measured using indirect calorimetry. Subsequent error statistics were calculated for the derived regression equations for all four device/location combinations, using a leave-one-out cross-validation analysis. Results Accelerometer outputs at each anatomical location were significantly (p < .01) associated with PAEE (GT3X+-UA; r = 0.68 and GT3X+-W; r = 0.82. GENEActiv-UA; r = 0.87 and GENEActiv-W; r = 0.88). Mean ± SD PAEE estimation errors for all activities combined were 15 ± 45%, 14 ± 50%, 3 ± 25% and 4 ± 26% for GT3X+-UA, GT3X+-W, GENEActiv-UA and GENEActiv-W, respectively. Absolute PAEE estimation errors for devices varied, 19 to 66% for GT3X+-UA, 17 to 122% for GT3X+-W, 15 to 26% for GENEActiv-UA and from 17.0 to 32% for the GENEActiv-W. Conclusion The results indicate that the GENEActiv device worn on either the upper arm or wrist provides the most valid prediction of PAEE in MWUs. Variation in error statistics between the two devices is a result of inherent differences in internal components, on-board filtering processes and outputs of each device. PMID:25955304

  10. UV to radio centimetric spectral energy distributions of optically-selected late-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Gavazzi, G.; Sanvito, G.

    2003-04-01

    We present a multifrequency dataset for an optically-selected, volume-limited, complete sample of 118 late-type galaxies (>=S0a) in the Virgo cluster. The database includes UV, visible, near-IR, mid-IR, far-IR, radio continuum photometric data as well as spectroscopic data of Hα , CO and HI lines, homogeneously reduced, obtained from our own observations or compiled from the literature. Assuming the energy balance between the absorbed stellar light and that radiated in the IR by dust, we calibarte an empirical attenuation law suitable for correcting photometric and spectroscopic data of normal galaxies. The data, corrected for internal extinction, are used to construct the spectral energy distribution (SED) of each individual galaxy, and combined to trace the median SED of galaxies in various classes of morphological type and luminosity. Low-luminosity, dwarf galaxies have on average bluer stellar continua and higher far-IR luminosities per unit galaxy mass than giant, early-type spirals. If compared to nearby starburst galaxies such as M 82 and Arp 220, normal spirals have relatively similar observed stellar spectra but 10-100 times lower IR luminosities. The temperature of the cold dust component increases with the far-IR luminosity, from giant spirals to dwarf irregulars. The SED are used to separate the stellar emission from the dust emission in the mid-IR regime. We show that the contribution of the stellar emission at 6.75 mu m to the total emission of galaxies is generally important, from ~ 80% in Sa to ~ 20% in Sc. Tables 2-5, 7, 8, and Fig. 2 are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org Tables 10-12 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/402/37

  11. Food Stress in Adelaide: The Relationship between Low Income and the Affordability of Healthy Food

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Paul R.; Verity, Fiona; Carter, Patricia; Tsourtos, George; Coveney, John; Wong, Kwan Chui

    2013-01-01

    Healthy food is becoming increasingly expensive, and families on low incomes face a difficult financial struggle to afford healthy food. When food costs are considered, families on low incomes often face circumstances of poverty. Housing, utilities, health care, and transport are somewhat fixed in cost; however food is more flexible in cost and therefore is often compromised with less healthy, cheaper food, presenting an opportunity for families on low incomes to cut costs. Using a “Healthy Food Basket” methodology, this study costed a week's supply of healthy food for a range of family types. It found that low-income families would have to spend approximately 30% of household income on eating healthily, whereas high-income households needed to spend about 10%. The differential is explained by the cost of the food basket relative to household income (i.e., affordability). It is argued that families that spend more than 30% of household income on food could be experiencing “food stress.” Moreover the high cost of healthy foods leaves low-income households vulnerable to diet-related health problems because they often have to rely on cheaper foods which are high in fat, sugar, and salt. PMID:23431321

  12. Food stress in Adelaide: the relationship between low income and the affordability of healthy food.

    PubMed

    Ward, Paul R; Verity, Fiona; Carter, Patricia; Tsourtos, George; Coveney, John; Wong, Kwan Chui

    2013-01-01

    Healthy food is becoming increasingly expensive, and families on low incomes face a difficult financial struggle to afford healthy food. When food costs are considered, families on low incomes often face circumstances of poverty. Housing, utilities, health care, and transport are somewhat fixed in cost; however food is more flexible in cost and therefore is often compromised with less healthy, cheaper food, presenting an opportunity for families on low incomes to cut costs. Using a "Healthy Food Basket" methodology, this study costed a week's supply of healthy food for a range of family types. It found that low-income families would have to spend approximately 30% of household income on eating healthily, whereas high-income households needed to spend about 10%. The differential is explained by the cost of the food basket relative to household income (i.e., affordability). It is argued that families that spend more than 30% of household income on food could be experiencing "food stress." Moreover the high cost of healthy foods leaves low-income households vulnerable to diet-related health problems because they often have to rely on cheaper foods which are high in fat, sugar, and salt.

  13. Computational simulations of the interaction of water waves with pitching flap-type ocean wave energy converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Using an in-house computational framework, we have studied the interaction of water waves with pitching flap-type ocean wave energy converters (WECs). The computational framework solves the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations and captures important effects, including the fluid-solid interaction, the nonlinear and viscous effects. The results of the computational tool, is first compared against the experimental data on the response of a flap-type WEC in a wave tank, and excellent agreement is demonstrated. Further simulations at the model and prototype scales are presented to assess the validity of the Froude scaling. The simulations are used to address some important questions, such as the validity range of common WEC modeling approaches that rely heavily on the Froude scaling and the inviscid potential flow theory. Additionally, the simulations examine the role of the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) number, which is often used as a measure of relative importance of viscous drag on bodies exposed to oscillating flows. The performance of the flap-type WECs is investigated at various KC numbers to establish the relationship between the viscous drag and KC number for such geometry. That is of significant importance because such relationship only exists for simple geometries, e.g., a cylinder. Support from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanebrook, J. Richard

    This document describes a course designed to acquaint students with the many societal and technological problems facing the United States and the world due to the increasing demand for energy. The course begins with a writing assignment that involves readings on the environmental philosophy of Native Americans and the Chernobyl catastrophe.…

  15. Do Affordable Housing Projects Harm Suburban Communities? Crime, Property Values, and Taxes in Mount Laurel, NJ

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Len; Derickson, Elizabeth S.; Massey, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a mixed-method analysis of the municipal-level consequences of an affordable housing development built in suburban New Jersey. Opponents of affordable housing development often suggest that creating affordable housing will harm surrounding communities. Feared consequences include increases in crime, declining property values, and rising taxes. To evaluate these claims, the paper uses the case of Mt. Laurel, NJ – the site of a landmark affordable housing legal case and subsequent affordable housing development. Employing a multiple time series group control design, we compare crime rates, property values, and property taxes in Mt. Laurel to outcomes in similar nearby municipalities that do not contain comparable affordable housing developments. We find that the opening of the affordable housing development was not associated with trends in crime, property values, or taxes, and discuss management practices and design features that may have mitigated potential negative externalities. PMID:27390552

  16. Do Affordable Housing Projects Harm Suburban Communities? Crime, Property Values, and Taxes in Mount Laurel, NJ.

    PubMed

    Albright, Len; Derickson, Elizabeth S; Massey, Douglas S

    2013-06-01

    This paper offers a mixed-method analysis of the municipal-level consequences of an affordable housing development built in suburban New Jersey. Opponents of affordable housing development often suggest that creating affordable housing will harm surrounding communities. Feared consequences include increases in crime, declining property values, and rising taxes. To evaluate these claims, the paper uses the case of Mt. Laurel, NJ - the site of a landmark affordable housing legal case and subsequent affordable housing development. Employing a multiple time series group control design, we compare crime rates, property values, and property taxes in Mt. Laurel to outcomes in similar nearby municipalities that do not contain comparable affordable housing developments. We find that the opening of the affordable housing development was not associated with trends in crime, property values, or taxes, and discuss management practices and design features that may have mitigated potential negative externalities.

  17. Longshore variability of beach states and bar types in a microtidal, storm-influenced, low-energy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleman, N.; Robin, N.; Certain, R.; Anthony, E. J.; Barusseau, J.-P.

    2015-07-01

    Beach classification models are widely used in the literature to describe beach states in response to environmental conditions. These models were essentially developed for sandy barred to barless beaches in micro- to meso-tidal environments subject to moderate to high wave energy conditions and have been based on field studies over limited stretches of coast. Here, we further interrogate the performance of the Australian beach classification scheme by analysing beach states and corresponding bar types on a regional scale in a storm-influenced, low wave-energy, microtidal environment, using a large and unique spatial and temporal dataset of supra- and subtidal beach morphology and sedimentology. The 200 km-long coast of the Gulf of Lions in the Mediterranean consists of quasi-continuous sandy beaches with a well-developed double sandbar system. All the reported classical beach states were observed on this coast, from reflective to dissipative, along with two more unusual states: the rock platform-constrained beach state which is associated with bedrock outcrops, and the non-barred dissipative beach state which is more commonly found in large tidal-range settings. LiDAR bathymetry shows that the transitions between beach state zones are marked mainly headlands but transitions also occur progressively along stretches of continuous sandy beach. The longshore distribution of beach states and associated bar types on a regional scale can be related to the variability of hydrodynamic conditions (wave incidence and energy) and sediment characteristics (particle size). However, the influence of these parameters on beach state seems to be largely controlled by the geological context such as the presence of a river mouth, headland or rock platform. Finally, we assessed the ability of the parameter Ω, commonly used to characterise beach states, which combines wave characteristics and sediment fall velocity, to predict the observed beach states and bar types using a very large

  18. NASA Affordable Vehicle Avionics (AVA): Common Modular Avionics System for Nano-Launchers Offering Affordable Access to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, James

    2015-01-01

    Small satellites are becoming ever more capable of performing valuable missions for both government and commercial customers. However, currently these satellites can only be launched affordably as secondary payloads. This makes it difficult for the small satellite mission to launch when needed, to the desired orbit, and with acceptable risk. NASA Ames Research Center has developed and tested a prototype low-cost avionics package for space launch vehicles that provides complete GNC functionality in a package smaller than a tissue box with a mass less than 0.84 kg. AVA takes advantage of commercially available, low-cost, mass-produced, miniaturized sensors, filtering their more noisy inertial data with realtime GPS data. The goal of the Advanced Vehicle Avionics project is to produce and flight-verify a common suite of avionics and software that deliver affordable, capable GNC and telemetry avionics with application to multiple nano-launch vehicles at 1 the cost of current state-of-the-art avionics.

  19. Impaired mitochondrial energy supply coupled to increased H2O2 emission under energy/redox stress leads to myocardial dysfunction during Type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tocchetti, Carlo G; Stanley, Brian A; Sivakumaran, Vidhya; Bedja, Djahida; O'Rourke, Brian; Paolocci, Nazareno; Cortassa, Sonia; Aon, Miguel A

    2015-10-01

    In Type I diabetic (T1DM) patients, both peaks of hyperglycaemia and increased sympathetic tone probably contribute to impair systolic and diastolic function. However, how these stressors eventually alter cardiac function during T1DM is not fully understood. In the present study, we hypothesized that impaired mitochondrial energy supply and excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission is centrally involved in T1DM cardiac dysfunction due to metabolic/redox stress and aimed to determine the mitochondrial sites implicated in these alterations. To this end, we used isolated myocytes and mitochondria from Sham and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced T1DM guinea pigs (GPs), untreated or treated with insulin. Relative to controls, T1DM myocytes exhibited higher oxidative stress when challenged with high glucose (HG) combined with β-adrenergic stimulation [via isoprenaline (isoproterenol) (ISO)], leading to contraction/relaxation deficits. T1DM mitochondria had decreased respiration with complex II and IV substrates and markedly lower ADP phosphorylation rates and higher H2O2 emission when challenged with oxidants to mimic the more oxidized redox milieu present in HG + ISO-treated cardiomyocytes. Since in T1DM hearts insulin-sensitivity is preserved and a glucose-to-fatty acid (FA) shift occurs, we next tested whether insulin therapy or acute palmitate (Palm) infusion prevents HG + ISO-induced cardiac dysfunction. We found that insulin rescued proper cardiac redox balance, but not mitochondrial respiration or contractile performance. Conversely, Palm restored redox balance and preserved myocyte function. Thus, stressors such as peaks of HG and adrenergic hyperactivity impair mitochondrial respiration, hampering energy supply while exacerbating ROS emission. Our study suggests that an ideal therapeutic measure to treat metabolically/redox-challenged T1DM hearts should concomitantly correct energetic and redox abnormalities to fully maintain cardiac function.

  20. Energy balance, glucose and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular risk and liver disease burden in adult patients with type 1 Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Nascimbeni, Fabio; Dalla Salda, Annalisa; Carubbi, Francesca

    2016-10-20

    Gaucher disease (GD), the most prevalent lysosomal storage disease, is characterized by systemic accumulation of macrophages engorged with glycosphingolipid-laden lysosomes. Even though both lysosomes and sphingolipids play a pivotal role in metabolic homeostasis, little is known on metabolic abnormalities associated with GD. In this review, we discuss the peculiarity of energy balance and glucose and lipid metabolism in adult type 1 GD patients. Moreover, we evaluate the potential relationship between these metabolic derangements, cardiovascular risk and chronic liver disease. The limited data available show that adult type 1 GD is characterized by a hypermetabolic state, peripheral insulin resistance and hypolipidemia with markedly reduced HDL-cholesterol levels, partially reverted by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) or substrate reduction therapy (SRT). Although this unfavorable metabolic profile has not been associated with increased incidence of type 2 diabetes and premature atherosclerosis, a natural history study has shown that cardio-cerebrovascular events and malignancy are the leading causes of death in treated type 1 GD patients. Hepatomegaly is frequently observed in GD and ERT/SRT are highly effective in reducing liver volume. Nevertheless, patients with GD may be at increased risk of long-term liver complications including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role that ERT/SRT and/or lifestyle habits may have on such metabolic features of GD patients, and subsequently on long-term prognosis, deserves further investigations. To gain more insights into the peculiarity of GD metabolism may serve both surveillance and treatment purposes by helping to identify new markers of disease severity and define an updated natural history of GD.

  1. Energy for the Developing World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Amulya K. N.; Goldemberg, Jose

    1990-01-01

    Described are methods which can be used by developing countries to affordably obtain the energy without ruining the environment. The approaches mix efficient end-use technologies with modest increases in generating capacity. (CW)

  2. Achieving Challenge Home in Affordable Housing in the Hot-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, D.; McIlvaine, J.; Winter, B.; Allnutt, R.

    2014-08-01

    The Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), one of the Building America research team leads, has partnered with two builders as they work through the Challenge Home certification process (now Zero Energy Ready Home) in one test home each. The builder partners participating in this cost-shared research are Southeast Volusia County Habitat for Humanity near Daytona, Florida and Manatee County Habitat for Humanity near Tampa, Florida. Both are affiliates of Habitat for Humanity International, a non-profit affordable housing organization. This research serves to identify viable technical pathways to meeting the CH criteria for other builders in the region. A further objective of this research is to identify gaps and barriers in the marketplace related to product availability, labor force capability, code issues, cost effectiveness, and business case issues that hinder or prevent broader adoption on a production scale.

  3. Application of calcium chloride as an additive for secondary refrigerant in the air conditioning system type chiller to minimized energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwono, A.; Indartono, Y. S.; Irsyad, M.; Al-Afkar, I. C.

    2015-09-01

    One way to resolve the energy problem is to increase the efficiency of energy use. Air conditioning system is one of the equipment that needs to be considered, because it is the biggest energy user in commercial building sector. Research currently developing is the use of phase change materials (PCM) as thermal energy storage (TES) in the air conditioning system to reduce energy consumption. Salt hydrates have been great potential to be developed because they have been high latent heat and thermal conductivity. This study has used a salt hydrate from calcium chloride to be tested in air conditioning systems type chiller. Thermal characteristics were examined using temperature history (T-history) test and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The test results showed that the thermal characteristics of the salt hydrate has been a high latent heat and in accordance with the evaporator temperature. The use of salt hydrates in air conditioning system type chiller can reduce energy consumption by 51.5%.

  4. Conceptual design of the bimodal nuclear power system based on the ``Romashka'' type reactor with thermionic energy conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponmarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Usov, Veniamin A.; Nikolaev, Yuri V.; Yeriemin, Stanislav A.; Zhabotinski, Yevgeny Ye.; Galkin, Anatoly Ya.; Avdoshyn, Yevgeny D.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents conceptual design of the bimodal space nuclear power system (NPS) based on the high-temperature reactor of ROMASHKA type with thermoninic energy conversion system. At the heart of the design is an employment of close-spaced thermionic diodes, operating in a quasi-vacuum mode. The paper gives preliminary estimates of the NPS neutron-physical, electric, thermophysical and mass-dimensional parameters for the reactor electric power of 25 kW and propulsive thrust of about 80 N. Discussed are peculiarities of the combined mode wherein electric power is generated along with propulsive thrust. The paper contains results of the design studies performed by the Small Business ``NP Energotech'' under the Agreement with Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division and according to the Rocketdyne Division provided Design Requirements. Involved in the work was the team of specialists of RRC ``Kurchatov Institute'', ``Red Star'' State Enterprise and Research Institute of SPA ``Luch''

  5. Affordable Cold Climate Infill Housing with Hybrid Insulation Approach, Wyandotte, Michigan (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, C.; Lukachko, A.; Grin, A.; Bergey, D.

    2013-11-01

    Even builders who are relatively new to energy-efficient construction can consistently reach a target whole house airtightness of 1.5 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals (ACH50) with high R-value enclosures that use a hybrid insulation approach. The City of Wyandotte, Michigan, started a construction program in 2010 to build affordable, energy-efficient homes on lots in existing neighborhoods. A goal of the program was to engage local builders in energy-efficient construction and be able to deliver the new houses for less than $100/ft2. By the end of 2012, approximately 25 new houses were built by five local builders under this program. To help builders consistently achieve the airtightness target, a local architect worked with researchers from Building Science Corporation, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, to develop a technology specification with several key pieces. A high R-value wall and roof assembly made use of 2 ?6 advanced framing and a hybrid insulation approach that included insulating sheathing to control thermal bridging and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation (ccSPF) for its airtightness and vapor control benefits. This approach allows the air barrier to be completed and tested before any finishing work occurs, ensuring that problems are spotted and corrected early in the construction process.

  6. Community-specific evaluation of tool affordances in wild chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Thibaud; Muller, Martin N; Reynolds, Vernon; Wrangham, Richard; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The notion of animal culture, defined as socially transmitted community-specific behaviour patterns, remains controversial, notably because the definition relies on surface behaviours without addressing underlying cognitive processes. In contrast, human cultures are the product of socially acquired ideas that shape how individuals interact with their environment. We conducted field experiments with two culturally distinct chimpanzee communities in Uganda, which revealed significant differences in how individuals considered the affording parts of an experimentally provided tool to extract honey from a standardised cavity. Firstly, individuals of the two communities found different functional parts of the tool salient, suggesting that they experienced a cultural bias in their cognition. Secondly, when the alternative function was made more salient, chimpanzees were unable to learn it, suggesting that prior cultural background can interfere with new learning. Culture appears to shape how chimpanzees see the world, suggesting that a cognitive component underlies the observed behavioural patterns.

  7. Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology (ARCJoinT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    1998-01-01

    Joining is recognized as one of the enabling technologies for the application of silicon carbide-based ceramic and composite components in a number of demanding and high temperature applications in aerospace and ground-based systems. An affordable, robust ceramic joining technology (ARCJoinT) for joining of silicon carbide-based ceramics and fiber reinforced composites has been developed. This technique is capable of producing joints with tailorable thickness and composition. A wide variety of silicon carbide-based ceramics and composites, in different shapes and sizes, have been joined using this technique. These joints maintain their mechanical strength up to 1350 C in air. This technology is suitable for the joining of large and complex shaped ceramic and composite components and with certain modifications, can be applied to repair ceramic components damaged in service.

  8. Women and the Affordable Care Act of 2010.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sara R; Rustgi, Sheila D; Doty, Michelle M

    2010-07-01

    This issue brief analyzes how, over the next decade, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is likely to stabilize and reverse women's growing exposure to health care costs. Up to 15 million women who now are uninsured could gain subsidized coverage under the law. In addition, 14.5 million insured women will benefit from provisions that improve coverage or reduce premiums. Women who have coverage through the individual insurance market and are charged higher premiums than men, who have been unable to secure coverage for the cost of pregnancy, or who have a preexisting health condition excluded from their benefits will ultimately find themselves on a level playing field with men, enjoying a full range of comprehensive benefits.

  9. The Future of the Affordable Care Act and Insurance Coverage.

    PubMed

    Glied, Sherry; Jackson, Adlan

    2017-04-01

    We describe the patterns of coverage gains associated with the Affordable Care Act (ACA) expansions and use these patterns to assess the potential impact of alternative repeal or repeal and replace strategies because Congress and the president are weighing options to repeal or replace the ACA. We find that specific provisions of the ACA, including the Medicaid expansion and the structure of premium subsidies, have been associated with large and robust gains in insurance coverage. We evaluate the impact of retaining dependent coverage and high-risk pool provisions and show, on the basis of the ACA experience, that these provisions would have little effect on coverage. We find that many replacement proposal components, including flat tax credits and maintaining cost savings provisions, could jeopardize the ability of many of the ACA's primary beneficiaries, as well as other Americans, to access coverage and care. By leading to a deterioration of the safety net, these strategies could also imperil population health activities.

  10. Design, analysis and testing of small, affordable HAWT rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricop, Mihai V.; Niculescu, Mihai L.; Cojocaru, Marius G.; Barsan, Dorin

    2012-09-01

    The paper presents affordable technologies dedicated to design, CAD modelling and manufacturing of the small-medium HAWT rotors. Three numerical tools are developed: blade/rotor design, blade modelling for industry CATIA(CATScript) and blade modelling for small scale developers. Numerical analysis of the rotors is accomplished for both performance and noise level estimation using XFLOW (LES) and an in-house code (URANS). Results are presented for a 5KW rotor at the design point only, since computations are expensive. Developement examples are included as two rotors are designed, manufactured and tested for 1.5 and 5KW. A third one, rated for 20KW is under developement. Basic testing results are also included.

  11. Pico Reentry Probes: Affordable Options for Reentry Measurements and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ailor, William H.; Kapoor, Vinod B.; Allen, Gay A., Jr.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Arnold, James O.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally very costly to perform in-space and atmospheric entry experiments. This paper presents a new platform - the Pico Reentry Probe (PREP) - that we believe will make targeted flight-tests and planetary atmospheric probe science missions considerably more affordable. Small, lightweight, self-contained, it is designed as a "launch and forget" system, suitable for experiments that require no ongoing communication with the ground. It contains a data recorder, battery, transmitter, and user-customized instrumentation. Data recorded during reentry or space operations is returned at end-of-mission via transmission to Iridium satellites (in the case of earth-based operations) or a similar orbiting communication system for planetary missions. This paper discusses possible applications of this concept for Earth and Martian atmospheric entry science. Two well-known heritage aerodynamic shapes are considered as candidates for PREP: the shape developed for the Planetary Atmospheric Experiment Test (PAET) and that for the Deep Space II Mars Probe.

  12. An Object Oriented Extensible Architecture for Affordable Aerospace Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follen, Gregory J.

    2003-01-01

    Driven by a need to explore and develop propulsion systems that exceeded current computing capabilities, NASA Glenn embarked on a novel strategy leading to the development of an architecture that enables propulsion simulations never thought possible before. Full engine 3 Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic propulsion system simulations were deemed impossible due to the impracticality of the hardware and software computing systems required. However, with a software paradigm shift and an embracing of parallel and distributed processing, an architecture was designed to meet the needs of future propulsion system modeling. The author suggests that the architecture designed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for propulsion system modeling has potential for impacting the direction of development of affordable weapons systems currently under consideration by the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel (AVT).

  13. International examples of undocumented immigration and the affordable care act.

    PubMed

    Stutz, Matthew; Baig, Arshiya

    2014-08-01

    As it stands there is no viable health care option for undocumented immigrants of low socioeconomic status. Even more worrisome is that Affordable Care Act simply does not address this issue with any direct plan. The US is in a very influential time period in terms of undocumented immigration and its relationship with health care. The purpose of this paper is to examine international examples of undocumented immigrant health care and their implications for the United States' undocumented immigrant health care. This study found that physicians in the US must work to prevent the initiation of policies which exclude undocumented immigrants from accessing health care. Exclusionary policies implemented in European nations have had disastrous effects on physicians and patients. This paper examines the implications which similar policies would have if implemented in the US.

  14. Gender performativity in physics: affordances or only constraints?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, Anna T.; Lundin, Mattias

    2014-06-01

    In this forum we engage in a dialogue with Allison Gonsalves's paper `"Physics and the girly girl—there is a contradiction somewhere": Doctoral students' positioning around discourses of gender and competence in physics'. In her paper Gonsalves uses a sociocultural approach to examine women doctoral students' stories about becoming physicists. In doing so her paper focuses on how discourses of masculinity and femininity can create available and unavailable positions for the women students. In this dialogue we do a parallel reading of two of the student narratives presented by Gonsalves, using Judith Butler's (1990) concept of discursive agency as a means to more explicitly bring the affordances for women identity constitution offered by their localized physicist context to the fore, rather focusing on its, often more visible, constraints.

  15. The Affordable Care Act, remedy, and litigation reform.

    PubMed

    Maher, Brendan S

    2014-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) rewrote the law of private health insurance. How the ACA rewrote the law of civil remedies, however, is a question largely unexamined by scholars. Courts everywhere, including the U.S. Supreme Court, will soon confront this important issue. This Article offers a foundational treatment of the ACA on remedy. It predicts a series of flashpoints over which litigation reform battles will be fought. It identifies several themes that will animate those conflicts and trigger others. It explains how judicial construction of the statute's functional predecessor, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), converted a protective statute into a uniquely effective piece of federal litigation reform. Ultimately, it considers whether the ACA--which incorporates, modifies, and rejects ERISA in several notable ways--will experience a similar fate.

  16. Suggested Interactivity: Seeking Perceived Affordances for Information Visualization.

    PubMed

    Boy, Jeremy; Eveillard, Louis; Detienne, Françoise; Fekete, Jean-Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate methods for suggesting the interactivity of online visualizations embedded with text. We first assess the need for such methods by conducting three initial experiments on Amazon's Mechanical Turk. We then present a design space for Suggested Interactivity (i. e., visual cues used as perceived affordances-SI), based on a survey of 382 HTML5 and visualization websites. Finally, we assess the effectiveness of three SI cues we designed for suggesting the interactivity of bar charts embedded with text. Our results show that only one cue (SI3) was successful in inciting participants to interact with the visualizations, and we hypothesize this is because this particular cue provided feedforward.

  17. Mobilizing slit lamp to the field: A new affordable solution.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Javed Hussain; Jorgenson, Richard; Gomaa, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    We are describing a simple and affordable design to pack and carry the slit lamp to the field. Orbis staff working on the Flying Eye Hospital (FEH) developed this design to facilitate mobilization of the slit lamp to the field during various FEH programs. The solution involves using a big toolbox, a central plywood apparatus, and foam. These supplies were cut to measure and used to support the slit lamp after being fitted snuggly in the box. This design allows easy and safe mobilization of the slit lamp to remote places. It was developed with the efficient use of space in mind and it can be easily reproduced in developing countries using same or similar supplies. Mobilizing slit lamp will be of great help for staff and institutes doing regular outreach clinical work.

  18. Monte Carlo aided design of an improved well-type ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bohm, Tim D.; Micka, John A.; De Werd, Larry A.

    2007-04-15

    The determination of the air kerma strength of a brachytherapy seed is necessary for effective treatment planning. Well-type ionization chambers are used on site at therapy clinics to determine the air kerma strength of seeds. In this work, an improved well-type ionization chamber for low energy, low dose rate brachytherapy sources is designed using Monte Carlo transport calculations to aid in the design process. The design improvements are the elimination of the air density induced over-response effect seen in other air-communicating chambers for low energy photon sources, and a larger signal strength (response or current) for {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I based seeds. A prototype well chamber based on the Monte Carlo aided design but using graphite coated acrylic walls rather than the design basis air equivalent plastic (C-552) walls was constructed and experimentally evaluated. The prototype chamber produced an 85% stronger signal when measuring a commonly used {sup 103}Pd seed and a 26% stronger signal when measuring a commonly used {sup 125}I seed when compared to another commonly used well chamber. The normalized P{sub TP} corrected chamber response is, at most, 1.3% and 2.4% over unity for air densities/pressures corresponding to an elevation of 3048 m (10 000 feet) above sea level for the commonly used {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I based seeds respectively. Comparing calculated and measured chamber responses for common {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I based brachytherapy seeds show agreement within 0.6% and 0.2%, respectively. We conclude that Monte Carlo transport calculations accurately model the response of this new well chamber and in general can be used to predict the response of well chambers. The prototype chamber built in this work responds as predicted by the Monte Carlo calculations.

  19. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15.2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US $6.2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery--e.g., pathology and imaging--are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning.

  20. Critical Care Implications of the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Anjali P.; Dorman, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To provide an overview of key elements of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). To evaluate ways in which the ACA will likely impact the practice of critical care medicine. To describe strategies that may help health systems and providers effectively adapt to changes brought about by the ACA. Data Sources and Synthesis Data sources for this concise review include search results from the PubMed and Embase databases, as well as sources relevant to public policy such as the text of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and reports of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). As all of the ACA's provisions will not be fully implemented until 2019, we also drew upon cost, population and utilization projections as well as the experience of existing state-based healthcare reforms. Conclusion The ACA represents the furthest reaching regulatory changes in the US healthcare system since the 1965 Medicare and Medicaid provisions of the Social Security Act. The ACA aims to expand health insurance coverage to millions of Americans and place an emphasis on quality and cost-effectiveness of care. From models which link pay and performance to those which center on episodic care, the ACA outlines sweeping changes to health systems, reimbursement structures, and the delivery of critical care. Staffing models that include daily rounding by an intensivist, palliative care integration, and expansion of the role of telemedicine in areas where intensivists are inaccessible are potential strategies that may improve quality and profitability of ICU care in the post-ACA era. PMID:26565630