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Sample records for affymetrix cdna microarray

  1. Affymetrix GeneChip microarray preprocessing for multivariate analyses.

    PubMed

    McCall, Matthew N; Almudevar, Anthony

    2012-09-01

    Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays are the most widely used high-throughput technology to measure gene expression, and a wide variety of preprocessing methods have been developed to transform probe intensities reported by a microarray scanner into gene expression estimates. There have been numerous comparisons of these preprocessing methods, focusing on the most common analyses-detection of differential expression and gene or sample clustering. Recently, more complex multivariate analyses, such as gene co-expression, differential co-expression, gene set analysis and network modeling, are becoming more common; however, the same preprocessing methods are typically applied. In this article, we examine the effect of preprocessing methods on some of these multivariate analyses and provide guidance to the user as to which methods are most appropriate.

  2. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the μ-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in μ-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power

  3. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the μ-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in μ-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power

  4. Analysis of discordant Affymetrix probesets casts serious doubt on idea of microarray data reutilization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Affymetrix microarray technology allows one to investigate expression of thousands of genes simultaneously upon a variety of conditions. In a popular U133A microarray platform, the expression of 37% of genes is measured by more than one probeset. The discordant expression observed for two different probesets that match the same gene is a widespread phenomenon which is usually underestimated, ignored or disregarded. Results Here we evaluate the prevalence of discordant expression in data collected using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarray platform. In U133A, about 30% of genes annotated by two different probesets demonstrate a substantial correlation between independently measured expression values. To our surprise, sorting the probesets according to the nature of the discrepancy in their expression levels allowed the classification of the respective genes according to their fundamental functional properties, including observed enrichment by tissue-specific transcripts and alternatively spliced variants. On another hand, an absence of discrepancies in probesets that simultaneously match several different genes allowed us to pinpoint non-expressed pseudogenes and gene groups with highly correlated expression patterns. Nevertheless, in many cases, the nature of discordant expression of two probesets that match the same transcript remains unexplained. It is possible that these probesets report differently regulated sets of transcripts, or, in best case scenario, two different sets of transcripts that represent the same gene. Conclusion The majority of absolute gene expression values collected using Affymetrix microarrays may not be suitable for typical interpretative downstream analysis. PMID:25563078

  5. AffyTrees: facilitating comparative analysis of Affymetrix plant microarray chips.

    PubMed

    Frickey, Tancred; Benedito, Vagner Augusto; Udvardi, Michael; Weiller, Georg

    2008-02-01

    Microarrays measure the expression of large numbers of genes simultaneously and can be used to delve into interaction networks involving many genes at a time. However, it is often difficult to decide to what extent knowledge about the expression of genes gleaned in one model organism can be transferred to other species. This can be examined either by measuring the expression of genes of interest under comparable experimental conditions in other species, or by gathering the necessary data from comparable microarray experiments. However, it is essential to know which genes to compare between the organisms. To facilitate comparison of expression data across different species, we have implemented a Web-based software tool that provides information about sequence orthologs across a range of Affymetrix microarray chips. AffyTrees provides a quick and easy way of assigning which probe sets on different Affymetrix chips measure the expression of orthologous genes. Even in cases where gene or genome duplications have complicated the assignment, groups of comparable probe sets can be identified. The phylogenetic trees provide a resource that can be used to improve sequence annotation and detect biases in the sequence complement of Affymetrix chips. Being able to identify sequence orthologs and recognize biases in the sequence complement of chips is necessary for reliable cross-species microarray comparison. As the amount of work required to generate a single phylogeny in a nonautomated manner is considerable, AffyTrees can greatly reduce the workload for scientists interested in large-scale cross-species comparisons.

  6. MAAMD: a workflow to standardize meta-analyses and comparison of affymetrix microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mandatory deposit of raw microarray data files for public access, prior to study publication, provides significant opportunities to conduct new bioinformatics analyses within and across multiple datasets. Analysis of raw microarray data files (e.g. Affymetrix CEL files) can be time consuming, complex, and requires fundamental computational and bioinformatics skills. The development of analytical workflows to automate these tasks simplifies the processing of, improves the efficiency of, and serves to standardize multiple and sequential analyses. Once installed, workflows facilitate the tedious steps required to run rapid intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. Results We developed a workflow to facilitate and standardize Meta-Analysis of Affymetrix Microarray Data analysis (MAAMD) in Kepler. Two freely available stand-alone software tools, R and AltAnalyze were embedded in MAAMD. The inputs of MAAMD are user-editable csv files, which contain sample information and parameters describing the locations of input files and required tools. MAAMD was tested by analyzing 4 different GEO datasets from mice and drosophila. MAAMD automates data downloading, data organization, data quality control assesment, differential gene expression analysis, clustering analysis, pathway visualization, gene-set enrichment analysis, and cross-species orthologous-gene comparisons. MAAMD was utilized to identify gene orthologues responding to hypoxia or hyperoxia in both mice and drosophila. The entire set of analyses for 4 datasets (34 total microarrays) finished in ~ one hour. Conclusions MAAMD saves time, minimizes the required computer skills, and offers a standardized procedure for users to analyze microarray datasets and make new intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. PMID:24621103

  7. affyPara-a Bioconductor Package for Parallelized Preprocessing Algorithms of Affymetrix Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Markus; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2009-07-22

    Microarray data repositories as well as large clinical applications of gene expression allow to analyse several hundreds of microarrays at one time. The preprocessing of large amounts of microarrays is still a challenge. The algorithms are limited by the available computer hardware. For example, building classification or prognostic rules from large microarray sets will be very time consuming. Here, preprocessing has to be a part of the cross-validation and resampling strategy which is necessary to estimate the rule's prediction quality honestly.This paper proposes the new Bioconductor package affyPara for parallelized preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data. Partition of data can be applied on arrays and parallelization of algorithms is a straightforward consequence. The partition of data and distribution to several nodes solves the main memory problems and accelerates preprocessing by up to the factor 20 for 200 or more arrays.affyPara is a free and open source package, under GPL license, available form the Bioconductor project at www.bioconductor.org. A user guide and examples are provided with the package.

  8. Methods comparison for high-resolution transcriptional analysis of archival material on Affymetrix Plus 2.0 and Exon 1.0 microarrays.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kim; Hey, Yvonne; Dibben, Sian; Miller, Crispin; Freemont, Anthony; Radford, John; Pepper, Stuart

    2009-07-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is a new and evolving technique. This report compares transcript detection rates on Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 and Human Exon 1.0 ST GeneChips across several RNA extraction and target labeling protocols, using routinely collected archival FFPE samples. All RNA extraction protocols tested (Ambion-Optimum, Ambion-RecoverAll, and Qiagen-RNeasy FFPE) provided extracts suitable for microarray hybridization. Compared with Affymetrix One-Cycle labeled extracts, NuGEN system protocols utilizing oligo(dT) and random hexamer primers, and cDNA target preparations instead of cRNA, achieved percent present rates up to 55% on Plus 2.0 arrays. Based on two paired-sample analyses, at 90% specificity this equalled an average 30 percentage-point increase (from 50% to 80%) in FFPE transcript sensitivity relative to fresh frozen tissues, which we have assumed to have 100% sensitivity and specificity. The high content of Exon arrays, with multiple probe sets per exon, improved FFPE sensitivity to 92% at 96% specificity, corresponding to an absolute increase of ~600 genes over Plus 2.0 arrays. While larger series are needed to confirm high correspondence between fresh-frozen and FFPE expression patterns, these data suggest that both Plus 2.0 and Exon arrays are suitable platforms for FFPE microarray expression analyses.

  9. cDNA microarray screening in food safety.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2006-04-01

    The cDNA microarray technology and related bioinformatics tools presents a wide range of novel application opportunities. The technology may be productively applied to address food safety. In this mini-review article, we present an update highlighting the late breaking discoveries that demonstrate the vitality of cDNA microarray technology as a tool to analyze food safety with reference to microbial pathogens and genetically modified foods. In order to bring the microarray technology to mainstream food safety, it is important to develop robust user-friendly tools that may be applied in a field setting. In addition, there needs to be a standardized process for regulatory agencies to interpret and act upon microarray-based data. The cDNA microarray approach is an emergent technology in diagnostics. Its values lie in being able to provide complimentary molecular insight when employed in addition to traditional tests for food safety, as part of a more comprehensive battery of tests.

  10. A new method for class prediction based on signed-rank algorithms applied to Affymetrix® microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rème, Thierry; Hose, Dirk; De Vos, John; Vassal, Aurélien; Poulain, Pierre-Olivier; Pantesco, Véronique; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background The huge amount of data generated by DNA chips is a powerful basis to classify various pathologies. However, constant evolution of microarray technology makes it difficult to mix data from different chip types for class prediction of limited sample populations. Affymetrix® technology provides both a quantitative fluorescence signal and a decision (detection call: absent or present) based on signed-rank algorithms applied to several hybridization repeats of each gene, with a per-chip normalization. We developed a new prediction method for class belonging based on the detection call only from recent Affymetrix chip type. Biological data were obtained by hybridization on U133A, U133B and U133Plus 2.0 microarrays of purified normal B cells and cells from three independent groups of multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Results After a call-based data reduction step to filter out non class-discriminative probe sets, the gene list obtained was reduced to a predictor with correction for multiple testing by iterative deletion of probe sets that sequentially improve inter-class comparisons and their significance. The error rate of the method was determined using leave-one-out and 5-fold cross-validation. It was successfully applied to (i) determine a sex predictor with the normal donor group classifying gender with no error in all patient groups except for male MM samples with a Y chromosome deletion, (ii) predict the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains expressed by the malignant myeloma clones of the validation group and (iii) predict sex, light and heavy chain nature for every new patient. Finally, this method was shown powerful when compared to the popular classification method Prediction Analysis of Microarray (PAM). Conclusion This normalization-free method is routinely used for quality control and correction of collection errors in patient reports to clinicians. It can be easily extended to multiple class prediction suitable with clinical groups, and looks

  11. Fabrication of high quality cDNA microarray using a small amount of cDNA.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Hee; Jeong, Ha Jin; Jung, Jae Jun; Lee, Gui Yeon; Kim, Sang-Chul; Kim, Tae Soo; Yang, Sang Hwa; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Rha, Sun Young

    2004-05-01

    DNA microarray technology has become an essential part of biological research. It enables the genome-scale analysis of gene expression in various types of model systems. Manufacturing high quality cDNA microarrays of microdeposition type depends on some key factors including a printing device, spotting pins, glass slides, spotting solution, and humidity during spotting. UsingEthe Microgrid II TAS model printing device, this study defined the optimal conditions for producing high density, high quality cDNA microarrays with the least amount of cDNA product. It was observed that aminosilane-modified slides were superior to other types of surface modified-slides. A humidity of 30+/-3% in a closed environment and the overnight drying of the spotted slides gave the best conditions for arraying. In addition, the cDNA dissolved in 30% DMSO gave the optimal conditions for spotting compared to the 1X ArrayIt, 3X SSC and 50% DMSO. Lastly, cDNA in the concentration range of 100-300 ng/ micro l was determined to be best for arraying and post-processing. Currently, the printing system in this study yields reproducible 9000 spots with a spot size 150 mm diameter, and a 200 nm spot spacing. PMID:15067369

  12. Identification of biomarkers regulated by rexinoids (LGD1069, LG100268 and Ro25-7386) in human breast cells using Affymetrix microarray.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye-Sook; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2015-07-01

    Retinoids possess anti-proliferative properties, which suggests that they possess chemopreventive and therapeutic potential against cancer. In the current study, genes modulated by rexinoids (retinoid X receptor (RXR)-pan agonists, LGD1069 and LG100268; and the RXRα agonist, Ro25-7386) were identified using an Affymetrix microarray in normal and malignant breast cells. It was observed that LGD1069, LG100268 and Ro25-7386 suppressed the growth of breast cells. Secondly, several rexinoid-regulated genes were identified, which are involved in cell death, cell growth/maintenance, signal transduction and response to stimulus. These genes may be associated with the growth-suppressive activity of rexinoids. Therefore, the identified genes may serve as biomarkers and novel molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  13. Construction of a cDNA microarray derived from the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Azumi, Kaoru; Takahashi, Hiroki; Miki, Yasufumi; Fujie, Manabu; Usami, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Hisayoshi; Kitayama, Atsusi; Satou, Yutaka; Ueno, Naoto; Satoh, Nori

    2003-10-01

    A cDNA microarray was constructed from a basal chordate, the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. The draft genome of Ciona has been read and inferred to contain approximately 16,000 protein-coding genes, and cDNAs for transcripts of 13,464 genes have been characterized and compiled as the "Ciona intestinalis Gene Collection Release I". In the present study, we constructed a cDNA microarray of these 13,464 Ciona genes. A preliminary experiment with Cy3- and Cy5-labeled probes showed extensive differential gene expression between fertilized eggs and larvae. In addition, there was a good correlation between results obtained by the present microarray analysis and those from previous EST analyses. This first microarray of a large collection of Ciona intestinalis cDNA clones should facilitate the analysis of global gene expression and gene networks during the embryogenesis of basal chordates.

  14. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN CDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN cDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    B.S. Pukazhenthi1, J. C. Rockett2, M. Ouyang3, D.J. Dix2, J.G. Howard1, P. Georgopoulos4, W.J. J. Welsh3 and D. E. Wildt1

    1Department of Reproductiv...

  15. APPLICATION OF CDNA MICROARRAY TO THE STUDY OF ARSENIC TOXICOLOGY AND CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (As) is a common environmental toxicant and known human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies link As exposure to various disorders and cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms for As toxicity and carcinogenicity are not completely known. The cDNA microarray, a high-th...

  16. Analysis of hypertrophic and normal scar gene expression with cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tsou, R; Cole, J K; Nathens, A B; Isik, F F; Heimbach, D M; Engrav, L H; Gibran, N S

    2000-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one form of abnormal wound healing. Previous studies have suggested that hypertrophic scar formation results from altered gene expression of extracellular matrix molecules. A broadscale evaluation of gene expression in hypertrophic scars has not been reported. To better understand abnormalities in hypertrophic scar gene expression, we compared messenger RNA expression in hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin with the use of complementary (c)DNA microarrays. Total RNA was extracted from freshly excised human hypertrophic scars, normal scars, or uninjured skin and reverse transcribed into cDNA with the incorporation of [33P] deoxycytidine triphosphate. The resulting radioactive cDNA probes were hybridized onto cDNA microarrays of 4000 genes. Hybridization signals were normalized and analyzed. In the comparison of tissue samples, mean intensities were calculated for each gene within each group (hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin). Ratios of the mean intensities of hypertrophic scars to normal scars, hypertrophic scars to uninjured skin, and normal scars to uninjured skin were generated. A ratio that was greater than 1 indicated upregulation of any particular gene and a ratio that was less than 1 indicated downregulation of any particular gene. Our data indicated that 142 genes were overexpressed and 50 genes were underexpressed in normal scars compared with uninjured skin, 107 genes were overexpressed and 71 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with uninjured skin, and 44 genes were overexpressed and 124 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with normal scars. Our analysis of collagen, growth factor, and metalloproteinase gene expression confirmed that our molecular data were consistent with published biochemical and clinical observations of normal scars and hypertrophic scars. cDNA microarray analysis provides a powerful tool for the investigation of differential gene expression in

  17. Identification of plant defence genes in canola using Arabidopsis cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Schenk, P M; Thomas-Hall, S R; Nguyen, A V; Manners, J M; Kazan, K; Spangenberg, G

    2008-09-01

    We report the identification of novel defence genes in canola by using a cDNA microarray from Arabidopsis. We examined changes that occur in the abundance of transcripts corresponding to 2375 Arabidopsis expressed sequence tags (selected for defence gene identification) following inoculation of canola plants with the fungal necrotrophic leaf pathogen, Alternaria brassicicola. Microarray data obtained from this cross-hybridisation experiment were compared to expression profiles previously obtained from the equivalent Arabidopsis experiment. Homology searches using a canola expressed sequence tag database with approximately 6000 unique clones led to identification of canola defence genes. Pathogen-responsive transcripts included those associated to known defence genes, reactive oxygen species metabolism, disease resistance and regulatory genes, and cell maintenance/metabolism genes. Using specific primers for quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, gene expression profiles in canola were obtained that demonstrated coordinated defence responses, including systemic responses in distal tissue and salicylic acid- and methyl jasmonate-mediated signalling against A. brassicicola.

  18. Transcriptome profiling of Lilium longiflorum generative cells by cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2007-07-01

    The generative cell, which is produced by asymmetric division of the unicellular microspore, undergoes further mitotic division to produce two sperm cells that take part in double fertilization. Expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of Lilium longiflorum (lily) generative cell cDNA library has shown that a diverse complement of genes is transcribed in these cells. Here we address the cell specificity of genes expressed in lily generative cell by using spotted cDNA microarray. Microarray slides were hybridized with labeled probes prepared from transcripts originating from generative cells and other tissues (mature pollen, uninucleate microspore, ovary, root tip, and shoot). The hierarchical clustering revealed that 356 of 430 gene transcripts (83%) of generative-cell genes were up regulated in generative cells. Thirty-eight percent of generative-cell-enriched transcripts were assigned their putative functions, with an abundance of genes involved in protein destination and signal transduction. These results suggest that the expression of a subset of flowering plant genes is tightly controlled and up-regulated in generative cells in order to implement their specialized function. These data thus represent a significant increase in the genes identified as being up-regulated in generative cells and would allow functional analysis of a large number of flowering plant male gamete expressed genes. PMID:17245599

  19. Dissection of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Transcriptome Using Genome-Wide cDNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background The differential pathophysiologic mechanisms that trigger and maintain the two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are only partially understood. cDNA microarrays can be used to decipher gene regulation events at a genome-wide level and to identify novel unknown genes that might be involved in perpetuating inflammatory disease progression. Methods and Findings High-density cDNA microarrays representing 33,792 UniGene clusters were prepared. Biopsies were taken from the sigmoid colon of normal controls (n = 11), CD patients (n = 10) and UC patients (n = 10). 33P-radiolabeled cDNA from purified poly(A)+ RNA extracted from biopsies (unpooled) was hybridized to the arrays. We identified 500 and 272 transcripts differentially regulated in CD and UC, respectively. Interesting hits were independently verified by real-time PCR in a second sample of 100 individuals, and immunohistochemistry was used for exemplary localization. The main findings point to novel molecules important in abnormal immune regulation and the highly disturbed cell biology of colonic epithelial cells in IBD pathogenesis, e.g., CYLD (cylindromatosis, turban tumor syndrome) and CDH11 (cadherin 11, type 2). By the nature of the array setup, many of the genes identified were to our knowledge previously uncharacterized, and prediction of the putative function of a subsection of these genes indicate that some could be involved in early events in disease pathophysiology. Conclusion A comprehensive set of candidate genes not previously associated with IBD was revealed, which underlines the polygenic and complex nature of the disease. It points out substantial differences in pathophysiology between CD and UC. The multiple unknown genes identified may stimulate new research in the fields of barrier mechanisms and cell signalling in the context of IBD, and ultimately new therapeutic approaches. PMID:16107186

  20. Evaluation of normalization methods for cDNA microarray data by k-NN classification

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Xing, Eric P; Myers, Connie; Mian, Saira; Bissell, Mina J

    2004-12-17

    Non-biological factors give rise to unwanted variations in cDNA microarray data. There are many normalization methods designed to remove such variations. However, to date there have been few published systematic evaluations of these techniques for removing variations arising from dye biases in the context of downstream, higher-order analytical tasks such as classification. Ten location normalization methods that adjust spatial- and/or intensity-dependent dye biases, and three scale methods that adjust scale differences were applied, individually and in combination, to five distinct, published, cancer biology-related cDNA microarray data sets. Leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) classification error was employed as the quantitative end-point for assessing the effectiveness of a normalization method. In particular, a known classifier, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), was estimated from data normalized using a given technique, and the LOOCV error rate of the ensuing model was computed. We found that k-NN classifiers are sensitive to dye biases in the data. Using NONRM and GMEDIAN as baseline methods, our results show that single-bias-removal techniques which remove either spatial-dependent dye bias (referred later as spatial effect) or intensity-dependent dye bias (referred later as intensity effect) moderately reduce LOOCV classification errors; whereas double-bias-removal techniques which remove both spatial- and intensity effect reduce LOOCV classification errors even further. Of the 41 different strategies examined, three two-step processes, IGLOESS-SLFILTERW7, ISTSPLINE-SLLOESS and IGLOESS-SLLOESS, all of which removed intensity effect globally and spatial effect locally, appear to reduce LOOCV classification errors most consistently and effectively across all data sets. We also found that the investigated scale normalization methods do not reduce LOOCV classification error. Using LOOCV error of k-NNs as the evaluation criterion, three double

  1. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi's individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  2. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi’s individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  3. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi's individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  4. cDNA microarray reveals signaling pathways involved in hormones expression of human pituitary.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yue-Yun; Qi, Xiao-Fei; Song, Shao-Jun; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Xin; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Teng, Yun; Han, Ze-Guang

    2005-09-01

    Pituitary, a master gland of neuroendocrine system, secretes hormones that orchestrate many physiological processes, under the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. To investigate the genes involved in hormones expression of human pituitary, homemade cDNA microarray containing 14,800 human genes/ESTs were used to profile the gene expression in both fetal and adult pituitaries. Seven hundred and twelve known genes changed over 2-fold between the both tissues. Of which, 23 genes were changed with hormones expression in aging were confirmed by RT-PCR, not only the known regulators such as Pit1, GATA4, ESRRA, GABA-A, and EMK, but also LOC55884, DUSP3, PNN, and RCL, which had not been reported to be involved in the hormones expression. Correspondingly, the mRNAs of GH, PRL, POMC, TSH-beta, FSH-beta, and LH-beta, was increased as much as 6- to 20-fold in adult pituitary than those in fetal pituitary, by real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay. In addition, the mRNAs of signaling pathways, such as cAMP-PKA-CREB, PI3K-Akt, and PKA-ERK were further investigated. Of them, it was only cAMP-PKA-CREB pathway, but not PI3K-Akt and PKA-ERK have the same expressing pattern as hormones. It suggested that cDNA microarray is highly advantages to profile the differential expressed genes that were involved in hormones expression of human pituitary, but it might ignore some responding proteins regulated posttranscriptionally.

  5. Global analysis of carbohydrate utilization by Lactobacillus acidophilus using cDNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Azcarate-Peril, M. Andrea; Duong, Tri; Conners, Shannon B.; Kelly, Robert M.; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2006-01-01

    The transport and catabolic machinery involved in carbohydrate utilization by Lactobacillus acidophilus was characterized genetically by using whole-genome cDNA microarrays. Global transcriptional profiles were determined for growth on glucose, fructose, sucrose, lactose, galactose, trehalose, raffinose, and fructooligosaccharides. Hybridizations were carried out by using a round-robin design, and microarray data were analyzed with a two-stage mixed model ANOVA. Differentially expressed genes were visualized by hierarchical clustering, volcano plots, and contour plots. Overall, only 63 genes (3% of the genome) showed a >4-fold induction. Specifically, transporters of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar transferase system were identified for uptake of glucose, fructose, sucrose, and trehalose, whereas ATP-binding cassette transporters were identified for uptake of raffinose and fructooligosaccharides. A member of the LacS subfamily of galactoside-pentose hexuronide translocators was identified for uptake of galactose and lactose. Saccharolytic enzymes likely involved in the metabolism of monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides into substrates of glycolysis were also found, including enzymatic machinery of the Leloir pathway. The transcriptome appeared to be regulated by carbon catabolite repression. Although substrate-specific carbohydrate transporters and hydrolases were regulated at the transcriptional level, genes encoding regulatory proteins CcpA, Hpr, HprK/P, and EI were consistently highly expressed. Genes central to glycolysis were among the most highly expressed in the genome. Collectively, microarray data revealed that coordinated and regulated transcription of genes involved in sugar uptake and metabolism is based on the specific carbohydrate provided. L. acidophilus's adaptability to environmental conditions likely contributes to its competitive ability for limited carbohydrate sources available in the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:16505367

  6. Processing the Loblolly Pine PtGen2 cDNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, W. Walter; Yu, Yuan-Sheng; Simões, Marta; Dean, Jeffrey F. D.

    2009-01-01

    PtGen2 is a 26,496 feature cDNA microarray containing amplified loblolly pine ESTs. The array is produced in our laboratory for use by researchers studying gene expression in pine and other conifer species. PtGen2 was developed as a result of our gene discovery efforts in loblolly pine, and is comprised of sequences identified primarily from root tissues, but also from needle and stem.1,2 PtGen2 has been tested by hybridizing different Cy-dye labeled conifer target cDNAs, using both amplified and non-amplified indirect labeling methods, and also tested with a number of hybridization and washing conditions. This video focuses on the handling and processing of slides before and after pre-hybridization, as well as after hybridization, using some modifications to procedures developed previously.3,4 Also included, in text form only, are the protocols used for the generation, labeling and clean up of target cDNA s, as well as information on software used for downstream data processing. PtGen2 is printed with a proprietary print buffer that contains high concentrations of salt that can be difficult to remove completely. The slides are washed first in a warm SDS solution prior to pre-hybridization. After pre-hybridization, the slides are washed vigorously in several changes of water to complete removal of remaining salts. LifterSlips™ are then cleaned and positioned on the slides and labeled cDNA is carefully loaded onto the microarray by way of capillary action which provides for even distribution of the sample across the slide, and reduces the chance of bubble incorporation. Hybridization of targets to the array is done at 48°C in high humidity conditions. After hybridization, a series of standard washes are done at 53°C and room temperature for extended times. Processing PtGen2 slides using this technique reduces salt and SDS-derived artifacts often seen when the array is processed less rigorously. Hybridizing targets derived from several different conifer RNA

  7. Processing the loblolly pine PtGen2 cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, W Walter; Yu, Yuan-Sheng; Simões, Marta; Dean, Jeffrey F D

    2009-01-01

    PtGen2 is a 26,496 feature cDNA microarray containing amplified loblolly pine ESTs. The array is produced in our laboratory for use by researchers studying gene expression in pine and other conifer species. PtGen2 was developed as a result of our gene discovery efforts in loblolly pine, and is comprised of sequences identified primarily from root tissues, but also from needle and stem. PtGen2 has been tested by hybridizing different Cy-dye labeled conifer target cDNAs, using both amplified and non-amplified indirect labeling methods, and also tested with a number of hybridization and washing conditions. This video focuses on the handling and processing of slides before and after pre-hybridization, as well as after hybridization, using some modifications to procedures developed previously. Also included, in text form only, are the protocols used for the generation, labeling and clean up of target cDNA s, as well as information on software used for downstream data processing. PtGen2 is printed with a proprietary print buffer that contains high concentrations of salt that can be difficult to remove completely. The slides are washed first in a warm SDS solution prior to pre-hybridization. After pre-hybridization, the slides are washed vigorously in several changes of water to complete removal of remaining salts. LifterSlips are then cleaned and positioned on the slides and labeled cDNA is carefully loaded onto the microarray by way of capillary action which provides for even distribution of the sample across the slide, and reduces the chance of bubble incorporation. Hybridization of targets to the array is done at 48 degrees C in high humidity conditions. After hybridization, a series of standard washes are done at 53 degrees C and room temperature for extended times. Processing PtGen2 slides using this technique reduces salt and SDS-derived artifacts often seen when the array is processed less rigorously. Hybridizing targets derived from several different conifer RNA

  8. Comparison of Nanostring nCounter® Data on FFPE Colon Cancer Samples and Affymetrix Microarray Data on Matched Frozen Tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Deane, Natasha G; Lewis, Keeli B; Li, Jiang; Zhu, Jing; Washington, M Kay; Beauchamp, R Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) stage II and III patients remains a challenge due to the difficulties of finding robust biomarkers suitable for testing clinical samples. The majority of published gene signatures of CRC have been generated on fresh frozen colorectal tissues. Because collection of frozen tissue is not practical for routine surgical pathology practice, a clinical test that improves prognostic capabilities beyond standard pathological staging of colon cancer will need to be designed for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. The NanoString nCounter® platform is a gene expression analysis tool developed for use with FFPE-derived samples. We designed a custom nCounter® codeset based on elements from multiple published fresh frozen tissue microarray-based prognostic gene signatures for colon cancer, and we used this platform to systematically compare gene expression data from FFPE with matched microarray array data from frozen tissues. Our results show moderate correlation of gene expression between two platforms and discovery of a small subset of genes as candidate biomarkers for colon cancer prognosis that are detectable and quantifiable in FFPE tissue sections. PMID:27176004

  9. Characterization of the vernalization response in Lolium perenne by a cDNA microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Ciannamea, Stefano; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; de Folter, Stefan; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H

    2006-04-01

    Many plant species including temperate grasses require vernalization in order to flower. Vernalization is the process of promotion of flowering after exposure to prolonged periods of cold. To investigate the vernalization response in monocots, the expression patterns of about 1,500 unique genes of Lolium perenne were analyzed by a cDNA microarray approach, at different time points after transfer of plants to low temperatures. Vernalization of L. perenne takes around 80 d and, therefore, the plants were incubated at low temperatures for at least 12 weeks. A total of 70 cold-responsive genes were identified that are either up- or down-regulated with a minimal 2-fold difference compared with the common reference. The majority of these genes show a very rapid response to the cold treatment, indicating that their expression is affected by the cold stress and, therefore, these genes are not likely to be involved in the flowering process. Based on hierarchical clustering, one gene could be identified that is down-regulated towards the end of the cold period and, in addition, a few genes have been found that are up-regulated in the last weeks of the cold treatment and, hence, are putative candidates for genes involved in the vernalization response. Three of the up-regulated genes are homologous to members of the MADS box, CONSTANS-like and JUMONJI families of transcription factors, respectively. The latter two are novel genes not connected previously to vernalization-induced flowering. Furthermore, members of the JUMONJI family of transcription factors have been shown to be involved in chromatin remodeling, suggesting that this molecular mechanism, as in Arabidopsis, plays a role in the regulation of the vernalization response in monocots. PMID:16449231

  10. Cross-species hybridisation of human and bovine orthologous genes on high density cDNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Adjaye, James; Herwig, Ralf; Herrmann, Doris; Wruck, Wasco; BenKahla, Alia; Brink, Thore C; Nowak, Monika; Carnwath, Joseph W; Hultschig, Claus; Niemann, Heiner; Lehrach, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Background Cross-species gene-expression comparison is a powerful tool for the discovery of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms and pathways of expression control. The usefulness of cDNA microarrays in this context is that broad areas of homology are compared and hybridization probes are sufficiently large that small inter-species differences in nucleotide sequence would not affect the analytical results. This comparative genomics approach would allow a common set of genes within a specific developmental, metabolic, or disease-related gene pathway to be evaluated in experimental models of human diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility and reproducibility of cross-species analysis employing a human cDNA microarray as probe. Results As a proof of principle, total RNA derived from human and bovine fetal brains was used as a source of labelled targets for hybridisation onto a human cDNA microarray composed of 349 characterised genes. Each gene was spotted 20 times representing 6,980 data points thus enabling highly reproducible spot quantification. Employing high stringency hybridisation and washing conditions, followed by data analysis, revealed slight differences in the expression levels and reproducibility of the signals between the two species. We also assigned each of the genes into three expression level categories- i.e. high, medium and low. The correlation co-efficient of cross hybridisation between the orthologous genes was 0.94. Verification of the array data by semi-quantitative RT-PCR using common primer sequences enabled co-amplification of both human and bovine transcripts. Finally, we were able to assign gene names to previously uncharacterised bovine ESTs. Conclusions Results of our study demonstrate the harnessing and utilisation power of comparative genomics and prove the feasibility of using human microarrays to facilitate the identification of co-expressed orthologous genes in common tissues derived from different

  11. Hypoxia-induced regulation of MAPK phosphatase-1 as identified by subtractive suppression hybridization and cDNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Seta, K A; Kim, R; Kim, H W; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    2001-11-30

    Subtractive suppression hybridization was used to generate a cDNA library enriched in cDNA sequences corresponding to mRNA species that are specifically up-regulated by hypoxia (6 h, 1% O(2)) in the oxygen-responsive pheochromocytoma cell line. The dual specificity protein-tyrosine phosphatase MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) was highly represented in this library. Clones were arrayed on glass slides to create a hypoxia-specific cDNA microarray chip. Microarray, northern blot, and western blot analyses confirmed that MKP-1 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated by hypoxia by approximately 8-fold. The magnitude of the effect of hypoxia on MKP-1 was approximately equal to that induced by KCl depolarization and much larger than the effects of either epidermal growth factor or nerve growth factor on MKP-1 mRNA levels. In contrast to the calcium-dependent induction of MKP-1 by KCl depolarization, the effect of hypoxia on MKP-1 persisted under calcium-free conditions. Cobalt and deferoxamine also increased MKP-1 mRNA levels, suggesting that hypoxia-inducible factor proteins may play a role in the regulation of MKP-1 by hypoxia. Pretreatment of cells with SB203580, which inhibits p38 kinase activity, significantly reduced the hypoxia-induced increase in MKP-1 RNA levels. Thus, hypoxia robustly increases MKP-1 levels, at least in part through a p38 kinase-mediated mechanism. PMID:11577072

  12. Comparison of hybridization behavior between double and single strands of targets and the application of asymmetric PCR targets in cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; Liu, Sanzhen; Huang, Jianfeng; Mao, Xueying; Chu, Xiaohui; Wang, Yu; Qiu, MinYan; Mao, Yumin; Xie, Yi; Li, Yao

    2004-07-31

    Double stranded targets on the cDNA microarray contain representatives of both the coding and noncoding strands, which will introduce hybridization competition with probes. Here, the effect of double and single strands of targets on the signal intensity and the ratios of Cy5/Cy3 within the same slide were compared. The results show that single stranded targets can increase the hybridization efficiency without changing the Cy5/Cy3 ratio. Based on these results, a new strategy was established by generating cDNA targets with asymmetric PCR, instead of conventional PCR, to increase the sensitivity of the cDNA microarray. Furthermore, the feasibility of this approach was validated. The results indicate that the cDNA microarray system based on asymmetric PCR is more sensitive, with no decrease in the reliability and reproducibility as compared with that based on conventional symmetric PCR.

  13. CDNA microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in blood mononuclear cells of SLA-DRB1-defined Yorkshire pigs.

    PubMed

    Nino-Soto, M I; Jozani, R J; Bridle, B; Mallard, B A

    2008-01-01

    Three lines of commercialYorkshire pigs with defined SLA-DRB1 alleles were developed at the University of Guelph for xenotransplantation and immune response studies. Two of the SLA-DRB1 alleles have been previously reported (SLA-DRB1*0502 and *0701), whereas the third one is a new allele. The influence of defined SLA-DRB1 alleles on transcriptional patterns of immune-related genes in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) of pigs was explored using cDNA microarray. Microarray analysis showed significant differential expression of inflammatory genes in association with the various SLA-DRB1 alleles. A better understanding of the association between SLA genotypes and gene activity can increase the knowledge of the function of these molecules, as well as define new strategies to control animal health and optimize animal production.

  14. Identification of hypoxia-responsive genes in a dopaminergic cell line by subtractive cDNA libraries and microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Seta, K; Yuan, Y; Kim, H -W.; Rust, R T.; Conrad, P W.; Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E.

    2001-07-01

    Transplantation of dopamine-secreting cells harvested from fetal mesencephalon directly into the striatum has had limited success as a therapy for Parkinson's disease. A major problem is that the majority of the cells die during the first 3 weeks following transplantation. Hypoxia in the tissue surrounding the graft is a potential cause of the cell death. We have used subtractive cDNA libraries and microarray analysis to identify the gene expression profile that regulates tolerance to hypoxia. An improved understanding of the molecular basis of hypoxia-tolerance may allow investigators to engineer cells that can survive in the hypoxic environment of the brain parenchyma following transplantation. PMID:11331199

  15. cDNA Microarrays as a Tool for Identification of Biomineralization Proteins in the Coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Patrick; Bowers, Robert M.; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wahlund, Thomas M.; Fanelli, Michael A.; Olszova, Daniela; Read, Betsy A.

    2006-01-01

    Marine unicellular coccolithophore algae produce species-specific calcite scales otherwise known as coccoliths. While the coccoliths and their elaborate architecture have attracted the attention of investigators from various scientific disciplines, our knowledge of the underpinnings of the process of biomineralization in this alga is still in its infancy. The processes of calcification and coccolithogenesis are highly regulated and likely to be complex, requiring coordinated expression of many genes and pathways. In this study, we have employed cDNA microarrays to investigate changes in gene expression associated with biomineralization in the most abundant coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi. Expression profiling of cultures grown under calcifying and noncalcifying conditions has been carried out using cDNA microarrays corresponding to approximately 2,300 expressed sequence tags. A total of 127 significantly up- or down-regulated transcripts were identified using a P value of 0.01 and a change of >2.0-fold. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to test the overall validity of the microarray data, as well as the relevance of many of the proteins predicted to be associated with biomineralization, including a novel gamma-class carbonic anhydrase (A. R. Soto, H. Zheng, D. Shoemaker, J. Rodriguez, B. A. Read, and T. M. Wahlund, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:5500-5511, 2006). Differentially regulated genes include those related to cellular metabolism, ion channels, transport proteins, vesicular trafficking, and cell signaling. The putative function of the vast majority of candidate transcripts could not be defined. Nonetheless, the data described herein represent profiles of the transcription changes associated with biomineralization-related pathways in E. huxleyi and have identified novel and potentially useful targets for more detailed analysis. PMID:16885305

  16. A murine dopamine neuron-specific cDNA library and microarray: increased COX1 expression during methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Barrett, T; Xie, T; Piao, Y; Dillon-Carter, O; Kargul, G J; Lim, M K; Chrest, F J; Wersto, R; Rowley, D L; Juhaszova, M; Zhou, L; Vawter, M P; Becker, K G; Cheadle, C; Wood, W H; McCann, U D; Freed, W J; Ko, M S; Ricaurte, G A; Donovan, D M

    2001-10-01

    Due to brain tissue heterogeneity, the molecular genetic profile of any neurotransmitter-specific neuronal subtype is unknown. The purpose of this study was to purify a population of dopamine neurons, construct a cDNA library, and generate an initial gene expression profile and a microarray representative of dopamine neuron transcripts. Ventral mesencephalic dopamine neurons were purified by fluorescent-activated cell sorting from embryonic day 13.5 transgenic mice harboring a 4.5-kb rat tyrosine hydroxylase promoter-lacZ fusion. Nine-hundred sixty dopamine neuron cDNA clones were sequenced and arrayed for use in studies of gene expression changes during methamphetamine neurotoxicity. A neurotoxic dose of methamphetamine produced a greater than twofold up-regulation of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase polypeptide I transcript from adult mouse substantia nigra at 12 h posttreatment. This is the first work to describe a gene expression profile for a neuronal subtype and to identify gene expression changes during methamphetamine neurotoxicity. PMID:11592851

  17. CDNA microarray analysis of nerve growth factor-regulated gene expression profile in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hee; Ryu, Chun Jeih; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Eunjoo H

    2005-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF)-driven differentiation of PC12 cells into neuronal-like cells provides a representative model system for studying neuronal differentiation processes. Despite of extensive research, gene regulation associated with the differentiation program in PC12 cells still needs to be elucidated. We used cDNA microarray analysis to characterize the response of PC12 cells to NGF at mRNA expression. Forty-six genes were reproducibly influenced by 2-fold or more after NGF treatment for 5 days. Twenty-five of the regulated transcripts were matched to genes which have known functions. Among the microarray results confirmed with real-time reverse transcriptase assay, several genes have not previously known to be modulated by NGF. The results mostly reflected changes in molecules regulating neural plasticity, cytoskeletal organization, and lipid metabolism, which include neuritin, PDZ protein Mrt1, lipoprotein lipase, tropomodulin 1 and rhoB. These observed genetic changes may provide new information about molecular mechanisms underlying NGF-promoted differentiation of PC12 cells. PMID:16076023

  18. Identification of Differentially Expressed IGFBP5-Related Genes in Breast Cancer Tumor Tissues Using cDNA Microarray Experiments.

    PubMed

    Akkiprik, Mustafa; Peker, İrem; Özmen, Tolga; Amuran, Gökçe Güllü; Güllüoğlu, Bahadır M; Kaya, Handan; Özer, Ayşe

    2015-11-10

    IGFBP5 is an important regulatory protein in breast cancer progression. We tried to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between breast tumor tissues with IGFBP5 overexpression and their adjacent normal tissues. In this study, thirty-eight breast cancer and adjacent normal breast tissue samples were used to determine IGFBP5 expression by qPCR. cDNA microarrays were applied to the highest IGFBP5 overexpressed tumor samples compared to their adjacent normal breast tissue. Microarray analysis revealed that a total of 186 genes were differentially expressed in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissues. Of the 186 genes, 169 genes were downregulated and 17 genes were upregulated in the tumor samples. KEGG pathway analyses showed that protein digestion and absorption, focal adhesion, salivary secretion, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, and phenylalanine metabolism pathways are involved. Among these DEGs, the prominent top two genes (MMP11 and COL1A1) which potentially correlated with IGFBP5 were selected for validation using real time RT-qPCR. Only COL1A1 expression showed a consistent upregulation with IGFBP5 expression and COL1A1 and MMP11 were significantly positively correlated. We concluded that the discovery of coordinately expressed genes related with IGFBP5 might contribute to understanding of the molecular mechanism of the function of IGFBP5 in breast cancer. Further functional studies on DEGs and association with IGFBP5 may identify novel biomarkers for clinical applications in breast cancer.

  19. Renal medullary genes in salt-sensitive hypertension: a chromosomal substitution and cDNA microarray study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mingyu; Yuan, Baozhi; Rute, Elizabeth; Greene, Andrew S; Zou, Ai-Ping; Soares, Paulo; MCQuestion, Gregory D; Slocum, Glenn R; Jacob, Howard J; Cowley, Allen W

    2002-02-28

    Substitution of chromosome 13 from Brown Norway BN/SsNHsd/Mcw (BN/Mcw) rats into the Dahl salt-sensitive SS/JrHsd/Mcw (SS/Mcw) rats resulted in substantial reduction of blood pressure salt sensitivity in this consomic rat strain designated SSBN13. In the present study, we attempted to identify genes associated with salt-sensitive hypertension by utilizing a custom, known-gene cDNA microarray to compare the mRNA expression profiles in the renal medulla (a tissue playing a pivotal role in long-term blood pressure regulation) of SS/Mcw and SSBN13 rats on either low-salt (0.4% NaCl) or high-salt (4% NaCl, 2 wk) diets. To increase the reliability of microarray data, we designed a four-way comparison experiment incorporating several levels of replication and developed a conservative yet robust data analysis method. Using this approach, from the 1,751 genes examined (representing more than 80% of all currently known rat genes), we identified 80 as being differentially expressed in at least 1 of the 4 comparisons. Substantial agreements were found between the microarray results and the results predicted on the basis of the four-way comparison as well as the results of Northern blots of 20 randomly selected genes. Analysis of the four-way comparison further indicated that approximately 75% of the 80 differentially expressed genes were likely related to salt-sensitive hypertension. Many of these genes had not previously been recognized to be important in hypertension, whereas several genes/pathways known to be involved in hypertension were confirmed. These results should provide an informative source for designing future functional studies in salt-sensitive hypertension.

  20. cDNA Microarray Analysis of Serially Sampled Cervical Cancer Specimens From Patients Treated With Thermochemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Borkamo, Erling Dahl; Schem, Baard-Christian; Fluge, Oystein; Bruland, Ove; Dahl, Olav; Mella, Olav

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To elucidate changes in gene expression after treatment with regional thermochemoradiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Tru-Cut biopsy specimens were serially collected from 16 patients. Microarray gene expression levels before and 24 h after the first and second trimodality treatment sessions were compared. Pathway and network analyses were conducted by use of Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA; Ingenuity Systems, Redwood City, CA). Single gene expressions were analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: We detected 53 annotated genes that were differentially expressed after trimodality treatment. Central in the three top networks detected by IPA were interferon alfa, interferon beta, and interferon gamma receptor; nuclear factor kappaB; and tumor necrosis factor, respectively. These genes encode proteins that are important in regulation cell signaling, proliferation, gene expression, and immune stimulation. Biological processes over-represented among the 53 genes were fibrosis, tumorigenesis, and immune response. Conclusions: Microarrays showed minor changes in gene expression after thermochemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. We detected 53 differentially expressed genes, mainly involved in fibrosis, tumorigenesis, and immune response. A limitation with the use of serial biopsy specimens was low quality of ribonucleic acid from tumors that respond to highly effective therapy. Another 'key limitation' is timing of the post-treatment biopsy, because 24 h may be too late to adequately assess the impact of hyperthermia on gene expression.

  1. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  2. Variance component estimation for mixed model analysis of cDNA microarray data.

    PubMed

    Sarholz, Barbara; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2008-12-01

    Microarrays provide a valuable tool for the quantification of gene expression. Usually, however, there is a limited number of replicates leading to unsatisfying variance estimates in a gene-wise mixed model analysis. As thousands of genes are available, it is desirable to combine information across genes. When more than two tissue types or treatments are to be compared it might be advisable to consider the array effect as random. Then information between arrays may be recovered, which can increase accuracy in estimation. We propose a method of variance component estimation across genes for a linear mixed model with two random effects. The method may be extended to models with more than two random effects. We assume that the variance components follow a log-normal distribution. Assuming that the sums of squares from the gene-wise analysis, given the true variance components, follow a scaled chi(2)-distribution, we adopt an empirical Bayes approach. The variance components are estimated by the expectation of their posterior distribution. The new method is evaluated in a simulation study. Differentially expressed genes are more likely to be detected by tests based on these variance estimates than by tests based on gene-wise variance estimates. This effect is most visible in studies with small array numbers. Analyzing a real data set on maize endosperm the method is shown to work well. PMID:19035549

  3. Identification of Genes Associated With Progression and Metastasis of Advanced Cervical Cancers After Radiotherapy by cDNA Microarray Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Harima, Yoko; Ikeda, Koshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Shiga, Toshiko; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Motoo; Kamata, Minoru; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To identify a set of genes related to the progression and metastasis of advanced cervical cancer after radiotherapy and to establish a predictive method. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with cervical cancer (15 stage IIIB, 13 stage IVA patients) who underwent definitive radiotherapy between May 1995 and April 2001 were included in this study. All patients were positive for human papillomavirus infection and harbored the wild-type p53 gene. The expression profiles of 14 tumors with local failure and multiple distant metastasis and 14 tumors without metastasis (cancer free) obtained by punch biopsy were compared before treatment, using a cDNA microarray consisting of 23,040 human genes. Results: Sixty-three genes were selected on the basis of a clustering analysis, and the validity of these genes was confirmed using a cross-validation test. The most accurate prediction was achieved for 63 genes (sensitivity, 78.8%; specificity, 38.1%). Some of these genes were already known to be associated with metastasis via chromosomal instability (TTK, BUB1B), extracellular matrix components (matrix metalloproteinase 1 [MMP-1]), and carcinogenesis (protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 7 [PPP1R7]). A 'predictive score' system was developed that could predict the probability for development of metastases using leave-one-out cross-validation methods. Conclusions: The present results may provide valuable information for identified predictive markers and novel therapeutic target molecules for progression and metastasis of advanced cervical cancer.

  4. Immunological responses of turbot (Psetta maxima) to nodavirus infection or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC) stimulation, using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) analysis and cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung C; Osborne, Jane A; Montes, Ariana; Dios, Sonia; Nerland, Audun H; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio; Brown, Laura L; Johnson, Stewart C

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the immunological responses of turbot to nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation, we constructed cDNA libraries from liver, kidney and gill tissues of nodavirus-infected fish and examined the differential gene expression within turbot kidney in response to nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation using a turbot cDNA microarray. Turbot were experimentally infected with nodavirus and samples of each tissue were collected at selected time points post-infection. Using equal amount of total RNA at each sampling time, we made three tissue-specific cDNA libraries. After sequencing 3230 clones we obtained 3173 (98.2%) high quality sequences from our liver, kidney and gill libraries. Of these 2568 (80.9%) were identified as known genes and 605 (19.1%) as unknown genes. A total of 768 unique genes were identified. The two largest groups resulting from the classification of ESTs according to function were the cell/organism defense genes (71 uni-genes) and apoptosis-related process (23 uni-genes). Using these clones, a 1920 element cDNA microarray was constructed and used to investigate the differential gene expression within turbot in response to experimental nodavirus infection or pIC stimulation. Kidney tissue was collected at selected times post-infection (HPI) or stimulation (HPS), and total RNA was isolated for microarray analysis. Of the 1920 genes studied on the microarray, we identified a total of 121 differentially expressed genes in the kidney: 94 genes from nodavirus-infected animals and 79 genes from those stimulated with pIC. Within the nodavirus-infected fish we observed the highest number of differentially expressed genes at 24 HPI. Our results indicate that certain genes in turbot have important roles in immune responses to nodavirus infection and dsRNA stimulation.

  5. Identification of Novel Protein-Ligand Interactions by Exon Microarray Analysis of Yeast Surface Displayed cDNA Library Selection Outputs.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Yeast surface display is widely utilized to screen large libraries for proteins or protein fragments with specific binding properties. We have previously constructed and utilized yeast surface displayed human cDNA libraries to identify protein fragments that bind to various target ligands. Conventional approaches employ monoclonal screening and sequencing of polyclonal outputs that have been enriched for binding to a target molecule by several rounds of affinity-based selection. Frequently, a small number of clones will dominate the selection output, making it difficult to comprehensively identify potentially important interactions due to low representation in the selection output. We have developed a novel method to address this problem. By analyzing selection outputs using high-density human exon microarrays, the full potential of selection output diversity can be revealed in one experiment. FACS-based selection using yeast surface displayed human cDNA libraries combined with exon microarray analysis of the selection outputs is a powerful way of rapidly identifying protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including small biological molecules and drugs. In this report we present protocols for exon microarray-based analysis of yeast surface display human cDNA library selection outputs. PMID:26060075

  6. Cancer immunotherapy using novel tumor-associated antigenic peptides identified by genome-wide cDNA microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yasuharu; Tomita, Yusuke; Yuno, Akira; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Masanori

    2015-05-01

    Recent genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in comprehensive tumor types coupled with isolation of cancer tissues by laser-microbeam microdissection have revealed ideal tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) that are frequently overexpressed in various cancers including head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and lung cancer, but not in most normal tissues except for testis, placenta, and fetal organs. Preclinical studies using HLA-transgenic mice and human T cells in vitro showed that TAA-derived CTL-epitope short peptides (SPs) are highly immunogenic and induce HLA-A2 or -A24-restricted CTLs. Based on the accumulated evidence, we carried out a phase II clinical trial of the TAA-SP vaccine in advanced 37 HNSCC patients. This study showed a significant induction of TAA-specific CTLs in the majority of patients without serious adverse effects. Importantly, clinical responses including a complete response were observed in this study. Another phase II clinical trial of therapeutic TAA-SP vaccine, designed to evaluate the ability of prevention of recurrence, is ongoing in HNSCC patients who have received curative operations. Further studies in human preclinical studies and in vivo studies using HLA class I transgenic mice showed TAA-derived long peptides (TAA-LPs) have the capacity to induce not only promiscuous HLA class II-restricted CD4(+) T helper type 1 cells but also tumor-specific CTLs through a cross-presentation mechanism. Moreover, we observed an augmentation of TAA-LP-specific T helper type 1 cell responses and tumor antigen-spreading in HNSCC patients vaccinated with TAA-SPs. This accumulated evidence suggests that therapeutic TAA-SPs and LPs vaccines may provide a promising cancer immunotherapy.

  7. APPLICATION OF CDNA MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY TO IN VITRO TOXICOLOGY AND THE SELECTION OF GENES FOR A REAL TIME RT-PCR-BASED SCREEN FOR OXIDATIVE STRESS IN HEP-G2 CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large-scale analysis of gene expression using cDNA microarrays promises the
    rapid detection of the mode of toxicity for drugs and other chemicals. cDNA
    microarrays were used to examine chemically-induced alterations of gene
    expression in HepG2 cells exposed to oxidative ...

  8. Transcriptomic identification of candidate genes involved in sunflower responses to chilling and salt stresses based on cDNA microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Paula; Di Rienzo, Julio; Fernandez, Luis; Hopp, H Esteban; Paniego, Norma; Heinz, Ruth A

    2008-01-01

    Background Considering that sunflower production is expanding to arid regions, tolerance to abiotic stresses as drought, low temperatures and salinity arises as one of the main constrains nowadays. Differential organ-specific sunflower ESTs (expressed sequence tags) were previously generated by a subtractive hybridization method that included a considerable number of putative abiotic stress associated sequences. The objective of this work is to analyze concerted gene expression profiles of organ-specific ESTs by fluorescence microarray assay, in response to high sodium chloride concentration and chilling treatments with the aim to identify and follow up candidate genes for early responses to abiotic stress in sunflower. Results Abiotic-related expressed genes were the target of this characterization through a gene expression analysis using an organ-specific cDNA fluorescence microarray approach in response to high salinity and low temperatures. The experiment included three independent replicates from leaf samples. We analyzed 317 unigenes previously isolated from differential organ-specific cDNA libraries from leaf, stem and flower at R1 and R4 developmental stage. A statistical analysis based on mean comparison by ANOVA and ordination by Principal Component Analysis allowed the detection of 80 candidate genes for either salinity and/or chilling stresses. Out of them, 50 genes were up or down regulated under both stresses, supporting common regulatory mechanisms and general responses to chilling and salinity. Interestingly 15 and 12 sequences were up regulated or down regulated specifically in one stress but not in the other, respectively. These genes are potentially involved in different regulatory mechanisms including transcription/translation/protein degradation/protein folding/ROS production or ROS-scavenging. Differential gene expression patterns were confirmed by qRT-PCR for 12.5% of the microarray candidate sequences. Conclusion Eighty genes isolated from

  9. Identification of amplified and highly expressed genes in amplicons of the T-cell line huT78 detected by cDNA microarray CGH

    PubMed Central

    Meléndez, Bárbara; Martínez-Delgado, Beatriz; Cuadros, Marta; Fernández, Victoria; Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón; Benítez, Javier

    2005-01-01

    Background Conventional Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) has been widely used for detecting copy number alterations in cancer and for identifying regions containing candidate tumor responsible genes. Recently, several studies have shown the utility of cDNA microarray CGH for studing gene copy changes in various types of tumors. However, no such studies on T-cell lymphomas have been performed. To date T-cell lymphomas analyzed by the use of chromosome CGH have revealed only slight copy number alterations and not gene amplifications. Results In the present study, we describe the characterization of three amplicons of the T-cell line huT78 located at 2q34-q37, 8q23-q24 and 20p, where new amplified and overexpressed genes are found. The use of a cDNA microarray containing 7.657 transcripts allowed the identification of certain genes, such as BCLX, PCNA, FKBP1A, IGFBP2 and cMYC, that are amplified, highly expressed, and also contained in the amplicons on 20p and 2q. The expresion of these genes was analyzed in 39 T-cell lymphomas and 3 other T-cell lines. Conclusion By the use of conventional CGH and CGH and expression cDNA microarrays we defined three amplicons in the T-cell line huT78 and identified several novel gene amplifications (BCLX, PCNA, FKBP1A, IGFBP2 and cMYC). We showed that overexpression of the amplified genes could be attributable to gene dosage. We speculate that deregulation of those genes could be important in the development of T-cell lymphomas and/or in the maintenance of T-cell lines. PMID:15656903

  10. cDNA microarray analysis of gene expression in rat alveolar macrophages in response to organic extract of diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Koike, Eiko; Hirano, Seishiro; Shimojo, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2002-06-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce pulmonary diseases including asthma and chronic bronchitis. Comprehensive evaluation is required to know the effects of pollutants including DEP on these and other lung diseases. Alveolar macrophages (AM) and epithelial cells are important cellular targets for pollutants such as DEP in the lung. Alveolar macrophages encounter and phagocytose DEP in the alveolar space, and their biological responses have been implicated in DEP-induced pulmonary diseases. Expression profiles of genes induced by DEP in AM will lead to better understanding of the mechanisms involved in pulmonary diseases. To characterize the effect of the DEP extract on AM systematically, we analyzed the gene expression in AM exposed to DEP extract using the Atlas Rat Toxicology Array II. The finding in cDNA microarray was further confirmed by Northern blot analysis. AM were exposed to 10 microg/ml of DEP extract for 6 h in order to elucidate early response to DEP extract in AM. Early response to DEP extract in AM may affect the alteration of gene expression in subsequent responses so that it is important to identify the alteration in early response. In this study, the transcription of 6 genes in the cDNA microarray was significantly elevated by exposure of the AM to DEP extract. These genes were heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and -2, thioredoxin peroxidase 2 (TDPX-2), glutathione S-transferase P subunit (GST-P), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The antioxidative enzymes such as HO, TDPX-2, GST-P, and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase may play a role in the pulmonary defense against oxidative stress caused by various pollutants including DEP. PCNA may have contributed to the repair of DNA damage and to cell proliferation caused by exposure to these pollutants. Our results suggest that cDNA microarray analysis is a useful tool to investigate the biological responses to pulmonary toxicants. PMID:12011483

  11. Biomphalaria glabrata transcriptome: cDNA microarray profiling identifies resistant- and susceptible-specific gene expression in haemocytes from snail strains exposed to Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Lockyer, Anne E; Spinks, Jenny; Kane, Richard A; Hoffmann, Karl F; Fitzpatrick, Jennifer M; Rollinson, David; Noble, Leslie R; Jones, Catherine S

    2008-01-01

    Background Biomphalaria glabrata is an intermediate snail host for Schistosoma mansoni, one of the important schistosomes infecting man. B. glabrata/S. mansoni provides a useful model system for investigating the intimate interactions between host and parasite. Examining differential gene expression between S. mansoni-exposed schistosome-resistant and susceptible snail lines will identify genes and pathways that may be involved in snail defences. Results We have developed a 2053 element cDNA microarray for B. glabrata containing clones from ORESTES (Open Reading frame ESTs) libraries, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries and clones identified in previous expression studies. Snail haemocyte RNA, extracted from parasite-challenged resistant and susceptible snails, 2 to 24 h post-exposure to S. mansoni, was hybridized to the custom made cDNA microarray and 98 differentially expressed genes or gene clusters were identified, 94 resistant-associated and 4 susceptible-associated. Quantitative PCR analysis verified the cDNA microarray results for representative transcripts. Differentially expressed genes were annotated and clustered using gene ontology (GO) terminology and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. 61% of the identified differentially expressed genes have no known function including the 4 susceptible strain-specific transcripts. Resistant strain-specific expression of genes implicated in innate immunity of invertebrates was identified, including hydrolytic enzymes such as cathepsin L, a cysteine proteinase involved in lysis of phagocytosed particles; metabolic enzymes such as ornithine decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of polyamines, important in inflammation and infection processes, as well as scavenging damaging free radicals produced during production of reactive oxygen species; stress response genes such as HSP70; proteins involved in signalling, such as importin 7 and copine 1

  12. Rawcopy: Improved copy number analysis with Affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhofer, Markus; Viklund, Björn; Isaksson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Microarray data is subject to noise and systematic variation that negatively affects the resolution of copy number analysis. We describe Rawcopy, an R package for processing of Affymetrix CytoScan HD, CytoScan 750k and SNP 6.0 microarray raw intensities (CEL files). Noise characteristics of a large number of reference samples are used to estimate log ratio and B-allele frequency for total and allele-specific copy number analysis. Rawcopy achieves better signal-to-noise ratio and higher proportion of validated alterations than commonly used free and proprietary alternatives. In addition, Rawcopy visualizes each microarray sample for assessment of technical quality, patient identity and genome-wide absolute copy number states. Software and instructions are available at http://rawcopy.org. PMID:27796336

  13. Identification of differentially-expressed genes potentially implicated in drought response in pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) by suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qing-Jie; Yan, Feng-Xia; Qiao, Guang; Zhang, Bing-Xue; Wen, Xiao-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Drought is one of the most severe threats to the growth, development and yield of plant. In order to unravel the molecular basis underlying the high tolerance of pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) to drought stress, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA microarray approaches were firstly combined to identify the potential important or novel genes involved in the plant responses to drought stress. The forward (drought over drought-free) and reverse (drought-free over drought) suppression subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed using in vitro shoots of cultivar 'Zihonglong' exposed to drought stress and drought-free (control). A total of 2112 clones, among which half were from either forward or reverse SSH library, were randomly picked up to construct a pitaya cDNA microarray. Microarray analysis was carried out to verify the expression fluctuations of this set of clones upon drought treatment compared with the controls. A total of 309 expressed sequence tags (ESTs), 153 from forward library and 156 from reverse library, were obtained, and 138 unique ESTs were identified after sequencing by clustering and blast analyses, which included genes that had been previously reported as responsive to water stress as well as some functionally unknown genes. Thirty six genes were mapped to 47 KEGG pathways, including carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, and amino acid metabolism of pitaya. Expression analysis of the selected ESTs by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) corroborated the results of differential screening. Moreover, time-course expression patterns of these selected ESTs further confirmed that they were closely responsive to drought treatment. Among the differentially expressed genes (DEGs), many are related to stress tolerances including drought tolerance. Thereby, the mechanism of drought tolerance of this pitaya genotype is a very complex physiological and biochemical process, in

  14. Pneumolysin-dependent and -independent gene expression identified by cDNA microarray analysis of THP-1 human mononuclear cells stimulated by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P David; Thornton, Justin; Barker, Katherine S; McDaniel, D Olga; Sacks, Gordon S; Swiatlo, Edwin; McDaniel, Larry S

    2003-04-01

    Pneumolysin is an important virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, interacting with the membranes of host cells to elicit a multitude of inflammatory responses. We used cDNA microarrays to identify genes which are responsive to S. pneumoniae in a pneumolysin-dependent and -independent fashion. The THP-1 human monocytic cell line was coincubated for 3 h with medium alone, with the virulent type 2 S. pneumoniae strain D39, or with the isogenic strain PLN, which does not express pneumolysin. RNA was isolated from the monocytes and hybridized on cDNA microarrays. Of 4,133 genes evaluated, 142 were found to be responsive in a pneumolysin-dependent fashion, whereas 40 were found to be responsive independent of pneumolysin. Genes that were up-regulated in cells exposed to D39 relative to those exposed to PLN included genes encoding proteins such as mannose binding lectin 1, lysozyme, alpha-1 catenin, cadherin 17, caspases 4 and 6, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta), interleukin 8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP-3), IL-2 receptor beta (IL-2Rbeta), IL-15 receptor alpha (IL-15Ralpha), interferon receptor 2, and prostaglandin E synthase. Down-regulated genes included those encoding complement component receptor 2/CD21, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1). Pneumolysin-independent responses included down-regulation of the genes encoding CD68, CD53, CD24, transforming growth factor beta2, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1. These results demonstrate the striking effects of pneumolysin on the host cell upon exposure to S. pneumoniae.

  15. Application of a cDNA microarray for profiling the gene expression of Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces treated with albendazole and artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Lü, Guodong; Zhang, Wenbao; Wang, Jianhua; Xiao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Jianqin; Sun, Yimin; Zhang, Chuanshan; Wang, Junhua; Lin, Renyong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Fuchun; Wen, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Cystic echinoccocosis (CE) is a neglected zoonosis that is caused by the dog-tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. The disease is endemic worldwide. There is an urgent need for searching effective drug for the treatment of the disease. In this study, we sequenced a cDNA library constructed using RNA isolated from oncospheres, protoscoleces, cyst membrane and adult worms of E. granulosus. A total of 9065 non-redundant or unique sequences were obtained and spotted on chips as uniEST probes to profile the gene expression in protoscoleces of E. granulosus treated with the anthelmintic drugs albendazole and artemisinin, respectively. The results showed that 7 genes were up-regulated and 38 genes were down-regulated in the protoscoleces treated with albendazole. Gene analysis showed that these genes are responsible for energy metabolism, cell cycle and assembly of cell structure. We also identified 100 genes up-regulated and 6 genes down-regulated in the protoscoleces treated with artemisinin. These genes play roles in the transduction of environmental signals, and metabolism. Albendazole appeared its drug efficacy in damaging cell structure, while artemisinin was observed to increase the formation of the heterochromatin in protoscolex cells. Our results highlight the utility of using cDNA microarray methods to detect gene expression profiles of E. granulosus and, in particular, to understand the pharmacologic mechanism of anti-echinococcosis drugs.

  16. Analytical approach for selecting normalizing genes from a cDNA microarray platform to be used in q-RT-PCR assays: a cnidarian case study.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio; Phillips, Wendy S; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Weis, Virginia M

    2008-04-24

    Research in gene function using Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR (q-RT-PCR) and microarray approaches are emerging and just about to explode in the field of coral and cnidarian biology. These approaches are showing the great potential to significantly advance our understanding of how corals respond to abiotic and biotic stresses, and how host cnidarians/dinoflagellates symbioses are maintained and regulated. With these genomic advances, however, new analytical challenges are also emerging, such as the normalization of gene expression data derived from q-RT-PCR. In this study, an effective analytical method is introduced to identify candidate housekeeping genes (HKG) from a sea anemone (Anthopleura elegantissima) cDNA microarray platform that can be used as internal control genes to normalize q-RT-PCR gene expression data. It is shown that the identified HKGs were stable among the experimental conditions tested in this study. The three most stables genes identified, in term of gene expression, were beta-actin, ribosomal protein L12, and a Poly(a) binding protein. The applications of these HKGs in other cnidarian systems are further discussed. PMID:17913235

  17. Identification of proteasome subunit beta type 2 associated with deltamethrin detoxification in Drosophila Kc cells by cDNA microarray analysis and bioassay analyses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Jiao, Dongxu; Xu, Qin; Ying, Xiaoli; Liu, Wei; Chi, Qingping; Ye, Yuting; Li, Xueyu; Cheng, Luogen

    2016-05-10

    Insecticide deltamethrin resistance has presented a difficult obstacle for pest control and the resistance development is complex and associated with many genes. To better understand the possible molecular mechanisms involved in DM stress, in this study, cDNA microarray analysis was employed. 448 differentially expressed genes with at least a 2-fold expression difference were identified in Drosophila cells after DM exposure. Moreover, some genes were confirmed with qPCR, which yielded results consistent with the microarray analysis. Three members of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were significantly elevated in DM-stressed cells, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may play an important role in DM detoxification. The proteasome beta2 subunit (Prosbeta2) is a member of 20S proteasome subunit family, which forms the proteolytic core of 26S proteasome. Whether Prosbeta2 participates in DM detoxification requires further study. RNAi and heterologous expression were conducted to investigate the contribution of Prosbeta2 in DM detoxification. The results revealed Prosbeta2 knockdown significantly reduce the level of DM detoxification in RNAi-treated cells after 48 h. Overexpression of Prosbeta2 increased cellular viability. These detoxification results represent the first evidence that Prosbeta2 plays a role in the detoxification of DM, which may provide new idea and target for studying the molecular mechanisms of insect resistance.

  18. Screening of genes related to sulfide metabolism in Urechis unicinctus (Echiura, Urechidae) using suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoli; Shao, Mingyu; Zhang, Litao; Ma, Yubin; Zhang, Zhifeng

    2012-09-01

    Exogenous sulfide can generally induce metabolic injuries in most organisms and even cause death. However, organisms inhabiting intertidal zones, hydrothermal vents, and cold seeps, can tolerate, metabolize, and utilize sulfide. In this study, both suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray analysis were employed to screen sulfide metabolism-related genes from the body wall in echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus, a marine sediment species. A total of 3456 monoclones were isolated and 82 were identified as differentially expressed genes in worms exposed to 50 μM sulfide for 24 h, compared to controls. The identified genes encoded proteins with multiple processes, including metabolism, cellular process, biological regulation, response to stimulus, multicellular organismal process, localization, development, and cellular component organization. Eight genes, serase, vacuolar protein, src tyrosine kinase, sulfide oxidase-like oxidoreductase, aprataxin, SN-RNP, aminopeptidase, and predicted protein, were selected to verify expression in the worm using qRT-PCR. The agreement of gene expression evaluation was 62.5% between the results of microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. These new data will provide clues for further probing of the molecular mechanism of sulfide metabolism. PMID:22591583

  19. Comparative transcript profiling of gene expression between seedless Ponkan mandarin and its seedy wild type during floral organ development by suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Seedlessness is an important agronomic trait for citrus, and male sterility (MS) is one main cause of seedless citrus fruit. However, the molecular mechanism of citrus seedlessness remained not well explored. Results An integrative strategy combining suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library with cDNA microarray was employed to study the underlying mechanism of seedlessness of a Ponkan mandarin seedless mutant (Citrus reticulata Blanco). Screening with custom microarray, a total of 279 differentially expressed clones were identified, and 133 unigenes (43 contigs and 90 singletons) were obtained after sequencing. Gene Ontology (GO) distribution based on biological process suggested that the majority of differential genes are involved in metabolic process and respond to stimulus and regulation of biology process; based on molecular function they function as DNA/RNA binding or have catalytic activity and oxidoreductase activity. A gene encoding male sterility-like protein was highly up-regulated in the seedless mutant compared with the wild type, while several transcription factors (TFs) such as AP2/EREBP, MYB, WRKY, NAC and C2C2-GATA zinc-finger domain TFs were down-regulated. Conclusion Our research highlighted some candidate pathways that participated in the citrus male gametophyte development and could be beneficial for seedless citrus breeding in the future. PMID:22897898

  20. A microarray method for identifying tumor antigens by screening a tumor cDNA expression library against cancer sera

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, Kurt; Sykes, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The immune system responds to tumor cells. The challenge has been how to effectively use these responses to treat or protect against cancer. Toward the goal of developing a cancer vaccine, we are pursuing methodologies for the discovery and testing of useful antigens. We present an array-based approach for discovering these B cell antigens by directly screening for specific host-sera reactivity to lysates from tumor-derived cDNA expression libraries. Several cancer-specific antigens were identified, and these are currently being validated as potential candidates. PMID:23851590

  1. Transcription profiles of boron-deficiency-responsive genes in citrus rootstock root by suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gao-Feng; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Sheng, Ou; Wei, Qing-Jiang; Yang, Cheng-Quan; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2015-01-01

    Boron (B) deficiency has seriously negative effect on citrus production. Carrizo citrange (CC) has been reported as a B-deficiency tolerant rootstock. However, the molecular mechanism of its B-deficiency tolerance remained not well-explored. To understand the molecular basis of citrus rootstock to B-deficiency, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and microarray approaches were combined to identify the potential important or novel genes responsive to B-deficiency. Firstly four SSH libraries were constructed for the root tissue of two citrus rootstocks CC and Trifoliate orange (TO) to compare B-deficiency treated and non-treated plants. Then 7680 clones from these SSH libraries were used to construct a cDNA array and microarray analysis was carried out to verify the expression changes of these clones upon B-deficiency treatment at various time points compared to the corresponding controls. A total of 139 unigenes that were differentially expressed upon B-deficiency stress either in CC or TO were identified from microarray analysis, some of these genes have not previously been reported to be associated with B-deficiency stress. In this work, several genes involved in cell wall metabolism and transmembrane transport were identified to be highly regulated under B-deficiency stress, and a total of 23 metabolic pathways were affected by B-deficiency, especially the lignin biosynthesis pathway, nitrogen metabolism, and glycolytic pathway. All these results indicated that CC was more tolerant than TO to B-deficiency stress. The B-deficiency responsive genes identified in this study could provide further information for understanding the mechanisms of B-deficiency tolerance in citrus. PMID:25674093

  2. Transcription profiles of boron-deficiency-responsive genes in citrus rootstock root by suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gao-Feng; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Sheng, Ou; Wei, Qing-Jiang; Yang, Cheng-Quan; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2014-01-01

    Boron (B) deficiency has seriously negative effect on citrus production. Carrizo citrange (CC) has been reported as a B-deficiency tolerant rootstock. However, the molecular mechanism of its B-deficiency tolerance remained not well-explored. To understand the molecular basis of citrus rootstock to B-deficiency, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and microarray approaches were combined to identify the potential important or novel genes responsive to B-deficiency. Firstly four SSH libraries were constructed for the root tissue of two citrus rootstocks CC and Trifoliate orange (TO) to compare B-deficiency treated and non-treated plants. Then 7680 clones from these SSH libraries were used to construct a cDNA array and microarray analysis was carried out to verify the expression changes of these clones upon B-deficiency treatment at various time points compared to the corresponding controls. A total of 139 unigenes that were differentially expressed upon B-deficiency stress either in CC or TO were identified from microarray analysis, some of these genes have not previously been reported to be associated with B-deficiency stress. In this work, several genes involved in cell wall metabolism and transmembrane transport were identified to be highly regulated under B-deficiency stress, and a total of 23 metabolic pathways were affected by B-deficiency, especially the lignin biosynthesis pathway, nitrogen metabolism, and glycolytic pathway. All these results indicated that CC was more tolerant than TO to B-deficiency stress. The B-deficiency responsive genes identified in this study could provide further information for understanding the mechanisms of B-deficiency tolerance in citrus.

  3. Profiling Ethylene-Responsive Genes Expressed in the Latex of the Mature Virgin Rubber Trees Using cDNA Microarray.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhiyi; Kang, Guijuan; Duan, Cuifang; Li, Yu; Dai, Longjun; Zeng, Rizhong

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene is commonly used as a latex stimulant of Hevea brasiliensis by application of ethephon (chloro-2-ethylphosphonic acid); however, the molecular mechanism by which ethylene increases latex production is not clear. To better understand the effects of ethylene stimulation on the laticiferous cells of rubber trees, a latex expressed sequence tag (EST)-based complementary DNA microarray containing 2,973 unique genes (probes) was first developed and used to analyze the gene expression changes in the latex of the mature virgin rubber trees after ethephon treatment at three different time-points: 8, 24 and 48 h. Transcript levels of 163 genes were significantly altered with fold-change values ≥ 2 or ≤ -2 (q-value < 0.05) in ethephon-treated rubber trees compared with control trees. Of the 163 genes, 92 were up-regulated and 71 down-regulated. The microarray results were further confirmed using real-time quantitative reverse transcript-PCR for 20 selected genes. The 163 ethylene-responsive genes were involved in several biological processes including organic substance metabolism, cellular metabolism, primary metabolism, biosynthetic process, cellular response to stimulus and stress. The presented data suggest that the laticifer water circulation, production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species, sugar metabolism, and assembly and depolymerization of the latex actin cytoskeleton might play important roles in ethylene-induced increase of latex production. The results may provide useful insights into understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of ethylene on latex metabolism of H. brasiliensis.

  4. cDNA microarray reveals the alterations of cytoskeleton-related genes in osteoblast under high magneto-gravitational environment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Airong; Di, Shengmeng; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Tian, Zongcheng; Li, Jingbao; Hu, Lifang; Yang, Pengfei; Yin, Dachuan; Shang, Peng

    2009-07-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has been widely applied in many fields. In this study, a special designed superconducting magnet, which can produce three apparent gravity levels (0, 1, and 2 g), namely high magneto-gravitational environment (HMGE), was used to simulate space gravity environment. The effects of HMGE on osteoblast gene expression profile were investigated by microarray. Genes sensitive to diamagnetic levitation environment (0 g), gravity changes, and high magnetic field changes were sorted on the basis of typical cell functions. Cytoskeleton, as an intracellular load-bearing structure, plays an important role in gravity perception. Therefore, 13 cytoskeleton-related genes were chosen according to the results of microarray analysis, and the expressions of these genes were found to be altered under HMGE by real-time PCR. Based on the PCR results, the expressions of WASF2 (WAS protein family, member 2), WIPF1 (WAS/WASL interacting protein family, member 1), paxillin, and talin 1 were further identified by western blot assay. Results indicated that WASF2 and WIPF1 were more sensitive to altered gravity levels, and talin 1 and paxillin were sensitive to both magnetic field and gravity changes. Our findings demonstrated that HMGE can affect osteoblast gene expression profile and cytoskeleton-related genes expression. The identification of mechanosensitive genes may enhance our understandings to the mechanism of bone loss induced by microgravity and may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis.

  5. Profiling Ethylene-Responsive Genes Expressed in the Latex of the Mature Virgin Rubber Trees Using cDNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Zhiyi; Kang, Guijuan; Duan, Cuifang; Li, Yu; Dai, Longjun; Zeng, Rizhong

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene is commonly used as a latex stimulant of Hevea brasiliensis by application of ethephon (chloro-2-ethylphosphonic acid); however, the molecular mechanism by which ethylene increases latex production is not clear. To better understand the effects of ethylene stimulation on the laticiferous cells of rubber trees, a latex expressed sequence tag (EST)-based complementary DNA microarray containing 2,973 unique genes (probes) was first developed and used to analyze the gene expression changes in the latex of the mature virgin rubber trees after ethephon treatment at three different time-points: 8, 24 and 48 h. Transcript levels of 163 genes were significantly altered with fold-change values ≥ 2 or ≤ –2 (q-value < 0.05) in ethephon-treated rubber trees compared with control trees. Of the 163 genes, 92 were up-regulated and 71 down-regulated. The microarray results were further confirmed using real-time quantitative reverse transcript-PCR for 20 selected genes. The 163 ethylene-responsive genes were involved in several biological processes including organic substance metabolism, cellular metabolism, primary metabolism, biosynthetic process, cellular response to stimulus and stress. The presented data suggest that the laticifer water circulation, production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species, sugar metabolism, and assembly and depolymerization of the latex actin cytoskeleton might play important roles in ethylene-induced increase of latex production. The results may provide useful insights into understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of ethylene on latex metabolism of H. brasiliensis. PMID:26985821

  6. cDNA microarray reveals the alterations of cytoskeleton-related genes in osteoblast under high magneto-gravitational environment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Airong; Di, Shengmeng; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Tian, Zongcheng; Li, Jingbao; Hu, Lifang; Yang, Pengfei; Yin, Dachuan; Shang, Peng

    2009-07-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has been widely applied in many fields. In this study, a special designed superconducting magnet, which can produce three apparent gravity levels (0, 1, and 2 g), namely high magneto-gravitational environment (HMGE), was used to simulate space gravity environment. The effects of HMGE on osteoblast gene expression profile were investigated by microarray. Genes sensitive to diamagnetic levitation environment (0 g), gravity changes, and high magnetic field changes were sorted on the basis of typical cell functions. Cytoskeleton, as an intracellular load-bearing structure, plays an important role in gravity perception. Therefore, 13 cytoskeleton-related genes were chosen according to the results of microarray analysis, and the expressions of these genes were found to be altered under HMGE by real-time PCR. Based on the PCR results, the expressions of WASF2 (WAS protein family, member 2), WIPF1 (WAS/WASL interacting protein family, member 1), paxillin, and talin 1 were further identified by western blot assay. Results indicated that WASF2 and WIPF1 were more sensitive to altered gravity levels, and talin 1 and paxillin were sensitive to both magnetic field and gravity changes. Our findings demonstrated that HMGE can affect osteoblast gene expression profile and cytoskeleton-related genes expression. The identification of mechanosensitive genes may enhance our understandings to the mechanism of bone loss induced by microgravity and may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis. PMID:19578720

  7. Profiling Ethylene-Responsive Genes Expressed in the Latex of the Mature Virgin Rubber Trees Using cDNA Microarray.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhiyi; Kang, Guijuan; Duan, Cuifang; Li, Yu; Dai, Longjun; Zeng, Rizhong

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene is commonly used as a latex stimulant of Hevea brasiliensis by application of ethephon (chloro-2-ethylphosphonic acid); however, the molecular mechanism by which ethylene increases latex production is not clear. To better understand the effects of ethylene stimulation on the laticiferous cells of rubber trees, a latex expressed sequence tag (EST)-based complementary DNA microarray containing 2,973 unique genes (probes) was first developed and used to analyze the gene expression changes in the latex of the mature virgin rubber trees after ethephon treatment at three different time-points: 8, 24 and 48 h. Transcript levels of 163 genes were significantly altered with fold-change values ≥ 2 or ≤ -2 (q-value < 0.05) in ethephon-treated rubber trees compared with control trees. Of the 163 genes, 92 were up-regulated and 71 down-regulated. The microarray results were further confirmed using real-time quantitative reverse transcript-PCR for 20 selected genes. The 163 ethylene-responsive genes were involved in several biological processes including organic substance metabolism, cellular metabolism, primary metabolism, biosynthetic process, cellular response to stimulus and stress. The presented data suggest that the laticifer water circulation, production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species, sugar metabolism, and assembly and depolymerization of the latex actin cytoskeleton might play important roles in ethylene-induced increase of latex production. The results may provide useful insights into understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of ethylene on latex metabolism of H. brasiliensis. PMID:26985821

  8. Expression profiling of synovial sarcoma by cDNA microarrays: association of ERBB2, IGFBP2, and ELF3 with epithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Allander, Susanne V; Illei, Peter B; Chen, Yidong; Antonescu, Cristina R; Bittner, Mike; Ladanyi, Marc; Meltzer, Paul S

    2002-11-01

    Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive spindle cell sarcoma with two major histological subtypes, biphasic and monophasic, defined respectively by the presence or absence of areas of glandular epithelial differentiation. It is characterized by a specific chromosomal translocation, t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2), which juxtaposes the SYT gene on chromosome 18 to either the SSX1 or the SSX2 gene on chromosome X. The chimeric SYT-SSX products are thought to function as transcriptional proteins that deregulate gene expression, thereby providing a putative oncogenic stimulus. We investigated the pattern of gene expression in synovial sarcoma using cDNA microarrays containing 6548 sequence-verified human cDNAs. A tissue microarray containing 37 synovial sarcoma samples verified to bear the SYT-SSX fusion was constructed for complementary analyses. Gene expression analyses were performed on individual tumor samples; 14 synovial sarcomas, 4 malignant fibrous histiocytomas, and 1 fibrosarcoma. Statistical analysis showed a distinct expression profile for the group of synovial sarcomas as compared to the other soft tissue sarcomas, which included variably high expression of ERBB2, IGFBP2, and IGF2 in the synovial sarcomas. Immunohistochemical analysis of protein expression in tissue microarrays of 37 synovial sarcomas demonstrated strong expression of ERBB2 and IGFBP2 in the glandular epithelial component of biphasic tumors and in solid epithelioid areas of some monophasic tumors. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated that the ERBB2 overexpression was not because of gene amplification. Differentially expressed genes were also found in a comparison of the expression profiles of the biphasic and monophasic histological subgroups of synovial sarcoma, notably several keratin genes, and ELF3, an epithelial-specific transcription factor gene. Finally, we also noted differential overexpression of several neural- or neuroectodermal-associated genes in synovial sarcomas relative to

  9. Gene Organization in Rice Revealed by Full-Length cDNA Mapping and Gene Expression Analysis through Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Kouji; Doi, Koji; Nagata, Toshifumi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Kohji; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Kawai, Jun; Nakamura, Mari; Hirozane-Kishikawa, Tomoko; Kanagawa, Saeko; Arakawa, Takahiro; Takahashi-Iida, Juri; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Ninomiya, Noriko; Sasaki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Shiro; Tagami, Michihira; Yamagata, Harumi; Kurita, Kanako; Kamiya, Kozue; Yamamoto, Mayu; Kikuta, Ari; Bito, Takahito; Fujitsuka, Nahoko; Ito, Kazue; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Choi, Il-Ryong; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Murakami, Kazuo; Matsubara, Ken-ichi; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2007-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a model organism for the functional genomics of monocotyledonous plants since the genome size is considerably smaller than those of other monocotyledonous plants. Although highly accurate genome sequences of indica and japonica rice are available, additional resources such as full-length complementary DNA (FL-cDNA) sequences are also indispensable for comprehensive analyses of gene structure and function. We cross-referenced 28.5K individual loci in the rice genome defined by mapping of 578K FL-cDNA clones with the 56K loci predicted in the TIGR genome assembly. Based on the annotation status and the presence of corresponding cDNA clones, genes were classified into 23K annotated expressed (AE) genes, 33K annotated non-expressed (ANE) genes, and 5.5K non-annotated expressed (NAE) genes. We developed a 60mer oligo-array for analysis of gene expression from each locus. Analysis of gene structures and expression levels revealed that the general features of gene structure and expression of NAE and ANE genes were considerably different from those of AE genes. The results also suggested that the cloning efficiency of rice FL-cDNA is associated with the transcription activity of the corresponding genetic locus, although other factors may also have an effect. Comparison of the coverage of FL-cDNA among gene families suggested that FL-cDNA from genes encoding rice- or eukaryote-specific domains, and those involved in regulatory functions were difficult to produce in bacterial cells. Collectively, these results indicate that rice genes can be divided into distinct groups based on transcription activity and gene structure, and that the coverage bias of FL-cDNA clones exists due to the incompatibility of certain eukaryotic genes in bacteria. PMID:18043742

  10. Using probe secondary structure information to enhance Affymetrix GeneChip background estimates

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Fodor, Anthony A.; Gibas, Cynthia J.

    2007-01-01

    High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are a primary research tool for assessing global gene expression. Background noise on microarrays comprises a significant portion of the measured raw data. A number of statistical techniques have been developed to correct for this background noise. Here, we demonstrate that probe minimum folding energy and structure can be used to enhance a previously existing model for background noise correction. We estimate that probe secondary structure accounts for up to 3% of all variation on Affymetrix microarrays. PMID:17387043

  11. Genes associated with heavy metal tolerance and accumulation in Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri: a genomic survey with cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Huai-Chih; Lo, Jing-Chi; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2006-11-01

    To survive in variable soil conditions, plants possess homeostatic mechanisms to maintain a suitable concentration of essential heavy metal ions. Certain plants, inhabiting heavy metal-enriched or -contaminated soil, thus are named hyperaccumulators. Studying hyperaccumulators has great potential to provide information for phytoremediation. To better understand the hyperaccumulating mechanism, we used an Arabidopsis cDNA microarray to compare the gene expression of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and a nonhyperaccumulator, Arabidopsis thaliana. By analyzing the expression of metal-chelators, antioxidation-related genes, and transporters, we revealed a few novel molecular features. We found that metallothionein 2b and 3, APX and MDAR4 in the ascorbate-glutathione pathway, and certain metal transporters in P(1B)-type ATPase, ZIP, Nramp, and CDF families, are expressed at higher levels in A. halleri than in A. thaliana. We further validated that the enzymatic activity of ascorbate peroxidase and class III peroxidases are highly elevated in A. halleri. This observation positively correlates with the higher ability of A. halleri to detoxify H2O2 produced by cadmium and paraquat treatments. We thus suggest that higher peroxidase activities contribute to the heavy metal tolerance in A. halleri by alleviating the ROS damage. We have revealed genes that could be candidates for the future engineering of plants with large biomass for use in phytoremediation. PMID:17144312

  12. Fungal transcript pattern during the preinfection stage (12 h) of ectomycorrhiza formed between Pisolithus tinctorius and Castanea sativa roots, identified using cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Acioli-Santos, Bartolomeu; Sebastiana, Mónica; Pessoa, Fernando; Sousa, Lisete; Figueiredo, Andreia; Fortes, Ana Margarida; Baldé, Aladje; Maia, Leonor C; Pais, Maria S

    2008-12-01

    Transcriptional changes in Pisolithus tinctorius leading to ectomycorrhizal formation in P. tinctorius- Castanea sativa were investigated using a 12-h fungal interaction in vitro system. Using a 3107-cDNA clone microarray, 34 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were found to be differentially expressed. These ESTs represent 14 known genes, 5 upregulated and 9 downregulated, and 20 orphan sequences. Some transcripts of upregulated genes (with unknown function) were previously identified in other mycorrhizal Pisolithus spp. associations. ESTs for S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase and several orphan sequences were identified in our system. The identified transcript of downregulated genes involved hydrophobins, 5S, 18S, and 28S ribosomal RNA genes, large subunits of ribosomal RNA (mitochondrial gene), and two types of heat shock proteins. This study demonstrates the high complexity of molecular events involved in the preinfection steps and suggests the utilization of different fungal gene repertories before ectomycorrhizal formation. These data constitute a first contribution for the molecular understanding of early signaling events between P. tinctorius and C. sativa roots during ectomycorrhizal formation.

  13. Identification of genes differentially expressed in a newly isolated human metastasizing esophageal cancer cell line, T.Tn-AT1, by cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Hitoshi; Furihata, Tadashi; Omotehara, Fumie; Sakai, Taro; Horiuchi, Hideki; Shinagawa, Yasuhiro; Imura, Johji; Ohkura, Yasuo; Tachibana, Masatsugu; Kubota, Keiichi; Terano, Akira; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2003-08-01

    We isolated a metastasizing human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line, T.Tn-AT1, from a parental non-metastasizing cell line, T.Tn, by in vitro selection and by use of a nude mouse orthotopic inoculation model. Then, we compared the expression profiles of 9206 genes in T.Tn-AT1 and T.Tn by cDNA microarray analysis. The gene expression profiles of T.Tn and T.Tn-AT1 were very similar, and only 34 genes showed more than 3-fold differential expression. Among the 34 genes, 29 genes were down-regulated and only 5 genes were up-regulated in T.Tn-AT1 cells. Subsequently, we confirmed the expression levels of 14 of the 34 genes in T.Tn and T.Tn-AT1 cells by means of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The expression of 8 genes (KAL1, HPGD, NDN, REG1A, CXCR4, SPOCK, DIAPH2 and AIF1) was down-regulated and that of one gene (VNN2) was up-regulated in T.Tn-AT1 cells. These 9 genes encoded proteins associated with metastatic processes, such as adhesion, migration, inflammation, proliferation, and differentiation. Thus, these genes might regulate the metastasis of esophageal SCC, and could be predictive markers for lymph node metastasis of esophageal SCC. PMID:12901795

  14. Genetic basis of phenotypic plasticity for predator-induced morphological defenses in anuran tadpole, Rana pirica, using cDNA subtraction and microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tsukasa; Hiraka, Ikuei; Kurata, Youichi; Kawachi, Hiroko; Kishida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kinya

    2005-05-20

    Anuran tadpoles (Rana pirica) are induced to develop a higher tail and a bulgy body as predator-specific morphological responses when they are exposed to predatory larval salamanders. Subtractive hybridization was performed using induced tadpole body skin and normal tadpoles' body skin. A total of 196 clones showed higher expression, and 104 clones showed lower expression, when they formed bulgy bodies. In the subtraction, carboxypeptidase B, trypsinogen, elastase I, fibrinogen, elastase II, triacyl-glycerol lipase, and alpha1-antitrypsin genes showed lower expression. In contrast, RT-like protein, bullous pemphigoid antigen, phosphoserine aminotransferase, uromodulin, tetranectin, chaperonin-like protein, zinc finger protein, osteonectin, aldehyde dehydrogenase, Sec 23A protein, and ribosomal protein showed higher gene expression. Microarray analysis was also performed using this subtracted cDNA (nine replicates). Results of the microarray data essentially corresponded with those of the subtraction data, and the degree of the suppressed genes was much stronger than that of the expressed genes. Carboxypeptidase B showed the strongest suppression, and its inhibition range was from 1/100 to 3/100 compared with that of control body skin. Strong suppression was also observed with trypsinogen, elastase I, fibrinogen, and elastase II as well. These results can be interpreted as increases of fibrinolysis by strong depression of both carboxypeptidase B and other genes simultaneously, resulting in the retention of blood vessels and facilitating the circulation of blood. Expression was observed in phosphoserine aminotransferase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, RT-related protein, chaperonin-like protein, tetranectin, bullous pemphigoid antigen, uromodulin, and Sec 23A protein. They were significantly (p<0.05) increased and were at least 1.5 times greater compared with the control. From the appearance, it seems that the bulgy shaped body is highly connecting to the bullous pemphigoid

  15. Application of cDNA microarray to the study of arsenic-induced liver diseases in the population of Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, T; Liu, J; LeCluyse, E L; Zhou, Y S; Cheng, M L; Waalkes, M P

    2001-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant and a human carcinogen. Epidemiology studies link human arsenic exposure to various diseases and cancers, including liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the molecular mechanisms for arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity are poorly understood. To better understand these mechanisms, we used the human cancer cDNA expression array to profile aberrant gene expression in arsenic-exposed populations in Guizhou, China. The selected patients had a history of exposure to environmental arsenic for at least 6-10 years, and had arsenic-induced skin lesions and hepatomegaly. Samples were obtained by liver needle biopsy. Histology showed degenerative liver lesions, such as chronic inflammation, vacuolation, and focal necrosis. The University of North Carolina Hospitals provided normal human liver tissues from surgical resection or rejected transplants. Microarray was performed with total RNA from liver samples, and signal intensities were analyzed with AtlasImage software and normalized with 9 housekeeping genes. Means and SEM were calculated for statistical analysis. Approximately 60 genes (10%) were differentially expressed in arsenic-exposed human livers compared to controls. The differentially expressed genes included those involved in cell-cycle regulation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, and intermediate filaments. The observed gene alterations appear to be reflective of hepatic degenerative lesions seen in the arsenic-exposed patients. This array analysis revealed important patterns of aberrant gene expression occurring with arsenic exposure in human livers. Aberrant expressions of several genes were consistent with the results of array analysis of chronic arsenic-exposed mouse livers and chronic arsenic-transformed rat liver cells. Clearly, a variety of gene expression changes may play an integral role in arsenic hepatotoxicity and possibly carcinogenesis.

  16. Synergistic Effect of Combinatorial Treatment with Curcumin and Mitomycin C on the Induction of Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cells: A cDNA Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qian-Mei; Chen, Qi-Long; Du, Jia; Wang, Xiu-Feng; Lu, Yi-Yu; Zhang, Hui; Su, Shi-Bing

    2014-01-01

    In order to explore the synergistic mechanisms of combinatorial treatment using curcumin and mitomycin C (MMC) for breast cancer, MCF-7 breast cancer xenografts were conducted to observe the synergistic effect of combinatorial treatment using curcumin and MMC at various dosages. The synergistic mechanisms of combinatorial treatment using curcumin and MMC on the inhibition of tumor growth were explored by differential gene expression profile, gene ontology (GO), ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) and Signal–Net network analysis. The expression levels of selected genes identified by cDNA microarray expression profiling were validated by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Effect of combinatorial treatment on the inhibition of cell growth was observed by MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric analysis and Hoechst 33258 staining. The combinatorial treatment of 100 mg/kg curcumin and 1.5 mg/kg MMC revealed synergistic inhibition on tumor growth. Among 1501 differentially expressed genes, the expression of 25 genes exhibited an obvious change and a significant difference in 27 signal pathways was observed (p < 0.05). In addition, Mapk1 (ERK) and Mapk14 (MAPK p38) had more cross-interactions with other genes and revealed an increase in expression by 8.14- and 11.84-fold, respectively during the combinatorial treatment by curcumin and MMC when compared with the control. Moreover, curcumin can synergistically improve tumoricidal effect of MMC in another human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Apoptosis was significantly induced by the combinatorial treatment (p < 0.05) and significantly inhibited by ERK inhibitor (PD98059) in MCF-7 cells (p < 0.05). The synergistic effect of combinatorial treatment by curcumin and MMC on the induction of apoptosis in breast cancer cells may be via the ERK pathway. PMID:25226537

  17. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Davis Austin

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons), 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)

  18. MADS+: discovery of differential splicing events from Affymetrix exon junction array data

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Warzecha, Claude C.; Carstens, Russ P.; Xing, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: The Affymetrix Human Exon Junction Array is a newly designed high-density exon-sensitive microarray for global analysis of alternative splicing. Contrary to the Affymetrix exon 1.0 array, which only contains four probes per exon and no probes for exon–exon junctions, this new junction array averages eight probes per probeset targeting all exons and exon–exon junctions observed in the human mRNA/EST transcripts, representing a significant increase in the probe density for alternative splicing events. Here, we present MADS+, a computational pipeline to detect differential splicing events from the Affymetrix exon junction array data. For each alternative splicing event, MADS+ evaluates the signals of probes targeting competing transcript isoforms to identify exons or splice sites with different levels of transcript inclusion between two sample groups. MADS+ is used routinely in our analysis of Affymetrix exon junction arrays and has a high accuracy in detecting differential splicing events. For example, in a study of the novel epithelial-specific splicing regulator ESRP1, MADS+ detects hundreds of exons whose inclusion levels are dependent on ESRP1, with a RT-PCR validation rate of 88.5% (153 validated out of 173 tested). Availability: MADS+ scripts, documentations and annotation files are available at http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/Labs/Xing/MADSplus/. Contact: yi-xing@uiowa.edu PMID:19933160

  19. COMPARISON OF TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESONSES FROM AVIAN GUT TISSUES AFTER EIMERIA ACERVULINA AND E. MAXIMA INFECTIONS USING cDNA MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the host response during pathogen infection will extend our knowledge of pathogenesis and enhance the development of novel preventive methodologies against important infectious diseases. Microarray technology is a powerful tool to analyze host transcriptional responses. Coccidiosis re...

  20. Comparison of Comparative Genomic Hybridization Technologies across Microarray Platforms

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the 2007 Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) project, we analyzed HL-60 DNA with five platforms: Agilent, Affymetrix 500K, Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0, Illumina, and RPCI 19K BAC arrays. Copy number variation (CNV) was analyzed ...

  1. COMPARISON OF TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSES FROM AVIAN GUT TISSUES AFTER E. ACERVULINA AND E. MAXIMA INFECTIONS USING cDNA MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the host response during pathogen infection will extend our knowledge of pathogenesis and enhance the development of novel preventive methodologies against important infectious diseases. In the current study, we developed 9.6K avian intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte cDNA microarra...

  2. Monitoring expression profiles of rice genes under cold, drought, and high-salinity stresses and abscisic acid application using cDNA microarray and RNA gel-blot analyses.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, M Ashiq; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Abe, Hiroshi; Khan, M Ayub; Katsura, Koji; Ito, Yusuke; Yoshiwara, Kyoko; Seki, Motoaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2003-12-01

    To identify cold-, drought-, high-salinity-, and/or abscisic acid (ABA)-inducible genes in rice (Oryza sativa), we prepared a rice cDNA microarray including about 1700 independent cDNAs derived from cDNA libraries prepared from drought-, cold-, and high-salinity-treated rice plants. We confirmed stress-inducible expression of the candidate genes selected by microarray analysis using RNA gel-blot analysis and finally identified a total of 73 genes as stress inducible including 58 novel unreported genes in rice. Among them, 36, 62, 57, and 43 genes were induced by cold, drought, high salinity, and ABA, respectively. We observed a strong association in the expression of stress-responsive genes and found 15 genes that responded to all four treatments. Venn diagram analysis revealed greater cross talk between signaling pathways for drought, ABA, and high-salinity stresses than between signaling pathways for cold and ABA stresses or cold and high-salinity stresses in rice. The rice genome database search enabled us not only to identify possible known cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of several stress-inducible genes but also to expect the existence of novel cis-acting elements involved in stress-responsive gene expression in rice stress-inducible promoters. Comparative analysis of Arabidopsis and rice showed that among the 73 stress-inducible rice genes, 51 already have been reported in Arabidopsis with similar function or gene name. Transcriptome analysis revealed novel stress-inducible genes, suggesting some differences between Arabidopsis and rice in their response to stress.

  3. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons),more » 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)« less

  4. Functional study of Capsicum annuum fatty acid desaturase 1 cDNA clone induced by Tobacco mosaic virus via microarray and virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jeong; Lim, Jee Hyuck; Lee, Sanghyeob; Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Soo Bok; Lee, Min Kyung; Choi, Doil; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2007-10-26

    A series of microarray analyses employing the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of hot pepper was conducted in an effort to elucidate the molecular mechanisms inherent to hypersensitive response (HR) by viral or bacterial pathogens. There were 2535 ESTs exhibiting differential expression (over 2-fold changes) among about 5000 ESTs during viral or bacterial response. Further, via virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and TMV-infection studies, we were able to isolate several ESTs, which may be relevant to defense response against TMV. Of these ESTs, Capsicum annuum fatty acid desaturase 1 (CaFAD1) showed the distinct phenotype against TMV infection and thus was subjected to further study. CaFAD1-silenced plants showed weaker resistance against TMV-P0 infection compared to TRV2 control plants. Also the suppression of FAD1 expression caused blocking of cell death induced by Bcl2-associated X (Bax) protein in tobacco plants. Therefore, this report presents that both microarray and VIGS approaches are feasible in hot pepper plants and the TMV-induced CaFAD1 plays a role in HR response.

  5. Quality Visualization of Microarray Datasets Using Circos

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Martin; Wiese, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Quality control and normalization is considered the most important step in the analysis of microarray data. At present there are various methods available for quality assessments of microarray datasets. However there seems to be no standard visualization routine, which also depicts individual microarray quality. Here we present a convenient method for visualizing the results of standard quality control tests using Circos plots. In these plots various quality measurements are drawn in a circular fashion, thus allowing for visualization of the quality and all outliers of each distinct array within a microarray dataset. The proposed method is intended for use with the Affymetrix Human Genome platform (i.e., GPL 96, GPL570 and GPL571). Circos quality measurement plots are a convenient way for the initial quality estimate of Affymetrix datasets that are stored in publicly available databases.

  6. Improvements to previous algorithms to predict gene structure and isoform concentrations using Affymetrix Exon arrays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Exon arrays provide a way to measure the expression of different isoforms of genes in an organism. Most of the procedures to deal with these arrays are focused on gene expression or on exon expression. Although the only biological analytes that can be properly assigned a concentration are transcripts, there are very few algorithms that focus on them. The reason is that previously developed summarization methods do not work well if applied to transcripts. In addition, gene structure prediction, i.e., the correspondence between probes and novel isoforms, is a field which is still unexplored. Results We have modified and adapted a previous algorithm to take advantage of the special characteristics of the Affymetrix exon arrays. The structure and concentration of transcripts -some of them possibly unknown- in microarray experiments were predicted using this algorithm. Simulations showed that the suggested modifications improved both specificity (SP) and sensitivity (ST) of the predictions. The algorithm was also applied to different real datasets showing its effectiveness and the concordance with PCR validated results. Conclusions The proposed algorithm shows a substantial improvement in the performance over the previous version. This improvement is mainly due to the exploitation of the redundancy of the Affymetrix exon arrays. An R-Package of SPACE with the updated algorithms have been developed and is freely available. PMID:21110835

  7. Evaluation of the Affymetrix CytoScan® Dx Assay for Developmental Delay

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Bryn D.; Scharf, Rebecca J.; Spear, Emily A.; Edelmann, Lisa J.; Stroustrup, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The goal of molecular cytogenetic testing for children presenting with developmental delay is to identify or exclude genetic abnormalities that are associated with cognitive, behavioral, and/or motor symptoms. Until 2010, chromosome analysis was the standard first-line genetic screening test for evaluation of patients with developmental delay when a specific syndrome was not suspected. In 2010, The American College of Medical Genetics and several other groups recommended chromosomal microarray (CMA) as the first-line test in children with developmental delays, multiple congenital anomalies, and/or autism. This test is able to detect regions of genomic imbalances at a much finer resolution than G-banded karyotyping. Until recently, no CMA testing had been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This review will focus on the use of the Affymetrix CytoScan® Dx Assay, the first CMA to receive FDA approval for the genetic evaluation of individuals with developmental delay. PMID:25350348

  8. Clinical and microarray analysis of breast cancers of all subtypes from two prospective preoperative chemotherapy studies

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, H S; Koizumi, F; Hirakawa, A; Nakatochi, M; Komori, O; Hashimoto, J; Kodaira, M; Yunokawa, M; Yamamoto, H; Yonemori, K; Shimizu, C; Fujiwara, Y; Tamura, K

    2016-01-01

    Background: We aimed to analyse clinical and gene expression profiles to predict pathologic complete response and disease-free survival using two consecutive, prospective, preoperative chemotherapy trial cohorts. Methods: Clinicopathological and gene expression data were evaluated in a cohort from two consecutive phase II preoperative studies that included patients with stage IIA–IIIC breast cancer of all subtypes. Analysed specimens were obtained before preoperative chemotherapy, and cDNA microarray analyses were performed using the Affymetrix Gene Chip U133 plus 2.0. Results: Between December 2005 and December 2010, 122 patients were analysed. The pathologic complete response rate was significantly higher in HER2+ and HR−/HER2− cancers. Age, pathologic complete response, HR−/HER2− status, and lymph node positivity (⩾4) were significant poor prognostic factors for disease-free survival. For the cDNA microarray analyses, sufficient tumour samples were available from 78 of the 107 patients (73%). An 8-gene signature predictive of pathologic complete response and a 17-gene signature predictive of prognosis were identified. Patients were categorised into low-risk (n=45) and high-risk groups (n=33) (HR 70.0, P=0.004). Conclusions: This study yielded preliminary data on the expression of specific genes predicting pathologic complete response and disease-free survival in a cohort of chemonaïve breast cancer patients. Further validation may distinguish those who would benefit most from perioperative chemotherapy as well as those needing further intervention. PMID:27415010

  9. High-throughput protein expression analysis using tissue microarray technology of a large well-characterised series identifies biologically distinct classes of breast cancer confirming recent cDNA expression analyses.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Rehim, Dalia M; Ball, Graham; Pinder, Sarah E; Rakha, Emad; Paish, Claire; Robertson, John F R; Macmillan, Douglas; Blamey, Roger W; Ellis, Ian O

    2005-09-01

    Recent studies on gene molecular profiling using cDNA microarray in a relatively small series of breast cancer have identified biologically distinct groups with apparent clinical and prognostic relevance. The validation of such new taxonomies should be confirmed on larger series of cases prior to acceptance in clinical practice. The development of tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides methodology for high-throughput concomitant analyses of multiple proteins on large numbers of archival tumour samples. In our study, we have used immunohistochemistry techniques applied to TMA preparations of 1,076 cases of invasive breast cancer to study the combined protein expression profiles of a large panel of well-characterized commercially available biomarkers related to epithelial cell lineage, differentiation, hormone and growth factor receptors and gene products known to be altered in some forms of breast cancer. Using hierarchical clustering methodology, 5 groups with distinct patterns of protein expression were identified. A sixth group of only 4 cases was also identified but deemed too small for further detailed assessment. Further analysis of these clusters was performed using multiple layer perceptron (MLP)-artificial neural network (ANN) with a back propagation algorithm to identify key biomarkers driving the membership of each group. We have identified 2 large groups by their expression of luminal epithelial cell phenotypic characteristics, hormone receptors positivity, absence of basal epithelial phenotype characteristics and lack of c-erbB-2 protein overexpression. Two additional groups were characterized by high c-erbB-2 positivity and negative or weak hormone receptors expression but showed differences in MUC1 and E-cadherin expression. The final group was characterized by strong basal epithelial characteristics, p53 positivity, absent hormone receptors and weak to low luminal epithelial cytokeratin expression. In addition, we have identified significant

  10. Application of cDNA microarray technology to in vitro toxicology and the selection of genes for a real-time RT-PCR-based screen for oxidative stress in Hep-G2 cells.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kevin T; Ni, Hong; Brown, H Roger; Yoon, Lawrence; Qualls, Charles W; Crosby, Lynn M; Reynolds, Randall; Gaskill, Betty; Anderson, Steven P; Kepler, Thomas B; Brainard, Tracy; Liv, Nik; Easton, Marilyn; Merrill, Christine; Creech, Don; Sprenger, Dirk; Conner, Gary; Johnson, Paul R; Fox, Tony; Sartor, Maureen; Richard, Erika; Kuruvilla, Sabu; Casey, Warren; Benavides, Gina

    2002-01-01

    Large-scale analysis of gene expression using cDNA microarrays promises the rapid detection of the mode of toxicity for drugs and other chemicals. cDNA microarrays were used to examine chemically induced alterations of gene expression in HepG2 cells exposed to a diverse group of toxicants at an equitoxic exposure concentration. The treatments were ouabain (43 microM), lauryl sulfate (260 microM), dimethylsulfoxide (1.28 M), cycloheximide (62.5 microM), tolbutamide (12.8 mM), sodium fluoride (3 mM), diethyl maleate (1.25 mM), buthionine sulfoximine (30 mM), potassium bromate (2.5 mM), sodium selenite (30 microM), alloxan (130 mM), adriamycin (40 microM), hydrogen peroxide (4 mM), and heat stress (45 degrees C x 30 minutes). Patterns of gene expression were correlated with morphologic and biochemical indicators of toxicity. Gene expression responses were characteristically different for each treatment. Patterns of expression were consistent with cell cycle arrest, DNA damage, diminished protein synthesis, and oxidative stress. Based upon these results, we concluded that gene expression changes provide a useful indicator of oxidative stress, as assessed by the GSH:GSSG ratio. Under the conditions of this cell culture test system, oxidative stress upregulated 5 genes, HMOX1, p21(waf1/cip1), GCLM, GR, TXNR1 while downregulating CYP1A1 and TOPO2A. Primers and probes for these genes were incorporated into the design of a 7-gene plate for RT-PCR. The plate design permitted statistical analysis and allowed clear discrimination between chemicals inducing oxidative vs nonoxidative stress. A simple oxidative stress score (0-1), based on the responses by the 7 genes (including p-value) on the RT-PCR plate, was correlated with the GSH:GSSG ratio using linear regression and ranking (Pearson product) procedures. These analyses yielded correlation coefficients of 0.74 and 0.87, respectively, for the treatments tested (when 1 outlier was excluded), indicating a good correlation

  11. In vitro antioxidant and antigenotoxic potentials of myricetin-3-o-galactoside and myricetin-3-o-rhamnoside from Myrtus communis: modulation of expression of genes involved in cell defence system using cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Hayder, Nawel; Bouhlel, Ines; Skandrani, Ines; Kadri, Malika; Steiman, Régine; Guiraud, Pascale; Mariotte, Anne-Marie; Ghedira, Kamel; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Geneviève; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2008-04-01

    Antioxidant activity of myricetin-3-o-galactoside and myricetin-3-o-rhamnoside, isolated from the leaves of Myrtus communis, was determined by the ability of each compound to inhibit xanthine oxidase activity, lipid peroxidation and to scavenge the free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl. Antimutagenic activity was assessed using the SOS chromotest and the Comet assay. The IC50 values of lipid peroxidation by myricetin-3-o-galactoside and myricetin-3-o-rhamnoside are respectively 160 microg/ml and 220 microg/ml. At a concentration of 100 microg/ml, the two compounds showed the most potent inhibitory effect of xanthine oxidase activity by respectively, 57% and 59%. Myricetin-3-o-rhamnoside was a very potent radical scavenger with an IC50 value of 1.4 microg/ml. Moreover, these two compounds induced an inhibitory activity against nifuroxazide, aflatoxine B1 and H2O2 induced mutagenicity. The protective effect exhibited by these molecules was also determined by analysis of gene expression as response to an oxidative stress using a cDNA micro-array. Myricetin-3-o-galactoside and myricetin-3-o-rhamnoside modulated the expression patterns of cellular genes involved in oxidative stress, respectively (GPX1, TXN, AOE372, SEPW1, SHC1) and (TXNRD1, TXN, SOD1 AOE372, SEPW1), in DNA damaging repair, respectively (XPC, LIG4, RPA3, PCNA, DDIT3, POLD1, XRCC5, MPG) and (TDG, PCNA, LIG4, XRCC5, DDIT3, MSH2, ERCC5, RPA3, POLD1), and in apoptosis (PARP). PMID:18222061

  12. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  13. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO). However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually annotated functions. In addition, there is no tool that facilitates microarray researchers to directly retrieve functional annotations for their datasets from the annotated arrays. This costs researchers amount of time in searching multiple GO databases for functional information. Results We have improved the breadth of functional annotations of the gene products associated with probesets on the Affymetrix chicken genome array by 45% and the quality of annotation by 14%. We have also identified the most significant diseases and disorders, different types of genes, and known drug targets represented on Affymetrix chicken genome array. To facilitate functional annotation of other arrays and microarray experimental datasets we developed an Array GO Mapper (AGOM) tool to help researchers to quickly retrieve corresponding functional information for their dataset. Conclusion Results from this study will directly facilitate annotation of other chicken arrays and microarray experimental datasets. Researchers will be able to quickly model their microarray dataset into more reliable biological functional information by using AGOM tool. The disease, disorders, gene types and drug targets revealed in the study will allow researchers to learn more about how genes function in complex biological systems and may lead to new drug discovery and development of therapies. The GO annotation data generated will be available for public use via AgBase website and will be updated on regular

  14. DMET-Analyzer: automatic analysis of Affymetrix DMET Data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical Bioinformatics is currently growing and is based on the integration of clinical and omics data aiming at the development of personalized medicine. Thus the introduction of novel technologies able to investigate the relationship among clinical states and biological machineries may help the development of this field. For instance the Affymetrix DMET platform (drug metabolism enzymes and transporters) is able to study the relationship among the variation of the genome of patients and drug metabolism, detecting SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) on genes related to drug metabolism. This may allow for instance to find genetic variants in patients which present different drug responses, in pharmacogenomics and clinical studies. Despite this, there is currently a lack in the development of open-source algorithms and tools for the analysis of DMET data. Existing software tools for DMET data generally allow only the preprocessing of binary data (e.g. the DMET-Console provided by Affymetrix) and simple data analysis operations, but do not allow to test the association of the presence of SNPs with the response to drugs. Results We developed DMET-Analyzer a tool for the automatic association analysis among the variation of the patient genomes and the clinical conditions of patients, i.e. the different response to drugs. The proposed system allows: (i) to automatize the workflow of analysis of DMET-SNP data avoiding the use of multiple tools; (ii) the automatic annotation of DMET-SNP data and the search in existing databases of SNPs (e.g. dbSNP), (iii) the association of SNP with pathway through the search in PharmaGKB, a major knowledge base for pharmacogenomic studies. DMET-Analyzer has a simple graphical user interface that allows users (doctors/biologists) to upload and analyse DMET files produced by Affymetrix DMET-Console in an interactive way. The effectiveness and easy use of DMET Analyzer is demonstrated through different case studies regarding

  15. ChIP-on-chip analysis methods for Affymetrix tiling arrays.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Sean J

    2015-01-01

    Although the ChIP-sequencing has gained significant attraction recently, ChIP analysis using microarrays is still an attractive option due to the low cost, ease of analysis, and access to legacy and public data sets. The analysis of ChIP-Chip data entails a multistep approach that requires several different applications to progress from the initial stages of raw data analysis to the identification and characterization of ChIP binding sites. There are multiple approaches to data analysis and there are several applications available for each stage of the analysis pipeline. Each application must be evaluated for its suitability for the particular experiment as well as the investigator's background with computational tools. This chapter is a review of the commonly available applications for Affymetrix ChIP-Chip data analysis, as well as the general workflow of a ChIP-Chip analysis approach. The purpose of the chapter is to allow the researcher to better select the appropriate applications and provide them with the direction necessary to proceed with a ChIP-Chip analysis.

  16. inSilicoDb: an R/Bioconductor package for accessing human Affymetrix expert-curated datasets from GEO.

    PubMed

    Taminau, Jonatan; Steenhoff, David; Coletta, Alain; Meganck, Stijn; Lazar, Cosmin; de Schaetzen, Virginie; Duque, Robin; Molter, Colin; Bersini, Hugues; Nowé, Ann; Weiss Solís, David Y

    2011-11-15

    Microarray technology has become an integral part of biomedical research and increasing amounts of datasets become available through public repositories. However, re-use of these datasets is severely hindered by unstructured, missing or incorrect biological samples information; as well as the wide variety of preprocessing methods in use. The inSilicoDb R/Bioconductor package is a command-line front-end to the InSilico DB, a web-based database currently containing 86 104 expert-curated human Affymetrix expression profiles compiled from 1937 GEO repository series. The use of this package builds on the Bioconductor project's focus on reproducibility by enabling a clear workflow in which not only analysis, but also the retrieval of verified data is supported.

  17. cDNA microarray analysis of the effect of cantharidin on DNA damage, cell cycle and apoptosis-associated gene expression in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yu, Chien-Chih; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Yu, Chun-Shu; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-07-01

    Cantharidin (CTD) induces cytotoxic effects in different types of human cancer cell; however, to date, there have been no studies on the effects of CTD on gene expression in human lung cancer cells and the potential associated signaling pathways. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate how CTD affects the expression of key genes and functional pathways of human H460 lung cancer cells using complementary DNA microarray analysis. Human H460 lung cancer cells were cultured for 24 h in the presence or absence of 10 µM CTD; gene expression was then examined using microarray analysis. The results indicated that 8 genes were upregulated > 4-fold, 29 genes were upregulated >3-4-fold and 156 genes were upregulated >2-3-fold. In addition, 1 gene was downregulated >4 fold, 14 genes were downregulated >3-4-fold and 150 genes were downregulated >2-3 fold in H460 cells following exposure to CTD. It was found that CTD affected DNA damage genes, including DNIT3 and GADD45A, which were upregulated 2.26- and 2.60-fold, respectively, as well as DdiT4, which was downregulated 3.14-fold. In addition, the expression of genes associated with the cell cycle progression were altered, including CCND2, CDKL3 and RASA4, which were upregulated 2.72-, 2.19- and 2.72-fold, respectively; however, CDC42EP3 was downregulated 2.16-fold. Furthermore, apoptosis-associated genes were differentially expressed, including CARD6, which was upregulated 3.54-fold. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that CTD affected the expression of genes associated with DNA damage, cell cycle progression and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer H460 cells.

  18. The Genopolis Microarray Database

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Andrea; Brandizi, Marco; Even, Gael; Beretta, Ottavio; Pavelka, Norman; Pelizzola, Mattia; Mayhaus, Manuel; Foti, Maria; Mauri, Giancarlo; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression databases are key resources for microarray data management and analysis and the importance of a proper annotation of their content is well understood. Public repositories as well as microarray database systems that can be implemented by single laboratories exist. However, there is not yet a tool that can easily support a collaborative environment where different users with different rights of access to data can interact to define a common highly coherent content. The scope of the Genopolis database is to provide a resource that allows different groups performing microarray experiments related to a common subject to create a common coherent knowledge base and to analyse it. The Genopolis database has been implemented as a dedicated system for the scientific community studying dendritic and macrophage cells functions and host-parasite interactions. Results The Genopolis Database system allows the community to build an object based MIAME compliant annotation of their experiments and to store images, raw and processed data from the Affymetrix GeneChip® platform. It supports dynamical definition of controlled vocabularies and provides automated and supervised steps to control the coherence of data and annotations. It allows a precise control of the visibility of the database content to different sub groups in the community and facilitates exports of its content to public repositories. It provides an interactive users interface for data analysis: this allows users to visualize data matrices based on functional lists and sample characterization, and to navigate to other data matrices defined by similarity of expression values as well as functional characterizations of genes involved. A collaborative environment is also provided for the definition and sharing of functional annotation by users. Conclusion The Genopolis Database supports a community in building a common coherent knowledge base and analyse it. This fills a gap between a local

  19. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  20. Ethanol extract of Hedyotis diffusa willd upregulates G0/G1 phase arrest and induces apoptosis in human leukemia cells by modulating caspase cascade signaling and altering associated genes expression was assayed by cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yu-Jui; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Su-Yin; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-09-01

    The authors' previous study has shown that water extract of Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW) promoted immune response and exhibited anti-leukemic activity in BALB/c leukemic mice in vivo. In this study, the anti-proliferation effects of ethanol extract of H. diffusa Willd (EEHDW) on lung cancer cell lines (A549, H1355, and LLC), leukemia cell lines (HL-60, WEHI-3), and a mouse melanoma cell line (B16F10) in vitro were investigated. The results demonstrated that EEHDW suppressed the cell proliferation of A549, H1355, HL-60, WEHI-3, and B16F10 cells as well as reduced cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. We found that EEHDW inhibited the cell proliferation of HL-60 cells in concentration-dependent manner. In addition, EEHDW triggered an arrest of HL-60 cells at G0/G1 phase and sub-G1 population (apoptotic cells). EEHDW provoked DNA condensation and DNA damage in HL-60 cells. The activities of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 were elevated in EEHDW-treated HL-60 cells. DNA microarray to investigate and display the gene levels related to cell growth, signal transduction, apoptosis, cell adhesion, cell cycle, DNA damage and repair, transcription and translation was also used. These findings suggest that EEHDW may be a potential herbal medicine and therapeutic agent for the treatment of leukemia.

  1. Identification of SNPs and INDELS in swine transcribed sequences using short oligonucleotide microarrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide detection of single feature polymorphisms (SFP) in swine using transcriptome profiling of day 25 placental RNA by contrasting probe intensities from either Meishan or an occidental composite breed with Affymetrix porcine microarrays is presented. A linear mixed model analysis was used to...

  2. Anticancer activity and cDNA microarray studies of a (RS)-1,2,3,5-tetrahydro-4,1-benzoxazepine-3-yl]-6-chloro-9H-purine, and an acyclic (RS)-O,N-acetalic 6-chloro-7H-purine.

    PubMed

    Caba, Octavio; Díaz-Gavilán, Mónica; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando; Boulaiz, Houria; Aránega, Antonia; Gallo, Miguel A; Marchal, Juan A; Campos, Joaquín M

    2011-09-01

    Completing a SAR study, a series of (RS)-6-substituted-7- or 9-(1,2,3,5-tetrahydro-4,1-benzoxazepine-3-yl)-7H or 9H-purines was previously prepared. The most potent antiproliferative agent against the MCF-7 adenocarcinoma cell line that belongs to the benzoxazepine O,N-acetalic family is (RS)-9-[1-(9H-fluorenyl-9-methoxycarbonyl)-1,2,3,5-tetrahydro-4,1-benzoxazepine-3-yl]-6-chloro-9H-purine (16, IC(50) = 0.67 ± 0.18 μM), whilst (RS)-7-{2-(N-hydroxymethylphenyl)-2-nitrobenzenesulfonamido]-1-methoxyethyl}-6-chloro-7H-purine (37) shows the lowest IC(50) value between the family of acyclic O,N-acetals (IC(50) = 3.25 ± 0.23 μM). Moreover, 16 showed the better in vitro Therapeutic Index in breast cell lines (3.19), whilst 37 was found to be 3.69-fold more active against HT-29 human colon cancer cell line than versus IEC-6 normal rat intestinal epithelial cell line. The global apoptotic cells caused by 16 and 37 against MCF-7 were 80.08% and 54.85% of cell population after 48 h, respectively. cDNA microarray technology reveals potential drug targets, which are mainly centred on positive apoptosis regulatory pathway genes, and the repression of genes involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation and tumour invasion.

  3. Tissue Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dancau, Ana-Maria; Simon, Ronald; Mirlacher, Martina; Sauter, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Modern next-generation sequencing and microarray technologies allow for the simultaneous analysis of all human genes on the DNA, RNA, miRNA, and methylation RNA level. Studies using such techniques have lead to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. The validation of all of these candidate genes requires in situ analysis of high numbers of clinical tissues samples. The tissue microarray technology greatly facilitates such analysis. In this method minute tissue samples (typically 0.6 mm in diameter) from up to 1000 different tissues can be analyzed on one microscope glass slide. All in situ methods suitable for histological studies can be applied to TMAs without major changes of protocols, including immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or RNA in situ hybridization. Because all tissues are analyzed simultaneously with the same batch of reagents, TMA studies provide an unprecedented degree of standardization, speed, and cost efficiency.

  4. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  5. Microarray Analysis of Human Liver Cells irradiated by 80MeV/u Carbon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Tian, Xiaoling; Kong, Fuquan; Li, Qiang; Jin, Xiaodong; Dai, Zhongying; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Mingjian; Zhao, Kui

    Objective Biological effect of heavy ion beam has the important significance for cancer therapy and space exploring owing its high LET and RBE, low OER, especially forming Bragg spike at the end of the tracks of charged particles. More serious damage for cells are induced by heavy ions and difficult repair than other irradiation such as X-ray and ν-ray . To explore the molecular mechanism of biological effect caused by heavy ionizing radiation (HIR) and to construct the gene expression profile database of HIR-induced human liver cells L02 by microarray analysis. Methods In this study, L02 cells were irradiated by 80MeV/u carbon ions at 5 Gy delivered by HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou) at room temperature. Total RNAs of cells incubated 6 hours and 24hours after irradiation were extracted with Trizol. Unirradiated cells were used as a control. RNAs were transcripted into cDNA by reverse transcription and labelled with cy5-dCTP and cy3-dCTP respectively. A human genome oligonucleotide set consisting of 5 amino acid-modified 70-mer probes and representing 21,329 well-characterized Homo sapiens genes was selected for microarray analysis and printed on amino-silaned glass slides. Arrays were fabricated using an OmniGrid microarrayer. Only genes whose alteration tendency was consistent in both microarrays were selected as differentially expressed genes. The Affymetrix's short oligonucleotide (25-mer) HG U133A 2.0 array analyses were performed per the manufacturer's instructions. Results Of the 21,329 genes tested, 37 genes showed changes in expression level with ratio higher than 2.0 and lower than 0.5 at 6hrs after irradiation. There were 19 genes showing up-regulation in radiated L02 cells, whereas 18 genes showing down-regulation; At 24hrs after irradiation, 269 genes showed changes in expression level with ratio higher than 2.0 and lower than 0.5. There were 67 genes showing up-regulation in radiated L02 cells, whereas 202 genes showing down

  6. Comparison of L1000 and Affymetrix Microarray for In Vitro Concentration-Response Gene Expression Profiling (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in high-throughput screening technologies and in vitro systems have opened doors for cost-efficient evaluation of chemical effects on a diversity of biological endpoints. However, toxicogenomics platforms remain too costly to evaluate large libraries of chemicals in conc...

  7. Assessing Agreement between miRNA Microarray Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Niccolò P.; Ambrogi, Federico; Biganzoli, Elia M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, miRNA microarray platforms have provided great insights into the biological mechanisms underlying the onset and development of several diseases. However, only a few studies have evaluated the concordance between different microarray platforms using methods that took into account measurement error in the data. In this work, we propose the use of a modified version of the Bland–Altman plot to assess agreement between microarray platforms. To this aim, two samples, one renal tumor cell line and a pool of 20 different human normal tissues, were profiled using three different miRNA platforms (Affymetrix, Agilent, Illumina) on triplicate arrays. Intra-platform reliability was assessed by calculating pair-wise concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) between technical replicates and overall concordance correlation coefficient (OCCC) with bootstrap percentile confidence intervals, which revealed moderate-to-good repeatability of all platforms for both samples. Modified Bland–Altman analysis revealed good patterns of concordance for Agilent and Illumina, whereas Affymetrix showed poor-to-moderate agreement for both samples considered. The proposed method is useful to assess agreement between array platforms by modifying the original Bland–Altman plot to let it account for measurement error and bias correction and can be used to assess patterns of concordance between other kinds of arrays other than miRNA microarrays.

  8. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Jun; Heo, Jin Yeong; Kim, Hi Chul; Kim, Jin Yeop; Liuzzi, Michel; Soloveva, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  9. MOLECULAR METHODS (E.G., MICROARRAYS) APPLIED TO PLANT GENOMES FOR ASSESSING GENETIC CHANGE AND ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a technical document that presents a detailed sample standard operating procedure (S.O.P.) for preparing plant nucleic acid samples for microarray analyses using commercial ¿chips¿ such as those sold by Affymetrix. It also presents the application of a commercially availa...

  10. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  11. Aptamer Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Angel-Syrett, Heather; Collett, Jim; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-02

    In vitro selection can yield specific, high-affinity aptamers. We and others have devised methods for the automated selection of aptamers, and have begun to use these reagents for the construction of arrays. Arrayed aptamers have proven to be almost as sensitive as their solution phase counterparts, and when ganged together can provide both specific and general diagnostic signals for proteins and other analytes. We describe here technical details regarding the production and processing of aptamer microarrays, including blocking, washing, drying, and scanning. We will also discuss the challenges involved in developing standardized and reproducible methods for binding and quantitating protein targets. While signals from fluorescent analytes or sandwiches are typically captured, it has proven possible for immobilized aptamers to be uniquely coupled to amplification methods not available to protein reagents, thus allowing for protein-binding signals to be greatly amplified. Into the future, many of the biosensor methods described in this book can potentially be adapted to array formats, thus further expanding the utility of and applications for aptamer arrays.

  12. An imputation approach for oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Lu, Qing; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2013-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are commonly adopted for detecting and qualifying the abundance of molecules in biological samples. Analysis of microarray data starts with recording and interpreting hybridization signals from CEL images. However, many CEL images may be blemished by noises from various sources, observed as "bright spots", "dark clouds", and "shadowy circles", etc. It is crucial that these image defects are correctly identified and properly processed. Existing approaches mainly focus on detecting defect areas and removing affected intensities. In this article, we propose to use a mixed effect model for imputing the affected intensities. The proposed imputation procedure is a single-array-based approach which does not require any biological replicate or between-array normalization. We further examine its performance by using Affymetrix high-density SNP arrays. The results show that this imputation procedure significantly reduces genotyping error rates. We also discuss the necessary adjustments for its potential extension to other oligonucleotide microarrays, such as gene expression profiling. The R source code for the implementation of approach is freely available upon request.

  13. Integrating data from heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms.

    PubMed

    Valente, Eduardo; Rocha, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays are one of the most used technologies for gene expression measurement. However, there are several distinct microarray platforms, from different manufacturers, each with its own measurement protocol, resulting in data that can hardly be compared or directly integrated. Data integration from multiple sources aims to improve the assertiveness of statistical tests, reducing the data dimensionality problem. The integration of heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms comprehends a set of tasks that range from the re-annotation of the features used on gene expression, to data normalization and batch effect elimination. In this work, a complete methodology for gene expression data integration and application is proposed, which comprehends a transcript-based re-annotation process and several methods for batch effect attenuation. The integrated data will be used to select the best feature set and learning algorithm for a brain tumor classification case study. The integration will consider data from heterogeneous Agilent and Affymetrix platforms, collected from public gene expression databases, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus. PMID:26673932

  14. A microarray analysis of two distinct lymphatic endothelial cell populations.

    PubMed

    Schweighofer, Bernhard; Rohringer, Sabrina; Pröll, Johannes; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    We have recently identified lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) to form two morphologically different populations, exhibiting significantly different surface protein expression levels of podoplanin, a major surface marker for this cell type. In vitro shockwave treatment (IVSWT) of LECs resulted in enrichment of the podoplanin(high) cell population and was accompanied by markedly increased cell proliferation, as well as 2D and 3D migration. Gene expression profiles of these distinct populations were established using Affymetrix microarray analyses. Here we provide additional details about our dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE62510) and describe how we analyzed the data to identify differently expressed genes in these two LEC populations.

  15. AMDA 2.13: A major update for automated cross-platform microarray data analysis.

    PubMed

    Kapetis, Dimos; Clarelli, Ferdinando; Vitulli, Federico; de Rosbo, Nicole Kerlero; Beretta, Ottavio; Foti, Maria; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Zolezzi, Francesca

    2012-07-01

    Microarray platforms require analytical pipelines with modules for data pre-processing including data normalization, statistical analysis for identification of differentially expressed genes, cluster analysis, and functional annotation. We previously developed the Automated Microarray Data Analysis (AMDA, version 2.3.5) pipeline to process Affymetrix 3' IVT GeneChips. The availability of newer technologies that demand open-source tools for microarray data analysis has impelled us to develop an updated multi-platform version, AMDA 2.13. It includes additional quality control metrics, annotation-driven (annotation grade of Affymetrix NetAffx) and signal-driven (Inter-Quartile Range) gene filtering, and approaches to experimental design. To enhance understanding of biological data, differentially expressed genes have been mapped into KEGG pathways. Finally, a more stable and user-friendly interface was designed to integrate the requirements for different platforms. AMDA 2.13 allows the analysis of Affymetrix (cartridges and plates) and whole transcript probe design (Gene 1.0/1.1 ST and Exon 1.0 ST GeneChips), Illumina Bead Arrays, and one-channel Agilent 4×44 arrays. Relative to early versions, it supports various experimental designs and delivers more insightful biological understanding and up-to-date annotations.

  16. Transcriptional analysis of the innate immune response using the avian innate immunity microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The avian innate immunity microarray (AIIM) is a genomics tool designed to study the transcriptional activity of the avian immune response (Cytogenet. Genome Res. 117:139-145, 2007). It is an avian cDNA microarray representing 4,959 avian genes spotted in triplicate. The AIIM contains 25 avian int...

  17. Study on the antiendotoxin action of Pulsatillae Decoction using an Affymetrix rat genome array.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiyi; Chen, Xi; Lin, Hong; Hu, Yuanliang; Mu, Xiang

    2009-01-01

    A high-throughput and efficient Affymetrix rat genome array was used to investigate the pharmacological mechanism of the traditional Chinese medicine, Pulsatillae Decoction (PD), used for the treatment of diseases induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Rat intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (RIMECs) were challenged with 1mug/ml LPS for 3h, and then treated with PD at a concentration of 1mg/ml for 24h. Total RNA from each treatment group was extracted from cultured RIMECs for detection by the Affymetrix Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array. The results showed that 36 genes were upregulated and 33 genes were downregulated in the LPS group vs. the blank control group; 566 genes were upregulated and 12 genes were downregulated in the PD-treated group vs. the LPS group; and 93 genes were upregulated and 29 genes were downregulated in the PD-treated group vs. the blank control group. The analysis of these data suggested that PD specifically and effectively reduce damage induced by LPS, and improved physiological and biochemical responses to counteract the effects of LPS.

  18. ACNE: a summarization method to estimate allele-specific copy numbers for Affymetrix SNP arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Estevez, Maria; Bengtsson, Henrik; Rubio, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Current algorithms for estimating DNA copy numbers (CNs) borrow concepts from gene expression analysis methods. However, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays have special characteristics that, if taken into account, can improve the overall performance. For example, cross hybridization between alleles occurs in SNP probe pairs. In addition, most of the current CN methods are focused on total CNs, while it has been shown that allele-specific CNs are of paramount importance for some studies. Therefore, we have developed a summarization method that estimates high-quality allele-specific CNs. Results: The proposed method estimates the allele-specific DNA CNs for all Affymetrix SNP arrays dealing directly with the cross hybridization between probes within SNP probesets. This algorithm outperforms (or at least it performs as well as) other state-of-the-art algorithms for computing DNA CNs. It better discerns an aberration from a normal state and it also gives more precise allele-specific CNs. Availability: The method is available in the open-source R package ACNE, which also includes an add on to the aroma.affymetrix framework (http://www.aroma-project.org/). Contact: arubio@ceit.es Supplementaruy information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20529889

  19. Microarrays, Integrated Analytical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combinatorial chemistry is used to find materials that form sensor microarrays. This book discusses the fundamentals, and then proceeds to the many applications of microarrays, from measuring gene expression (DNA microarrays) to protein-protein interactions, peptide chemistry, carbodhydrate chemistry, electrochemical detection, and microfluidics.

  20. Benchmarking the CATMA Microarray. A Novel Tool forArabidopsis Transcriptome Analysis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Allemeersch, Joke; Durinck, Steffen; Vanderhaeghen, Rudy; Alard, Philippe; Maes, Ruth; Seeuws, Kurt; Bogaert, Tom; Coddens, Kathleen; Deschouwer, Kirsten; Van Hummelen, Paul; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Moreau, Yves; Kwekkeboom, Jeroen; Wijfjes, André H.M.; May, Sean; Beynon, Jim; Hilson, Pierre; Kuiper, Martin T.R.

    2005-01-01

    Transcript profiling is crucial to study biological systems, and various platforms have been implemented to survey mRNAs at the genome scale. We have assessed the performance of the CATMA microarray designed for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transcriptome analysis and compared it with the Agilent and Affymetrix commercial platforms. The CATMA array consists of gene-specific sequence tags of 150 to 500 bp, the Agilent (Arabidopsis 2) array of 60mer oligonucleotides, and the Affymetrix gene chip (ATH1) of 25mer oligonucleotide sets. We have matched each probe repertoire with the Arabidopsis genome annotation (The Institute for Genomic Research release 5.0) and determined the correspondence between them. Array performance was analyzed by hybridization with labeled targets derived from eight RNA samples made of shoot total RNA spiked with a calibrated series of 14 control transcripts. CATMA arrays showed the largest dynamic range extending over three to four logs. Agilent and Affymetrix arrays displayed a narrower range, presumably because signal saturation occurred for transcripts at concentrations beyond 1,000 copies per cell. Sensitivity was comparable for all three platforms. For Affymetrix GeneChip data, the RMA software package outperformed Microarray Suite 5.0 for all investigated criteria, confirming that the information provided by the mismatch oligonucleotides has no added value. In addition, taking advantage of replicates in our dataset, we conducted a robust statistical analysis of the platform propensity to yield false positive and false negative differentially expressed genes, and all gave satisfactory results. The results establish the CATMA array as a mature alternative to the Affymetrix and Agilent platforms. PMID:15710687

  1. Manufacturing of microarrays.

    PubMed

    Petersen, David W; Kawasaki, Ernest S

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has become a powerful tool in the arsenal of the molecular biologist. Capitalizing on high precision robotics and the wealth of DNA sequences annotated from the genomes of a large number of organisms, the manufacture of microarrays is now possible for the average academic laboratory with the funds and motivation. Microarray production requires attention to both biological and physical resources, including DNA libraries, robotics, and qualified personnel. While the fabrication of microarrays is a very labor-intensive process, production of quality microarrays individually tailored on a project-by-project basis will help researchers shed light on future scientific questions.

  2. Global Expression Patterns of Three Festuca Species Exposed to Different Doses of Glyphosate Using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, Ozge; Budak, Hikmet

    2009-01-01

    Glyphosate has been shown to act as an inhibitor of an aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway, while other pathways that may be affected by glyphosate are not known. Cross species hybridizations can provide a tool for elucidating biological pathways conserved among organisms. Comparative genome analyses have indicated a high level of colinearity among grass species and Festuca, on which we focus here, and showed rearrangements common to the Pooideae family. Based on sequence conservation among grass species, we selected the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array as a tool for the analysis of expression profiles of three Festuca (fescue) species with distinctly different tolerances to varying levels of glyphosate. Differences in transcript expression were recorded upon foliar glyphosate application at 1.58 mM and 6.32 mM, representing 5% and 20%, respectively, of the recommended rate. Differences highlighted categories of general metabolic processes, such as photosynthesis, protein synthesis, stress responses, and a larger number of transcripts responded to 20% glyphosate application. Differential expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the shikimic acid pathway could not be identified by cross hybridization. Microarray data were confirmed by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analyses. This is the first report to analyze the potential of cross species hybridization in Fescue species and the data and analyses will help extend our knowledge on the cellular processes affected by glyphosate.

  3. Microarrays in hematology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Flower, Darren; Rigley, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Microarrays are fast becoming routine tools for the high-throughput analysis of gene expression in a wide range of biologic systems, including hematology. Although a number of approaches can be taken when implementing microarray-based studies, all are capable of providing important insights into biologic function. Although some technical issues have not been resolved, microarrays will continue to make a significant impact on hematologically important research. PMID:11753074

  4. Development and application of a 6.5 million feature Affymetrix Genechip® for massively parallel discovery of single position polymorphisms in lettuce (Lactuca spp.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-resolution genetic maps are needed in many crops to help characterize the genetic diversity that determines agriculturally important traits. Hybridization to microarrays to detect single feature polymorphisms is a powerful technique for marker discovery and genotyping because of its highly parallel nature. However, microarrays designed for gene expression analysis rarely provide sufficient gene coverage for optimal detection of nucleotide polymorphisms, which limits utility in species with low rates of polymorphism such as lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Results We developed a 6.5 million feature Affymetrix GeneChip® for efficient polymorphism discovery and genotyping, as well as for analysis of gene expression in lettuce. Probes on the microarray were designed from 26,809 unigenes from cultivated lettuce and an additional 8,819 unigenes from four related species (L. serriola, L. saligna, L. virosa and L. perennis). Where possible, probes were tiled with a 2 bp stagger, alternating on each DNA strand; providing an average of 187 probes covering approximately 600 bp for each of over 35,000 unigenes; resulting in up to 13 fold redundancy in coverage per nucleotide. We developed protocols for hybridization of genomic DNA to the GeneChip® and refined custom algorithms that utilized coverage from multiple, high quality probes to detect single position polymorphisms in 2 bp sliding windows across each unigene. This allowed us to detect greater than 18,000 polymorphisms between the parental lines of our core mapping population, as well as numerous polymorphisms between cultivated lettuce and wild species in the lettuce genepool. Using marker data from our diversity panel comprised of 52 accessions from the five species listed above, we were able to separate accessions by species using both phylogenetic and principal component analyses. Additionally, we estimated the diversity between different types of cultivated lettuce and distinguished morphological types

  5. Microarray analysis of gene expression in mouse (strain 129) embryonic stem cells after typical synthetic musk exposure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiachen; Li, Ming; Jiao, Zhihao; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic musks are widely used in personal-care products and can readily accumulate in the adipose tissue, breast milk, and blood of humans. In this study, the Affymetrix Mouse Genome GeneChip was used to identify alterations in gene expression of embryonic stem cells from the 129 strain of the laboratory mouse after treatment with the synthetic musk tonalide (AHTN). Among the 45,037 transcripts in the microarray, 2,879 genes were differentially expressed. According to the microarray analysis, the potential influence of AHTN on the development to embryo should be of concern, and the toxicological effects of it and related musk compounds should be studied further.

  6. The Affymetrix DMET Plus Platform Reveals Unique Distribution of ADME-Related Variants in Ethnic Arabs

    PubMed Central

    Wakil, Salma M.; Nguyen, Cao; Muiya, Nzioka P.; Andres, Editha; Lykowska-Tarnowska, Agnieszka; Baz, Batoul; Meyer, Brian F.; Morahan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus Premier Pack has been designed to genotype 1936 gene variants thought to be essential for screening patients in personalized drug therapy. These variants include the cytochrome P450s (CYP450s), the key metabolizing enzymes, many other enzymes involved in phase I and phase II pharmacokinetic reactions, and signaling mediators associated with variability in clinical response to numerous drugs not only among individuals, but also between ethnic populations. Materials and Methods. We genotyped 600 Saudi individuals for 1936 variants on the DMET platform to evaluate their clinical potential in personalized medicine in ethnic Arabs. Results. Approximately 49% each of the 437 CYP450 variants, 56% of the 581 transporters, 56% of 419 transferases, 48% of the 104 dehydrogenases, and 58% of the remaining 390 variants were detected. Several variants, such as rs3740071, rs6193, rs258751, rs6199, rs11568421, and rs8187797, exhibited significantly either higher or lower minor allele frequencies (MAFs) than those in other ethnic groups. Discussion. The present study revealed some unique distribution trends for several variants in Arabs, which displayed partly inverse allelic prevalence compared to other ethnic populations. The results point therefore to the need to verify and ascertain the prevalence of a variant as a prerequisite for engaging it in clinical routine screening in personalized medicine in any given population. PMID:25802476

  7. Identifying the impact of G-quadruplexes on Affymetrix 3' arrays using cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Memon, Farhat N; Owen, Anne M; Sanchez-Graillet, Olivia; Upton, Graham J G; Harrison, Andrew P

    2010-01-15

    A tetramer quadruplex structure is formed by four parallel strands of DNA/ RNA containing runs of guanine. These quadruplexes are able to form because guanine can Hoogsteen hydrogen bond to other guanines, and a tetrad of guanines can form a stable arrangement. Recently we have discovered that probes on Affymetrix GeneChips that contain runs of guanine do not measure gene expression reliably. We associate this finding with the likelihood that quadruplexes are forming on the surface of GeneChips. In order to cope with the rapidly expanding size of GeneChip array datasets in the public domain, we are exploring the use of cloud computing to replicate our experiments on 3' arrays to look at the effect of the location of G-spots (runs of guanines). Cloud computing is a recently introduced high-performance solution that takes advantage of the computational infrastructure of large organisations such as Amazon and Google. We expect that cloud computing will become widely adopted because it enables bioinformaticians to avoid capital expenditure on expensive computing resources and to only pay a cloud computing provider for what is used. Moreover, as well as financial efficiency, cloud computing is an ecologically-friendly technology, it enables efficient data-sharing and we expect it to be faster for development purposes. Here we propose the advantageous use of cloud computing to perform a large data-mining analysis of public domain 3' arrays.

  8. LS-CAP: an algorithm for identifying cytogenetic aberrations in hepatocellular carcinoma using microarray data.

    PubMed

    He, Xianmin; Wei, Qing; Sun, Meiqian; Fu, Xuping; Fan, Sichang; Li, Yao

    2006-05-01

    Biological techniques such as Array-Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and affymetrix single nucleotide pleomorphism (SNP) array have been used to detect cytogenetic aberrations. However, on genomic scale, these techniques are labor intensive and time consuming. Comparative genomic microarray analysis (CGMA) has been used to identify cytogenetic changes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using gene expression microarray data. However, CGMA algorithm can not give precise localization of aberrations, fails to identify small cytogenetic changes, and exhibits false negatives and positives. Locally un-weighted smoothing cytogenetic aberrations prediction (LS-CAP) based on local smoothing and binomial distribution can be expected to address these problems. LS-CAP algorithm was built and used on HCC microarray profiles. Eighteen cytogenetic abnormalities were identified, among them 5 were reported previously, and 12 were proven by CGH studies. LS-CAP effectively reduced the false negatives and positives, and precisely located small fragments with cytogenetic aberrations.

  9. Starr: Simple Tiling ARRay analysis of Affymetrix ChIP-chip data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with DNA microarrays (ChIP-chip) is an assay used for investigating DNA-protein-binding or post-translational chromatin/histone modifications. As with all high-throughput technologies, it requires thorough bioinformatic processing of the data for which there is no standard yet. The primary goal is to reliably identify and localize genomic regions that bind a specific protein. Further investigation compares binding profiles of functionally related proteins, or binding profiles of the same proteins in different genetic backgrounds or experimental conditions. Ultimately, the goal is to gain a mechanistic understanding of the effects of DNA binding events on gene expression. Results We present a free, open-source R/Bioconductor package Starr that facilitates comparative analysis of ChIP-chip data across experiments and across different microarray platforms. The package provides functions for data import, quality assessment, data visualization and exploration. Starr includes high-level analysis tools such as the alignment of ChIP signals along annotated features, correlation analysis of ChIP signals with complementary genomic data, peak-finding and comparative display of multiple clusters of binding profiles. It uses standard Bioconductor classes for maximum compatibility with other software. Moreover, Starr automatically updates microarray probe annotation files by a highly efficient remapping of microarray probe sequences to an arbitrary genome. Conclusion Starr is an R package that covers the complete ChIP-chip workflow from data processing to binding pattern detection. It focuses on the high-level data analysis, e.g., it provides methods for the integration and combined statistical analysis of binding profiles and complementary functional genomics data. Starr enables systematic assessment of binding behaviour for groups of genes that are alingned along arbitrary genomic features. PMID:20398407

  10. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M.; Aghi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930–2942, 2012)To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013)To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59–70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98–110, 2010) While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  11. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M; Aghi, Manish K

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: i. To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930-2942, 2012). ii. To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013). iii. To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59-70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98-110, 2010). While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  12. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  13. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  14. Microarrays in Glycoproteomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Tingting; Haab, Brian B.

    2009-01-01

    Microarrays have been extremely useful for investigating binding interactions among diverse types of molecular species, with the main advantage being the ability to examine many interactions using small amount of samples and reagents. Microarrays are increasingly being used to advance research in the field of glycobiology, which is the study of the nature and function and carbohydrates in health and disease. Several types of microarrays are being used in the study of glycans and proteins in glycobiology, including glycan arrays to study the recognition of carbohydrates, lectin arrays to determine carbohydrate expression on purified proteins or on cells, and antibody arrays to examine the variation in particular glycan structures on specific proteins. This review will cover the technology and applications of these types of microarrays, as well as their use for obtaining complementary information on various aspects of glycobiology. PMID:19389548

  15. Functional Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Xie, Zhi; Qian, Jiang; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng

    2010-01-01

    Functional protein microarrays are emerging as a promising new tool for large-scale and high-throughput studies. In this article, we will review their applications in basic proteomics research, where various types of assays have been developed to probe binding activities to other biomolecules, such as proteins, DNA, RNA, small molecules, and glycans. We will also report recent progress of using functional protein microarrays in profiling protein posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, acetylation, and nitrosylation. Finally, we will discuss potential of functional protein microarrays in biomarker identification and clinical diagnostics. We strongly believe that functional protein microarrays will soon become an indispensible and invaluable tool in proteomics research and systems biology. PMID:20872749

  16. High-throughput variation detection and genotyping using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Cutler, D J; Zwick, M E; Carrasquillo, M M; Yohn, C T; Tobin, K P; Kashuk, C; Mathews, D J; Shah, N A; Eichler, E E; Warrington, J A; Chakravarti, A

    2001-11-01

    The genetic dissection of complex traits may ultimately require a large number of SNPs to be genotyped in multiple individuals who exhibit phenotypic variation in a trait of interest. Microarray technology can enable rapid genotyping of variation specific to study samples. To facilitate their use, we have developed an automated statistical method (ABACUS) to analyze microarray hybridization data and applied this method to Affymetrix Variation Detection Arrays (VDAs). ABACUS provides a quality score to individual genotypes, allowing investigators to focus their attention on sites that give accurate information. We have applied ABACUS to an experiment encompassing 32 autosomal and eight X-linked genomic regions, each consisting of approximately 50 kb of unique sequence spanning a 100-kb region, in 40 humans. At sufficiently high-quality scores, we are able to read approximately 80% of all sites. To assess the accuracy of SNP detection, 108 of 108 SNPs have been experimentally confirmed; an additional 371 SNPs have been confirmed electronically. To access the accuracy of diploid genotypes at segregating autosomal sites, we confirmed 1515 of 1515 homozygous calls, and 420 of 423 (99.29%) heterozygotes. In replicate experiments, consisting of independent amplification of identical samples followed by hybridization to distinct microarrays of the same design, genotyping is highly repeatable. In an autosomal replicate experiment, 813,295 of 813,295 genotypes are called identically (including 351 heterozygotes); at an X-linked locus in males (haploid), 841,236 of 841,236 sites are called identically.

  17. DNA Microarray Technology

    SciTech Connect

    WERNER-WASHBURNE, MARGARET; DAVIDSON, GEORGE S.

    2002-01-01

    Collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico Biology Department resulted in the capability to train students in microarray techniques and the interpretation of data from microarray experiments. These studies provide for a better understanding of the role of stationary phase and the gene regulation involved in exit from stationary phase, which may eventually have important clinical implications. Importantly, this research trained numerous students and is the basis for three new Ph.D. projects.

  18. DNA microarrays in neuropsychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, E R; Srivastava, L K; Quirion, R

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in experimental genomics, coupled with the wealth of sequence information available for a variety of organisms, have the potential to transform the way pharmacological research is performed. At present, high-density DNA microarrays allow researchers to quickly and accurately quantify gene-expression changes in a massively parallel manner. Although now well established in other biomedical fields, such as cancer and genetics research, DNA microarrays have only recently begun to make significant inroads into pharmacology. To date, the major focus in this field has been on the general application of DNA microarrays to toxicology and drug discovery and design. This review summarizes the major microarray findings of relevance to neuropsychopharmacology, as a prelude to the design and analysis of future basic and clinical microarray experiments. The ability of DNA microarrays to monitor gene expression simultaneously in a large-scale format is helping to usher in a post-genomic age, where simple constructs about the role of nature versus nurture are being replaced by a functional understanding of gene expression in living organisms. PMID:11479006

  19. Microarray Data Processing Techniques for Genome-Scale Network Inference from Large Public Repositories.

    PubMed

    Chockalingam, Sriram; Aluru, Maneesha; Aluru, Srinivas

    2016-09-19

    Pre-processing of microarray data is a well-studied problem. Furthermore, all popular platforms come with their own recommended best practices for differential analysis of genes. However, for genome-scale network inference using microarray data collected from large public repositories, these methods filter out a considerable number of genes. This is primarily due to the effects of aggregating a diverse array of experiments with different technical and biological scenarios. Here we introduce a pre-processing pipeline suitable for inferring genome-scale gene networks from large microarray datasets. We show that partitioning of the available microarray datasets according to biological relevance into tissue- and process-specific categories significantly extends the limits of downstream network construction. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our pre-processing pipeline by inferring genome-scale networks for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using two different construction methods and a collection of 11,760 Affymetrix ATH1 microarray chips. Our pre-processing pipeline and the datasets used in this paper are made available at http://alurulab.cc.gatech.edu/microarray-pp.

  20. Microarray Data Processing Techniques for Genome-Scale Network Inference from Large Public Repositories

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Sriram; Aluru, Maneesha; Aluru, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Pre-processing of microarray data is a well-studied problem. Furthermore, all popular platforms come with their own recommended best practices for differential analysis of genes. However, for genome-scale network inference using microarray data collected from large public repositories, these methods filter out a considerable number of genes. This is primarily due to the effects of aggregating a diverse array of experiments with different technical and biological scenarios. Here we introduce a pre-processing pipeline suitable for inferring genome-scale gene networks from large microarray datasets. We show that partitioning of the available microarray datasets according to biological relevance into tissue- and process-specific categories significantly extends the limits of downstream network construction. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our pre-processing pipeline by inferring genome-scale networks for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using two different construction methods and a collection of 11,760 Affymetrix ATH1 microarray chips. Our pre-processing pipeline and the datasets used in this paper are made available at http://alurulab.cc.gatech.edu/microarray-pp. PMID:27657141

  1. Microarray Data Processing Techniques for Genome-Scale Network Inference from Large Public Repositories.

    PubMed

    Chockalingam, Sriram; Aluru, Maneesha; Aluru, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Pre-processing of microarray data is a well-studied problem. Furthermore, all popular platforms come with their own recommended best practices for differential analysis of genes. However, for genome-scale network inference using microarray data collected from large public repositories, these methods filter out a considerable number of genes. This is primarily due to the effects of aggregating a diverse array of experiments with different technical and biological scenarios. Here we introduce a pre-processing pipeline suitable for inferring genome-scale gene networks from large microarray datasets. We show that partitioning of the available microarray datasets according to biological relevance into tissue- and process-specific categories significantly extends the limits of downstream network construction. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our pre-processing pipeline by inferring genome-scale networks for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using two different construction methods and a collection of 11,760 Affymetrix ATH1 microarray chips. Our pre-processing pipeline and the datasets used in this paper are made available at http://alurulab.cc.gatech.edu/microarray-pp. PMID:27657141

  2. Microarray analysis of ox-LDL (oxidized low-density lipoprotein)-regulated genes in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Minta, Joe; Jungwon Yun, James; St Bernard, Rosanne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that circulating LDL (low-density lipoproteins) play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and the oxidized form (ox-LDL) is highly atherogenic. Deposits of ox-LDL have been found in atherosclerotic plaques, and ox-LDL has been shown to promote monocyte recruitment, foam cell formation and the transition of quiescent and contractile vascular SMCs (smooth muscle cells) to the migratory and proliferative phenotype. SMC phenotype transition and hyperplasia are the pivotal events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. To comprehend the complex molecular mechanisms involved in ox-LDL-mediated SMC phenotype transition, we have compared the differential gene expression profiles of cultured quiescent human coronary artery SMCs with cells induced with ox-LDL for 3 and 21 h using Affymetrix HG-133UA cDNA microarray chips. Assignment of the regulated genes into functional groups indicated that several genes involved in metabolism, membrane transport, cell-cell interactions, signal transduction, transcription, translation, cell migration, proliferation and apoptosis were differentially expressed. Our data suggests that the interaction of ox-LDL with its cognate receptors on SMCs modulates the induction of several growth factors and cytokines, which activate a variety of intracellular signalling mechanisms (including PI3K, MAPK, Jak/STAT, sphingosine, Rho kinase pathways) that contribute to SMC transition from the quiescent and contractile phenotype to the proliferative and migratory phenotype. Our study has also identified several genes (including CDC27, cyclin A1, cyclin G2, glypican 1, MINOR, p15 and apolipoprotein) not previously implicated in ox-LDL-induced SMC phenotype transition and substantially extends the list of potential candidate genes involved in atherogenesis.

  3. DNA Microarray Technologies: A Novel Approach to Geonomic Research

    SciTech Connect

    Hinman, R.; Thrall, B.; Wong, K,

    2002-01-01

    A cDNA microarray allows biologists to examine the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously. Researchers may analyze the complete transcriptional program of an organism in response to specific physiological or developmental conditions. By design, a cDNA microarray is an experiment with many variables and few controls. One question that inevitably arises when working with a cDNA microarray is data reproducibility. How easy is it to confirm mRNA expression patterns? In this paper, a case study involving the treatment of a murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) was used to obtain a rough estimate of data reproducibility. Two trials were examined and a list of genes displaying either a > 2-fold or > 4-fold increase in gene expression was compiled. Variations in signal mean ratios between the two slides were observed. We can assume that erring in reproducibility may be compensated by greater inductive levels of similar genes. Steps taken to obtain results included serum starvation of cells before treatment, tests of mRNA for quality/consistency, and data normalization.

  4. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  5. Emerging Use of Gene Expression Microarrays in Plant Physiology

    DOE PAGES

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays have become an important technology for the global analysis of gene expression in humans, animals, plants, and microbes. Implemented in the context of a well-designed experiment, cDNA and oligonucleotide arrays can provide highthroughput, simultaneous analysis of transcript abundance for hundreds, if not thousands, of genes. However, despite widespread acceptance, the use of microarrays as a tool to better understand processes of interest to the plant physiologist is still being explored. To help illustrate current uses of microarrays in the plant sciences, several case studies that we believe demonstrate the emerging application of gene expression arrays in plant physiology weremore » selected from among the many posters and presentations at the 2003 Plant and Animal Genome XI Conference. Based on this survey, microarrays are being used to assess gene expression in plants exposed to the experimental manipulation of air temperature, soil water content and aluminium concentration in the root zone. Analysis often includes characterizing transcript profiles for multiple post-treatment sampling periods and categorizing genes with common patterns of response using hierarchical clustering techniques. In addition, microarrays are also providing insights into developmental changes in gene expression associated with fibre and root elongation in cotton and maize, respectively. Technical and analytical limitations of microarrays are discussed and projects attempting to advance areas of microarray design and data analysis are highlighted. Finally, although much work remains, we conclude that microarrays are a valuable tool for the plant physiologist interested in the characterization and identification of individual genes and gene families with potential application in the fields of agriculture, horticulture and forestry.« less

  6. Emerging Use of Gene Expression Microarrays in Plant Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Difazio, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays have become an important technology for the global analysis of gene expression in humans, animals, plants, and microbes. Implemented in the context of a well-designed experiment, cDNA and oligonucleotide arrays can provide highthroughput, simultaneous analysis of transcript abundance for hundreds, if not thousands, of genes. However, despite widespread acceptance, the use of microarrays as a tool to better understand processes of interest to the plant physiologist is still being explored. To help illustrate current uses of microarrays in the plant sciences, several case studies that we believe demonstrate the emerging application of gene expression arrays in plant physiology were selected from among the many posters and presentations at the 2003 Plant and Animal Genome XI Conference. Based on this survey, microarrays are being used to assess gene expression in plants exposed to the experimental manipulation of air temperature, soil water content and aluminium concentration in the root zone. Analysis often includes characterizing transcript profiles for multiple post-treatment sampling periods and categorizing genes with common patterns of response using hierarchical clustering techniques. In addition, microarrays are also providing insights into developmental changes in gene expression associated with fibre and root elongation in cotton and maize, respectively. Technical and analytical limitations of microarrays are discussed and projects attempting to advance areas of microarray design and data analysis are highlighted. Finally, although much work remains, we conclude that microarrays are a valuable tool for the plant physiologist interested in the characterization and identification of individual genes and gene families with potential application in the fields of agriculture, horticulture and forestry. PMID:18629133

  7. Workflows for microarray data processing in the Kepler environment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Microarray data analysis has been the subject of extensive and ongoing pipeline development due to its complexity, the availability of several options at each analysis step, and the development of new analysis demands, including integration with new data sources. Bioinformatics pipelines are usually custom built for different applications, making them typically difficult to modify, extend and repurpose. Scientific workflow systems are intended to address these issues by providing general-purpose frameworks in which to develop and execute such pipelines. The Kepler workflow environment is a well-established system under continual development that is employed in several areas of scientific research. Kepler provides a flexible graphical interface, featuring clear display of parameter values, for design and modification of workflows. It has capabilities for developing novel computational components in the R, Python, and Java programming languages, all of which are widely used for bioinformatics algorithm development, along with capabilities for invoking external applications and using web services. Results We developed a series of fully functional bioinformatics pipelines addressing common tasks in microarray processing in the Kepler workflow environment. These pipelines consist of a set of tools for GFF file processing of NimbleGen chromatin immunoprecipitation on microarray (ChIP-chip) datasets and more comprehensive workflows for Affymetrix gene expression microarray bioinformatics and basic primer design for PCR experiments, which are often used to validate microarray results. Although functional in themselves, these workflows can be easily customized, extended, or repurposed to match the needs of specific projects and are designed to be a toolkit and starting point for specific applications. These workflows illustrate a workflow programming paradigm focusing on local resources (programs and data) and therefore are close to traditional shell scripting or

  8. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  9. A microarray analysis for differential gene expression in the soybean genome using Bioconductor and R.

    PubMed

    Gregory Alvord, W; Roayaei, Jean A; Quiñones, Octavio A; Schneider, Katherine T

    2007-11-01

    This article describes specific procedures for conducting quality assessment of Affymetrix GeneChip(R) soybean genome data and for performing analyses to determine differential gene expression using the open-source R programming environment in conjunction with the open-source Bioconductor software. We describe procedures for extracting those Affymetrix probe set IDs related specifically to the soybean genome on the Affymetrix soybean chip and demonstrate the use of exploratory plots including images of raw probe-level data, boxplots, density plots and M versus A plots. RNA degradation and recommended procedures from Affymetrix for quality control are discussed. An appropriate probe-level model provides an excellent quality assessment tool. To demonstrate this, we discuss and display chip pseudo-images of weights, residuals and signed residuals and additional probe-level modeling plots that may be used to identify aberrant chips. The Robust Multichip Averaging (RMA) procedure was used for background correction, normalization and summarization of the AffyBatch probe-level data to obtain expression level data and to discover differentially expressed genes. Examples of boxplots and MA plots are presented for the expression level data. Volcano plots and heatmaps are used to demonstrate the use of (log) fold changes in conjunction with ordinary and moderated t-statistics for determining interesting genes. We show, with real data, how implementation of functions in R and Bioconductor successfully identified differentially expressed genes that may play a role in soybean resistance to a fungal pathogen, Phakopsora pachyrhizi. Complete source code for performing all quality assessment and statistical procedures may be downloaded from our web source: http://css.ncifcrf.gov/services/download/MicroarraySoybean.zip.

  10. Array2BIO: A Comprehensive Suite of Utilities for the Analysis of Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Chain, P G; Mabery, S; Rasley, A; Garcia, E; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-02-13

    We have developed an integrative and automated toolkit for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray data, named Array2BIO. It identifies groups of coexpressed genes using two complementary approaches--comparative analysis of signal versus control microarrays and clustering analysis of gene expression across different conditions. The identified genes are assigned to functional categories based on the Gene Ontology classification, and a detection of corresponding KEGG protein interaction pathways. Array2BIO reliably handles low-expressor genes and provides a set of statistical methods to quantify the odds of observations, including the Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni multiple testing corrections. Automated interface with the ECR Browser provides evolutionary conservation analysis of identified gene loci while the interconnection with Creme allows high-throughput analysis of human promoter regions and prediction of gene regulatory elements that underlie the observed expression patterns. Array2BIO is publicly available at http://array2bio.dcode.org.

  11. Biostatistical Considerations of the Use of Genomic DNA Reference in Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Zhu, Mengxia; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    Using genomic DNA as common reference in microarray experiments has recently been tested by different laboratories (2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 20, 24-26). While some reported that experimental results of microarrays using genomic DNA reference conforms nicely to those obtained by cDNA: cDNA co-hybridization method, others acquired poor results. We hypothesize that these conflicting reports could be resolved by biostatistical analyses. To test it, microarray experiments were performed in a -proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis. Pair-wise comparison of three experimental conditions was obtained either by direct cDNA: cDNA co-hybridization, or by indirect calculation through a Shewanella genomic DNA reference. Several major biostatistical techniques were exploited to reduce the amount of inconsistency between both methods and the results were assessed. We discovered that imposing the constraint of minimal number of replicates, logarithmic transformation and random error analyses could significantly improve the data quality. Therefore, it is useful to adopt these biostatistical techniques for microarray data analysis using genomic DNA as reference.

  12. APPLICATION OF DNA MICROARRAYS TO REPRODUCTIVE TOXICOLOGY AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TESTIS ARRAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the advent of sequence information for entire mammalian genomes, it is now possible to analyze gene expression and gene polymorphisms on a genomic scale. The primary tool for analysis of gene expression is the DNA microarray. We have used commercially available cDNA micro...

  13. Hyperspectral microarray scanning: impact on the accuracy and reliability of gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Timlin, Jerilyn A; Haaland, David M; Sinclair, Michael B; Aragon, Anthony D; Martinez, M Juanita; Werner-Washburne, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    Background Commercial microarray scanners and software cannot distinguish between spectrally overlapping emission sources, and hence cannot accurately identify or correct for emissions not originating from the labeled cDNA. We employed our hyperspectral microarray scanner coupled with multivariate data analysis algorithms that independently identify and quantitate emissions from all sources to investigate three artifacts that reduce the accuracy and reliability of microarray data: skew toward the green channel, dye separation, and variable background emissions. Results Here we demonstrate that several common microarray artifacts resulted from the presence of emission sources other than the labeled cDNA that can dramatically alter the accuracy and reliability of the array data. The microarrays utilized in this study were representative of a wide cross-section of the microarrays currently employed in genomic research. These findings reinforce the need for careful attention to detail to recognize and subsequently eliminate or quantify the presence of extraneous emissions in microarray images. Conclusion Hyperspectral scanning together with multivariate analysis offers a unique and detailed understanding of the sources of microarray emissions after hybridization. This opportunity to simultaneously identify and quantitate contaminant and background emissions in microarrays markedly improves the reliability and accuracy of the data and permits a level of quality control of microarray emissions previously unachievable. Using these tools, we can not only quantify the extent and contribution of extraneous emission sources to the signal, but also determine the consequences of failing to account for them and gain the insight necessary to adjust preparation protocols to prevent such problems from occurring. PMID:15888208

  14. Sample phenotype clusters in high-density oligonucleotide microarray data sets are revealed using Isomap, a nonlinear algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Kevin; Rodriguez, Raymond L; Malyj, Wasyl

    2005-01-01

    Background Life processes are determined by the organism's genetic profile and multiple environmental variables. However the interaction between these factors is inherently non-linear [1]. Microarray data is one representation of the nonlinear interactions among genes and genes and environmental factors. Still most microarray studies use linear methods for the interpretation of nonlinear data. In this study, we apply Isomap, a nonlinear method of dimensionality reduction, to analyze three independent large Affymetrix high-density oligonucleotide microarray data sets. Results Isomap discovered low-dimensional structures embedded in the Affymetrix microarray data sets. These structures correspond to and help to interpret biological phenomena present in the data. This analysis provides examples of temporal, spatial, and functional processes revealed by the Isomap algorithm. In a spinal cord injury data set, Isomap discovers the three main modalities of the experiment – location and severity of the injury and the time elapsed after the injury. In a multiple tissue data set, Isomap discovers a low-dimensional structure that corresponds to anatomical locations of the source tissues. This model is capable of describing low- and high-resolution differences in the same model, such as kidney-vs.-brain and differences between the nuclei of the amygdala, respectively. In a high-throughput drug screening data set, Isomap discovers the monocytic and granulocytic differentiation of myeloid cells and maps several chemical compounds on the two-dimensional model. Conclusion Visualization of Isomap models provides useful tools for exploratory analysis of microarray data sets. In most instances, Isomap models explain more of the variance present in the microarray data than PCA or MDS. Finally, Isomap is a promising new algorithm for class discovery and class prediction in high-density oligonucleotide data sets. PMID:16076401

  15. Microarrays under the microscope

    PubMed Central

    Wildsmith, S E; Elcock, F J

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology is a rapidly advancing area, which is gaining popularity in many biological disciplines from drug target identification to predictive toxicology. Over the past few years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of methods and techniques available for carrying out this form of gene expression analysis. The techniques and associated peripherals, such as slide types, deposition methods, robotics, and scanning equipment, are undergoing constant improvement, helping to drive the technology forward in terms of robustness and ease of use. These rapid developments, combined with the number of options available and the associated hyperbole, can prove daunting for the new user. This review aims to guide the researcher through the various steps of conducting microarray experiments, from initial strategy to analysing the data, with critical examination of the benefits and disadvantages along the way. PMID:11212888

  16. Navigating public microarray databases.

    PubMed

    Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources.

  17. Use of Genomic DNA as A Reference in DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray has become a mainstream technology to explore gene expression profiles, identify novel genes involved in a biological process of interest and predict their function, and determine biomarkers that are relevant to a given phenotype or disease. Typical two-channel microarray studies use an experimental design called the complementary DNA (cDNA) reference method, in which samples from test and control conditions are compared directly on a microarray slide. A substantial limitation of this strategy is that it is nearly impossible to compare data between experiments because the reference sample composition is subjected to changes at the level of experimental design and thereby not consistent from one experiment to another. Using genomic DNA as common reference will effectively overcome this limitation. This chapter describes detailed methods to prepare genomic DNA of high quality, label with fluorescent dye, co-hybridize with cDNA samples, and the subsequent data analyses. In addition, notes are provided to help the readers to obtain optimal results using the procedure.

  18. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  19. Comparative examination of probe labeling methods for microarray hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, David I.; Woodward, Karen; Setterquist, Robert A.; Kawasaki, Ernest S.

    2001-06-01

    For detection of differential gene expression, confocal laser based scanners are now capable of analyzing microarrays using one to five wavelengths. This allows investigators to choose among several labeling methods. Here we compare direct incorporation and indirect methods (amino-allyl and dendrimers) for labeling cDNA probes. We assessed reproducible sensitivity of each probe preparation method in two ways. First, by comparing hybridization intensities for limit of signal detection and second by measuring the lowest detectable concentration of a known ratio of mixed DNA (spikes). Limit of detection assay was done using arrays of mixed targets consisting of a serially diluted human specific gene fragment (HU1) and an undiluted DNA of chloramphenicol acetyl tranferase (CAT) gene. Then, individual single target arrays of CAT and HU1 DNA were used to determine the lowest detectable spike ratio of each labeling method. The results of this study will be presented and their significance for the analysis of microarrays will be discussed.

  20. Groundtruth approach to accurate quantitation of fluorescence microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mascio-Kegelmeyer, L; Tomascik-Cheeseman, L; Burnett, M S; van Hummelen, P; Wyrobek, A J

    2000-12-01

    To more accurately measure fluorescent signals from microarrays, we calibrated our acquisition and analysis systems by using groundtruth samples comprised of known quantities of red and green gene-specific DNA probes hybridized to cDNA targets. We imaged the slides with a full-field, white light CCD imager and analyzed them with our custom analysis software. Here we compare, for multiple genes, results obtained with and without preprocessing (alignment, color crosstalk compensation, dark field subtraction, and integration time). We also evaluate the accuracy of various image processing and analysis techniques (background subtraction, segmentation, quantitation and normalization). This methodology calibrates and validates our system for accurate quantitative measurement of microarrays. Specifically, we show that preprocessing the images produces results significantly closer to the known ground-truth for these samples.

  1. Ecotoxicogenomics: Microarray interlaboratory comparability.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dorsch, Doris E; Bay, Steven M; Moore, Shelly; Layton, Blythe; Mehinto, Alvine C; Vulpe, Chris D; Brown-Augustine, Marianna; Loguinov, Alex; Poynton, Helen; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Perkins, Edward J; Escalon, Lynn; Denslow, Nancy D; Cristina, Colli-Dula R; Doan, Tri; Shukradas, Shweta; Bruno, Joy; Brown, Lorraine; Van Agglen, Graham; Jackman, Paula; Bauer, Megan

    2016-02-01

    Transcriptomic analysis can complement traditional ecotoxicology data by providing mechanistic insight, and by identifying sub-lethal organismal responses and contaminant classes underlying observed toxicity. Before transcriptomic information can be used in monitoring and risk assessment, it is necessary to determine its reproducibility and detect key steps impacting the reliable identification of differentially expressed genes. A custom 15K-probe microarray was used to conduct transcriptomics analyses across six laboratories with estuarine amphipods exposed to cyfluthrin-spiked or control sediments (10 days). Two sample types were generated, one consisted of total RNA extracts (Ex) from exposed and control samples (extracted by one laboratory) and the other consisted of exposed and control whole body amphipods (WB) from which each laboratory extracted RNA. Our findings indicate that gene expression microarray results are repeatable. Differentially expressed data had a higher degree of repeatability across all laboratories in samples with similar RNA quality (Ex) when compared to WB samples with more variable RNA quality. Despite such variability a subset of genes were consistently identified as differentially expressed across all laboratories and sample types. We found that the differences among the individual laboratory results can be attributed to several factors including RNA quality and technical expertise, but the overall results can be improved by following consistent protocols and with appropriate training.

  2. Direct Detection of Soil mRNAs using Targeted Microarrays for Genes Associated with Lignin Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Smith, Jeff L.; Waters, Katrina M.; Bolton, Harvey

    2010-07-04

    Microarrays have become established tools for describing microbial systems, however the assessment of expression profiles for environmental microbial communities still presents unique challenges. Notably, the concentration of particular transcripts are likely very dilute relative to the pool of total RNA, and PCR-based amplification strategies are vulnerable to amplification biases and the appropriate primer selection. Thus, we apply a signal amplification approach, rather than template amplification, to analyze the expression of genes encoding selected lignin-degrading enzymes in soil. Controls in the form of known amplicons and cDNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium were included and mixed with the soil cDNA both before and after the signal amplification in order to assess the dynamic range of the microarray. We demonstrate that restored prairie soil expresses a diverse range of genes encoding lignin-degrading enzymes following incubation with lignin substrate, while farmed agricultural soil does not. The mixed additions of control cDNA with soil cDNA does interfere with detection of the low abundance transcripts, nevertheless this microarray approach consistently reports the higher-abundance transcripts which present more robust signals.

  3. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  4. Living-Cell Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yarmush, Martin L.; King, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Living cells are remarkably complex. To unravel this complexity, living-cell assays have been developed that allow delivery of experimental stimuli and measurement of the resulting cellular responses. High-throughput adaptations of these assays, known as living-cell microarrays, which are based on microtiter plates, high-density spotting, microfabrication, and microfluidics technologies, are being developed for two general applications: (a) to screen large-scale chemical and genomic libraries and (b) to systematically investigate the local cellular microenvironment. These emerging experimental platforms offer exciting opportunities to rapidly identify genetic determinants of disease, to discover modulators of cellular function, and to probe the complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment. PMID:19413510

  5. Isolation of Microarray-Grade Total RNA, MicroRNA, and DNA from a Single PAXgene Blood RNA Tube

    PubMed Central

    Kruhøffer, Mogens; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Voss, Thorsten; Lindberg, Raija L.P.; Wyrich, Ralf; Thykjaer, Thomas; Orntoft, Torben F.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for isolation of microRNA and genomic DNA in addition to total RNA from whole blood stabilized in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes. The procedure is based on automatic extraction on a BioRobot MDx and includes isolation of DNA from a fraction of the stabilized blood and recovery of small RNA species that are otherwise lost. The procedure presented here is suitable for large-scale experiments and is amenable to further automation. Procured total RNA and DNA was tested using Affymetrix Expression and single-nucleotide polymorphism GeneChips, respectively, and isolated microRNA was tested using spotted locked nucleic acid-based microarrays. We conclude that the yield and quality of total RNA, microRNA, and DNA from a single PAXgene blood RNA tube is sufficient for downstream microarray analysis. PMID:17690207

  6. Comparative microarray analysis of intestinal lymphocytes following Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima, or E. tenella infection in the chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relative expression levels of immune- and non-immune-related mRNAs in chicken intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes experimentally infected with Eimeria acervulina, E. maxima, or E. tenella were measured using a 10K cDNA microarray. Based on a cutoff of > 2.0-fold differential expression compared ...

  7. Gene expression in the rat brain during sleep deprivation and recovery sleep: an Affymetrix GeneChip study.

    PubMed

    Terao, A; Wisor, J P; Peyron, C; Apte-Deshpande, A; Wurts, S W; Edgar, D M; Kilduff, T S

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that macromolecular synthesis in the brain is modulated in association with the occurrence of sleep and wakefulness. Similarly, the spectral composition of electroencephalographic activity that occurs during sleep is dependent on the duration of prior wakefulness. Since this homeostatic relationship between wake and sleep is highly conserved across mammalian species, genes that are truly involved in the electroencephalographic response to sleep deprivation might be expected to be conserved across mammalian species. Therefore, in the rat cerebral cortex, we have studied the effects of sleep deprivation on the expression of immediate early gene and heat shock protein mRNAs previously shown to be upregulated in the mouse brain in sleep deprivation and in recovery sleep after sleep deprivation. We find that the molecular response to sleep deprivation and recovery sleep in the brain is highly conserved between these two mammalian species, at least in terms of expression of immediate early gene and heat shock protein family members. Using Affymetrix Neurobiology U34 GeneChips , we also screened the rat cerebral cortex, basal forebrain, and hypothalamus for other genes whose expression may be modulated by sleep deprivation or recovery sleep. We find that the response of the basal forebrain to sleep deprivation is more similar to that of the cerebral cortex than to the hypothalamus. Together, these results suggest that sleep-dependent changes in gene expression in the cerebral cortex are similar across rodent species and therefore may underlie sleep history-dependent changes in sleep electroencephalographic activity.

  8. Microarray platform for omics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecklenburg, Michael; Xie, Bin

    2001-09-01

    Microarray technology has revolutionized genetic analysis. However, limitations in genome analysis has lead to renewed interest in establishing 'omic' strategies. As we enter the post-genomic era, new microarray technologies are needed to address these new classes of 'omic' targets, such as proteins, as well as lipids and carbohydrates. We have developed a microarray platform that combines self- assembling monolayers with the biotin-streptavidin system to provide a robust, versatile immobilization scheme. A hydrophobic film is patterned on the surface creating an array of tension wells that eliminates evaporation effects thereby reducing the shear stress to which biomolecules are exposed to during immobilization. The streptavidin linker layer makes it possible to adapt and/or develop microarray based assays using virtually any class of biomolecules including: carbohydrates, peptides, antibodies, receptors, as well as them ore traditional DNA based arrays. Our microarray technology is designed to furnish seamless compatibility across the various 'omic' platforms by providing a common blueprint for fabricating and analyzing arrays. The prototype microarray uses a microscope slide footprint patterned with 2 by 96 flat wells. Data on the microarray platform will be presented.

  9. Transcript-Specific Expression Profiles Derived from Sequence-Based Analysis of Standard Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Anton G.; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Peter J.; Zimmer, Ralf; Cohen, Clemens D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Alternative mRNA processing mechanisms lead to multiple transcripts (i.e. splice isoforms) of a given gene which may have distinct biological functions. Microarrays like Affymetrix GeneChips measure mRNA expression of genes using sets of nucleotide probes. Until recently probe sets were not designed for transcript specificity. Nevertheless, the re-analysis of established microarray data using newly defined transcript-specific probe sets may provide information about expression levels of specific transcripts. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study alignment of probe sequences of the Affymetrix microarray HG-U133A with Ensembl transcript sequences was performed to define transcript-specific probe sets. Out of a total of 247,965 perfect match probes, 95,008 were designated “transcript-specific”, i.e. showing complete sequence alignment, no cross-hybridization, and transcript-, not only gene-specificity. These probes were grouped into 7,941 transcript-specific probe sets and 15,619 gene-specific probe sets, respectively. The former were used to differentiate 445 alternative transcripts of 215 genes. For selected transcripts, predicted by this analysis to be differentially expressed in the human kidney, confirmatory real-time RT-PCR experiments were performed. First, the expression of two specific transcripts of the genes PPM1A (PP2CA_HUMAN and P35813) and PLG (PLMN_HUMAN and Q5TEH5) in human kidneys was determined by the transcript-specific array analysis and confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Secondly, disease-specific differential expression of single transcripts of PLG and ABCA1 (ABCA1_HUMAN and Q5VYS0_HUMAN) was computed from the available array data sets and confirmed by transcript-specific real-time RT-PCR. Conclusions Transcript-specific analysis of microarray experiments can be employed to study gene-regulation on the transcript level using conventional microarray data. In this study, predictions based on sufficient probe set size and

  10. Fine-scaled human genetic structure revealed by SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Zhang, Yuhua; Guthery, Stephen L; Thara, Rangaswamy; Mowry, Bryan J; Bulayeva, Kazima; Weiss, Robert B; Jorde, Lynn B

    2009-05-01

    We report an analysis of more than 240,000 loci genotyped using the Affymetrix SNP microarray in 554 individuals from 27 worldwide populations in Africa, Asia, and Europe. To provide a more extensive and complete sampling of human genetic variation, we have included caste and tribal samples from two states in South India, Daghestanis from eastern Europe, and the Iban from Malaysia. Consistent with observations made by Charles Darwin, our results highlight shared variation among human populations and demonstrate that much genetic variation is geographically continuous. At the same time, principal components analyses reveal discernible genetic differentiation among almost all identified populations in our sample, and in most cases, individuals can be clearly assigned to defined populations on the basis of SNP genotypes. All individuals are accurately classified into continental groups using a model-based clustering algorithm, but between closely related populations, genetic and self-classifications conflict for some individuals. The 250K data permitted high-level resolution of genetic variation among Indian caste and tribal populations and between highland and lowland Daghestani populations. In particular, upper-caste individuals from Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh form one defined group, lower-caste individuals from these two states form another, and the tribal Irula samples form a third. Our results emphasize the correlation of genetic and geographic distances and highlight other elements, including social factors that have contributed to population structure. PMID:19411602

  11. Fine-scaled human genetic structure revealed by SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Zhang, Yuhua; Guthery, Stephen L; Thara, Rangaswamy; Mowry, Bryan J; Bulayeva, Kazima; Weiss, Robert B; Jorde, Lynn B

    2009-05-01

    We report an analysis of more than 240,000 loci genotyped using the Affymetrix SNP microarray in 554 individuals from 27 worldwide populations in Africa, Asia, and Europe. To provide a more extensive and complete sampling of human genetic variation, we have included caste and tribal samples from two states in South India, Daghestanis from eastern Europe, and the Iban from Malaysia. Consistent with observations made by Charles Darwin, our results highlight shared variation among human populations and demonstrate that much genetic variation is geographically continuous. At the same time, principal components analyses reveal discernible genetic differentiation among almost all identified populations in our sample, and in most cases, individuals can be clearly assigned to defined populations on the basis of SNP genotypes. All individuals are accurately classified into continental groups using a model-based clustering algorithm, but between closely related populations, genetic and self-classifications conflict for some individuals. The 250K data permitted high-level resolution of genetic variation among Indian caste and tribal populations and between highland and lowland Daghestani populations. In particular, upper-caste individuals from Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh form one defined group, lower-caste individuals from these two states form another, and the tribal Irula samples form a third. Our results emphasize the correlation of genetic and geographic distances and highlight other elements, including social factors that have contributed to population structure.

  12. GENEVESTIGATOR. Arabidopsis Microarray Database and Analysis Toolbox1[w

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Philip; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Matthias; Hennig, Lars; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2004-01-01

    High-throughput gene expression analysis has become a frequent and powerful research tool in biology. At present, however, few software applications have been developed for biologists to query large microarray gene expression databases using a Web-browser interface. We present GENEVESTIGATOR, a database and Web-browser data mining interface for Affymetrix GeneChip data. Users can query the database to retrieve the expression patterns of individual genes throughout chosen environmental conditions, growth stages, or organs. Reversely, mining tools allow users to identify genes specifically expressed during selected stresses, growth stages, or in particular organs. Using GENEVESTIGATOR, the gene expression profiles of more than 22,000 Arabidopsis genes can be obtained, including those of 10,600 currently uncharacterized genes. The objective of this software application is to direct gene functional discovery and design of new experiments by providing plant biologists with contextual information on the expression of genes. The database and analysis toolbox is available as a community resource at https://www.genevestigator.ethz.ch. PMID:15375207

  13. Microarray Analysis of Microbial Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson-Francis, K.; van Houdt, R.; Leys, N.; Mergeay, M.; Cockell, C. S.

    2010-04-01

    Microarray analysis of the heavy metal resistant bacterium, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 was used to investigate the genes involved in the weathering. The results demonstrated that large porin and membrane transporter genes were unregulated.

  14. Unsupervised assessment of microarray data quality using a Gaussian mixture model

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Brian E; Sick, Beate; Heber, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Background Quality assessment of microarray data is an important and often challenging aspect of gene expression analysis. This task frequently involves the examination of a variety of summary statistics and diagnostic plots. The interpretation of these diagnostics is often subjective, and generally requires careful expert scrutiny. Results We show how an unsupervised classification technique based on the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm and the naïve Bayes model can be used to automate microarray quality assessment. The method is flexible and can be easily adapted to accommodate alternate quality statistics and platforms. We evaluate our approach using Affymetrix 3' gene expression and exon arrays and compare the performance of this method to a similar supervised approach. Conclusion This research illustrates the efficacy of an unsupervised classification approach for the purpose of automated microarray data quality assessment. Since our approach requires only unannotated training data, it is easy to customize and to keep up-to-date as technology evolves. In contrast to other "black box" classification systems, this method also allows for intuitive explanations. PMID:19545436

  15. Microarray analysis of the AHR system: Tissue-specific flexibility in signal and target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Frericks, Markus; Meissner, Marc; Esser, Charlotte . E-mail: chesser@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2007-05-01

    Data mining published microarray experiments require that expression profiles are directly comparable. We performed linear global normalization on the data of 1967 Affymetrix U74av2 microarrays, i.e. the transcriptomes of > 100 murine tissues or cell types. The mathematical transformation effectively nullifies inter-experimental or inter-laboratory differences between microarrays. The correctness of expression values was validated by quantitative RT-PCR. Using the database we analyze components of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signaling pathway in various tissues. We identified lineage and differentiation specific variant expression of AHR, ARNT, and HIF1{alpha} in the T-cell lineage and high expression of CYP1A1 in immature B cells and dendritic cells. Performing co-expression analysis we found unorthodox expression of the AHR in the absence of ARNT, particularly in stem cell populations, and can reject the hypothesis that ARNT2 takes over and is highly expressed when ARNT expression is low or absent. Furthermore the AHR shows no co-expression with any other transcript present on the chip. Analysis of differential gene expression under 308 conditions revealed 53 conditions under which the AHR is regulated, numerous conditions under which an intrinsic AHR action is modified as well as conditions activating the AHR even in the absence of known AHR ligands. Thus meta-analysis of published expression profiles is a powerful tool to gain novel insights into known and unknown systems.

  16. Optimization of gene expression microarray protocol for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Belder, Nevin; Coşkun, Öznur; Erdoğan, Beyza Doğanay; Savaş, Berna; Ensari, Arzu; Özdağ, Hilal

    2016-03-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a widely available clinical specimen for retrospective studies. The possibility of long-term clinical follow-up of FFPE samples makes them a valuable source to evaluate links between molecular and clinical information. Working with FFPE samples in the molecular research area, especially using high-throughput molecular techniques such as microarray gene expression profiling, has come into prominence. Because of the harmful effects of formalin fixation process such as degradation of nucleic acids, cross-linking with proteins, and chemical modifications on DNA and RNA, there are some limitations in gene expression profiling studies using FFPE samples. To date many studies have been conducted to evaluate gene expression profiling using microarrays (Thomas et al., Thomas et al. (2013) [1]; Scicchitano et al., Scicchitano et al. (2006) [2]; Frank et al., Frank et al. (2007) [3]; Fedorowicz et al., Fedorowicz et al. (2009) [4]). However, there is still no generally accepted, efficient and standardized procedure for microarray analysis of FFPE samples. This paper describes the microarray data presented in our recently accepted to be published article showing a standard protocol from deparaffinization of FFPE tissue sections and RNA extraction to microarray gene expression analysis. Here we represent our data in detail, deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database with the accession number GSE73883. Four combinations of two different cRNA/cDNA preparation and labeling protocols with two different array platforms (Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 and U133_X3P) were evaluated to determine which combination gives the best percentage of present call. The study presents a dataset for comparative analysis which has a potential in terms of providing a robust protocol for gene expression profiling with FFPE tissue samples. PMID:26981433

  17. Optimization of gene expression microarray protocol for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Belder, Nevin; Coşkun, Öznur; Erdoğan, Beyza Doğanay; Savaş, Berna; Ensari, Arzu; Özdağ, Hilal

    2016-03-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a widely available clinical specimen for retrospective studies. The possibility of long-term clinical follow-up of FFPE samples makes them a valuable source to evaluate links between molecular and clinical information. Working with FFPE samples in the molecular research area, especially using high-throughput molecular techniques such as microarray gene expression profiling, has come into prominence. Because of the harmful effects of formalin fixation process such as degradation of nucleic acids, cross-linking with proteins, and chemical modifications on DNA and RNA, there are some limitations in gene expression profiling studies using FFPE samples. To date many studies have been conducted to evaluate gene expression profiling using microarrays (Thomas et al., Thomas et al. (2013) [1]; Scicchitano et al., Scicchitano et al. (2006) [2]; Frank et al., Frank et al. (2007) [3]; Fedorowicz et al., Fedorowicz et al. (2009) [4]). However, there is still no generally accepted, efficient and standardized procedure for microarray analysis of FFPE samples. This paper describes the microarray data presented in our recently accepted to be published article showing a standard protocol from deparaffinization of FFPE tissue sections and RNA extraction to microarray gene expression analysis. Here we represent our data in detail, deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database with the accession number GSE73883. Four combinations of two different cRNA/cDNA preparation and labeling protocols with two different array platforms (Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 and U133_X3P) were evaluated to determine which combination gives the best percentage of present call. The study presents a dataset for comparative analysis which has a potential in terms of providing a robust protocol for gene expression profiling with FFPE tissue samples.

  18. [Protein microarrays and personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiabo; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Joos, Thomas O

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, DNA microarrays have achieved a robust analytical performance, enabling their use for analyzing the whole transcriptome or for screening thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a single experiment. DNA microarrays allow scientists to correlate gene expression signatures with disease progression, to screen for disease-specific mutations, and to treat patients according to their individual genetic profiles; however, the real key is proteins and their manifold functions. It is necessary to achieve a greater understanding of not only protein function and abundance but also their role in the development of diseases. Protein concentrations have been shown to reflect the physiological and pathologic state of an organ, tissue, or cells far more directly than DNA, and proteins can be profiled effectively with protein microarrays, which require only a small amount of sample material. Protein microarrays have become wellestablished tools in basic and applied research, and the first products have already entered the in vitro diagnostics market. This review focuses on protein microarray applications for biomarker discovery and validation, disease diagnosis, and use within the area of personalized medicine. Protein microarrays have proved to be reliable research tools in screening for a multitude of parameters with only a minimal quantity of sample and have enormous potential in applications for diagnostic and personalized medicine.

  19. A multivariate prediction model for microarray cross-hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yian A; Chou, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Xinghua; Slate, Elizabeth H; Peck, Konan; Xu, Wenying; Voit, Eberhard O; Almeida, Jonas S

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression microarray analysis is one of the most popular molecular diagnostic techniques in the post-genomic era. However, this technique faces the fundamental problem of potential cross-hybridization. This is a pervasive problem for both oligonucleotide and cDNA microarrays; it is considered particularly problematic for the latter. No comprehensive multivariate predictive modeling has been performed to understand how multiple variables contribute to (cross-) hybridization. Results We propose a systematic search strategy using multiple multivariate models [multiple linear regressions, regression trees, and artificial neural network analyses (ANNs)] to select an effective set of predictors for hybridization. We validate this approach on a set of DNA microarrays with cytochrome p450 family genes. The performance of our multiple multivariate models is compared with that of a recently proposed third-order polynomial regression method that uses percent identity as the sole predictor. All multivariate models agree that the 'most contiguous base pairs between probe and target sequences,' rather than percent identity, is the best univariate predictor. The predictive power is improved by inclusion of additional nonlinear effects, in particular target GC content, when regression trees or ANNs are used. Conclusion A systematic multivariate approach is provided to assess the importance of multiple sequence features for hybridization and of relationships among these features. This approach can easily be applied to larger datasets. This will allow future developments of generalized hybridization models that will be able to correct for false-positive cross-hybridization signals in expression experiments. PMID:16509965

  20. A Decision Tree Based Classifier to Analyze Human Ovarian Cancer cDNA Microarray Datasets.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Hsiun; Wang, Hsin-Chieh; Lee, Guan-Wei; Lin, Yi-Chen; Chiu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynaecological disease because of the high mortality rate and there is no any symptom in cancer early stage. It was often the terminal cancer period when patients were diagnosed with ovarian cancer and thus delays a good opportunity of treatment. The current common method for detecting ovarian cancer is blood testing for analyzing the tumor marker CA-125 of serum. However, specificity and sensitivity of CA-125 are insufficient for early detection. Therefore, it has become an urgent issue to look for an efficient method which precisely detects the tumor markers for ovarian cancer. This study aims to find the target genes of ovarian cancer by different algorithms of information science. Feature selection and decision tree were applied to analyze 9600 ovarian cancer-related genes. After screening the target genes, candidate genes will be analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software to create a genetic pathway model and to understand the interactive relationship in the different pathological stages of ovarian cancer. Finally, this research found 9 oncogenes associated with ovarian cancer and some genes had not been discovered in previous studies. This system will assist medical staffs in diagnosis and treatment at cancer early stage and improve the patient's survival. PMID:26531754

  1. Development and validation of a 2,000-gene microarray for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, Patrick; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Liu, Li; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-07-01

    Gene microarrays provide the field of ecotoxicology new tools to identify mechanisms of action of chemicals and chemical mixtures. Herein we describe the development and application of a 2,000-gene oligonucleotide microarray for the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, a species commonly used in ecological risk assessments in North America. The microarrays were developed from various cDNA and subtraction libraries that we constructed. Consistency and reproducibility of the microarrays were documented by examining multiple technical replicates. To test application of the fathead minnow microarrays, gene expression profiles of fish exposed to 17-estradiol, a well-characterized estrogen receptor (ER) agonist, were examined. For these experiments, adult male fathead minnows were exposed for 24 h to waterborne 17-estradiol (40 or 100 ng/L) in a flow-through system, and gene expression in liver samples was characterized. Seventy-one genes were identified as differentially regulated by estradiol exposure. Examination of the gene ontology designations of these genes revealed patterns consistent with estradiol’s expected mechanisms of action and also provided novel insights as to molecular effects of the estrogen. Our studies indicate the feasibility and utility of microarrays as a basis for understanding biological responses to chemical exposure in a model ecotoxicology test species.

  2. Microarrays of lentiviruses for gene function screens in immortalized and primary cells.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Steve N; Ali, Siraj M; Carpenter, Anne E; Higgins, Caitlin O; Sabatini, David M

    2006-02-01

    Here we describe lentivirus-infected cell microarrays for the high-throughput screening of gene function in mammalian cells. To create these arrays, we cultured mammalian cells on glass slides 'printed' with lentiviruses pseudotyped as vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein, which encode short hairpin RNA or cDNA. Cells that land on the printed 'features' become infected with lentivirus, creating a living array of stably transduced cell clusters within a monolayer of uninfected cells. The small size of the features of the microarrays (300 microm in diameter) allows high-density spotting of lentivirus, permitting thousands of distinct parallel infections on a single glass slide. Because lentiviruses have a wide cellular tropism, including primary cells, lentivirus-infected cell microarrays can be used as a platform for high-throughput screening in a variety of cell types. PMID:16432521

  3. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  4. Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure identified by cross-comparison on two microarray platforms

    SciTech Connect

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Li, Guilan; Hubbard, Alan E.; Forrest, Matthew S.; Vermeulen, Roel; Chen, Jinsong; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2009-03-01

    Benzene is an established cause of leukemia and a possible cause of lymphoma in humans but the molecular pathways underlying this remain largely undetermined. This study sought to determine if the use of two different microarray platforms could identify robust global gene expression and pathway changes associated with occupational benzene exposure in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression of a population of shoe-factory workers with well-characterized occupational exposures to benzene. Microarray data was analyzed by a robust t-test using a Quantile Transformation (QT) approach. Differential expression of 2692 genes using the Affymetrix platform and 1828 genes using the Illumina platform was found. While the overall concordance in genes identified as significantly associated with benzene exposure between the two platforms was 26% (475 genes), the most significant genes identified by either array were more likely to be ranked as significant by the other platform (Illumina = 64%, Affymetrix = 58%). Expression ratios were similar among the concordant genes (mean difference in expression ratio = 0.04, standard deviation = 0.17). Four genes (CXCL16, ZNF331, JUN and PF4), which we previously identified by microarray and confirmed by real-time PCR, were identified by both platforms in the current study and were among the top 100 genes. Gene Ontology analysis showed over representation of genes involved in apoptosis among the concordant genes while Ingenuity{reg_sign} Pathway Analysis (IPA) identified pathways related to lipid metabolism. Using a two-platform approach allows for robust changes in the PBMC transcriptome of benzene-exposed individuals to be identified.

  5. Protein microarrays: prospects and problems.

    PubMed

    Kodadek, T

    2001-02-01

    Protein microarrays are potentially powerful tools in biochemistry and molecular biology. Two types of protein microarrays are defined. One, termed a protein function array, will consist of thousands of native proteins immobilized in a defined pattern. Such arrays can be utilized for massively parallel testing of protein function, hence the name. The other type is termed a protein-detecting array. This will consist of large numbers of arrayed protein-binding agents. These arrays will allow for expression profiling to be done at the protein level. In this article, some of the major technological challenges to the development of protein arrays are discussed, along with potential solutions.

  6. Quality control in microarray assessment of gene expression in human airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Tina; O'Connor, Timothy P; Hackett, Neil R; Wang, Wei; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Attiyeh, Marc A; Dang, David T; Teater, Matthew; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for defining gene expression profiles of airway epithelium that lend insight into the pathogenesis of human airway disorders. The focus of this study was to establish rigorous quality control parameters to ensure that microarray assessment of the airway epithelium is not confounded by experimental artifact. Samples (total n = 223) of trachea, large and small airway epithelium were collected by fiberoptic bronchoscopy of 144 individuals and hybridized to Affymetrix microarrays. The pre- and post-chip quality control (QC) criteria established, included: (1) RNA quality, assessed by RNA Integrity Number (RIN) ≥ 7.0; (2) cRNA transcript integrity, assessed by signal intensity ratio of GAPDH 3' to 5' probe sets ≤ 3.0; and (3) the multi-chip normalization scaling factor ≤ 10.0. Results Of the 223 samples, all three criteria were assessed in 191; of these 184 (96.3%) passed all three criteria. For the remaining 32 samples, the RIN was not available, and only the other two criteria were used; of these 29 (90.6%) passed these two criteria. Correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons of expression levels for 100 maintenance genes in which at least one array failed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.90 ± 0.04) were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) than correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons between arrays that passed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.97 ± 0.01). Inter-array variability was significantly decreased (p < 0.0001) among samples passing the QC criteria compared with samples failing the QC criteria. Conclusion Based on the aberrant maintenance gene data generated from samples failing the established QC criteria, we propose that the QC criteria outlined in this study can accurately distinguish high quality from low quality data, and can be used to delete poor quality microarray samples before proceeding to higher-order biological analyses and interpretation. PMID:19852842

  7. Microarray Developed on Plastic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Bañuls, María-José; Morais, Sergi B; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    There is a huge potential interest to use synthetic polymers as versatile solid supports for analytical microarraying. Chemical modification of polycarbonate (PC) for covalent immobilization of probes, micro-printing of protein or nucleic acid probes, development of indirect immunoassay, and development of hybridization protocols are described and discussed. PMID:26614067

  8. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    SciTech Connect

    West, Jay A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.

    2009-04-28

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  9. Construction of a cDNA library for miniature pig mandibular deciduous molars

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The miniature pig provides an excellent experimental model for tooth morphogenesis because its diphyodont and heterodont dentition resembles that of humans. However, little information is available on the process of tooth development or the exact molecular mechanisms controlling tooth development in miniature pigs or humans. Thus, the analysis of gene expression related to each stage of tooth development is very important. Results In our study, after serial sections were made, the development of the crown of the miniature pigs’ mandibular deciduous molar could be divided into five main phases: dental lamina stage (E33-E35), bud stage (E35-E40), cap stage (E40-E50), early bell stage (E50-E60), and late bell stage (E60-E65). Total RNA was isolated from the tooth germ of miniature pig embryos at E35, E45, E50, and E60, and a cDNA library was constructed. Then, we identified cDNA sequences on a large scale screen for cDNA profiles in the developing mandibular deciduous molars (E35, E45, E50, and E60) of miniature pigs using Illumina Solexa deep sequencing. Microarray assay was used to detect the expression of genes. Lastly, through Unigene sequence analysis and cDNA expression pattern analysis at E45 and E60, we found that 12 up-regulated and 15 down-regulated genes during the four periods are highly conserved genes homologous with known Homo sapiens genes. Furthermore, there were 6 down-regulated and 2 up-regulated genes in the miniature pig that were highly homologous to Homo sapiens genes compared with those in the mouse. Conclusion Our results not only identify the specific transcriptome and cDNA profile in developing mandibular deciduous molars of the miniature pig, but also provide useful information for investigating the molecular mechanism of tooth development in the miniature pig. PMID:24750690

  10. The Porcelain Crab Transcriptome and PCAD, the Porcelain Crab Microarray and Sequence Database

    SciTech Connect

    Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Wang, Mei; Lindquist, Erika; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Teranishi, Kristen S.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wong, Mike; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2010-01-27

    Background: With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Methodology/Principal Findings: A set of ~;;30K unique sequences (UniSeqs) representing ~;;19K clusters were generated from ~;;98K high quality ESTs from a set of tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66percent of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD), a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases.Conclusions/Significance: The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the transcriptome as can reasonably be captured in

  11. Multi-Platform, Multi-Site, Microarray-Based Human Tumor Classification

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Greg; Yang, Ivana V.; Boulware, David; Kwong, Ka Yin; Coppola, Domenico; Eschrich, Steven; Quackenbush, John; Yeatman, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of gene expression profiling has resulted in the production of rich human data sets with potential for deciphering tumor diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. Here we demonstrate how artificial neural networks (ANNs) can be applied to two completely different microarray platforms (cDNA and oligonucleotide), or a combination of both, to build tumor classifiers capable of deciphering the identity of most human cancers. First, 78 tumors representing eight different types of histologically similar adenocarcinoma, were evaluated with a 32k cDNA microarray and correctly classified by a cDNA-based ANN, using independent training and test sets, with a mean accuracy of 83%. To expand our approach, oligonucleotide data derived from six independent performance sites, representing 463 tumors and 21 tumor types, were assembled, normalized, and scaled. An oligonucleotide-based ANN, trained on a random fraction of the tumors (n = 343), was 88% accurate in predicting known pathological origin of the remaining fraction of tumors (n = 120) not exposed to the training algorithm. Finally, a mixed-platform classifier using a combination of both cDNA and oligonucleotide microarray data from seven performance sites, normalized and scaled from a large and diverse tumor set (n = 539), produced similar results (85% accuracy) on independent test sets. Further validation of our classifiers was achieved by accurately (84%) predicting the known primary site of origin for an independent set of metastatic lesions (n = 50), resected from brain, lung, and liver, potentially addressing the vexing classification problems imposed by unknown primary cancers. These cDNA- and oligonucleotide-based classifiers provide a first proof of principle that data derived from multiple platforms and performance sites can be exploited to build multi-tissue tumor classifiers. PMID:14695313

  12. From microarrays to networks: mining expression time series.

    PubMed

    Dewey, T Gregory

    2002-10-15

    Over the past few years, powerful new methods have been devised that enable researchers to study the expression dynamics of many genes simultaneously (e.g. gene expression profiles using cDNA microarrays). In principle, this potentially vast quantity of data enables the dissection of the complex genetic networks that control the patterns and rhythms of gene expression in the cell. Finding the patterns in those data represents the next major phase in our understanding of the programming and functioning of the living cell. Simple dynamic models can be used to generate gene expression networks. These networks reveal the phenomenological link between the expression of different genes. This review discuss how these networks are generated and outlines several data-mining techniques for extracting relationships and hypotheses in gene expression. These emerging methods can be applied to a range of biological problems.

  13. The Microarray Revolution: Perspectives from Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Jay L.; Beason, K. Beth; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Evans, Irene M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, microarray analysis has become a key experimental tool, enabling the analysis of genome-wide patterns of gene expression. This review approaches the microarray revolution with a focus upon four topics: 1) the early development of this technology and its application to cancer diagnostics; 2) a primer of microarray research,…

  14. Microarray-Based Mapping for the Detection of Molecular Markers in Response to Aspergillus flavus Infection in Susceptible and Resistant Maize Lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate differential gene expression levels for resistance to A. flavus kernel infection in susceptible (Va35) and resistant (Mp313E) maize lines using Oligonucleotide and cDNA microarray analysis, (2) to evaluate differences in A. flavus accumulation betwee...

  15. Transcriptional Profiling of Hydrogen Production Metabolism of Rhodobacter capsulatus under Temperature Stress by Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gürgan, Muazzez; Afşar Erkal, Nilüfer; Özgür, Ebru; Gündüz, Ufuk; Eroglu, Inci; Yücel, Meral

    2015-01-01

    Biohydrogen is a clean and renewable form of hydrogen, which can be produced by photosynthetic bacteria in outdoor large-scale photobioreactors using sunlight. In this study, the transcriptional response of Rhodobacter capsulatus to cold (4 °C) and heat (42 °C) stress was studied using microarrays. Bacteria were grown in 30/2 acetate/glutamate medium at 30 °C for 48 h under continuous illumination. Then, cold and heat stresses were applied for two and six hours. Growth and hydrogen production were impaired under both stress conditions. Microarray chips for R. capsulatus were custom designed by Affymetrix (GeneChip®. TR_RCH2a520699F). The numbers of significantly changed genes were 328 and 293 out of 3685 genes under cold and heat stress, respectively. Our results indicate that temperature stress greatly affects the hydrogen production metabolisms of R. capsulatus. Specifically, the expression of genes that participate in nitrogen metabolism, photosynthesis and the electron transport system were induced by cold stress, while decreased by heat stress. Heat stress also resulted in down regulation of genes related to cell envelope, transporter and binding proteins. Transcriptome analysis and physiological results were consistent with each other. The results presented here may aid clarification of the genetic mechanisms for hydrogen production in purple non-sulfur (PNS) bacteria under temperature stress. PMID:26086826

  16. Comparison of High-Level Microarray Analysis Methods in the Context of Result Consistency

    PubMed Central

    Chrominski, Kornel; Tkacz, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Motivation When we were asked for help with high-level microarray data analysis (on Affymetrix HGU-133A microarray), we faced the problem of selecting an appropriate method. We wanted to select a method that would yield "the best result" (detected as many "really" differentially expressed genes (DEGs) as possible, without false positives and false negatives). However, life scientists could not help us – they use their "favorite" method without special argumentation. We also did not find any norm or recommendation. Therefore, we decided to examine it for our own purpose. We considered whether the results obtained using different methods of high-level microarray data analyses – Significant Analysis of Microarrays, Rank Products, Bland-Altman, Mann-Whitney test, T test and the Linear Models for Microarray Data – would be in agreement. Initially, we conducted a comparative analysis of the results on eight real data sets from microarray experiments (from the Array Express database). The results were surprising. On the same array set, the set of DEGs by different methods were significantly different. We also applied the methods to artificial data sets and determined some measures that allow the preparation of the overall scoring of tested methods for future recommendation. Results We found a very low level concordance of results from tested methods on real array sets. The number of common DEGs (detected by all six methods on fixed array sets, checked on eight array sets) ranged from 6 to 433 (22,283 total array readings). Results on artificial data sets were better than those on the real data. However, they were not fully satisfying. We scored tested methods on accuracy, recall, precision, f-measure and Matthews correlation coefficient. Based on the overall scoring, the best methods were SAM and LIMMA. We also found TT to be acceptable. The worst scoring was MW. Based on our study, we recommend: 1. Carefully taking into account the need for study when choosing a

  17. MicroGen: a MIAME compliant web system for microarray experiment information and workflow management

    PubMed Central

    Burgarella, Sarah; Cattaneo, Dario; Pinciroli, Francesco; Masseroli, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Background Improvements of bio-nano-technologies and biomolecular techniques have led to increasing production of high-throughput experimental data. Spotted cDNA microarray is one of the most diffuse technologies, used in single research laboratories and in biotechnology service facilities. Although they are routinely performed, spotted microarray experiments are complex procedures entailing several experimental steps and actors with different technical skills and roles. During an experiment, involved actors, who can also be located in a distance, need to access and share specific experiment information according to their roles. Furthermore, complete information describing all experimental steps must be orderly collected to allow subsequent correct interpretation of experimental results. Results We developed MicroGen, a web system for managing information and workflow in the production pipeline of spotted microarray experiments. It is constituted of a core multi-database system able to store all data completely characterizing different spotted microarray experiments according to the Minimum Information About Microarray Experiments (MIAME) standard, and of an intuitive and user-friendly web interface able to support the collaborative work required among multidisciplinary actors and roles involved in spotted microarray experiment production. MicroGen supports six types of user roles: the researcher who designs and requests the experiment, the spotting operator, the hybridisation operator, the image processing operator, the system administrator, and the generic public user who can access the unrestricted part of the system to get information about MicroGen services. Conclusion MicroGen represents a MIAME compliant information system that enables managing workflow and supporting collaborative work in spotted microarray experiment production. PMID:16351755

  18. User-friendly solutions for microarray quality control and pre-processing on ArrayAnalysis.org.

    PubMed

    Eijssen, Lars M T; Jaillard, Magali; Adriaens, Michiel E; Gaj, Stan; de Groot, Philip J; Müller, Michael; Evelo, Chris T

    2013-07-01

    Quality control (QC) is crucial for any scientific method producing data. Applying adequate QC introduces new challenges in the genomics field where large amounts of data are produced with complex technologies. For DNA microarrays, specific algorithms for QC and pre-processing including normalization have been developed by the scientific community, especially for expression chips of the Affymetrix platform. Many of these have been implemented in the statistical scripting language R and are available from the Bioconductor repository. However, application is hampered by lack of integrative tools that can be used by users of any experience level. To fill this gap, we developed a freely available tool for QC and pre-processing of Affymetrix gene expression results, extending, integrating and harmonizing functionality of Bioconductor packages. The tool can be easily accessed through a wizard-like web portal at http://www.arrayanalysis.org or downloaded for local use in R. The portal provides extensive documentation, including user guides, interpretation help with real output illustrations and detailed technical documentation. It assists newcomers to the field in performing state-of-the-art QC and pre-processing while offering data analysts an integral open-source package. Providing the scientific community with this easily accessible tool will allow improving data quality and reuse and adoption of standards. PMID:23620278

  19. User-friendly solutions for microarray quality control and pre-processing on ArrayAnalysis.org.

    PubMed

    Eijssen, Lars M T; Jaillard, Magali; Adriaens, Michiel E; Gaj, Stan; de Groot, Philip J; Müller, Michael; Evelo, Chris T

    2013-07-01

    Quality control (QC) is crucial for any scientific method producing data. Applying adequate QC introduces new challenges in the genomics field where large amounts of data are produced with complex technologies. For DNA microarrays, specific algorithms for QC and pre-processing including normalization have been developed by the scientific community, especially for expression chips of the Affymetrix platform. Many of these have been implemented in the statistical scripting language R and are available from the Bioconductor repository. However, application is hampered by lack of integrative tools that can be used by users of any experience level. To fill this gap, we developed a freely available tool for QC and pre-processing of Affymetrix gene expression results, extending, integrating and harmonizing functionality of Bioconductor packages. The tool can be easily accessed through a wizard-like web portal at http://www.arrayanalysis.org or downloaded for local use in R. The portal provides extensive documentation, including user guides, interpretation help with real output illustrations and detailed technical documentation. It assists newcomers to the field in performing state-of-the-art QC and pre-processing while offering data analysts an integral open-source package. Providing the scientific community with this easily accessible tool will allow improving data quality and reuse and adoption of standards.

  20. Microarray technology for use in molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Suzanne D; Whistler, Toni

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful laboratory tool for the simultaneous assessment of the activity of thousands genes. Remarkable advances in biological sample collection, preparation and automation of hybridization have enabled the application of microarray technology to large, population-based studies. Now, microarrays have the potential to serve as screening tools for the detection of altered gene expression activity that might contribute to diseases in human populations. Reproducible and reliable microarray results depend on multiple factors. In this chapter, biological sample parameters are introduced that should be considered for any microarray experiment. Then, the microarray technology that we have successfully applied to limited biological sample from all our molecular epidemiology studies is detailed. This reproducible and reliable approach for using microarrays should be applicable to any biological questions asked.

  1. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  2. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  3. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  4. Microarrays, antiobesity and the liver

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chávez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    In this review, the microarray technology and especially oligonucleotide arrays are exemplified with a practical example taken from the perilipin−/− mice and using the dChip software, available for non-lucrative purposes. It was found that the liver of perilipin−/− mice was healthy and normal, even under high-fat diet when compared with the results published for the scd1−/− mice, which under high-fat diets had a darker liver, suggestive of hepatic steatosis. Scd1 is required for the biosynthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids and plays a key role in the hepatic synthesis of triglycerides and of very-low-density lipoproteins. Both models of obesity resistance share many similar phenotypic antiobesity features, however, the perilipin−/− mice had a significant downregulation of stearoyl CoA desaturases scd1 and scd2 in its white adipose tissue, but a normal level of both genes inside the liver, even under high-fat diet. Here, different microarray methodologies are discussed, and also some of the most recent discoveries and perspectives regarding the use of microarrays, with an emphasis on obesity gene expression, and a personal remark on my findings of increased expression for hemoglobin transcripts and other hemo related genes (hemo-like), and for leukocyte like (leuko-like) genes inside the white adipose tissue of the perilipin−/− mice. In conclusion, microarrays have much to offer in comparative studies such as those in antiobesity, and also they are methodologies adequate for new astounding molecular discoveries [free full text of this article PMID:15657555

  5. Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression in Soybean Roots Susceptible to the Soybean Cyst Nematode Two Days Post Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Khan, R.; Alkharouf, N.; Beard, H.; MacDonald, M.; Chouikha, I.; Meyer, S.; Grefenstette, J.; Knap, H.; Matthews, B.

    2004-01-01

    Soybean root cells undergo dramatic morphological and biochemical changes during the establishment of a feeding site in a compatible interaction with the soybean cyst nematode (SCN). We constructed a cDNA microarray with approximately 1,300 cDNA inserts targeted to identify differentially expressed genes during the compatible interaction of SCN with soybean roots 2 days after infection. Three independent biological replicates were grown and inoculated with SCN, and 2 days later RNA was extracted for hybridization to microarrays and compared to noninoculated controls. Statistical analysis indicated that approximately 8% of the genes monitored were induced and more than 50% of these were genes of unknown function. Notable genes that were more highly expressed 2 days after inoculation with SCN as compared to noninoculated roots included the repetitive proline-rich glycoprotein, the stress-induced gene SAM22, ß-1,3-endoglucanase, peroxidase, and those involved in carbohydrate metabolism, plant defense, and signaling. PMID:19262812

  6. Microarray analysis of gene expression in soybean roots susceptible to the soybean cyst nematode two days post invasion.

    PubMed

    Khan, R; Alkharouf, N; Beard, H; Macdonald, M; Chouikha, I; Meyer, S; Grefenstette, J; Knap, H; Matthews, B

    2004-09-01

    Soybean root cells undergo dramatic morphological and biochemical changes during the establishment of a feeding site in a compatible interaction with the soybean cyst nematode (SCN). We constructed a cDNA microarray with approximately 1,300 cDNA inserts targeted to identify differentially expressed genes during the compatible interaction of SCN with soybean roots 2 days after infection. Three independent biological replicates were grown and inoculated with SCN, and 2 days later RNA was extracted for hybridization to microarrays and compared to noninoculated controls. Statistical analysis indicated that approximately 8% of the genes monitored were induced and more than 50% of these were genes of unknown function. Notable genes that were more highly expressed 2 days after inoculation with SCN as compared to noninoculated roots included the repetitive proline-rich glycoprotein, the stress-induced gene SAM22, ss-1,3-endoglucanase, peroxidase, and those involved in carbohydrate metabolism, plant defense, and signaling.

  7. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins. PMID:20726799

  8. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins.

  9. A comprehensive study design reveals treatment- and transcript abundance–dependent concordance between RNA-seq and microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charles; Gong, Binsheng; Bushel, Pierre R.; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Xu, Joshua; Fang, Hong; Hong, Huixiao; Shen, Jie; Su, Zhenqiang; Meehan, Joe; Li, Xiaojin; Yang, Lu; Li, Haiqing; Łabaj, Paweł P.; Kreil, David P.; Megherbi, Dalila; Florian, Caiment; Gaj, Stan; van Delft, Joost; Kleinjans, Jos; Scherer, Andreas; Viswanath, Devanarayan; Wang, Jian; Yang, Yong; Qian, Hui-Rong; Lancashire, Lee J.; Bessarabova, Marina; Nikolsky, Yuri; Furlanello, Cesare; Chierici, Marco; Albanese, Davide; Jurman, Giuseppe; Riccadonna, Samantha; Filosi, Michele; Visintainer, Roberto; Zhang, Ke K.; Li, Jianying; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Svoboda, Daniel L.; Fuscoe, James C.; Deng, Youping; Shi, Leming; Paules, Richard S.; Auerbach, Scott S.; Tong, Weida

    2014-01-01

    RNA-seq facilitates unbiased genome-wide gene-expression profiling. However, its concordance with the well-established microarray platform must be rigorously assessed for confident uses in clinical and regulatory application. Here we use a comprehensive study design to generate Illumina RNA-seq and Affymetrix microarray data from the same set of liver samples of rats under varying degrees of perturbation by 27 chemicals representing multiple modes of action (MOA). The cross-platform concordance in terms of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) or enriched pathways is highly correlated with treatment effect size, gene-expression abundance and the biological complexity of the MOA. RNA-seq outperforms microarray (90% versus 76%) in DEG verification by quantitative PCR and the main gain is its improved accuracy for low expressed genes. Nonetheless, predictive classifiers derived from both platforms performed similarly. Therefore, the endpoint studied and its biological complexity, transcript abundance, and intended application are important factors in transcriptomic research and for decision-making. PMID:25150839

  10. An advanced application of protein microarrays: cell-based assays for functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    Microarrays have become common tools for approaching different experimental questions: DNA, protein and peptide arrays offer the power of multiplexing the assay and by means of miniaturization technology, the possibility to reduce cost and amount of samples and reagents. Recently, a novel technology for functional assays has been proposed. Sabatini and co-workers have shown a cell-based microarrays method (1) that relies on the deposition and immobilization of an array of cDNA plasmids on a slide where cells are subsequently plated; the cDNA is then internalized by "reverse transfection" and cells overexpress or downregulate in each single spot the genes of interest. This approach allows the screening of different phenotypes in living cells of many genes in parallel on a single slide. To overcome some relevant limitations of this approach, we have implemented the technology by means of viral immobilization (2) on a novel surface of cluster-assembled nanostructured TiO2 (3) previously functionalized with an array of a docking protein. In this work, we present the detailed development of the "reverse infection cell-microarray based technology" in U2OS cells on a novel coated slide that represents an advanced application of protein arrays.

  11. Simplified Microarray Technique for Identifying mRNA in Rare Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almeida, Eduardo; Kadambi, Geeta

    2007-01-01

    Two simplified methods of identifying messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), and compact, low-power apparatuses to implement the methods, are at the proof-of-concept stage of development. These methods are related to traditional methods based on hybridization of nucleic acid, but whereas the traditional methods must be practiced in laboratory settings, these methods could be practiced in field settings. Hybridization of nucleic acid is a powerful technique for detection of specific complementary nucleic acid sequences, and is increasingly being used for detection of changes in gene expression in microarrays containing thousands of gene probes. A traditional microarray study entails at least the following six steps: 1. Purification of cellular RNA, 2. Amplification of complementary deoxyribonucleic acid [cDNA] by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 3. Labeling of cDNA with fluorophores of Cy3 (a green cyanine dye) and Cy5 (a red cyanine dye), 4. Hybridization to a microarray chip, 5. Fluorescence scanning the array(s) with dual excitation wavelengths, and 6. Analysis of the resulting images. This six-step procedure must be performed in a laboratory because it requires bulky equipment.

  12. Robin: An Intuitive Wizard Application for R-Based Expression Microarray Quality Assessment and Analysis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, Marc; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Krüger, Peter; Nagel, Axel; Hannemann, Jan; Giorgi, Federico M.; Childs, Liam; Osorio, Sonia; Walther, Dirk; Selbig, Joachim; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Usadel, Björn

    2010-01-01

    The wide application of high-throughput transcriptomics using microarrays has generated a plethora of technical platforms, data repositories, and sophisticated statistical analysis methods, leaving the individual scientist with the problem of choosing the appropriate approach to address a biological question. Several software applications that provide a rich environment for microarray analysis and data storage are available (e.g. GeneSpring, EMMA2), but these are mostly commercial or require an advanced informatics infrastructure. There is a need for a noncommercial, easy-to-use graphical application that aids the lab researcher to find the proper method to analyze microarray data, without this requiring expert understanding of the complex underlying statistics, or programming skills. We have developed Robin, a Java-based graphical wizard application that harnesses the advanced statistical analysis functions of the R/BioConductor project. Robin implements streamlined workflows that guide the user through all steps of two-color, single-color, or Affymetrix microarray analysis. It provides functions for thorough quality assessment of the data and automatically generates warnings to notify the user of potential outliers, low-quality chips, or low statistical power. The results are generated in a standard format that allows ready use with both specialized analysis tools like MapMan and PageMan and generic spreadsheet applications. To further improve user friendliness, Robin includes both integrated help and comprehensive external documentation. To demonstrate the statistical power and ease of use of the workflows in Robin, we present a case study in which we apply Robin to analyze a two-color microarray experiment comparing gene expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves, flowers, and roots. PMID:20388663

  13. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  14. "Per cell" normalization method for mRNA measurement by quantitative PCR and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Jun; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Ono, Atsushi; Kodama, Yukio; Nagao, Taku

    2006-01-01

    Background Transcriptome data from quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and DNA microarrays are typically obtained from a fixed amount of RNA collected per sample. Therefore, variations in tissue cellularity and RNA yield across samples in an experimental series compromise accurate determination of the absolute level of each mRNA species per cell in any sample. Since mRNAs are copied from genomic DNA, the simplest way to express mRNA level would be as copy number per template DNA, or more practically, as copy number per cell. Results Here we report a method (designated the "Percellome" method) for normalizing the expression of mRNA values in biological samples. It provides a "per cell" readout in mRNA copy number and is applicable to both quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and DNA microarray studies. The genomic DNA content of each sample homogenate was measured from a small aliquot to derive the number of cells in the sample. A cocktail of five external spike RNAs admixed in a dose-graded manner (dose-graded spike cocktail; GSC) was prepared and added to each homogenate in proportion to its DNA content. In this way, the spike mRNAs represented absolute copy numbers per cell in the sample. The signals from the five spike mRNAs were used as a dose-response standard curve for each sample, enabling us to convert all the signals measured to copy numbers per cell in an expression profile-independent manner. A series of samples was measured by Q-PCR and Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays using this Percellome method, and the results showed up to 90 % concordance. Conclusion Percellome data can be compared directly among samples and among different studies, and between different platforms, without further normalization. Therefore, "percellome" normalization can serve as a standard method for exchanging and comparing data across different platforms and among different laboratories. PMID:16571132

  15. Concordance between RNA-sequencing data and DNA microarray data in transcriptome analysis of proliferative and quiescent fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Trost, Brett; Moir, Catherine A; Gillespie, Zoe E; Kusalik, Anthony; Mitchell, Jennifer A; Eskiw, Christopher H

    2015-09-01

    DNA microarrays and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) are major technologies for performing high-throughput analysis of transcript abundance. Recently, concerns have been raised regarding the concordance of data derived from the two techniques. Using cDNA libraries derived from normal human foreskin fibroblasts, we measured changes in transcript abundance as cells transitioned from proliferative growth to quiescence using both DNA microarrays and RNA-seq. The internal reproducibility of the RNA-seq data was greater than that of the microarray data. Correlations between the RNA-seq data and the individual microarrays were low, but correlations between the RNA-seq values and the geometric mean of the microarray values were moderate. The two technologies had good agreement when considering probes with the largest (both positive and negative) fold change (FC) values. An independent technique, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), was used to measure the FC of 76 genes between proliferative and quiescent samples, and a higher correlation was observed between the qRT-PCR data and the RNA-seq data than between the qRT-PCR data and the microarray data.

  16. Integrated Amplification Microarrays for Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Bryant, Lexi; Griesemer, Sara B.; Gu, Rui; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Kukhtin, Alexander; Parker, Jennifer; Zimmerman, Cynthia; George, Kirsten St.; Cooney, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    This overview describes microarray-based tests that combine solution-phase amplification chemistry and microarray hybridization within a single microfluidic chamber. The integrated biochemical approach improves microarray workflow for diagnostic applications by reducing the number of steps and minimizing the potential for sample or amplicon cross-contamination. Examples described herein illustrate a basic, integrated approach for DNA and RNA genomes, and a simple consumable architecture for incorporating wash steps while retaining an entirely closed system. It is anticipated that integrated microarray biochemistry will provide an opportunity to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of microarray consumables, equipment, and workflow, which in turn will enable a broader spectrum of users to exploit the intrinsic multiplexing power of microarrays for infectious disease diagnostics.

  17. Microarray data analysis and mining approaches.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Francesca; Botta, Marco; Calogero, Raffaele A

    2007-12-01

    Microarray based transcription profiling is now a consolidated methodology and has widespread use in areas such as pharmacogenomics, diagnostics and drug target identification. Large-scale microarray studies are also becoming crucial to a new way of conceiving experimental biology. A main issue in microarray transcription profiling is data analysis and mining. When microarrays became a methodology of general use, considerable effort was made to produce algorithms and methods for the identification of differentially expressed genes. More recently, the focus has switched to algorithms and database development for microarray data mining. Furthermore, the evolution of microarray technology is allowing researchers to grasp the regulative nature of transcription, integrating basic expression analysis with mRNA characteristics, i.e. exon-based arrays, and with DNA characteristics, i.e. comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism, tiling and promoter structure. In this article, we will review approaches used to detect differentially expressed genes and to link differential expression to specific biological functions.

  18. Gene expression profiling of gastric cancer by microarray combined with laser capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Shiang; Lin, Yi-Shing; Chang, Yu-Ting; Shun, Chia-Tung; Lin, Ming-Tsan; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the gene expression profile of gastric cancer (GC) by combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and microarray and to correlate the profiling with histological subtypes. METHODS: Using LCM, pure cancer cells were procured from 45 cancerous tissues. After procurement of about 5 000 cells, total RNA was extracted and the quality of RNA was determined before further amplification and hybridization. One microgram of amplified RNA was converted to cDNA and hybridized to cDNA microarray. RESULTS: Among 45 cases, only 21 were qualified for their RNAs. A total of 62 arrays were performed. These included 42 arrays for cancer (21 cases with dye-swab duplication) and 20 arrays for non-tumorous cells (10 cases with dye-swab duplication) with universal reference. Analyzed data showed 504 genes were differentially expressed and could distinguish cancerous and non-cancerous groups with more than 99% accuracy. Of the 504 genes, trefoil factors 1, 2, and 3 were in the list and their expression patterns were consistent with previous reports. Immunohistochemical staining of trefoil factor 1 was also consistent with the array data. Analyses of the tumor group with these 504 genes showed that there were 3 subgroups of GC that did not correspond to any current classification system, including Lauren’s classification. CONCLUSION: By using LCM, linear amplification of RNA, and cDNA microarray, we have identified a panel of genes that have the power to discriminate between GC and non-cancer groups. The new molecular classification and the identified novel genes in gastric carcinogenesis deserve further investigations to elucidate their clinicopathological significance. PMID:16437709

  19. Automated Microarray Image Analysis Toolbox for MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Willse, Alan R.; Protic, Miroslava; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2005-09-01

    The Automated Microarray Image Analysis (AMIA) Toolbox for MATLAB is a flexible, open-source microarray image analysis tool that allows the user to customize analysis of sets of microarray images. This tool provides several methods of identifying and quantify spot statistics, as well as extensive diagnostic statistics and images to identify poor data quality or processing. The open nature of this software allows researchers to understand the algorithms used to provide intensity estimates and to modify them easily if desired.

  20. Surface free energy and microarray deposition technology.

    PubMed

    McHale, Glen

    2007-03-01

    Microarray techniques use a combinatorial approach to assess complex biochemical interactions. The fundamental goal is simultaneous, large-scale experimentation analogous to the automation achieved in the semiconductor industry. However, microarray deposition inherently involves liquids contacting solid substrates. Liquid droplet shapes are determined by surface and interfacial tension forces, and flows during drying. This article looks at how surface free energy and wetting considerations may influence the accuracy and reliability of spotted microarray experiments.

  1. Microarray analysis of relative gene expression stability for selection of internal reference genes in the rhesus macaque brain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Normalization of gene expression data refers to the comparison of expression values using reference standards that are consistent across all conditions of an experiment. In PCR studies, genes designated as "housekeeping genes" have been used as internal reference genes under the assumption that their expression is stable and independent of experimental conditions. However, verification of this assumption is rarely performed. Here we assess the use of gene microarray analysis to facilitate selection of internal reference sequences with higher expression stability across experimental conditions than can be expected using traditional selection methods. We recently demonstrated that relative gene expression from qRT-PCR data normalized using GAPDH, ALG9 and RPL13A expression values mirrored relative expression using quantile normalization in Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) on the Affymetrix® GeneChip® rhesus Macaque Genome Array. Having shown that qRT-PCR and Affymetrix® GeneChip® data from the same hormone replacement therapy (HRT) study yielded concordant results, we used quantile-normalized gene microarray data to identify the most stably expressed among probe sets for prospective internal reference genes across three brain regions from the HRT study and an additional study of normally menstruating rhesus macaques (cycle study). Gene selection was limited to 575 previously published human "housekeeping" genes. Twelve animals were used per study, and three brain regions were analyzed from each animal. Gene expression stabilities were determined using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software packages. Results Sequences co-annotated for ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27A), and ubiquitin were among the most stably expressed under all conditions and selection criteria used for both studies. Higher annotation quality on the human GeneChip® facilitated more targeted analysis than could be accomplished using the rhesus GeneChip®. In the cycle study, multiple

  2. Chum-RNA allows preparation of a high-quality cDNA library from a single-cell quantity of mRNA without PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Tougan, Takahiro; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    Linear RNA amplification using T7 RNA polymerase is useful in genome-wide analysis of gene expression using DNA microarrays, but exponential amplification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is still required for cDNA library preparation from single-cell quantities of RNA. We have designed a small RNA molecule called chum-RNA that has enabled us to prepare a single-cell cDNA library after four rounds of T7-based linear amplification, without using PCR amplification. Chum-RNA drove cDNA synthesis from only 0.49 femtograms of mRNA (730 mRNA molecules) as a substrate, a quantity that corresponds to a minor population of mRNA molecules in a single mammalian cell. Analysis of the independent cDNA clone of this library (6.6 x 10(5) cfu) suggests that 30-fold RNA amplification occurred in each round of the amplification process. The size distribution and representation of mRNAs in the resulting one-cell cDNA library retained its similarity to that of the million-cell cDNA library. The use of chum-RNA might also facilitate reactions involving other DNA/RNA modifying enzymes whose Michaelis constant (K(m)) values are around 1 mM, allowing them to be activated in the presence of only small quantities of substrate. PMID:18603591

  3. Chum-RNA allows preparation of a high-quality cDNA library from a single-cell quantity of mRNA without PCR amplification

    PubMed Central

    Tougan, Takahiro; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Linear RNA amplification using T7 RNA polymerase is useful in genome-wide analysis of gene expression using DNA microarrays, but exponential amplification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is still required for cDNA library preparation from single-cell quantities of RNA. We have designed a small RNA molecule called chum-RNA that has enabled us to prepare a single-cell cDNA library after four rounds of T7-based linear amplification, without using PCR amplification. Chum-RNA drove cDNA synthesis from only 0.49 femtograms of mRNA (730 mRNA molecules) as a substrate, a quantity that corresponds to a minor population of mRNA molecules in a single mammalian cell. Analysis of the independent cDNA clone of this library (6.6 × 105 cfu) suggests that 30-fold RNA amplification occurred in each round of the amplification process. The size distribution and representation of mRNAs in the resulting one-cell cDNA library retained its similarity to that of the million-cell cDNA library. The use of chum-RNA might also facilitate reactions involving other DNA/RNA modifying enzymes whose Michaelis constant (Km) values are around 1 mM, allowing them to be activated in the presence of only small quantities of substrate. PMID:18603591

  4. Optimised laser microdissection of the human ocular surface epithelial regions for microarray studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    concentration of these samples ranged from 10.88 ng/12 μl to 25.8 ng/12 μl, with the RNA integrity numbers (RIN) for these samples from 3.3 to 7.9. RNA samples with RIN values below 2, that had failed to amplify satisfactorily were discarded. Conclusions The optimised protocol for sample collection and laser microdissection improved the RNA yield of the insitu ocular surface epithelial regions for effective microarray studies on spotted oligonucleotide and affymetrix platforms. PMID:24160452

  5. THE ABRF MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2005: TAKING THE PULSE ON THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years microarray technology has evolved into a critical component of any discovery based program. Since 1999, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) has conducted biennial surveys designed to generate a pr...

  6. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts.

    PubMed

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  7. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  8. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays.

  9. Highly parallel microbial diagnostics using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Loy, Alexander; Bodrossy, Levente

    2006-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are highly parallel hybridization platforms, allowing rapid and simultaneous identification of many different microorganisms and viruses in a single assay. In the past few years, researchers have been confronted with a dramatic increase in the number of studies reporting development and/or improvement of oligonucleotide microarrays for microbial diagnostics, but use of the technology in routine diagnostics is still constrained by a variety of factors. Careful development of microarray essentials (such as oligonucleotide probes, protocols for target preparation and hybridization, etc.) combined with extensive performance testing are thus mandatory requirements for the maturation of diagnostic microarrays from fancy technological gimmicks to robust and routinely applicable tools.

  10. A method for evaluation of the quality of DNA microarray spots.

    PubMed

    Boa, Zhang; Ma, Wen-Li; Hu, Zi-You; Rong, Shi; Shi, Yan-Bin; Zheng, Wen-Ling

    2002-09-30

    To establish a method to evaluate the quality of the printed microarray and DNA fragments' immobilization. The target gene fragments that were made with the restriction display PCR (RD-PCR) technique were printed on a superamine modified glass slide, then immobilized with UV cross-linking and heat. This chip was hybridized with universal primers that were labeled with cy3-dUTP, as well as cDNA that was labeled with cy3-dCTP, as the conventional protocol. Most of the target gene fragments on the chip showed positive signals, but the negative control showed no signal, and vice versa. We established a method that enables an effective evaluation of the quality of the microarrays.

  11. Segmentation of complementary DNA microarray images by wavelet-based Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I; Cavouras, Dionisis A; Glotsos, Dimitris Th; Georgiadis, Pantelis V; Kalatzis, Ioannis K; Nikiforidis, George C

    2009-11-01

    A wavelet-based modification of the Markov random field (WMRF) model is proposed for segmenting complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray images. For evaluation purposes, five simulated and a set of five real microarray images were used. The one-level stationary wavelet transform (SWT) of each microarray image was used to form two images, a denoised image, using hard thresholding filter, and a magnitude image, from the amplitudes of the horizontal and vertical components of SWT. Elements from these two images were suitably combined to form the WMRF model for segmenting spots from their background. The WMRF was compared against the conventional MRF and the Fuzzy C means (FCM) algorithms on simulated and real microarray images and their performances were evaluated by means of the segmentation matching factor (SMF) and the coefficient of determination (r2). Additionally, the WMRF was compared against the SPOT and SCANALYZE, and performances were evaluated by the mean absolute error (MAE) and the coefficient of variation (CV). The WMRF performed more accurately than the MRF and FCM (SMF: 92.66, 92.15, and 89.22, r2 : 0.92, 0.90, and 0.84, respectively) and achieved higher reproducibility than the MRF, SPOT, and SCANALYZE (MAE: 497, 1215, 1180, and 503, CV: 0.88, 1.15, 0.93, and 0.90, respectively).

  12. Fabrication of a microarray using a combination of the large circular sense and antisense DNA.

    PubMed

    Doh, Kyung-Oh; Lee, Yun-Han; Han, Kil-Hwan; Uhm, Seok-Yong; Kim, Jong-Pil; Bae, Yun-Ui; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Moon, Ik-Jae; Park, Jong-Gu

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, single-stranded large circular (LC)-sense molecules were utilized as probes for DNA microarrays and showed stronger binding signals than those of PCR-amplified cDNA probes. A microarray experiment using 284 LC-sense DNA probes found 6 upregulated and 7 downregulated genes in A549 cells as compared to WI38VA13 cells. Repeated experiments showed largely consistent results, and microarray data strongly correlated with data acquired from quantitative real-time RT-PCR. A large array comprising 5,079 LC-sense DNA was prepared, and analysis of the mean differential expression from dye-swap experiments revealed 332 upregulated and 509 downregulated genes in A549 cells compared to WI38VA13 cells. Subsequent functional analysis using an LC-antisense library of overexpressed genes identified 28 genes involved in A549 cell growth. These experiments demonstrated the proper features of LC-sense molecules as probe DNA for microarray and the potential utility of the combination of LC-sense and -antisense libraries for an effective functional validation of genes.

  13. Genomic resources for Myzus persicae: EST sequencing, SNP identification, and microarray design

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, John S; Wilson, Alex CC; de Vos, Martin; Sun, Qi; Tamborindeguy, Cecilia; Winfield, Agnese; Malloch, Gaynor; Smith, Dawn M; Fenton, Brian; Gray, Stewart M; Jander, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Background The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), is a world-wide insect pest capable of infesting more than 40 plant families, including many crop species. However, despite the significant damage inflicted by M. persicae in agricultural systems through direct feeding damage and by its ability to transmit plant viruses, limited genomic information is available for this species. Results Sequencing of 16 M. persicae cDNA libraries generated 26,669 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Aphids for library construction were raised on Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana benthamiana, Brassica oleracea, B. napus, and Physalis floridana (with and without Potato leafroll virus infection). The M. persicae cDNA libraries include ones made from sexual and asexual whole aphids, guts, heads, and salivary glands. In silico comparison of cDNA libraries identified aphid genes with tissue-specific expression patterns, and gene expression that is induced by feeding on Nicotiana benthamiana. Furthermore, 2423 genes that are novel to science and potentially aphid-specific were identified. Comparison of cDNA data from three aphid lineages identified single nucleotide polymorphisms that can be used as genetic markers and, in some cases, may represent functional differences in the protein products. In particular, non-conservative amino acid substitutions in a highly expressed gut protease may be of adaptive significance for M. persicae feeding on different host plants. The Agilent eArray platform was used to design an M. persicae oligonucleotide microarray representing over 10,000 unique genes. Conclusion New genomic resources have been developed for M. persicae, an agriculturally important insect pest. These include previously unknown sequence data, a collection of expressed genes, molecular markers, and a DNA microarray that can be used to study aphid gene expression. These resources will help elucidate the adaptations that allow M. persicae to develop compatible interactions with its

  14. 2008 Microarray Research Group (MARG Survey): Sensing the State of Microarray Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution and transformation, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. Th...

  15. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  16. Gene expression profiles in the rat streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model identified using microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Inmaculada; Clayton, Chris L; Graham, Simon J; Life, Paul F; Dickson, Marion C

    2005-01-01

    Experimental arthritis models are considered valuable tools for delineating mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmune phenomena. Use of microarray-based methods represents a new and challenging approach that allows molecular dissection of complex autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. In order to characterize the temporal gene expression profile in joints from the reactivation model of streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rats, total RNA was extracted from ankle joints from naive, SCW injected, or phosphate buffered saline injected animals (time course study) and gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray technology (RAE230A). After normalization and statistical analysis of data, 631 differentially expressed genes were sorted into clusters based on their levels and kinetics of expression using Spotfire profile search and K-mean cluster analysis. Microarray-based data for a subset of genes were validated using real-time PCR TaqMan analysis. Analysis of the microarray data identified 631 genes (441 upregulated and 190 downregulated) that were differentially expressed (Delta > 1.8, P < 0.01), showing specific levels and patterns of gene expression. The genes exhibiting the highest fold increase in expression on days -13.8, -13, or 3 were involved in chemotaxis, inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodelling. Transcriptome analysis identified 10 upregulated genes (Delta > 5), which have not previously been associated with arthritis pathology and are located in genomic regions associated with autoimmune disease. The majority of the downregulated genes were associated with metabolism, transport and regulation of muscle development. In conclusion, the present study describes the temporal expression of multiple disease-associated genes with potential pathophysiological roles in the reactivation model of SCW-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rat. These findings improve our understanding of

  17. Studying bovine early embryo transcriptome by microarray.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Isabelle; Robert, Claude; Sirard, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    Microarrays represent a significant advantage when studying gene expression in early embryo because they allow for a speedy study of a large number of genes even if the sample of interest contains small quantities of genetic material. Here we describe the protocols developed by the EmbryoGENE Network to study the bovine transcriptome in early embryo using a microarray experimental design.

  18. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  19. Application of microarray technology in pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Patlakas, George; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2004-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful tool that have multiple applications both in clinical and cell biology arenas of common lung diseases. To exemplify how this tool can be useful, in this review, we will provide an overview of the application of microarray technology in research relevant to common lung diseases and present some of the future perspectives. PMID:15585067

  20. Sensing immune responses with customized peptide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Schirwitz, Christopher; Loeffler, Felix F; Felgenhauer, Thomas; Stadler, Volker; Breitling, Frank; Bischoff, F Ralf

    2012-12-01

    The intent to solve biological and biomedical questions in high-throughput led to an immense interest in microarray technologies. Nowadays, DNA microarrays are routinely used to screen for oligonucleotide interactions within a large variety of potential interaction partners. To study interactions on the protein level with the same efficiency, protein and peptide microarrays offer similar advantages, but their production is more demanding. A new technology to produce peptide microarrays with a laser printer provides access to affordable and highly complex peptide microarrays. Such a peptide microarray can contain up to 775 peptide spots per cm², whereby the position of each peptide spot and, thus, the amino acid sequence of the corresponding peptide, is exactly known. Compared to other techniques, such as the SPOT synthesis, more features per cm² at lower costs can be synthesized which paves the way for laser printed peptide microarrays to take on roles as efficient and affordable biomedical sensors. Here, we describe the laser printer-based synthesis of peptide microarrays and focus on an application involving the blood sera of tetanus immunized individuals, indicating the potential of peptide arrays to sense immune responses.

  1. Microarray Applications in Microbial Ecology Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, T.; Schadt, C.; Zhou, J.

    2006-04-06

    Microarray technology has the unparalleled potential tosimultaneously determine the dynamics and/or activities of most, if notall, of the microbial populations in complex environments such as soilsand sediments. Researchers have developed several types of arrays thatcharacterize the microbial populations in these samples based on theirphylogenetic relatedness or functional genomic content. Several recentstudies have used these microarrays to investigate ecological issues;however, most have only analyzed a limited number of samples withrelatively few experiments utilizing the full high-throughput potentialof microarray analysis. This is due in part to the unique analyticalchallenges that these samples present with regard to sensitivity,specificity, quantitation, and data analysis. This review discussesspecific applications of microarrays to microbial ecology research alongwith some of the latest studies addressing the difficulties encounteredduring analysis of complex microbial communities within environmentalsamples. With continued development, microarray technology may ultimatelyachieve its potential for comprehensive, high-throughput characterizationof microbial populations in near real-time.

  2. Real-time DNA microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e. real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation in the capturing spots, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other signal amplitude-affecting non-idealities. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing in microarrays, similar to all affinity-based biosensors, is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we subsequently use as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to empirically validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:19723688

  3. Real-time DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2009-11-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e. real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation in the capturing spots, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other signal amplitude-affecting non-idealities. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing in microarrays, similar to all affinity-based biosensors, is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we subsequently use as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to empirically validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:19723688

  4. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  5. DNA Microarrays for Identifying Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nölte, M.; Weber, H.; Silkenbeumer, N.; Hjörleifsdottir, S.; Hreggvidsson, G. O.; Marteinsson, V.; Kappel, K.; Planes, S.; Tinti, F.; Magoulas, A.; Garcia Vazquez, E.; Turan, C.; Hervet, C.; Campo Falgueras, D.; Antoniou, A.; Landi, M.; Blohm, D.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases marine organisms and especially their diverse developmental stages are difficult to identify by morphological characters. DNA-based identification methods offer an analytically powerful addition or even an alternative. In this study, a DNA microarray has been developed to be able to investigate its potential as a tool for the identification of fish species from European seas based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Eleven commercially important fish species were selected for a first prototype. Oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rDNA sequences obtained from 230 individuals of 27 fish species. In addition, more than 1200 sequences of 380 species served as sequence background against which the specificity of the probes was tested in silico. Single target hybridisations with Cy5-labelled, PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from each of the 11 species on microarrays containing the complete set of probes confirmed their suitability. True-positive, fluorescence signals obtained were at least one order of magnitude stronger than false-positive cross-hybridisations. Single nontarget hybridisations resulted in cross-hybridisation signals at approximately 27% of the cases tested, but all of them were at least one order of magnitude lower than true-positive signals. This study demonstrates that the 16S rDNA gene is suitable for designing oligonucleotide probes, which can be used to differentiate 11 fish species. These data are a solid basis for the second step to create a “Fish Chip” for approximately 50 fish species relevant in marine environmental and fisheries research, as well as control of fisheries products. PMID:18270778

  6. Microarray analysis of thioacetamide-treated type 1 diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, Sachin S.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-04-01

    It is well known that diabetes imparts high sensitivity to numerous hepatotoxicants. Previously, we have shown that a normally non-lethal dose of thioacetamide (TA, 300 mg/kg) causes 90% mortality in type 1 diabetic (DB) rats due to inhibited tissue repair allowing progression of liver injury. On the other hand, DB rats exposed to 30 mg TA/kg exhibit delayed tissue repair and delayed recovery from injury. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of impaired tissue repair and progression of liver injury in TA-treated DB rats by using cDNA microarray. Gene expression pattern was examined at 0, 6, and 12 h after TA challenge, and selected mechanistic leads from microarray experiments were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and further investigated at protein level over the time course of 0 to 36 h after TA treatment. Diabetic condition itself increased gene expression of proteases and decreased gene expression of protease inhibitors. Administration of 300 mg TA/kg to DB rats further elevated gene expression of proteases and suppressed gene expression of protease inhibitors, explaining progression of liver injury in DB rats after TA treatment. Inhibited expression of genes involved in cell division cycle (cyclin D1, IGFBP-1, ras, E2F) was observed after exposure of DB rats to 300 mg TA/kg, explaining inhibited tissue repair in these rats. On the other hand, DB rats receiving 30 mg TA/kg exhibit delayed expression of genes involved in cell division cycle, explaining delayed tissue repair in these rats. In conclusion, impaired cyclin D1 signaling along with increased proteases and decreased protease inhibitors may explain impaired tissue repair that leads to progression of liver injury initiated by TA in DB rats.

  7. Detection of genomic deletions in rice using oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Myron; Hess, Ann; Bai, Jianfa; Mauleon, Ramil; Diaz, M Genaleen; Sugiyama, Nobuko; Bordeos, Alicia; Wang, Guo-Liang; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E

    2009-01-01

    Background The induction of genomic deletions by physical- or chemical- agents is an easy and inexpensive means to generate a genome-saturating collection of mutations. Different mutagens can be selected to ensure a mutant collection with a range of deletion sizes. This would allow identification of mutations in single genes or, alternatively, a deleted group of genes that might collectively govern a trait (e.g., quantitative trait loci, QTL). However, deletion mutants have not been widely used in functional genomics, because the mutated genes are not tagged and therefore, difficult to identify. Here, we present a microarray-based approach to identify deleted genomic regions in rice mutants selected from a large collection generated by gamma ray or fast neutron treatment. Our study focuses not only on the utility of this method for forward genetics, but also its potential as a reverse genetics tool through accumulation of hybridization data for a collection of deletion mutants harboring multiple genetic lesions. Results We demonstrate that hybridization of labeled genomic DNA directly onto the Affymetrix Rice GeneChip® allows rapid localization of deleted regions in rice mutants. Deletions ranged in size from one gene model to ~500 kb and were predicted on all 12 rice chromosomes. The utility of the technique as a tool in forward genetics was demonstrated in combination with an allelic series of mutants to rapidly narrow the genomic region, and eventually identify a candidate gene responsible for a lesion mimic phenotype. Finally, the positions of mutations in 14 mutants were aligned onto the rice pseudomolecules in a user-friendly genome browser to allow for rapid identification of untagged mutations . Conclusion We demonstrate the utility of oligonucleotide arrays to discover deleted genes in rice. The density and distribution of deletions suggests the feasibility of a database saturated with deletions across the rice genome. This community resource can continue

  8. Molecular impact of propiconazole on Daphnia magna using a reproduction-related cDNA array.

    PubMed

    Soetaert, Anneleen; Moens, Lotte N; Van der Ven, Karlijn; Van Leemput, Koen; Naudts, Bart; Blust, Ronny; De Coen, Wim M

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a first version cDNA microarray of the cladoceran Daphnia magna. Through Suppression Subtractive Hybridisation PCR (SSH-PCR) 855 life stage-specific cDNAs were collected and used to document the toxicological mode of action of the pesticide propiconazole. DNA sequencing analysis revealed gene fragments related to important functional classes such as embryo development, energy metabolism, molting and cell cycle. Major changes in transcription were observed in organisms exposed for 4 and 8 days to 1 microg/mL. After 4 days a 3-fold down-regulation of the gene encoding the yolk protein, vitellogenin, was observed indicating impaired oocyte maturation. Moreover, genes such as a larval-specific gene and chaperonin were repressed, whereas the heat shock 90 protein and ATP synthase were induced. Organismal effects clearly confirmed the major molecular findings: at the highest concentration (1 microg/mL) adult growth was significantly (p < 0.05) impaired and increased developmental effects in the offspring could be noted. We have demonstrated the potential of microarray analysis in toxicity screening with D. magna. The use of vitellogenin mRNA as a rapid biomarker of reproductive effects in chronic toxicity studies with cladocerans is suggested. PMID:16311075

  9. Molecular impact of propiconazole on Daphnia magna using a reproduction-related cDNA array.

    PubMed

    Soetaert, Anneleen; Moens, Lotte N; Van der Ven, Karlijn; Van Leemput, Koen; Naudts, Bart; Blust, Ronny; De Coen, Wim M

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a first version cDNA microarray of the cladoceran Daphnia magna. Through Suppression Subtractive Hybridisation PCR (SSH-PCR) 855 life stage-specific cDNAs were collected and used to document the toxicological mode of action of the pesticide propiconazole. DNA sequencing analysis revealed gene fragments related to important functional classes such as embryo development, energy metabolism, molting and cell cycle. Major changes in transcription were observed in organisms exposed for 4 and 8 days to 1 microg/mL. After 4 days a 3-fold down-regulation of the gene encoding the yolk protein, vitellogenin, was observed indicating impaired oocyte maturation. Moreover, genes such as a larval-specific gene and chaperonin were repressed, whereas the heat shock 90 protein and ATP synthase were induced. Organismal effects clearly confirmed the major molecular findings: at the highest concentration (1 microg/mL) adult growth was significantly (p < 0.05) impaired and increased developmental effects in the offspring could be noted. We have demonstrated the potential of microarray analysis in toxicity screening with D. magna. The use of vitellogenin mRNA as a rapid biomarker of reproductive effects in chronic toxicity studies with cladocerans is suggested.

  10. Microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic immunoassay system.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-05-01

    A microarray-based analytical platform has been utilized as a powerful tool in biological assay fields. However, an analyte depletion problem due to the slow mass transport based on molecular diffusion causes low reaction efficiency, resulting in a limitation for practical applications. This paper presents a novel method to improve the efficiency of microarray-based immunoassay via an optically induced electrokinetic phenomenon by integrating an optoelectrofluidic device with a conventional glass slide-based microarray format. A sample droplet was loaded between the microarray slide and the optoelectrofluidic device on which a photoconductive layer was deposited. Under the application of an AC voltage, optically induced AC electroosmotic flows caused by a microarray-patterned light actively enhanced the mass transport of target molecules at the multiple assay spots of the microarray simultaneously, which reduced tedious reaction time from more than 30 min to 10 min. Based on this enhancing effect, a heterogeneous immunoassay with a tiny volume of sample (5 μl) was successfully performed in the microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic system using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG, resulting in improved efficiency compared to the static environment. Furthermore, the application of multiplex assays was also demonstrated by multiple protein detection.

  11. hemaClass.org: Online One-By-One Microarray Normalization and Classification of Hematological Cancers for Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Falgreen, Steffen; Ellern Bilgrau, Anders; Brøndum, Rasmus Froberg; Hjort Jakobsen, Lasse; Have, Jonas; Lindblad Nielsen, Kasper; El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Bødker, Julie Støve; Schmitz, Alexander; H. Young, Ken; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Dozens of omics based cancer classification systems have been introduced with prognostic, diagnostic, and predictive capabilities. However, they often employ complex algorithms and are only applicable on whole cohorts of patients, making them difficult to apply in a personalized clinical setting. Results This prompted us to create hemaClass.org, an online web application providing an easy interface to one-by-one RMA normalization of microarrays and subsequent risk classifications of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) into cell-of-origin and chemotherapeutic sensitivity classes. Classification results for one-by-one array pre-processing with and without a laboratory specific RMA reference dataset were compared to cohort based classifiers in 4 publicly available datasets. Classifications showed high agreement between one-by-one and whole cohort pre-processsed data when a laboratory specific reference set was supplied. The website is essentially the R-package hemaClass accompanied by a Shiny web application. The well-documented package can be used to run the website locally or to use the developed methods programmatically. Conclusions The website and R-package is relevant for biological and clinical lymphoma researchers using affymetrix U-133 Plus 2 arrays, as it provides reliable and swift methods for calculation of disease subclasses. The proposed one-by-one pre-processing method is relevant for all researchers using microarrays. PMID:27701436

  12. Microarray analysis of thyroid hormone-induced changes in mRNA expression in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Haas, Michael J; Mreyoud, Amjad; Fishman, Miriam; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2004-07-15

    To determine which genes in the adult rat brain are regulated by thyroid hormone (TH), we used microarrays to examine the effect of hyperthyroidism on neuron-specific gene expression. Four-month-old male Fisher 344 rats were rendered hyperthyroid by intraperitoneal injection of 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine (T3, 15 microg/100 g body weight) for 10 consecutive days. To minimize interindividual variability, pooled cerebral tissue RNA from four-control and five-hyperthyroid rats was hybridized in duplicates to the Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) U34N rat neurobiology microarray, which contains probes for 1224 neural-specific genes. Changes in gene expression were considered significant only if they were observed in both pair-wise comparisons as well as by Northern blot analysis. Hyperthyroidism was associated with modest changes in the expression of only 11 genes. The expression of the phosphodiesterase Enpp2, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), growth hormone (GH), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase beta-subunit (Camk2b), neuron-specific protein PEP-19 (Pcp4), a sodium-dependent neurotransmitter, and the myelin-associated glycoprotein (S-MAG) was significantly increased. Three genes were suppressed by hyperthyroidism, including the activity and neurotransmitter-induced early genes-1 and -7 (ANIA-1 and ANIA-7) and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein one (Gnb1). The present study underscores the paucity of TH responsive genes in adult cerebral tissue. PMID:15234464

  13. A wavelet-based Markov random field segmentation model in segmenting microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, Emmanouil; Cavouras, Dionisis; Kostopoulos, Spyros; Glotsos, Dimitris; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Nikiforidis, George

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, an adaptation of the Markov Random Field (MRF) segmentation model, by means of the stationary wavelet transform (SWT), applied to complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray images is proposed (WMRF). A 3-level decomposition scheme of the initial microarray image was performed, followed by a soft thresholding filtering technique. With the inverse process, a Denoised image was created. In addition, by using the Amplitudes of the filtered wavelet Horizontal and Vertical images at each level, three different Magnitudes were formed. These images were combined with the Denoised one to create the proposed SMRF segmentation model. For numerical evaluation of the segmentation accuracy, the segmentation matching factor (SMF), the Coefficient of Determination (r(2)), and the concordance correlation (p(c)) were calculated on the simulated images. In addition, the SMRF performance was contrasted to the Fuzzy C Means (FCM), Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), Fuzzy GMM (FGMM), and the conventional MRF techniques. Indirect accuracy performances were also tested on the experimental images by means of the Mean Absolute Error (MAE) and the Coefficient of Variation (CV). In the latter case, SPOT and SCANALYZE software results were also tested. In the former case, SMRF attained the best SMF, r(2), and p(c) (92.66%, 0.923, and 0.88, respectively) scores, whereas, in the latter case scored MAE and CV, 497 and 0.88, respectively. The results and support the performance superiority of the SMRF algorithm in segmenting cDNA images.

  14. Gene expression analysis of strawberry achene and receptacle maturation using DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Asaph; O'Connell, Ann P

    2002-10-01

    Large-scale, single pass sequencing and parallel gene expression analysis using DNA microarrays were employed for the comprehensive investigation of ripening in strawberry fruit. A total of 1701 cDNA clones (comprising 1100 strawberry ESTs and 601 unsequenced cDNAs) obtained from a strawberry (Fragariaxananassa) ripe fruit cDNA library were displayed on microarrays, and used for monitoring concurrent gene expression in receptacle and achene tissues. Analysis of expression ratios identified 66 out of the 259 (25%) achene-related clones and 80 out of 182 (44%) receptacle-related clones with more than a 4-fold difference in expression between the two tissue types. Half of the achene-associated genes putatively encode proteins with unknown function, and a large number of the remainder were proteins predicted to form part of the signal and regulation cascades related to achene maturation and acquisition of stress and desiccation tolerance. These included phosphatases, protein kinases, 14-3-3 proteins, transcription factors, and others. In the receptacle, key processes and novel genes that could be associated with ripening were identified. Genes putatively encoding proteins related to stress, the cell wall, DNA/RNA/protein, and primary metabolism were highly represented. Apart from providing a global observation on gene expression programmes and metabolic pathways in the developing strawberry, this study has made available a large database and unique information for gene discovery, promoter selection and markers for molecular breeding approaches.

  15. Progress in the application of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed Central

    Lobenhofer, E K; Bushel, P R; Afshari, C A; Hamadeh, H K

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology has been applied to a variety of different fields to address fundamental research questions. The use of microarrays, or DNA chips, to study the gene expression profiles of biologic samples began in 1995. Since that time, the fundamental concepts behind the chip, the technology required for making and using these chips, and the multitude of statistical tools for analyzing the data have been extensively reviewed. For this reason, the focus of this review will be not on the technology itself but on the application of microarrays as a research tool and the future challenges of the field. PMID:11673116

  16. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Preeti; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2006-01-01

    Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts. PMID:17173108

  17. Transcriptome assembly and microarray construction for Enchytraeus crypticus, a model oligochaete to assess stress response mechanisms derived from soil conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The soil worm Enchytraeus crypticus (Oligochaeta) is an ecotoxicology model species that, until now, was without genome or transcriptome sequence information. The present research aims at studying the transcriptome of Enchytraeus crypticus, sampled from multiple test conditions, and the construction of a high-density microarray for functional genomic studies. Results Over 1.5 million cDNA sequence reads were obtained representing 645 million nucleotides. After assembly, 27,296 contigs and 87,686 singletons were obtained, from which 44% and 25% are annotated as protein-coding genes, respectively, sharing homology with other animal proteomes. Concerning assembly quality, 84% of the contig sequences contain an open reading frame with a start codon while E. crypticus homologs were identified for 92% of the core eukaryotic genes. Moreover, 65% and 77% of the singletons and contigs without known homologs, respectively, were shown to be transcribed in an independent microarray experiment. An Agilent 180 K microarray platform was designed and validated by hybridizing cDNA from 4 day zinc- exposed E. crypticus to the concentration corresponding to 50% reduction in reproduction after three weeks (EC50). Overall, 70% of all probes signaled expression above background levels (mean signal + 1x standard deviation). More specifically, the probes derived from contigs showed a wider range of average intensities when compared to probes derived from singletons. In total, 522 significantly differentially regulated transcripts were identified upon zinc exposure. Several significantly regulated genes exerted predicted functions (e.g. zinc efflux, zinc transport) associated with zinc stress. Unexpectedly, the microarray data suggest that zinc exposure alters retro transposon activity in the E. crypticus genome. Conclusion An initial investigation of the E. crypticus transcriptome including an associated microarray platform for future studies proves to be a valuable

  18. Assessment of algorithms for high throughput detection of genomic copy number variation in oligonucleotide microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Baross, Ágnes; Delaney, Allen D; Li, H Irene; Nayar, Tarun; Flibotte, Stephane; Qian, Hong; Chan, Susanna Y; Asano, Jennifer; Ally, Adrian; Cao, Manqiu; Birch, Patricia; Brown-John, Mabel; Fernandes, Nicole; Go, Anne; Kennedy, Giulia; Langlois, Sylvie; Eydoux, Patrice; Friedman, JM; Marra, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    Background Genomic deletions and duplications are important in the pathogenesis of diseases, such as cancer and mental retardation, and have recently been shown to occur frequently in unaffected individuals as polymorphisms. Affymetrix GeneChip whole genome sampling analysis (WGSA) combined with 100 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays is one of several microarray-based approaches that are now being used to detect such structural genomic changes. The popularity of this technology and its associated open source data format have resulted in the development of an increasing number of software packages for the analysis of copy number changes using these SNP arrays. Results We evaluated four publicly available software packages for high throughput copy number analysis using synthetic and empirical 100 K SNP array data sets, the latter obtained from 107 mental retardation (MR) patients and their unaffected parents and siblings. We evaluated the software with regards to overall suitability for high-throughput 100 K SNP array data analysis, as well as effectiveness of normalization, scaling with various reference sets and feature extraction, as well as true and false positive rates of genomic copy number variant (CNV) detection. Conclusion We observed considerable variation among the numbers and types of candidate CNVs detected by different analysis approaches, and found that multiple programs were needed to find all real aberrations in our test set. The frequency of false positive deletions was substantial, but could be greatly reduced by using the SNP genotype information to confirm loss of heterozygosity. PMID:17910767

  19. Microarray studies of genomic oxidative stress and cell cycle responses in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Michal S; Singh, Prachi; Wolk, Robert; Romero-Corral, Abel; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Somers, Virend K

    2007-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the commonest form of sleep-disordered breathing, is characterized by recurrent episodes of intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. This study evaluated microarray measures of gene transcript levels in OSA subjects compared to age and BMI matched healthy controls. Measurements were obtained before and after: (a) a night of normal sleep in controls; and (b) a night of untreated apnea in OSA patients. All subjects underwent full polysomnography. mRNA from the whole blood samples was analyzed by HG-U133A and B Affymetrix GeneChip arrays using Spotfire 7.2 data analysis platform. After sleep in OSA patients, changes were noted in several genes involved in modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including heme oxygenase 1, superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, and catalase. Changes were also observed in genes involved in cell growth, proliferation, and the cell cycle such as cell division cycle 25B, signaling lymphocyte activating molecule (SLAM), calgizzarin S100A11, B-cell translocation gene, Src-like adapter protein (SLAP), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 2. These overnight changes in OSA patients are suggestive of activation of several mechanisms to modulate, and adapt to, increased ROS developing in response to the frequent episodes of intermittent hypoxia.

  20. Comparison of microarray preprocessing methods.

    PubMed

    Shakya, K; Ruskin, H J; Kerr, G; Crane, M; Becker, J

    2010-01-01

    Data preprocessing in microarray technology is a crucial initial step before data analysis is performed. Many preprocessing methods have been proposed but none has proved to be ideal to date. Frequently, datasets are limited by laboratory constraints so that the need is for guidelines on quality and robustness, to inform further experimentation while data are yet restricted. In this paper, we compared the performance of four popular methods, namely MAS5, Li & Wong pmonly (LWPM), Li & Wong subtractMM (LWMM), and Robust Multichip Average (RMA). The comparison is based on the analysis carried out on sets of laboratory-generated data from the Bioinformatics Lab, National Institute of Cellular Biotechnology (NICB), Dublin City University, Ireland. These experiments were designed to examine the effect of Bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, BrdU) treatment in deep lamellar keratoplasty (DLKP) cells. The methodology employed is to assess dispersion across the replicates and analyze the false discovery rate. From the dispersion analysis, we found that variability is reduced more effectively by LWPM and RMA methods. From the false positive analysis, and for both parametric and nonparametric approaches, LWMM is found to perform best. Based on a complementary q-value analysis, LWMM approach again is the strongest candidate. The indications are that, while LWMM is marginally less effective than LWPM and RMA in terms of variance reduction, it has considerably improved discrimination overall.

  1. AMIC@: All MIcroarray Clusterings @ once.

    PubMed

    Geraci, Filippo; Pellegrini, Marco; Renda, M Elena

    2008-07-01

    The AMIC@ Web Server offers a light-weight multi-method clustering engine for microarray gene-expression data. AMIC@ is a highly interactive tool that stresses user-friendliness and robustness by adopting AJAX technology, thus allowing an effective interleaved execution of different clustering algorithms and inspection of results. Among the salient features AMIC@ offers, there are: (i) automatic file format detection, (ii) suggestions on the number of clusters using a variant of the stability-based method of Tibshirani et al. (iii) intuitive visual inspection of the data via heatmaps and (iv) measurements of the clustering quality using cluster homogeneity. Large data sets can be processed efficiently by selecting algorithms (such as FPF-SB and k-Boost), specifically designed for this purpose. In case of very large data sets, the user can opt for a batch-mode use of the system by means of the Clustering wizard that runs all algorithms at once and delivers the results via email. AMIC@ is freely available and open to all users with no login requirement at the following URL http://bioalgo.iit.cnr.it/amica.

  2. Protein Microarrays: Novel Developments and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Berrade, Luis; Garcia, Angie E.

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarray technology possesses some of the greatest potential for providing direct information on protein function and potential drug targets. For example, functional protein microarrays are ideal tools suited for the mapping of biological pathways. They can be used to study most major types of interactions and enzymatic activities that take place in biochemical pathways and have been used for the analysis of simultaneous multiple biomolecular interactions involving protein-protein, protein-lipid, protein-DNA and protein-small molecule interactions. Because of this unique ability to analyze many kinds of molecular interactions en masse, the requirement of very small sample amount and the potential to be miniaturized and automated, protein microarrays are extremely well suited for protein profiling, drug discovery, drug target identification and clinical prognosis and diagnosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the production, applications and analysis of protein microarrays. PMID:21116694

  3. Microarray gene expression analysis of fixed archival tissue permits molecular classification and identification of potential therapeutic targets in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kim; Howarth, Christopher; Wappett, Mark; Newton, Gillian; Lachel, Cynthia; Iqbal, Javeed; Pepper, Stuart; Byers, Richard; Chan, Wing John; Radford, John

    2012-01-01

    Refractory/relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has a poor prognosis. Novel drugs targeting the constitutively activated NF-κB pathway characteristic of ABC-DLBCL are promising, but evaluation depends on accurate activated B cell-like (ABC)/germinal center B cell-like (GCB) molecular classification. This is traditionally performed on gene microarray expression profiles of fresh biopsies, which are not routinely collected, or by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue, which lacks reproducibility and classification accuracy. We explored the possibility of using routine archival FFPE tissue for gene microarray applications. We examined Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 gene expression profiles from paired archival FFPE and fresh-frozen tissues of 40 ABC/GCB-classified DLBCL cases to compare classification accuracy and test the potential for this approach to aid the discovery of therapeutic targets and disease classifiers in DLBCL. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of unselected present probe sets distinguished ABC/GCB in FFPE with remarkable accuracy, and a Bayesian classifier correctly assigned 32 of 36 cases with >90% probability. Enrichment for NF-κB genes was appropriately seen in ABC-DLBCL FFPE tissues. The top discriminatory genes expressed in FFPE separated cases with high statistical significance and contained novel biology with potential therapeutic insights, warranting further investigation. These results support a growing understanding that archival FFPE tissues can be used in microarray experiments aimed at molecular classification, prognostic biomarker discovery, and molecular exploration of rare diseases.

  4. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  5. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    von der Haar, Marcel; Preuß, John-Alexander; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores' susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner's laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube's voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results. PMID:26378589

  6. Automated analytical microarrays: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard

    2008-07-01

    Microarrays provide a powerful analytical tool for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes in a single experiment. The specific affinity reaction of nucleic acids (hybridization) and antibodies towards antigens is the most common bioanalytical method for generating multiplexed quantitative results. Nucleic acid-based analysis is restricted to the detection of cells and viruses. Antibodies are more universal biomolecular receptors that selectively bind small molecules such as pesticides, small toxins, and pharmaceuticals and to biopolymers (e.g. toxins, allergens) and complex biological structures like bacterial cells and viruses. By producing an appropriate antibody, the corresponding antigenic analyte can be detected on a multiplexed immunoanalytical microarray. Food and water analysis along with clinical diagnostics constitute potential application fields for multiplexed analysis. Diverse fluorescence, chemiluminescence, electrochemical, and label-free microarray readout systems have been developed in the last decade. Some of them are constructed as flow-through microarrays by combination with a fluidic system. Microarrays have the potential to become widely accepted as a system for analytical applications, provided that robust and validated results on fully automated platforms are successfully generated. This review gives an overview of the current research on microarrays with the focus on automated systems and quantitative multiplexed applications.

  7. Evaluation of Surface Chemistries for Antibody Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; White, Amanda M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-12-01

    Antibody microarrays are an emerging technology that promises to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The current technology for protein microarrays has been primarily derived from DNA microarrays and is not fully characterized for use with proteins. For example, there are a myriad of surface chemistries that are commercially available for antibody microarrays, but no rigorous studies that compare these different surfaces. Therefore, we have used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to analyze 16 different commercially available slide types. Full standard curves were generated for 24 different assays. We found that this approach provides a rigorous and quantitative system for comparing the different slide types based on spot size and morphology, slide noise, spot background, lower limit of detection, and reproducibility. These studies demonstrate that the properties of the slide surface affect the activity of immobilized antibodies and the quality of data produced. Although many slide types can produce useful data, glass slides coated with poly-L-lysine or aminosilane, with or without activation with a crosslinker, consistently produce superior results in the ELISA microarray analyses we performed.

  8. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  9. Development of a consensus microarray method for identification of some highly pathogenic viruses.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Ping, Kang; Yong-Qiang, Li; Qing-Ge, Sun; Hong, Liu; Qing-Yu, Zhu; Yin-Hui, Yang

    2009-11-01

    Some highly pathogenic viruses, such as Chikungunya virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Yellow fever virus, Dengue virus, Hanta virus, SARS-CoV, and H5N1 avian influenza virus can cause severe infectious diseases. However, the consensus method for detecting these viruses has not been well established. A rapid and sensitive microarray approach for detection of these viruses and a panel of specific probes covering nine genera and 16 virus species were designed. 70-mer oligonucleotides were used at the genus level and 50-mer oligonucleotides were at the species level, respectively. To decrease the interference of the host genome in hybridization, the consensus genus primers were designed and used to reverse transcribe only virus genome. The synthesis of the second strand was carried out with a random primer sequence (5'-GTTTCCCAGTAGGTCTCNNNNNNNN-3'). The amplified products were labeled and processed for microarray analyses. This microarray-based method used the highly conserved consensus primers to synthesize specifically the virus cDNA and could identify effectively Chikungunya virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Yellow fever virus, Dengue virus, Tick borne encephalitis virus, and H5N1 avian influenza virus. Using this method, one unknown virus isolated from pig brain in Shanxi Province, China was identified. This method may have an important potential application for the diagnosis of virus infection.

  10. Development and assessment of oligonucleotide microarrays for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Aleksei; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Afanasyev, Sergey; Jørgensen, Sven Martin

    2011-03-01

    The cDNA microarrays have played a major role in functional genomics of fish and contributed substantially to different areas of aquaculture research. However at present these platforms are gradually substituted with oligonucleotide microarrays (ONM), which represent the most cost-efficient, flexible, powerful and accurate tool for multiple gene expression profiling, especially in species with rich genomic resources. This paper describes the development and assessment of ONM platforms for Atlantic salmon. The process started with the establishment of a bioinformatic system, selection of a low redundancy set of nucleotide sequences providing coverage of transcriptomes of several fish species, their identification by protein products and annotations. Pilot experiments were performed to address issues that are essential for development of ONM: gene composition, quality assessment, hybridization success of homologous and heterologous probes, optimum numbers of spot replicates and processing, management and mining of gene expression data. Performance of microarrays was evaluated in two experiments with Atlantic salmon. Comparison of peripheral blood leukocytes with a mixture of other tissues was conducted for characterization of the leukocyte transcriptome. Analyses of salmon infected with different viral diseases identified virus-responsive genes that can be used as markers for diagnostics of infected status of fish. Data mining with functional annotations confirmed the relevance of these findings.

  11. Toward a universal standard: comparing two methods for standardizing spotted microarray data.

    PubMed

    Weil, Michael Ryan; Macatee, Timothy; Garner, Harold R

    2002-06-01

    DNA microarray technology has allowed the transcriptome to be studied to a depth that was inconceivable only 10 years ago. Until recently these studies were isolated because, without a universal standard, the results from experiment to experiment and laboratory to laboratory were not directly comparable. For human microarrays, this problem has been addressed by numerous methods, but only two are truly universal. The first method uses genomic DNA as a standard for comparison since it is, by definition, complete and universally available. The second method employs a highly representative total RNA pool such as the one currently available from Stratagene. To determine the advantages and disadvantages of both methods, they were directly compared by hybridization to the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center's 4000- or 10800-member human cDNA array, using typical microarray techniques. The labeled analytes were 2 microg normal human genomic DNA labeled by nick translation or 20 microg total RNA pool labeled by reverse transcription. The resulting data were then background-subtracted, analyzed, and the number of spots above a background threshold was compared in each sample. Using the McNemar test and a Yate's correction with one degree of freedom, the samples were statistically identical with chi2 = 3.72.

  12. Microarray analysis of gene expression in disk abalone Haliotis discus discus after bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    De Zoysa, Mahanama; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Oh, Chulhong; Lee, Youngdeuk; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Jae-Seong; Choi, Cheol Young; Lee, Jehee

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the gene expression profiling of disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus challenged by a mixture of three pathogenic bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Listeria monocytogenes using a cDNA microarray. Upon bacteria challenge, 68 (1.6%) and 112 (2.7%) gene transcripts changed their expression levels ≥2 or ≤2 -fold in gills and digestive tract, respectively. There were 46 tissue-specific transcripts that up-regulated specifically in the digestive tract. In contrast, only 13 transcripts showed gill-specific up-regulation. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to verify microarray data and results revealed that candidate genes namely Krüppell-like factor (KLF), lachesin, muscle lim protein, thioredoxin-2 (TRx-2), nuclear factor interleukin 3 (NFIL-3) and abalone protein 38 were up-regulated. Also, our results further indicated that bacteria challenge may activate the transcription factors or their activators (Krüppell-like factor, inhibitor of NF-κB or Ik-B), inflammatory cytokines (IL-3 regulated protein, allograft inflammatory factor), other cytokines (IFN-44-like protein, SOCS-2), antioxidant enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase, thioredoxin-2 and thioredoxin peroxidase), and apoptosis-related proteins (TNF-α, archeron) in abalone. The identification of immune and stress response genes and their expression profiles in this microarray will permit detailed investigation of the stress and immune responses of abalone genes.

  13. Microarray-Based Maps of Copy-Number Variant Regions in European and Sub-Saharan Populations

    PubMed Central

    Röthlisberger, Benno; Huber, Andreas; Filges, Isabel; Miny, Peter; Auschra, Bianca; Stetak, Attila; Demougin, Philippe; Vukojevic, Vanja; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Elbert, Thomas; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The genetic basis of phenotypic variation can be partially explained by the presence of copy-number variations (CNVs). Currently available methods for CNV assessment include high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays that have become an indispensable tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, insufficient concordance rates between different CNV assessment methods call for cautious interpretation of results from CNV-based genetic association studies. Here we provide a cross-population, microarray-based map of copy-number variant regions (CNVRs) to enable reliable interpretation of CNV association findings. We used the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to scan the genomes of 1167 individuals from two ethnically distinct populations (Europe, N = 717; Rwanda, N = 450). Three different CNV-finding algorithms were tested and compared for sensitivity, specificity, and feasibility. Two algorithms were subsequently used to construct CNVR maps, which were also validated by processing subsamples with additional microarray platforms (Illumina 1M-Duo BeadChip, Nimblegen 385K aCGH array) and by comparing our data with publicly available information. Both algorithms detected a total of 42669 CNVs, 74% of which clustered in 385 CNVRs of a cross-population map. These CNVRs overlap with 862 annotated genes and account for approximately 3.3% of the haploid human genome. We created comprehensive cross-populational CNVR-maps. They represent an extendable framework that can leverage the detection of common CNVs and additionally assist in interpreting CNV-based association studies. PMID:21179565

  14. Microarray-based maps of copy-number variant regions in European and sub-Saharan populations.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Christian; Gschwind, Leo; Röthlisberger, Benno; Huber, Andreas; Filges, Isabel; Miny, Peter; Auschra, Bianca; Stetak, Attila; Demougin, Philippe; Vukojevic, Vanja; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Elbert, Thomas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2010-12-16

    The genetic basis of phenotypic variation can be partially explained by the presence of copy-number variations (CNVs). Currently available methods for CNV assessment include high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays that have become an indispensable tool in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, insufficient concordance rates between different CNV assessment methods call for cautious interpretation of results from CNV-based genetic association studies. Here we provide a cross-population, microarray-based map of copy-number variant regions (CNVRs) to enable reliable interpretation of CNV association findings. We used the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to scan the genomes of 1167 individuals from two ethnically distinct populations (Europe, N=717; Rwanda, N=450). Three different CNV-finding algorithms were tested and compared for sensitivity, specificity, and feasibility. Two algorithms were subsequently used to construct CNVR maps, which were also validated by processing subsamples with additional microarray platforms (Illumina 1M-Duo BeadChip, Nimblegen 385K aCGH array) and by comparing our data with publicly available information. Both algorithms detected a total of 42669 CNVs, 74% of which clustered in 385 CNVRs of a cross-population map. These CNVRs overlap with 862 annotated genes and account for approximately 3.3% of the haploid human genome.We created comprehensive cross-populational CNVR-maps. They represent an extendable framework that can leverage the detection of common CNVs and additionally assist in interpreting CNV-based association studies.

  15. Transcriptomic response of murine liver to severe injury and hemorrhagic shock: a dual-platform microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Rebecca D.; Lagoa, Claudio; Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Yang, Yawching; Fink, Mitchell P.; Levy, Ryan M.; Prince, Jose M.; Kaczorowski, David J.; Tseng, George C.; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    Trauma-hemorrhagic shock (HS/T) is a complex process that elicits numerous molecular pathways. We hypothesized that a dual-platform microarray analysis of the liver, an organ that integrates immunology and metabolism, would reveal key pathways engaged following HS/T. C57BL/6 mice were divided into five groups (n = 4/group), anesthetized, and surgically treated to simulate a time course and trauma severity model: 1) nonmanipulated animals, 2) minor trauma, 3) 1.5 h of hemorrhagic shock and severe trauma (HS/T), 4) 1.5 h HS/T followed by 1 h resuscitation (HS/T+1.0R), 5) 1.5 h HS/T followed by 4.5 h resuscitation (HS/T+4.5R). Liver RNA was hybridized to CodeLink and Affymetrix mouse whole genome microarray chips. Common genes with a cross-platform correlation >0.6 (2,353 genes in total) were clustered using k-means clustering, and clusters were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis. Genes involved in the stress response and immunoregulation were upregulated early and remained upregulated throughout the course of the experiment. Genes involved in cell death and inflammatory pathways were upregulated in a linear fashion with elapsed time and in severe injury compared with minor trauma. Three of the six clusters contained genes involved in metabolic function; these were downregulated with elapsed time. Transcripts involved in amino acid metabolism as well as signaling pathways associated with glucocorticoid receptors, IL-6, IL-10, and the acute phase response were elevated in a severity-dependent manner. This is the first study to examine the postinjury response using dual-platform microarray analysis, revealing responses that may enable novel therapies or diagnostics. PMID:21828244

  16. Gene regulation induced in the C57BL/6J mouse retina by hyperoxia: a temporal microarray study

    PubMed Central

    Provis, Jan; Valter, Krisztina; Stone, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Hyperoxia is specifically toxic to photoreceptors, and this toxicity may be important in the progress of retinal dystrophies. This study examines gene expression induced in the C57BL/6J mouse retina by hyperoxia over the 14-day period during which photoreceptors first resist, then succumb to, hyperoxia. Methods Young adult C57BL/6J mice were exposed to hyperoxia (75% oxygen) for up to 14 days. On day 0 (control), day 3, day 7, and day 14, retinal RNA was extracted and processed on Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Genome 430 2.0 arrays. Microarray data were analyzed using GCOS Version 1.4 and GeneSpring Version 7.3.1. For 15 genes, microarray data were confirmed using relative quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction techniques. Results The overall numbers of hyperoxia-regulated genes increased monotonically with exposure. Within that increase, however, a distinctive temporal pattern was apparent. At 3 days exposure, there was prominent upregulation of genes associated with neuroprotection. By day 14, these early-responsive genes were downregulated, and genes related to cell death were strongly expressed. At day 7, the regulation of these genes was mixed, indicating a possible “transition period” from stability at day 3 to degeneration at day 14. When functional groupings of genes were analyzed separately, there was significant regulation in genes responsive to stress, genes known to cause human photoreceptor dystrophies and genes associated with apoptosis. Conclusions Microarray analysis of the response of the retina to prolonged hyperoxia demonstrated a temporal pattern involving early neuroprotection and later cell death, and provided insight into the mechanisms involved in the two phases of response. As hyperoxia is a consistent feature of the late stages of photoreceptor degenerations, understanding the mechanisms of oxygen toxicity may be important therapeutically. PMID:18989387

  17. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  18. cDNA microarray analysis of gene expression in insecticide-susceptible and –resistant Tarnished Plant bug

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insecticide resistance in the tarnished plant bug is most likely associated with increased detoxification gene expression. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of insecticide resistance, an insecticide-susceptible laboratory colony and several resistant field-collected strains of Lygus line...

  19. DNA microarray analyses in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, David W

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarrays were originally devised and described as a convenient technology for the global analysis of plant gene expression. Over the past decade, their use has expanded enormously to cover all kingdoms of living organisms. At the same time, the scope of applications of microarrays has increased beyond expression analyses, with plant genomics playing a leadership role in the on-going development of this technology. As the field has matured, the rate-limiting step has moved from that of the technical process of data generation to that of data analysis. We currently face major problems in dealing with the accumulating datasets, not simply with respect to how to archive, access, and process the huge amounts of data that have been and are being produced, but also in determining the relative quality of the different datasets. A major recognized concern is the appropriate use of statistical design in microarray experiments, without which the datasets are rendered useless. A vigorous area of current research involves the development of novel statistical tools specifically for microarray experiments. This article describes, in a necessarily selective manner, the types of platforms currently employed in microarray research and provides an overview of recent activities using these platforms in plant biology.

  20. Oligonucleotide microarrays in constitutional genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Keren, Boris; Le Caignec, Cedric

    2011-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays such as comparative genomic hybridization arrays and SNP microarrays enable the identification of genomic imbalances - also termed copy-number variants - with increasing resolution. This article will focus on the most significant applications of high-throughput oligonucleotide microarrays, both in genetic diagnosis and research. In genetic diagnosis, the method is becoming a standard tool for investigating patients with unexplained developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and/or with multiple congenital anomalies. Oligonucleotide microarray have also been recently applied to the detection of genomic imbalances in prenatal diagnosis either to characterize a chromosomal rearrangement that has previously been identified by standard prenatal karyotyping or to detect a cryptic genomic imbalance in a fetus with ultrasound abnormalities and a normal standard prenatal karyotype. In research, oligonucleotide microarrays have been used for a wide range of applications, such as the identification of new genes responsible for monogenic disorders and the association of a copy-number variant as a predisposing factor to a common disease. Despite its widespread use, the interpretation of results is not always straightforward. We will discuss several unexpected results and ethical issues raised by these new methods.

  1. Advancing Microarray Assembly with Acoustic Dispensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, E. Y.; Diamond, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    In the assembly of microarrays and microarray-based chemical assays and enzymatic bioassays, most approaches use pins for contact spotting. Acoustic dispensing is a technology capable of nanoliter transfers by using acoustic energy to eject liquid sample from an open source well. Although typically used for well plate transfers, when applied to microarraying it avoids drawbacks of undesired physical contact with sample, difficulty in assembling multicomponent reactions on a chip by readdressing, a rigid mode of printing that lacks patterning capabilities, and time-consuming wash steps. We demonstrated the utility of acoustic dispensing by delivering human cathepsin L in a drop-on-drop fashion into individual 50-nanoliter, pre-spotted reaction volumes to activate enzyme reactions at targeted positions on a microarray. We generated variable-sized spots ranging from 200 to 750 μm (and higher), and handled the transfer of fluorescent bead suspensions with increasing source well concentrations of 0.1 to 10 ×108 beads/mL in a linear fashion. There are no tips that can clog and liquid dispensing CVs are generally below 5%. This platform expands the toolbox for generating analytical arrays and meets needs associated with spatially-addressed assembly of multicomponent microarrays on the nanoliter scale. PMID:19035650

  2. A Synthetic Kinome Microarray Data Generator

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farhad; Kusalik, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cellular pathways involve the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins. Peptide microarrays called kinome arrays facilitate the measurement of the phosphorylation activity of hundreds of proteins in a single experiment. Analyzing the data from kinome microarrays is a multi-step process. Typically, various techniques are possible for a particular step, and it is necessary to compare and evaluate them. Such evaluations require data for which correct analysis results are known. Unfortunately, such kinome data is not readily available in the community. Further, there are no established techniques for creating artificial kinome datasets with known results and with the same characteristics as real kinome datasets. In this paper, a methodology for generating synthetic kinome array data is proposed. The methodology relies on actual intensity measurements from kinome microarray experiments and preserves their subtle characteristics. The utility of the methodology is demonstrated by evaluating methods for eliminating heterogeneous variance in kinome microarray data. Phosphorylation intensities from kinome microarrays often exhibit such heterogeneous variance and its presence can negatively impact downstream statistical techniques that rely on homogeneity of variance. It is shown that using the output from the proposed synthetic data generator, it is possible to critically compare two variance stabilization methods. PMID:27600233

  3. Microarray-based detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium transposon mutants that cannot survive in macrophages and mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kaman; Kim, Charles C; Falkow, Stanley

    2005-09-01

    DNA microarrays provide an opportunity to combine the principles of signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) with microarray technology to identify potentially important bacterial virulence genes. The scope of DNA microarrays allows for less laborious screening on a much larger scale than possible by STM alone. We have adapted a microarray-based transposon tracking strategy for use with a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium cDNA microarray in order to identify genes important for survival and replication in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage-like cells or in the spleens of BALB/cJ mice. A 50,000-CFU transposon library of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 was serially passaged in cultured macrophages or intraperitoneally inoculated into BALB/cJ mice. The bacterial genomic DNA was isolated and processed for analysis on the microarray. The novel application of this approach to identify mutants unable to survive in cultured cells resulted in the identification of components of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2), which is known to be critical for intracellular survival and replication. In addition, array results indicated that a number of SPI1-associated genes, currently not associated with intracellular survival, are negatively selected. However, of the SPI1-associated mutants individually tested for intracellular survival, only a sirA mutant exhibited reduced numbers relative to those of wild-type bacteria. Of the mutants unable to survive in mice, significant proportions are either components of the SPI2 pathogenicity island or involved in lipopolysaccharide synthesis. This observation is in agreement with results obtained in the original S. enterica serovar Typhimurium STM screen, illustrating the utility of this approach for the high-throughput identification of virulence factors important for survival in the host.

  4. Interpretation of microarray data: trudging out of the abyss towards elucidation of biological significance.

    PubMed

    Smith, G W; Rosa, G J M

    2007-03-01

    The recent development of tools for expression profiling in livestock has availed reproductive biologists of new opportunities to examine global changes in gene expression during key developmental events, in response to hormonal or other treatments, and as a tool for phenotyping or predicting developmental potential. Such experiments often yield lists of tens to thousands of modulated genes, transcripts of interest, or both. Some argue that such technological advances signal a move from hypothesis-driven research to descriptive discovery research, resulting in information overload at the expense of biological significance. One can easily spend hours staring into the abyss, wondering if the results are real and what they mean. However, microarrays can be more than a high throughput and expensive screening tool. Many factors contribute to the success of expression profiling experiments and the yield of interpretable data, including the nature of the hypothesis or objective of the study, the microarray platform, the complexity of the tissue of interest, the experimental design, and the incorporation of the best available strategies for data analysis and interpretation of the biological themes. Although challenging due to the lack of extensive annotation or ontology classification for genes in livestock species, functional categories of coregulated genes and gene pathways can be determined, and hypotheses about common regulatory elements or the functional significance can be formulated. We have applied cDNA microarray technology to studies of follicular growth, oocyte quality, and the periovulatory period in cattle. Lessons learned from such experiments and a review of the available literature form the basis for the strategies described to facilitate successful application of microarray technology to studies of reproductive biology of livestock species.

  5. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1996-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  6. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1996-01-09

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form. The method comprises: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  7. Protein microarrays for parasite antigen discovery.

    PubMed

    Driguez, Patrick; Doolan, Denise L; Molina, Douglas M; Loukas, Alex; Trieu, Angela; Felgner, Phil L; McManus, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The host serological profile to a parasitic infection, such as schistosomiasis, can be used to define potential vaccine and diagnostic targets. Determining the host antibody response using traditional approaches is hindered by the large number of putative antigens in any parasite proteome. Parasite protein microarrays offer the potential for a high-throughput host antibody screen to simplify this task. In order to construct the array, parasite proteins are selected from available genomic sequence and protein databases using bioinformatic tools. Selected open reading frames are PCR amplified, incorporated into a vector for cell-free protein expression, and printed robotically onto glass slides. The protein microarrays can be probed with antisera from infected/immune animals or humans and the antibody reactivity measured with fluorophore labeled antibodies on a confocal laser microarray scanner to identify potential targets for diagnosis or therapeutic or prophylactic intervention. PMID:25388117

  8. Validation and implementation of a method for microarray gene expression profiling of minor B-cell subpopulations in man

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This report describes a method for the generation of global gene expression profiles from low frequent B-cell subsets by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and RNA amplification. However, some of the differentiating compartments involve a low number of cells and therefore it is important to optimize and validate each step in the procedure. Methods Normal lymphoid tissues from blood, tonsils, thymus and bone marrow were immunophenotyped by the 8-colour Euroflow panel using multiparametric flow cytometry. Subsets of B-cells containing cell numbers ranging from 800 to 33,000 and with frequencies varying between 0.1 and 10 percent were sorted, subjected to mRNA purification, amplified by the NuGEN protocol and finally analysed by the Affymetrix platform. Results Following a step by step strategy, each step in the workflow was validated and the sorting/storage conditions optimized as described in this report. First, an analysis of four cancer cell lines on Affymetrix arrays, using either 100 ng RNA labelled with the Ambion standard protocol or 1 ng RNA amplified and labelled by the NuGEN protocol, revealed a significant correlation of gene expressions (r ≥ 0.9 for all). Comparison of qPCR data in samples with or without amplification for 8 genes showed that a relative difference between six cell lines was preserved (r ≥ 0.9). Second, a comparison of cells sorted into PrepProtect, RNAlater or directly into lysis/binding buffer showed a higher yield of purified mRNA following storage in lysis/binding buffer (p < 0.001). Third, the identity of the B-cell subsets validated by the cluster of differentiation (CD) membrane profile was highly concordant with the transcriptional gene expression (p-values <0.001). Finally, in normal bone marrow and tonsil samples, eight evaluated genes were expressed in accordance with the biology of lymphopoiesis (p-values < 0.001), which enabled the generation of a gene-specific B-cell atlas. Conclusion A

  9. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  10. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  11. Photo-Generation of Carbohydrate Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Gregory T.; Wang, Denong; Turro, Nicholas J.; Koberstein, Jeffrey T.

    The unparalleled structural diversity of carbohydrates among biological molecules has been recognized for decades. Recent studies have highlighted carbohydrate signaling roles in many important biological processes, such as fertilization, embryonic development, cell differentiation and cellȁ4cell communication, blood coagulation, inflammation, chemotaxis, as well as host recognition and immune responses to microbial pathogens. In this chapter, we summarize recent progress in the establishment of carbohydrate-based microarrays and the application of these technologies in exploring the biological information content in carbohydrates. A newly established photochemical platform of carbohydrate microarrays serves as a model for a focused discussion.

  12. Protein Microarrays for the Detection of Biothreats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Amy E.

    Although protein microarrays have proven to be an important tool in proteomics research, the technology is emerging as useful for public health and defense applications. Recent progress in the measurement and characterization of biothreat agents is reviewed in this chapter. Details concerning validation of various protein microarray formats, from contact-printed sandwich assays to supported lipid bilayers, are presented. The reviewed technologies have important implications for in vitro characterization of toxin-ligand interactions, serotyping of bacteria, screening of potential biothreat inhibitors, and as core components of biosensors, among others, research and engineering applications.

  13. Pineal Function: Impact of Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David C.; Bailey, Michael J.; Carter, David A.; Kim, Jong-so; Shi, Qiong; Ho, Anthony; Chik, Constance; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Morin, Fabrice; Ganguly, Surajit; Rath, Martin F.; Møller, Morten; Sugden, David; Rangel, Zoila G.; Munson, Peter J.; Weller, Joan L.; Coon, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Microarray analysis has provided a new understanding of pineal function by identifying genes that are highly expressed in this tissue relative to other tissues and also by identifying over 600 genes that are expressed on a 24-hour schedule. This effort has highlighted surprising similarity to the retina and has provided reason to explore new avenues of study including intracellular signaling, signal transduction, transcriptional cascades, thyroid/retinoic acid hormone signaling, metal biology, RNA splicing, and the role the pineal gland plays in the immune/inflammation response. The new foundation that microarray analysis has provided will broadly support future research on pineal function. PMID:19622385

  14. The use of microarrays in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G.L.; He, Z.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Zhou, J.

    2009-09-15

    Microarrays have proven to be a useful and high-throughput method to provide targeted DNA sequence information for up to many thousands of specific genetic regions in a single test. A microarray consists of multiple DNA oligonucleotide probes that, under high stringency conditions, hybridize only to specific complementary nucleic acid sequences (targets). A fluorescent signal indicates the presence and, in many cases, the abundance of genetic regions of interest. In this chapter we will look at how microarrays are used in microbial ecology, especially with the recent increase in microbial community DNA sequence data. Of particular interest to microbial ecologists, phylogenetic microarrays are used for the analysis of phylotypes in a community and functional gene arrays are used for the analysis of functional genes, and, by inference, phylotypes in environmental samples. A phylogenetic microarray that has been developed by the Andersen laboratory, the PhyloChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that targets the known diversity within the 16S rRNA gene to determine microbial community composition. Using multiple, confirmatory probes to increase the confidence of detection and a mismatch probe for every perfect match probe to minimize the effect of cross-hybridization by non-target regions, the PhyloChip is able to simultaneously identify any of thousands of taxa present in an environmental sample. The PhyloChip is shown to reveal greater diversity within a community than rRNA gene sequencing due to the placement of the entire gene product on the microarray compared with the analysis of up to thousands of individual molecules by traditional sequencing methods. A functional gene array that has been developed by the Zhou laboratory, the GeoChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that dynamically identifies functional activities of multiple members within a community. The recent version of GeoChip contains more than 24,000 50mer

  15. MicroRNA expression profiling using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Love, Cassandra; Dave, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs which are able to regulate gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. There is a growing recognition of the role of microRNAs in nearly every tissue type and cellular process. Thus there is an increasing need for accurate quantitation of microRNA expression in a variety of tissues. Microarrays provide a robust method for the examination of microRNA expression. In this chapter, we describe detailed methods for the use of microarrays to measure microRNA expression and discuss methods for the analysis of microRNA expression data. PMID:23666707

  16. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1998-11-03

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries. 19 figs.

  17. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries.

  18. Constructing and detecting a cDNA library for mites.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li; Zhao, YaE; Cheng, Juan; Yang, YuanJun; Li, Chen; Lu, ZhaoHui

    2015-10-01

    RNA extraction and construction of complementary DNA (cDNA) library for mites have been quite challenging due to difficulties in acquiring tiny living mites and breaking their hard chitin. The present study is to explore a better method to construct cDNA library for mites that will lay the foundation on transcriptome and molecular pathogenesis research. We selected Psoroptes cuniculi as an experimental subject and took the following steps to construct and verify cDNA library. First, we combined liquid nitrogen grinding with TRIzol for total RNA extraction. Then, switching mechanism at 5' end of the RNA transcript (SMART) technique was used to construct full-length cDNA library. To evaluate the quality of cDNA library, the library titer and recombination rate were calculated. The reliability of cDNA library was detected by sequencing and analyzing positive clones and genes amplified by specific primers. The results showed that the RNA concentration was 836 ng/μl and the absorbance ratio at 260/280 nm was 1.82. The library titer was 5.31 × 10(5) plaque-forming unit (PFU)/ml and the recombination rate was 98.21%, indicating that the library was of good quality. In the 33 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of P. cuniculi, two clones of 1656 and 1658 bp were almost identical with only three variable sites detected, which had an identity of 99.63% with that of Psoroptes ovis, indicating that the cDNA library was reliable. Further detection by specific primers demonstrated that the 553-bp Pso c II gene sequences of P. cuniculi had an identity of 98.56% with those of P. ovis, confirming that the cDNA library was not only reliable but also feasible.

  19. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  20. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  1. High-Throughput Plasmid cDNA Library Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Kenneth H.; Yu, Charles; George, Reed A.; Carlson, JosephW.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Svirskas, Robert; Stapleton, Mark; Celniker, SusanE.

    2006-05-24

    Libraries of cDNA clones are valuable resources foranalysing the expression, structure, and regulation of genes, as well asfor studying protein functions and interactions. Full-length cDNA clonesprovide information about intron and exon structures, splice junctionsand 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). Open reading frames (ORFs)derived from cDNA clones can be used to generate constructs allowingexpression of native proteins and N- or C-terminally tagged proteins.Thus, obtaining full-length cDNA clones and sequences for most or allgenes in an organism is critical for understanding genome functions.Expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing samples cDNA libraries at random,which is most useful at the beginning of large-scale screening projects.However, as projects progress towards completion, the probability ofidentifying unique cDNAs via EST sequencing diminishes, resulting in poorrecovery of rare transcripts. We describe an adapted, high-throughputprotocol intended for recovery of specific, full-length clones fromplasmid cDNA libraries in five days.

  2. A new method for gridding DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Christoforos C; Matsopoulos, George K

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, a new methodological scheme for the gridding of DNA microarrays is proposed. The scheme composes of a series of processes applied sequentially. Each DNA microarray image is pre-processed to remove any noise and the center of each spot is detected using a template matching algorithm. Then, an initial gridding is automatically placed on the DNA microarray image by 'building' rectangular pyramids around the detected spots' centers. The gridlines "move" between the pyramids, horizontally and vertically, forming this initial grid. Furthermore, a refinement process is applied composing of a five-step approach in order to correct gridding imperfections caused by its initial placement, both in non-spot cases and in more than one spot enclosure cases. The proposed gridding scheme is applied on DNA microarray images under known transformations and on real-world DNA data. Its performance is compared against the projection pursuit method, which is often used due to its speed and simplicity, as well as against a state-of-the-art method, the Optimal Multi-level Thresholding Gridding (OMTG). According to the obtained results, the proposed gridding scheme outperforms both methods, qualitatively and quantitatively.

  3. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S.; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander N.; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Shipma, Matthew; White, Amanda M.; Willse, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic, genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using DNA oligonucleotide microarrays was used for high-resolution differentiation between closely related Bacillus strains, including two strains of Bacillus anthracis that are monomorphic (indistinguishable) via amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting techniques. Replicated hybridizations on 391-probe nonamer arrays were used to construct a prototype fingerprint library for quantitative comparisons. Descriptive analysis of the fingerprints, including phylogenetic reconstruction, is consistent with previous taxonomic organization of the genus. Newly developed statistical analysis methods were used to quantitatively compare and objectively confirm apparent differences in microarray fingerprints with the statistical rigor required for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics. These data suggest that a relatively simple fingerprinting microarray and statistical analysis method can differentiate between species in the Bacillus cereus complex, and between strains of B. anthracis. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand underlying microarray and process-level variability, leading to specific recommendations for the development of a standard operating procedure and/or continued technology enhancements for microbial forensics and diagnostics.

  4. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Paula; Dasilva, Noelia; González-González, María; Matarraz, Sergio; Casado-Vela, Juan; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays constitute a new platform which allows the discovery and characterization of proteins. According to different features, such as content, surface or detection system, there are many types of protein microarrays which can be applied for the identification of disease biomarkers and the characterization of protein expression patterns. However, the analysis and interpretation of the amount of information generated by microarrays remain a challenge. Further data analysis strategies are essential to obtain representative and reproducible results. Therefore, the experimental design is key, since the number of samples and dyes, among others aspects, would define the appropriate analysis method to be used. In this sense, several algorithms have been proposed so far to overcome analytical difficulties derived from fluorescence overlapping and/or background noise. Each kind of microarray is developed to fulfill a specific purpose. Therefore, the selection of appropriate analytical and data analysis strategies is crucial to achieve successful biological conclusions. In the present review, we focus on current algorithms and main strategies for data interpretation.

  5. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  6. Microarrays (DNA Chips) for the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The primary…

  7. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Paula; Dasilva, Noelia; González-González, María; Matarraz, Sergio; Casado-Vela, Juan; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays constitute a new platform which allows the discovery and characterization of proteins. According to different features, such as content, surface or detection system, there are many types of protein microarrays which can be applied for the identification of disease biomarkers and the characterization of protein expression patterns. However, the analysis and interpretation of the amount of information generated by microarrays remain a challenge. Further data analysis strategies are essential to obtain representative and reproducible results. Therefore, the experimental design is key, since the number of samples and dyes, among others aspects, would define the appropriate analysis method to be used. In this sense, several algorithms have been proposed so far to overcome analytical difficulties derived from fluorescence overlapping and/or background noise. Each kind of microarray is developed to fulfill a specific purpose. Therefore, the selection of appropriate analytical and data analysis strategies is crucial to achieve successful biological conclusions. In the present review, we focus on current algorithms and main strategies for data interpretation. PMID:27605336

  8. DISC-BASED IMMUNOASSAY MICROARRAYS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology as applied to areas that include genomics, diagnostics, environmental, and drug discovery, is an interesting research topic for which different chip-based devices have been developed. As an alternative, we have explored the principle of compact disc-based...

  9. MICROARRAY DATA ANALYSIS USING MULTIPLE STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray Data Analysis Using Multiple Statistical Models

    Wenjun Bao1, Judith E. Schmid1, Amber K. Goetz1, Ming Ouyang2, William J. Welsh2,Andrew I. Brooks3,4, ChiYi Chu3,Mitsunori Ogihara3,4, Yinhe Cheng5, David J. Dix1. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Researc...

  10. Raman-based microarray readout: a review.

    PubMed

    Haisch, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    For a quarter of a century, microarrays have been part of the routine analytical toolbox. Label-based fluorescence detection is still the commonest optical readout strategy. Since the 1990s, a continuously increasing number of label-based as well as label-free experiments on Raman-based microarray readout concepts have been reported. This review summarizes the possible concepts and methods and their advantages and challenges. A common label-based strategy is based on the binding of selective receptors as well as Raman reporter molecules to plasmonic nanoparticles in a sandwich immunoassay, which results in surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of the reporter molecule. Alternatively, capture of the analytes can be performed by receptors on a microarray surface. Addition of plasmonic nanoparticles again leads to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal, not of a label but directly of the analyte. This approach is mostly proposed for bacteria and cell detection. However, although many promising readout strategies have been discussed in numerous publications, rarely have any of them made the step from proof of concept to a practical application, let alone routine use. Graphical Abstract Possible realization of a SERS (Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering) system for microarray readout. PMID:26973235

  11. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  12. EST and microarray analysis of horn development in Onthophagus beetles

    PubMed Central

    Kijimoto, Teiya; Costello, James; Tang, Zuojian; Moczek, Armin P; Andrews, Justen

    2009-01-01

    Background The origin of novel traits and their subsequent diversification represent central themes in evo-devo and evolutionary ecology. Here we explore the genetic and genomic basis of a class of traits that is both novel and highly diverse, in a group of organisms that is ecologically complex and experimentally tractable: horned beetles. Results We developed two high quality, normalized cDNA libraries for larval and pupal Onthophagus taurus and sequenced 3,488 ESTs that assembled into 451 contigs and 2,330 singletons. We present the annotation and a comparative analysis of the conservation of the sequences. Microarrays developed from the combined libraries were then used to contrast the transcriptome of developing primordia of head horns, prothoracic horns, and legs. Our experiments identify a first comprehensive list of candidate genes for the evolution and diversification of beetle horns. We find that developing horns and legs show many similarities as well as important differences in their transcription profiles, suggesting that the origin of horns was mediated partly, but not entirely, by the recruitment of genes involved in the formation of more traditional appendages such as legs. Furthermore, we find that horns developing from the head and prothorax differ in their transcription profiles to a degree that suggests that head and prothoracic horns are not serial homologs, but instead may have evolved independently from each other. Conclusion We have laid the foundation for a systematic analysis of the genetic basis of horned beetle development and diversification with the potential to contribute significantly to several major frontiers in evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:19878565

  13. Examining microarray slide quality for the EPA using SNL's hyperspectral microarray scanner.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Rachel M.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes research performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess microarray quality on arrays from two platforms of interest to the EPA. Custom microarrays from two novel, commercially produced array platforms were imaged with SNL's unique hyperspectral imaging technology and multivariate data analysis was performed to investigate sources of emission on the arrays. No extraneous sources of emission were evident in any of the array areas scanned. This led to the conclusions that either of these array platforms could produce high quality, reliable microarray data for the EPA toxicology programs. Hyperspectral imaging results are presented and recommendations for microarray analyses using these platforms are detailed within the report.

  14. Identifying Fishes through DNA Barcodes and Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kochzius, Marc; Seidel, Christian; Antoniou, Aglaia; Botla, Sandeep Kumar; Campo, Daniel; Cariani, Alessia; Vazquez, Eva Garcia; Hauschild, Janet; Hervet, Caroline; Hjörleifsdottir, Sigridur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur; Kappel, Kristina; Landi, Monica; Magoulas, Antonios; Marteinsson, Viggo; Nölte, Manfred; Planes, Serge; Tinti, Fausto; Turan, Cemal; Venugopal, Moleyur N.; Weber, Hannes; Blohm, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Background International fish trade reached an import value of 62.8 billion Euro in 2006, of which 44.6% are covered by the European Union. Species identification is a key problem throughout the life cycle of fishes: from eggs and larvae to adults in fisheries research and control, as well as processed fish products in consumer protection. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to evaluate the applicability of the three mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S), cytochrome b (cyt b), and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) for the identification of 50 European marine fish species by combining techniques of “DNA barcoding” and microarrays. In a DNA barcoding approach, neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees of 369 16S, 212 cyt b, and 447 COI sequences indicated that cyt b and COI are suitable for unambiguous identification, whereas 16S failed to discriminate closely related flatfish and gurnard species. In course of probe design for DNA microarray development, each of the markers yielded a high number of potentially species-specific probes in silico, although many of them were rejected based on microarray hybridisation experiments. None of the markers provided probes to discriminate the sibling flatfish and gurnard species. However, since 16S-probes were less negatively influenced by the “position of label” effect and showed the lowest rejection rate and the highest mean signal intensity, 16S is more suitable for DNA microarray probe design than cty b and COI. The large portion of rejected COI-probes after hybridisation experiments (>90%) renders the DNA barcoding marker as rather unsuitable for this high-throughput technology. Conclusions/Significance Based on these data, a DNA microarray containing 64 functional oligonucleotide probes for the identification of 30 out of the 50 fish species investigated was developed. It represents the next step towards an automated and easy-to-handle method to identify fish, ichthyoplankton, and fish products. PMID

  15. Microarray analysis at single molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mureşan, Leila; Jacak, Jarosław; Klement, Erich Peter; Hesse, Jan; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bioanalytical chip-based assays have been enormously improved in sensitivity in the recent years; detection of trace amounts of substances down to the level of individual fluorescent molecules has become state of the art technology. The impact of such detection methods, however, has yet not fully been exploited, mainly due to a lack in appropriate mathematical tools for robust data analysis. One particular example relates to the analysis of microarray data. While classical microarray analysis works at resolutions of two to 20 micrometers and quantifies the abundance of target molecules by determining average pixel intensities, a novel high resolution approach [1] directly visualizes individual bound molecules as diffraction limited peaks. The now possible quantification via counting is less susceptible to labeling artifacts and background noise. We have developed an approach for the analysis of high-resolution microarray images. It consists first of a single molecule detection step, based on undecimated wavelet transforms, and second, of a spot identification step via spatial statistics approach (corresponding to the segmentation step in the classical microarray analysis). The detection method was tested on simulated images with a concentration range of 0.001 to 0.5 molecules per square micron and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between 0.9 and 31.6. For SNR above 15 the false negatives relative error was below 15%. Separation of foreground/background proved reliable, in case foreground density exceeds background by a factor of 2. The method has also been applied to real data from high-resolution microarray measurements. PMID:20123580

  16. Molecular Sub-Classification of Renal Epithelial Tumors Using Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Thomas; Chung, Paul H.; Reinish, Ariel; Valera, Vladimir; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Linehan, W. Marston; Bratslavsky, Gennady

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the accuracy of the sub-classification of renal cortical neoplasms using molecular signatures. Experimental Design A search of publicly available databases was performed to identify microarray datasets with multiple histologic sub-types of renal cortical neoplasms. Meta-analytic techniques were utilized to identify differentially expressed genes for each histologic subtype. The lists of genes obtained from the meta-analysis were used to create predictive signatures through the use of a pair-based method. These signatures were organized into an algorithm to sub-classify renal neoplasms. The use of these signatures according to our algorithm was validated on several independent datasets. Results We identified three Gene Expression Omnibus datasets that fit our criteria to develop a training set. All of the datasets in our study utilized the Affymetrix platform. The final training dataset included 149 samples represented by the four most common histologic subtypes of renal cortical neoplasms: 69 clear cell, 41 papillary, 16 chromophobe, and 23 oncocytomas. When validation of our signatures was performed on external datasets, we were able to correctly classify 68 of the 72 samples (94%). The correct classification by subtype was 19/20 (95%) for clear cell, 14/14 (100%) for papillary, 17/19 (89%) for chromophobe, 18/19 (95%) for oncocytomas. Conclusions Through the use of meta-analytic techniques, we were able to create an algorithm that sub-classified renal neoplasms on a molecular level with 94% accuracy across multiple independent datasets. This algorithm may aid in selecting molecular therapies and may improve the accuracy of subtyping of renal cortical tumors. PMID:21818257

  17. Chromosomal patterns of gene expression from microarray data: methodology, validation and clinical relevance in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Roncaroli, Federico; Hennuy, Benoit; Herens, Christian; Nguyen, Minh; Martin, Didier; Evrard, Annick; Bours, Vincent; Boniver, Jacques; Deprez, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression microarrays represent a powerful technique for the simultaneous investigation of thousands of genes. The evidence that genes are not randomly distributed in the genome and that their coordinated expression depends on their position on chromosomes has highlighted the need for mathematical approaches to exploit this dependency for the analysis of expression data-sets. Results We have devised a novel mathematical technique (CHROMOWAVE) based on the Haar wavelet transform and applied it to a dataset obtained with the Affymetrix® HG-U133_Plus_2 array in 27 gliomas. CHROMOWAVE generated multi-chromosomal pattern featuring low expression in chromosomes 1p, 4, 9q, 13, 18, and 19q. This pattern was not only statistically robust but also clinically relevant as it was predictive of favourable outcome. This finding was replicated on a data-set independently acquired by another laboratory. FISH analysis indicated that monosomy 1p and 19q was a frequent feature of tumours displaying the CHROMOWAVE pattern but that allelic loss on chromosomes 4, 9q, 13 and 18 was much less common. Conclusion The ability to detect expression changes of spatially related genes and to map their position on chromosomes makes CHROMOWAVE a valuable screening method for the identification and display of regional gene expression changes of clinical relevance. In this study, FISH data showed that monosomy was frequently associated with diffuse low gene expression on chromosome 1p and 19q but not on chromosomes 4, 9q, 13 and 18. Comparative genomic hybridisation, allelic polymorphism analysis and methylation studies are in progress in order to identify the various mechanisms involved in this multi-chromosomal expression pattern. PMID:17140431

  18. Microarray profiling of secretory-phase endometrium from patients with recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rosfayati; Omar, Mohd Hashim; Shan, Lim Pei; Shafiee, Mohd Nasir; Jamal, Rahman; Mokhtar, Norfilza Mohd

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify differentially expressed genes and their related biological pathways in the secretory phase endometrium from patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM) and fertile subjects. Endometrial samples from RM and fertile patients were analyzed using the Affymetrix GeneChip® ST Array. The bioinformatic analysis using the Partek Genomic Suite revealed 346 genes (175 up-regulated and 171 down-regulated) that were differentially expressed in the endometrium of RM patients compared to the fertile subjects (fold change ≥1.5, p<0.005). Validation step using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) confirmed a similar expression pattern of four exemplary genes: one up-regulated gene (fibroblast growth factor 9, FGF9) and three down-regulated genes: integrin β3 (ITGB3), colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) and matrix-metalloproteinases 19 (MMP19). The Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and the Pathway Studio software have found 101 signaling pathways (p<0.05) associated with the affected genes including the FGFR3 /signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway and the CSF1R/STAT pathway. Cell adhesion, cell differentiation and angiogenesis were among biological processes indicated by this system. In conclusion, microarray technique is a useful tool to study gene expression in the secretory phase-endometrium of RM patients. The differences in endometrial gene expressions between healthy and RM subjects contribute to an increase in our knowledge on molecular mechanisms of RM development and may improve the outcome of pregnancies in high-risk women with RM.

  19. Transformation of metabolism with age and lifestyle in Antarctic seals: a case study of systems biology approach to cross-species microarray experiment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The metabolic transformation that changes Weddell seal pups born on land into aquatic animals is not only interesting for the study of general biology, but it also provides a model for the acquired and congenital muscle disorders which are associated with oxygen metabolism in skeletal muscle. However, the analysis of gene expression in seals is hampered by the lack of specific microarrays and the very limited annotation of known Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) genes. Results Muscle samples from newborn, juvenile, and adult Weddell seals were collected during an Antarctic expedition. Extracted RNA was hybridized on Affymetrix Human Expression chips. Preliminary studies showed a detectable signal from at least 7000 probe sets present in all samples and replicates. Relative expression levels for these genes was used for further analysis of the biological pathways implicated in the metabolism transformation which occurs in the transition from newborn, to juvenile, to adult seals. Cytoskeletal remodeling, WNT signaling, FAK signaling, hypoxia-induced HIF1 activation, and insulin regulation were identified as being among the most important biological pathways involved in transformation. Conclusion In spite of certain losses in specificity and sensitivity, the cross-species application of gene expression microarrays is capable of solving challenging puzzles in biology. A Systems Biology approach based on gene interaction patterns can compensate adequately for the lack of species-specific genomics information. PMID:20920245

  20. Heterologous oligonucleotide microarrays for transcriptomics in a non-model species; a proof-of-concept study of drought stress in Musa

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Mark W; Graham, Neil S; Vanholme, Bartel; Swennen, Rony; May, Sean T; Keulemans, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Background 'Systems-wide' approaches such as microarray RNA-profiling are ideally suited to the study of the complex overlapping responses of plants to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, commercial microarrays are only available for a limited number of plant species and development costs are so substantial as to be prohibitive for most research groups. Here we evaluate the use of cross-hybridisation to Affymetrix oligonucleotide GeneChip® microarrays to profile the response of the banana (Musa spp.) leaf transcriptome to drought stress using a genomic DNA (gDNA)-based probe-selection strategy to improve the efficiency of detection of differentially expressed Musa transcripts. Results Following cross-hybridisation of Musa gDNA to the Rice GeneChip® Genome Array, ~33,700 gene-specific probe-sets had a sufficiently high degree of homology to be retained for transcriptomic analyses. In a proof-of-concept approach, pooled RNA representing a single biological replicate of control and drought stressed leaves of the Musa cultivar 'Cachaco' were hybridised to the Affymetrix Rice Genome Array. A total of 2,910 Musa gene homologues with a >2-fold difference in expression levels were subsequently identified. These drought-responsive transcripts included many functional classes associated with plant biotic and abiotic stress responses, as well as a range of regulatory genes known to be involved in coordinating abiotic stress responses. This latter group included members of the ERF, DREB, MYB, bZIP and bHLH transcription factor families. Fifty-two of these drought-sensitive Musa transcripts were homologous to genes underlying QTLs for drought and cold tolerance in rice, including in 2 instances QTLs associated with a single underlying gene. The list of drought-responsive transcripts also included genes identified in publicly-available comparative transcriptomics experiments. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that despite the general paucity of nucleotide sequence data in

  1. Reproducibility, Fidelity, and Discriminant Validity of mRNA Amplification for Microarray Analysis from Primary Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Roden, Joe; Shapiro, Bruce E.; Wold, Barbara J.; Bhatia, Smita; Forman, Stephen J.; Bhatia, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of gene expression in clinical samples poses special challenges, including limited RNA availability and poor RNA quality. Quantitative information regarding reliability of RNA amplification methodologies applied to primary cells and representativeness of resulting gene expression profiles is limited. We evaluated four protocols for RNA amplification from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results obtained with 100 ng or 10 ng of RNA amplified using two rounds of cDNA synthesis and in vitro transcription were compared with control 2.5-μg RNA samples processed using a single round of in vitro transcription. Samples were hybridized to Affymetrix HG-U133A arrays. Considerable differences in results were obtained with different protocols. The optimal protocol resulted in highly reproducible gene expression profiles from amplified samples (r = 0.98) and good correlation between amplified and control samples (r = 0.94). Using the optimal protocol dissimilarities of gene expression between mononuclear cells from a normal individual and a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome were primarily maintained after amplification compared with controls. We conclude that small variations in methodology introduce considerable distortion of gene expression profiles obtained after RNA amplification from clinical samples and too strong a focus on a very small number of genes picked from an array analysis could be unduly influenced by seemingly acceptable methodologies. However, it is possible to obtain reproducible and representative results using optimized protocols. PMID:15681474

  2. Construction and Validation of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 DNA Microarray: Transcriptome Flexibility at Diverse Growth Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Christopher T.; Sram, Jakub; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Ivanov, Pavel S.; Mackenzie, Christopher; Choudhary, Madhusudan; Land, Miriam L; Larimer, Frank W; Kaplan, Samuel; Gomelsky, Mark

    2004-07-01

    A high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarray, a genechip, representing the 4.6-Mb genome of the facultative phototrophic proteobacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, was custom-designed and manufactured by Affymetrix, Santa Clara, Calif. The genechip contains probe sets for 4,292 open reading frames (ORFs), 47 rRNA and tRNA genes, and 394 intergenic regions. The probe set sequences were derived from the genome annotation generated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory after extensive revision, which was based primarily upon codon usage characteristic of this GC-rich bacterium. As a result of the revision, numerous missing ORFs were uncovered, nonexistent ORFs were deleted, and misidentified start codons were corrected. To evaluate R. sphaeroides transcriptome flexibility, expression profiles for three diverse growth modes-aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration in the dark, and anaerobic photosynthesis-were generated. Expression levels of one-fifth to one-third of the R. sphaeroides ORFs were significantly different in cells under any two growth modes. Pathways involved in energy generation and redox balance maintenance under three growth modes were reconstructed. Expression patterns of genes involved in these pathways mirrored known functional changes, suggesting that massive changes in gene expression are the major means used by R. sphaeroides in adaptation to diverse conditions. Differential expression was observed for genes encoding putative new participants in these pathways (additional photosystem genes, duplicate NADH dehydrogenase, ATP synthases), whose functionality has yet to be investigated. The DNA microarray data correlated well with data derived from quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, as well as with data from the literature, thus validating the R. sphaeroides genechip as a powerful and reliable tool for studying unprecedented metabolic versatility of this bacterium.

  3. DNA Microarray and Signal Transduction Analysis in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells From Heritable and Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Wilson, Jamie; Taylor, Linda; Polgar, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by increased pulmonary vascular smooth muscle contraction and proliferation. Here, we analyze genome-wide mRNA expression in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) isolated from three control, three hereditary (HPAH), and three idiopathic PAH (IPAH) subjects using the Affymetrix Human Gene ST 1.0 chip. The microarray analysis reveals the expression of 537 genes in HPAH and 1024 genes in IPAH changed compared with control HPASMC. Among those genes, 227 genes show similar directionality of expression in both HPAH and IPAH HPASMC. Ingenuity™ Pathway Analysis (IPA) suggests that many of those genes are involved in cellular growth/proliferation and cell cycle regulation and that signaling pathways such as the mitotic activators, polo-like kinases, ATM signaling are activated under PAH conditions. Furthermore, the analysis demonstrates downregulated mRNA expression of certain vasoactive receptors such as bradykinin receptor B2 (BKB2R). Using real time PCR, we verified the downregulated BKB2R expression in the PAH cells. Bradykinin-stimulated calcium influx is also decreased in PAH PASMC. IPA also identified transcriptional factors such p53 and Rb as downregulated, and FoxM1 and Myc as upregulated in both HPAH and IPAH HPASMC. The decreased level of phospho-p53 in PAH cells was confirmed with a phospho-protein array; and we experimentally show a dysregulated proliferation of both HPAH and IPAH PASMC. Together, the microarray experiments and bioinformatics analysis highlight an aberrant proliferation and cell cycle regulation in HPASMC from PAH subjects. These newly identified pathways may provide new targets for the treatment of both hereditary and idiopathic PAH. PMID:25290246

  4. Microarray Analysis of LTR Retrotransposon Silencing Identifies Hdac1 as a Regulator of Retrotransposon Expression in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Madej, Monika J.; Taggart, Mary; Gautier, Philippe; Garcia-Perez, Jose Luis; Meehan, Richard R.; Adams, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    Retrotransposons are highly prevalent in mammalian genomes due to their ability to amplify in pluripotent cells or developing germ cells. Host mechanisms that silence retrotransposons in germ cells and pluripotent cells are important for limiting the accumulation of the repetitive elements in the genome during evolution. However, although silencing of selected individual retrotransposons can be relatively well-studied, many mammalian retrotransposons are seldom analysed and their silencing in germ cells, pluripotent cells or somatic cells remains poorly understood. Here we show, and experimentally verify, that cryptic repetitive element probes present in Illumina and Affymetrix gene expression microarray platforms can accurately and sensitively monitor repetitive element expression data. This computational approach to genome-wide retrotransposon expression has allowed us to identify the histone deacetylase Hdac1 as a component of the retrotransposon silencing machinery in mouse embryonic stem cells, and to determine the retrotransposon targets of Hdac1 in these cells. We also identify retrotransposons that are targets of other retrotransposon silencing mechanisms such as DNA methylation, Eset-mediated histone modification, and Ring1B/Eed-containing polycomb repressive complexes in mouse embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, our computational analysis of retrotransposon silencing suggests that multiple silencing mechanisms are independently targeted to retrotransposons in embryonic stem cells, that different genomic copies of the same retrotransposon can be differentially sensitive to these silencing mechanisms, and helps define retrotransposon sequence elements that are targeted by silencing machineries. Thus repeat annotation of gene expression microarray data suggests that a complex interplay between silencing mechanisms represses retrotransposon loci in germ cells and embryonic stem cells. PMID:22570599

  5. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation.

  6. Advancing translational research with next-generation protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; Petritis, Brianne; LaBaer, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    Protein microarrays are a high-throughput technology used increasingly in translational research, seeking to apply basic science findings to enhance human health. In addition to assessing protein levels, posttranslational modifications, and signaling pathways in patient samples, protein microarrays have aided in the identification of potential protein biomarkers of disease and infection. In this perspective, the different types of full-length protein microarrays that are used in translational research are reviewed. Specific studies employing these microarrays are presented to highlight their potential in finding solutions to real clinical problems. Finally, the criteria that should be considered when developing next-generation protein microarrays are provided. PMID:26749402

  7. Microarray analysis of cultured human brain aggregates following cortisol exposure: implications for cellular functions relevant to mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Salaria, S; Chana, G; Caldara, F; Feltrin, E; Altieri, M; Faggioni, F; Domenici, E; Merlo-Pich, E; Everall, I P

    2006-09-01

    Increased cortisol levels in humans are often observed in patients suffering from mood disorders. In this study human fetal brain aggregates were exposed to cortisol at 500 nM for 3 weeks, as an in-vitro model of chronic cortisol exposure. Microarray analysis on extracted mRNA using the Affymetrix U133A platform was then performed. Our results demonstrated a significant effect of cortisol on 1648 transcripts; 736 up-regulated and 912 down-regulated genes. The most differentially regulated biological categories were: RNA processing, protein metabolism, and cell growth. Within these categories we observed a down-regulation of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) (-1.5-fold) and aquaporin4 (AQP4) (-1.7-fold), alongside an up-regulation of fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) (+1.7-fold) and vesicle associated membrane protein2 (VAMP2) (+1.7-fold). FGF2, FGF9, AQP4 and VAMP2 changes were confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemistry. Alterations in FGF transcripts are in keeping with recent literature demonstrating such effects in patients with mood disorders. PMID:16844382

  8. Profiling Pre-MicroRNA and Mature MicroRNA Expressions Using a Single Microarray and Avoiding Separate Sample Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lin; Denecke, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Mature microRNA is a crucial component in the gene expression regulation network. At the same time, microRNA gene expression and procession is regulated in a precise and collaborated way. Pre-microRNAs mediate products during the microRNA transcription process, they can provide hints of microRNA gene expression regulation or can serve as alternative biomarkers. To date, little effort has been devoted to pre-microRNA expression profiling. In this study, three human and three mouse microRNA profile data sets, based on the Affymetrix miRNA 2.0 array, have been re-analyzed for both mature and pre-microRNA signals as a primary test of parallel mature/pre-microRNA expression profiling on a single platform. The results not only demonstrated a glimpse of pre-microRNA expression in human and mouse, but also the relationship of microRNA expressions between pre- and mature forms. The study also showed a possible application of currently available microRNA microarrays in profiling pre-microRNA expression in a time and cost effective manner.

  9. Routine Chromosomal Microarray Analysis is Necessary in Korean Patients With Unexplained Developmental Delay/Mental Retardation/Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Saeam; Yu, Nae; Choi, Jong Rak; Jeong, Seri

    2015-01-01

    Background All over the world, chromosomal microarray (CMA) is now the first tier diagnostic assay for genetic testing to evaluate developmental delay (DD), mental retardation (MR), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with unknown etiology. The average diagnostic yield of the CMA test is known to be about 12.2%, while that of conventional G-banding karyotype is below 3%. This study aimed to assess the usefulness of CMA for the purpose of clinical diagnostic testing in the Korean population. Methods We performed CMA and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) tests in 96 patients with normal karyotype and unexplained DD, MR, or ASD. The CMA was conducted with CytoScan 750K array (Affymetrix, USA) with an average resolution of 100 kb. Results Pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs) were detected in 15 patients by CMA and in two patients by MLPA for four known microdeletion syndromes (Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome, Miller-Dieker syndrome and Williams syndrome) designated by National Health Insurance system in Korea. The diagnostic yield was 15.6% and 2.1%, respectively. Thirteen (13.5%) patients (excluding cases with pathogenic CNVs) had variants of uncertain clinical significance. There was one patient with a 17.1-megabase (Mb) region of homozygosity on chromosome 4q. Conclusions Our findings suggest the necessity of CMA as a routine diagnostic test for unexplained DD, MR, and ASD in Korea. PMID:26206688

  10. Pigeons: A Novel GUI Software for Analysing and Parsing High Density Heterologous Oligonucleotide Microarray Probe Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hung-Ming; May, Sean T.; Mayes, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Genomic DNA-based probe selection by using high density oligonucleotide arrays has recently been applied to heterologous species (Xspecies). With the advent of this new approach, researchers are able to study the genome and transcriptome of a non-model or an underutilised crop species through current state-of-the-art microarray platforms. However, a software package with a graphical user interface (GUI) to analyse and parse the oligonucleotide probe pair level data is still lacking when an experiment is designed on the basis of this cross species approach. A novel computer program called Pigeons has been developed for customised array data analysis to allow the user to import and analyse Affymetrix GeneChip® probe level data through XSpecies. One can determine empirical boundaries for removing poor probes based on genomic hybridisation of the test species to the Xspecies array, followed by making a species-specific Chip Description File (CDF) file for transcriptomics in the heterologous species, or Pigeons can be used to examine an experimental design to identify potential Single-Feature Polymorphisms (SFPs) at the DNA or RNA level. Pigeons is also focused around visualization and interactive analysis of the datasets. The software with its manual (the current release number version 1.2.1) is freely available at the website of the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre (NASC).

  11. Development of a porcine (Sus scofa) embryo-specific microarray: array annotation and validation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The domestic pig is an important livestock species and there is strong interest in the factors that affect the development of viable embryos and offspring in this species. A limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in early embryonic development has inhibited our ability to fully elucidate these factors. Next generation deep sequencing and microarray technologies are powerful tools for delineation of molecular pathways involved in the developing embryo. Results Here we present the development of a porcine-embryo-specific microarray platform created from a large expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis generated by Roche/454 next-generation sequencing of cDNAs constructed from critical stages of in vivo or in vitro porcine preimplantation embryos. Two cDNA libraries constructed from in vitro and in vivo produced preimplantation porcine embryos were normalized and sequenced using 454 Titanium pyrosequencing technology. Over one million high-quality EST sequences were obtained and used to develop the EMbryogene Porcine Version 1 (EMPV1) microarray composed of 43,795 probes. Based on an initial probe sequence annotation, the EMPV1 features 17,409 protein-coding, 473 pseudogenes, 46 retrotransposed, 2,359 non-coding RNA, 4,121 splice variants in 2,862 genes and a total of 12,324 Novel Transcript Regions (NTR). After re-annotation, the total unique genes increased from 11,961 to 16,281 and 1.9% of them belonged to a large olfactory receptor (OR) gene family. Quality control on the EMPV1 was performed and revealed an even distribution of ten clusters of spiked-in control spots and array to array (dye-swap) correlation was 0.97. Conclusions Using next-generation deep sequencing we have produced a large EST dataset to allow for the selection of probe sequences for the development of the EMPV1 microarray platform. The quality of this embryo-specific array was confirmed with a high-level of reproducibility using current Agilent microarray technology

  12. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  13. Phylogenetic Microarray Analysis of a Microbial Community Performing Reductive Dechlorination at a TCE-contaminated Site

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick K. H.; Warnecke, F.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Macbeth, Tamzen W.; Conrad, Mark E.; Andersen, Gary L.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A high-density phylogenetic microarray (PhyloChip) was applied to track bacterial and archaeal populations through different phases of remediation at Ft. Lewis, WA, a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater site. Biostimulation with whey, and bioaugmentation with a Dehalococcoides-containing enrichment culture were strategies implemented to enhance dechlorination. As a measure of species richness, over 1300 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected in DNA from groundwater samples extracted during different stages of treatment and in the bioaugmentation culture. In order to determine active members within the community, 16S rRNA from samples were analyzed by microarray and ~600 OTUs identified. A cDNA clone library of the expressed 16S rRNA corroborated the observed diversity and activity of some of the phyla. Principle component analysis of the treatment plot samples revealed that the microbial populations were constantly changing during the course of the study. Dynamic analysis of the archaeal population showed significant increases in methanogens at the later stages of treatment that correlated with increases in methane concentrations of over two orders of magnitude. Overall, the PhyloChip analyses in this study have provided insights into the microbial ecology and population dynamics at the TCE-contaminated field site useful for understanding the in situ reductive dechlorination processes. PMID:22091783

  14. Microarray analysis of ripening-regulated gene expression and its modulation by 1-MCP and hexanal.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Krishnaraj; Paliyath, Gopinadhan

    2011-03-01

    Hexanal, an inhibitor of phospholipase D, has been successfully applied for the pre- and post-harvest treatment of fruits, vegetables and flowers. Changes in gene expression induced by hexanal and the ethylene antagonist 1-MCP, were analyzed by microarray using TOM2 tomato oligo-array containing approximately 12 000 unigenes. Mature green tomato fruits were treated with 1-MCP and hexanal, RNA isolated after 10 days of storage, and labeled cDNA synthesized for microarray analysis. A large variation in gene expression profile was observed in 1-MCP-treated fruits. Genes for ethylene biosynthetic pathway enzymes such as ACC- synthase/oxidase, ethylene receptor and ethylene response factors were heavily down-regulated in 1-MCP-treated fruits. In addition, genes for key enzymes involved in cell wall degradation and carotenoid development pathways were down-regulated. Hexanal treatment significantly down-regulated ACC-synthase, and to a lesser extent, other components of ethylene signal transduction. By contrast to MCP-treated fruits, hexanal-treated fruits gradually ripened and showed higher levels of lycopene and β-carotene. GC-MS analysis of volatiles showed a higher level of major volatile components in hexanal-treated fruits. Similarities in the modulation of gene expression by hexanal and 1-MCP suggest that hexanal, in addition to being a PLD inhibitor, may also act as a weak ethylene inhibitor.

  15. Phylogenetic microarray analysis of a microbial community performing reductive dechlorination at a TCE-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Lee, Patrick K H; Warnecke, F; Brodie, Eoin L; Macbeth, Tamzen W; Conrad, Mark E; Andersen, Gary L; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2012-01-17

    A high-density phylogenetic microarray (PhyloChip) was applied to track bacterial and archaeal populations through different phases of remediation at Ft. Lewis, WA, a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater site. Biostimulation with whey, and bioaugmentation with a Dehalococcoides-containing enrichment culture were strategies implemented to enhance dechlorination. As a measure of species richness, over 1300 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected in DNA from groundwater samples extracted during different stages of treatment and in the bioaugmentation culture. In order to determine active members within the community, 16S rRNA from samples were analyzed by microarray and ∼600 OTUs identified. A cDNA clone library of the expressed 16S rRNA corroborated the observed diversity and activity of some of the phyla. Principle component analysis of the treatment plot samples revealed that the microbial populations were constantly changing during the course of the study. Dynamic analysis of the archaeal population showed significant increases in methanogens at the later stages of treatment that correlated with increases in methane concentrations of over 2 orders of magnitude. Overall, the PhyloChip analyses in this study have provided insights into the microbial ecology and population dynamics at the TCE-contaminated field site useful for understanding the in situ reductive dechlorination processes.

  16. Microarray Analysis of Port Wine Stains Before and After Pulsed Dye Laser Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Laquer, Vivian T.; Hevezi, Peter A.; Albrecht, Huguette; Chen, Tina S.; Zlotnik, Albert; Kelly, Kristen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Neither the pathogenesis of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks nor tissue effects of pulsed dye laser (PDL) treatment of these lesions is fully understood. There are few published reports utilizing gene expression analysis in human PWS skin. We aim to compare gene expression in PWS before and after PDL, using DNA microarrays that represent most, if not all, human genes to obtain comprehensive molecular profiles of PWS lesions and PDL-associated tissue effects. Materials and Methods Five human subjects had PDL treatment of their PWS. One week later, three biopsies were taken from each subject: normal skin (N); untreated PWS (PWS); PWS post-PDL (PWS + PDL). Samples included two lower extremity lesions, two facial lesions, and one facial nodule. High-quality total RNA isolated from skin biopsies was processed and applied to Affymetrix Human gene 1.0ST microarrays for gene expression analysis. We performed a 16 pair-wise comparison identifying either up- or down-regulated genes between N versus PWS and PWS versus PWS + PDL for four of the donor samples. The PWS nodule (nPWS) was analyzed separately. Results There was significant variation in gene expression profiles between individuals. By doing pair-wise comparisons between samples taken from the same donor, we were able to identify genes that may participate in the formation of PWS lesions and PDL tissue effects. Genes associated with immune, epidermal, and lipid metabolism were up-regulated in PWS skin. The nPWS exhibited more profound differences in gene expression than the rest of the samples, with significant differential expression of genes associated with angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, and inflammation. Conclusion In summary, gene expression profiles from N, PWS, and PWS + PDL demonstrated significant variation within samples from the same donor and between donors. By doing pair-wise comparisons between samples taken from the same donor and comparing these results between donors, we were

  17. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-Hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2016-01-27

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn.

  18. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn. PMID:26813635

  19. Statistical Considerations for Analysis of Microarray Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Owzar, Kouros; Barry, William T.; Jung, Sin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Microarray technologies enable the simultaneous interrogation of expressions from thousands of genes from a biospecimen sample taken from a patient. This large set of expressions generate a genetic profile of the patient that may be used to identify potential prognostic or predictive genes or genetic models for clinical outcomes. The aim of this article is to provide a broad overview of some of the major statistical considerations for the design and analysis of microarrays experiments conducted as correlative science studies to clinical trials. An emphasis will be placed on how the lack of understanding and improper use of statistical concepts and methods will lead to noise discovery and misinterpretation of experimental results. PMID:22212230

  20. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  1. Microarrays: how many do you need?

    PubMed

    Zien, Alexander; Fluck, Juliane; Zimmer, Ralf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We estimate the number of microarrays that is required in order to gain reliable results from a common type of study: the pairwise comparison of different classes of samples. We show that current knowledge allows for the construction of models that look realistic with respect to searches for individual differentially expressed genes and derive prototypical parameters from real data sets. Such models allow investigation of the dependence of the required number of samples on the relevant parameters: the biological variability of the samples within each class, the fold changes in expression that are desired to be detected, the detection sensitivity of the microarrays, and the acceptable error rates of the results. We supply experimentalists with general conclusions as well as a freely accessible Java applet at www.scai.fhg.de/special/bio/howmanyarrays/ for fine tuning simulations to their particular settings. PMID:12935350

  2. A Flexible Microarray Data Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Dembélé, Doulaye

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology allows monitoring of gene expression profiling at the genome level. This is useful in order to search for genes involved in a disease. The performances of the methods used to select interesting genes are most often judged after other analyzes (qPCR validation, search in databases...), which are also subject to error. A good evaluation of gene selection methods is possible with data whose characteristics are known, that is to say, synthetic data. We propose a model to simulate microarray data with similar characteristics to the data commonly produced by current platforms. The parameters used in this model are described to allow the user to generate data with varying characteristics. In order to show the flexibility of the proposed model, a commented example is given and illustrated. An R package is available for immediate use.

  3. Profiling protein function with small molecule microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Winssinger, Nicolas; Ficarro, Scott; Schultz, Peter G.; Harris, Jennifer L.

    2002-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through posttranslational modification, local environment, and protein–protein interaction is critical to cellular function. The ability to analyze on a genome-wide scale protein functional activity rather than changes in protein abundance or structure would provide important new insights into complex biological processes. Herein, we report the application of a spatially addressable small molecule microarray to an activity-based profile of proteases in crude cell lysates. The potential of this small molecule-based profiling technology is demonstrated by the detection of caspase activation upon induction of apoptosis, characterization of the activated caspase, and inhibition of the caspase-executed apoptotic phenotype using the small molecule inhibitor identified in the microarray-based profile. PMID:12167675

  4. Application of DNA Microarray to Clinical Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2016-01-01

    Microarray-based technology to conduct array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has made a significant impact on the diagnosis of human genetic diseases. Such diagnoses, previously undetectable by traditional G-banding chromosome analysis, are now achieved by identifying genomic copy number variants (CNVs) using the microarray. Not only can hundreds of well-characterized genetic syndromes be detected in a single assay, but new genomic disorders and disease-causing genes can also be discovered through the utilization of aCGH technology. Although other platforms such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays can be used for detecting CNVs, in this chapter we focus on describing the methods for performing aCGH using Agilent oligonucleotide arrays for both prenatal (e.g., amniotic fluid and chorionic villus sample) and postnatal samples (e.g., blood).

  5. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Bonaldo, Maria DeFatima; Soares, Marcelo Bento

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  6. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Bonaldo, M.D.; Soares, M.B.

    1997-12-30

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 1 fig.

  7. Weighted analysis of general microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, Anders; Kristiansson, Erik; Rudemo, Mats; Nerman, Olle

    2007-01-01

    Background In DNA microarray experiments, measurements from different biological samples are often assumed to be independent and to have identical variance. For many datasets these assumptions have been shown to be invalid and typically lead to too optimistic p-values. A method called WAME has been proposed where a variance is estimated for each sample and a covariance is estimated for each pair of samples. The current version of WAME is, however, limited to experiments with paired design, e.g. two-channel microarrays. Results The WAME procedure is extended to general microarray experiments, making it capable of handling both one- and two-channel datasets. Two public one-channel datasets are analysed and WAME detects both unequal variances and correlations. WAME is compared to other common methods: fold-change ranking, ordinary linear model with t-tests, LIMMA and weighted LIMMA. The p-value distributions are shown to differ greatly between the examined methods. In a resampling-based simulation study, the p-values generated by WAME are found to be substantially more correct than the alternatives when a relatively small proportion of the genes is regulated. WAME is also shown to have higher power than the other methods. WAME is available as an R-package. Conclusion The WAME procedure is generalized and the limitation to paired-design microarray datasets is removed. The examined other methods produce invalid p-values in many cases, while WAME is shown to produce essentially valid p-values when a relatively small proportion of genes is regulated. WAME is also shown to have higher power than the examined alternative methods. PMID:17937807

  8. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    PubMed

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  9. Restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS): a novel cDNA display system using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, H; Yaoi, T; Kawai, J; Hara, A; Kuwajima, G; Wantanabe, S

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new method, designated restriction landmark cDNA scanning (RLCS), which displays many cDNA species quantitatively and simultaneously as two-dimensional gel spots. In this method cDNA species of uniform length were prepared for each mRNA species using restriction enzymes. After the restriction enzyme sites were radiolabeled as landmarks, the labeled fragments were subjected to high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In analyses of cDNA samples from adult mouse liver and brain (cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brain stem) we detected approximately 500 and >1000 discrete gel spots respectively of various intensities at a time. The spot patterns of the three brain regions were very similar, although not identical, but were quite different from the pattern for the liver. RNA blot hybridization analysis using several cloned spot DNAs as probes showed that differences in intensity of the spots among RLCS profiles correlated well with expression levels of the corresponding mRNA species in the brain regions. Because the spots and their intensities reflect distinct mRNA species and their expression level respectively, the RLCS is a novel cDNA display system which provides a great deal of information and should be useful for systematic documentation of differentially expressed genes. PMID:8628652

  10. Immune-Signatures for Lung Cancer Diagnostics: Evaluation of Protein Microarray Data Normalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brezina, Stefanie; Soldo, Regina; Kreuzhuber, Roman; Hofer, Philipp; Gsur, Andrea; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    New minimal invasive diagnostic methods for early detection of lung cancer are urgently needed. It is known that the immune system responds to tumors with production of tumor-autoantibodies. Protein microarrays are a suitable highly multiplexed platform for identification of autoantibody signatures against tumor-associated antigens (TAA). These microarrays can be probed using 0.1 mg immunoglobulin G (IgG), purified from 10 µL of plasma. We used a microarray comprising recombinant proteins derived from 15,417 cDNA clones for the screening of 100 lung cancer samples, including 25 samples of each main histological entity of lung cancer, and 100 controls. Since this number of samples cannot be processed at once, the resulting data showed non-biological variances due to “batch effects”. Our aim was to evaluate quantile normalization, “distance-weighted discrimination” (DWD), and “ComBat” for their effectiveness in data pre-processing for elucidating diagnostic immune-signatures. “ComBat” data adjustment outperformed the other methods and allowed us to identify classifiers for all lung cancer cases versus controls and small-cell, squamous cell, large-cell, and adenocarcinoma of the lung with an accuracy of 85%, 94%, 96%, 92%, and 83% (sensitivity of 0.85, 0.92, 0.96, 0.88, 0.83; specificity of 0.85, 0.96, 0.96, 0.96, 0.83), respectively. These promising data would be the basis for further validation using targeted autoantibody tests.

  11. Microarray analysis in gastric cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Giovanna; Di Rienzo, Teresa; Ojetti, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. Although several treatment options have been developed, the mortality rate is increasing. Lymph node involvement is considered the most reliable prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. Early diagnosis improves the survival rate of patients and increases the likelihood of successful treatment. The most reliable diagnostic method is endoscopic examination, however, it is expensive and not feasible in poorer countries. Therefore, many innovative techniques have been studied to develop a new non-invasive screening test and to identify specific serum biomarkers. DNA microarray analysis is one of the new technologies able to measure the expression levels of a large number of genes simultaneously. It is possible to define the gene expression profile of the tumor and to correlate it with the prognosis and metastasis formation. Several studies in the literature have been published on the role of microarray analysis in gastric cancer and the mechanisms of proliferation and metastasis formation. The aim of this review is to analyze the importance of microarray analysis and its clinical applications to better define the genetic characteristics of gastric cancer and its possible implications in a more decisive treatment. PMID:25232233

  12. Repeatability of published microarray gene expression analyses.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A; Allison, David B; Ball, Catherine A; Coulibaly, Issa; Cui, Xiangqin; Culhane, Aedín C; Falchi, Mario; Furlanello, Cesare; Game, Laurence; Jurman, Giuseppe; Mangion, Jon; Mehta, Tapan; Nitzberg, Michael; Page, Grier P; Petretto, Enrico; van Noort, Vera

    2009-02-01

    Given the complexity of microarray-based gene expression studies, guidelines encourage transparent design and public data availability. Several journals require public data deposition and several public databases exist. However, not all data are publicly available, and even when available, it is unknown whether the published results are reproducible by independent scientists. Here we evaluated the replication of data analyses in 18 articles on microarray-based gene expression profiling published in Nature Genetics in 2005-2006. One table or figure from each article was independently evaluated by two teams of analysts. We reproduced two analyses in principle and six partially or with some discrepancies; ten could not be reproduced. The main reason for failure to reproduce was data unavailability, and discrepancies were mostly due to incomplete data annotation or specification of data processing and analysis. Repeatability of published microarray studies is apparently limited. More strict publication rules enforcing public data availability and explicit description of data processing and analysis should be considered.

  13. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  14. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed.

  15. Metadata management and semantics in microarray repositories.

    PubMed

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-12-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework. PMID:24052712

  16. Chicken sperm transcriptome profiling by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Shafeeque, C M; Sharma, S K; Singh, R; Mohan, J; Sastry, K V H; Saxena, V K; Azeez, P A

    2016-03-01

    It has been confirmed that mammalian sperm contain thousands of functional RNAs, and some of them have vital roles in fertilization and early embryonic development. Therefore, we attempted to characterize transcriptome of the sperm of fertile chickens using microarray analysis. Spermatozoal RNA was pooled from 10 fertile males and used for RNA preparation. Prior to performing the microarray, RNA quality was assessed using a bioanalyzer, and gDNA and somatic cell RNA contamination was assessed by CD4 and PTPRC gene amplification. The chicken sperm transcriptome was cross-examined by analysing sperm and testes RNA on a 4 × 44K chicken array, and results were verified by RT-PCR. Microarray analysis identified 21,639 predominantly nuclear-encoded transcripts in chicken sperm. The majority (66.55%) of the sperm transcripts were shared with the testes, while surprisingly, 33.45% transcripts were detected (raw signal intensity greater than 50) only in the sperm and not in the testes. The greatest proportion of up-regulated transcripts were responsible for signal transduction (63.20%) followed by embryonic development (56.76%) and cell structure (56.25%). Of the 20 most abundant transcripts, 18 remain uncharacterized, whereas the least abundant genes were mostly associated with the ribosome. These findings lay a foundation for more detailed investigations on sperm RNAs in chickens to identify sperm-based biomarkers for fertility.

  17. [Genomic medicine. Polymorphisms and microarray applications].

    PubMed

    Spalvieri, Mónica P; Rotenberg, Rosa G

    2004-01-01

    This update shows new concepts related to the significance of DNA variations among individuals, as well as to their detection by using a new technology. The sequencing of the human genome is only the beginning of what will enable us to understand genetic diversity. The unit of DNA variability is the polymorphism of a single nucleotide (SNP). At present, studies on SNPs are restricted to basic research but the large number of papers on this subject makes feasible their entrance into clinical practice. We illustrate here the use of SNPs as molecular markers in ethnical genotyping, gene expression in some diseases and as potential targets in pharmacological response, and also introduce the technology of arrays. Microarrays experiments allow the quantification and comparison of gene expression on a large scale, at the same time, by using special chips and array designs. Conventional methods provide data from up to 20 genes, while a single microarray may provide information about thousands of them simultaneously, leading to a more rapid and accurate genotyping. Biotechnology improvements will facilitate our knowledge of each gene sequence, the frequency and exact location of SNPs and their influence on cellular behavior. Although experimental efficiency and validity of results from microarrays are still controversial, the knowledge and characterization of a patient's genetic profile will lead, undoubtedly, to advances in prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of human diseases. PMID:15637833

  18. Development of a Cross-Disciplinary Investigative Model for the Introduction of Microarray Techniques at Non-R1 Undergraduate Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Walker, David E.; Lutz, Gary P.

    2008-01-01

    Integrating advanced biological techniques into instruction at non-R1 institutions can prove to be a challenge. Here, we report the creation of a model for the introduction of gene expression microarray technology into a research laboratory. A student assessment tool was used to evaluate 1) technical skill development, 2) cross-disciplinary issues, 3) development of trouble-shooting skills, and 4) career evaluation. The exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells to three plasticizers served as a template for the introduction of this technology. Cells were harvested at mid-log phase, and RNA was extracted. The mRNA was converted to cDNA by using reverse transcriptase primers containing a capture sequence that was later recognized by a fluorescent dendrimer by using cyanine (Cy)3 or Cy5 dyes. cDNA was hybridized onto yeast microarray chips provided by the Genome Consortium for Active Teaching. Exposure to phthalate plasticizers revealed genes with differential gene expression. Trouble-shooting approaches were used as learning opportunities for the evaluation of RNA extraction methods, and data analysis highlighted the use of mathematics in a molecular biology context. This article describes a promising model for the introduction of interdisciplinary, student-based projects involving microarray technology at non-R1 undergraduate institutions. PMID:18316815

  19. The comparison of different pre- and post-analysis filters for determination of exon-level alternative splicing events using Affymetrix arrays.

    PubMed

    Whistler, Toni; Chiang, Cheng-Feng; Lin, Jin-Mann; Lonergan, William; Reeves, William C

    2010-04-01

    Understanding the biologic significance of alternative splicing has been impeded by the difficulty in systematically identifying and validating transcript isoforms. Current exon array workflows suggest several different filtration steps to reduce the number of tests and increase the detection of alternative splicing events. In this study, we examine the effects of the suggested pre-analysis filtration by detection above background P value or signal intensity. This is followed post-analytically by restriction of exon expression to a fivefold change between groups, limiting the analysis to known alternative splicing events, or using the intersection of the results from different algorithms. Combinations of the filters are also examined. We find that none of the filtering methods reduces the number of technical false-positive calls identified by visual inspection. These include edge effects, nonresponsive probe sets, and inclusion of intronic and untranslated region probe sets into transcript annotations. Modules for filtering the exon microarray data on the basis of annotation features are needed. We propose new approaches to data filtration that would reduce the number of technical false-positives and therefore, impact the time spent performing visual inspection of the exon arrays.

  20. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  1. Comparative genomics in salt tolerance between Arabidopsis and aRabidopsis-related halophyte salt cress using Arabidopsis microarray.

    PubMed

    Taji, Teruaki; Seki, Motoaki; Satou, Masakazu; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Ishiyama, Kanako; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Narusaka, Mari; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2004-07-01

    Salt cress (Thellungiella halophila), a halophyte, is a genetic model system with a small plant size, short life cycle, copious seed production, small genome size, and an efficient transformation. Its genes have a high sequence identity (90%-95% at cDNA level) to genes of its close relative, Arabidopsis. These qualities are advantageous not only in genetics but also in genomics, such as gene expression profiling using Arabidopsis cDNA microarrays. Although salt cress plants are salt tolerant and can grow in 500 mm NaCl medium, they do not have salt glands or other morphological alterations either before or after salt adaptation. This suggests that the salt tolerance in salt cress results from mechanisms that are similar to those operating in glycophytes. To elucidate the differences in the regulation of salt tolerance between salt cress and Arabidopsis, we analyzed the gene expression profiles in salt cress by using a full-length Arabidopsis cDNA microarray. In salt cress, only a few genes were induced by 250 mm NaCl stress in contrast to Arabidopsis. Notably a large number of known abiotic- and biotic-stress inducible genes, including Fe-SOD, P5CS, PDF1.2, AtNCED, P-protein, beta-glucosidase, and SOS1, were expressed in salt cress at high levels even in the absence of stress. Under normal growing conditions, salt cress accumulated Pro at much higher levels than did Arabidopsis, and this corresponded to a higher expression of AtP5CS in salt cress, a key enzyme of Pro biosynthesis. Furthermore, salt cress was more tolerant to oxidative stress than Arabidopsis. Stress tolerance of salt cress may be due to constitutive overexpression of many genes that function in stress tolerance and that are stress inducible in Arabidopsis. PMID:15247402

  2. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  3. DNA microarray for detection of gastrointestinal viruses.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel A; Soto-Del Río, María de Los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y; Greninger, Alexander L; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 10(3) virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  4. Statistically designing microarrays and microarray experiments to enhance sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jason C; Chang, Jane; Wang, Tao; Steingrímsson, Eiríkur; Magnússon, Magnús Karl; Bergsteinsdottir, Kristin

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression signatures from microarray experiments promise to provide important prognostic tools for predicting disease outcome or response to treatment. A number of microarray studies in various cancers have reported such gene signatures. However, the overlap of gene signatures in the same disease has been limited so far, and some reported signatures have not been reproduced in other populations. Clearly, the methods used for verifying novel gene signatures need improvement. In this article, we describe an experiment in which microarrays and sample hybridization are designed according to the statistical principles of randomization, replication and blocking. Our results show that such designs provide unbiased estimation of differential expression levels as well as powerful tests for them.

  5. Comments on selected fundamental aspects of microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Riva, Alessandra; Carpentier, Anne-Sophie; Torrésani, Bruno; Hénaut, Alain

    2005-10-01

    Microarrays are becoming a ubiquitous tool of research in life sciences. However, the working principles of microarray-based methodologies are often misunderstood or apparently ignored by the researchers who actually perform and interpret experiments. This in turn seems to lead to a common over-expectation regarding the explanatory and/or knowledge-generating power of microarray analyses. In this note we intend to explain basic principles of five (5) major groups of analytical techniques used in studies of microarray data and their interpretation: the principal component analysis (PCA), the independent component analysis (ICA), the t-test, the analysis of variance (ANOVA), and self organizing maps (SOM). We discuss answers to selected practical questions related to the analysis of microarray data. We also take a closer look at the experimental setup and the rules, which have to be observed in order to exploit microarrays efficiently. Finally, we discuss in detail the scope and limitations of microarray-based methods. We emphasize the fact that no amount of statistical analysis can compensate for (or replace) a well thought through experimental setup. We conclude that microarrays are indeed useful tools in life sciences but by no means should they be expected to generate complete answers to complex biological questions. We argue that even well posed questions, formulated within a microarray-specific terminology, cannot be completely answered with the use of microarray analyses alone.

  6. NORMAL NASAL GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS USING CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Nasal Gene Expression Levels Using cDNA Array Technology.

    The nasal epithelium is a target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. To detect and analyze genetic events which contribute to nasal tumor development, we first defined the gene expressi...

  7. A BIOINFORMATIC STRATEGY TO RAPIDLY CHARACTERIZE CDNA LIBRARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Bioinformatic Strategy to Rapidly Characterize cDNA Libraries

    G. Charles Ostermeier1, David J. Dix2 and Stephen A. Krawetz1.
    1Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, & Institute for Scientific Computing, Wayne State Univer...

  8. cDNA expression cloning in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, B J

    2001-05-01

    This unit contains protocols for expression cloning in mammalian cells. Either calcium phosphate- or liposome-mediated transfection of mammalian cells, or virus infection and liposome-mediated transfection are used to screen pools derived from a cDNA library. cDNA pools are prepared for cloning from library-transformed E. coli grown in liquid culture medium or on antibiotic-containing selection plates. Results of screening assays for expression can be detected using autoradiography of dishes of cultured cells to identify clones, direct visualization of radiolabeled cells on emulsion-coated and developed chamber slides, detection and quantification of gene activity by a functional (transport) assay with scintillation counting, or detection using a filter-based assay for binding of radioligand to membranes or whole cells. The most critical step of any cDNA cloning project is the establishment of the screening protocol. Therefore, the bioassay for the gene product must be established prior to executing any of these protocols, including construction of the cDNA library. PMID:18428491

  9. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION IN FISH USING CDNA ARRAYS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are developing cDNA macroarrays to measure the induction of gene expression in sheepshead minnows and largemouth bass exposed to anthropogenic chemicals that can mimic the action of endogenous hormones. For sheepshead minnows exposed in aqua, we observed similar genetic profil...

  10. Rescue of mumps virus from cDNA.

    PubMed

    Clarke, D K; Sidhu, M S; Johnson, J E; Udem, S A

    2000-05-01

    A complete DNA copy of the genome of a Jeryl Lynn strain of mumps virus (15,384 nucleotides) was assembled from cDNA fragments such that an exact antigenome RNA could be generated following transcription by T7 RNA polymerase and cleavage by hepatitis delta virus ribozyme. The plasmid containing the genome sequence, together with support plasmids which express mumps virus NP, P, and L proteins under control of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter, were transfected into A549 cells previously infected with recombinant vaccinia virus (MVA-T7) that expressed T7 RNA polymerase. Rescue of infectious virus from the genome cDNA was demonstrated by amplification of mumps virus from transfected-cell cultures and by subsequent consensus sequencing of reverse transcription-PCR products generated from infected-cell RNA to verify the presence of specific nucleotide tags introduced into the genome cDNA clone. The only coding change (position 8502, A to G) in the cDNA clone relative to the consensus sequence of the Jeryl Lynn plaque isolate from which it was derived, resulting in a lysine-to-arginine substitution at amino acid 22 of the L protein, did not prevent rescue of mumps virus, even though an amino acid alignment for the L proteins of paramyxoviruses indicates that lysine is highly conserved at that position. This system may provide the basis of a safe and effective virus vector for the in vivo expression of immunologically and biologically active proteins, peptides, and RNAs.

  11. High-throughput allogeneic antibody detection using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jed; Sahaf, Bita; Perloff, Spenser; Schoenrock, Kelsi; Wu, Fang; Nakasone, Hideki; Coller, John; Miklos, David

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have traditionally been used to detect alloantibodies in patient plasma samples post hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT); however, protein microarrays have the potential to be multiplexed, more sensitive, and higher throughput than ELISAs. Here, we describe the development of a novel and sensitive microarray method for detection of allogeneic antibodies against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded on the Y chromosome, called HY antigens. Six microarray surfaces were tested for their ability to bind recombinant protein and peptide HY antigens. Significant allogeneic immune responses were determined in male patients with female donors by considering normal male donor responses as baseline. HY microarray results were also compared with our previous ELISA results. Our overall goal was to maximize antibody detection for both recombinant protein and peptide epitopes. For detection of HY antigens, the Epoxy (Schott) protein microarray surface was both most sensitive and reliable and has become the standard surface in our microarray platform. PMID:26902899

  12. Formation and characterization of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride substrates.

    PubMed

    Manning, Mary; Redmond, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    A versatile method for direct, covalent attachment of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride layers, previously deposited by chemical vapor deposition at silicon wafer substrates, is reported. Each microarray fabrication process step, from silicon nitride substrate deposition, surface cleaning, amino-silanation, and attachment of a homobifunctional cross-linking molecule to covalent immobilization of probe oligonucleotides, is defined, characterized, and optimized to yield consistent probe microarray quality, homogeneity, and probe-target hybridization performance. The developed microarray fabrication methodology provides excellent (high signal-to-background ratio) and reproducible responsivity to target oligonucleotide hybridization with a rugged chemical stability that permits exposure of arrays to stringent pre- and posthybridization wash conditions through many sustained cycles of reuse. Overall, the achieved performance features compare very favorably with those of more mature glass based microarrays. It is proposed that this DNA microarray fabrication strategy has the potential to provide a viable route toward the successful realization of future integrated DNA biochips.

  13. Microarray profiling of gene expression patterns in glomerular cells of astaxanthin-treated diabetic mice: a nutrigenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Kuroda, Masaaki; Akagiri, Satomi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshida, Norimasa; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Jiro; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-10-01

    We have demonstrated that astaxanthin reduces glomerular oxidative stress as well as inhibits the increase in urinary albumin in diabetic db/db mice. The aim of the present study was to determine the gene expression patterns in the glomerular cells of the diabetic mouse kidney, and to investigate the effects of astaxanthin on the expression of these genes using a high-density DNA microarray. The diet administered to the astaxanthin-supplementation group was prepared by mixing a control powder with astaxanthin at a concentration of 0.02%. Glomerular cells were obtained from the kidneys of mice by laser capture microdissection. Preparation of cRNA and target hybridization were performed according to the Affymetrix GeneChip eukaryotic small sample target labeling assay protocol. The gene expression profile was evaluated by the mouse expression set 430A GeneChip. Array data analysis was carried out using Affymetrix GeneChip operating and Ingenuity Pathway analysis software. Comparison between diabetic db/db and non-diabetic db/m mice revealed that 779 probes (3.1%) were significantly affected, i.e. 550 probes were up-regulated, and 229 probes were down-regulated, both at levels of >/=1.5-fold in the diabetic mice. Ingenuity signal analysis of 550 up-regulated probes revealed the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway as the most significantly affected caronical pathway. The affected genes were associated with complexes I, III, and IV located on the mitochondrial inner membrane, and the expression levels of these genes were decreased in mice treated with astaxanthin as compared to the levels in the control mice. In addition, the expression of many genes associated with oxidative stress, collagen synthesis, and transforming growth factor-beta signaling was enhanced in the diabetic mice, and this enhancement was slightly inhibited in the astaxanthin-treated mice. In conclusion, this genome-wide nutrigenomics approach provided insight into genes and putative

  14. ProMAT: protein microarray analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Zangar, Richard C.

    2006-04-04

    Summary: ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from ELISA microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code. Availability: ProMAT is available at http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT. ProMAT requires Java version 1.5.0 and R version 1.9.1 (or more recent versions) which are distributed with the tool.

  15. Protein Microarrays--Without a Trace

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A

    2007-04-05

    Many experimental approaches in biology and biophysics, as well as applications in diagnosis and drug discovery, require proteins to be immobilized on solid supports. Protein microarrays, for example, provide a high-throughput format to study biomolecular interactions. The technique employed for protein immobilization is a key to the success of these applications. Recent biochemical developments are allowing, for the first time, the selective and traceless immobilization of proteins generated by cell-free systems without the need for purification and/or reconcentration prior to the immobilization step.

  16. Applications of Functional Protein Microarrays in Basic and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput manner. It is viewed as a new tool that overcomes the limitation of DNA microarrays. On the basis of its application, protein microarrays fall into two major classes: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be directly spotted on a slide to form the so-called “reverse-phase” protein microarray. In the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function and construction of networks and pathways. In this chapter, we will review the recent advancements in the protein microarray technology, followed by presenting a series of examples to illustrate the power and versatility of protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:22989767

  17. Refractive index change detection based on porous silicon microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weirong; Jia, Zhenhong; Li, Peng; Lv, Guodong; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-05-01

    By combining photolithography with the electrochemical anodization method, a microarray device of porous silicon (PS) photonic crystal was fabricated on the crystalline silicon substrate. The optical properties of the microarray were analyzed with the transfer matrix method. The relationship between refractive index and reflectivity of each array element of the microarray at 633 nm was also studied, and the array surface reflectivity changes were observed through digital imaging. By means of the reflectivity measurement method, reflectivity changes below 10-3 can be observed based on PS microarray. The results of this study can be applied to the detection of biosensor arrays.

  18. Re-Annotator: Annotation Pipeline for Microarray Probe Sequences.

    PubMed

    Arloth, Janine; Bader, Daniel M; Röh, Simone; Altmann, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technologies are established approaches for high throughput gene expression, methylation and genotyping analysis. An accurate mapping of the array probes is essential to generate reliable biological findings. However, manufacturers of the microarray platforms typically provide incomplete and outdated annotation tables, which often rely on older genome and transcriptome versions that differ substantially from up-to-date sequence databases. Here, we present the Re-Annotator, a re-annotation pipeline for microarray probe sequences. It is primarily designed for gene expression microarrays but can also be adapted to other types of microarrays. The Re-Annotator uses a custom-built mRNA reference database to identify the positions of gene expression array probe sequences. We applied Re-Annotator to the Illumina Human-HT12 v4 microarray platform and found that about one quarter (25%) of the probes differed from the manufacturer's annotation. In further computational experiments on experimental gene expression data, we compared Re-Annotator to another probe re-annotation tool, ReMOAT, and found that Re-Annotator provided an improved re-annotation of microarray probes. A thorough re-annotation of probe information is crucial to any microarray analysis. The Re-Annotator pipeline is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/reannotator along with re-annotated files for Illumina microarrays HumanHT-12 v3/v4 and MouseRef-8 v2.

  19. Chemiluminescence microarrays in analytical chemistry: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard

    2014-09-01

    Multi-analyte immunoassays on microarrays and on multiplex DNA microarrays have been described for quantitative analysis of small organic molecules (e.g., antibiotics, drugs of abuse, small molecule toxins), proteins (e.g., antibodies or protein toxins), and microorganisms, viruses, and eukaryotic cells. In analytical chemistry, multi-analyte detection by use of analytical microarrays has become an innovative research topic because of the possibility of generating several sets of quantitative data for different analyte classes in a short time. Chemiluminescence (CL) microarrays are powerful tools for rapid multiplex analysis of complex matrices. A wide range of applications for CL microarrays is described in the literature dealing with analytical microarrays. The motivation for this review is to summarize the current state of CL-based analytical microarrays. Combining analysis of different compound classes on CL microarrays reduces analysis time, cost of reagents, and use of laboratory space. Applications are discussed, with examples from food safety, water safety, environmental monitoring, diagnostics, forensics, toxicology, and biosecurity. The potential and limitations of research on multiplex analysis by use of CL microarrays are discussed in this review.

  20. Studying cellular processes and detecting disease with protein microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.; Bollinger, Nikki

    2005-10-31

    Protein microarrays are a rapidly developing analytic tool with diverse applications in biomedical research. These applications include profiling of disease markers or autoimmune responses, understanding molecular pathways, protein modifications and protein activities. One factor that is driving this expanding usage is the wide variety of experimental formats that protein microarrays can take. In this review, we provide a short, conceptual overview of the different approaches for protein microarray. We then examine some of the most significant applications of these microarrays to date, with an emphasis on how global protein analyses can be used to facilitate biomedical research.

  1. The use of antigen microarrays in antibody profiling.

    PubMed

    Papp, Krisztián; Prechl, József

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances in the field of microarray production and analysis lead to the development of protein microarrays. Of these, antigen microarrays are one particular format that allows the study of antigen-antibody interactions in a miniaturized and highly multiplexed fashion. Here, we describe the parallel detection of antibodies with different specificities in human serum, a procedure also called antibody profiling. Autoantigens printed on microarray slides are reacted with test sera and the bound antibodies are identified by fluorescently labeled secondary reagents. Reactivity patterns generated this way characterize individuals and can help design novel diagnostic tools.

  2. Massive Collection of Full-Length Complementary DNA Clones and Microarray Analyses:. Keys to Rice Transcriptome Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2009-02-01

    Completion of the high-precision genome sequence analysis of rice led to the collection of about 35,000 full-length cDNA clones and the determination of their complete sequences. Mapping of these full-length cDNA sequences has given us information on (1) the number of genes expressed in the rice genome; (2) the start and end positions and exon-intron structures of rice genes; (3) alternative transcripts; (4) possible encoded proteins; (5) non-protein-coding (np) RNAs; (6) the density of gene localization on the chromosome; (7) setting the parameters of gene prediction programs; and (8) the construction of a microarray system that monitors global gene expression. Manual curation for rice gene annotation by using mapping information on full-length cDNA and EST assemblies has revealed about 32,000 expressed genes in the rice genome. Analysis of major gene families, such as those encoding membrane transport proteins (pumps, ion channels, and secondary transporters), along with the evolution from bacteria to higher animals and plants, reveals how gene numbers have increased through adaptation to circumstances. Family-based gene annotation also gives us a new way of comparing organisms. Massive amounts of data on gene expression under many kinds of physiological conditions are being accumulated in rice oligoarrays (22K and 44K) based on full-length cDNA sequences. Cluster analyses of genes that have the same promoter cis-elements, that have similar expression profiles, or that encode enzymes in the same metabolic pathways or signal transduction cascades give us clues to understanding the networks of gene expression in rice. As a tool for that purpose, we recently developed "RiCES", a tool for searching for cis-elements in the promoter regions of clustered genes.

  3. Ability to differentiate between cp and ncp BVDV by microarrays: towards an application in clinical veterinary medicine?

    PubMed

    Werling, Dirk; Ruryk, Andriy; Heaney, Judith; Moeller, Eva; Brownlie, Joe

    2005-10-18

    Microarray expression profiling provides a comprehensive portrait of the transcriptional world enabling us to view the organism as a 'system' that is more than the sum of its parts. The vigilance of cells to environmental change, the alacrity of the transcriptional response, the short half-life of cellular mRNA and the genome-scale nature of the investigation collectively explain the power of this method. These same features pose the most significant experimental design and execution issues which, unless surmounted, predictably generate a distorted image of the transcriptome. Conversely, the expression profile of a properly conceived and conducted microarray experiment can be used for hypothesis testing: disclosure of the metabolic and biosynthetic pathways that underlie adaptation of the organism to infectious processes; the identification of co-ordinately regulated genes; the regulatory circuits and signal transduction systems that mediate the adaptive response; and temporal features of developmental programmes. The study of viral pathogenesis by microarray expression profiling poses special challenges and opportunities. Although the technical hurdles are many, obtaining expression profiles of an organism growing in tissue will probably reveal strategies for growth and survival of the virus in the host's cells. Here, we show data obtained using a tailored microarray system based on synthetic polynucleotides derived from human sequences (SIRS-Lab GmbH, Jena, Germany) to study the effect of cytopathogenic (cpe) and non-cytopathogenic (ncp) bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection of bovine macrophages, focusing on intracellular signalling molecules. Of the 575 genes present on the array, more than 70% showed a reaction with the oligonuleotides spotted on the array, and 26 genes were differentially expressed comparing cDNA derived from cpe and ncp infected cells. These data will help to further understand our knowledge regarding BVDV infection, and will

  4. Segmentation of prostate cancer tissue microarray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Harvey E.; Can, Ali; Padfield, Dirk

    2006-02-01

    Prostate cancer is diagnosed by histopathology interpretation of hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)-stained tissue sections. Gland and nuclei distributions vary with the disease grade. The morphological features vary with the advance of cancer where the epithelial regions grow into the stroma. An efficient pathology slide image analysis method involved using a tissue microarray with known disease stages. Digital 24-bit RGB images were acquired for each tissue element on the slide with both 10X and 40X objectives. Initial segmentation at low magnification was accomplished using prior spectral characteristics from a training tissue set composed of four tissue clusters; namely, glands, epithelia, stroma and nuclei. The segmentation method was automated by using the training RGB values as an initial guess and iterating the averaging process 10 times to find the four cluster centers. Labels were assigned to the nearest cluster center in red-blue spectral feature space. An automatic threshold algorithm separated the glands from the tissue. A visual pseudo color representation of 60 segmented tissue microarray image was generated where white, pink, red, blue colors represent glands, epithelia, stroma and nuclei, respectively. The higher magnification images provided refined nuclei morphology. The nuclei were detected with a RGB color space principle component analysis that resulted in a grey scale image. The shape metrics such as compactness, elongation, minimum and maximum diameters were calculated based on the eigenvalues of the best-fitting ellipses to the nuclei.

  5. Inferring genetic networks from microarray data.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Elebeoba Eni; Davidson, George S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2004-06-01

    In theory, it should be possible to infer realistic genetic networks from time series microarray data. In practice, however, network discovery has proved problematic. The three major challenges are: (1) inferring the network; (2) estimating the stability of the inferred network; and (3) making the network visually accessible to the user. Here we describe a method, tested on publicly available time series microarray data, which addresses these concerns. The inference of genetic networks from genome-wide experimental data is an important biological problem which has received much attention. Approaches to this problem have typically included application of clustering algorithms [6]; the use of Boolean networks [12, 1, 10]; the use of Bayesian networks [8, 11]; and the use of continuous models [21, 14, 19]. Overviews of the problem and general approaches to network inference can be found in [4, 3]. Our approach to network inference is similar to earlier methods in that we use both clustering and Boolean network inference. However, we have attempted to extend the process to better serve the end-user, the biologist. In particular, we have incorporated a system to assess the reliability of our network, and we have developed tools which allow interactive visualization of the proposed network.

  6. Intensity-based segmentation of microarray images.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan

    2003-07-01

    The underlying principle in microarray image analysis is that the spot intensity is a measure of the gene expression. This implicitly assumes the gene expression of a spot to be governed entirely by the distribution of the pixel intensities. Thus, a segmentation technique based on the distribution of the pixel intensities is appropriate for the current problem. In this paper, clustering-based segmentation is described to extract the target intensity of the spots. The approximate boundaries of the spots in the microarray are determined by manual adjustment of rectilinear grids. The distribution of the pixel intensity in a grid containing a spot is assumed to be the superposition of the foreground and the local background. The k-means clustering technique and the partitioning around medoids (PAM) were used to generate a binary partition of the pixel intensity distribution. The median (k-means) and the medoid (PAM) of the cluster members are chosen as the cluster representatives. The effectiveness of the clustering-based segmentation techniques was tested on publicly available arrays generated in a lipid metabolism experiment (Callow et al., 2000). The results are compared against those obtained using the region-growing approach (SPOT) (Yang et al., 2001). The effect of additive white Gaussian noise is also investigated. PMID:12906242

  7. Microarray analysis of the developing cortex.

    PubMed

    Semeralul, Mawahib O; Boutros, Paul C; Likhodi, Olga; Okey, Allan B; Van Tol, Hubert H M; Wong, Albert H C

    2006-12-01

    Abnormal development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders that have an onset in childhood or adolescence. Although the basic laminar structure of the PFC is established in utero, extensive remodeling continues into adolescence. To map the overall pattern of changes in cortical gene transcripts during postnatal development, we made serial measurements of mRNA levels in mouse PFC using oligonucleotide microarrays. We observed changes in mRNA transcripts consistent with known postnatal morphological and biochemical events. Overall, most transcripts that changed significantly showed a progressive decrease in abundance after birth, with the majority of change between postnatal weeks 2 and 4. Genes with cell proliferative, cytoskeletal, extracellular matrix, plasma membrane lipid/transport, protein folding, and regulatory functions had decreases in mRNA levels. Quantitative PCR verified the microarray results for six selected genes: DNA methyltransferase 3A (Dnmt3a), procollagen, type III, alpha 1 (Col3a1), solute carrier family 16 (monocarboxylic acid transporters), member 1 (Slc16a1), MARCKS-like 1 (Marcksl1), nidogen 1 (Nid1) and 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (heart, mitochondrial) (Bdh).

  8. Enzyme Microarrays Assembled by Acoustic Dispensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, E. Y.; Diamond, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Miniaturizing bioassays to the nanoliter scale for high-throughput screening reduces the consumption of reagents that are expensive or difficult to handle. Utilizing acoustic dispensing technology, nanodroplets containing 10 µM ATP (3 µCi/µL 32P) and reaction buffer in 10% glycerol were positionally dispensed to the surface of glass slides to form 40 nL compartments (100 droplets/slide) for Pim1 (Proviral integration site 1) kinase reactions. The reactions were activated by dispensing 4 nL of various levels of a pyridocarbazolo-cyclopentadienyl ruthenium-complex Pim1 inhibitor, followed by dispensing 4 nL of a Pim1 kinase and peptide substrate solution to achieve final concentrations of 150 nM enzyme and 10 µM substrate. The microarray was incubated at 30°C (97% Rh) for 1.5 hr. The spots were then blotted to phosphocellulose membranes to capture phosphorylated substrate. Using phosphor imaging to quantify the washed membranes, the assay showed that, for doses of inhibitor from 0.75 µM to 3 µM, Pim1 was increasingly inhibited. Signal-to-background ratios were as high as 165 and average coefficients of variation (CVs) for the assay were ~20%. CVs for dispensing typical working buffers were under 5%. Thus, microarrays assembled by acoustic dispensing are promising as cost-effective tools that can be used in protein assay development. PMID:18616925

  9. Laser direct writing of biomolecule microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, P.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Berthet, F. X.; Colina, M.; Elvira, J.; Morenza, J. L.

    Protein-based biosensors are highly efficient tools for protein detection and identification. The production of these devices requires the manipulation of tiny amounts of protein solutions in conditions preserving their biological properties. In this work, laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) was used for spotting an array of a purified bacterial antigen in order to check the viability of this technique for the production of protein microarrays. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (355 nm wavelength, 10 ns pulse duration) was used to transfer droplets of a solution containing the Treponema pallidum 17 kDa protein antigen on a glass slide. Optical microscopy showed that a regular array of micrometric droplets could be precisely and uniformly spotted onto a solid substrate. Subsequently, it was proved that LIFT deposition of a T. pallidum 17 kDa antigen onto nylon-coated glass slides preserves its antigenic reactivity and diagnostic properties. These results support that LIFT is suitable for the production of protein microarrays and pave the way for future diagnostics applications.

  10. Label-free detection repeatability of protein microarrays by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jun; Li, Lin; Wang, JingYi; He, LiPing; Lu, HuiBin; Ruan, KangCheng; Jin, KuiJuan; Yang, GuoZhen

    2012-12-01

    We examine the repeatabilities of oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OIRD) method for label-free detecting biological molecular interaction using protein microarrays. The experimental results show that the repeatabilities are the same in a given microarray or microarray-microarray and are consistent, indicating that OIRD is a promising label-free detection technique for biological microarrays.

  11. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  12. Molecular cloning of lungfish proopiomelanocortin cDNA.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Y; Takahashi, A; Meguro, H; Kawauchi, H

    1999-09-01

    To investigate the evolution of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) from fish to tetrapods, nucleotide sequence of POMC cDNA from a lobe-finned fish, the African lungfish, was determined. POMC cDNA was prepared from lungfish pituitary glands. The POMC cDNA is composed of 1114 bp, excluding a poly-A tail, and encodes 255 amino acids (aa) including a signal peptide of 25 aa. The lungfish POMC contains the segment corresponding to gamma-melanotropin (MSH), corticotropin, alpha-MSH, beta-MSH, and beta-endorphin at positions (50-61), (108-146), (108-120), (178-194), and (197-230), respectively. The lungfish POMC shows greater sequence identity on average with amphibian (62%), ancient ray-finned fishes including acipenseriformes and semionotiformes (62%), and mammalian POMC (52%) than with teleostean (49%), elasmobranch (46%), and agnathan POMC (31%). Thus, the overall structural feature of lungfish POMC is close to the tetrapod POMCs which contain gamma-MSH and the ancient ray-finned fishes POMCs containing gamma-MSH-like sequence. However, amino acid sequence of lungfish beta-endorphin exhibits properties which are specifically observed in the ray-finned fishes and the elasmobranchs.

  13. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  14. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  15. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  16. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  17. Experimental Approaches to Microarray Analysis of Tumor Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furge, Laura Lowe; Winter, Michael B.; Meyers, Jacob I.; Furge, Kyle A.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive measurement of gene expression using high-density nucleic acid arrays (i.e. microarrays) has become an important tool for investigating the molecular differences in clinical and research samples. Consequently, inclusion of discussion in biochemistry, molecular biology, or other appropriate courses of microarray technologies has…

  18. Demonstrating a Multi-drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice. PMID:24796567

  19. The Importance of Normalization on Large and Heterogeneous Microarray Datasets

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA microarray technology is a powerful functional genomics tool increasingly used for investigating global gene expression in environmental studies. Microarrays can also be used in identifying biological networks, as they give insight on the complex gene-to-gene interactions, ne...

  20. Demonstrating a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis amplification microarray.

    PubMed

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G; Chandler, Darrell P

    2014-04-25

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice.

  1. Genomic-Wide Analysis with Microarrays in Human Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Inaoka, Kenichi; Inokawa, Yoshikuni; Nomoto, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarray technologies have advanced rapidly and had a profound impact on examining gene expression on a genomic scale in research. This review discusses the history and development of microarray and DNA chip devices, and specific microarrays are described along with their methods and applications. In particular, microarrays have detected many novel cancer-related genes by comparing cancer tissues and non-cancerous tissues in oncological research. Recently, new methods have been in development, such as the double-combination array and triple-combination array, which allow more effective analysis of gene expression and epigenetic changes. Analysis of gene expression alterations in precancerous regions compared with normal regions and array analysis in drug-resistance cancer tissues are also successfully performed. Compared with next-generation sequencing, a similar method of genome analysis, several important differences distinguish these techniques and their applications. Development of novel microarray technologies is expected to contribute to further cancer research.

  2. An ultralow background substrate for protein microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui; Zhang, Qingyang; Ma, Hongwei; Zheng, Bo

    2015-08-21

    We herein report an ultralow background substrate for protein microarrays. Conventional protein microarray substrates often suffer from non-specific protein adsorption and inhomogeneous spot morphology. Consequently, surface treatment and a suitable printing solution are required to improve the microarray performance. In the current work, we improved the situation by developing a new microarray substrate based on a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) membrane. A polydopamine microspot array was fabricated on the FEP membrane, with proteins conjugated to the FEP surface through polydopamine. Uniform microspots were obtained on FEP without the application of a special printing solution. The modified FEP membrane demonstrated ultralow background signal and was applied in protein and peptide microarray analysis. PMID:26134063

  3. Finding dominant sets in microarray data.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xuping; Teng, Li; Li, Yao; Chen, Wenbin; Mao, Yumin; Shen, I-Fan; Xie, Yi

    2005-01-01

    Clustering allows us to extract groups of genes that are tightly coexpressed from Microarray data. In this paper, a new method DSF_Clust is developed to find dominant sets (clusters). We have preformed DSF_Clust on several gene expression datasets and given the evaluation with some criteria. The results showed that this approach could cluster dominant sets of good quality compared to kmeans method. DSF_Clust deals with three issues that have bedeviled clustering, some dominant sets being statistically determined in a significance level, predefining cluster structure being not required, and the quality of a dominant set being ensured. We have also applied this approach to analyze published data of yeast cell cycle gene expression and found some biologically meaningful gene groups to be dug out. Furthermore, DSF_Clust is a potentially good tool to search for putative regulatory signals.

  4. Digital microarray analysis for digital artifact genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger; Handley, James; Williams, Deborah

    2013-06-01

    We implement a Spatial Voting (SV) based analogy of microarray analysis for digital gene marker identification in malware code sections. We examine a famous set of malware formally analyzed by Mandiant and code named Advanced Persistent Threat (APT1). APT1 is a Chinese organization formed with specific intent to infiltrate and exploit US resources. Manidant provided a detailed behavior and sting analysis report for the 288 malware samples available. We performed an independent analysis using a new alternative to the traditional dynamic analysis and static analysis we call Spatial Analysis (SA). We perform unsupervised SA on the APT1 originating malware code sections and report our findings. We also show the results of SA performed on some members of the families associated by Manidant. We conclude that SV based SA is a practical fast alternative to dynamics analysis and static analysis.

  5. SAMMD: Staphylococcus aureus Microarray Meta-Database

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2007-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen, causing a wide variety of diseases ranging from superficial skin infections to severe life threatening infections. S. aureus is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Its ability to resist multiple antibiotics poses a growing public health problem. In order to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis of S. aureus, several global expression profiles have been developed. These transcriptional profiles included regulatory mutants of S. aureus and growth of wild type under different growth conditions. The abundance of these profiles has generated a large amount of data without a uniform annotation system to comprehensively examine them. We report the development of the Staphylococcus aureus Microarray meta-database (SAMMD) which includes data from all the published transcriptional profiles. SAMMD is a web-accessible database that helps users to perform a variety of analysis against and within the existing transcriptional profiles. Description SAMMD is a relational database that uses MySQL as the back end and PHP/JavaScript/DHTML as the front end. The database is normalized and consists of five tables, which holds information about gene annotations, regulated gene lists, experimental details, references, and other details. SAMMD data is collected from the peer-reviewed published articles. Data extraction and conversion was done using perl scripts while data entry was done through phpMyAdmin tool. The database is accessible via a web interface that contains several features such as a simple search by ORF ID, gene name, gene product name, advanced search using gene lists, comparing among datasets, browsing, downloading, statistics, and help. The database is licensed under General Public License (GPL). Conclusion SAMMD is hosted and available at . Currently there are over 9500 entries for regulated genes, from 67 microarray experiments. SAMMD will help staphylococcal scientists to analyze their

  6. Analysis of environmental transcriptomes by DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Parro, Víctor; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; González-Toril, Elena

    2007-02-01

    In this work we investigated the correlations between global gene expression patterns and environmental parameters in natural ecosystems. We studied the preferential gene expression of the iron oxidizer bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans to adapt its physiology to changes in the physicochemical parameters in its natural medium. Transcriptome analysis by DNA microarrays can proportionate an instant picture about the preferential gene expression between two different environmental samples. However, this type of analysis is very difficult and complex in natural ecosystems, mainly because of the broad biodiversity and multiple environmental parameters that may affect gene expression. The necessity of high-quality RNA preparations as well as complicated data analysis are also technological limitations. The low prokaryotic diversity of the extremely acidic and iron-rich waters of the Tinto River (Spain) ecosystem, where L. ferrooxidans is abundant, allows the opportunity to achieve global gene expression studies and to associate gene function with environmental parameters. We applied a total RNA amplification protocol validated previously for the amplification of the environmental transcriptome (meta-transcriptome). The meta-transcriptome of two sites from the Tinto River mainly differing in the salt and oxygen contents were amplified and analysed by a L. ferrooxidans DNA microarray. The results showed a clear preferential induction of genes involved in certain physicochemical parameters like: high salinity (ectAB, otsAB), low oxygen concentration (cydAB), iron uptake (fecA-exbBD-tonB), oxidative stress (carotenoid synthesis, oxyR, recG), potassium (kdpBAC) or phosphate concentrations (pstSCAB), etc. We conclude that specific gene expression patterns can be useful indicators for the physiological conditions in a defined ecosystem. Also, the upregulation of certain genes and operons reveals information about the environmental conditions (nutrient limitations, stresses

  7. Lipid Microarray Biosensor for Biotoxin Detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anup K.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Moran-Mirabal, Jose C.; Edel, Joshua B.; Meyer, Grant D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2006-05-01

    We present the use of micron-sized lipid domains, patterned onto planar substrates and within microfluidic channels, to assay the binding of bacterial toxins via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The lipid domains were patterned using a polymer lift-off technique and consisted of ganglioside-populated DSPC:cholesterol supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). Lipid patterns were formed on the substrates by vesicle fusion followed by polymer lift-off, which revealed micron-sized SLBs containing either ganglioside GT1b or GM1. The ganglioside-populated SLB arrays were then exposed to either Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) or Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTC). Binding was assayed on planar substrates by TIRFM down to 1 nM concentration for CTB and 100 nM for TTC. Apparent binding constants extracted from three different models applied to the binding curves suggest that binding of a protein to a lipid-based receptor is strongly affected by the lipid composition of the SLB and by the substrate on which the bilayer is formed. Patterning of SLBs inside microfluidic channels also allowed the preparation of lipid domains with different compositions on a single device. Arrays within microfluidic channels were used to achieve segregation and selective binding from a binary mixture of the toxin fragments in one device. The binding and segregation within the microfluidic channels was assayed with epifluorescence as proof of concept. We propose that the method used for patterning the lipid microarrays on planar substrates and within microfluidic channels can be easily adapted to proteins or nucleic acids and can be used for biosensor applications and cell stimulation assays under different flow conditions. KEYWORDS. Microarray, ganglioside, polymer lift-off, cholera toxin, tetanus toxin, TIRFM, binding constant.4

  8. Reactive astrogliosis in response to hemorrhagic fever virus: microarray profile of Junin virus-infected human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arenavirus Junin is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Limited information is available concerning the pathogenesis of this human disease, especially the pathogenesis of acute and late neurological symptoms. Methods In our study we present for the first time cDNA microarray profile of human astrocytes infected with the virulent strain of Junin virus. Transcriptional profiling was confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and cytokine/chemokine/growth factor assay. Results We demonstrated the impact of virus infection on immune/inflammatory response/interferon signaling and apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic response and amplification with time of pro-inflammatory cascade of human astrocytes suggested neurodegenerative dysfunctional reactive astrogliosis in response to Junin virus infection. Conclusion Our results suggest potential pathogenic role of astroglial cells in the development of neurological symptoms and late neurological syndrome during Argentine hemorrhagic fever. PMID:25015256

  9. Enchytraeus albidus Microarray: Enrichment, Design, Annotation and Database (EnchyBASE)

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Sara C.; Arrais, Joel; Lopes, Pedro; Vandenbrouck, Tine; De Coen, Wim; Roelofs, Dick; Soares, Amadeu M. V. M.; Amorim, Mónica J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta) is an ecologically relevant species used as standard test organisms for risk assessment. Effects of stressors in this species are commonly determined at the population level using reproduction and survival as endpoints. The assessment of transcriptomic responses can be very useful e.g. to understand underlying mechanisms of toxicity with gene expression fingerprinting. In the present paper the following is being addressed: 1) development of suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries enriched for differentially expressed genes after metal and pesticide exposures; 2) sequencing and characterization of all generated cDNA inserts; 3) development of a publicly available genomic database on E. albidus. A total of 2100 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were isolated, sequenced and assembled into 1124 clusters (947 singletons and 177 contigs). From these sequences, 41% matched known proteins in GenBank (BLASTX, e-value≤10-5) and 37% had at least one Gene Ontology (GO) term assigned. In total, 5.5% of the sequences were assigned to a metabolic pathway, based on KEGG. With this new sequencing information, an Agilent custom oligonucleotide microarray was designed, representing a potential tool for transcriptomic studies. EnchyBASE (http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/enchybase/) was developed as a web freely available database containing genomic information on E. albidus and will be further extended in the near future for other enchytraeid species. The database so far includes all ESTs generated for E. albidus from three cDNA libraries. This information can be downloaded and applied in functional genomics and transcription studies. PMID:22558086

  10. Transcriptome sequencing and microarray development for the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum: genomic tools for environmental monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, is one of the major aquaculture species in the world and a potential sentinel organism for monitoring the status of marine ecosystems. However, genomic resources for R. philippinarum are still extremely limited. Global analysis of gene expression profiles is increasingly used to evaluate the biological effects of various environmental stressors on aquatic animals under either artificial conditions or in the wild. Here, we report on the development of a transcriptomic platform for global gene expression profiling in the Manila clam. Results A normalized cDNA library representing a mixture of adult tissues was sequenced using a ultra high-throughput sequencing technology (Roche 454). A database consisting of 32,606 unique transcripts was constructed, 9,747 (30%) of which could be annotated by similarity. An oligo-DNA microarray platform was designed and applied to profile gene expression of digestive gland and gills. Functional annotation of differentially expressed genes between different tissues was performed by enrichment analysis. Expression of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NAT) analysis was also performed and bi-directional transcription appears a common phenomenon in the R. philippinarum transcriptome. A preliminary study on clam samples collected in a highly polluted area of the Venice Lagoon demonstrated the applicability of genomic tools to environmental monitoring. Conclusions The transcriptomic platform developed for the Manila clam confirmed the high level of reproducibility of current microarray technology. Next-generation sequencing provided a good representation of the clam transcriptome. Despite the known limitations in transcript annotation and sequence coverage for non model species, sufficient information was obtained to identify a large set of genes potentially involved in cellular response to environmental stress. PMID:21569398

  11. A Grid-based solution for management and analysis of microarrays in distributed experiments

    PubMed Central

    Porro, Ivan; Torterolo, Livia; Corradi, Luca; Fato, Marco; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Scaglione, Silvia; Schenone, Andrea; Viti, Federica

    2007-01-01

    Several systems have been presented in the last years in order to manage the complexity of large microarray experiments. Although good results have been achieved, most systems tend to lack in one or more fields. A Grid based approach may provide a shared, standardized and reliable solution for storage and analysis of biological data, in order to maximize the results of experimental efforts. A Grid framework has been therefore adopted due to the necessity of remotely accessing large amounts of distributed data as well as to scale computational performances for terabyte datasets. Two different biological studies have been planned in order to highlight the benefits that can emerge from our Grid based platform. The described environment relies on storage services and computational services provided by the gLite Grid middleware. The Grid environment is also able to exploit the added value of metadata in order to let users better classify and search experiments. A state-of-art Grid portal has been implemented in order to hide the complexity of framework from end users and to make them able to easily access available services and data. The functional architecture of the portal is described. As a first test of the system performances, a gene expression analysis has been performed on a dataset of Affymetrix GeneChip® Rat Expression Array RAE230A, from the ArrayExpress database. The sequence of analysis includes three steps: (i) group opening and image set uploading, (ii) normalization, and (iii) model based gene expression (based on PM/MM difference model). Two different Linux versions (sequential and parallel) of the dChip software have been developed to implement the analysis and have been tested on a cluster. From results, it emerges that the parallelization of the analysis process and the execution of parallel jobs on distributed computational resources actually improve the performances. Moreover, the Grid environment have been tested both against the possibility of

  12. A microarray analysis of retinal transcripts that are controlled by image contrast in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Christine; Schaeffel, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The development of myopia is controlled by still largely unknown retinal signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in retinal mRNA expression after different periods of visual deprivation in mice, while controlling for retinal illuminance. Methods Each group consisted of three male C57BL/6 mice. Treatment periods were 30 min, 4 h, and 6+6 h. High spatial frequencies were filtered from the retinal image by frosted diffusers over one eye while the fellow eyes were covered by clear neutral density (ND) filters that exhibited similar light attenuating properties (0.1 log units) as the diffusers. For the final 30 min of the respective treatment period mice were individually placed in a clear Perspex cylinder that was positioned in the center of a rotating (60 degrees) large drum. The inside of the drum was covered with a 0.1 cyc/degree vertical square wave grating. This visual environment was chosen to standardize illuminances and contrasts seen by the mice. Labeled cRNA was prepared and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Genome 430 2.0 arrays. Alterations in mRNA expression levels of candidate genes with potential biological relevance were confirmed by semi-quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results In all groups, Egr-1 mRNA expression was reduced in diffuser-treated eyes. Furthermore, the degradation of the spatial frequency spectrum also changed the cFos mRNA level, with reduced expression after 4 h of diffuser treatment. Other interesting candidates were Akt2, which was up-regulated after 30 min of deprivation and Mapk8ip3, a neuron specific JNK binding and scaffolding protein that was temporally regulated in the diffuser-treated eyes only. Conclusions The microarray analysis demonstrated a pattern of differential transcriptional changes, even though differences in the retinal images were restricted to spatial features. The candidate genes may provide further insight into the

  13. Microarray-based Identification of Individual HERV Loci Expression: Application to Biomarker Discovery in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérot, Philippe; Cheynet, Valérie; Decaussin-Petrucci, Myriam; Oriol, Guy; Mugnier, Nathalie; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Ruffion, Alain; Mallet, François

    2013-01-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the main diagnostic biomarker for prostate cancer in clinical use, but it lacks specificity and sensitivity, particularly in low dosage values1​​. ‘How to use PSA' remains a current issue, either for diagnosis as a gray zone corresponding to a concentration in serum of 2.5-10 ng/ml which does not allow a clear differentiation to be made between cancer and noncancer2 or for patient follow-up as analysis of post-operative PSA kinetic parameters can pose considerable challenges for their practical application3,4. Alternatively, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are emerging as key molecules in human cancer, with the potential to serve as novel markers of disease, e.g. PCA3 in prostate cancer5,6 and to reveal uncharacterized aspects of tumor biology. Moreover, data from the ENCODE project published in 2012 showed that different RNA types cover about 62% of the genome. It also appears that the amount of transcriptional regulatory motifs is at least 4.5x higher than the one corresponding to protein-coding exons. Thus, long terminal repeats (LTRs) of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) constitute a wide range of putative/candidate transcriptional regulatory sequences, as it is their primary function in infectious retroviruses. HERVs, which are spread throughout the human genome, originate from ancestral and independent infections within the germ line, followed by copy-paste propagation processes and leading to multicopy families occupying 8% of the human genome (note that exons span 2% of our genome). Some HERV loci still express proteins that have been associated with several pathologies including cancer7-10. We have designed a high-density microarray, in Affymetrix format, aiming to optimally characterize individual HERV loci expression, in order to better understand whether they can be active, if they drive ncRNA transcription or modulate coding gene expression. This tool has been applied in the prostate cancer field (Figure 1

  14. Microarrays for identifying binding sites and probing structure of RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kierzek, Ryszard; Turner, Douglas H.; Kierzek, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are widely used in various biological studies. In this review, application of oligonucleotide microarrays for identifying binding sites and probing structure of RNAs is described. Deep sequencing allows fast determination of DNA and RNA sequence. High-throughput methods for determination of secondary structures of RNAs have also been developed. Those methods, however, do not reveal binding sites for oligonucleotides. In contrast, microarrays directly determine binding sites while also providing structural insights. Microarray mapping can be used over a wide range of experimental conditions, including temperature, pH, various cations at different concentrations and the presence of other molecules. Moreover, it is possible to make universal microarrays suitable for investigations of many different RNAs, and readout of results is rapid. Thus, microarrays are used to provide insight into oligonucleotide sequences potentially able to interfere with biological function. Better understanding of structure–function relationships of RNA can be facilitated by using microarrays to find RNA regions capable to bind oligonucleotides. That information is extremely important to design optimal sequences for antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA because both bind to single-stranded regions of target RNAs. PMID:25505162

  15. The EADGENE Microarray Data Analysis Workshop (Open Access publication)

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Dirk-Jan; Jaffrézic, Florence; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Watson, Michael; Channing, Caroline; Hulsegge, Ina; Pool, Marco H; Buitenhuis, Bart; Hedegaard, Jakob; Hornshøj, Henrik; Jiang, Li; Sørensen, Peter; Marot, Guillemette; Delmas, Céline; Cao, Kim-Anh Lê; San Cristobal, Magali; Baron, Michael D; Malinverni, Roberto; Stella, Alessandra; Brunner, Ronald M; Seyfert, Hans-Martin; Jensen, Kirsty; Mouzaki, Daphne; Waddington, David; Jiménez-Marín, Ángeles; Pérez-Alegre, Mónica; Pérez-Reinado, Eva; Closset, Rodrigue; Detilleux, Johanne C; Dovč, Peter; Lavrič, Miha; Nie, Haisheng; Janss, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Microarray analyses have become an important tool in animal genomics. While their use is becoming widespread, there is still a lot of ongoing research regarding the analysis of microarray data. In the context of a European Network of Excellence, 31 researchers representing 14 research groups from 10 countries performed and discussed the statistical analyses of real and simulated 2-colour microarray data that were distributed among participants. The real data consisted of 48 microarrays from a disease challenge experiment in dairy cattle, while the simulated data consisted of 10 microarrays from a direct comparison of two treatments (dye-balanced). While there was broader agreement with regards to methods of microarray normalisation and significance testing, there were major differences with regards to quality control. The quality control approaches varied from none, through using statistical weights, to omitting a large number of spots or omitting entire slides. Surprisingly, these very different approaches gave quite similar results when applied to the simulated data, although not all participating groups analysed both real and simulated data. The workshop was very successful in facilitating interaction between scientists with a diverse background but a common interest in microarray analyses. PMID:18053572

  16. Novel microarrays for simultaneous serodiagnosis of multiple antiviral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Ponnurengam Malliappan; Moritsugu, Nozomi; Obuse, Sei; Isoshima, Takashi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    We developed an automated diagnostic system for the detection of virus-specific immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) that was based on a microarray platform. We compared efficacies of our automated system with conventional enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). Viruses were immobilized to microarrays using a radical cross-linking reaction that was induced by photo-irradiation. A new photoreactive polymer containing perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) and poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate was prepared and coated on plates. Inactivated measles, rubella, mumps, Varicella-Zoster and recombinant Epstein-Barr viruse antigen were added to coated plates, and irradiated with ultraviolet light to facilitate immobilization. Virus-specific IgGs in healthy human sera were assayed using these prepared microarrays and the results obtained compared with those from conventional EIAs. We observed high correlation (0.79-0.96) in the results between the automated microarray technique and EIAs. The microarray-based assay was more rapid, involved less reagents and sample, and was easier to conduct compared with conventional EIA techniques. The automated microarray system was further improved by introducing reagent storage reservoirs inside the chamber, thereby conserving the use of expensive reagents and antibodies. We considered the microarray format to be suitable for rapid and multiple serological diagnoses of viral diseases that could be developed further for clinical applications. PMID:24367491

  17. Microintaglio Printing for Soft Lithography-Based in Situ Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Biyani, Manish; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Advances in lithographic approaches to fabricating bio-microarrays have been extensively explored over the last two decades. However, the need for pattern flexibility, a high density, a high resolution, affordability and on-demand fabrication is promoting the development of unconventional routes for microarray fabrication. This review highlights the development and uses of a new molecular lithography approach, called “microintaglio printing technology”, for large-scale bio-microarray fabrication using a microreactor array (µRA)-based chip consisting of uniformly-arranged, femtoliter-size µRA molds. In this method, a single-molecule-amplified DNA microarray pattern is self-assembled onto a µRA mold and subsequently converted into a messenger RNA or protein microarray pattern by simultaneously producing and transferring (immobilizing) a messenger RNA or a protein from a µRA mold to a glass surface. Microintaglio printing allows the self-assembly and patterning of in situ-synthesized biomolecules into high-density (kilo-giga-density), ordered arrays on a chip surface with µm-order precision. This holistic aim, which is difficult to achieve using conventional printing and microarray approaches, is expected to revolutionize and reshape proteomics. This review is not written comprehensively, but rather substantively, highlighting the versatility of microintaglio printing for developing a prerequisite platform for microarray technology for the postgenomic era.

  18. Screening of differentially expressed genes in the growth plate of broiler chickens with Tibial Dyschondroplasia by microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is a common skeletal disorder in broiler chickens. It is characterized by the presence of a non-vascularized and unmineralized cartilage in the growth plate. Previous studies have investigated differential expression of genes related to cartilage development during latter stages of TD. The aim of our study was to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the growth plate of broiler chickens, which were associated with early stage TD. We induced TD using tetramethylthiuram disulfide (thiram) for 1, 2, and 6 days and determined DEGs with chicken Affymetrix GeneChip assays. The identified DEGs were verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Results We identified 1630 DEGs, with 82, 1385, and 429 exhibiting at least 2.0-fold changes (P < 0.05) at days 1, 2, and 6, respectively. These DEGs participate in a variety of biological processes, including cytokine production, oxidation reduction, and cell surface receptor linked signal transduction on day 1; lipid biosynthesis, regulation of growth, cell cycle, positive and negative gene regulation, transcription and transcription regulation, and anti-apoptosis on day 2; and regulation of cell proliferation, transcription, dephosphorylation, catabolism, proteolysis, and immune responses on day 6. The identified DEGs were associated with the following pathways: neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction on day 1; synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, terpenoid backbone biosynthesis, ether lipid metabolism, JAK-STAT, GnRH signaling pathway, ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, TGF-β signaling, focal adhesion, and Wnt signaling on day 2; and arachidonic acid metabolism, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, JAK-STAT, insulin signaling, and glycolysis on day 6. We validated seven DEGs by qPCR. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate previously unrecognized changes in gene transcription associated with early stage TD. The DEGs we identified by

  19. Microarray-based detection and expression analysis of extracellular matrix proteins in drug‑resistant ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Multiple drug resistance (MDR) development leads to resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Microarray methods can provide information regarding new candidate genes that can play a role in resistance to cytostatic drugs. Extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into cancer tissue as well as increased apoptosis resistance. In the present study, we report changes in the ECM and related gene expression pattern in methotrexate-, cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, vincristine-, topotecan- and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the W1 ovarian cancer cell line. The resistant variants of the W1 cell line were generated by stepwise selection of cells with an increasing concentration of the indicated drugs. Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Genome U219 Array Strips were used for hybridizations. Independent t-tests were used to determinate the statistical significance of results. Genes whose expression levels were higher than the assumed threshold (upregulated, >5-fold and downregulated, <5-fold) were visualized using the scatter plot method, selected and listed in the tables. Among the investigated genes, expression of 24 genes increased, expression of 14 genes decreased and expression of three genes increased or decreased depending on the cell line. Among the increased genes, expression of 10 increased very significantly, >20-fold. These genes were: ITGB1BP3, COL3A1, COL5A2, COL15A1, TGFBI, DCN, LUM, MATN2, POSTN and EGFL6. The expression of seven genes decreased very significantly: ITGA1, COL1A2, LAMA2, GPC3, KRT23, VIT and HMCN1. The expression pattern of ECM and related genes provided the preliminary view into the role of ECM components in cytostatic drug resistance of cancer cells. The exact role of the investigated genes in drug resistance requires further investigation.

  20. Microarray analysis of gene expression in vestibular schwannomas reveals SPP1/MET signaling pathway and androgen receptor deregulation

    PubMed Central

    TORRES-MARTIN, MIGUEL; LASSALETTA, LUIS; SAN-ROMAN-MONTERO, JESUS; DE CAMPOS, JOSE M.; ISLA, ALBERTO; GAVILAN, JAVIER; MELENDEZ, BARBARA; PINTO, GIOVANNY R.; BURBANO, ROMMEL R.; CASTRESANA, JAVIER S.; REY, JUAN A.

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas are benign neoplasms that arise from the vestibular nerve. The hallmark of these tumors is the biallelic inactivation of neurofibromin 2 (NF2). Transcriptomic alterations, such as the neuregulin 1 (NRG1)/ErbB2 pathway, have been described in schwannomas. In this study, we performed a whole transcriptome analysis in 31 vestibular schwannomas and 9 control nerves in the Affymetrix Gene 1.0 ST platform, validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) using TaqMan Low Density arrays. We performed a mutational analysis of NF2 by PCR/denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), as well as a microsatellite marker analysis of the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosome 22q. The microarray analysis demonstrated that 1,516 genes were deregulated and 48 of the genes were validated by qRT-PCR. At least 2 genetic hits (allelic loss and/or gene mutation) in NF2 were found in 16 tumors, seven cases showed 1 hit and 8 tumors showed no NF2 alteration. MET and associated genes, such as integrin, alpha 4 (ITGA4)/B6, PLEXNB3/SEMA5 and caveolin-1 (CAV1) showed a clear deregulation in vestibular schwannomas. In addition, androgen receptor (AR) downregulation may denote a hormonal effect or cause in this tumor. Furthermore, the osteopontin gene (SPP1), which is involved in merlin protein degradation, was upregulated, which suggests that this mechanism may also exert a pivotal role in schwannoma merlin depletion. Finally, no major differences were observed among tumors of different size, histological type or NF2 status, which suggests that, at the mRNA level, all schwannomas, regardless of their molecular and clinical characteristics, may share common features that can be used in their treatment. PMID:23354516

  1. Microarray-based detection and expression analysis of ABC and SLC transporters in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Ruciński, Marcin; Zabel, Maciej

    2013-04-01

    Multiple drug resistance of cancer cells is multifactorial. A microarray technique may provide information about new candidate genes playing a role in drug resistance. Drug membrane transporters from ABC and SLC families play a main role in this phenomenon. This study demonstrates alterations in ABC and SLC gene expression levels in methotrexate, cisplatin, doxorubicin, vincristine, topotecan and paclitaxel-resistant variant of W1 ovarian cancer cell line. Resistant W1 cell lines were derived by stepwise selection of cells in increasing concentration of drugs. Affymetrix GeneChip(®) Human Genome U219 Array Strip was used for hybridizations. Statistical significance was determined by independent sample t-test. The genes having altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scater plot. Genes up/downregulated more than threefolds were selected and listed. Among ABC genes, seven were upregulated and three were downregulated. Three genes: ABCB1, ABCB4 and ABCG2 were upregulated very significantly (over tenfold). One ABCA8 was significantly downregulated. Among 38 SLC genes, 18 were upregulated, 16 were downregulated and four were up- or downregulated dependent on the cell line. Expression of 10 SLC genes was changed very significantly (over tenfold). Four genes were significantly increased: SLC6A1, SLC9A2, SLC12A1, SLC16A6 and six genes were significantly decreased: SLC2A14, SLC7A3, SLC7A8, SLC7A11, SLC16A14, SLC38A9. Based on the expression profiles, our results provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and expression of membrane transporters involved in drug resistance. Correlation of specific drug transporter with drug resistance requires further analysis.

  2. Microarray-based detection and expression analysis of extracellular matrix proteins in drug‑resistant ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Multiple drug resistance (MDR) development leads to resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Microarray methods can provide information regarding new candidate genes that can play a role in resistance to cytostatic drugs. Extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into cancer tissue as well as increased apoptosis resistance. In the present study, we report changes in the ECM and related gene expression pattern in methotrexate-, cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, vincristine-, topotecan- and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the W1 ovarian cancer cell line. The resistant variants of the W1 cell line were generated by stepwise selection of cells with an increasing concentration of the indicated drugs. Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Genome U219 Array Strips were used for hybridizations. Independent t-tests were used to determinate the statistical significance of results. Genes whose expression levels were higher than the assumed threshold (upregulated, >5-fold and downregulated, <5-fold) were visualized using the scatter plot method, selected and listed in the tables. Among the investigated genes, expression of 24 genes increased, expression of 14 genes decreased and expression of three genes increased or decreased depending on the cell line. Among the increased genes, expression of 10 increased very significantly, >20-fold. These genes were: ITGB1BP3, COL3A1, COL5A2, COL15A1, TGFBI, DCN, LUM, MATN2, POSTN and EGFL6. The expression of seven genes decreased very significantly: ITGA1, COL1A2, LAMA2, GPC3, KRT23, VIT and HMCN1. The expression pattern of ECM and related genes provided the preliminary view into the role of ECM components in cytostatic drug resistance of cancer cells. The exact role of the investigated genes in drug resistance requires further investigation. PMID:25199881

  3. Rainbow trout prolactin cDNA cloning in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mercier, L; Rentier-Delrue, F; Swennen, D; Lion, M; Le Goff, P; Prunet, P; Martial, J A

    1989-03-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a cDNA for trout prolactin (tPrl). An extensive analysis of tPrl recombinant clones by restriction analysis and sequencing revealed the presence of only one form of tPrl mRNA. The deduced protein sequence consists of 210 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 23 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of the mature protein is compared among teleosts and mammals, showing two domains of strong similarity that may be involved in biological activity. PMID:2647439

  4. Nucleotide sequence of equine caspase-1 cDNA.

    PubMed

    Wardlow, S; Penha-Goncalves, M N; Argyle, D J; Onions, D E; Nicolson, L

    1999-01-01

    Caspases are a family of cysteine proteases which have important roles in activation of cytokines and in apoptosis. Caspase-1, or interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE), promotes maturation of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) by proteolytic cleavage of precursor forms to generate biologically active peptides. We report the cloning and sequencing of equine caspase-1 cDNA. Equine caspase-1 is 405 amino acids in length and has 72% and 63% identity to human and mouse caspase-1, respectively, at the amino acid level. Sites of proteolytic cleavage and catalytic activity as identified in human caspase-1, are conserved. PMID:10376217

  5. Deciphering the glycosaminoglycan code with the help of microarrays.

    PubMed

    de Paz, Jose L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2008-07-01

    Carbohydrate microarrays have become a powerful tool to elucidate the biological role of complex sugars. Microarrays are particularly useful for the study of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a key class of carbohydrates. The high-throughput chip format enables rapid screening of large numbers of potential GAG sequences produced via a complex biosynthesis while consuming very little sample. Here, we briefly highlight the most recent advances involving GAG microarrays built with synthetic or naturally derived oligosaccharides. These chips are powerful tools for characterizing GAG-protein interactions and determining structure-activity relationships for specific sequences. Thereby, they contribute to decoding the information contained in specific GAG sequences. PMID:18563243

  6. Protein Microarrays with Novel Microfluidic Methods: Current Advances

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Chandra K.; Aguirre, Gerson R.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic-based micromosaic technology has allowed the pattering of recognition elements in restricted micrometer scale areas with high precision. This controlled patterning enabled the development of highly multiplexed arrays multiple analyte detection. This arraying technology was first introduced in the beginning of 2001 and holds tremendous potential to revolutionize microarray development and analyte detection. Later, several microfluidic methods were developed for microarray application. In this review we discuss these novel methods and approaches which leverage the property of microfluidic technologies to significantly improve various physical aspects of microarray technology, such as enhanced imprinting homogeneity, stability of the immobilized biomolecules, decreasing assay times, and reduction of the costs and of the bulky instrumentation.

  7. Deciphering the glycosaminoglycan code with the help of microarrays.

    PubMed

    de Paz, Jose L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2008-07-01

    Carbohydrate microarrays have become a powerful tool to elucidate the biological role of complex sugars. Microarrays are particularly useful for the study of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a key class of carbohydrates. The high-throughput chip format enables rapid screening of large numbers of potential GAG sequences produced via a complex biosynthesis while consuming very little sample. Here, we briefly highlight the most recent advances involving GAG microarrays built with synthetic or naturally derived oligosaccharides. These chips are powerful tools for characterizing GAG-protein interactions and determining structure-activity relationships for specific sequences. Thereby, they contribute to decoding the information contained in specific GAG sequences.

  8. A Perspective on DNA Microarrays in Pathology Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Jonathan R.

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarray technology matured in the mid-1990s, and the past decade has witnessed a tremendous growth in its application. DNA microarrays have provided powerful tools for pathology researchers seeking to describe, classify, and understand human disease. There has also been great expectation that the technology would advance the practice of pathology. This review highlights some of the key contributions of DNA microarrays to experimental pathology, focusing in the area of cancer research. Also discussed are some of the current challenges in translating utility to clinical practice. PMID:17600117

  9. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  10. New technologies for fabricating biological microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Bradley James

    This dissertation contains the description of two technologies that we have developed to reduce the cost and improve the quality of spotted biological microarrays. The first is a device, called a fluid microplotter, that uses ultrasonics to deposit spots with diameters of less than 5 microns. It consists of a dispenser, composed of a micropipette fastened to a piece of PZT piezoelectric, attached to a precision positioning system. A gentle pumping of fluid to the surface occurs when the micropipette is driven at specific frequencies. Spots or continuous lines can be deposited in this manner. The small fluid features conserve expensive and limited-quantity biological reagents. We characterize the performance of the microplotter in depositing fluid and examine the theoretical underpinnings of its operation. We present an analytical expression for the diameter of a deposited spot as a function of droplet volume and wettability of a surface and compare it with experimental results. We also examine the resonant properties of the piezoelectric element used to drive the dispenser and relate that to the frequencies at which pumping occurs. Finally, we propose a mechanism to explain the pumping behavior within the microplotter dispenser. The second technology we present is a process that uses a cold plasma and a subsequent in vacuo vapor-phase reaction to terminate a variety of oxide surfaces with epoxide chemical groups. These epoxide groups can react with amine-containing biomolecules to form strong covalent linkages between the biomolecules and the treated surface. The use of a plasma activation step followed by an in vacuo vapor-phase reaction allows for the precise control of surface functional groups, rather than the mixture of functionalities normally produced. This process modifies a range of different oxide surfaces, is fast, consumes a minimal amount of reagents, and produces attachment densities for bound biomolecules that are comparable to or better than

  11. A comprehensive comparison of RNA-Seq-based transcriptome analysis from reads to differential gene expression and cross-comparison with microarrays: a case study in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nookaew, Intawat; Papini, Marta; Pornputtapong, Natapol; Scalcinati, Gionata; Fagerberg, Linn; Uhlén, Matthias; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    RNA-seq, has recently become an attractive method of choice in the studies of transcriptomes, promising several advantages compared with microarrays. In this study, we sought to assess the contribution of the different analytical steps involved in the analysis of RNA-seq data generated with the Illumina platform, and to perform a cross-platform comparison based on the results obtained through Affymetrix microarray. As a case study for our work we, used the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CEN.PK 113-7D, grown under two different conditions (batch and chemostat). Here, we asses the influence of genetic variation on the estimation of gene expression level using three different aligners for read-mapping (Gsnap, Stampy and TopHat) on S288c genome, the capabilities of five different statistical methods to detect differential gene expression (baySeq, Cuffdiff, DESeq, edgeR and NOISeq) and we explored the consistency between RNA-seq analysis using reference genome and de novo assembly approach. High reproducibility among biological replicates (correlation ≥0.99) and high consistency between the two platforms for analysis of gene expression levels (correlation ≥0.91) are reported. The results from differential gene expression identification derived from the different statistical methods, as well as their integrated analysis results based on gene ontology annotation are in good agreement. Overall, our study provides a useful and comprehensive comparison between the two platforms (RNA-seq and microrrays) for gene expression analysis and addresses the contribution of the different steps involved in the analysis of RNA-seq data. PMID:22965124

  12. Sex-related gene expression profiles in the adrenal cortex in the mature rat: Microarray analysis with emphasis on genes involved in steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    TREJTER, MARCIN; HOCHOL, ANNA; TYCZEWSKA, MARIANNA; ZIOLKOWSKA, AGNIESZKA; JOPEK, KAROL; SZYSZKA, MARTA; MALENDOWICZ, LUDWIK K; RUCINSKI, MARCIN

    2015-01-01

    Notable sex-related differences exist in mammalian adrenal cortex structure and function. In adult rats, the adrenal weight and the average volume of zona fasciculata cells of females are larger and secrete greater amounts of corticosterone than those of males. The molecular bases of these sex-related differences are poorly understood. In this study, to explore the molecular background of these differences, we defined zone- and sex-specific transcripts in adult male and female (estrous cycle phase) rats. Twelve-week-old rats of both genders were used and samples were taken from the zona glomerulosa (ZG) and zona fasciculata/reticularis (ZF/R) zones. Transcriptome identification was carried out using the Affymetrix® Rat Gene 1.1 ST Array. The microarray data were compared by fold change with significance according to moderated t-statistics. Subsequently, we performed functional annotation clustering using the Gene Ontology (GO) and Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). In the first step, we explored differentially expressed transcripts in the adrenal ZG and ZF/R. The number of differentially expressed transcripts was notably higher in the female than in the male rats (702 vs. 571). The differentially expressed genes which were significantly enriched included genes involved in steroid hormone metabolism, and their expression levels in the ZF/R of adult female rats were significantly higher compared with those in the male rats. In the female ZF/R, when compared with that of the males, prevailing numbers of genes linked to cell fraction, oxidation/reduction processes, response to nutrients and to extracellular stimuli or steroid hormone stimuli were downregulated. The microarray data for key genes involved directly in steroidogenesis were confirmed by qPCR. Thus, when compared with that of the males, in the female ZF/R, higher expression levels of genes involved directly in steroid hormone synthesis were accompanied by lower

  13. Collection of Epithelial Cells from Rodent Mammary Gland Via Laser Capture Microdissection Yielding High-Quality RNA Suitable for Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) enables collection of cell populations highly enriched for specific cell types that have the potential of yielding critical information about physiological and pathophysiological processes. One use of cells collected by LCM is for gene expression profiling. Samples intended for transcript analyses should be of the highest quality possible. RNA degradation is an ever-present concern in molecular biological assays, and LCM is no exception. This paper identifies issues related to preparation, collection, and processing in a lipid-rich tissue, rodent mammary gland, in which the epithelial to stromal cell ratio is low and the stromal component is primarily adipocytes, a situation that presents numerous technical challenges for high-quality RNA isolation. Our goal was to improve the procedure so that a greater probe set present call rate would be obtained when isolated RNA was evaluated using Affymetrix microarrays. The results showed that the quality of RNA isolated from epithelial cells of both mammary gland and mammary adenocarcinomas was high with a probe set present call rate of 65% and a high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:21406068

  14. Investigating the global genomic diversity of Escherichia coli using a multi-genome DNA microarray platform with novel gene prediction strategies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The gene content of a diverse group of 183 unique Escherichia coli and Shigella isolates was determined using the Affymetrix GeneChip® E. coli Genome 2.0 Array, originally designed for transcriptome analysis, as a genotyping tool. The probe set design utilized by this array provided the opportunity to determine the gene content of each strain very accurately and reliably. This array constitutes 10,112 independent genes representing four individual E. coli genomes, therefore providing the ability to survey genes of several different pathogen types. The entire ECOR collection, 80 EHEC-like isolates, and a diverse set of isolates from our FDA strain repository were included in our analysis. Results From this study we were able to define sets of genes that correspond to, and therefore define, the EHEC pathogen type. Furthermore, our sampling of 63 unique strains of O157:H7 showed the ability of this array to discriminate between closely related strains. We found that individual strains of O157:H7 differed, on average, by 197 probe sets. Finally, we describe an analysis method that utilizes the power of the probe sets to determine accurately the presence/absence of each gene represented on this array. Conclusions These elements provide insights into understanding the microbial diversity that exists within extant E. coli populations. Moreover, these data demonstrate that this novel microarray-based analysis is a powerful tool in the field of molecular epidemiology and the newly emerging field of microbial forensics. PMID:21733163

  15. Genomic response to Wnt signalling is highly context-dependent - Evidence from DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation screens of Wnt/TCF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Railo, Antti; Pajunen, Antti; Itaeranta, Petri; Naillat, Florence; Vuoristo, Jussi; Kilpelaeinen, Pekka; Vainio, Seppo

    2009-10-01

    Wnt proteins are important regulators of embryonic development, and dysregulated Wnt signalling is involved in the oncogenesis of several human cancers. Our knowledge of the downstream target genes is limited, however. We used a chromatin immunoprecipitation-based assay to isolate and characterize the actual gene segments through which Wnt-activatable transcription factors, TCFs, regulate transcription and an Affymetrix microarray analysis to study the global transcriptional response to the Wnt3a ligand. The anti-{beta}-catenin immunoprecipitation of DNA-protein complexes from mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts expressing a fusion protein of {beta}-catenin and TCF7 resulted in the identification of 92 genes as putative TCF targets. GeneChip assays of gene expression performed on NIH3T3 cells and the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 revealed 355 genes in NIH3T3 and 129 genes in the PC12 cells with marked changes in expression after Wnt3a stimulus. Only 2 Wnt-regulated genes were shared by both cell lines. Surprisingly, Disabled-2 was the only gene identified by the chromatin immunoprecipitation approach that displayed a marked change in expression in the GeneChip assay. Taken together, our approaches give an insight into the complex context-dependent nature of Wnt pathway transcriptional responses and identify Disabled-2 as a potential new direct target for Wnt signalling.

  16. Similar Response Patterns to 5%Topical Minoxidil Foam in Frontal and Vertex Scalp of Men with Androgenetic Alopecia: A Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mirmirani, P.; Consolo, M.; Oyetakin-White, P.; Baron, E.; Leahy, P.; Karnik, P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are regional variations in scalp hair miniaturization seen in androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Use of topical minoxidil can lead to reversal of miniaturization in the vertex scalp. However, its effects on other scalp regions are less well studied. Methods A placebo controlled double-blinded prospective pilot study of minoxidil topical foam 5% (MTF) vs placebo was conducted in sixteen healthy men ages 18-49 with Hamilton-Norwood type IV-V thinning. The subjects were asked to apply the treatment (active drug or placebo) to the scalp twice daily for eight weeks. Stereotactic scalp photographs were taken at the baseline and final visits to monitor global hair growth. Scalp biopsies were done at the leading edge of hair loss from the frontal and vertex scalp before and after treatment with MTF and placebo and microarray analysis was done using the Affymetrix GeneChip HG U133 Plus 2.0. Results Global stereotactic photographs showed that MTF induced hair growth in both the frontal and vertex scalp of AGA patients. Regional differences in gene expression profiles were observed before treatment. However, MTF treatment induced the expression of hair keratin associated genes and decreased the expression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) and inflammatory genes in both scalp regions. Conclusions These data suggest that MTF is effective in the treatment of both the frontal and vertex scalp of AGA patients. PMID:25204361

  17. Differential expression of extracellular matrix proteins in senescent and young human fibroblasts: a comparative proteomics and microarray study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyeong Eun; Kwon, Joseph; Rhim, Ji-Heon; Choi, Jong Soon; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Junsoo; Jang, Ik-Soon

    2011-07-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides an essential structural framework for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation, and undergoes progressive changes during senescence. To investigate changes in protein expression in the extracellular matrix between young and senescent fibroblasts, we compared proteomic data (LTQ-FT) with cDNA microarray results. The peptide counts from the proteomics analysis were used to evaluate the level of ECM protein expression by young cells and senescent cells, and ECM protein expression data were compared with the microarray data. After completing the comparative analysis, we grouped the genes into four categories. Class I included genes with increased expression levels in both analyses, while class IV contained genes with reduced expression in both analyses. Class II and Class III contained genes with an inconsistent expression pattern. Finally, we validated the comparative analysis results by examining the expression level of the specific gene from each category using Western blot analysis and semiquantitative RT-PCR. Our results demonstrate that comparative analysis can be used to identify differentially expressed genes.

  18. Suppression subtractive hybridization coupled with microarray analysis to examine differential expression of genes in virus infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sushmita; Kaur, Kuljeet; Kapur, Vivek

    2004-01-01

    High throughput detection of differential expression of genes is an efficient means of identifying genes and pathways that may play a role in biological systems under certain experimental conditions. There exist a variety of approaches that could be used to identify groups of genes that change in expression in response to a particular stimulus or environment. We here describe the application of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) coupled with cDNA microarray analysis for isolation and identification of chicken transcripts that change in expression on infection of host cells with a paramyxovirus. SSH was used for initial isolation of differentially expressed transcripts, a large-scale validation of which was accomplished by microarray analysis. The data reveals a large group of regulated genes constituting many biochemical pathways that could serve as targets for future investigations to explore their role in paramyxovirus pathogenesis. The detailed methods described herein could be useful and adaptable to any biological system for studying changes in gene expression. PMID:15181476

  19. The prostate cancer immunome: In silico functional analysis of antigenic proteins from microarray profiling with IgG.

    PubMed

    Luna-Coronell, Johana A; Vierlinger, Klemens; Gamperl, Magdalena; Hofbauer, Johann; Berger, Ingrid; Weinhäusel, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The study of the immunome of prostate cancer (PCa) and characterization of autoantibody signature from differentially reactive antigens can uncover disease stage proteins, reveal enriched networks and even expose aberrant cellular mechanisms during the disease process. By conducting plasma IgG profiling on protein microarrays presenting 5449 unique human proteins expressed in 15 417 E. coli human cDNA expression clones, we elucidated 471 (21 higher reactive in PCa) differentially reactive antigens in 50 PCa versus 49 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) at initial diagnosis. Functional analyzes show that the immune-profile of PCa compared to BPH control samples is significantly enriched in features targeting Cellular assembly, Cell death and pathways involved in Cell cycle, translation, and assembly of proteins as EIF2 signaling, PCa related genes as AXIN1 and TP53, and ribosomal proteins (e.g. RPS10). An overlap of 61 (out of 471) DIRAGs with the published 1545 antigens from the SEREX database has been found, however those were higher reactive in BPH. Clinical relevance is shown when antibody-reactivities against eight proteins were significantly (p < 0.001) correlated with Gleason-score. Herewith we provide a biological and pathophysiological characterization of the immunological layer of cancerous (PCa) versus benign (BPH) disease, derived from antibody profiling on protein microarrays. PMID:27089054

  20. Ontology-Based Analysis of Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Agapito; Milano, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    The importance of semantic-based methods and algorithms for the analysis and management of biological data is growing for two main reasons. From a biological side, knowledge contained in ontologies is more and more accurate and complete, from a computational side, recent algorithms are using in a valuable way such knowledge. Here we focus on semantic-based management and analysis of protein interaction networks referring to all the approaches of analysis of protein-protein interaction data that uses knowledge encoded into biological ontologies. Semantic approaches for studying high-throughput data have been largely used in the past to mine genomic and expression data. Recently, the emergence of network approaches for investigating molecular machineries has stimulated in a parallel way the introduction of semantic-based techniques for analysis and management of network data. The application of these computational approaches to the study of microarray data can broad the application scenario of them and simultaneously can help the understanding of disease development and progress.

  1. Tissue microarray profiling in human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lal, Sean; Nguyen, Lisa; Tezone, Rhenan; Ponten, Fredrik; Odeberg, Jacob; Li, Amy; Dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2016-09-01

    Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) are a versatile tool for high-throughput protein screening, allowing qualitative analysis of a large number of samples on a single slide. We have developed a customizable TMA system that uniquely utilizes cryopreserved human cardiac samples from both heart failure and donor patients to produce formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Confirmatory upstream or downstream molecular studies can then be performed on the same (biobanked) cryopreserved tissue. In a pilot study, we applied our TMAs to screen for the expression of four-and-a-half LIM-domain 2 (FHL2), a member of the four-and-a-half LIM family. This protein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure in a variety of animal models. While FHL2 is abundant in the heart, not much is known about its expression in human heart failure. For this purpose, we generated an affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-human FHL2 antibody. Our TMAs allowed high-throughput profiling of FHL2 protein using qualitative and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry that proved complementary to Western blot analysis. We demonstrated a significant relative reduction in FHL2 protein expression across different forms of human heart failure.

  2. A drosophila full-length cDNA resource

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph; Brokstein, Peter; Yu, Charles; Champe, Mark; George, Reed; Guarin, Hannibal; Kronmiller, Brent; Pacleb, Joanne; Park, Soo; Rubin, Gerald M.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2003-05-09

    Background: A collection of sequenced full-length cDNAs is an important resource both for functional genomics studies and for the determination of the intron-exon structure of genes. Providing this resource to the Drosophila melanogaster research community has been a long-term goal of the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project. We have previously described the Drosophila Gene Collection (DGC), a set of putative full-length cDNAs that was produced by generating and analyzing over 250,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a variety of tissues and developmental stages. Results: We have generated high-quality full-insert sequence for 8,921 clones in the DGC. We compared the sequence of these clones to the annotated Release 3 genomic sequence, and identified more than 5,300 cDNAs that contain a complete and accurate protein-coding sequence. This corresponds to at least one splice form for 40 percent of the predicted D. melanogaster genes. We also identified potential new cases of RNA editing. Conclusions: We show that comparison of cDNA sequences to a high-quality annotated genomic sequence is an effective approach to identifying and eliminating defective clones from a cDNA collection and ensure its utility for experimentation. Clones were eliminated either because they carry single nucleotide discrepancies, which most probably result from reverse transcriptase errors, or because they are truncated and contain only part of the protein-coding sequence.

  3. Sequence of a cDNA encoding pancreatic preprosomatostatin-22.

    PubMed

    Magazin, M; Minth, C D; Funckes, C L; Deschenes, R; Tavianini, M A; Dixon, J E

    1982-09-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a precursor to somatostatin that upon proteolytic processing may give rise to a hormone of 22 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of a cDNA from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) encodes a precursor to somatostatin that is 105 amino acids (Mr, 11,500). The cDNA coding for somatostatin-22 consists of 36 nucleotides in the 5' untranslated region, 315 nucleotides that code for the precursor to somatostatin-22, 269 nucleotides at the 3' untranslated region, and a variable length of poly(A). The putative preprohormone contains a sequence of hydrophobic amino acids at the amino terminus that has the properties of a "signal" peptide. A connecting sequence of approximately 57 amino acids is followed by a single Arg-Arg sequence, which immediately precedes the hormone. Somatostatin-22 is homologous to somatostatin-14 in 7 of the 14 amino acids, including the Phe-Trp-Lys sequence. Hybridization selection of mRNA, followed by its translation in a wheat germ cell-free system, resulted in the synthesis of a single polypeptide having a molecular weight of approximately 10,000 as estimated on Na-DodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. PMID:6127673

  4. Sequence of a cDNA encoding pancreatic preprosomatostatin-22.

    PubMed Central

    Magazin, M; Minth, C D; Funckes, C L; Deschenes, R; Tavianini, M A; Dixon, J E

    1982-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a precursor to somatostatin that upon proteolytic processing may give rise to a hormone of 22 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of a cDNA from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) encodes a precursor to somatostatin that is 105 amino acids (Mr, 11,500). The cDNA coding for somatostatin-22 consists of 36 nucleotides in the 5' untranslated region, 315 nucleotides that code for the precursor to somatostatin-22, 269 nucleotides at the 3' untranslated region, and a variable length of poly(A). The putative preprohormone contains a sequence of hydrophobic amino acids at the amino terminus that has the properties of a "signal" peptide. A connecting sequence of approximately 57 amino acids is followed by a single Arg-Arg sequence, which immediately precedes the hormone. Somatostatin-22 is homologous to somatostatin-14 in 7 of the 14 amino acids, including the Phe-Trp-Lys sequence. Hybridization selection of mRNA, followed by its translation in a wheat germ cell-free system, resulted in the synthesis of a single polypeptide having a molecular weight of approximately 10,000 as estimated on Na-DodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. Images PMID:6127673

  5. cDNA sequences of two apolipoproteins from lamprey

    SciTech Connect

    Pontes, M.; Xu, X.; Graham, D.; Riley, M.; Doolittle, R.F.

    1987-03-24

    The messages for two small but abundant apolipoproteins found in lamprey blood plasma were cloned with the aid of oligonucleotide probes based on amino-terminal sequences. In both cases, numerous clones were identified in a lamprey liver cDNA library, consistent with the great abundance of these proteins in lamprey blood. One of the cDNAs (LAL1) has a coding region of 105 amino acids that corresponds to a 21-residue signal peptide, a putative 8-residue propeptide, and the 76-residue mature protein found in blood. The other cDNA (LAL2) codes for a total of 191 residues, the first 23 of which constitute a signal peptide. The two proteins, which occur in the high-density lipoprotein fraction of ultracentrifuged plasma, have amino acid compositions similar to those of apolipoproteins found in mammalian blood; computer analysis indicates that the sequences are largely helix-permissive. When the sequences were searched against an amino acid sequence data base, rat apolipoprotein IV was the best matching candidate in both cases. Although a reasonable alignment can be made with that sequence and LAL1, definitive assignment of the two lamprey proteins to typical mammalian classes cannot be made at this point.

  6. A microarray-based comparative analysis of gene expression profiles during grain development in transgenic and wild type wheat.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Per L; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holm, Preben B

    2005-12-01

    Global, comparative gene expression analysis is potentially a very powerful tool in the safety assessment of transgenic plants since it allows for the detection of differences in gene expression patterns between a transgenic line and the mother variety. In the present study, we compared the gene expression profile in developing seeds of wild type wheat and wheat transformed for endosperm-specific expression of an Aspergillus fumigatus phytase. High-level expression of the phytase gene was ensured by codon modification towards the prevalent codon usage of wheat genes and by using the wheat 1DX5HMW glutenin promoter for driving transgene expression. A 9K wheat unigene cDNA microarray was produced from cDNA libraries prepared mainly from developing wheat seed. The arrays were hybridised to flourescently labelled cDNA prepared from developing seeds of the transgenic wheat line and the mother variety, Bobwhite, at three developmental stages. Comparisons and statistical analyses of the gene expression profiles of the transgenic line vs. that of the mother line revealed only slight differences at the three developmental stages. In the few cases where differential expression was indicated by the statistical analysis it was primarily genes that were strongly expressed over a shorter interval of seed development such as genes encoding storage proteins. Accordingly, we interpret these differences in gene expression levels to result from minor asynchrony in seed development between the transgenic line and the mother line. In support of this, real time PCR validation of results from selected genes at the late developmental stage could not confirm differential expression of these genes. We conclude that the expression of the codon-modified A. fumigatus phytase gene in the wheat seed had no significant effects on the overall gene expression patterns in the developing seed.

  7. Design, construction, characterization, and application of a hyperspectral microarray scanner.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Michael B; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Haaland, David M; Werner-Washburne, Margaret

    2004-04-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a hyperspectral microarray scanner for functional genomic research. The hyperspectral instrument operates with spatial resolutions ranging from 3 to 30 microm and records the emission spectrum between 490 and 900 nm with a spectral resolution of 3 nm for each pixel of the microarray. This spectral information, when coupled with multivariate data analysis techniques, allows for identification and elimination of unwanted artifacts and greatly improves the accuracy of microarray experiments. Microarray results presented in this study clearly demonstrate the separation of fluorescent label emission from the spectrally overlapping emission due to the underlying glass substrate. We also demonstrate separation of the emission due to green fluorescent protein expressed by yeast cells from the spectrally overlapping autofluorescence of the yeast cells and the growth media.

  8. Severe acute respiratory syndrome diagnostics using a coronavirus protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Heng; Hu, Shaohui; Jona, Ghil; Zhu, Xiaowei; Kreiswirth, Nate; Willey, Barbara M; Mazzulli, Tony; Liu, Guozhen; Song, Qifeng; Chen, Peng; Cameron, Mark; Tyler, Andrea; Wang, Jian; Wen, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Compton, Susan; Snyder, Michael

    2006-03-14

    To monitor severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infection, a coronavirus protein microarray that harbors proteins from SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and five additional coronaviruses was constructed. These microarrays were used to screen approximately 400 Canadian sera from the SARS outbreak, including samples from confirmed SARS-CoV cases, respiratory illness patients, and healthcare professionals. A computer algorithm that uses multiple classifiers to predict samples from SARS patients was developed and used to predict 206 sera from Chinese fever patients. The test assigned patients into two distinct groups: those with antibodies to SARS-CoV and those without. The microarray also identified patients with sera reactive against other coronavirus proteins. Our results correlated well with an indirect immunofluorescence test and demonstrated that viral infection can be monitored for many months after infection. We show that protein microarrays can serve as a rapid, sensitive, and simple tool for large-scale identification of viral-specific antibodies in sera.

  9. Development and Optimization of a Thrombin Sandwich Aptamer Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Meneghello, Anna; Sosic, Alice; Antognoli, Agnese; Cretaio, Erica; Gatto, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    A sandwich microarray employing two distinct aptamers for human thrombin has been optimized for the detection of subnanomolar concentrations of the protein. The aptamer microarray demonstrates high specificity for thrombin, proving that a two-site binding assay with the TBA1 aptamer as capture layer and the TBA2 aptamer as detection layer can ensure great specificity at times and conditions compatible with standard routine analysis of biological samples. Aptamer microarray sensitivity was evaluated directly by fluorescent analysis employing Cy5-labeled TBA2 and indirectly by the use of TBA2-biotin followed by detection with fluorescent streptavidin. Sub-nanomolar LODs were reached in all cases and in the presence of serum, demonstrating that the optimized aptamer microarray can identify thrombin by a low-cost, sensitive and specific method.

  10. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-07-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches.

  11. FRET-based real-time DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e., real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other intensity-affecting impediments. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we take advantage of as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to experimentally validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:22130990

  12. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches. PMID:26077916

  13. Applications in high-content functional protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Moore, Cedric D; Ajala, Olutobi Z; Zhu, Heng

    2016-02-01

    Protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a parallel and high-throughput manner. Over the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function at a systems level and have led to the construction of networks and pathways describing these functions. Relevant areas of research include the detection of various binding properties of proteins, the study of enzyme-substrate relationships, the analysis of host-microbe interactions, and profiling antibody specificity. In addition, discovery of novel biomarkers in autoimmune diseases and cancers is emerging as a major clinical application of functional protein microarrays. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances of functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical applications. PMID:26599287

  14. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches.

  15. Chaperone network composition in Solanum lycopersicum explored by transcriptome profiling and microarray meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Simm, Stefan; Paul, Puneet; Bublak, Daniela; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones primarily involved in maintenance of protein homeostasis. Their function has been best characterized in heat stress (HS) response during which Hsps are transcriptionally controlled by HS transcription factors (Hsfs). The role of Hsfs and Hsps in HS response in tomato was initially examined by transcriptome analysis using the massive analysis of cDNA ends (MACE) method. Approximately 9.6% of all genes expressed in leaves are enhanced in response to HS, including a subset of Hsfs and Hsps. The underlying Hsp-Hsf networks with potential functions in stress responses or developmental processes were further explored by meta-analysis of existing microarray datasets. We identified clusters with differential transcript profiles with respect to abiotic stresses, plant organs and developmental stages. The composition of two clusters points towards two major chaperone networks. One cluster consisted of constitutively expressed plastidial chaperones and other genes involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis. The second cluster represents genes strongly induced by heat, drought and salinity stress, including HsfA2 and many stress-inducible chaperones, but also potential targets of HsfA2 not related to protein homeostasis. This observation attributes a central regulatory role to HsfA2 in controlling different aspects of abiotic stress response and tolerance in tomato. PMID:25124075

  16. Ameliorative effects of baicalein in MPTP-induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease: A microarray study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Li, Chao; Yang, Ran-Yao; Lian, Wen-Wen; Fang, Jian-Song; Pang, Xiao-Cong; Qin, Xue-Mei; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Baicalein, a flavonoid from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of baicalein on motor behavioral deficits and gene expression in N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mice model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The behavioral results showed that baicalein significantly improves the abnormal behaviors in MPTP-induced mice model of PD, as manifested by shortening the total time for climbing down the pole, prolonging the latent periods of rotarod, and increasing the vertical movements. Using cDNA microarray and subsequent bioinformatic analyses, it was found that baicalein significantly promotes the biological processes including neurogenesis, neuroblast proliferation, neurotrophin signaling pathway, walking and locomotor behaviors, and inhibits dopamine metabolic process through regulation of gene expressions. Based on analysis of gene co-expression networks, the results indicated that the regulation of genes such as LIMK1, SNCA and GLRA1 by baicalein might play central roles in the network. Our results provide experimental evidence for the potential use of baicalein in the treatment of PD, and revealed gene expression profiles, biological processes and pathways influenced by baicalein in MPTP-treated mice.

  17. Hazard characterization and identification of a former ammunition site using microarrays, bioassays, and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Eisentraeger, Adolf; Reifferscheid, Georg; Dardenne, Freddy; Blust, Ronny; Schofer, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    More than 100,000 tons of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene were produced at the former ammunition site Werk Tanne in Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany. The production of explosives and consequent detonation in approximately 1944 by the Allies caused great pollution in this area. Four soil samples and three water samples were taken from this site and characterized by applying chemical-analytical methods and several bioassays. Ecotoxicological test systems, such as the algal growth inhibition assay with Desmodesmus subspicatus, and genotoxicity tests, such as the umu and NM2009 tests, were performed. Also applied were the Ames test, according to International Organization for Standardization 16240, and an Ames fluctuation test. The toxic mode of action was examined using bacterial gene profiling assays with a battery of Escherichia coli strains and with the human liver cell line hepG2 using the PIQOR Toxicology cDNA microarray. Additionally, the molecular mechanism of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in hepG2 cells was analyzed. The present assessment indicates a danger of pollutant leaching for the soil-groundwater path. A possible impact for human health is discussed, because the groundwater in this area serves as drinking water. PMID:17447547

  18. Microarray expression profiling in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Park, Bokyung; Oh, Chang-Ki; Choi, Won-Seok; Chung, In Kwon; Youdim, Moussa B H; Oh, Young J

    2011-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and is characterized by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. To discover potential key molecules in this process, we utilized cDNA microarray technology to obtain an expression profile of transcripts in MN9D dopaminergic neuronal cells treated with 6-hydroxydopamine. Using a self-organizing map algorithm, data mining and clustering were combined to identify distinct functional subgroups of genes. We identified alterations in the expression of 81 genes in eight clusters. Among these genes, we verified protein expression patterns of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 and sequestosome 1 using both cell culture and rat brain models of PD. Immunological analyses revealed increased expression levels as well as aggregated distribution patterns of these gene products in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated dopaminergic neurons. In addition to the identification of other proteins that are known to be associated with protein aggregation, our results raise the possibility that a more widespread set of proteins may be associated with the generation of protein aggregates in dying neurons. Further research to determine the functional roles of other altered gene products within the same cluster as well as the seven remaining clusters may provide new insights into the neurodegeneration that underlies PD pathogenesis.

  19. Hazard characterization and identification of a former ammunition site using microarrays, bioassays, and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Eisentraeger, Adolf; Reifferscheid, Georg; Dardenne, Freddy; Blust, Ronny; Schofer, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    More than 100,000 tons of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene were produced at the former ammunition site Werk Tanne in Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Germany. The production of explosives and consequent detonation in approximately 1944 by the Allies caused great pollution in this area. Four soil samples and three water samples were taken from this site and characterized by applying chemical-analytical methods and several bioassays. Ecotoxicological test systems, such as the algal growth inhibition assay with Desmodesmus subspicatus, and genotoxicity tests, such as the umu and NM2009 tests, were performed. Also applied were the Ames test, according to International Organization for Standardization 16240, and an Ames fluctuation test. The toxic mode of action was examined using bacterial gene profiling assays with a battery of Escherichia coli strains and with the human liver cell line hepG2 using the PIQOR Toxicology cDNA microarray. Additionally, the molecular mechanism of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in hepG2 cells was analyzed. The present assessment indicates a danger of pollutant leaching for the soil-groundwater path. A possible impact for human health is discussed, because the groundwater in this area serves as drinking water.

  20. Microarrays meet the Voltaire challenge: Drug discovery on a chip?

    PubMed

    Jackson, David B; Stein, Martin A; Merino, Alejandro; Eils, Roland

    2006-01-01

    The co-emergence of microarray technologies with systems oriented approaches to discovery is testament to the technological and conceptual advancements of recent years. By providing a platform for massively parallelized reductionism, microarrays are enabling us to examine the functional features of diverse classes of bio-system components in a contextually meaningful manner. Yet, to provide economic impact, future development of these technologies demands intimate alignment with the goal of producing safer and more efficacious drugs.: PMID:24980402

  1. Profiling in situ microbial community structure with an amplification microarray.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Darrell P; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Bryant, Lexi; Golova, Julia; Wiles, Cory; Williams, Kenneth H; Peacock, Aaron D; Long, Philip E

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to unify amplification, labeling, and microarray hybridization chemistries within a single, closed microfluidic chamber (an amplification microarray) and verify technology performance on a series of groundwater samples from an in situ field experiment designed to compare U(VI) mobility under conditions of various alkalinities (as HCO(3)(-)) during stimulated microbial activity accompanying acetate amendment. Analytical limits of detection were between 2 and 200 cell equivalents of purified DNA. Amplification microarray signatures were well correlated with 16S rRNA-targeted quantitative PCR results and hybridization microarray signatures. The succession of the microbial community was evident with and consistent between the two microarray platforms. Amplification microarray analysis of acetate-treated groundwater showed elevated levels of iron-reducing bacteria (Flexibacter, Geobacter, Rhodoferax, and Shewanella) relative to the average background profile, as expected. Identical molecular signatures were evident in the transect treated with acetate plus NaHCO(3), but at much lower signal intensities and with a much more rapid decline (to nondetection). Azoarcus, Thaurea, and Methylobacterium were responsive in the acetate-only transect but not in the presence of bicarbonate. Observed differences in microbial community composition or response to bicarbonate amendment likely had an effect on measured rates of U reduction, with higher rates probable in the part of the field experiment that was amended with bicarbonate. The simplification in microarray-based work flow is a significant technological advance toward entirely closed-amplicon microarray-based tests and is generally extensible to any number of environmental monitoring applications.

  2. Where statistics and molecular microarray experiments biology meet.

    PubMed

    Kelmansky, Diana M

    2013-01-01

    This review chapter presents a statistical point of view to microarray experiments with the purpose of understanding the apparent contradictions that often appear in relation to their results. We give a brief introduction of molecular biology for nonspecialists. We describe microarray experiments from their construction and the biological principles the experiments rely on, to data acquisition and analysis. The role of epidemiological approaches and sample size considerations are also discussed.

  3. DNA Microarray Analysis of Estrogen-Responsive Genes.

    PubMed

    Eyster, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    DNA microarray is a powerful, non-biased discovery technology that allows the analysis of the expression of thousands of genes at a time. The technology can be used for the identification of differential gene expression, genetic mutations associated with diseases, DNA methylation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and microRNA expression, to name a few. This chapter describes microarray technology for the analysis of differential gene expression in response to estrogen treatment.

  4. Plant protein kinase substrates identification using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate signaling pathways by phosphorylating their targets. They play critical roles in plant signaling networks. Although many important protein kinases have been identified in plants, their substrates are largely unknown. We have developed and produced plant protein microarrays with more than 15,000 purified plant proteins. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to use these microarrays to identify plant protein kinase substrates via in vitro phosphorylation assays on these arrays. PMID:25930701

  5. Profiling In Situ Microbial Community Structure with an Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Knickerbocker, Christopher; Bryant, Lexi; Golova, Julia; Wiles, Cory; Williams, Kenneth H.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Long, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to unify amplification, labeling, and microarray hybridization chemistries within a single, closed microfluidic chamber (an amplification microarray) and verify technology performance on a series of groundwater samples from an in situ field experiment designed to compare U(VI) mobility under conditions of various alkalinities (as HCO3−) during stimulated microbial activity accompanying acetate amendment. Analytical limits of detection were between 2 and 200 cell equivalents of purified DNA. Amplification microarray signatures were well correlated with 16S rRNA-targeted quantitative PCR results and hybridization microarray signatures. The succession of the microbial community was evident with and consistent between the two microarray platforms. Amplification microarray analysis of acetate-treated groundwater showed elevated levels of iron-reducing bacteria (Flexibacter, Geobacter, Rhodoferax, and Shewanella) relative to the average background profile, as expected. Identical molecular signatures were evident in the transect treated with acetate plus NaHCO3, but at much lower signal intensities and with a much more rapid decline (to nondetection). Azoarcus, Thaurea, and Methylobacterium were responsive in the acetate-only transect but not in the presence of bicarbonate. Observed differences in microbial community composition or response to bicarbonate amendment likely had an effect on measured rates of U reduction, with higher rates probable in the part of the field experiment that was amended with bicarbonate. The simplification in microarray-based work flow is a significant technological advance toward entirely closed-amplicon microarray-based tests and is generally extensible to any number of environmental monitoring applications. PMID:23160129

  6. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments. PMID:27600247

  7. Basic Concepts of Microarrays and Potential Applications in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa B.; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The introduction of in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, led by real-time PCR, into the clinical microbiology laboratory has transformed the laboratory detection of viruses and select bacterial pathogens. However, the progression of the molecular diagnostic revolution currently relies on the ability to efficiently and accurately offer multiplex detection and characterization for a variety of infectious disease pathogens. Microarray analysis has the capability to offer robust multiplex detection but has just started to enter the diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Multiple microarray platforms exist, including printed double-stranded DNA and oligonucleotide arrays, in situ-synthesized arrays, high-density bead arrays, electronic microarrays, and suspension bead arrays. One aim of this paper is to review microarray technology, highlighting technical differences between them and each platform's advantages and disadvantages. Although the use of microarrays to generate gene expression data has become routine, applications pertinent to clinical microbiology continue to rapidly expand. This review highlights uses of microarray technology that impact diagnostic microbiology, including the detection and identification of pathogens, determination of antimicrobial resistance, epidemiological strain typing, and analysis of microbial infections using host genomic expression and polymorphism profiles. PMID:19822891

  8. Shrinkage regression-based methods for microarray missing value imputation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Missing values commonly occur in the microarray data, which usually contain more than 5% missing values with up to 90% of genes affected. Inaccurate missing value estimation results in reducing the power of downstream microarray data analyses. Many types of methods have been developed to estimate missing values. Among them, the regression-based methods are very popular and have been shown to perform better than the other types of methods in many testing microarray datasets. Results To further improve the performances of the regression-based methods, we propose shrinkage regression-based methods. Our methods take the advantage of the correlation structure in the microarray data and select similar genes for the target gene by Pearson correlation coefficients. Besides, our methods incorporate the least squares principle, utilize a shrinkage estimation approach to adjust the coefficients of the regression model, and then use the new coefficients to estimate missing values. Simulation results show that the proposed methods provide more accurate missing value estimation in six testing microarray datasets than the existing regression-based methods do. Conclusions Imputation of missing values is a very important aspect of microarray data analyses because most of the downstream analyses require a complete dataset. Therefore, exploring accurate and efficient methods for estimating missing values has become an essential issue. Since our proposed shrinkage regression-based methods can provide accurate missing value estimation, they are competitive alternatives to the existing regression-based methods. PMID:24565159

  9. Evaluating concentration estimation errors in ELISA microarray experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Don S.; White, Amanda M.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2005-01-26

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a standard immunoassay to predict a protein concentration in a sample. Deploying ELISA in a microarray format permits simultaneous prediction of the concentrations of numerous proteins in a small sample. These predictions, however, are uncertain due to processing error and biological variability. Evaluating prediction error is critical to interpreting biological significance and improving the ELISA microarray process. Evaluating prediction error must be automated to realize a reliable high-throughput ELISA microarray system. Methods: In this paper, we present a statistical method based on propagation of error to evaluate prediction errors in the ELISA microarray process. Although propagation of error is central to this method, it is effective only when comparable data are available. Therefore, we briefly discuss the roles of experimental design, data screening, normalization and statistical diagnostics when evaluating ELISA microarray prediction errors. We use an ELISA microarray investigation of breast cancer biomarkers to illustrate the evaluation of prediction errors. The illustration begins with a description of the design and resulting data, followed by a brief discussion of data screening and normalization. In our illustration, we fit a standard curve to the screened and normalized data, review the modeling diagnostics, and apply propagation of error.

  10. [Future aspect of cytogenetics using chromosomal microarray testing].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of chromosomal microarray testing, microdeletions can be detected in approximately 17% of cases without any abnormality detectable by conventional karyotyping. Structural abnormalities frequently occur at the terminal regions of the chromosomes, called the subtelomeres, because of their structural features. Subtelomere deletions and unbalanced translocations between chromosomes are frequently observed. However, most microdeletions observed by chromosomal microarray testing are microdeletions in intermediate regions. Submicroscopic duplications reciprocal to the deletions seen in the microdeletion syndromes, such as the 16p11.2 region, have been revealed. Discovery of multi-hit chromosomal abnormalities is another achievement by chromosomal microarray testing. Chromosomal microarray testing can determine the ranges of chromosomal structural abnormalities at a DNA level. Thus, the effects of a specific gene deletion on symptoms can be revealed by comparing multiple patients with slightly different chromosomal deletions in the same region (genotype/phenotype correlation). Chromosomal microarray testing comprehensively determines the genomic copy number, but reveals no secondary structure, requiring verification by cytogenetics using FISH. To interpret the results, familial or benign copy number variations (CNV) should be taken into consideration. An appropriate system should be constructed to provide opportunities of chromosomal microarray testing for patients who need this examination and to facilitate the use of results for medical practice.

  11. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  12. DNA Microarray Characterization of Pathogens Associated with Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Wang, Suwei; Tian, Zhenyang; Hu, Pinliang; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    This study established a multiplex PCR-based microarray to detect simultaneously a diverse panel of 17 sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)-associated pathogens including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, and Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 54 and 58. The target genes are 16S rRNA gene for N. gonorrhoeae, M. genitalium, M. hominism, and Ureaplasma, the major outer membrane protein gene (ompA) for C. trachomatis, the glycoprotein B gene (gB) for HSV; and the L1 gene for HPV. A total of 34 probes were selected for the microarray including 31 specific probes, one as positive control, one as negative control, and one as positional control probe for printing reference. The microarray is specific as the commensal and pathogenic microbes (and closely related organisms) in the genitourinary tract did not cross-react with the microarray probes. The microarray is 10 times more sensitive than that of the multiplex PCR. Among the 158 suspected HPV specimens examined, the microarray showed that 49 samples contained HPV, 21 samples contained Ureaplasma, 15 contained M. hominis, four contained C. trachomatis, and one contained N. gonorrhoeae. This work reports the development of the first high through-put detection system that identifies common pathogens associated with STDs from clinical samples, and paves the way for establishing a time-saving, accurate and high-throughput diagnostic tool for STDs.

  13. A brief introduction to tiling microarrays: principles, concepts, and applications.

    PubMed

    Lemetre, Christophe; Zhang, Zhengdong D

    2013-01-01

    Technological achievements have always contributed to the advancement of biomedical research. It has never been more so than in recent times, when the development and application of innovative cutting-edge technologies have transformed biology into a data-rich quantitative science. This stunning revolution in biology primarily ensued from the emergence of microarrays over two decades ago. The completion of whole-genome sequencing projects and the advance in microarray manufacturing technologies enabled the development of tiling microarrays, which gave unprecedented genomic coverage. Since their first description, several types of application of tiling arrays have emerged, each aiming to tackle a different biological problem. Although numerous algorithms have already been developed to analyze microarray data, new method development is still needed not only for better performance but also for integration of available microarray data sets, which without doubt constitute one of the largest collections of biological data ever generated. In this chapter we first introduce the principles behind the emergence and the development of tiling microarrays, and then discuss with some examples how they are used to investigate different biological problems.

  14. Novel 3-Dimensional Dendrimer Platform for Glycolipid Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Xichun

    2011-01-01

    Glycolipids are important biological molecules that modulate cellular recognitions and pathogen adhesions. In this paper, we report a sensitive glycolipid microarray for non-covalently immobilizing glycolipids on a microarray substrate and we perform a set of immunoassays to explore glycolipid-protein interactions. This substrate utilizes a three-dimensional hydrazide-functionalized dendrimer monolayer attached onto a microscopic glass surface, which possesses the characteristics to adsorb glycoliplids non-covalently and facilitates multivalent attributes on the substrate surface. In the proof-of-concept experiments, gangliosides such as GM1, FucGM1, GM3, GD1b, GT1b, and GQ1b, and a lipoarabinomannan were tested on the substrate and interrogated with toxins and antibodies. The resulting glycolipid microarrays exhibited hypersensitivity and specificity for detection of glycolipid-protein interactions. In particular, a robust and specific binding of a pentameric cholera toxin B subunit to the GM1 glycolipid spotted on the array has demonstrated its superiority in sensitivity and specificity. In addition, this glycolipid microarray substrate was used to detect lipoarabinomannan in buffer within a limit-of-detection of 125 ng/mL. Furthermore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) Lipoarabinomannan was tested in human urine specimens on this platform, which can effectively identify urine samples either infected or not infected with Mtb. The results of this work suggest the possibility of using this glycolipid microarray platform to fabricate glycoconjugate microarrays, which includes free glycans and glycolipids and potential application in detection of pathogen and toxin. PMID:21820887

  15. Surface Enzyme Chemistries for Ultrasensitive Microarray Biosensing with SPR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Jennifer B; Corn, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity and selectivity of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensing with nucleic acid microarrays can be greatly enhanced by exploiting various nucleic acid ligases, nucleases, and polymerases that manipulate the surface-bound DNA and RNA. We describe here various examples from each of these different classes of surface enzyme chemistries that have been incorporated into novel detection strategies that either drastically enhance the sensitivity of or create uniquely selective methods for the SPRI biosensing of proteins and nucleic acids. A dual-element generator-detector microarray approach that couples a bioaffinity adsorption event on one microarray element to nanoparticle-enhanced SPRI measurements of nucleic acid hybridization adsorption on a different microarray element is used to quantitatively detect DNA, RNA, and proteins at femtomolar concentrations. Additionally, this dual-element format can be combined with the transcription and translation of RNA from surface-bound double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) templates for the on-chip multiplexed biosynthesis of aptamer and protein microarrays in a microfluidic format; these microarrays can be immediately used for real-time SPRI bioaffinity sensing measurements.

  16. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments.

  17. Microarray oligonucleotide probe designer (MOPeD): A web service

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Viren C; Mondal, Kajari; Shetty, Amol Carl; Horner, Vanessa L; Bedoyan, Jirair K; Martin, Donna; Caspary, Tamara; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Methods of genomic selection that combine high-density oligonucleotide microarrays with next-generation DNA sequencing allow investigators to characterize genomic variation in selected portions of complex eukaryotic genomes. Yet choosing which specific oligonucleotides to be use can pose a major technical challenge. To address this issue, we have developed a software package called MOPeD (Microarray Oligonucleotide Probe Designer), which automates the process of designing genomic selection microarrays. This web-based software allows individual investigators to design custom genomic selection microarrays optimized for synthesis with Roche NimbleGen’s maskless photolithography. Design parameters include uniqueness of the probe sequences, melting temperature, hairpin formation, and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms. We generated probe databases for the human, mouse, and rhesus macaque genomes and conducted experimental validation of MOPeD-designed microarrays in human samples by sequencing the human X chromosome exome, where relevant sequence metrics indicated superior performance relative to a microarray designed by the Roche NimbleGen proprietary algorithm. We also performed validation in the mouse to identify known mutations contained within a 487-kb region from mouse chromosome 16, the mouse chromosome 16 exome (1.7 Mb), and the mouse chromosome 12 exome (3.3 Mb). Our results suggest that the open source MOPeD software package and website (http://moped.genetics.emory.edu/) will make a valuable resource for investigators in their sequence-based studies of complex eukaryotic genomes. PMID:21379402

  18. A comparative analysis of DNA barcode microarray feature size

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Ron; Smith, Andrew M; Heisler, Lawrence E; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarrays are an invaluable tool in many modern genomic studies. It is generally perceived that decreasing the size of microarray features leads to arrays with higher resolution (due to greater feature density), but this increase in resolution can compromise sensitivity. Results We demonstrate that barcode microarrays with smaller features are equally capable of detecting variation in DNA barcode intensity when compared to larger feature sizes within a specific microarray platform. The barcodes used in this study are the well-characterized set derived from the Yeast KnockOut (YKO) collection used for screens of pooled yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) deletion mutants. We treated these pools with the glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin as a test compound. Three generations of barcode microarrays at 30, 8 and 5 μm features sizes independently identified the primary target of tunicamycin to be ALG7. Conclusion We show that the data obtained with 5 μm feature size is of comparable quality to the 30 μm size and propose that further shrinking of features could yield barcode microarrays with equal or greater resolving power and, more importantly, higher density. PMID:19825181

  19. Surface Enzyme Chemistries for Ultrasensitive Microarray Biosensing with SPR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Jennifer B; Corn, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity and selectivity of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensing with nucleic acid microarrays can be greatly enhanced by exploiting various nucleic acid ligases, nucleases, and polymerases that manipulate the surface-bound DNA and RNA. We describe here various examples from each of these different classes of surface enzyme chemistries that have been incorporated into novel detection strategies that either drastically enhance the sensitivity of or create uniquely selective methods for the SPRI biosensing of proteins and nucleic acids. A dual-element generator-detector microarray approach that couples a bioaffinity adsorption event on one microarray element to nanoparticle-enhanced SPRI measurements of nucleic acid hybridization adsorption on a different microarray element is used to quantitatively detect DNA, RNA, and proteins at femtomolar concentrations. Additionally, this dual-element format can be combined with the transcription and translation of RNA from surface-bound double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) templates for the on-chip multiplexed biosynthesis of aptamer and protein microarrays in a microfluidic format; these microarrays can be immediately used for real-time SPRI bioaffinity sensing measurements. PMID:25641598

  20. Characterization of an inexpensive, nontoxic, and highly sensitive microarray substrate.

    PubMed

    Dufva, Martin; Petronis, Sarunas; Jensen, Louise Bjerremann; Krag, Claudia; Christensen, Claus B V

    2004-08-01

    An agarose film has been proposed as an efficient substrate for producing microarrays. The original film preparation procedure was simplified significantly by grafting the agarose layer directly onto unmodified microscope glass slides instead of aminated glass slides, and the blocking procedure was replaced with a wash in 0.1x standard saline citrate (SSC) and 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) without decreasing the performance of the produced microarrays. Characterization of the grafted agarose film using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the agarose film had a 10-fold increase in surface roughness compared to glass and that the interior of the agarose film was porous, with pore sizes between 100-500 nm. A comparison of hybridization on aldehyde-activated agarose-coated microarray slides and commercial amino-reactive microarray slides showed that aldehyde-activated agarose-coated slides had the highest signal-to-noise ratio of 850, suggesting that the aldehyde-activated agarose microarray slides are suitable in applications where analytes have a wide concentration range. By immobilizing the DNA probes using ultraviolet (UV) light, the signal-to-noise ratio was further increased to 3000 on the agarose microarray slides. The specificity of the UV cross-linked DNA probes was demonstrated using 21 and 25 bp long capture probes, enabling discrimination of target molecules differing in only one base.

  1. DNA microarray technology for target identification and validation.

    PubMed

    Jayapal, Manikandan; Melendez, Alirio J

    2006-01-01

    1. Microarrays, a recent development, provide a revolutionary platform to analyse thousands of genes at once. They have enormous potential in the study of biological processes in health and disease and, perhaps, microarrays have become crucial tools in diagnostic applications and drug discovery. 2. Microarray based studies have provided the essential impetus for biomedical experiments, such as identification of disease-causing genes in malignancies and regulatory genes in the cell cycle mechanism. Microarrays can identify genes for new and unique potential drug targets, predict drug responsiveness for individual patients and, finally, initiate gene therapy and prevention strategies. 3. The present article reviews the principles and technological concerns, as well as the steps involved in obtaining and analysing of data. Furthermore, applications of microarray based experiments in drug target identifications and validation strategies are discussed. 4. To exemplify how this tool can be useful, in the present review we provide an overview of some of the past and potential future aspects of microarray technology and present a broad overview of this rapidly growing field.

  2. Rabbit muscle creatine phosphokinase. CDNA cloning, primary structure and detection of human homologues.

    PubMed

    Putney, S; Herlihy, W; Royal, N; Pang, H; Aposhian, H V; Pickering, L; Belagaje, R; Biemann, K; Page, D; Kuby, S

    1984-12-10

    A cDNA library was constructed from rabbit muscle poly(A) RNA. Limited amino acid sequence information was obtained on rabbit muscle creatine phosphokinase and this was the basis for design and synthesis of two oligonucleotide probes complementary to a creatine kinase cDNA sequence which encodes a pentapeptide. Colony hybridizations with the probes and subsequent steps led to isolation of two clones, whose cDNA segments partially overlap and which together encode the entire protein. The primary structure was established from the sequence of two cDNA clones and from independently determined sequences of scattered portions of the polypeptide. The reactive cysteine has been located to position 282 within the 380 amino acid polypeptide. The rabbit cDNA hybridizes to digests of human chromosomal DNA. This reveals a restriction fragment length polymorphism associated with the human homologue(s) which hybridizes to the rabbit cDNA.

  3. Tilapia growth hormone: molecular cloning of cDNA and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rentier-Delrue, F; Swennen, D; Philippart, J C; L'Hoir, C; Lion, M; Benrubi, O; Martial, J A

    1989-05-01

    A cDNA library was prepared from poly(A)+RNA extracted from tilapia Oreochromis niloticus anterior pituitaries. The recombinant clones carrying the cDNA sequence of tilapia growth hormone (tiGH) were selected using a fragment of the trout growth hormone (tGH) cDNA as hybridization probe. The nucleotide sequence of the full-length tiGH cDNA was determined. This cDNA encodes a protein of 204 amino acids, including the putative signal peptide of 17 amino acids. Mature tiGH cDNA was inserted in an Escherichia coli expression vector which led to the production of tiGH protein with a yield estimated to be 20% of the total bacterial proteins. PMID:2670496

  4. Microintaglio Printing of In situ Synthesized Proteins Enables Rapid Printing of High-Density Protein Microarrays Directly from DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biyani, Manish; Moriyasu, Junpei; Tanaka, Yoko; Sato, Shusuke; Ueno, Shingo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2013-08-01

    A simple and versatile approach to the simultaneous on-chip synthesis and printing of proteins has been studied for high-density protein microarray applications. The method used is based on the principle of intaglio printing using microengraved plates. Unlike conventional approaches that require multistep reactions for synthesizing proteins off the chip followed by printing using a robotic spotter, our approach demonstrates the following: (i) parallel and spotter-free printing of high-density protein microarrays directly from a type of DNA microarray and (ii) microcompartmentalization of cell-free coupled transcription/translation reaction and direct transferring of picoliter protein solution per spot to pattern microarrays of 25-100 µm features.

  5. Functional microarray analysis of differentially expressed genes in granulosa cells from women with polycystic ovary syndrome related to MAPK/ERK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chen-Wei; Chen, Mei-Jou; Tai, Kang-Yu; Yu, Danny CW; Yang, Yu-Chieh; Jan, Pey-Shynan; Yang, Yu-Shih; Chen, Hsin-Fu; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age. Although its aetiology and pathogenesis remain unclear, recent studies suggest that the dysfunction of granulosa cells may partly be responsible. This study aimed to use cDNA microarray technology to compare granulosa cell gene expression profiles in women with and without PCOS to identify genes that may be aetiologically implicated in the pathogenesis of PCOS. The study cohort included 12 women undergoing in vitro fertilization, six with PCOS and six without PCOS. Differential gene expression profiles were classified by post-analyses of microarray data, followed by western blot analyses to confirm the microarray data of selected genes. In total, 243 genes were differentially expressed (125 upregulated and 118 downregulated) between the PCOS and non-PCOS granulosa cells. These genes are involved in reproductive system development, amino acid metabolism and cellular development and proliferation. Comparative analysis revealed genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathways. Western blot analyses confirmed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 4 and phospho-ERK1/2 were decreased in PCOS granulosa cells. This study identified candidate genes involved in MAPK/ERK signaling pathways that may influence the function of granulosa cells in PCOS. PMID:26459919

  6. Microarray analysis of microRNA expression in mouse fetus at 13.5 and 14.5 days post-coitum in ear and back skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Torres, Leda; Juárez, Ulises; García, Laura; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Frias, Sara

    2016-09-01

    There is no information regarding the role of microRNAs in the development of the external ear in mammals. The purpose of this study was to determine the stage-specific expression of microRNA during external ear development in mice under normal conditions. GeneChip miRNA 3.0 arrays by Affymetrix were used to obtain miRNA expression profiles from mice fetal pinnae and back skin tissues at 13.5 days-post-coitum (dpc) and 14.5 dpc. Biological triplicates for each tissue were analyzed; one litter represents one biological replica, each litter had 16 fetuses on average. The results were analyzed with Affymetrix's Transcriptome Analysis Console software to identify differentially expressed miRNAs. The inquiry showed significant differential expression of 25 miRNAs at 13.5 dpc and 31 at 14.5 dpc, some of these miRNAs were predicted to target genes implicated in external ear development. One example is mmu-miR-10a whose low expression in pinnae is known to impact ear development by modulating Hoxa1 mRNA levels Garzon et al. (2006), Gavalas et al. (1998) [1], [2]. Other findings like the upregulation of mmu-miR-200c and mmu-miR-205 in the pinnae tissues of healthy mice are in agreement with what has been reported in human patients with microtia, in which down regulation of both miRNAs has been found Li et al. (2013) [3]. This study uncovered a spatiotemporal pattern of miRNA expression in the external ear, which results from continuous transcriptional changes during normal development of body structures. All microarray data are available at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at NCBI under accession number GSE64945. PMID:27408816

  7. Microarray analysis of microRNA expression in mouse fetus at 13.5 and 14.5 days post-coitum in ear and back skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Torres, Leda; Juárez, Ulises; García, Laura; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Frias, Sara

    2016-09-01

    There is no information regarding the role of microRNAs in the development of the external ear in mammals. The purpose of this study was to determine the stage-specific expression of microRNA during external ear development in mice under normal conditions. GeneChip miRNA 3.0 arrays by Affymetrix were used to obtain miRNA expression profiles from mice fetal pinnae and back skin tissues at 13.5 days-post-coitum (dpc) and 14.5 dpc. Biological triplicates for each tissue were analyzed; one litter represents one biological replica, each litter had 16 fetuses on average. The results were analyzed with Affymetrix's Transcriptome Analysis Console software to identify differentially expressed miRNAs. The inquiry showed significant differential expression of 25 miRNAs at 13.5 dpc and 31 at 14.5 dpc, some of these miRNAs were predicted to target genes implicated in external ear development. One example is mmu-miR-10a whose low expression in pinnae is known to impact ear development by modulating Hoxa1 mRNA levels Garzon et al. (2006), Gavalas et al. (1998) [1], [2]. Other findings like the upregulation of mmu-miR-200c and mmu-miR-205 in the pinnae tissues of healthy mice are in agreement with what has been reported in human patients with microtia, in which down regulation of both miRNAs has been found Li et al. (2013) [3]. This study uncovered a spatiotemporal pattern of miRNA expression in the external ear, which results from continuous transcriptional changes during normal development of body structures. All microarray data are available at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at NCBI under accession number GSE64945.

  8. An Automatic and Power Spectra-based Rotate Correcting Algorithm for Microarray Image.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ning; Duan, Huilong

    2005-01-01

    Microarray image analysis, an important aspect of microarray technology, faces vast amount of data processing. At present, the speed of microarray image analysis is quite limited by excessive manual intervention. The geometric structure of microarray determines that, while being analyzed, microarray image should be collimated in the scanning vertical orientation. If rotation or tilt happens in microarray image, the analysis result may be incorrect. Although some automatic image analysis algorithms are used for microarray, still few methods are reported to calibrate the microarray image rotation problem. In this paper, an automatic rotate correcting algorithm is presented which aims at the deflective problem of microarray image. This method is based on image power spectra. Examined by hundreds of samples of clinical data, the algorithm is proved to achieve high precision. As a result, adopting this algorithm, the overall procedure automation in microarray image analysis can be realized.

  9. Estimating Gene Signals From Noisy Microarray Images

    PubMed Central

    Sarder, Pinaki; Davis, Paul H.; Stanley, Samuel L.

    2016-01-01

    In oligonucleotide microarray experiments, noise is a challenging problem, as biologists now are studying their organisms not in isolation but in the context of a natural environment. In low photomultiplier tube (PMT) voltage images, weak gene signals and their interactions with the background fluorescence noise are most problematic. In addition, nonspecific sequences bind to array spots intermittently causing inaccurate measurements. Conventional techniques cannot precisely separate the foreground and the background signals. In this paper, we propose analytically based estimation technique. We assume a priori spot-shape information using a circular outer periphery with an elliptical center hole. We assume Gaussian statistics for modeling both the foreground and background signals. The mean of the foreground signal quantifies the weak gene signal corresponding to the spot, and the variance gives the measure of the undesired binding that causes fluctuation in the measurement. We propose a foreground-signal and shape-estimation algorithm using the Gibbs sampling method. We compare our developed algorithm with the existing Mann–Whitney (MW)- and expectation maximization (EM)/iterated conditional modes (ICM)-based methods. Our method outperforms the existing methods with considerably smaller mean-square error (MSE) for all signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in computer-generated images and gives better qualitative results in low-SNR real-data images. Our method is computationally relatively slow because of its inherent sampling operation and hence only applicable to very noisy-spot images. In a realistic example using our method, we show that the gene-signal fluctuations on the estimated foreground are better observed for the input noisy images with relatively higher undesired bindings. PMID:18556262

  10. Photopatterning of Hydrogel Microarrays in Closed Microchips.

    PubMed

    Gumuscu, Burcu; Bomer, Johan G; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2015-12-14

    To date, optical lithography has been extensively used for in situ patterning of hydrogel structures in a scale range from hundreds of microns to a few millimeters. The two main limitations which prevent smaller feature sizes of hydrogel structures are (1) the upper glass layer of a microchip maintains a large spacing (typically 525 μm) between the photomask and hydrogel precursor, leading to diffraction of UV light at the edges of mask patterns, (2) diffusion of free radicals and monomers results in irregular polymerization near the illumination interface. In this work, we present a simple approach to enable the use of optical lithography to fabricate hydrogel arrays with a minimum feature size of 4 μm inside closed microchips. To achieve this, we combined two different techniques. First, the upper glass layer of the microchip was thinned by mechanical polishing to reduce the spacing between the photomask and hydrogel precursor, and thereby the diffraction of UV light at the edges of mask patterns. The polishing process reduces the upper layer thickness from ∼525 to ∼100 μm, and the mean surface roughness from 20 to 3 nm. Second, we developed an intermittent illumination technique consisting of short illumination periods followed by relatively longer dark periods, which decrease the diffusion of monomers. Combination of these two methods allows for fabrication of 0.4 × 10(6) sub-10 μm sized hydrogel patterns over large areas (cm(2)) with high reproducibility (∼98.5% patterning success). The patterning method is tested with two different types of photopolymerizing hydrogels: polyacrylamide and polyethylene glycol diacrylate. This method enables in situ fabrication of well-defined hydrogel patterns and presents a simple approach to fabricate 3-D hydrogel matrices for biomolecule separation, biosensing, tissue engineering, and immobilized protein microarray applications.

  11. Photopatterning of Hydrogel Microarrays in Closed Microchips.

    PubMed

    Gumuscu, Burcu; Bomer, Johan G; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2015-12-14

    To date, optical lithography has been extensively used for in situ patterning of hydrogel structures in a scale range from hundreds of microns to a few millimeters. The two main limitations which prevent smaller feature sizes of hydrogel structures are (1) the upper glass layer of a microchip maintains a large spacing (typically 525 μm) between the photomask and hydrogel precursor, leading to diffraction of UV light at the edges of mask patterns, (2) diffusion of free radicals and monomers results in irregular polymerization near the illumination interface. In this work, we present a simple approach to enable the use of optical lithography to fabricate hydrogel arrays with a minimum feature size of 4 μm inside closed microchips. To achieve this, we combined two different techniques. First, the upper glass layer of the microchip was thinned by mechanical polishing to reduce the spacing between the photomask and hydrogel precursor, and thereby the diffraction of UV light at the edges of mask patterns. The polishing process reduces the upper layer thickness from ∼525 to ∼100 μm, and the mean surface roughness from 20 to 3 nm. Second, we developed an intermittent illumination technique consisting of short illumination periods followed by relatively longer dark periods, which decrease the diffusion of monomers. Combination of these two methods allows for fabrication of 0.4 × 10(6) sub-10 μm sized hydrogel patterns over large areas (cm(2)) with high reproducibility (∼98.5% patterning success). The patterning method is tested with two different types of photopolymerizing hydrogels: polyacrylamide and polyethylene glycol diacrylate. This method enables in situ fabrication of well-defined hydrogel patterns and presents a simple approach to fabricate 3-D hydrogel matrices for biomolecule separation, biosensing, tissue engineering, and immobilized protein microarray applications. PMID:26558488

  12. DNA microarray application in ecotoxicology: experimental design, microarray scanning, and factors affecting transcriptional profiles in a small fish species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Lin; Biales, Adam; Bencic, David; Lattier, David; Kostich, Mitch; Villeneuve, Dan; Ankley, Gerald T; Lazorchak, Jim; Toth, Greg

    2008-03-01

    The research presented here is part of a larger study of the molecular mode of action of endocrine-disrupting chemicals targeting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in zebrafish (Danio rerio). It addresses several issues critical to microarray application in aquatic ecotoxicology: experimental design, microarray scanning, gene expression intensity distribution, and the effect of experimental parameters on the zebrafish transcriptome. Expression profiles from various tissues of individual zebrafish exposed to 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (30 ng/L), fadrozole (25 micro.g/L), or 17beta-trenbolone (3.0 microg/L) for 48 or 96 h were examined with the Agilent Oligo Microarray (G2518A). As a flexible and efficient alternative to the designs commonly used in microarray studies, an unbalanced incomplete block design was found to be well suited for this work, as evidenced by high data reproducibility, low microarray-to-microarray variability, and little gene-specific dye bias. Random scanner noise had little effect on data reproducibility. A low-level, slightly variable Cyanine 3 (Cy3) contaminant was revealed by hyperspectral imaging, suggesting fluorescence contamination as a potential contributor to the large variance associated with weakly expressed genes. Expression intensities of zebrafish genes were skewed toward the lower end of their distribution range, and more weakly expressed genes tended to have larger variances. Tissue type, followed in descending order by gender, chemical treatment, and exposure duration, had the greatest effect on the overall gene expression profiles, a finding potentially critical to experimental design optimization. Overall, congruence was excellent between quantitative polymerase chain reaction results and microarray profiles of 13 genes examined across a subset of 20 pairs of ovarian samples. These findings will help to improve applications of microarrays in future ecotoxicological studies.

  13. c-DNA vaccination against parasitic infections: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Kofta, W; Wedrychowicz, H

    2001-09-12

    Recently developed technology for DNA vaccination appears to offer the good prospect for the development of a multivalent vaccines that will effectively activate both the humoral and cell mediated mechanisms of the immune system. Currently, DNA vaccination against such important parasitic diseases like malaria, leishmaniosis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, schistosomosis, fasciolosis offers several new opportunities. However, the outcome of vaccination depends very much on vaccine formulations, dose and route of vaccine delivery, and the species and even strain of the vaccinated host. To overcome these problems much research is still needed, specifically focused on cloning and testing of new c-DNA sequences in the following: genome projects: different ways of delivery: design of vectors containing appropriate immunostimulatory sequences and very detailed studies on safety. PMID:11522401

  14. Isolation and characterization of a chicken tyrosinase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Mochii, M; Iio, A; Yamamoto, H; Takeuchi, T; Eguchi, G

    1992-10-01

    Complementary DNA clones coding for chicken tyrosinase were isolated from retinal pigmented epithelium of chicken embryo. Sequence analysis shows that one of the cDNA clones consisting of 1,997 nucleotides has an open reading frame coding for 529 amino acids. The deduced protein has nine N-glycosylation sites and a transmembrane region. A sequence comparison of the deduced chicken tyrosinase with the mouse and human homologues revealed that amino acid sequences are conserved for the entire polypeptides. Seventy-two percent and 73% of amino acids in the chicken sequence are identical to that of the mouse and human tyrosinases, respectively. Histidines neighboring the postulated copper-binding sites and the cysteines are well conserved. RNA blotting analysis showed that a major transcript of 2.5 kb is detected in retinal pigmented epithelium of a 9-day-old chicken embryo.

  15. Lysosomal {beta}-mannosidase: cDNA cloning and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Leipprandt, J.R.; Traviss, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Lysosomal {beta}-mannosidase is an exoglycosidase that cleaves the single {beta}-linked mannose residue from the non-reducing end of all N-linked glycoprotein oligosaccharides. Deficiency of this enzyme results in {beta}-mannosidosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease in goats and cattle. The human cases described have a milder, highly variable presentation. Study of the molecular pathology of this disease in ruminants and humans and development of the animal model for gene therapy studies required cloning of the gene for {beta}-mannosidase has been cloned. {beta}-Mannosidase cDNA were obtained from a bovine thyroid cDNA library by screening with mixed oligonucleotides derived from peptide sequences resulting from microsequencing of bovine {beta}-mannosidase peptides. A total of six independent positive clones were identified from 5 x 10{sup 5} plaques, covering about 80% of the C-terminal region. The missing 5{prime} region was obtained using 5{prime} RACE. The full-length construct contains 3852-bp nucleotides, encoding 879 amino acids. The initiation codon is followed by 17 amino acids containing the characteristics of a typical signal peptide sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence is colinear with all peptide sequences determined by protein microsequencing. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 4.2 kb single transcript in various tissues from both normal and affected goats and calves. The mRNA level was decreased in affected {beta}-mannosidosis animals. The gene encoding {beta}-mannosidase was localized on human chromosome 4 by Southern analysis of rodent/human somatic cell hybrids. The mutation in bovine {beta}-mannosidosis has been identified. This is the first report of cloning of the {beta}-mannosidase gene.

  16. Protein microarray: sensitive and effective immunodetection for drug residues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Veterinary drugs such as clenbuterol (CL) and sulfamethazine (SM2) are low molecular weight (<1000 Da) compounds, or haptens, that are diffi