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Sample records for affymetrix gene chips

  1. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  2. Gene Expression Analysis of Cultured Rat-Endothelial Cells after Nd:YAG Laser Irradiation by Affymetrix GeneChip Array

    PubMed Central

    MASUDA, YOSHIKO; YOKOSE, SATOSHI; SAKAGAMI, HIROSHI

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial cells and dental pulp cells enhance osteo-/odontogenic and angiogenic differentiation. In our previous study, rat pulp cells migrated to Nd:YAG laser-irradiated endothelial cells in an insert cell culture system. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible changes in the gene expression of cultured rat aortic endothelial cells after Nd:YAG laser irradiation using affymetrix GeneChip Array. Total RNA was extracted from the cells at 5 h after laser irradiation. Gene expressions were evaluated by DNA array chip. Up-regulated genes were related to cell migration and cell structure (membrane stretch, actin regulation and junctional complexes), neurotransmission and inflammation. Heat-shock 70 kDa protein (Hsp70) was related to the development of tooth germ. This study offers candidate genes for understanding the relationship between the laser-stimulated endothelial cells and dental pulp cells. PMID:28064220

  3. Comparative transcriptomic profiling of Vitis vinifera under high light using a custom-made array and the Affymetrix GeneChip.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luísa C; Vilela, Belmiro J; Mullineaux, Phil M; Amâncio, Sara

    2011-11-01

    Understanding abiotic stress responses is one of the most important issues in plant research nowadays. Abiotic stress, including excess light, can promote the onset of oxidative stress through the accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Oxidative stress also arises when in vitro propagated plants are exposed to high light upon transfer to ex vitro. To determine whether the underlying pathways activated at the transfer of in vitro grapevine to ex vitro conditions reflect the processes occurring upon light stress, we used Vitis vinifera Affymetrix GeneChip (VvGA) and a custom array of genes responsive to light stress (LSCA) detected by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). When gene-expression profiles were compared, 'protein metabolism and modification', 'signaling', and 'anti-oxidative' genes were more represented in LSCA, while, in VvGA, 'cell wall metabolism' and 'secondary metabolism' were the categories in which gene expression varied more significantly. The above functional categories confirm previous studies involving other types of abiotic stresses, enhancing the common attributes of abiotic stress defense pathways. The LSCA analysis of our experimental system detected strong response of heat shock genes, particularly the protein rescuing mechanism involving the cooperation of two ATP-dependent chaperone systems, Hsp100 and Hsp70, which showed an unusually late response during the recovery period, of extreme relevance to remove non-functional, potentially harmful polypeptides arising from misfolding, denaturation, or aggregation brought about by stress. The success of LSCA also proves the feasibility of a custom-made qRT-PCR approach, particularly for species for which no GeneChip is available and for researchers dealing with a specific and focused problem.

  4. BEAT: Bioinformatics Exon Array Tool to store, analyze and visualize Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon Array data from disease experiments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is known from recent studies that more than 90% of human multi-exon genes are subject to Alternative Splicing (AS), a key molecular mechanism in which multiple transcripts may be generated from a single gene. It is widely recognized that a breakdown in AS mechanisms plays an important role in cellular differentiation and pathologies. Polymerase Chain Reactions, microarrays and sequencing technologies have been applied to the study of transcript diversity arising from alternative expression. Last generation Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays offer a more detailed view of the gene expression profile providing information on the AS patterns. The exon array technology, with more than five million data points, can detect approximately one million exons, and it allows performing analyses at both gene and exon level. In this paper we describe BEAT, an integrated user-friendly bioinformatics framework to store, analyze and visualize exon arrays datasets. It combines a data warehouse approach with some rigorous statistical methods for assessing the AS of genes involved in diseases. Meta statistics are proposed as a novel approach to explore the analysis results. BEAT is available at http://beat.ba.itb.cnr.it. Results BEAT is a web tool which allows uploading and analyzing exon array datasets using standard statistical methods and an easy-to-use graphical web front-end. BEAT has been tested on a dataset with 173 samples and tuned using new datasets of exon array experiments from 28 colorectal cancer and 26 renal cell cancer samples produced at the Medical Genetics Unit of IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza. To highlight all possible AS events, alternative names, accession Ids, Gene Ontology terms and biochemical pathways annotations are integrated with exon and gene level expression plots. The user can customize the results choosing custom thresholds for the statistical parameters and exploiting the available clinical data of the samples for a

  5. Qualitative assessment of gene expression in affymetrix genechip arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix Genechip microarrays are used widely to determine the simultaneous expression of genes in a given biological paradigm. Probes on the Genechip array are atomic entities which by definition are randomly distributed across the array and in turn govern the gene expression. In the present study, we make several interesting observations. We show that there is considerable correlation between the probe intensities across the array which defy the independence assumption. While the mechanism behind such correlations is unclear, we show that scaling behavior and the profiles of perfect match (PM) as well as mismatch (MM) probes are similar and immune-to-background subtraction. We believe that the observed correlations are possibly an outcome of inherent non-stationarities or patchiness in the array devoid of biological significance. This is demonstrated by inspecting their scaling behavior and profiles of the PM and MM probe intensities obtained from publicly available Genechip arrays from three eukaryotic genomes, namely: Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), Homo sapiens (humans) and Mus musculus (house mouse) across distinct biological paradigms and across laboratories, with and without background subtraction. The fluctuation functions were estimated using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) with fourth-order polynomial detrending. The results presented in this study provide new insights into correlation signatures of PM and MM probe intensities and suggests the choice of DFA as a tool for qualitative assessment of Affymetrix Genechip microarrays prior to their analysis. A more detailed investigation is necessary in order to understand the source of these correlations.

  6. Affymetrix Whole-Transcript Human Gene 1.0 ST array is highly concordant with standard 3' expression arrays.

    PubMed

    Pradervand, Sylvain; Paillusson, Alexandra; Thomas, Jérôme; Weber, Johann; Wirapati, Pratyaksha; Hagenbüchle, Otto; Harshman, Keith

    2008-05-01

    The recently released Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array has two major differences compared with standard 3' based arrays: (i) it interrogates the entire mRNA transcript, and (ii) it uses DNA targets. To assess the impact of these differences on array performance, we performed a series of comparative hybridizations between the Human Gene 1.0 ST and the Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 and the Illumina HumanRef-8 BeadChip arrays. Additionally, both RNA and DNA targets were hybridized on HG-U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. The results show that the overall reproducibility of the Gene 1.0 ST array is best. When looking only at the high intensity probes, the reproducibility of the Gene 1.0 ST array and the Illumina BeadChip array is equally good. Concordance of array results was assessed using different inter-platform mappings. Agreements are best between the two labeling protocols using HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array. The Gene 1.0 ST array is most concordant with the HG-U133 array hybridized with cDNA targets. This may reflect the impact of the target type. Overall, the high degree of correspondence provides strong evidence for the reliability of the Gene 1.0 ST array.

  7. Improvements to previous algorithms to predict gene structure and isoform concentrations using Affymetrix Exon arrays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Exon arrays provide a way to measure the expression of different isoforms of genes in an organism. Most of the procedures to deal with these arrays are focused on gene expression or on exon expression. Although the only biological analytes that can be properly assigned a concentration are transcripts, there are very few algorithms that focus on them. The reason is that previously developed summarization methods do not work well if applied to transcripts. In addition, gene structure prediction, i.e., the correspondence between probes and novel isoforms, is a field which is still unexplored. Results We have modified and adapted a previous algorithm to take advantage of the special characteristics of the Affymetrix exon arrays. The structure and concentration of transcripts -some of them possibly unknown- in microarray experiments were predicted using this algorithm. Simulations showed that the suggested modifications improved both specificity (SP) and sensitivity (ST) of the predictions. The algorithm was also applied to different real datasets showing its effectiveness and the concordance with PCR validated results. Conclusions The proposed algorithm shows a substantial improvement in the performance over the previous version. This improvement is mainly due to the exploitation of the redundancy of the Affymetrix exon arrays. An R-Package of SPACE with the updated algorithms have been developed and is freely available. PMID:21110835

  8. CEL_INTERROGATOR: A FREE AND OPEN SOURCE PACKAGE FOR AFFYMETRIX CEL FILE PARSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CEL_Interrogator Package is a suite of programs designed to extract the average probe intensity and other information for each probe sequence from an Affymetrix GeneChip CEL file and unite them with their human-readable Affymetrix consensus sequence names. The resulting text file is suitable for di...

  9. A sequence-based identification of the genes detected by probesets on the Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 array.

    PubMed

    Harbig, Jeremy; Sprinkle, Robert; Enkemann, Steven A

    2005-02-18

    One of the biggest problems facing microarray experiments is the difficulty of translating results into other microarray formats or comparing microarray results to other biochemical methods. We believe that this is largely the result of poor gene identification. We re-identified the probesets on the Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 GeneChip array. This identification was based on the sequence of the probes and the sequence of the human genome. Using the BLAST program, we matched probes with documented and postulated human transcripts. This resulted in the redefinition of approximately 37% of the probes on the U133 plus 2.0 array. This updated identification specifically points out where the identification is complicated by cross-hybridization from splice variants or closely related genes. More than 5000 probesets detect multiple transcripts and therefore the exact protein affected cannot be readily concluded from the performance of one probeset alone. This makes naming difficult and impacts any downstream analysis such as associating gene ontologies, mapping affected pathways or simply validating expression changes. We have now automated the sequence-based identification and can more appropriately annotate any array where the sequence on each spot is known.

  10. Discovery and mapping of single feature polymorphisms in wheat using affymetrix arrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single feature polymorphisms (SFPs) can be a rich source of markers for gene mapping and function studies. To explore the feasibility of using the Affymetrix GeneChip to discover and map SFPs in the large hexaploid wheat genome, six wheat varieties of diverse origins were analyzed for significant pr...

  11. Acquisition of biologically relevant gene expression data by Affymetrix microarray analysis of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumours

    PubMed Central

    Linton, K M; Hey, Y; Saunders, E; Jeziorska, M; Denton, J; Wilson, C L; Swindell, R; Dibben, S; Miller, C J; Pepper, S D; Radford, J A; Freemont, A J

    2008-01-01

    Robust protocols for microarray gene expression profiling of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET) are needed to facilitate research when availability of fresh-frozen tissue is limited. Recent reports attest to the feasibility of this approach, but the clinical value of these data is poorly understood. We employed state-of-the-art RNA extraction and Affymetrix microarray technology to examine 34 archival FFPET primary extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Nineteen arrays met stringent QC criteria and were used to model prognostic signatures for metastatic recurrence. Arrays from two paired frozen and FFPET samples were compared: although FFPET sensitivity was low (∼50%), high specificity (95%) and positive predictive value (92%) suggest that transcript detection is reliable. Good agreement between arrays and real time (RT)–PCR was confirmed, especially for abundant transcripts, and RT–PCR validated the regulation pattern for 19 of 24 candidate genes (overall R2=0.4662). RT–PCR and immunohistochemistry on independent cases validated prognostic significance for several genes including RECQL4, FRRS1, CFH and MET – whose combined expression carried greater prognostic value than tumour grade – and cmet and TRKB proteins. These molecules warrant further evaluation in larger series. Reliable clinically relevant data can be obtained from archival FFPET, but protocol amendments are needed to improve the sensitivity and broad application of this approach. PMID:18382428

  12. Acquisition of biologically relevant gene expression data by Affymetrix microarray analysis of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumours.

    PubMed

    Linton, K M; Hey, Y; Saunders, E; Jeziorska, M; Denton, J; Wilson, C L; Swindell, R; Dibben, S; Miller, C J; Pepper, S D; Radford, J A; Freemont, A J

    2008-04-22

    Robust protocols for microarray gene expression profiling of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET) are needed to facilitate research when availability of fresh-frozen tissue is limited. Recent reports attest to the feasibility of this approach, but the clinical value of these data is poorly understood. We employed state-of-the-art RNA extraction and Affymetrix microarray technology to examine 34 archival FFPET primary extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Nineteen arrays met stringent QC criteria and were used to model prognostic signatures for metastatic recurrence. Arrays from two paired frozen and FFPET samples were compared: although FFPET sensitivity was low ( approximately 50%), high specificity (95%) and positive predictive value (92%) suggest that transcript detection is reliable. Good agreement between arrays and real time (RT)-PCR was confirmed, especially for abundant transcripts, and RT-PCR validated the regulation pattern for 19 of 24 candidate genes (overall R(2)=0.4662). RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry on independent cases validated prognostic significance for several genes including RECQL4, FRRS1, CFH and MET - whose combined expression carried greater prognostic value than tumour grade - and cmet and TRKB proteins. These molecules warrant further evaluation in larger series. Reliable clinically relevant data can be obtained from archival FFPET, but protocol amendments are needed to improve the sensitivity and broad application of this approach.

  13. SFP Genotyping from Affymetrix Arrays is Robust but Largely Detects Cis-acting Expression Regulators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent development of Affymetrix chips designed from assembled EST sequences has spawned considerable interest in identifying single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) from transcriptome data. SFPs are valuable genetic markers that potentially offer a physical link to the structural genes themselves....

  14. High correspondence between Affymetrix exon and standard expression arrays.

    PubMed

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Hey, Yvonne; Pepper, Stuart D; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-02-01

    Exon arrays aim to provide comprehensive gene expression data at the level of individual exons, similar to that provided on a per-gene basis by existing expression arrays. This report describes the performance of Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST array by using replicated RNA samples from two human cell lines, MCF7 and MCF10A, hybridized both to Exon 1.0 ST and to HG-U133 Plus2 arrays. Cross-comparison between array types requires an appropriate mapping to be found between individual probe sets. Three possible mappings were considered, reflecting different strategies for dealing with probe sets that target different parts of the same transcript. Irrespective of the mapping used, Exon 1.0 ST and HG-U133 Plus2 arrays show a high degree of correspondence. More than 80% of HG-U133 Plus2 probe sets may be mapped to the Exon chip, and fold changes are found well preserved for over 96% of those probe sets detected present. Since HG-U133 Plus2 arrays have already been extensively validated, these results lend a significant degree of confidence to exon arrays.

  15. Gene Chips and Functional Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadeh, Hisham; Afshari, Cynthia

    2000-11-01

    These past few years of scientific discovery will undoubtedly be remembered as the "genomics era," the period in which biologists succeeded in enumerating the sequence of nucleotides making up all, or at least most, of human DNA. And while this achievement has been heralded as a technological feat equal to the moon landing, it is only the first of many advances in DNA technology. Scientists are now faced with the task of understanding the meaning of the DNA sequence. Specifically, they want to learn how the DNA code relates to protein function. An important tool in the study of "functional genomics," is the cDNA microarray—also known as the gene chip. Inspired by computer microchips, gene chips allow scientists to monitor the expression of hundreds, even thousands, of genes in a fraction of the time it used to take to monitor the expression of a single one. By altering the conditions under which a particular tissue expresses genes—say, by exposing it to toxins or growth factors—scientists can determine the suite of genes expressed in different situations and hence start to get a handle on the function of these genes. The authors discuss this important new technology and some of its practical applications.

  16. Mining gene-chip data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, Morten

    2005-03-01

    DNA microarray (``gene chip'') technology has enabled a rapid accumulation of gene-expression data for model organisms such as S. cerevisiae and C. elegans, as well as for H. sapiens, raising the issue of how best to extract information about the gene regulatory networks of these organisms from this data. While basic clustering algorithms have been successful at finding genes that are coregulated for a small, specific set of experimental conditions, these algorithms are less effective when applied to large, varied data sets. One of the major challenges in analyzing the data is the diversity in both size and signal strength of the various transcriptional modules, i.e. sets of coregulated genes along with the sets of conditions for which the genes are strongly coregulated. One method that has proven successful at identifying large and/or strong modules is the Iterative Signature Algorithm (ISA) [1]. A modified version of the ISA algorithm, the Progressive Iterative Signature Algorithm (PISA), is also able to identify smaller, weaker modules by sequentially eliminating transcriptional modules as they are identified. Applying these algorithms to a large set of yeast gene expression data illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. [1] Bergmann, S., Ihmels, J., and Barkai, N., Phys. Rev. E 67, 031902 (2002).

  17. [Detection of transgenic crop with gene chip].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Chun; Sun, Chun-Yun; Feng, Hong; Hu, Xiao-Dong; Yin, Hai-Bin

    2003-05-01

    Some selected available sequences of reporter genes,resistant genes, promoters and terminators are amplified by PCR for the probes of transgenic crop detection gene chip. These probes are arrayed at definite density and printed on the surface of amino-slides by bioRobot MicroGrid II. Results showed that gene chip worked quickly and correctly, when transgenic rice, pawpaw,maize and soybean were applied.

  18. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the μ-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in μ-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power

  19. Identifying the impact of G-quadruplexes on Affymetrix 3' arrays using cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Memon, Farhat N; Owen, Anne M; Sanchez-Graillet, Olivia; Upton, Graham J G; Harrison, Andrew P

    2010-01-15

    A tetramer quadruplex structure is formed by four parallel strands of DNA/ RNA containing runs of guanine. These quadruplexes are able to form because guanine can Hoogsteen hydrogen bond to other guanines, and a tetrad of guanines can form a stable arrangement. Recently we have discovered that probes on Affymetrix GeneChips that contain runs of guanine do not measure gene expression reliably. We associate this finding with the likelihood that quadruplexes are forming on the surface of GeneChips. In order to cope with the rapidly expanding size of GeneChip array datasets in the public domain, we are exploring the use of cloud computing to replicate our experiments on 3' arrays to look at the effect of the location of G-spots (runs of guanines). Cloud computing is a recently introduced high-performance solution that takes advantage of the computational infrastructure of large organisations such as Amazon and Google. We expect that cloud computing will become widely adopted because it enables bioinformaticians to avoid capital expenditure on expensive computing resources and to only pay a cloud computing provider for what is used. Moreover, as well as financial efficiency, cloud computing is an ecologically-friendly technology, it enables efficient data-sharing and we expect it to be faster for development purposes. Here we propose the advantageous use of cloud computing to perform a large data-mining analysis of public domain 3' arrays.

  20. Key genes and proteins involved in CTCM-reducing microvascular endothelial cell permeability induced by SLT-IIv using gene chips and DIGE.

    PubMed

    Yi, Pengfei; Guo, Yang; Wang, Xin; Mu, Xiang; Wei, Xubin

    2010-01-01

    An Affymetrix mouse genome array and differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) techniques were used to investigate the pharmacological mechanisms of a mixture of herbs, designated CTCM, a compound of traditional Chinese medicine, for the treatment of increased permeability in mouse intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (MIMECs) induced by the Shiga-like toxin type II variant (SLT-IIv). MIMECs were challenged with 10microg/ml SLT-IIv for 12h and then treated with CTCM at a concentration of 200microg/ml for 12h. Total RNA and proteins from each treatment group were extracted from cultured MIMECs for analysis by the Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Genome 430 2.0 microarray and DIGE. The results obtained demonstrated that there were one genes downregulated and one genes upregulated, one protein downregulated and four proteins upregulated in the SLT-IIv group compared to the control group. In the CTCM group, four genes were upregulated, three genes were downregulated, a single protein was downregulated and a single protein was upregulated when compared to the control group. When the CTCM-treated group was compared to the SLT-IIv group, expression of one gene was found to be increased, and all other genes were decreased, with five proteins downregulated. Analysis of the data suggested that CTCM specifically and effectively reduced microvascular endothelial cell permeability to SLT-IIv in the treatment of pig edema disease. In the CTCM-treated group, hspa9 expression was increased in both gene chip and DIGE analysis, so it may be a key protein in reducing cell permeability and utilized in medical treatments.

  1. Evolving DNA motifs to predict GeneChip probe performance

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, WB; Harrison, AP

    2009-01-01

    Background Affymetrix High Density Oligonuclotide Arrays (HDONA) simultaneously measure expression of thousands of genes using millions of probes. We use correlations between measurements for the same gene across 6685 human tissue samples from NCBI's GEO database to indicated the quality of individual HG-U133A probes. Low correlation indicates a poor probe. Results Regular expressions can be automatically created from a Backus-Naur form (BNF) context-free grammar using strongly typed genetic programming. Conclusion The automatically produced motif is better at predicting poor DNA sequences than an existing human generated RE, suggesting runs of Cytosine and Guanine and mixtures should all be avoided. PMID:19298675

  2. Gene Chips: A New Tool for Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botstein, David

    2005-03-01

    The knowledge of many complete genomic sequences has led to a ``grand unification of biology,'' consisting of direct evidence that most of the basic cellular functions of all organisms are carried out by genes and proteins whose primary sequences are directly related by descent (i.e. orthologs). Further, genome sequences have made it possible to study all the genes of a single organism simultaneously. We have been using DNA microarrays (sometime referred to as ``gene chips'') to study patterns of gene expression and genome rearrangement in yeast and human cells under a variety of conditions and in human tumors and normal tissues. These experiments produce huge volumes of data; new computational and statistical methods are required to analyze them properly. Examples from this work will be presented to illustrate how genome-scale experiments and analysis can result in new biological insights not obtainable by traditional analyses of genes and proteins one by one. For lymphomas, breast tumors, lung tumors, liver tumors, gastric tumors, brain tumors and soft tissue tumors we have been able, by the application of clustering algorithms, to subclassify tumors of similar anatomical origin on the basis of their gene expression patterns. These subclassifications appear to be reproducible and clinically as well as biologically meaningful. By studying synchronized cells growing in culture, we have identified many hundreds of yeast and human genes that are expressed periodically, at characteristically different points in the cell division cycle. In humans, it turns out that most of these genes are the same genes that comprise the ``proliferation cluster,'' i.e. the genes whose expression is specifically associated with the proliferativeness of tumors and tumor cell lines. Finally, we have been applying a variant of our DNA microarray technology (which we call ``array comparative hybridization'') to follow the DNA copy number of genes, both in tumors and in yeast cells

  3. Differential gene expression in anterior pituitary glands from anestrous and cycling postpartum beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oligionucleotide microarrays (GeneChip Bovine Genome Arrays, Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA) were used to evaluate gene expression profiles in anterior pituitary glands collected from 4 anestrous and 4 cycling postpartum primiparous beef cows to provide insight into genes associated with transitio...

  4. Methods comparison for high-resolution transcriptional analysis of archival material on Affymetrix Plus 2.0 and Exon 1.0 microarrays.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kim; Hey, Yvonne; Dibben, Sian; Miller, Crispin; Freemont, Anthony; Radford, John; Pepper, Stuart

    2009-07-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is a new and evolving technique. This report compares transcript detection rates on Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 and Human Exon 1.0 ST GeneChips across several RNA extraction and target labeling protocols, using routinely collected archival FFPE samples. All RNA extraction protocols tested (Ambion-Optimum, Ambion-RecoverAll, and Qiagen-RNeasy FFPE) provided extracts suitable for microarray hybridization. Compared with Affymetrix One-Cycle labeled extracts, NuGEN system protocols utilizing oligo(dT) and random hexamer primers, and cDNA target preparations instead of cRNA, achieved percent present rates up to 55% on Plus 2.0 arrays. Based on two paired-sample analyses, at 90% specificity this equalled an average 30 percentage-point increase (from 50% to 80%) in FFPE transcript sensitivity relative to fresh frozen tissues, which we have assumed to have 100% sensitivity and specificity. The high content of Exon arrays, with multiple probe sets per exon, improved FFPE sensitivity to 92% at 96% specificity, corresponding to an absolute increase of ~600 genes over Plus 2.0 arrays. While larger series are needed to confirm high correspondence between fresh-frozen and FFPE expression patterns, these data suggest that both Plus 2.0 and Exon arrays are suitable platforms for FFPE microarray expression analyses.

  5. Computational Integration of Structural and Functional Genomics Data Across Species to Develop Information on Porcine Inflammatory Gene Regulatory Pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative integration of structural and functional genomic data across species holds great promise in finding genes controlling disease resistance. We are investigating the porcine gut immune response to infection through gene expression profiling. We have collected porcine Affymetrix GeneChip da...

  6. A Microarray Analysis for Differential Gene Expression in the Soybean Genome Using Bioconductor and R

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes specific procedures for conducting quality assessment of Affymetrix GeneChip® soybean genome data and performing analyses to determine differential gene expression using the open-source R language and environment in conjunction with the open-source Bioconductor package. Procedu...

  7. Celsius: a community resource for Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Day, Allen; Carlson, Marc R J; Dong, Jun; O'Connor, Brian D; Nelson, Stanley F

    2007-01-01

    Celsius is a data warehousing system to aggregate Affymetrix CEL files and associated metadata. It provides mechanisms for importing, storing, querying, and exporting large volumes of primary and pre-processed microarray data. Celsius contains ten billion assay measurements and affiliated metadata. It is the largest publicly available source of Affymetrix microarray data, and through sheer volume it allows a sophisticated, broad view of transcription that has not previously been possible.

  8. GeneChip resequencing of the smallpox virus genome can identify novel strains: a biodefense application.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Tang, Kevin; Osborne, John; Sammons, Scott; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2007-02-01

    We developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips, based on the complete genome sequences of 24 strains of smallpox virus (variola virus), for rapid characterization of this human-pathogenic virus. Each GeneChip was designed to analyze a divergent segment of approximately 30,000 bases of the smallpox virus genome. This study includes the hybridization results of 14 smallpox virus strains. Of the 14 smallpox virus strains hybridized, only 7 had sequence information included in the design of the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips; similar information for the remaining strains was not tiled as a reference in these GeneChips. By use of variola virus-specific primers and long-range PCR, 22 overlapping amplicons were amplified to cover nearly the complete genome and hybridized with the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChip set. These GeneChips were successful in generating nucleotide sequences for all 14 of the smallpox virus strains hybridized. Analysis of the data indicated that the GeneChip resequencing by hybridization was fast and reproducible and that the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips could differentiate the 14 smallpox virus strains characterized. This study also suggests that high-density resequencing GeneChips have potential biodefense applications and may be used as an alternate tool for rapid identification of smallpox virus in the future.

  9. An annotation infrastructure for the analysis and interpretation of Affymetrix exon array data.

    PubMed

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Yates, Tim; Dibben, Siân; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays contain probesets intended to target every known and predicted exon in the entire genome, posing significant challenges for high-throughput genome-wide data analysis. X:MAP http://xmap.picr.man.ac.uk, an annotation database, and exonmap http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/2.0/bioc/html/exonmap.html, a BioConductor/R package, are designed to support fine-grained analysis of exon array data. The system supports the application of standard statistical techniques, prior to the use of genome scale annotation to provide gene-, transcript- and exon-level summaries and visualization tools.

  10. An annotation infrastructure for the analysis and interpretation of Affymetrix exon array data

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Yates, Tim; Dibben, Siân; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays contain probesets intended to target every known and predicted exon in the entire genome, posing significant challenges for high-throughput genome-wide data analysis. X:MAP , an annotation database, and exonmap , a BioConductor/R package, are designed to support fine-grained analysis of exon array data. The system supports the application of standard statistical techniques, prior to the use of genome scale annotation to provide gene-, transcript- and exon-level summaries and visualization tools. PMID:17498294

  11. Rapid nested-PCR for tyrosinase gene detection on chip.

    PubMed

    Sciancalepore, Anna Giovanna; Polini, Alessandro; Mele, Elisa; Girardo, Salvatore; Cingolani, Roberto; Pisignano, Dario

    2011-01-15

    The availability of non-invasive, fast and sensitive technologies for detection of circulating cancer cells is still a critical need of clinical oncology, particularly for diagnosis of aggressive and highly metastatic tumors, like malignant melanoma. Here we present the first nested polymerase chain reaction process carried out by a microfabricated, hybrid plastic-glass microfluidic chip on the tyrosinase gene, a predictive marker for melanoma diagnosis. The device is a hybrid system consisting of a glass microchannel embedded in an elastomeric matrix, and operating in flow-oscillating modality on a droplet of biological sample. The convection heat transfer and the temperature distribution inside the carrier fluid in the device are investigated. The oil responds to temperature changes with a characteristic time around 53 s, and exhibits three different thermal gradients along the capillary, with temperature variations below 4°C in correspondence of heater electrodes. The sample heating/cooling rates in the chip are as high as 16°C/s, allowing rapid processes. The nested polymerase chain reaction process is performed in less than 50 min, namely more than four times faster than in a standard thermocycler. The rapidity of the analysis method, combined with the simple and low-cost fabrication, reduced sample evaporation, and flexibility of the overall microfluidic platform, make it promising for the detection of events of tumor spreading.

  12. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform. PMID:21498550

  13. X:Map: annotation and visualization of genome structure for Affymetrix exon array analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Tim; Okoniewski, Michał J.; Miller, Crispin J.

    2008-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays aim to target every known and predicted exon in the human, mouse or rat genomes, and have reporters that extend beyond protein coding regions to other areas of the transcribed genome. This combination of increased coverage and precision is important because a substantial proportion of protein coding genes are predicted to be alternatively spliced, and because many non-coding genes are known also to be of biological significance. In order to fully exploit these arrays, it is necessary to associate each reporter on the array with the features of the genome it is targeting, and to relate these to gene and genome structure. X:Map is a genome annotation database that provides this information. Data can be browsed using a novel Google-maps based interface, and analysed and further visualized through an associated BioConductor package. The database can be found at http://xmap.picr.man.ac.uk. PMID:17932061

  14. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software.

    PubMed

    Lockstone, Helen E

    2011-11-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform.

  15. MAAMD: a workflow to standardize meta-analyses and comparison of affymetrix microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mandatory deposit of raw microarray data files for public access, prior to study publication, provides significant opportunities to conduct new bioinformatics analyses within and across multiple datasets. Analysis of raw microarray data files (e.g. Affymetrix CEL files) can be time consuming, complex, and requires fundamental computational and bioinformatics skills. The development of analytical workflows to automate these tasks simplifies the processing of, improves the efficiency of, and serves to standardize multiple and sequential analyses. Once installed, workflows facilitate the tedious steps required to run rapid intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. Results We developed a workflow to facilitate and standardize Meta-Analysis of Affymetrix Microarray Data analysis (MAAMD) in Kepler. Two freely available stand-alone software tools, R and AltAnalyze were embedded in MAAMD. The inputs of MAAMD are user-editable csv files, which contain sample information and parameters describing the locations of input files and required tools. MAAMD was tested by analyzing 4 different GEO datasets from mice and drosophila. MAAMD automates data downloading, data organization, data quality control assesment, differential gene expression analysis, clustering analysis, pathway visualization, gene-set enrichment analysis, and cross-species orthologous-gene comparisons. MAAMD was utilized to identify gene orthologues responding to hypoxia or hyperoxia in both mice and drosophila. The entire set of analyses for 4 datasets (34 total microarrays) finished in ~ one hour. Conclusions MAAMD saves time, minimizes the required computer skills, and offers a standardized procedure for users to analyze microarray datasets and make new intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. PMID:24621103

  16. Rawcopy: Improved copy number analysis with Affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhofer, Markus; Viklund, Björn; Isaksson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Microarray data is subject to noise and systematic variation that negatively affects the resolution of copy number analysis. We describe Rawcopy, an R package for processing of Affymetrix CytoScan HD, CytoScan 750k and SNP 6.0 microarray raw intensities (CEL files). Noise characteristics of a large number of reference samples are used to estimate log ratio and B-allele frequency for total and allele-specific copy number analysis. Rawcopy achieves better signal-to-noise ratio and higher proportion of validated alterations than commonly used free and proprietary alternatives. In addition, Rawcopy visualizes each microarray sample for assessment of technical quality, patient identity and genome-wide absolute copy number states. Software and instructions are available at http://rawcopy.org. PMID:27796336

  17. Smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips can also rapidly ascertain species status for some zoonotic non-variola orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Sammons, Scott A; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2008-04-01

    We recently developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips for the rapid sequencing of Variola virus strains in the WHO Repository of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this study, we attempted to hybridize these GeneChips with some known non-Variola orthopoxvirus isolates, including monkeypox, cowpox, and vaccinia viruses, for rapid detection.

  18. A Novel Self-Assembling DNA Nano Chip for Rapid Detection of Human Papillomavirus Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Li, Yanbo; Hong, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection of tumor-associated DNA such as Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has important clinical value for the early screening of tumors. By attaching oligonucleotides or cDNA onto the chip surface, DNA chip technology provides a rapid method to analyze gene expression. However, challenges remain regarding increasing probe density and improving detection time. To address these challenges, we proposed a DNA chip that was self-assembled from single stranded DNA in combination with high probe density and a rapid detection method. Over 200 probes could be attached to the surface of this 100-nm diameter DNA chip. For detection, the chips were adsorbed onto a mica surface and then incubated for ten minutes with HPV-DNA; the results were directly observable using atomic force microscopy (AFM). This bottom-up fabricated DNA nano chip combined with high probe density and direct AFM detection at the single molecule level will likely have numerous potential clinical applications for gene screening and the early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:27706184

  19. High-Throughput and Combinatorial Gene Expression on a Chip for Metabolism-Induced Toxicology Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok Joon; Lee, Dong Woo; Shah, Dhiral A.; Ku, Bosung; Jeon, Sang Youl; Solanki, Kusum; Ryan, Jessica D.; Clark, Douglas S.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2014-01-01

    Differential expression of various drug-metabolizing enzymes in the human liver may cause deviations of pharmacokinetic profiles, resulting in inter-individual variability of drug toxicity and/or efficacy. Here we present the “Transfected Enzyme and Metabolism Chip” (TeamChip), which predicts potential metabolism-induced drug or drug-candidate toxicity. The TeamChip is prepared by delivering genes into miniaturized three-dimensional cellular microarrays on a micropillar chip using recombinant adenoviruses in a complementary microwell chip. The device enables users to manipulate the expression of individual and multiple human metabolizing-enzyme genes (such as CYP3A4, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP1A2, CYP2E1, and UGT1A4) in THLE-2 cell microarrays. To identify specific enzymes involved in drug detoxification, we created 84 combinations of metabolic-gene expressions in a combinatorial fashion on a single microarray. Thus, the TeamChip platform can provide critical information necessary for evaluating metabolism-induced toxicity in a high-throughput manner. PMID:24799042

  20. Identification of CHIP as a Novel Causative Gene for Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuting; Wang, Junling; Li, Jia-Da; Ren, Haigang; Guan, Wenjuan; He, Miao; Yan, Weiqian; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhengmao; Zhang, Jianguo; Xiao, Jingjing; Su, Zheng; Dai, Meizhi; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Jifeng; Zhou, Yafang; Zhang, Fufeng; Li, Nan; Du, Juan; Xu, Qian; Hu, Yacen; Pan, Qian; Shen, Lu; Wang, Guanghui; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Zhuohua; Tang, Beisha

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by complex clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Although more than 20 disease-causing genes have been identified, many patients are still currently without a molecular diagnosis. In a two-generation autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia family, we mapped a linkage to a minimal candidate region on chromosome 16p13.3 flanked by single-nucleotide polymorphism markers rs11248850 and rs1218762. By combining the defined linkage region with the whole-exome sequencing results, we identified a homozygous mutation (c.493CT) in CHIP (NM_005861) in this family. Using Sanger sequencing, we also identified two compound heterozygous mutations (c.389AT/c.441GT; c.621C>G/c.707GC) in CHIP gene in two additional kindreds. These mutations co-segregated exactly with the disease in these families and were not observed in 500 control subjects with matched ancestry. CHIP colocalized with NR2A, a subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, in the cerebellum, pons, medulla oblongata, hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Wild-type, but not disease-associated mutant CHIPs promoted the degradation of NR2A, which may underlie the pathogenesis of ataxia. In conclusion, using a combination of whole-exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we identified CHIP, encoding a U-box containing ubiquitin E3 ligase, as a novel causative gene for autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia. PMID:24312598

  1. The Role of the Co-Chaperone, CHIP, in Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    or off, which were responsible for this finding following CHIP expression. Methods: Affymetrix arrays. LNCaP, C42 and LNCaP-Tsai cells were...significantly expression in LNCap Tsai and LNCap C42 but not in LNCap cells. Others papers also show that RhoE may inhibit cell cycle progression and...LNCap Tsai and LNCap C42 cells. SASH1 has been implicated to act as a tumour suppressor gene in human breast cancer6. Sash1 has an SH3 region together

  2. Characterization of Capsicum annuum genetic diversity and population structure based on parallel polymorphism discovery with a 30K unigene Pepper GeneChip.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theresa A; Ashrafi, Hamid; Reyes-Chin-Wo, Sebastian; Yao, JiQiang; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP). Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens) detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and application of genome

  3. Gene expression profiling in the rhesus macaque: methodology, annotation and data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Nigel C; Kohama, Steven G; Urbanski, Henryk F

    2009-09-01

    Gene microarray analyses represent potentially effective means for high-throughput gene expression profiling in non-human primates. In the companion article, we emphasize effective experimental design based on the in vivo physiology of the rhesus macaque, whereas this article emphasizes considerations for gene annotation and data interpretation using gene microarray platforms from Affymetrix. Initial annotation of the rhesus genome array was based on Affymetrix human GeneChips. However, annotation revisions improve the precision with which rhesus transcripts are identified. Annotation of the rhesus GeneChip is under continuous revision with large percentages of probesets under multiple annotation systems having undergone multiple reassignments between March 2007 and November 2008. It is also important to consider that quantitation and comparison of gene expression levels across multiple chips requires appropriate normalization. External corroboration of microarray results using PCR-based methodology also requires validation of appropriate internal reference genes for normalization of expression values. Many tools are now freely available to aid investigators with microarray normalization and selection of internal reference genes to be used for independent corroboration of microarray results.

  4. CGO: utilizing and integrating gene expression microarray data in clinical research and data management.

    PubMed

    Bumm, Klaus; Zheng, Mingzhong; Bailey, Clyde; Zhan, Fenghuang; Chiriva-Internati, M; Eddlemon, Paul; Terry, Julian; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D

    2002-02-01

    Clinical GeneOrganizer (CGO) is a novel windows-based archiving, organization and data mining software for the integration of gene expression profiling in clinical medicine. The program implements various user-friendly tools and extracts data for further statistical analysis. This software was written for Affymetrix GeneChip *.txt files, but can also be used for any other microarray-derived data. The MS-SQL server version acts as a data mart and links microarray data with clinical parameters of any other existing database and therefore represents a valuable tool for combining gene expression analysis and clinical disease characteristics.

  5. GeneChip{sup {trademark}} screening assay for cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Cronn, M.T.; Miyada, C.G.; Fucini, R.V.

    1994-09-01

    GeneChip{sup {trademark}} assays are based on high density, carefully designed arrays of short oligonucleotide probes (13-16 bases) built directly on derivatized silica substrates. DNA target sequence analysis is achieved by hybridizing fluorescently labeled amplification products to these arrays. Fluorescent hybridization signals located within the probe array are translated into target sequence information using the known probe sequence at each array feature. The mutation screening assay for cystic fibrosis includes sets of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect numerous different mutations that have been described in 14 exons and one intron of the CFTR gene. Each mutation site is addressed by a sub-array of at least 40 probe sequences, half designed to detect the wild type gene sequence and half designed to detect the reported mutant sequence. Hybridization with homozygous mutant, homozygous wild type or heterozygous targets results in distinctive hybridization patterns within a sub-array, permitting specific discrimination of each mutation. The GeneChip probe arrays are very small (approximately 1 cm{sup 2}). There miniature size coupled with their high information content make GeneChip probe arrays a useful and practical means for providing CF mutation analysis in a clinical setting.

  6. Mining Affymetrix microarray data for long non-coding RNAs: altered expression in the nucleus accumbens of heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Lipovich, Leonard; Blythe, Jason; Jia, Hui; Kapatos, Gregory; Bannon, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Although recent data suggest that some long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) exert widespread effects on gene expression and organelle formation, lncRNAs as a group constitute a sizable but poorly characterized fraction of the human transcriptome. We investigated whether some human lncRNA sequences were fortuitously represented on commonly used microarrays, then used this annotation to assess lncRNA expression in human brain. A computational and annotation pipeline was developed to identify lncRNA transcripts represented on Affymetrix U133 arrays. A previously published dataset derived from human nucleus accumbens was then examined for potential lncRNA expression. Twenty-three lncRNAs were determined to be represented on U133 arrays. Of these, dataset analysis revealed that five lncRNAs were consistently detected in samples of human nucleus accumbens. Strikingly, the abundance of these lncRNAs was up-regulated in human heroin abusers compared to matched drug-free control subjects, a finding confirmed by quantitative PCR. This study presents a paradigm for examining existing Affymetrix datasets for the detection and potential regulation of lncRNA expression, including changes associated with human disease. The finding that all detected lncRNAs were up-regulated in heroin abusers is consonant with the proposed role of lncRNAs as mediators of widespread changes in gene expression as occur in drug abuse.

  7. Genetic screening for mutations in the chip gene in intracranial aneurysm patients of Chinese Han nationality.

    PubMed

    Su, Li; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Chun-Yang; Zhang, An-Long; Mei, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Han, Jian-Guo; Zhao, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    We performed a case-control study to investigate whether SNPs of CHIP might affect the development of IA in Chinese Han nationality. We believe we are the first to have screened IA patients for mutations in the CHIP gene to determine the association with these variants. The study group comprised 224 Chinese Han nationality patients with at least one intracranial aneurysm and 238 unrelated healthy Han nationality controls. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood leukocytes. The entire coding regions of CHIP were genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Differences in genotype and allele frequencies between patients and controls were tested by the chi-square method. Genotype and allele frequencies of the SNP rs116166850 was demonstrated to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. No significant difference in genotype or allele frequencies between case and control groups was detected at the SNP. Our data do not support the hypothesis of a major role for the CHIP gene in IA development in the Chinese Han population.

  8. The Affymetrix DMET Plus Platform Reveals Unique Distribution of ADME-Related Variants in Ethnic Arabs

    PubMed Central

    Wakil, Salma M.; Nguyen, Cao; Muiya, Nzioka P.; Andres, Editha; Lykowska-Tarnowska, Agnieszka; Baz, Batoul; Meyer, Brian F.; Morahan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus Premier Pack has been designed to genotype 1936 gene variants thought to be essential for screening patients in personalized drug therapy. These variants include the cytochrome P450s (CYP450s), the key metabolizing enzymes, many other enzymes involved in phase I and phase II pharmacokinetic reactions, and signaling mediators associated with variability in clinical response to numerous drugs not only among individuals, but also between ethnic populations. Materials and Methods. We genotyped 600 Saudi individuals for 1936 variants on the DMET platform to evaluate their clinical potential in personalized medicine in ethnic Arabs. Results. Approximately 49% each of the 437 CYP450 variants, 56% of the 581 transporters, 56% of 419 transferases, 48% of the 104 dehydrogenases, and 58% of the remaining 390 variants were detected. Several variants, such as rs3740071, rs6193, rs258751, rs6199, rs11568421, and rs8187797, exhibited significantly either higher or lower minor allele frequencies (MAFs) than those in other ethnic groups. Discussion. The present study revealed some unique distribution trends for several variants in Arabs, which displayed partly inverse allelic prevalence compared to other ethnic populations. The results point therefore to the need to verify and ascertain the prevalence of a variant as a prerequisite for engaging it in clinical routine screening in personalized medicine in any given population. PMID:25802476

  9. Gene brushes on a chip: From crowding and the search problem to synthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Ziv, Roy

    2009-03-01

    We assemble DNA polymer brushes coding for entire genes on a surface by means of a new photolithographic approach. The gene density can be controlled from dilute to high density where the local concentration -- Megabase pairs per micron cubed -- is comparable to that in a bacterium. The gene brush, therefore, emulates the crowded medium of the cell, allowing us to study DNA transactions in vitro under native conditions. We find that transcription/translation from these gene brushes is highly sensitive to DNA density, orientation and composition. As a step towards multi-gene synthetic systems, we integrated on a chip two spatially separated gene brushes, and implemented a two-stage transcription/translation cascade.

  10. Statistical evaluation of transcriptomic data generated using the Affymetrix one-cycle, two-cycle and IVT-Express RNA labelling protocols with the Arabidopsis ATH1 microarray

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarrays are a powerful tool used for the determination of global RNA expression. There is an increasing requirement to focus on profiling gene expression in tissues where it is difficult to obtain large quantities of material, for example individual tissues within organs such as the root, or individual isolated cells. From such samples, it is difficult to produce the amount of RNA required for labelling and hybridisation in microarray experiments, thus a process of amplification is usually adopted. Despite the increasing use of two-cycle amplification for transcriptomic analyses on the Affymetrix ATH1 array, there has been no report investigating any potential bias in gene representation that may occur as a result. Results Here we compare transcriptomic data generated using Affymetrix one-cycle (standard labelling protocol), two-cycle (small-sample protocol) and IVT-Express protocols with the Affymetrix ATH1 array using Arabidopsis root samples. Results obtained with each protocol are broadly similar. However, we show that there are 35 probe sets (of a total of 22810) that are misrepresented in the two-cycle data sets. Of these, 33 probe sets were classed as mis-amplified when comparisons of two independent publicly available data sets were undertaken. Conclusions Given the unreliable nature of the highlighted probes, we caution against using data associated with the corresponding genes in analyses involving transcriptomic data generated with two-cycle amplification protocols. We have shown that the Affymetrix IVT-E labelling protocol produces data with less associated bias than the two-cycle protocol, and as such, would recommend this kit for new experiments that involve small samples. PMID:20230623

  11. HuMiChip: Development of a Functional Gene Array for the Study of Human Microbiomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Q.; Deng, Ye; Lin, Lu; Hemme, Chris L.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Microbiomes play very important roles in terms of nutrition, health and disease by interacting with their hosts. Based on sequence data currently available in public domains, we have developed a functional gene array to monitor both organismal and functional gene profiles of normal microbiota in human and mouse hosts, and such an array is called human and mouse microbiota array, HMM-Chip. First, seed sequences were identified from KEGG databases, and used to construct a seed database (seedDB) containing 136 gene families in 19 metabolic pathways closely related to human and mouse microbiomes. Second, a mother database (motherDB) was constructed with 81 genomes of bacterial strains with 54 from gut and 27 from oral environments, and 16 metagenomes, and used for selection of genes and probe design. Gene prediction was performed by Glimmer3 for bacterial genomes, and by the Metagene program for metagenomes. In total, 228,240 and 801,599 genes were identified for bacterial genomes and metagenomes, respectively. Then the motherDB was searched against the seedDB using the HMMer program, and gene sequences in the motherDB that were highly homologous with seed sequences in the seedDB were used for probe design by the CommOligo software. Different degrees of specific probes, including gene-specific, inclusive and exclusive group-specific probes were selected. All candidate probes were checked against the motherDB and NCBI databases for specificity. Finally, 7,763 probes covering 91.2percent (12,601 out of 13,814) HMMer confirmed sequences from 75 bacterial genomes and 16 metagenomes were selected. This developed HMM-Chip is able to detect the diversity and abundance of functional genes, the gene expression of microbial communities, and potentially, the interactions of microorganisms and their hosts.

  12. Genome-wide detection of allelic gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells using a human exome SNP chip.

    PubMed

    Park, Yon Mi; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Lee, Jong-Keuk

    2014-11-10

    Allelic variations in gene expression influence many biological responses and cause phenotypic variations in humans. In this study, Illumina Human Exome BeadChips containing more than 240,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used to identify changes in allelic gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. We found 17 monoallelically expressed genes, 58 allelic imbalanced genes, and 7 genes showing allele substitution. In addition, we also detected 33 differentially expressed genes following LPS treatment in vitro using these human exome SNP chips. However, alterations in allelic gene expression following LPS treatment were detected in only three genes (MLXIPL, TNC, and MX2), which were observed in one cell line sample only, indicating that changes in allelic gene expression following LPS stimulation of liver cells are rare events. Among a total of 75 genes showing allelic expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells, either monoallelic or imbalanced, 43 genes (57.33%) had expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data, indicating that high-density exome SNP chips are useful and reliable for studying allelic gene expression. Furthermore, most genes showing allelic expression were regulated by cis-acting mechanisms and were also significantly associated with several human diseases. Overall, our study provides a better understanding of allele-specific gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with and without LPS stimulation and potential clues for the cause of human disease due to alterations in allelic gene expression.

  13. Visualisation of gene expression data - the GE-biplot, the Chip-plot and the Gene-plot.

    PubMed

    Pittelkow, Yvonne E; Wilson, Susan R

    2003-01-01

    Visualisation methods for exploring microarray data are particularly important for gaining insight into data from gene expression experiments, such as those concerned with the development of an understanding of gene function and interactions. Further, good visualisation techniques are useful for outlier detection in microarray data and for aiding biological interpretation of results, as well as for presentation of overall summaries of the data. The biplot is particularly useful for the display of microarray data as both the genes and the chips can be simultaneously plotted. In this paper we describe several ordination techniques suitable for exploring microarray data, and we call these the GE-biplot, the Chip-plot and the Gene-plot. The general method is first evaluated on synthetic data simulated in accord with current biological interpretation of microarray data. Then it is applied to two well-known data sets, namely the colon data of Alon et al. (1999) and the leukaemia data of Golub et al. (1999). The usefulness of the approach for interpreting and comparing different analyses of the same data is demonstrated.

  14. GeneChip Expression Profiling Reveals the Alterations of Energy Metabolism Related Genes in Osteocytes under Large Gradient High Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis. PMID:25635858

  15. GeneChip expression profiling reveals the alterations of energy metabolism related genes in osteocytes under large gradient high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis.

  16. EzArray: A web-based highly automated Affymetrix expression array data management and analysis system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuerong; Zhu, Yuelin; Xu, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Background Though microarray experiments are very popular in life science research, managing and analyzing microarray data are still challenging tasks for many biologists. Most microarray programs require users to have sophisticated knowledge of mathematics, statistics and computer skills for usage. With accumulating microarray data deposited in public databases, easy-to-use programs to re-analyze previously published microarray data are in high demand. Results EzArray is a web-based Affymetrix expression array data management and analysis system for researchers who need to organize microarray data efficiently and get data analyzed instantly. EzArray organizes microarray data into projects that can be analyzed online with predefined or custom procedures. EzArray performs data preprocessing and detection of differentially expressed genes with statistical methods. All analysis procedures are optimized and highly automated so that even novice users with limited pre-knowledge of microarray data analysis can complete initial analysis quickly. Since all input files, analysis parameters, and executed scripts can be downloaded, EzArray provides maximum reproducibility for each analysis. In addition, EzArray integrates with Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and allows instantaneous re-analysis of published array data. Conclusion EzArray is a novel Affymetrix expression array data analysis and sharing system. EzArray provides easy-to-use tools for re-analyzing published microarray data and will help both novice and experienced users perform initial analysis of their microarray data from the location of data storage. We believe EzArray will be a useful system for facilities with microarray services and laboratories with multiple members involved in microarray data analysis. EzArray is freely available from . PMID:18218103

  17. Spotting and validation of a genome wide oligonucleotide chip with duplicate measurement of each gene

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, Mads . E-mail: mads.thomassen@ouh.fyns-amt.dk; Skov, Vibe; Eiriksdottir, Freyja; Tan, Qihua; Jochumsen, Kirsten; Fritzner, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus; Dahlgaard, Jesper; Kruse, Torben A.

    2006-06-16

    The quality of DNA microarray based gene expression data relies on the reproducibility of several steps in a microarray experiment. We have developed a spotted genome wide microarray chip with oligonucleotides printed in duplicate in order to minimise undesirable biases, thereby optimising detection of true differential expression. The validation study design consisted of an assessment of the microarray chip performance using the MessageAmp and FairPlay labelling kits. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to demonstrate that MessageAmp was significantly more reproducible than FairPlay. Further examinations with MessageAmp revealed the applicability of the system. The linear range of the chips was three orders of magnitude, the precision was high, as 95% of measurements deviated less than 1.24-fold from the expected value, and the coefficient of variation for relative expression was 13.6%. Relative quantitation was more reproducible than absolute quantitation and substantial reduction of variance was attained with duplicate spotting. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated no significant day-to-day variation.

  18. On-chip quantitative detection of pathogen genes by autonomous microfluidic PCR platform.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hiroaki; Saito, Masato; Shibuya, Shogo; Tsuji, Koji; Miyagawa, Nobuyuki; Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-12-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genetic testing has become a routine part of clinical diagnoses and food testing. In these fields, rapid, easy-to-use, and cost-efficient PCR chips are expected to be appeared for providing such testing on-site. In this study, a new autonomous disposable plastic microfluidic PCR chip was created, and was utilized for quantitative detection of pathogenic microorganisms. To control the capillary flow of the following solution in the PCR microchannel, a driving microchannel was newly designed behind the PCR microchannel. This allowed the effective PCR by simply dropping the PCR solution onto the inlet without any external pumps. In order to achieve disposability, injection-molded cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) of a cost-competitive plastic was used for the PCR chip. We discovered that coating the microchannel walls with non-ionic surfactant produced a suitable hydrophilic surface for driving the capillary flow through the 1250-mm long microchannel. As a result, quantitative real-time PCR with the lowest initial concentration of human, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and pathogenic E. coli O157 genomic DNA of 4, 0.0019, 0.031 pg/μl, respectively, was successfully achieved in less than 18 min. Our results indicate that the platform presented in this study provided a rapid, easy-to-use, and low-cost real-time PCR system that could be potentially used for on-site gene testing.

  19. A New Resource for Cereal Genomics: 22K Barley GeneChip Comes of Age1

    PubMed Central

    Close, Timothy J.; Wanamaker, Steve I.; Caldo, Rico A.; Turner, Stacy M.; Ashlock, Daniel A.; Dickerson, Julie A.; Wing, Rod A.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.; Kleinhofs, Andris; Wise, Roger P.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, access to complete genomic sequences, coupled with rapidly accumulating data related to RNA and protein expression patterns, has made it possible to determine comprehensively how genes contribute to complex phenotypes. However, for major crop plants, publicly available, standard platforms for parallel expression analysis have been limited. We report the conception and design of the new publicly available, 22K Barley1 GeneChip probe array, a model for plants without a fully sequenced genome. Array content was derived from worldwide contribution of 350,000 high-quality ESTs from 84 cDNA libraries, in addition to 1,145 barley (Hordeum vulgare) gene sequences from the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database. Conserved sequences expressed in seedlings of wheat (Triticum aestivum), oat (Avena strigosa), rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and maize (Zea mays) were identified that will be valuable in the design of arrays across grasses. To enhance the usability of the data, BarleyBase, a MIAME-compliant, MySQL relational database, serves as a public repository for raw and normalized expression data from the Barley1 GeneChip probe array. Interconnecting links with PlantGDB and Gramene allow BarleyBase users to perform gene predictions using the 21,439 non-redundant Barley1 exemplar sequences or cross-species comparison at the genome level, respectively. We expect that this first generation array will accelerate hypothesis generation and gene discovery in disease defense pathways, responses to abiotic stresses, development, and evolutionary diversity in monocot plants. PMID:15020760

  20. Single-copy gene based 50 K SNP chip for genetic studies and molecular breeding in rice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nisha; Jayaswal, Pawan Kumar; Panda, Kabita; Mandal, Paritra; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Balwant; Mishra, Shefali; Singh, Yashi; Singh, Renu; Rai, Vandna; Gupta, Anita; Raj Sharma, Tilak; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is the most abundant DNA sequence variation present in plant genomes. Here, we report the design and validation of a unique genic-SNP genotyping chip for genetic and evolutionary studies as well as molecular breeding applications in rice. The chip incorporates 50,051 SNPs from 18,980 different genes spanning 12 rice chromosomes, including 3,710 single-copy (SC) genes conserved between wheat and rice, 14,959 SC genes unique to rice, 194 agronomically important cloned rice genes and 117 multi-copy rice genes. Assays with this chip showed high success rate and reproducibility because of the SC gene based array with no sequence redundancy and cross-hybridisation problems. The usefulness of the chip in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies of cultivated and wild rice germplasm was demonstrated. Furthermore, its efficacy was validated for analysing background recovery in improved mega rice varieties with submergence tolerance developed through marker-assisted backcross breeding. PMID:26111882

  1. Detection of cystic fibrosis mutations in a GeneChip{trademark} assay format

    SciTech Connect

    Miyada, C.G.; Cronin, M.T.; Kim, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    We are developing assays for the detection of cystic fibrosis mutations based on DNA hybridization. A DNA sample is amplified by PCR, labeled by incorporating a fluorescein-tagged dNTP, enzymatically treated to produce smaller fragments and hybridized to a series of short (13-16 bases) oligonucleotides synthesized on a glass surface via photolithography. The hybrids are detected by eqifluorescence and mutations are identified by the specific pattern of hybridization. In a GeneChip assay, the chip surface is composed of a series of subarrays, each being specific for a particular mutation. Each subarray is further subdivided into a series of probes (40 total), half based on the mutant sequence and the remainder based on the wild-type sequence. For each of the subarrays, there is a redundancy in the number of probes that should hybridize to either a wild-type or a mutant target. The multiple probe strategy provides sequence information for a short five base region overlapping the mutation site. In addition, homozygous wild-type and mutant as well as heterozygous samples are each identified by a specific pattern of hybridization. The small size of each probe feature (250 x 250 {mu}m{sup 2}) permits the inclusion of additional probes required to generate sequence information by hybridization.

  2. Obesity in BSB mice is correlated with expression of genes foriron homeostasis and leptin

    SciTech Connect

    Farahani, Poupak; Chiu, Sally; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Boffelli,Dario; Lee, Eric; Fisler, Janis S.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Warden, Craig H.

    2003-04-01

    Obesity is a complex disease. To date, over 100 chromosomal loci for body weight, body fat, regional white adipose tissue weight, and other obesity-related traits have been identified in humans and in animal models. For most loci, the underlying genes are not yet identified; some of these chromosomal loci will be alleles of known obesity genes, whereas many will represent alleles of unknown genes. Microarray analysis allows simultaneous multiple gene and pathway discovery. cDNA and oligonucleotide arrays are commonly used to identify differentially expressed genes by surveys of large numbers of known and unnamed genes. Two papers previously identified genes differentially expressed in adipose tissue of mouse models of obesity and diabetes by analysis of hybridization to Affymetrix oligonucleotide chips.

  3. β-catenin promoter ChIP-chip reveals potential schizophrenia and bipolar disorder gene network.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Erika; Shah, Abhishek; Tenore, Christopher; Capogna, Michael; Villa, Catalina; Guo, Xingyi; Zheng, Deyou; Lachman, Herbert M

    2010-12-01

    Therapeutic concentrations of lithium salts inhibit glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) and phosphoinositide (PI) signaling suggesting that abnormal activation of these pathways could be a factor in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). Involvement of these pathways is also supported by recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs). One way investigators have investigated the molecular basis of BD and the therapeutic action of lithium is by microarray expression studies, since both GSK3β- and PI-mediated signal transduction pathways are coupled to transcriptional activation and inhibition. However, expression profiling has some limitations and investigators cannot use the approach to analyze fetal brain tissue, arguably the most relevant biological structure related to the development of genetically based psychiatric disorders. To address these shortcomings, the authors have taken a novel approach using chromatin immunoprecipitation-enriched material annealed to microarrays (ChIP-chip) targeting genes in fetal brain tissue bound by β-catenin, a transcription factor that is directly regulated by GSK3β. The promoters for 640 genes were found to be bound by β-catenin, many of which are known schizophrenia (SZ), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and BD candidates, including CACNA1B, NRNG, SNAP29, FGFR1, PCDH9, and nine others identified in recently published GWASs and genome-wide searches for copy number variants (CNVs). The findings suggest that seemingly disparate candidate genes for SZ and BD can be incorporated into a common molecular network revolving around GSK3β/β-catenin signaling. In addition, the finding that a putative lithium-responsive pathway may influence a subgroup of SZ and ASD candidate genes could have therapeutic implications.

  4. Development of a Chip Assay and Quantitative PCR for Detecting Microcystin Synthetase E Gene Expression ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sipari, Hanna; Rantala-Ylinen, Anne; Jokela, Jouni; Oksanen, Ilona; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2010-01-01

    The chip and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays were optimized to study the expression of microcystin biosynthesis genes (mcy) with RNA samples extracted from cyanobacterial strains and environmental water samples. Both microcystin-producing Anabaena and Microcystis were identified in Lake Tuusulanjärvi samples. Microcystis transcribed the mcyE genes throughout the summer of 2006, while expression by Anabaena became evident later in August and September. Active mcyE gene expression was also detectable when microcystin concentrations were very low. Detection of Anabaena mcyE transcripts by qPCR, as well as certain cyanobacterial 16S rRNAs with the chip assay, showed slightly reduced sensitivity compared with the DNA analyses. In contrast, even groups undetectable or present in low quantities as determined by microscopy could be identified with the chip assay from DNA samples. The methods introduced add to the previously scarce repertoire of applications for mcy expression profiling in environmental samples and enable in situ studies of regulation of microcystin synthesis in response to environmental factors. PMID:20400558

  5. Use of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples for gene expression studies in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Musella, Valeria; Callari, Maurizio; Di Buduo, Eleonora; Scuro, Manuela; Dugo, Matteo; Miodini, Patrizia; Bianchini, Giampaolo; Paolini, Biagio; Gianni, Luca; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Cappelletti, Vera

    2015-01-01

    To obtain gene expression profiles from samples collected in clinical trials, we conducted a pilot study to assess feasibility and estimate sample attrition rates when profiling formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens. Ten matched fresh-frozen and fixed breast cancer samples were profiled using the Illumina HT-12 and Ref-8 chips, respectively. The profiles obtained with Ref 8, were neither technically nor biologically reliable since they failed to yield the expected separation between estrogen receptor positive and negative samples. With the use of Affymetrix HG-U133 2.0 Plus chips on fixed samples and a quantitative polymerase chain reaction -based sample pre-assessment step, results were satisfactory in terms of biological reliability, despite the low number of present calls (M = 21%±5). Compared with the Illumina DASL WG platform, Affymetrix data showed a wider interquartile range (1.32 vs 0.57, P<2.2 E-16,) and larger fold changes. The Affymetrix chips were used to run a pilot study on 60 fixed breast cancers. By including in the workflow the sample pre-assessment steps, 96% of the samples predicted to give good results (44/46), were in fact rated as satisfactory from the point of view of technical and biological meaningfulness. Our gene expression profiles showed strong agreement with immunohistochemistry data, were able to reproduce breast cancer molecular subtypes, and allowed the validation of an estrogen receptor status classifier derived in frozen samples. The approach is therefore suitable to profile formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples collected in clinical trials, provided that quality controls are run both before (sample pre-assessment) and after hybridization on the array.

  6. Cloning and characterization of the drought-resistance OsRCI2-5 gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Li, L; Li, N; Song, S F; Li, Y X; Xia, X J; Fu, X Q; Chen, G H; Deng, H F

    2014-05-23

    The genomic expression profile of the super-hybrid rice Liangyoupeijiu female parent Pei'ai 64S in different tissues at different developmental stages under low temperature, drought, and high temperature stresses were detected using an Affymetrix GeneChip Rice Genome Array to screen upregulated and downregulated genes. In this study, we screened the drought-resistant gene OsRCI2-5, after which a constitutive OsRCI2-5 construct was created and transferred into Nipponbare. After polyethylene glycol-6000 and drought treatment, we found that the OsRCI2-5 gene improved the drought resistance of Nipponbare. Gene expression profiling showed that the OsRCI2-5 gene was expressed in the rice leaves, stems, and flower organs. Subcellular localization revealed that the gene was located in the membranes, and hence, we can deduce that a membrane signal peptide was responsible for signal transduction.

  7. Chip, Chip, Hooray!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a science laboratory using different brands of potato chips in which students test their oiliness, size, thickness, saltiness, quality, and cost, then analyze the results to determine the best chip. Gives a brief history of potato chips. (YDS)

  8. Sensitive HPV Genotyping Based on the Flow-Through Hybridization and Gene Chip

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Pingping; Zheng, Weiping; Wang, Yungen; Bian, Mei-lu

    2012-01-01

    Persistent infection of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recognized as the direct cause of cervical carcinoma. Therefore, detection and genotyping of HPV are important to cervical-cancer screening. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy of flow-through hybridization and gene chip (HybriMax) on HPV genotyping through comparison of the results with Hybrid Capture II (HC-II) and in situ hybridization (ISH). 591 women were classified into 6 groups according to their histological diagnoses. The overall accordance rate on 13 types of HPV genotypes between HybriMax and HC-II were 92.5% and 100% in the cancer group. The overall accordance was excellent with the Kappa index (KI) of 0.814. The value of KI in each group was 0.750 (normal cytological diagnosis), 0.781 (chronic cervicitis), 0.80 (condyloma acuminatum), 0.755 (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I), 0.723 (CIN II), and 0.547 (CIN III) (0.75 > KI > 0.4, good; KI ≥ 0.75, excellent). The 10 most common HPV subtype detected by HybriMax were 16, 52/58, 18, 33, 31, 81, 53, 68, and 66 in patients, and 16, 68, 18, 52, 58, 11, 53, 31/39, and 33 in normal controls. In conclusion, HybriMax is an efficient method for HPV genotyping and more suitable for clinical use. PMID:23193367

  9. Sensitive HPV genotyping based on the flow-through hybridization and gene chip.

    PubMed

    Tao, Pingping; Zheng, Weiping; Wang, Yungen; Bian, Mei-Lu

    2012-01-01

    Persistent infection of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recognized as the direct cause of cervical carcinoma. Therefore, detection and genotyping of HPV are important to cervical-cancer screening. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy of flow-through hybridization and gene chip (HybriMax) on HPV genotyping through comparison of the results with Hybrid Capture II (HC-II) and in situ hybridization (ISH). 591 women were classified into 6 groups according to their histological diagnoses. The overall accordance rate on 13 types of HPV genotypes between HybriMax and HC-II were 92.5% and 100% in the cancer group. The overall accordance was excellent with the Kappa index (KI) of 0.814. The value of KI in each group was 0.750 (normal cytological diagnosis), 0.781 (chronic cervicitis), 0.80 (condyloma acuminatum), 0.755 (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I), 0.723 (CIN II), and 0.547 (CIN III) (0.75 > KI > 0.4, good; KI ≥ 0.75, excellent). The 10 most common HPV subtype detected by HybriMax were 16, 52/58, 18, 33, 31, 81, 53, 68, and 66 in patients, and 16, 68, 18, 52, 58, 11, 53, 31/39, and 33 in normal controls. In conclusion, HybriMax is an efficient method for HPV genotyping and more suitable for clinical use.

  10. Understanding the physics of oligonucleotide microarrays: the Affymetrix spike-in data reanalysed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, Conrad J.

    2008-03-01

    The Affymetrix U95 and U133 Latin-Square spike-in datasets are reanalysed, together with a dataset from a version of the U95 spike-in experiment without a complex non-specific background. The approach uses a physico-chemical model which includes the effects of the specific and non-specific hybridization and probe folding at the microarray surface, target folding and hybridization in the bulk RNA target solution and duplex dissociation during the post-hybridization washing phase. The model predicts a three-parameter hyperbolic response function that fits well with fluorescence intensity data from all the three datasets. The importance of the various hybridization and washing effects in determining each of the three parameters is examined, and some guidance is given as to how a practical algorithm for determining specific target concentrations might be developed.

  11. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M.; Borradaile, Nica M.

    2016-01-01

    The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors “Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity” (Hughes-Large et al. 2014). Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA) values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR. PMID:26937468

  12. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Borradaile, Nica M

    2016-03-01

    The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors "Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity" (Hughes-Large et al. 2014). Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA) values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR.

  13. Identification of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binding Sites and Target Genes Using ChIP-on-Chip in Developing Mouse Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongyan; Yauk, Carole L.; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; You, Seo-Hee; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Lambert, Iain; Wade, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is critical to normal brain development, but the mechanisms operating in this process are poorly understood. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to enrich regions of DNA bound to thyroid receptor beta (TRβ) of mouse cerebellum sampled on post natal day 15. Enriched target was hybridized to promoter microarrays (ChIP-on-chip) spanning −8 kb to +2 kb of the transcription start site (TSS) of 5000 genes. We identified 91 genes with TR binding sites. Roughly half of the sites were located in introns, while 30% were located within 1 kb upstream (5′) of the TSS. Of these genes, 83 with known function included genes involved in apoptosis, neurodevelopment, metabolism and signal transduction. Two genes, MBP and CD44, are known to contain TREs, providing validation of the system. This is the first report of TR binding for 81 of these genes. ChIP-on-chip results were confirmed for 10 of the 13 binding fragments using ChIP-PCR. The expression of 4 novel TH target genes was found to be correlated with TH levels in hyper/hypothyroid animals providing further support for TR binding. A TRβ binding site upstream of the coding region of myelin associated glycoprotein was demonstrated to be TH-responsive using a luciferase expression system. Motif searches did not identify any classic binding elements, indicating that not all TR binding sites conform to variations of the classic form. These findings provide mechanistic insight into impaired neurodevelopment resulting from TH deficiency and a rich bioinformatics resource for developing a better understanding of TR binding. PMID:19240802

  14. Temporal ChIP-on-Chip of RNA-Polymerase-II to detect novel gene activation events during photoreceptor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Padmaja; Mali, Raghuveer S.; Guzman, Eduardo; Zhang, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose During retinal development, post-mitotic neural progenitor cells must activate thousands of genes to complete synaptogenesis and terminal maturation. While many of these genes are known, others remain beyond the sensitivity of expression microarray analysis. Some of these elusive gene activation events can be detected by mapping changes in RNA polymerase-II (Pol-II) association around transcription start sites. Methods High-resolution (35 bp) chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip was used to map changes in Pol-II binding surrounding 26,000 gene transcription start sites during photoreceptor maturation of the mouse neural retina, comparing postnatal age 25 (P25) to P2. Coverage was 10–12 kb per transcription start site, including 2.5 kb downstream. Pol-II-active regions were mapped to the mouse genomic DNA sequence by using computational methods (Tiling Analysis Software-TAS program), and the ratio of maximum Pol-II binding (P25/P2) was calculated for each gene. A validation set of 36 genes (3%), representing a full range of Pol-II signal ratios (P25/P2), were examined with quantitative ChIP assays for transcriptionally active Pol-II. Gene expression assays were also performed for 19 genes of the validation set, again on independent samples. FLT-3 Interacting Zinc-finger-1 (FIZ1), a zinc-finger protein that associates with active promoter complexes of photoreceptor-specific genes, provided an additional ChIP marker to highlight genes activated in the mature neural retina. To demonstrate the use of ChIP-on-chip predictions to find novel gene activation events, four additional genes were selected for quantitative PCR analysis (qRT–PCR analysis); these four genes have human homologs located in unidentified retinal disease regions: Solute carrier family 25 member 33 (Slc25a33), Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (Lpcat1), Coiled-coil domain-containing 126 (Ccdc126), and ADP-ribosylation factor-like 4D (Arl4d). Results ChIP-on-chip Pol-II peak

  15. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  16. Gene chip technology used in the detection of HPV infection in esophageal cancer of Kazakh Chinese in Xinjiang Province.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-gang; Yang, Chun-mei; Xu, Li-hong; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Xiao-yan; Ma, Yun-gui; Huo, Xiao-ling; Han, Yu-sheng; Tian, De-an; Zheng, Yong

    2014-06-01

    This study was aimed to screen human papillomavirus (HPV) types associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma of Kazakh in Xinjiang using the gene chip technique and study the clinical significance of this application. The DNAs were collected from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma tissues and healthy esophageal mucosa of Kazakh adults in Xinjiang, and amplified firstly using HPV MY09/11 and then using HPV G5+/6+ to screen positive HPV specimens. These positive specimens were further detected by the gene chip technique to screen highly pathogenic HPV types. After determination with nested PCR amplification with HPV MY09/11 and G5+/6+, the infection rate of HPV was 66.67% in the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma group and 12.12% in the healthy control group. By testing the positive HPV specimens from the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma group, the infection rate of HPV16 was 97.72% and the co-infection rate of HPV16 and HPV18 was 2.27%. HPV16 infection may be involved in the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Xinjiang Hazakh adults.

  17. Developing cold-chipping potato varieties by silencing the vacuolar invertase gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulation of reducing sugars during cold storage is a persistent and costly problem for the potato processing industry. High temperature processing of potato tubers with elevated amounts of reducing sugars results in potato chips, fries and other products that are unacceptable to consumers becaus...

  18. Effects of weak, low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (BEMER type) on gene expression of human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Walther, Markus; Mayer, Florian; Kafka, Wolf; Schütze, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    In vitro effects of electromagnetic fields appear to be related to the type of electromagnetic field applied. Previously, we showed that human osteoblasts display effects of BEMER type electromagnetic field (BTEMF) on gene regulation. Here, we analyze effects of BTEMF on gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes. Primary mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and the chondrocyte cell line C28I2 were stimulated 5 times at 12-h intervals for 8 min each with BTEMF. RNA from treated and control cells was analyzed for gene expression using the affymetrix chip HG-U133A. A limited number of regulated gene products from both cell types mainly affect cell metabolism and cell matrix structure. There was no increased expression of cancer-related genes. RT-PCR analysis of selected transcripts partly confirmed array data. Results indicate that BTEMF in human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes provide the first indications to understanding therapeutic effects achieved with BTEMF stimulation.

  19. Endometrial Gene Expression in Early Pregnancy: Lessons From Human Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savaris, Ricardo F.; Hamilton, Amy E.; Lessey, Bruce A.; Giudice, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    Human endometrium undergoes modifications in preparation for embryonic implantation. This study investigated in vivo the endocrine effects of pregnancy on the endometrium, using the model of ectopic pregnancy. Endometrial biopsies from 9 subjects with ectopic pregnancy (Preg) were compared with 8 and 6 samples of mid and late secretory endometrium, respectively. After hybridizing with Affymetrix HGU133 Plus 2 chips, data were analyzed using GeneSpring GX and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis. From 54 675 genes, 3021 genes were significantly differentiated when mid-secretory endometrium was compared with the Preg (Volcano plot; P < .05, ≥2-fold change). The complement and coagulation cascade, phospholid degradation, glycosphingolipid biosynthesis (globoseries), retinol metabolism, antigen presentation pathway, glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, and O-glycan biosynthesis were main significant canonical pathways found in Preg samples. Validation was done with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, the ectopic embryo has a significant impact, by an endocrine mechanism, on endometrium, when compared with the window of implantation. PMID:18591649

  20. GeoChip-based analysis of microbial functional gene diversity in a landfill leachate-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhenmei; He, Zhili; Parisi, Victoria A.; Kang, Sanghoon; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Masoner, Jason R.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Suflita, Joseph M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2012-01-01

    The functional gene diversity and structure of microbial communities in a shallow landfill leachate-contaminated aquifer were assessed using a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0). Water samples were obtained from eight wells at the same aquifer depth immediately below a municipal landfill or along the predominant downgradient groundwater flowpath. Functional gene richness and diversity immediately below the landfill and the closest well were considerably lower than those in downgradient wells. Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) suggested that various geochemical parameters had a significant impact on the subsurface microbial community structure. That is, leachate from the unlined landfill impacted the diversity, composition, structure, and functional potential of groundwater microbial communities as a function of groundwater pH, and concentrations of sulfate, ammonia, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Historical geochemical records indicate that all sampled wells chronically received leachate, and the increase in microbial diversity as a function of distance from the landfill is consistent with mitigation of the impact of leachate on the groundwater system by natural attenuation mechanisms.

  1. BPH gene expression profile associated to prostate gland volume.

    PubMed

    Descazeaud, Aurelien; Rubin, Mark A; Hofer, Matthias; Setlur, Sunita; Nikolaief, Nathalie; Vacherot, Francis; Soyeux, Pascale; Kheuang, Laurence; Abbou, Claude C; Allory, Yves; de la Taille, Alexandre

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to analyze gene expression profiles in benign prostatic hyperplasia and to compare them with phenotypic properties. Thirty-seven specimens of benign prostatic hyperplasia were obtained from symptomatic patients undergoing surgery. RNA was extracted and hybridized to Affymetrix Chips containing 54,000 gene expression probes. Gene expression profiles were analyzed using cluster, TreeView, and significance analysis of microarrays softwares. In an initial unsupervised analysis, our 37 samples clustered hierarchically in 2 groups of 18 and 19 samples, respectively. Five clinical parameters were statistically different between the 2 groups: in group 1 compared with group 2, patients had larger prostate glands, had higher prostate specific antigen levels, were more likely to be treated by alpha blockers, to be operated by prostatectomy, and to have major irritative symptoms. The sole independent parameter associated with this dichotome clustering, however, was the prostate gland volume. Therefore, the role of prostate volume was explored in a supervised analysis. Gene expression of prostate glands <60 mL and >60 mL were compared using significance analysis of microarrays and 227 genes were found differentially expressed between the 2 groups (>2 change and false discovery rate of <5%). Several specific pathways including growth factors genes, cell cycle genes, apoptose genes, inflammation genes, and androgen regulated genes, displayed major differences between small and large prostate glands.

  2. Rice transcriptome analysis to identify possible herbicide quinclorac detoxification genes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenying; Di, Chao; Zhou, Shaoxia; Liu, Jia; Li, Li; Liu, Fengxia; Yang, Xinling; Ling, Yun; Su, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Quinclorac is a highly selective auxin-type herbicide and is widely used in the effective control of barnyard grass in paddy rice fields, improving the world's rice yield. The herbicide mode of action of quinclorac has been proposed, and hormone interactions affecting quinclorac signaling has been identified. Because of widespread use, quinclorac may be transported outside rice fields with the drainage waters, leading to soil and water pollution and other environmental health problems. In this study, we used 57K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array to identify quinclorac signaling response genes to study the molecular mechanisms of action and detoxification of quinclorac in rice plants. Overall, 637 probe sets were identified with differential expression levels under either 6 or 24 h of quinclorac treatment. Auxin-related genes such as GH3 and OsIAAs responded to quinclorac treatment. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes of detoxification-related family genes were significantly enriched, including cytochrome P450, GST, UGT, and ABC and drug transporter genes. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that top candidate genes of P450 families such as CYP81, CYP709C, and CYP72A were universally induced by different herbicides. Some Arabidopsis genes of the same P450 family were up-regulated under quinclorac treatment. We conducted rice whole-genome GeneChip analysis and the first global identification of quinclorac response genes. This work may provide potential markers for detoxification of quinclorac and biomonitors of environmental chemical pollution. PMID:26483837

  3. rAAV8-733-Mediated Gene Transfer of CHIP/Stub-1 Prevents Hippocampal Neuronal Death in Experimental Brain Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Cabral-Miranda, Felipe; Nicoloso-Simões, Elisa; Adão-Novaes, Juliana; Chiodo, Vince; Hauswirth, William W; Linden, Rafael; Chiarini, Luciana Barreto; Petrs-Silva, Hilda

    2017-02-01

    Brain ischemia is a major cause of adult disability and death, and it represents a worldwide health problem with significant economic burden for modern society. The identification of the molecular pathways activated after brain ischemia, together with efficient technologies of gene delivery to the CNS, may lead to novel treatments based on gene therapy. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is an effective platform for gene transfer to the CNS. Here, we used a serotype 8 rAAV bearing the Y733F mutation (rAAV8-733) to overexpress co-chaperone E3 ligase CHIP (also known as Stub-1) in rat hippocampal neurons, both in an oxygen and glucose deprivation model in vitro and in a four-vessel occlusion model of ischemia in vivo. We show that CHIP overexpression prevented neuronal degeneration in both cases and led to a decrease of both eIF2α (serine 51) and AKT (serine 473) phosphorylation, as well as reduced amounts of ubiquitinated proteins following hypoxia or ischemia. These data add to current knowledge of ischemia-related signaling in the brain and suggest that gene therapy based on the role of CHIP in proteostasis may provide a new venue for brain ischemia treatment.

  4. Lab-on-a-chip mRNA purification and reverse transcription via a solid-phase gene extraction technique.

    PubMed

    Nestorova, Gergana G; Hasenstein, Karl; Nguyen, Nam; DeCoster, Mark A; Crews, Niel D

    2017-03-14

    Extraction and purification of high quality RNA is a crucial initial step required for a variety of genomic assays. We report a solid phase gene extraction (SPGE) method for automated extraction, purification and reverse transcription of mRNA in a microfluidic device. This is performed using a 130 μm diameter stainless steel needle that is amino-linked to dT(15) oligonucleotides for selective hybridization of mRNA. By inserting this probe into the biological sample for only 30 seconds, mRNA is captured with high selectivity and a yield greater than 10 pg per mm of probe length. The probe is then inserted into a lab-on-a-chip device, where the bound poly-adenylated RNA is thermally released and immediately reverse transcribed for subsequent PCR amplification. The insertion of the probe into the microfluidic device is straightforward: the microchannel is formed with an elastomer (PDMS) that, when punctured, will seal around the probe. The specificity and RNA loading capacity of the probes were evaluated using conventional qPCR. This procedure was successfully used to extract, purify, and transcribe mRNA from rat glioblastoma cell spheroids in less than seven minutes. Analysis of the product confirmed that the SPGE technique selectively captures and inherently purifies high-quality mRNA directly from biological material with no need for additional pre-processing steps. Integrating this elegant sample preparation method into a complete lab-on-a-chip system will substantially enhance the speed and automation of mRNA assays for research and clinical diagnostics.

  5. Gene expression profiles in peripheral lymphocytes by arsenic exposure and skin lesion status in a Bangladeshi population.

    PubMed

    Argos, Maria; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Parvez, Faruque; Jasmine, Farzana; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Ahsan, Habibul

    2006-07-01

    Millions of individuals worldwide are chronically exposed to arsenic through their drinking water. In this study, the effect of arsenic exposure and arsenical skin lesion status on genome-wide gene expression patterns was evaluated using RNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes of individuals selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study. Affymetrix HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) arrays were used to measure the expression of approximately 22,000 transcripts. Our primary statistical analysis involved identifying differentially expressed genes between participants with and without arsenical skin lesions based on the significance analysis of microarrays statistic with an a priori defined 1% false discovery rate to minimize false positives. To better characterize differential expression, we also conducted Gene Ontology and pathway comparisons in addition to the gene-specific analyses. Four-hundred sixty-eight genes were differentially expressed between these two groups, from which 312 differentially expressed genes were identified by restricting the analysis to female never-smokers. We also explored possible differential gene expression by arsenic exposure levels among individuals without manifest arsenical skin lesions; however, no differentially expressed genes could be identified from this comparison. Our findings show that microarray-based gene expression analysis is a powerful method to characterize the molecular profile of arsenic exposure and arsenic-induced diseases. Genes identified from this analysis may provide insights into the underlying processes of arsenic-induced disease and represent potential targets for chemoprevention studies to reduce arsenic-induced skin cancer in this population.

  6. Altered gene expression patterns during the initiation and promotion stages of neonatally diethylstilbestrol-induced hyperplasia/dysplasia/neoplasia in the hamster uterus.

    PubMed

    Hendry, William J; Hariri, Hussam Y; Alwis, Imala D; Gunewardena, Sumedha S; Hendry, Isabel R

    2014-12-01

    Neonatal treatment of hamsters with diethylstilbestrol (DES) induces uterine hyperplasia/dysplasia/neoplasia (endometrial adenocarcinoma) in adult animals. We subsequently determined that the neonatal DES exposure event directly and permanently disrupts the developing hamster uterus (initiation stage) so that it responds abnormally when it is stimulated with estrogen in adulthood (promotion stage). To identify candidate molecular elements involved in progression of the disruption/neoplastic process, we performed: (1) immunoblot analyses and (2) microarray profiling (Affymetrix Gene Chip System) on sets of uterine protein and RNA extracts, respectively, and (3) immunohistochemical analysis on uterine sections; all from both initiation stage and promotion stage groups of animals. Here we report that: (1) progression of the neonatal DES-induced hyperplasia/dysplasia/neoplasia phenomenon in the hamster uterus involves a wide spectrum of specific gene expression alterations and (2) the gene products involved and their manner of altered expression differ dramatically during the initiation vs. promotion stages of the phenomenon.

  7. Analysis of the Metabolic Pathways Affected by Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) in Arabidopsis thaliana Based on GeneChip Microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zongqi; Lei, Peng; Feng, Xiaohai; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2016-08-17

    Plant growth is promoted by poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA). However, the molecular mechanism underlying such promotion is not yet well understood. Therefore, we used GeneChip microarrays to explore the effects of γ-PGA on gene transcription in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results revealed 299 genes significantly regulated by γ-PGA. These differently expressed genes participate mainly in metabolic and cellular processes and in stimuli responses. The metabolic pathways linked to these differently expressed genes were also investigated. A total of 64 of the 299 differently expressed genes were shown to be directly involved in 24 pathways such as brassinosteroid biosynthesis, α-linolenic acid metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and nitrogen metabolism, all of which were influenced by γ-PGA. The analysis demonstrated that γ-PGA promoted nitrogen assimilation and biosynthesis of brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, and lignins, providing a better explanation for why γ-PGA promotes growth and enhances stress tolerance in plants.

  8. Renal tissue thawed for 30 minutes is still suitable for gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Kang, Xiao-Nan; Ding, Wen-Bin; Yang, Hao-Zheng; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Yi-Ran; Dai, Hui-Li

    2014-01-01

    Some biosamples obtained from biobanks may go through thawing before processing. We aim to evaluate the effects of thawing at room temperature for different time periods on gene expression analysis. A time course study with four time points was conducted to investigate the expression profiling on 10 thawed normal mice renal tissue samples through Affymetrix GeneChip mouse gene 2.0 st array. Microarray results were validated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) on 6 candidate reference genes and 11 target genes. Additionally, we used geNorm plus and NormFinder to identify the most stably expressed reference genes over time. The results showed RNA degraded more after longer incubation at room temperature. However, microarray results showed only 240 genes (0.91%) altered significantly in response to thawing at room temperature. The signal of majority altered probe sets decreased with thawing time, and the crossing point (Cp) values of all candidate reference genes correlated positively with the thawing time (p<0.05). The combination of B2M, ACTB and PPIA was identified as the best choice for qPCR normalization. We found most target genes were stable by using this normalization method. However, serious gene quantification errors were resulted from improper reference genes. In conclusion, thirty minutes of thawing at room temperature has a limited impact on microarray and qPCR analysis, gene expression variations due to RNA degradation in early period after thawing can be largely reduced by proper normalization.

  9. Circular RNA and gene expression profiles in gastric cancer based on microarray chip technology.

    PubMed

    Sui, Weiguo; Shi, Zhoufang; Xue, Wen; Ou, Minglin; Zhu, Ying; Chen, Jiejing; Lin, Hua; Liu, Fuhua; Dai, Yong

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to screen gastric cancer (GC) tissue and adjacent tissue for differences in mRNA and circular (circRNA) expression, to analyze the differences in circRNA and mRNA expression, and to investigate the circRNA expression in gastric carcinoma and its mechanism. circRNA and mRNA differential expression profiles generated using Agilent microarray technology were analyzed in the GC tissues and adjacent tissues. qRT-PCR was used to verify the differential expression of circRNAs and mRNAs according to the interactions between circRNAs and miRNAs as well as the possible existence of miRNA and mRNA interactions. We found that: i) the circRNA expression profile revealed 1,285 significant differences in circRNA expression, with circRNA expression downregulated in 594 samples and upregulated in 691 samples via interactions with miRNAs. The qRT-PCR validation experiments showed that hsa_circRNA_400071, hsa_circRNA_000543 and hsa_circRNA_001959 expression was consistent with the microarray analysis results. ii) 29,112 genes were found in the GC tissues and adjacent tissues, including 5,460 differentially expressed genes. Among them, 2,390 differentially expressed genes were upregulated and 3,070 genes were downregulated. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the differentially expressed genes revealed these genes involved in biological process classification, cellular component classification and molecular function classification. Pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes identified 83 significantly enriched genes, including 28 upregulated genes and 55 downregulated genes. iii) 69 differentially expressed circRNAs were found that might adsorb specific miRNAs to regulate the expression of their target gene mRNAs. The conclusions are: i) differentially expressed circRNAs had corresponding miRNA binding sites. These circRNAs regulated the expression of target genes through interactions with miRNAs and might become new molecular biomarkers for GC

  10. Increased expression of a set of genes enriched in oxygen binding function discloses a predisposition of breast cancer bone metastases to generate metastasis spread in multiple organs.

    PubMed

    Capulli, Mattia; Angelucci, Adriano; Driouch, Keltouma; Garcia, Teresa; Clement-Lacroix, Philippe; Martella, Francesco; Ventura, Luca; Bologna, Mauro; Flamini, Stefano; Moreschini, Oreste; Lidereau, Rosette; Ricevuto, Enrico; Muraca, Maurizio; Teti, Anna; Rucci, Nadia

    2012-11-01

    Bone is the preferential site of distant metastasis in breast carcinoma (BrCa). Patients with metastasis restricted to bone (BO) usually show a longer overall survival compared to patients who rapidly develop multiple metastases also involving liver and lung. Hence, molecular predisposition to generate bone and visceral metastases (BV) represents a clear indication of poor clinical outcome. We performed microarray analysis with two different chip platforms, Affymetrix and Agilent, on bone metastasis samples from BO and BV patients. The unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the resulting transcriptomes correlated with the clinical progression, segregating the BO from the BV profiles. Matching the twofold significantly regulated genes from Affymetrix and Agilent chips resulted in a 15-gene signature with 13 upregulated and two downregulated genes in BV versus BO bone metastasis samples. In order to validate the resulting signature, we isolated different MDA-MB-231 clonal subpopulations that metastasize only in the bone (MDA-BO) or in bone and visceral tissues (MDA-BV). Six of the signature genes were also significantly upregulated in MDA-BV compared to MDA-BO clones. A group of upregulated genes, including Hemoglobin B (HBB), were involved in oxygen metabolism, and in vitro functional analysis of HBB revealed that its expression in the MDA subpopulations was associated with a reduced production of hydrogen peroxide. Expression of HBB was detected in primary BrCa tissue but not in normal breast epithelial cells. Metastatic lymph nodes were frequently more positive for HBB compared to the corresponding primary tumors, whereas BO metastases had a lower expression than BV metastases, suggesting a positive correlation between HBB and ability of bone metastasis to rapidly spread to other organs. We propose that HBB, along with other genes involved in oxygen metabolism, confers a more aggressive metastatic phenotype in BrCa cells disseminated to bone.

  11. Bacterial Diversity Analysis of Huanglongbing Pathogen-Infected Citrus, Using PhyloChip Arrays and 16S rRNA Gene Clone Library Sequencing▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sagaram, Uma Shankar; DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Trivedi, Pankaj; Andersen, Gary L.; Lu, Shi-En; Wang, Nian

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized for citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene microarrays and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition for symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria in 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs, while 20 orders in 8 phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs than in asymptomatic midribs. “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis results were further verified by sequencing 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. PMID:19151177

  12. Gene expression from plants grown on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimpson, Alexander; Pereira, Rhea; Kiss, John Z.; Correll, Melanie

    Three experiments were performed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2006 as part of the TROPI experiments. These experiments were performed to study graviTROPIsm and photoTROPIsm responses of Arabidopsis in microgravity (µg). Seedlings were grown with a variety of light and gravitational treatments for approximately five days. The frozen samples were returned to Earth during three space shuttle missions in 2007 and stored at -80° C. Due to the limited amount of plant biomass returned, new protocols were developed to minimize the amount of material needed for RNA extraction as a preparation for microarray analysis. Using these new protocols, RNA was extracted from several sets of seedlings grown in red light followed by blue light with one sample from 1.0g treatment and the other at µg. Using a 2-fold change criterion, microarray (Affymetrix, GeneChip) results showed that 613 genes were upregulated in the µg sample while 757 genes were downregulated. Upregulated genes in response to µg included transcription factors from the WRKY (15 genes), MYB (3) and ZF (8) families as well as those that are involved in auxin responses (10). Downregulated genes also included transcription factors such as MYB (5) and Zinc finger (10) but interestingly only two WRKY family genes were down-regulated during the µg treatment. Studies are underway to compare these results with other samples to identify the genes involved in the gravity and light signal transduction pathways (this project is Supported By: NASA NCC2-1200).

  13. Hepatology in the 21st century. Gene transfer, hepatocyte transplantation, DNA chips, cyberspace and ... a friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Jansen, P L

    1999-12-01

    What to expect for hepatology in the 21st century? If science is allowed to proceed at its current rate, expectations can hardly be underestimated. Bound by the present day's limitations we are only able to see a glimpse of what could be available 100 years from now. For the next few decades, the global eradication of viral hepatitis will be on the agenda. For the treatment of inherited and acquired metabolic, toxic and immune liver disease, targeted drugs, genes and antisense oligonucleotides will be added to our therapeutic repertoire. The completion of the human genome project in 2003 will have far-reaching consequences: the widespread use of prenatal diagnosis, using DNA chip technology, may be expected to cause a dramatic decrease in the incidence of inherited diseases. Liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and inborn errors of metabolism may be treated by gene transfer or gene repair therapy. Although eventually these developments may decrease the need for organ transplantation, this by no means is the case yet and no solution is available for an increased demand and a decreased supply of organs. In the long run, diseases caused by multi-drug-resistant infectious agents and diseases associated with the abuse of alcohol and drugs are expected to become major problems. The future of university-based research is uncertain. The staggering costs of research and limited career possibilities may force universities to the limited task of higher education, with as a result biotech companies, shareholders and corporate finance ruling the scientific waves in the next century. The 21st century patient will know the way in cyberspace and will go shopping for the best doctor, for the best treatment and for the best, or friendliest, hospital.

  14. Automated target preparation for microarray-based gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Frédéric; Metairon, Sylviane; Borner, Roland; Hofmann, Markus; Kussmann, Martin

    2006-09-15

    DNA microarrays have rapidly evolved toward a platform for massively paralleled gene expression analysis. Despite its widespread use, the technology has been criticized to be vulnerable to technical variability. Addressing this issue, recent comparative, interplatform, and interlaboratory studies have revealed that, given defined procedures for "wet lab" experiments and data processing, a satisfactory reproducibility and little experimental variability can be achieved. In view of these advances in standardization, the requirement for uniform sample preparation becomes evident, especially if a microarray platform is used as a facility, i.e., by different users working in the laboratory. While one option to reduce technical variability is to dedicate one laboratory technician to all microarray studies, we have decided to automate the entire RNA sample preparation implementing a liquid handling system coupled to a thermocycler and a microtiter plate reader. Indeed, automated RNA sample preparation prior to chip analysis enables (1) the reduction of experimentally caused result variability, (2) the separation of (important) biological variability from (undesired) experimental variation, and (3) interstudy comparison of gene expression results. Our robotic platform can process up to 24 samples in parallel, using an automated sample preparation method that produces high-quality biotin-labeled cRNA ready to be hybridized on Affymetrix GeneChips. The results show that the technical interexperiment variation is less pronounced than with manually prepared samples. Moreover, experiments using the same starting material showed that the automated process yields a good reproducibility between samples.

  15. Whole mitochondrial genome screening in maternally inherited non-syndromic hearing impairment using a microarray resequencing mitochondrial DNA chip.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Marianne; Marlin, Sandrine; Jonard, Laurence; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Baulande, Sylvain; Pierron, Denis; Lacombe, Didier; Duriez, Françoise; Francannet, Christine; Mom, Thierry; Journel, Hubert; Catros, Hélène; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Obstoy, Marie-Françoise; Dollfus, Hélène; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Faivre, Laurence; Duvillard, Christian; Couderc, Remy; Garabedian, Eréa-Noël; Petit, Christine; Feldmann, Delphine; Denoyelle, Françoise

    2007-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been implicated in non-syndromic hearing loss either as primary or as predisposing factors. As only a part of the mitochondrial genome is usually explored in deafness, its prevalence is probably under-estimated. Among 1350 families with non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss collected through a French collaborative network, we selected 29 large families with a clear maternal lineage and screened them for known mtDNA mutations in 12S rRNA, tRNASer(UCN) and tRNALeu(UUR) genes. When no mutation could be identified, a whole mitochondrial genome screening was performed, using a microarray resequencing chip: the MitoChip version 2.0 developed by Affymetrix Inc. Known mtDNA mutations was found in nine of the 29 families, which are described in the article: five with A1555G, two with the T7511C, one with 7472insC and one with A3243G mutation. In the remaining 20 families, the resequencing Mitochip detected 258 mitochondrial homoplasmic variants and 107 potentially heteroplasmic variants. Controls were made by direct sequencing on selected fragments and showed a high sensibility of the MitoChip but a low specificity, especially for heteroplasmic variations. An original analysis on the basis of species conservation, frequency and phylogenetic investigation was performed to select the more probably pathogenic variants. The entire genome analysis allowed us to identify five additional families with a putatively pathogenic mitochondrial variant: T669C, C1537T, G8078A, G12236A and G15077A. These results indicate that the new MitoChip platform is a rapid and valuable tool for identification of new mtDNA mutations in deafness.

  16. Microgravity and immunity: Changes in lymphocyte gene expression.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risin, D.; Ward, N. E.; Risin, S. A.; Pellis, N. R.

    Earlier studies had shown that modeled and true microgravity MG cause multiple direct effects on human lymphocytes MG inhibits lymphocyte locomotion suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific activation affects signal transduction mechanisms as well as activation-induced apoptosis In this study we assessed changes in gene expression associated with lymphocyte exposure to microgravity in an attempt to identify microgravity-sensitive genes MGSG in general and specifically those genes that might be responsible for the functional and structural changes observed earlier Two sets of experiments targeting different goals were conducted In the first set T-lymphocytes from normal donors were activated with anti-CD3 and IL2 and then cultured in 1g static and modeled MG MMG conditions Rotating Wall Vessel bioreactor for 24 hours This setting allowed searching for MGSG by comparison of gene expression patterns in zero and 1 g gravity In the second set - activated T-cells after culturing for 24 hours in 1g and MMG were exposed three hours before harvesting to a secondary activation stimulus PHA thus triggering the apoptotic pathway Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy isolation kit Qiagen Valencia CA Affymetrix Gene Chips U133A allowing testing for 18 400 human genes were used for microarray analysis The experiments were performed in triplicates with T-cells obtained from different blood donors to minimize the possible input of biological variation in gene expression and discriminate changes that are associated with the

  17. Gene-centric Association Signals for Lipids and Apolipoproteins Identified via the HumanCVD BeadChip

    PubMed Central

    Talmud, Philippa J.; Drenos, Fotios; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Palmen, Jutta; Verzilli, Claudio; Gaunt, Tom R.; Pallas, Jacky; Lovering, Ruth; Li, Kawah; Casas, Juan Pablo; Sofat, Reecha; Kumari, Meena; Rodriguez, Santiago; Johnson, Toby; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Dominiczak, Anna; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark; Sever, Peter; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Melander, Olle; Hastie, Claire; Delles, Christian; Ebrahim, Shah; Marmot, Michael G.; Smith, George Davey; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Day, Ian N.; Kivimaki, Mika; Whittaker, John; Humphries, Steve E.; Hingorani, Aroon D.

    2009-01-01

    Blood lipids are important cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors with both genetic and environmental determinants. The Whitehall II study (n = 5592) was genotyped with the gene-centric HumanCVD BeadChip (Illumina). We identified 195 SNPs in 16 genes/regions associated with 3 major lipid fractions and 2 apolipoprotein components at p < 10−5, with the associations being broadly concordant with prior genome-wide analysis. SNPs associated with LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B were located in LDLR, PCSK9, APOB, CELSR2, HMGCR, CETP, the TOMM40-APOE-C1-C2-C4 cluster, and the APOA5-A4-C3-A1 cluster; SNPs associated with HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI were in CETP, LPL, LIPC, APOA5-A4-C3-A1, and ABCA1; and SNPs associated with triglycerides in GCKR, BAZ1B, MLXIPL, LPL, and APOA5-A4-C3-A1. For 48 SNPs in previously unreported loci that were significant at p < 10−4 in Whitehall II, in silico analysis including the British Women's Heart and Health Study, BRIGHT, ASCOT, and NORDIL studies (total n > 12,500) revealed previously unreported associations of SH2B3 (p < 2.2 × 10−6), BMPR2 (p < 2.3 × 10−7), BCL3/PVRL2 (flanking APOE; p < 4.4 × 10−8), and SMARCA4 (flanking LDLR; p < 2.5 × 10−7) with LDL cholesterol. Common alleles in these genes explained 6.1%–14.7% of the variance in the five lipid-related traits, and individuals at opposite tails of the additive allele score exhibited substantial differences in trait levels (e.g., >1 mmol/L in LDL cholesterol [∼1 SD of the trait distribution]). These data suggest that multiple common alleles of small effect can make important contributions to individual differences in blood lipids potentially relevant to the assessment of CVD risk. These genes provide further insights into lipid metabolism and the likely effects of modifying the encoded targets therapeutically. PMID:19913121

  18. Molecular Targeting of Prostate Cancer during Androgen Ablation: Inhibition of CHES1/FOXN3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    wide gene expression profiling with Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays in order to identify the genes whose expression were...analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays. Microarray data analysis was performed using GeneSpring GX software. Differentially

  19. ChIP-on-chip analysis of thyroid hormone-regulated genes and their physiological significance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Huang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Chang-Ching; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Triiodothyronine (T3) and its receptor (TR) modulate several physiological processes, including cell development, proliferation, differentiation and metabolism. The regulatory mechanism of T3/TR involves binding to the thyroid hormone response element (TRE) within the target gene promoter. However, the number of target genes directly regulated by TRα1 and the specific pathways of TR-regulated target genes remain largely unknown. Here, we expressed TRα1 in a HepG2 cell line and used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with microarray to determine the genes that are directly regulated by TRα1 and also involved in cell metabolism and proliferation. Our analysis identified E74-like factor 2 (ELF2), a transcription factor associated with tumor growth, as a direct target downregulated by T3/TR. Overexpression of ELF2 enhanced tumor cell proliferation, and conversely, its knockdown suppressed tumor growth. Additionally, ELF2 restored the proliferative ability of hepatoma cells inhibited by T3/TR. Our findings collectively support a potential role of T3/TR in tumor growth inhibition through regulation of ELF2. PMID:26968954

  20. Comprehensive evaluation of the contribution of X chromosome genes to platinum sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gamazon, Eric R; Im, Hae Kyung; O'Donnell, Peter H; Ziliak, Dana; Stark, Amy L; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen; Huang, Rong Stephanie

    2011-03-01

    Using a genome-wide gene expression data set generated from Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0ST array, we comprehensively surveyed the role of 322 X chromosome gene expression traits on cellular sensitivity to cisplatin and carboplatin. We identified 31 and 17 X chromosome genes whose expression levels are significantly correlated (after multiple testing correction) with sensitivity to carboplatin and cisplatin, respectively, in the combined HapMap CEU (Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe) and YRI (Yoruba in Ibahan, Nigeria) populations (false discovery rate, FDR < 0.05). Of those, 14 overlap for both cisplatin and carboplatin. Using an independent gene expression quantification method, the Illumina Sentrix Human-6 Expression BeadChip, measured on the same HapMap cell lines, we found that 4 and 2 of these genes are significantly associated with carboplatin and cisplatin sensitivity, respectively, in both analyses. Two genes, CTPS2 and DLG3, were identified by both genome-wide gene expression analyses as correlated with cellular sensitivity to both platinating agents. The expression of DLG3 gene was also found to correlate with cellular sensitivity to platinating agents in NCI-60 cancer cell lines. In addition, we evaluated whether the expression of X chromosome genes contributed to the observed differences in sensitivity to the platinums between CEU and YRI-derived cell lines. Of the 34 distinct genes significantly correlated with either carboplatin or cisplatin sensitivity, 14 are differentially expressed (defined as P < 0.05) between CEU and YRI. Thus, sex chromosome genes play a role in cellular sensitivity to platinating agents and differences in the expression level of these genes are an important source of variation that should be included in comprehensive pharmacogenomic studies.

  1. Kidney transplant rejection and tissue injury by gene profiling of biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Flechner, Stuart M; Kurian, Sunil M; Head, Steven R; Sharp, Starlette M; Whisenant, Thomas C; Zhang, Jie; Chismar, Jeffrey D; Horvath, Steve; Mondala, Tony; Gilmartin, Timothy; Cook, Daniel J; Kay, Steven A; Walker, John R; Salomon, Daniel R

    2004-09-01

    A major challenge for kidney transplantation is balancing the need for immunosuppression to prevent rejection, while minimizing drug-induced toxicities. We used DNA microarrays (HG-U95Av2 GeneChips, Affymetrix) to determine gene expression profiles for kidney biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in transplant patients including normal donor kidneys, well-functioning transplants without rejection, kidneys undergoing acute rejection, and transplants with renal dysfunction without rejection. We developed a data analysis schema based on expression signal determination, class comparison and prediction, hierarchical clustering, statistical power analysis and real-time quantitative PCR validation. We identified distinct gene expression signatures for both biopsies and PBLs that correlated significantly with each of the different classes of transplant patients. This is the most complete report to date using commercial arrays to identify unique expression signatures in transplant biopsies distinguishing acute rejection, acute dysfunction without rejection and well-functioning transplants with no rejection history. We demonstrate for the first time the successful application of high density DNA chip analysis of PBL as a diagnostic tool for transplantation. The significance of these results, if validated in a multicenter prospective trial, would be the establishment of a metric based on gene expression signatures for monitoring the immune status and immunosuppression of transplanted patients.

  2. Comparison of L1000 and Affymetrix Microarray for In Vitro Concentration-Response Gene Expression Profiling (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in high-throughput screening technologies and in vitro systems have opened doors for cost-efficient evaluation of chemical effects on a diversity of biological endpoints. However, toxicogenomics platforms remain too costly to evaluate large libraries of chemicals in conc...

  3. Integration of Genome-Wide Computation DRE Search, AhR ChIP-chip and Gene Expression Analyses of TCDD-Elicited Responses in the Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor (TF) that mediates responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Integration of TCDD-induced genome-wide AhR enrichment, differential gene expression and computational dioxin response element (DRE) analyses further elucidate the hepatic AhR regulatory network. Results Global ChIP-chip and gene expression analyses were performed on hepatic tissue from immature ovariectomized mice orally gavaged with 30 μg/kg TCDD. ChIP-chip analysis identified 14,446 and 974 AhR enriched regions (1% false discovery rate) at 2 and 24 hrs, respectively. Enrichment density was greatest in the proximal promoter, and more specifically, within ± 1.5 kb of a transcriptional start site (TSS). AhR enrichment also occurred distal to a TSS (e.g. intergenic DNA and 3' UTR), extending the potential gene expression regulatory roles of the AhR. Although TF binding site analyses identified over-represented DRE sequences within enriched regions, approximately 50% of all AhR enriched regions lacked a DRE core (5'-GCGTG-3'). Microarray analysis identified 1,896 number of TCDD-responsive genes (|fold change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) > 0.999). Integrating this gene expression data with our ChIP-chip and DRE analyses only identified 625 differentially expressed genes that involved an AhR interaction at a DRE. Functional annotation analysis of differentially regulated genes associated with AhR enrichment identified overrepresented processes related to fatty acid and lipid metabolism and transport, and xenobiotic metabolism, which are consistent with TCDD-elicited steatosis in the mouse liver. Conclusions Details of the AhR regulatory network have been expanded to include AhR-DNA interactions within intragenic and intergenic genomic regions. Moreover, the AhR can interact with DNA independent of a DRE core suggesting there are alternative mechanisms of AhR-mediated gene regulation. PMID:21762485

  4. Identification of differentially expressed genes in HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ivan; Wang, Jun; Hobson, Kenosha F.; Ferris, Robert L.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a subset of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The goal of this study was to compare the cellular gene expression profiles of HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal carcinomas with those of the normal oral epithelium. Using Affymetrix Human U133A GeneChip, our results showed that 397 genes were differentially expressed in HPV-positive SCCHN compared to the normal oral epithelium. The up-regulated genes included those involved in cell cycle regulation (CDKN2A), cell differentiation (SFRP4) and DNA repair (RAD51AP1), while the down-regulated genes included those involved in proteolysis (PRSS3). We also found 162 differentially expressed genes in HPV-negative SCCHN compared to the normal oral mucosa. The up-regulated genes included those involved in cell proliferation (AKR1C3) and transcription regulation (SNAPC1), while down-regulated genes included those involved in apoptosis (CLU) and RNA processing (RBM3). Our studies also identified a subgroup of 59 differentially expressed genes in HPV-positive SCCHN as compared to both HPV-negative SCCHN and normal oral tissues. Such up-regulated genes included those involved in nuclear structure and meiosis (SYCP2), DNA repair (RFC5), and transcription regulation (ZNF238). Genes involved in proteolysis (KLK8) and signal transduction (CRABP2) were found to be down-regulated in HPV-positive SCCHN. The results of GeneChip experiments were validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis of a few representative genes. Our results reveal specific gene expression patterns in HPV-positive and HPV-negative oropharyngeal squamous carcinomas that may serve as potential biomarkers for the development of SCCHN. PMID:17079134

  5. Gene expression profiling in the skin of zebrafish infected with Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Lü, Aijun; Hu, Xiucai; Xue, Jun; Zhu, Jingrong; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Guangzhou

    2012-02-01

    Skin is considered the largest immunologically active organ, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear in fish. Here, Affymetrix Zebrafish GeneChip was used to assess gene expression in the skin of zebrafish (Danio rerio) infected with the bacterium Citrobacter freundii. The results showed that 229 genes were differentially expressed, of which 196 genes were upregulated and 33 genes were downregulated. Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analyses indicated 88 genes significantly associated with skin immunity involved in complement activation and acute phase response, defense and immune response, response to stress and stimulus, antigen processing and presentation, cell adhesion and migration, platelet activation and coagulation factors, regulation of autophagy and apoptosis. When compared with transcriptional profiles of previously reported carp (Cyprinus carpio) skin, a similar innate immunity (e.g., interferon, lectin, heat shock proteins, complements), and several different acute phase proteins (transferrin, ceruloplasmin, vitellogenin and alpha-1-microglobulin, etc.) were detected in zebrafish skin. The validity of the microarray results was verified by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of nine representative genes. This is first report that skin play important roles in innate immune responses to bacterial infection, which contribute to understanding the defense mechanisms of the skin in fish.

  6. A lab-on-a-chip system integrating tissue sample preparation and multiplex RT-qPCR for gene expression analysis in point-of-care hepatotoxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Lim, Geok Soon; Chang, Joseph S; Lei, Zhang; Wu, Ruige; Wang, Zhiping; Cui, Kemi; Wong, Stephen

    2015-10-21

    A truly practical lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system for point-of-care testing (POCT) hepatotoxicity assessment necessitates the embodiment of full-automation, ease-of-use and "sample-in-answer-out" diagnostic capabilities. To date, the reported microfluidic devices for POCT hepatotoxicity assessment remain rudimentary as they largely embody only semi-quantitative or single sample/gene detection capabilities. In this paper, we describe, for the first time, an integrated LOC system that is somewhat close to a practical POCT hepatotoxicity assessment device - it embodies both tissue sample preparation and multiplex real-time RT-PCR. It features semi-automation, is relatively easy to use, and has "sample-in-answer-out" capabilities for multiplex gene expression analysis. Our tissue sample preparation module incorporating both a microhomogenizer and surface-treated paramagnetic microbeads yielded high purity mRNA extracts, considerably better than manual means of extraction. A primer preloading surface treatment procedure and the single-loading inlet on our multiplex real-time RT-PCR module simplify off-chip handling procedures for ease-of-use. To demonstrate the efficacy of our LOC system for POCT hepatotoxicity assessment, we perform a preclinical animal study with the administration of cyclophosphamide, followed by gene expression analysis of two critical protein biomarkers for liver function tests, aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT). Our experimental results depict normalized fold changes of 1.62 and 1.31 for AST and ALT, respectively, illustrating up-regulations in their expression levels and hence validating their selection as critical genes of interest. In short, we illustrate the feasibility of multiplex gene expression analysis in an integrated LOC system as a viable POCT means for hepatotoxicity assessment.

  7. Gene expression analysis of tuberous sclerosis complex cortical tubers reveals increased expression of adhesion and inflammatory factors

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Karin; Crino, Peter B.; Gorter, Jan A.; Nellist, Mark; Jansen, Floor E.; Spliet, Wim G.M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Wittink, Floyd R.A.; Breit, Timo M.; Troost, Dirk; Wadman, Wytse J.; Aronica, Eleonora

    2009-01-01

    Cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are associated with disabling neurological manifestations, including intractable epilepsy. While these malformations are believed to result from the effects of TSC1 or TSC2 gene mutations, the molecular mechanisms leading to tuber formation, as well as the onset of seizures remain largely unknown. We used the Affymetrix Gene Chip platform to provide the first genome wide investigation of gene expression in surgically resected tubers, compared with histological normal perituberal tissue from the same patients or autopsy control tissue. We identified 2501 differentially expressed genes in cortical tubers compared with autopsy controls. Expression of genes associated with cell adhesion e.g., VCAM1, integrins and CD44, or with the inflammatory response, including complement factors, serpinA3, CCL2 and several cytokines, was increased in cortical tubers, whereas genes related to synaptic transmission e.g., the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1, and voltage-gated channel activity, exhibited lower expression. Gene expression in perituberal cortex was distinct from autopsy control cortex suggesting that even in the absence of tissue pathology the transcriptome is altered in TSC. Changes in gene expression yield insights into new candidate genes that may contribute to tuber formation or seizure onset, representing new targets for potential therapeutic development. PMID:19912235

  8. Reverse engineering and analysis of large genome-scale gene networks.

    PubMed

    Aluru, Maneesha; Zola, Jaroslaw; Nettleton, Dan; Aluru, Srinivas

    2013-01-07

    Reverse engineering the whole-genome networks of complex multicellular organisms continues to remain a challenge. While simpler models easily scale to large number of genes and gene expression datasets, more accurate models are compute intensive limiting their scale of applicability. To enable fast and accurate reconstruction of large networks, we developed Tool for Inferring Network of Genes (TINGe), a parallel mutual information (MI)-based program. The novel features of our approach include: (i) B-spline-based formulation for linear-time computation of MI, (ii) a novel algorithm for direct permutation testing and (iii) development of parallel algorithms to reduce run-time and facilitate construction of large networks. We assess the quality of our method by comparison with ARACNe (Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks) and GeneNet and demonstrate its unique capability by reverse engineering the whole-genome network of Arabidopsis thaliana from 3137 Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips in just 9 min on a 1024-core cluster. We further report on the development of a new software Gene Network Analyzer (GeNA) for extracting context-specific subnetworks from a given set of seed genes. Using TINGe and GeNA, we performed analysis of 241 Arabidopsis AraCyc 8.0 pathways, and the results are made available through the web.

  9. Downregulation of myelination, energy, and translational genes in Menkes disease brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Po-Ching; Chen, Yi-Wen; Centeno, Jose A; Quezado, Martha; Lem, Kristen; Kaler, Stephen G

    2005-08-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is an X-linked recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in a copper-transporting p-type ATPase (ATP7A) that normally delivers copper to the central nervous system. The precise reasons for neurodegeneration in MD are poorly understood. We hypothesized that gene expression changes in a MD patient with a lethal ATP7A mutation would indicate pathophysiological cascades relevant to the effects of copper deficiency in the developing brain. To test this hypothesis, oligonucleotide probes for 12,000 genes arrayed on Affymetrix Human Genome U95 GeneChips were used for expression profiling of fluorescently labeled primary cRNAs from post-mortem cerebral cortex and cerebellum of a MD patient who died at 6 months of age and a normal control brain matched for age, gender, and race. Histopathologic analysis of the proband's brain showed preservation of neuronal integrity and no hypoxic effects. However, cerebrospinal fluid and brain copper levels were subnormal, and expression profiling identified over 350 known dysregulated genes. For a subset of genes (approximately 12%) analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, the correct cross-validation rate was 88%. Thirty known genes were altered in both cortex and cerebellum. Downregulation of genes involved in myelination, energy metabolism, and translation was the major finding. The cerebellum was more sensitive to copper deficiency.

  10. Effect of chronic valproic Acid treatment on hepatic gene expression profile in wfs1 knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Punapart, Marite; Eltermaa, Mall; Oflijan, Julia; Sütt, Silva; Must, Anne; Kõks, Sulev; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Fernandes, Catherine; Vasar, Eero; Soomets, Ursel; Terasmaa, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug whose use is often associated with drug-induced weight gain. Treatment with VPA has been shown to upregulate Wfs1 expression in vitro. Aim of the present study was to compare the effect of chronic VPA treatment in wild type (WT) and Wfs1 knockout (KO) mice on hepatic gene expression profile. Wild type, Wfs1 heterozygous, and homozygous mice were treated with VPA for three months (300 mg/kg i.p. daily) and gene expression profiles in liver were evaluated using Affymetrix Mouse GeneChip 1.0 ST array. We identified 42 genes affected by Wfs1 genotype, 10 genes regulated by VPA treatment, and 9 genes whose regulation by VPA was dependent on genotype. Among the genes that were regulated differentially by VPA depending on genotype was peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (Ppard), whose expression was upregulated in response to VPA treatment in WT, but not in Wfs1 KO mice. Thus, regulation of Ppard by VPA is dependent on Wfs1 genotype.

  11. Differential gene expression in mouse liver associated with the hepatoprotective effect of clofibrate

    SciTech Connect

    Moffit, Jeffrey S.; Koza-Taylor, Petra H.; Holland, Ricky D.; Thibodeau, Michael S.; Beger, Richard D.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, Jose E. . E-mail: jose.manautou@uconn.edu

    2007-07-15

    Pretreatment of mice with the peroxisome proliferator clofibrate (CFB) protects against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Previous studies have shown that activation of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is required for this effect. The present study utilizes gene expression profile analysis to identify potential pathways contributing to PPAR{alpha}-mediated hepatoprotection. Gene expression profiles were compared between wild type and PPAR{alpha}-null mice pretreated with vehicle or CFB (500 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 10 days) and then challenged with APAP (400 mg/kg, p.o.). Total hepatic RNA was isolated 4 h after APAP treatment and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MGU74 v2.0 GeneChips. Gene expression analysis was performed utilizing GeneSpring (registered) software. Our analysis identified 53 genes of interest including vanin-1, cell cycle regulators, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, an acetaminophen binding protein. Vanin-1 could be important for CFB-mediated hepatoprotection because this protein is involved in the synthesis of cysteamine and cystamine. These are potent antioxidants capable of ameliorating APAP toxicity in rodents and humans. HPLC-ESI/MS/MS analysis of liver extracts indicates that enhanced vanin-1 gene expression results in elevated cystamine levels, which could be mechanistically associated with CFB-mediated hepatoprotection.

  12. Dexpanthenol modulates gene expression in skin wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heise, R; Skazik, C; Marquardt, Y; Czaja, K; Sebastian, K; Kurschat, P; Gan, L; Denecke, B; Ekanayake-Bohlig, S; Wilhelm, K-P; Merk, H F; Baron, J M

    2012-01-01

    Topical application of dexpanthenol is widely used in clinical practice for the improvement of wound healing. Previous in vitro experiments identified a stimulatory effect of pantothenate on migration, proliferation and gene regulation in cultured human dermal fibroblasts. To correlate these in vitro findings with the more complex in vivo situation of wound healing, a clinical trial was performed in which the dexpanthenol-induced gene expression profile in punch biopsies of previously injured and dexpanthenol-treated skin in comparison to placebo-treated skin was analyzed at the molecular level by Affymetrix® GeneChip analysis. Upregulation of IL-6, IL-1β, CYP1B1, CXCL1, CCL18 and KAP 4-2 gene expression and downregulation of psorasin mRNA and protein expression were identified in samples treated topically with dexpanthenol. This in vivo study might provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the effect of dexpanthenol in wound healing and shows strong correlations to previous in vitro data using cultured dermal fibroblasts.

  13. Transcriptional Profiling of Canker-Resistant Transgenic Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) Constitutively Overexpressing a Spermidine Synthase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xing-Zheng; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Citrus canker disease caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is one of the most devastating diseases affecting the citrus industry worldwide. In our previous study, the canker-resistant transgenic sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) plants were produced via constitutively overexpressing a spermidine synthase. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying Xcc resistance of the transgenic plants, in the present study global transcriptional profiling was compared between untransformed line (WT) and the transgenic line (TG9) by hybridizing with Affymetrix Citrus GeneChip. In total, 666 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, 448 upregulated, and 218 downregulated. The DEGs were classified into 33 categories after Gene ontology (GO) annotation, in which 68 genes are in response to stimulus and involved in immune system process, 12 genes are related to cell wall, and 13 genes belong to transcription factors. These genes and those related to starch and sucrose metabolism, glutathione metabolism, biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids, and plant hormones were hypothesized to play major roles in the canker resistance of TG9. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the transcript levels of several candidate genes in TG9 were significantly higher than in WT both before and after Xcc inoculation, indicating their potential association with canker disease. PMID:23509803

  14. Transcriptional profiling of canker-resistant transgenic sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) constitutively overexpressing a spermidine synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xing-Zheng; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Citrus canker disease caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) is one of the most devastating diseases affecting the citrus industry worldwide. In our previous study, the canker-resistant transgenic sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) plants were produced via constitutively overexpressing a spermidine synthase. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying Xcc resistance of the transgenic plants, in the present study global transcriptional profiling was compared between untransformed line (WT) and the transgenic line (TG9) by hybridizing with Affymetrix Citrus GeneChip. In total, 666 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, 448 upregulated, and 218 downregulated. The DEGs were classified into 33 categories after Gene ontology (GO) annotation, in which 68 genes are in response to stimulus and involved in immune system process, 12 genes are related to cell wall, and 13 genes belong to transcription factors. These genes and those related to starch and sucrose metabolism, glutathione metabolism, biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids, and plant hormones were hypothesized to play major roles in the canker resistance of TG9. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the transcript levels of several candidate genes in TG9 were significantly higher than in WT both before and after Xcc inoculation, indicating their potential association with canker disease.

  15. Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the setting of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a relatively common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that leads to progressive narrowing of the lumen of leg arteries. Circulating monocytes are in contact with the arterial wall and can serve as reporters of vascular pathology in the setting of PAD. We performed gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with PAD and controls without PAD to identify differentially regulated genes. Methods PAD was defined as an ankle brachial index (ABI) ≤0.9 (n = 19) while age and gender matched controls had an ABI > 1.0 (n = 18). Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix HG-U133 plus 2.0 gene chips and analyzed using GeneSpring GX 11.0. Gene expression data was normalized using Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) normalization method, differential expression was defined as a fold change ≥1.5, followed by unpaired Mann-Whitney test (P < 0.05) and correction for multiple testing by Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes was performed using an integrated bioinformatics pipeline with tools for enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, pathway analysis using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), molecular event enrichment using Reactome annotations and network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suite. Extensive biocuration was also performed to understand the functional context of genes. Results We identified 87 genes differentially expressed in the setting of PAD; 40 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated. We employed an integrated bioinformatics pipeline coupled with literature curation to characterize the functional coherence of differentially regulated genes. Conclusion Notably, upregulated genes mediate immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, stress response, phosphorylation, hemostasis, platelet activation and platelet aggregation. Downregulated genes included several genes from

  16. Beyond the Gene Chip

    PubMed Central

    Heng, J. B; Aksimentiev, A.; Ho, C.; Dimitrov, V.; Sorsch, T.; Miner, J.; Mansfield, W.; Schulten, K.; Timp, G.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a prospective strategy for reading the encyclopedic information encoded in the genome: using a nanopore in a membrane formed from an MOS-capacitor to sense the charge in DNA. In principle, as DNA permeates the capacitor-membrane through the pore, the electrostatic charge distribution characteristic of the molecule should polarize the capacitor and induce a voltage on the electrodes that can be measured. Silicon nanofabrication and molecular dynamic simulations with atomic detail are technological linchpins in the development of this detector. The sub-nanometer precision available through silicon nanotechnology facilitates the fabrication of the detector, and molecular dynamics provides us with a means to design it and analyze the experimental outcomes. PMID:18815623

  17. Real-time microfluidic recombinase polymerase amplification for the toxin B gene of Clostridium difficile on a SlipChip platform.

    PubMed

    Tsaloglou, M-N; Watson, R J; Rushworth, C M; Zhao, Y; Niu, X; Sutton, J M; Morgan, H

    2015-01-07

    Clostridium difficile is one of the key bacterial pathogens that cause infectious diarrhoea both in the developed and developing world. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods are increasingly used for identification of toxinogenic infection by clinical labs. For this purpose, we developed a low-cost microfluidic platform based on the SlipChip concept and implemented real-time isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The on-chip RPA assay targets the Clostridium difficile toxin B gene (tcdB) coding for toxin B, one of the proteins responsible for bacterial toxicity. The device was fabricated in clear acrylic using rapid prototyping methods. It has six replicate 500 nL reaction wells as well as two sets of 500 nL control wells. The reaction can be monitored in real-time using exonuclease fluorescent probes with an initial sample volume of as little as 6.4 μL. We demonstrated a limit of detection of 1000 DNA copies, corresponding to 1 fg, at a time-to-result of <20 minutes. This miniaturised platform for pathogen detection has potential for use in resource-limited environments or at the point-of-care because of its ease of use and low cost, particularly if combined with preserved reagents.

  18. Atrial Fibrillation, Neurocognitive Decline and Gene Expression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Rahul S.; Sabe, Ashraf A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Ramlawi, Basel; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline are common complications after cardiopulmonary bypass. By utilizing genomic microarrays we investigate whether gene expression is associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline. METHODS Twenty one cardiac surgery patients were prospectively matched and underwent neurocognitive assessments pre-operatively and four days postoperatively. The whole blood collected in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass, 6 hours after-cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the 4th postoperative day was hybridized to Affymetrix Gene Chip U133 Plus 2.0 Microarrays. Gene expression in patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline (n=6; POAF+NCD) was compared with gene expression in patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation and normal cognitive function (n=5; POAF+NORM) and patients with sinus rhythm and normal cognitive function (n=10; SR+NORM). Regulated genes were identified using JMP Genomics 4.0 with a false discovery rate of 0.05 and fold change of >1.5 or <-1.5. RESULTS Eleven patients developed postoperative atrial fibrillation. Six of these also developed neurocognitive decline. Of the 12 patients with sinus rhythm, only 2 developed neurocognitive decline. POAF+NCD patients had unique regulation of 17 named genes preoperatively, 60 named genes six hours after cardiopulmonary bypass, and 34 named genes four days postoperatively (P<0.05) compared with normal patients. Pathway analysis demonstrated that these genes are involved in cell death, inflammation, cardiac remodeling and nervous system function. CONCLUSION Patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline after cardiopulmonary bypass may have differential genomic responses compared to normal patients and patients with only postoperative atrial fibrillation, suggesting common pathophysiology for these conditions. Further exploration of these genes may provide insight into the

  19. Rapid identification of Candida spp. frequently involved in invasive mycoses by using flow-through hybridization and Gene Chip (FHGC) technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Ding, Xiurong; Liu, Zhizhong; Zhu, Juanjuan

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients has increased in recent decades. Rapid and accurate identification of these pathogenic fungi is crucial for initiating a timely, safe, and effective antifungal therapy. Here we developed a microarray based on flow-through hybridization gene chip technology. The microarray was tested for its specificity using a panel of reference and blinded clinical isolates. The results proved that this microarray was highly discriminative, leading to the unequivocal identification of each species, including Candida famata and the highly related species Candida parapsilosis, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis. This new system represents a reliable method that is of potential use in clinical laboratories for the simultaneous detection and identification of the most common pathogenic fungi.

  20. Microarray Analysis of Murine Retinal Light Damage Reveals Changes in Iron Regulatory, Complement, and Antioxidant Genes in the Neurosensory Retina and Isolated RPE

    PubMed Central

    Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Kumar, Usha; Song, Ying; Grieco, Steven; Song, Delu; Li, Yafeng; Tobias, John W.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate light damage–induced transcript changes within neurosensory retina (NSR) and isolated retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Similar studies have been conducted previously, but were usually limited to the NSR and only a portion of the transcriptome. Herein most of the transcriptome, not just in the NSR but also in isolated RPE, was queried. Methods. Mice were exposed to 10,000 lux cool white fluorescent light for 18 hours and euthanized 4 hours after photic injury. NSR and isolated RPE were collected, and RNA was isolated. DNA microarray hybridization was conducted as described in the Affymetrix GeneChip Expression Analysis Technical Manual. Microarray analysis was performed using probe intensity data derived from the Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Array. For the genes of interest, confirmation of gene expression was done using quantitative real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence assessed protein levels and localization. Results. Numerous iron regulatory genes were significantly changed in the light-exposed NSR and RPE. Several of these gene expression changes favored an iron-overloaded state. For example, the transferrin receptor was upregulated in both light-exposed NSR and RPE. Consistent with this, there was stronger transferrin receptor immunoreactivity in the light-exposed retinas. Significant changes in gene expression following light damage were also observed in oxidative stress and complement system genes. Conclusions. The concept of a photooxidative stress–induced vicious cycle of increased iron uptake leading to further oxidative stress was introduced. PMID:22736611

  1. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena; and others

    2016-01-15

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants. - Highlights: • Amino acid changes in HPV16 E6 variants modulate the transciption of specific genes. • This is the first comparison of global gene expression profile of HPV 16 E6 variants. • Each HPV 16 E6 variant appears to have its own molecular signature.

  2. Temporal Dissection of Rate Limiting Transcriptional Events Using Pol II ChIP and RNA Analysis of Adrenergic Stress Gene Activation

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Daniel P.; Lei, Beilei; Longo, Lawrence D.; Bomsztyk, Karol; Schwinn, Debra A.; Michelotti, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, increasing evidence supports mechanisms of co-transcriptional gene regulation and the generality of genetic control subsequent to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment. In this report, we use Pol II Chromatin Immunoprecipitation to investigate relationships between the mechanistic events controlling immediate early gene (IEG) activation following stimulation of the α1a-Adrenergic Receptor expressed in rat-1 fibroblasts. We validate our Pol II ChIP assay by comparison to major transcriptional events assessable by microarray and PCR analysis of precursor and mature mRNA. Temporal analysis of Pol II density suggests that reduced proximal pausing often enhances gene expression and was essential for Nr4a3 expression. Nevertheless, for Nr4a3 and several other genes, proximal pausing delayed the time required for initiation of productive elongation, consistent with a role in ensuring transcriptional fidelity. Arrival of Pol II at the 3’ cleavage site usually correlated with increased polyadenylated mRNA; however, for Nfil3 and probably Gprc5a expression was delayed and accompanied by apparent pre-mRNA degradation. Intragenic pausing not associated with polyadenylation was also found to regulate and delay Gprc5a expression. Temporal analysis of Nr4a3, Dusp5 and Nfil3 shows that transcription of native IEG genes can proceed at velocities of 3.5 to 4 kilobases/min immediately after activation. Of note, all of the genes studied here also used increased Pol II recruitment as an important regulator of expression. Nevertheless, the generality of co-transcriptional regulation during IEG activation suggests temporal and integrated analysis will often be necessary to distinguish causative from potential rate limiting mechanisms. PMID:26244980

  3. Hepatic temporal gene expression profiling in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Samuel R; Rogers, Arlin B; Shen, Zeli; Fry, Rebecca C; Love, Jennifer A; Nambiar, Prashant R; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Fox, James G

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection of A/JCr mice is a model of infectious liver cancer. We monitored hepatic global gene expression profiles in H. hepaticus infected and control male A/JCr mice at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year of age using an Affymetrix-based oligonucleotide microarray platform on the premise that a specific genetic expression signature at isolated time points would be indicative of disease status. Model based expression index comparisons generated by dChip yielded consistent profiles of differential gene expression for H. hepaticus infected male mice with progressive liver disease versus uninfected control mice within each age group. Linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis allowed segregation of mice based on combined age and lesion status, or age alone. Up-regulation of putative tumor markers correlated with advancing hepatocellular dysplasia. Transcriptionally down-regulated genes in mice with liver lesions included those related to peroxisome proliferator, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism pathways. In conclusion, transcriptional profiling of hepatic genes documented gene expression signatures in the livers of H. hepaticus infected male A/JCr mice with chronic progressive hepatitis and preneoplastic liver lesions, complemented the histopathological diagnosis, and suggested molecular targets for the monitoring and intervention of disease progression prior to the onset of hepatocellular neoplasia.

  4. [Analysis of gene expression and DNA methylation patterns in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Kazutoshi; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2016-04-01

    The 5-year survival rate of patients with childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) now exceeds 90%, though there are still patients who fail to achieve remission or relapse early. To improve the outcomes of these cases, new diagnostic markers for stratification of those with unfavorable outcomes and novel targets for treatment have been investigated based on data from the OMICs analysis. We performed gene expression analysis of leukemic cells from 91 near-diploid BCP-ALL cases without specific fusion genes enrolled in Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group (TCCSG)-L0416 & L0616 clinical trials employing the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array. Among them, DNA methylation status was analyzed in 24 cases by using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Herein, initially, the current situations of gene expression analysis and DNA methylation analysis of childhood BCP-ALL are reviewed. Then, our analyses of gene expressions and DNA methylation related to the prognosis of childhood ALL without fusion genes are presented.

  5. Genes influencing circadian differences in blood pressure in hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Marques, Francine Z; Campain, Anna E; Davern, Pamela J; Yang, Yee Hwa J; Head, Geoffrey A; Morris, Brian J

    2011-04-26

    Essential hypertension is a common multifactorial heritable condition in which increased sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system is involved in the elevation in blood pressure (BP), as well as the exaggerated morning surge in BP that is a risk factor for myocardial infarction and stroke in hypertensive patients. The Schlager BPH/2J mouse is a genetic model of hypertension in which increased sympathetic outflow from the hypothalamus has an important etiological role in the elevation of BP. Schlager hypertensive mice exhibit a large variation in BP between the active and inactive periods of the day, and also show a morning surge in BP. To investigate the genes responsible for the circadian variation in BP in hypertension, hypothalamic tissue was collected from BPH/2J and normotensive BPN/3J mice at the 'peak' (n = 12) and 'trough' (n = 6) of diurnal BP. Using Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays, validation by quantitative real-time PCR and a statistical method that adjusted for clock genes, we identified 212 hypothalamic genes whose expression differed between 'peak' and 'trough' BP in the hypertensive strain. These included genes with known roles in BP regulation, such as vasopressin, oxytocin and thyrotropin releasing hormone, as well as genes not recognized previously as regulators of BP, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 19, hypocretin and zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16. Gene ontology analysis showed an enrichment of terms for inflammatory response, mitochondrial proton-transporting ATP synthase complex, structural constituent of ribosome, amongst others. In conclusion, we have identified genes whose expression differs between the peak and trough of 24-hour circadian BP in BPH/2J mice, pointing to mechanisms responsible for diurnal variation in BP. The findings may assist in the elucidation of the mechanism for the morning surge in BP in essential hypertension.

  6. Validation study of existing gene expression signatures for anti-TNF treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Erik J M; Gilissen, Christian; Franke, Barbara; Kievit, Wietske; Eijsbouts, Agnes M; den Broeder, Alfons A; van Reijmersdal, Simon V; Veltman, Joris A; Scheffer, Hans; Radstake, Timothy R D J; van Riel, Piet L C M; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J H

    2012-01-01

    So far, there are no means of identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who will fail to respond to tumour necrosis factor blocking agents (anti-TNF), prior to treatment. We set out to validate eight previously reported gene expression signatures predicting therapy outcome. Genome-wide expression profiling using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST arrays was performed on RNA isolated from whole blood of 42 RA patients starting treatment with infliximab or adalimumab. Clinical response according to EULAR criteria was determined at week 14 of therapy. Genes that have been reported to be associated with anti-TNF treatment were extracted from our dataset. K-means partition clustering was performed to assess the predictive value of the gene-sets. We performed a hypothesis-driven analysis of the dataset using eight existing gene sets predictive of anti-TNF treatment outcome. The set that performed best reached a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 61%, for classifying the patients in the current study. We successfully validated one of eight previously reported predictive expression profile. This replicated expression signature is a good starting point for developing a prediction model for anti-TNF treatment outcome that can be used in a daily clinical setting. Our results confirm that gene expression profiling prior to treatment is a useful tool to predict anti-TNF (non) response.

  7. Validation Study of Existing Gene Expression Signatures for Anti-TNF Treatment in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Erik J. M.; Gilissen, Christian; Franke, Barbara; Kievit, Wietske; Eijsbouts, Agnes M.; den Broeder, Alfons A.; van Reijmersdal, Simon V.; Veltman, Joris A.; Scheffer, Hans; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J. H.

    2012-01-01

    So far, there are no means of identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who will fail to respond to tumour necrosis factor blocking agents (anti-TNF), prior to treatment. We set out to validate eight previously reported gene expression signatures predicting therapy outcome. Genome-wide expression profiling using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST arrays was performed on RNA isolated from whole blood of 42 RA patients starting treatment with infliximab or adalimumab. Clinical response according to EULAR criteria was determined at week 14 of therapy. Genes that have been reported to be associated with anti-TNF treatment were extracted from our dataset. K-means partition clustering was performed to assess the predictive value of the gene-sets. We performed a hypothesis-driven analysis of the dataset using eight existing gene sets predictive of anti-TNF treatment outcome. The set that performed best reached a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 61%, for classifying the patients in the current study. We successfully validated one of eight previously reported predictive expression profile. This replicated expression signature is a good starting point for developing a prediction model for anti-TNF treatment outcome that can be used in a daily clinical setting. Our results confirm that gene expression profiling prior to treatment is a useful tool to predict anti-TNF (non) response. PMID:22457743

  8. Effect of Chronic Pioglitazone Treatment on Hepatic Gene Expression Profile in Obese C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chunming; Huan, Yi; Liu, Shuainan; Hou, Shaocong; Sun, Sujuan; Li, Caina; Liu, Quan; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Yue; Shen, Zhufang

    2015-05-29

    Pioglitazone, a selective ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), is an insulin sensitizer drug that is being used in a number of insulin-resistant conditions, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, there is a discrepancy between preclinical and clinical data in the literature and the benefits of pioglitazone treatment as well as the precise mechanism of action remain unclear. In the present study, we determined the effect of chronic pioglitazone treatment on hepatic gene expression profile in diet-induced obesity (DIO) C57BL/6J mice in order to understand the mechanisms of NAFLD induced by PPARγ agonists. DIO mice were treated with pioglitazone (25 mg/kg/day) for 38 days, the gene expression profile in liver was evaluated using Affymetrix Mouse GeneChip 1.0 ST array. Pioglitazone treatment resulted in exacerbated hepatic steatosis and increased hepatic triglyceride and free fatty acids concentrations, though significantly increased the glucose infusion rate in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp test. The differentially expressed genes in liver of pioglitazone treated vs. untreated mice include 260 upregulated and 86 downregulated genes. Gene Ontology based enrichment analysis suggests that inflammation response is transcriptionally downregulated, while lipid metabolism is transcriptionally upregulated. This may underlie the observed aggravating liver steatosis and ameliorated systemic insulin resistance in DIO mice.

  9. Differential gene expression, GATA1 target genes, and the chemotherapy sensitivity of Down syndrome megakaryocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yubin; Dombkowski, Alan A; LaFiura, Katherine M; Tatman, Dana; Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Stout, Mark L; Buck, Steven A; Massey, Gita; Becton, David L; Weinstein, Howard J; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Matherly, Larry H; Taub, Jeffrey W

    2006-02-15

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) with acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMkL) have very high survival rates compared with non-DS AMkL patients. Somatic mutations identified in the X-linked transcription factor gene, GATA1, in essentially all DS AMkL cases result in the synthesis of a shorter (40 kDa) protein (GATA1s) with altered transactivation activity and may lead to altered expression of GATA1 target genes. Using the Affymetrix U133A microarray chip, we identified 551 differentially expressed genes between DS and non-DS AMkL samples. Transcripts for the bone marrow stromal-cell antigen 2 (BST2) gene, encoding a transmembrane glycoprotein potentially involved in interactions between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells, were 7.3-fold higher (validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction) in the non-DS compared with the DS group. Additional studies confirmed GATA1 protein binding and transactivation of the BST2 promoter; however, stimulation of BST2 promoter activity by GATA1s was substantially reduced compared with the full-length GATA1. CMK sublines, transfected with the BST2 cDNA and incubated with HS-5 bone marrow stromal cells, exhibited up to 1.7-fold reduced cytosine arabinoside (ara-C)-induced apoptosis, compared with mock-transfected cells. Our results demonstrate that genes that account for differences in survival between DS and non-DS AMkL cases may be identified by microarray analysis and that differential gene expression may reflect relative transactivation capacities of the GATA1s and full-length GATA1 proteins.

  10. Differential gene expression, GATA1 target genes, and the chemotherapy sensitivity of Down syndrome megakaryocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yubin; Dombkowski, Alan A.; LaFiura, Katherine M.; Tatman, Dana; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Stout, Mark L.; Buck, Steven A.; Massey, Gita; Becton, David L.; Weinstein, Howard J.; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Matherly, Larry H.; Taub, Jeffrey W.

    2006-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) with acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMkL) have very high survival rates compared with non-DS AMkL patients. Somatic mutations identified in the X-linked transcription factor gene, GATA1, in essentially all DS AMkL cases result in the synthesis of a shorter (40 kDa) protein (GATA1s) with altered transactivation activity and may lead to altered expression of GATA1 target genes. Using the Affymetrix U133A microarray chip, we identified 551 differentially expressed genes between DS and non-DS AMkL samples. Transcripts for the bone marrow stromal-cell antigen 2 (BST2) gene, encoding a transmembrane glycoprotein potentially involved in interactions between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells, were 7.3-fold higher (validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction) in the non-DS compared with the DS group. Additional studies confirmed GATA1 protein binding and transactivation of the BST2 promoter; however, stimulation of BST2 promoter activity by GATA1s was substantially reduced compared with the full-length GATA1. CMK sublines, transfected with the BST2 cDNA and incubated with HS-5 bone marrow stromal cells, exhibited up to 1.7-fold reduced cytosine arabinoside (ara-C)-induced apoptosis, compared with mock-transfected cells. Our results demonstrate that genes that account for differences in survival between DS and non-DS AMkL cases may be identified by microarray analysis and that differential gene expression may reflect relative transactivation capacities of the GATA1s and full-length GATA1 proteins. PMID:16249385

  11. Global gene expression in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine and sertraline) reveals unique expression profiles and potential biomarkers of exposure.

    PubMed

    Park, June-Woo; Heah, Tze Ping; Gouffon, Julia S; Henry, Theodore B; Sayler, Gary S

    2012-08-01

    Larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed (96 h) to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) fluoxetine and sertraline and changes in transcriptomes analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChip Zebrafish Array were evaluated to enhance understanding of biochemical pathways and differences between these SSRIs. The number of genes differentially expressed after fluoxetine exposure was 288 at 25 μg/L and 131 at 250 μg/L; and after sertraline exposure was 33 at 25 μg/L and 52 at 250 μg/L. Same five genes were differentially regulated in both SSRIs indicating shared molecular pathways. Among these, the gene coding for FK506 binding protein 5, annotated to stress response regulation, was highly down-regulated in all treatments (results confirmed by qRT-PCR). Gene ontology analysis indicated at the gene expression level that regulation of stress response and cholinesterase activities were influenced by these SSRIs, and suggested that changes in transcription of these genes could be used as biomarkers of SSRI exposure.

  12. Marek's disease virus-induced immunosuppression: array analysis of chicken immune response gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad; Sarson, Aimie J; Huebner, Marianne; Sharif, Shayan; Kireev, Dmitry; Zhou, Huaijun

    2010-06-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4(+) T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to infection, and transcriptional profiling of chicken gene expression in MD are poorly understood. In this study we conducted a global host gene expression analysis in the splenocytes of MDV-infected chickens using oligonucleotide-based Affymetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays. These arrays contain probes for more than 32,000 chicken transcripts and most of the known MDV genes and open reading frames. Two-week-old MD-susceptible chickens were inoculated with an oncogenic strain of MDV, and spleen samples were collected 5 and 15 days post-infection (dpi) for RNA isolation and microarray analysis. Array results displayed a significant differential pattern of immune response transcriptome between the two phases of MDV infection. The expression levels of more than 22 immune-response and related genes were downregulated, while the expression levels of at least 58 genes were increased at 5 dpi (cytolytic infection), compared to age-matched control birds. In comparison, out of 73 immune-response and related genes, 67 genes were downregulated, with only 6 genes having higher expression levels at 15 dpi (latency infection). Cytokines, chemokines, MHC molecules and related receptors, and adhesion molecules were among the many MDV-induced downregulated genes that are critical for an effective antiviral immune response. In addition, several apoptosis-associated genes were decreased in expression during latent infection, suggesting an MDV-induced blocking of initiation or progression of programmed cell death processes. These chicken arrays are valuable tools in understanding the molecular mechanisms behind viral pathogenesis and chicken gene expression patterns, and associated

  13. Gene expression profiles of fatigued fibromyalgia patients with different categories of pain and catastrophizing: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Lukkahatai, Nada; Majors, Benjamin; Reddy, Swarnalatha; Walitt, Brian; Saligan, Leorey N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic condition characterized by diffused musculoskeletal pain and overwhelming fatigue. Purpose To compare the gene expression profiles of fatigued FM women with different levels of pain and catastrophizing. Methods Nine FM women enrolled in an active Medstar Research Institute protocol were included in the gene expression analyses of peripheral blood RNA using Affymetrix GeneChip® human genome U133 Plus 2.0 array. Scores from Brief Pain Inventory, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory categorized the 9 participants into pain (high, n = 3; low, n = 6) and catastrophizing groups (high, n = 5; low, n = 4). Discussion Differential expression of 107 genes between the high and low pain groups and 139 genes between the high and low catastrophizing groups (over 2.0-fold change, p < 0.05) were observed. Network analyses showed interferon signaling and interferon regulatory activation factor pathways distinguished between the pain groups while dendritic cell maturation delineated between the catastrophizing groups. Conclusion Findings provide preliminary evidence that specific physiological pathways may possibly delineate pain and catastrophizing mechanisms. Further investigation using larger and more homogenous sample is warranted. PMID:23684314

  14. Gene expression profiling to identify the toxicities and potentially relevant human disease outcomes associated with environmental heavy metal exposure.

    PubMed

    Korashy, Hesham M; Attafi, Ibraheem M; Famulski, Konrad S; Bakheet, Saleh A; Hafez, Mohammed M; Alsaad, Abdulaziz M S; Al-Ghadeer, Abdul Rahman M

    2017-02-01

    Heavy metals are the most commonly encountered toxic substances that increase susceptibility to various diseases after prolonged exposure. We have previously shown that healthy volunteers living near a mining area had significant contamination with heavy metals associated with significant changes in the expression of some detoxifying genes, xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, and DNA repair genes. However, alterations of most of the molecular target genes associated with diseases are still unknown. Thus, the aims of this study were to (a) evaluate the gene expression profile and (b) identify the toxicities and potentially relevant human disease outcomes associated with long-term human exposure to environmental heavy metals in mining area using microarray analysis. For this purpose, 40 healthy male volunteers who were residents of a heavy metal-polluted area (Mahd Al-Dhahab city, Saudi Arabia) and 20 healthy male volunteers who were residents of a non-heavy metal-polluted area were included in the study. Total RNA was isolated from whole blood using PAXgene Blood RNA tubes and then reversed transcribed and hybridized to the gene array using the Affymetrix U219 GeneChip. Microarray analysis showed about 2129 genes were identified and differentially altered, among which a shared set of 425 genes was differentially expressed in the heavy metal-exposed groups. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that the most altered gene-regulated diseases in heavy metal-exposed groups included hematological and developmental disorders and mostly renal and urological diseases. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction closely matched the microarray data for some genes tested. Importantly, changes in gene-related diseases were attributed to alterations in the genes encoded for protein synthesis. Renal and urological diseases were the diseases that were most frequently associated with the heavy metal-exposed group. Therefore, there is a need for further studies to validate these

  15. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus counteracts cortical expression of major histocompatibility complex genes in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Grieb, Benjamin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; von Nicolai, Constantin; Streichert, Thomas; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Schulte, Alexander; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin; Engel, Andreas K; Moll, Christian K E; Hamel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) is widely used as therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from advanced Parkinson's disease. STN-HFS exerts a powerful modulatory effect on cortical motor control by orthodromic modulation of basal ganglia outflow and via antidromic activation of corticofugal fibers. However, STN-HFS-induced changes of the sensorimotor cortex are hitherto unexplored. To address this question at a genomic level, we performed mRNA expression analyses using Affymetrix microarray gene chips and real-time RT-PCR in sensorimotor cortex of parkinsonian and control rats following STN-HFS. Experimental parkinsonism was induced in Brown Norway rats by bilateral nigral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine and was assessed histologically, behaviorally, and electrophysiologically. We applied prolonged (23h) unilateral STN-HFS in awake and freely moving animals, with the non-stimulated hemisphere serving as an internal control for gene expression analyses. Gene enrichment analysis revealed strongest regulation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) related genes. STN-HFS led to a cortical downregulation of several MHC class II (RT1-Da, Db1, Ba, and Cd74) and MHC class I (RT1CE) encoding genes. The same set of genes showed increased expression levels in a comparison addressing the effect of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Hence, our data suggest the possible association of altered microglial activity and synaptic transmission by STN-HFS within the sensorimotor cortex of 6-hydroxydopamine treated rats.

  16. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells.

    PubMed

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena; Beltrán-Anaya, Fredy Omar; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio; Alarcón-Romero, Luz Del Carmen; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2016-01-15

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants.

  17. Effects of DMSA-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles on global gene expression of mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxun; Chen, Zhongping; Gu, Ning; Wang, Jinke

    2011-08-28

    Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with 2,3-dimercaptosuccinnic acid (DMSA) are considered to be a promising nanomaterial with biocompatibility. In the present study, the effects of DMSA-coated Fe(3)O(4) MNPs on the expression of all identified mouse genes, which regulate various cellular biological processes, were determined to establish whether this nanoparticle is cytotoxic to mammalian cells. Mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells were treated with 100μg/ml of DMSA-coated Fe(3)O(4) MNPs for 4, 24 and 48h, and the global gene expression was detected via Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 GeneChips(®) microarrays. It was found that gene expression of 711, 545 and 434 transcripts was significantly altered by 4-, 24- and 48-h treatments, respectively. Of these genes, 27 were consistently upregulated and 6 were consistently downregulated at the three treatment durations. Bioinformatic analysis of all differentially expressed genes revealed that this nanoparticle can strongly activate inflammatory and immune responses and can inhibit the biosynthesis and metabolism of RAW264.7 cells at a dose of 100μg/ml. These results demonstrated that DMSA-coated Fe(3)O(4) MNPs display cytotoxicity in this type of macrophage at high doses.

  18. Influence of sex on gene expression in human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tomo; Richards, Stephen M.; Liu, Shaohui; Jensen, Roderick V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Sex-associated differences have been identified in the anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the human cornea. We hypothesize that many of these differences are due to fundamental variations in gene expression. Our objective in this study was to determine whether such differences exist in human corneal epithelial cells both in vivo and in vitro. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells were isolated from the corneoscleral rims of male and female donors. Cells were processed either directly for RNA extraction, or first cultured in phenol red-free keratinocyte serum-free media. The RNA samples were examined for differentially expressed mRNAs by using of CodeLink Bioarrays and Affymetrix GeneChips. Data were analyzed with GeneSifter.Net software. Results Our results demonstrate that sex significantly influences the expression of over 600 genes in human corneal epithelial cells in vivo. These genes are involved in a broad spectrum of biologic processes, molecular functions and cellular components, such as metabolic processes, DNA replication, cell migration, RNA binding, oxidoreductase activity and nucleoli. We also identified significant, sex-related effects on gene expression in human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. However, with few exceptions (e.g., X- and Y-linked genes), these sex-related differences in gene expression in vitro were typically different than those in vivo. Conclusions Our findings support our hypothesis that sex-related differences exist in the gene expression of human corneal epithelial cells. Variations in gene expression may contribute to sex-related differences in the prevalence of certain corneal diseases. PMID:20011627

  19. Effects of High Fat Feeding on Liver Gene Expression in Diabetic Goto-Kakizaki Rats

    PubMed Central

    Almon, Richard R.; DuBois, Debra C.; Sukumaran, Siddharth; Wang, Xi; Xue, Bai; Nie, Jing; Jusko, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of high fat diet (HFD) on obesity and, subsequently, on diabetes are highly variable and modulated by genetics in both humans and rodents. In this report, we characterized the response of Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a spontaneous polygenic model for lean diabetes and healthy Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls, to high fat feeding from weaning to 20 weeks of age. Animals fed either normal diet or HFD were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks of age and a wide array of physiological measurements were made along with gene expression profiling using Affymetrix gene array chips. Mining of the microarray data identified differentially regulated genes (involved in inflammation, metabolism, transcription regulation, and signaling) in diabetic animals, as well as the response of both strains to HFD. Functional annotation suggested that HFD increased inflammatory differences between the two strains. Chronic inflammation driven by heightened innate immune response was identified to be present in GK animals regardless of diet. In addition, compensatory mechanisms by which WKY animals on HFD resisted the development of diabetes were identified, thus illustrating the complexity of diabetes disease progression. PMID:23236253

  20. Diversity in global gene expression and morphology across a watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) germplasm collection: first steps to breeding.

    PubMed

    Payne, Adrienne C; Clarkson, Graham J J; Rothwell, Steve; Taylor, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) is a nutrient intense, leafy crop that is consumed raw or in soups across the globe, but for which, currently no genomic resources or breeding programme exists. Promising morphological, biochemical and functional genomic variation was identified for the first time in a newly established watercress germplasm collection, consisting of 48 watercress accessions sourced from contrasting global locations. Stem length, stem diameter and anti-oxidant (AO) potential varied across the accessions. This variation was used to identify three extreme contrasting accessions for further analysis. Variation in global gene expression was investigated using an Affymetrix Arabidopsis ATH1 microarray gene chip, using the commercial control (C), an accession selected for dwarf phenotype with a high AO potential (dwarfAO, called 'Boldrewood') and one with high AO potential alone. A set of transcripts significantly differentially expressed between these three accessions, were identified, including transcripts involved in the regulation of growth and development and those involved in secondary metabolism. In particular, when differential gene expression was compared between C and dwarfAO, the dwarfAO was characterised by increased expression of genes encoding glucosinolates, which are known precursors of phenethyl isothiocyanate, linked to the anti-carcinogenic effects well-documented in watercress. This study provides the first analysis of natural variation across the watercress genome and has identified important underpinning information for future breeding for enhanced anti-carcinogenic properties and morphology traits in this nutrient-intense crop.

  1. Semaphorin and plexin gene expression is altered in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia patients with and without auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Sáez, Ana Rosa; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo; Sebastiá-Ortega, Noelia; González-Martínez, Rocio; Costa, Juan; Haro, Josep María; Callado, Luis F; Meana, J Javier; Nacher, Juán; Sanjuán, Julio; Moltó, María Dolores

    2015-10-30

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are clinical hallmarks of schizophrenia, however little is known about molecular genetics of these symptoms. In this study, gene expression profiling of postmortem brain samples from prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients without AH (SNA), patients with AH (SA) and control subjects were compared. Genome-wide expression analysis was conducted using samples of three individuals of each group and the Affymetrix GeneChip Human-Gene 1.0 ST-Array. This analysis identified the Axon Guidance pathway as one of the most differentially expressed network among SNA, SA and CNT. To confirm the transcriptome results, mRNA level quantification of seventeen genes involved in this pathway was performed in a larger sample. PLXNB1, SEMA3A, SEMA4D and SEM6C were upregulated in SNA or SA patients compared to controls. PLXNA1 and SEMA3D showed down-regulation in their expression in the patient's samples, but differences remained statistically significant between the SNA patients and controls. Differences between SNA and SA were found in PLXNB1 expression which is decreased in SA patients. This study strengthens the contribution of brain plasticity in pathophysiology of schizophrenia and shows that non-hallucinatory patients present more alterations in frontal regions than patients with hallucinations concerning neural plasticity.

  2. Parvalbumin-Neurons of the Ventrolateral Hypothalamic Parvafox Nucleus Receive a Glycinergic Input: A Gene-Microarray Study

    PubMed Central

    Szabolcsi, Viktoria; Albisetti, Gioele W.; Celio, Marco R.

    2017-01-01

    The ventrolateral hypothalamic parvafox (formerly called PV1-Foxb1) nucleus is an anatomical entity of recent discovery and unknown function. With a view to gaining an insight into its putative functional role(s), we conducted a gene-microarray analysis and, armed with the forthcoming data, controlled the results with the Allen databases and the murine BrainStars (B*) database. The parvafox nucleus was specifically sampled by laser-capture microdissection and the transcriptome was subjected to a microarray analysis on Affymetrix chips. Eighty-two relevant genes were found to be potentially more expressed in this brain region than in either the cerebral cortex or the hippocampus. When the expression patterns of these genes were counterchecked in the Allen-Database of in-situ hybridizations and in the B*-microarray database, their localization in the parvafox region was confirmed for thirteen. For nine novel genes, which are particularly interesting because of their possible involvement in neuromodulation, the expression was verified by quantitative real time-PCR. Of particular functional importance may be the occurrence of glycine receptors, the presence of which indicates that the activity of the parvafox nucleus is under ascending inhibitory control. PMID:28167900

  3. Diversity in global gene expression and morphology across a watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) germplasm collection: first steps to breeding

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Adrienne C.; Clarkson, Graham J.J.; Rothwell, Steve; Taylor, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) is a nutrient intense, leafy crop that is consumed raw or in soups across the globe, but for which, currently no genomic resources or breeding programme exists. Promising morphological, biochemical and functional genomic variation was identified for the first time in a newly established watercress germplasm collection, consisting of 48 watercress accessions sourced from contrasting global locations. Stem length, stem diameter and anti-oxidant (AO) potential varied across the accessions. This variation was used to identify three extreme contrasting accessions for further analysis. Variation in global gene expression was investigated using an Affymetrix Arabidopsis ATH1 microarray gene chip, using the commercial control (C), an accession selected for dwarf phenotype with a high AO potential (dwarfAO, called ‘Boldrewood’) and one with high AO potential alone. A set of transcripts significantly differentially expressed between these three accessions, were identified, including transcripts involved in the regulation of growth and development and those involved in secondary metabolism. In particular, when differential gene expression was compared between C and dwarfAO, the dwarfAO was characterised by increased expression of genes encoding glucosinolates, which are known precursors of phenethyl isothiocyanate, linked to the anti-carcinogenic effects well-documented in watercress. This study provides the first analysis of natural variation across the watercress genome and has identified important underpinning information for future breeding for enhanced anti-carcinogenic properties and morphology traits in this nutrient-intense crop. PMID:26504575

  4. Chronic wound healing by fetal cell therapy may be explained by differential gene profiling observed in fetal versus old skin cells.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, Albert-Adrien; Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Raffoul, Wassim; Scaletta, Corinne; Pioletti, Dominique P; Offord, Elizabeth; Mansourian, Robert; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2009-03-01

    Engineering of fetal tissue has a high potential for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds of the skin in humans as these cells have high expansion capacity under simple culture conditions and one organ donation can produce Master Cell Banks which can fabricate over 900 million biological bandages (9 x 12cm). In a Phase 1 clinical safety study, cases are presented for the treatment of therapy resistant leg ulcers. All eight patients, representing 13 ulcers, tolerated multiple treatments with fetal biological bandages showing no negative secondary effects and repair processes similar to that seen in 3rd degree burns. Differential gene profiling using Affymetrix gene chips (analyzing 12,500 genes) were accomplished on these banked fetal dermal skin cells compared to banked dermal skin cells of an aged donor in order to point to potential indicators of wound healing. Families of genes involved in cell adhesion and extracellular matrix, cell cycle, cellular signaling, development and immune response show significant differences in regulation between banked fetal and those from banked old skin cells: with approximately 47.0% of genes over-expressed in fetal fibroblasts. It is perhaps these differences which contribute to efficient tissue repair seen in the clinic with fetal cell therapy.

  5. Neutral Lipids and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Control Pulmonary Gene Expression and Inflammation-Triggered Pathogenesis in Lysosomal Acid Lipase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Xuemei; Yan, Cong; Qin, Yulin; Knox, Lana; Li, Tingyu; Du, Hong

    2005-01-01

    The functional roles of neutral lipids in the lung are poorly understood. However, blocking cholesteryl ester and triglyceride metabolism in lysosomal acid lipase gene knockout mice (lal−/−) results in severe pathogenic phenotypes in the lung, including massive neutrophil infiltration, foamy macrophage accumulation, unwanted cell growth, and emphysema. To elucidate the mechanism underlining these pathologies, we performed Affymetrix GeneChip microarray analysis of 1-, 3-, and 6-month-old mice and identified aberrant gene expression that progressed with age. Among changed genes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12, apoptosis inhibitor 6 (Api-6), erythroblast transformation-specific domain (Ets) transcription factor family member Spi-C, and oncogene MafB were increased 100-, 70-, 40-, and 10-fold, respectively, in lal−/− lungs versus the wild-type lungs. The pathogenic increases of these molecules occurred primarily in alveolar type II epithelial cells. Transcriptional activities of the MMP-12 and Api-6 promoters were stimulated by Spi-C or MafB in respiratory epithelial cells. Treatment with 9-hydroxyoctadecanoic acids and ciglitazone significantly rescued lal−/− pulmonary inflammation and aberrant gene expression. In addition, both compounds as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma inhibited MMP-12 and Api-6 promoter activities. These data suggest that inflammation-triggered cell growth and emphysema during lysosomal acid lipase deficiency are partially caused by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ inactivation. PMID:16127159

  6. The Ews/Fli-1 fusion gene switches the differentiation program of neuroblastomas to Ewing sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Rorie, Checo J; Thomas, Venetia D; Chen, Pengchin; Pierce, Heather Hanson; O'Bryan, John P; Weissman, Bernard E

    2004-02-15

    Neuroblastoma (NB) and the Ewing sarcoma (ES)/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) family are pediatric cancers derived from neural crest cells. Although NBs display features of the sympathetic nervous system, ES/PNETs express markers consistent with parasympathetic differentiation. To examine the control of these differentiation markers, we generated NB x ES/PNET somatic cell hybrids. NB-specific markers were suppressed in the hybrids, whereas ES/PNET-specific markers were unaffected. These results suggested that the Ews/Fli-1 fusion gene, resulting from a translocation unique to ES/PNETs, might account for the loss of NB-specific markers. To test this hypothesis, we generated two different NB cell lines that stably expressed the Ews/Fli-1 gene. We observed that heterologous expression of the Ews/Fli-1 protein led to the suppression of NB-specific markers and de novo expression of ES/PNET markers. To determine the extent of changes in differentiation, we used the Affymetrix GeneChip Array system to observe global transcriptional changes of genes. This analysis revealed that the gene expression pattern of the Ews/Fli-1-expressing NB cells resembled that observed in pooled ES/PNET cell lines and differed significantly from the NB parental cells. Therefore, we propose that Ews/Fli-1 contributes to the etiology of ES/PNET by subverting the differentiation program of its neural crest precursor cell to a less differentiated and more proliferative state.

  7. Comparative gene expression profiles between heterotic and non-heterotic hybrids of tetraploid Medicago sativa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuehui; Wei, Yanling; Nettleton, Dan; Brummer, E Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background Heterosis, the superior performance of hybrids relative to parents, has clear agricultural value, but its genetic control is unknown. Our objective was to test the hypotheses that hybrids expressing heterosis for biomass yield would show more gene expression levels that were different from midparental values and outside the range of parental values than hybrids that do not exhibit heterosis. Results We tested these hypotheses in three Medicago sativa (alfalfa) genotypes and their three hybrids, two of which expressed heterosis for biomass yield and a third that did not, using Affymetrix M. truncatula GeneChip arrays. Alfalfa hybridized to approximately 47% of the M. truncatula probe sets. Probe set signal intensities were analyzed using MicroArray Suite v.5.0 (MAS) and robust multi-array average (RMA) algorithms. Based on MAS analysis, the two heterotic hybrids performed similarly, with about 27% of genes showing differential expression among the parents and their hybrid compared to 12.5% for the non-heterotic hybrid. At a false discovery rate of 0.15, 4.7% of differentially expressed genes in hybrids (~300 genes) showed nonadditive expression compared to only 0.5% (16 genes) in the non-heterotic hybrid. Of the nonadditively expressed genes, approximately 50% showed expression levels that fell outside the parental range in heterotic hybrids, but only one of 16 showed a similar profile in the non-heterotic hybrid. Genes whose expression differed in the parents were three times more likely to show nonadditive expression than genes whose parental transcript levels were equal. Conclusion The higher proportions of probe sets with expression level that differed from the parental midparent value and that were more extreme than either parental value in the heterotic hybrids compared to a non-heterotic hybrid were also found using RMA. We conclude that nonadditive expression of transcript levels may contribute to heterosis for biomass yield in alfalfa. PMID

  8. Comparative Analysis of Gene Regulation by the Transcription Factor PPARα between Mouse and Human

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Hooiveld, Guido; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies in mice have shown that PPARα is an important regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism and the acute phase response. However, little information is available on the role of PPARα in human liver. Here we set out to compare the function of PPARα in mouse and human hepatocytes via analysis of target gene regulation. Methodology/Principal Findings Primary hepatocytes from 6 human and 6 mouse donors were treated with PPARα agonist Wy14643 and gene expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix GeneChips followed by a systems biology analysis. Baseline PPARα expression was similar in human and mouse hepatocytes. Depending on species and time of exposure, Wy14643 significantly induced the expression of 362–672 genes. Surprisingly minor overlap was observed between the Wy14643-regulated genes from mouse and human, although more substantial overlap was observed at the pathway level. Xenobiotics metabolism and apolipoprotein synthesis were specifically regulated by PPARα in human hepatocytes, whereas glycolysis-gluconeogenesis was regulated specifically in mouse hepatocytes. Most of the genes commonly regulated in mouse and human were involved in lipid metabolism and many represented known PPARα targets, including CPT1A, HMGCS2, FABP1, ACSL1, and ADFP. Several genes were identified that were specifically induced by PPARα in human (MBL2, ALAS1, CYP1A1, TSKU) or mouse (Fbp2, lgals4, Cd36, Ucp2, Pxmp4). Furthermore, several putative novel PPARα targets were identified that were commonly regulated in both species, including CREB3L3, KLF10, KLF11 and MAP3K8. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that PPARα activation has a major impact on gene regulation in human hepatocytes. Importantly, the role of PPARα as master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism is generally well-conserved between mouse and human. Overall, however, PPARα regulates a mostly divergent set of genes in mouse and human hepatocytes. PMID:19710929

  9. Identification of genes and gene pathways associated with major depressive disorder by integrative brain analysis of rat and human prefrontal cortex transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Malki, K; Pain, O; Tosto, M G; Du Rietz, E; Carboni, L; Schalkwyk, L C

    2015-03-03

    Despite moderate heritability estimates, progress in uncovering the molecular substrate underpinning major depressive disorder (MDD) has been slow. In this study, we used prefrontal cortex (PFC) gene expression from a genetic rat model of MDD to inform probe set prioritization in PFC in a human post-mortem study to uncover genes and gene pathways associated with MDD. Gene expression differences between Flinders sensitive (FSL) and Flinders resistant (FRL) rat lines were statistically evaluated using the RankProd, non-parametric algorithm. Top ranking probe sets in the rat study were subsequently used to prioritize orthologous selection in a human PFC in a case-control post-mortem study on MDD from the Stanley Brain Consortium. Candidate genes in the human post-mortem study were then tested against a matched control sample using the RankProd method. A total of 1767 probe sets were differentially expressed in the PFC between FSL and FRL rat lines at (q⩽0.001). A total of 898 orthologous probe sets was found on Affymetrix's HG-U95A chip used in the human study. Correcting for the number of multiple, non-independent tests, 20 probe sets were found to be significantly dysregulated between human cases and controls at q⩽0.05. These probe sets tagged the expression profile of 18 human genes (11 upregulated and seven downregulated). Using an integrative rat-human study, a number of convergent genes that may have a role in pathogenesis of MDD were uncovered. Eighty percent of these genes were functionally associated with a key stress response signalling cascade, involving NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells), AP-1 (activator protein 1) and ERK/MAPK, which has been systematically associated with MDD, neuroplasticity and neurogenesis.

  10. Microarray profiling of isolated abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes from obese vs non-obese Pima Indians: increased expression of inflammation-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y. H.; Nair, S.; Rousseau, E.; Tataranni, P. A.; Bogardus, C.; Allison, D. B.; Page, G. P.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Obesity increases the risk of developing major diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Adipose tissue, particularly adipocytes, may play a major role in the development of obesity and its comorbidities. The aim of this study was to characterise, in adipocytes from obese people, the most differentially expressed genes that might be relevant to the development of obesity. Methods: We carried out microarray gene profiling of isolated abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes from 20 non-obese (BMI 25±3 kg/m2) and 19 obese (BMI 55± 8 kg/m2) non-diabetic Pima Indians using Affymetrix HG-U95 GeneChip arrays. After data analyses, we measured the transcript levels of selected genes based on their biological functions and chromosomal positions using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: The most differentially expressed genes in adipocytes of obese individuals consisted of 433 upregulated and 244 downregulated genes. Of these, 410 genes could be classified into 20 functional Gene Ontology categories. The analyses indicated that the inflammation/immune response category was over-represented, and that most inflammation-related genes were upregulated in adipocytes of obese subjects. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the transcriptional upregulation of representative inflammation-related genes (CCL2 and CCL3) encoding the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α. The differential expression levels of eight positional candidate genes, including inflammation-related THY1 and C1QTNF5, were also confirmed. These genes are located on chromosome 11q22-q24, a region with linkage to obesity in the Pima Indians. Conclusions/interpretation: This study provides evidence supporting the active role of mature adipocytes in obesity-related inflammation. It also provides potential candidate genes for susceptibility to obesity. PMID:16059715

  11. Gene expression does not change significantly in C3H 10T(1/2) cells after exposure to 847.74 CDMA or 835.62 FDMA radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, T D; Moros, E G; Brownstein, B H; Roti Roti, J L

    2006-06-01

    In vitro experiments with C3H 10T(1/2) mouse cells were performed to determine whether Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) or Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) modulated radiofrequency (RF) radiations induce changes in gene expression. After the cells were exposed to either modulation for 24 h at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 5 W/ kg, RNA was extracted from both exposed and sham-exposed cells for gene expression analysis. As a positive control, cells were exposed to 0.68 Gy of X rays and gene expression was evaluated 4 h after exposure. Gene expression was evaluated using the Affymetrix U74Av2 GeneChip to detect changes in mRNA levels. Each exposure condition was repeated three times. The GeneChip data were analyzed using a two-tailed t test, and the expected number of false positives was estimated from t tests on 20 permutations of the six sham RF-field-exposed samples. For the X-ray-treated samples, there were more than 90 probe sets with expression changes greater than 1.3-fold beyond the number of expected false positives. Approximately one-third of these genes had previously been reported in the literature as being responsive to radiation. In contrast, for both CDMA and FDMA radiation, the number of probe sets with an expression change greater than 1.3-fold was less than or equal to the expected number of false positives. Thus the 24-h exposures to FDMA or CDMA RF radiation at 5 W/kg had no statistically significant effect on gene expression.

  12. Dose response evaluation of gene expression profiles in the skin of K6/ODC mice exposed to sodium arsenite

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlborn, Gene J.; Nelson, Gail M.; Ward, William O.; Knapp, Geremy; Allen, James W.; Ouyang Ming; Roop, Barbara C.; Chen Yan; O'Brien, Thomas; Kitchin, Kirk T.; Delker, Don A.

    2008-03-15

    Chronic drinking water exposure to inorganic arsenic and its metabolites increases tumor frequency in the skin of K6/ODC transgenic mice. To identify potential biomarkers and modes of action for this skin tumorigenicity, we characterized gene expression profiles from analysis of K6/ODC mice administered 0, 0.05, 0.25, 1.0 and 10 ppm sodium arsenite in their drinking water for 4 weeks. Following exposure, total RNA was isolated from mouse skin and processed to biotin-labeled cRNA for microarray analyses. Skin gene expression was analyzed with Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 GeneChips (registered) , and pathway analysis was conducted with DAVID (NIH), Ingenuity (registered) Systems and MetaCore's GeneGo. Differential expression of several key genes was verified through qPCR. Only the highest dose (10 ppm) resulted in significantly altered KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways, including MAPK, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, Wnt, Jak-Stat, Tight junction, Toll-like, phosphatidylinositol and insulin signaling pathways. Approximately 20 genes exhibited a dose response, including several genes known to be associated with carcinogenesis or tumor progression including cyclin D1, CLIC4, Ephrin A1, STAT3 and DNA methyltransferase 3a. Although transcription changes in all identified genes have not previously been linked to arsenic carcinogenesis, their association with carcinogenesis in other systems suggests that these genes may play a role in the early stages of arsenic-induced skin carcinogenesis and can be considered potential biomarkers.

  13. Localization of candidate regions for a novel gene for Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Roelens, Ilse; Sluysmans, Thierry; Jorissen, Mark; Amyere, Mustapha; Vikkula, Miikka

    2006-07-01

    Asymmetric positioning of internal organs is a characteristics of vertebrates. The normal left-right anatomic positioning, situs solitus, sometimes does not occur normaly, leading to laterality defects. Studies in animal models have shown that laterality decisions are mediated by a cascade of genes that lead to the asymmetric expression of Nodal, LEFTA, LEFTB and PITX2 in the lateral plate mesoderm. A search for mutations in genes implicated in left-right patterning in animal models allowed genes associated with heterotaxia defects in humans to be identified. However, these genes explain only a small percentage of human situs defects, suggesting that other genes must play a role. In this study, we report a consanguineous family of Turkish origin, composed of two unaffected parents and three children, two of whom presented Kartagener syndrome. On the basis of their family history, we hypothesize autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A genotype analysis with polymorphic markers did not show linkage with any known genes or loci causing laterality disorders. Array CGH did not detect a duplication or microdeletion greater than 1 Mb as a possible cause. Genome wide screening using 10 K Affymetrix SNP chips was performed, allowing the identification of two regions of autozygosity, one in chromosome 1 and the other on chromosome 7. In the chromosome 1 locus, a strong candidate gene, encoding the kinesin-associated protein 3 (KIF3AP) was not mutated, based on SSCP/heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing. These data provide a basis for the identification of a novel gene implicated in Kartagener syndrome.

  14. Quality control in microarray assessment of gene expression in human airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Tina; O'Connor, Timothy P; Hackett, Neil R; Wang, Wei; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Attiyeh, Marc A; Dang, David T; Teater, Matthew; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for defining gene expression profiles of airway epithelium that lend insight into the pathogenesis of human airway disorders. The focus of this study was to establish rigorous quality control parameters to ensure that microarray assessment of the airway epithelium is not confounded by experimental artifact. Samples (total n = 223) of trachea, large and small airway epithelium were collected by fiberoptic bronchoscopy of 144 individuals and hybridized to Affymetrix microarrays. The pre- and post-chip quality control (QC) criteria established, included: (1) RNA quality, assessed by RNA Integrity Number (RIN) ≥ 7.0; (2) cRNA transcript integrity, assessed by signal intensity ratio of GAPDH 3' to 5' probe sets ≤ 3.0; and (3) the multi-chip normalization scaling factor ≤ 10.0. Results Of the 223 samples, all three criteria were assessed in 191; of these 184 (96.3%) passed all three criteria. For the remaining 32 samples, the RIN was not available, and only the other two criteria were used; of these 29 (90.6%) passed these two criteria. Correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons of expression levels for 100 maintenance genes in which at least one array failed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.90 ± 0.04) were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) than correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons between arrays that passed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.97 ± 0.01). Inter-array variability was significantly decreased (p < 0.0001) among samples passing the QC criteria compared with samples failing the QC criteria. Conclusion Based on the aberrant maintenance gene data generated from samples failing the established QC criteria, we propose that the QC criteria outlined in this study can accurately distinguish high quality from low quality data, and can be used to delete poor quality microarray samples before proceeding to higher-order biological analyses and interpretation. PMID:19852842

  15. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    relative abundance, species richness and phylogenetic diversity of the microbial communities associated with the leaf midribs of HLB symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus trees were investigated using high-density 16S rDNA microarray PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library methods.

  16. Altered Epithelial Gene Expression in Peripheral Airways of Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Singhania, Akul; Rupani, Hitasha; Jayasekera, Nivenka; Lumb, Simon; Hales, Paul; Gozzard, Neil; Davies, Donna E.

    2017-01-01

    Management of severe asthma remains a challenge despite treatment with glucocorticosteroid therapy. The majority of studies investigating disease mechanisms in treatment-resistant severe asthma have previously focused on the large central airways, with very few utilizing transcriptomic approaches. The small peripheral airways, which comprise the majority of the airway surface area, remain an unexplored area in severe asthma and were targeted for global epithelial gene expression profiling in this study. Differences between central and peripheral airways were evaluated using transcriptomic analysis (Affymetrix HG U133 plus 2.0 GeneChips) of epithelial brushings obtained from severe asthma patients (N = 17) and healthy volunteers (N = 23). Results were validated in an independent cohort (N = 10) by real-time quantitative PCR. The IL-13 disease signature that is associated with an asthmatic phenotype was upregulated in severe asthmatics compared to healthy controls but was predominantly evident within the peripheral airways, as were genes related to mast cell presence. The gene expression response associated with glucocorticosteroid therapy (i.e. FKBP5) was also upregulated in severe asthmatics compared to healthy controls but, in contrast, was more pronounced in central airways. Moreover, an altered epithelial repair response (e.g. FGFBP1) was evident across both airway sites reflecting a significant aspect of disease in severe asthma unadressed by current therapies. A transcriptomic approach to understand epithelial activation in severe asthma has thus highlighted the need for better-targeted therapy to the peripheral airways in severe asthma, where the IL-13 disease signature persists despite treatment with currently available therapy. PMID:28045928

  17. Altered Epithelial Gene Expression in Peripheral Airways of Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Singhania, Akul; Rupani, Hitasha; Jayasekera, Nivenka; Lumb, Simon; Hales, Paul; Gozzard, Neil; Davies, Donna E; Woelk, Christopher H; Howarth, Peter H

    2017-01-01

    Management of severe asthma remains a challenge despite treatment with glucocorticosteroid therapy. The majority of studies investigating disease mechanisms in treatment-resistant severe asthma have previously focused on the large central airways, with very few utilizing transcriptomic approaches. The small peripheral airways, which comprise the majority of the airway surface area, remain an unexplored area in severe asthma and were targeted for global epithelial gene expression profiling in this study. Differences between central and peripheral airways were evaluated using transcriptomic analysis (Affymetrix HG U133 plus 2.0 GeneChips) of epithelial brushings obtained from severe asthma patients (N = 17) and healthy volunteers (N = 23). Results were validated in an independent cohort (N = 10) by real-time quantitative PCR. The IL-13 disease signature that is associated with an asthmatic phenotype was upregulated in severe asthmatics compared to healthy controls but was predominantly evident within the peripheral airways, as were genes related to mast cell presence. The gene expression response associated with glucocorticosteroid therapy (i.e. FKBP5) was also upregulated in severe asthmatics compared to healthy controls but, in contrast, was more pronounced in central airways. Moreover, an altered epithelial repair response (e.g. FGFBP1) was evident across both airway sites reflecting a significant aspect of disease in severe asthma unadressed by current therapies. A transcriptomic approach to understand epithelial activation in severe asthma has thus highlighted the need for better-targeted therapy to the peripheral airways in severe asthma, where the IL-13 disease signature persists despite treatment with currently available therapy.

  18. NODAL PATHWAY GENES ARE DOWNREGULATED IN FACIAL ASYMMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Romain; Hottenstein, Molly; Raoul, Gwenael; Ferri, Joel; Horton, Michael; Tobias, John W.; Barton, Elisabeth; Gelé, Patrick; Sciote, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Facial asymmetry is a common comorbid condition in patients with jaw deformation malocclusion. Heritability of malocclusion is advancing rapidly, but very little is known regarding genetic contributions to asymmetry. This study identifies differences in expression of key asymmetry-producing genes which are down regulated in facial asymmetry patients. Material and Methods Masseter muscle samples were collected during BSSO orthognathic surgery to correct skeletal-based malocclusion. Patients were classified as Class II or III and open or deep bite malocclusion with or without facial asymmetry. Muscle samples were analyzed for gene expression differences on Affymetrix HT2.0 microarray global expression chips. Results Overall gene expression was different for asymmetric patients compared to other malocclusion classifications by principal component analysis (P<0.05). We identified differences in the nodal signaling pathway (NSP) which promotes development of mesoderm and endoderm and left-right patterning during embryogenesis. Nodal and Lefty expression was 1.39–1.84 fold greater (P<3.41×10−5) whereas integral membrane Nodal-modulators Nomo1,2,3 were −5.63 to −5.81 (P<3.05×10−4) less in asymmetry subjects. Fold differences among intracellular pathway members were negative in the range of −7.02 to −2.47 (P<0.003). Finally Pitx2, a upstream effector of Nodal known to influence the size of type II skeletal muscle fibers was also significantly decreased in facial asymmetry (P<0.05). Conclusions When facial asymmetry is part of skeletal malocclusion there are decreases of NSP genes in masseter muscle. This data suggests that the NSP is down regulated to help promote development of asymmetry. Pitx2 expression differences also contributed to both skeletal and muscle development in this condition. PMID:25364968

  19. The Kampo medicines Orengedokuto, Bofutsushosan and Boiogito have different activities to regulate gene expressions in differentiated rat white adipocytes: comprehensive analysis of genetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Jun-ichi; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Takano, Fumihide; Takahashi, Takashi; Yoshida, Junko; Moriya, Junji; Takata, Takanobu; Tatsuno, Takanori; Sasaki, Kenroh; Ohta, Tomihisa; Takegami, Tsutomu; Yoshizaki, Fumihiko

    2008-11-01

    Three Kampo medicines, Boiogito (BOT), Bofutsushosan (BTS) and Orengedokuto (OGT), used for obese patients were investigated for their effects on adipogenesis in cultured rat white adipocytes. Administration of the three extracts suppressed adipogenesis in concentration-dependent manners (1-100 microg/ml) without any cytotoxicity. Changes in mRNA expression levels were analyzed using a Rat 230 2.0 Affymetrix GeneChip microarray system. DNA microarray analysis (total probe set: 31099) using cDNAs prepared from adipocytes revealed that BOT, BTS and OGT increased the expression of 133-150 genes and decreased the expression of 42-110 genes by > or =2-fold. We identified 329 downregulated genes and 189 upregulated genes among a total set of 514 probes (overlap: 4). Overall, genes related to cellular movement, cell death, cell growth/differentiation and immune responses were the most downregulated, while those related to lipid metabolism and cell signaling were the most upregulated. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays were conducted to confirm the microarray results. Analysis of the clustering profiles of the microarray results revealed that BOT and BTS changed the expression levels of similar genes mainly involved in small molecule biochemistry and cell differentiation, while OGT altered 10 genes related to lipid metabolism, in contrast to the effects of BOT and BTS. We also measured mRNA expression levels of seven selected genes highly contributing to the lipid metabolism by using semiquantitative RT-PCR assay, that were acetyl-Coenzyme A carboxylase alpha (ACACA), AE binding protein 1 (AEBP1), patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 8 (PNPLA8), secretoglobin (SCGB1A1), adrenergic (ADRB3), adiponectin (ADIPOQ), monoglyceride lipase (MGLL). Beta-actin (ACTB) gene was used as an endogenous internal standard. The present findings indicate that these three herbal extracts have the potential to prevent adipogenesis in rat

  20. Analysis of Global and Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Elimination Gene Expression in the Progressive Stages of Human Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver DiseaseS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Fisher, Craig D.; Jackson, Jonathan P.; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Billheimer, D. Dean; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by a series of pathological changes that range from simple fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The objective of this study is to describe changes in global gene expression associated with the progression of human NAFLD. This study is focused on the expression levels of genes responsible for the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) of drugs. Differential gene expression between three clinically defined pathological groups—normal, steatosis, and NASH—was analyzed. Genome-wide mRNA levels in samples of human liver tissue were assayed with Affymetrix GeneChip Human 1.0ST arrays. A total of 11,633 genes exhibited altered expression out of 33,252 genes at a 5% false discovery rate. Most gene expression changes occurred in the progression from steatosis to NASH. Principal component analysis revealed that hepatic disease status was the major determinant of differential ADME gene expression rather than age or sex of sample donors. Among the 515 drug transporters and 258 drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) examined, uptake transporters but not efflux transporters or DMEs were significantly over-represented in the number of genes down-regulated. These results suggest that uptake transporter genes are coordinately targeted for down-regulation at the global level during the pathological development of NASH and that these patients may have decreased drug uptake capacity. This coordinated regulation of uptake transporter genes is indicative of a hepatoprotective mechanism acting to prevent accumulation of toxic intermediates in disease-compromised hepatocytes. PMID:21737566

  1. Gene expression profile predictive of response to chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Estevez-Garcia, Purificacion; Rivera, Fernando; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Benavent, Marta; Gómez, Javier; Limón, Maria Luisa; Pastor, Maria Dolores; Martinez-Perez, Julia; Paz-Ares, Luis; Carnero, Amancio; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio

    2015-03-20

    Fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CT) has been the mainstay of care of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) for years. Response rates are only observed, however, in about half of treated patients, and there are no reliable tools to prospectively identify patients more likely to benefit from therapy. The purpose of our study was to identify a gene expression profile predictive of CT response in mCRC. Whole genome expression analyses (Affymetrix GeneChip HG-U133 Plus 2.0) were performed in fresh frozen tumor samples of 37 mCRC patients (training cohort). Differential gene expression profiles among the two study conditions (responders versus non-responders) were assessed using supervised class prediction algorithms. A set of 161 differentially expressed genes in responders (23 patients; 62%) versus non-responders (14 patients; 38%) was selected for further assessment and validation by RT-qPCR (TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA) 7900 HT Micro Fluidic Cards) in an independent multi-institutional cohort (53 mCRC patients). Seven of these genes were confirmed as significant predictors of response. Patients with a favorable predictive signature had significantly greater response rate (58% vs. 13%, p = 0.024), progression-free survival (61% vs. 13% at 1 year, HR = 0.32, p = 0.009) and overall survival (32 vs. 16 months, HR = 0.21, p = 0.003) than patients with an unfavorable gene signature. This is the first study to validate a gene-expression profile predictive of response to CT in mCRC patients. Larger and prospective confirmatory studies are required, however, in order to successfully provide oncologists with adequate tools to optimize treatment selection in routine clinical practice.

  2. Antimutagenicity of Cinnamaldehyde and Vanillin in Human Cells: Global Gene Expression and Possible Role of DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    King, Audrey A.; Shaughnessy, Daniel T.; Mure, Kanae; Leszczynska, Joanna; Ward, William O.; Umbach, David M.; Xu, Zongli; Ducharme, Danica; Taylor, Jack A.; DeMarini, David M.; Klein, Catherine B.

    2007-01-01

    Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary flavorings that exhibit antimutagenic activity against mutagen-induced and spontaneous mutations in bacteria. Although these compounds were antimutagenic against chromosomal mutations in mammalian cells, they have not been studied for antimutagenesis against spontaneous gene mutations in mammalian cells. Thus, we initiated studies with VAN and CIN in human mismatch repair-deficient (hMLH1−) HCT116 colon cancer cells, which exhibit high spontaneous mutation rates (mutations/cell/generation) at the HPRT locus, permitting analysis of antimutagenic effects of agents against spontaneous mutation. Long-term (1–3-week) treatments of HCT116 cells with VAN at minimally toxic concentrations (0.5–2.5 mM) reduced the spontaneous HPRT mutant fraction (MF, mutants/106 survivors) in a concentration-related manner by 19% to 73%. A similar treatment with CIN at 2.5–7.5 μM yielded a 13% to 56% reduction of the spontaneous MF. Short-term (4–h) treatments also reduced the spontaneous MF by 64% (VAN) and 31% (CIN). To investigate the mechanisms of antimutagenesis, we evaluated the ability of VAN and CIN to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and to alter global gene expression (Affymetrix GeneChip) after 4-h treatments. Both VAN and CIN induced DNA damage in both mismatch repair-proficient (HCT116 + chr3) and deficient (HCT116) cells at concentrations that were antimutagenic in HCT116 cells. There were 64 genes in common whose expression was changed similarly by both VAN and CIN; these included genes related to DNA damage, stress responses, oxidative damage, apoptosis, and cell growth. RT-PCR results paralleled the Affymetrix results for 4 selected genes (HMOX1, DDIT4, GCLM, and CLK4). Our results show for the first time that VAN and CIN are antimutagenic against spontaneous mutations in mammalian (human) cells. These and other data lead us to propose that VAN and CIN may induce DNA damage that elicits recombinational DNA

  3. Antimutagenicity of cinnamaldehyde and vanillin in human cells: Global gene expression and possible role of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    King, Audrey A; Shaughnessy, Daniel T; Mure, Kanae; Leszczynska, Joanna; Ward, William O; Umbach, David M; Xu, Zongli; Ducharme, Danica; Taylor, Jack A; Demarini, David M; Klein, Catherine B

    2007-03-01

    Vanillin (VAN) and cinnamaldehyde (CIN) are dietary flavorings that exhibit antimutagenic activity against mutagen-induced and spontaneous mutations in bacteria. Although these compounds were antimutagenic against chromosomal mutations in mammalian cells, they have not been studied for antimutagenesis against spontaneous gene mutations in mammalian cells. Thus, we initiated studies with VAN and CIN in human mismatch repair-deficient (hMLH1(-)) HCT116 colon cancer cells, which exhibit high spontaneous mutation rates (mutations/cell/generation) at the HPRT locus, permitting analysis of antimutagenic effects of agents against spontaneous mutation. Long-term (1-3 weeks) treatment of HCT116 cells with VAN at minimally toxic concentrations (0.5-2.5mM) reduced the spontaneous HPRT mutant fraction (MF, mutants/10(6) survivors) in a concentration-related manner by 19-73%. A similar treatment with CIN at 2.5-7.5microM yielded a 13-56% reduction of the spontaneous MF. Short-term (4-h) treatments also reduced the spontaneous MF by 64% (VAN) and 31% (CIN). To investigate the mechanisms of antimutagenesis, we evaluated the ability of VAN and CIN to induce DNA damage (comet assay) and to alter global gene expression (Affymetrix GeneChip) after 4-h treatments. Both VAN and CIN induced DNA damage in both mismatch repair-proficient (HCT116+chr3) and deficient (HCT116) cells at concentrations that were antimutagenic in HCT116 cells. There were 64 genes whose expression was changed similarly by both VAN and CIN; these included genes related to DNA damage, stress responses, oxidative damage, apoptosis, and cell growth. RT-PCR results paralleled the Affymetrix results for four selected genes (HMOX1, DDIT4, GCLM, and CLK4). Our results show for the first time that VAN and CIN are antimutagenic against spontaneous mutations in mammalian (human) cells. These and other data lead us to propose that VAN and CIN may induce DNA damage that elicits recombinational DNA repair, which reduces

  4. The effect of trimethylamine N-oxide on Helicobacter pylori-induced changes of immunoinflammatory genes expression in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daoyan; Cao, Mei; Peng, Jingshan; Li, Ningzhe; Yi, Sijun; Song, Liju; Wang, Xuege; Zhang, Mao; Zhao, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Colonization of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces immune and inflammatory response in gastric mucosa. Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), from diet and metabolite through the action of gut microbiota, has been linked to inflammatory diseases. To investigate the effects of TMAO and H. pylori infection on gene expression in gastric epithelial cells, Human gene chip Affymetrix HTA 2.0 was used in this study. 1312 genes were identified as differentially expressed genes in GES-1 cells with H. pylori and TMAO co-treatment compared to the control. GO and KEGG analyses indicated that the functions of these differentially expressed genes were related closely with immune inflammation. GO-network showed that Toll-like receptor signaling pathway was the most important biological processes and 49 up-regulated genes related to immune inflammation were obtained. The synergistic effects of H. pylori and TMAO enhanced the genes expression of IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL2, FOS and C3 related to immune inflammation in comparison with those of non-infected control cells, H. pylori-infected cells, and TMAO-stimulated cells. RT-PCR verified the expression levels of IL-6, CXCL1. Additionally, expression levels of 2053 genes were altered and 52 immunoinflammatory genes were upregulated in comparison with H. pylori-infected cells. This study suggested that TMAO altered the expression levels of immunoinflammatory genes induced by H. pylori infection, and the synergistic effects of H. pylori and TMAO provided novel insights into the development of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

  5. Gene Regulation of Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells IPEC-J2 Is Dependent on the Site of Deoxynivalenol Toxicological Action

    PubMed Central

    Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Nossol, Constanze; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Wimmers, Klaus; Kluess, Jeannette; Walk, Nicole; Post, Andreas; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Kahlert, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cell layer represents the border between the luminal and systemic side of the gut. The decision between absorption and exclusion of substances is the quintessential function of the gut and varies along the gut axis. Consequently, potentially toxic substances may reach the basolateral domain of the epithelial cell layer via blood stream. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a Fusarium derived secondary metabolite known to enter the blood stream and displaying a striking toxicity on the basolateral side of polarised epithelial cell layers in vitro. Here we analysed potential mechanisms of apical and basolateral DON toxicity reflected in the gene expression. We used the jejunum-derived, polarised intestinal porcine epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 as an in vitro cell culture model. Luminal and systemic DON challenge of the epithelial cell layer was mimicked by a DON application from the apical or basolateral compartment of membrane inserts for 72 h. We compared the genome-wide gene expression of untreated and DON-treated IPEC-J2 cells with the GeneChip® Porcine Genome Array of Affymetrix. Low basolateral DON (200 ng/mL) application triggered 10 times more gene transcripts in comparison to the corresponding apical application (2539 versus 267) despite the intactness of the challenged cell layer as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Analysis of the regulated genes by bioinformatic resource DAVID identified several groups of biochemical pathways modulated by concentration and orientation of DON application. Selected genes representing pathways of the cellular metabolism, information processing and structural design were analysed in detail by quantitative PCR. Our findings clearly show that apical and basolateral challenge of epithelial cell layers trigger different gene response profiles paralleled with a higher susceptibility towards basolateral challenge. The evaluation of toxicological potentials of mycotoxins should take this

  6. Age-Related Changes in Cochlear Gene Expression In Normal and Shaker 2 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tzy-Wen L.; Karolyi, I. Jill; MacDonald, James; Beyer, Lisa; Raphael, Yehoash; Kohrman, David C.; Camper, Sally A.

    2006-01-01

    The vertebrate cochlea is a complex organ optimized for sound transduction. Auditory hair cells, with their precisely arranged stereocilia bundles, transduce sound waves to electrical signals that are transmitted to the brain. Mutations in the unconventional myosin XV cause deafness in both human DFNB3 families and in shaker 2 (sh2) mice as a result of defects in stereocilia. In these mutant mice, hair cells have relatively normal spatial organization of stereocilia bundles but lack the graded, stair-step organization. We used sh2 mice as an experimental model to investigate the molecular consequences of the sh2 mutation in the Myo15 gene. Gene expression profiling with Affymetrix GeneChips in deaf homozygous (sh2/sh2) mice at 3 weeks and 3 months of age, and in age-matched, normal-hearing heterozygotes (+/sh2) identified only a few genes whose expression was affected by genotype, but a large number with age-associated changes in expression in both normal mice and sh2/sh2 homozygotes. Microarray data analyzed using Robust Multiarray Average identified Aim1, Dbi, and Tm4sf3 as genes with increased expression in sh2/sh2 homozygotes. These increases were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Genes exhibiting altered expression with age encoded collagens and proteins involved in collagen maturation, extracellular matrix, and bone mineralization. These results identified potential cellular pathways associated with myosin XV defects, and age-associated molecular events that are likely to be involved in maturation of the cochlea and auditory function. PMID:16794912

  7. Mechanism-based biomarker gene sets for glutathione depletion-related hepatotoxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Weihua; Mizukawa, Yumiko; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Minowa, Yosuke; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yasuo; Urushidani, Tetsuro

    2010-09-15

    Chemical-induced glutathione depletion is thought to be caused by two types of toxicological mechanisms: PHO-type glutathione depletion [glutathione conjugated with chemicals such as phorone (PHO) or diethyl maleate (DEM)], and BSO-type glutathione depletion [i.e., glutathione synthesis inhibited by chemicals such as L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO)]. In order to identify mechanism-based biomarker gene sets for glutathione depletion in rat liver, male SD rats were treated with various chemicals including PHO (40, 120 and 400 mg/kg), DEM (80, 240 and 800 mg/kg), BSO (150, 450 and 1500 mg/kg), and bromobenzene (BBZ, 10, 100 and 300 mg/kg). Liver samples were taken 3, 6, 9 and 24 h after administration and examined for hepatic glutathione content, physiological and pathological changes, and gene expression changes using Affymetrix GeneChip Arrays. To identify differentially expressed probe sets in response to glutathione depletion, we focused on the following two courses of events for the two types of mechanisms of glutathione depletion: a) gene expression changes occurring simultaneously in response to glutathione depletion, and b) gene expression changes after glutathione was depleted. The gene expression profiles of the identified probe sets for the two types of glutathione depletion differed markedly at times during and after glutathione depletion, whereas Srxn1 was markedly increased for both types as glutathione was depleted, suggesting that Srxn1 is a key molecule in oxidative stress related to glutathione. The extracted probe sets were refined and verified using various compounds including 13 additional positive or negative compounds, and they established two useful marker sets. One contained three probe sets (Akr7a3, Trib3 and Gstp1) that could detect conjugation-type glutathione depletors any time within 24 h after dosing, and the other contained 14 probe sets that could detect glutathione depletors by any mechanism. These two sets, with appropriate scoring

  8. Maize Opaque Endosperm Mutations Create Extensive Changes in Patterns of Gene ExpressionW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Brenda G.; Beatty, Mary K.; Singletary, George W.; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Dilkes, Brian P.; Larkins, Brian A.; Jung, Rudolf

    2002-01-01

    Maize starchy endosperm mutants have kernel phenotypes that include a brittle texture, susceptibility to insect pests, and inferior functional characteristics of products made from their flour. At least 18 such mutants have been identified, but only in the cases of opaque2 (o2) and floury2 (fl2), which affect different aspects of storage protein synthesis, is the molecular basis of the mutation known. To better understand the relationship between the phenotypes of these mutants and their biochemical bases, we characterized the protein and amino acid composition, as well as the mRNA transcript profiles, of nearly isogenic inbred lines of W64A o1, o2, o5, o9, o11, Mucuronate (Mc), Defective endosperm B30 (DeB30), and fl2. The largest reductions in zein protein synthesis occur in the W64A o2, DeB30, and fl2 mutants, which have ∼35 to 55% of the wild-type level of storage proteins. Zeins in W64A o5, o9, o11, and Mc are within 80 to 90% of the amount found in the wild type. Only in the cases of o5 and Mc were significant qualitative changes in zein synthesis observed. The pattern of gene expression in normal and mutant genotypes was assayed by profiling endosperm mRNA transcripts at 18 days after pollination with an Affymetrix GeneChip containing >1400 selected maize gene sequences. Compared with W64A sugary1, a mutant defective in starch synthesis, alterations in the gene expression patterns of the opaque mutants are very pleiotropic. Increased expression of genes associated with physiological stress, and the unfolded protein response, are common features of the opaque mutants. Based on global patterns of gene expression, these mutants were categorized in four phenotypic groups as follows: W64A+ and o1; o2; o5/o9/o11; and Mc and fl2. PMID:12368507

  9. Solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation induces histone 3 methylation changes in the gene promoters of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 in primary human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gesumaria, Lisa; Matsui, Mary S; Kluz, Thomas; Costa, Max

    2015-05-01

    Molecular signalling pathways delineating the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are currently well-defined; however, the effects of UVR on epigenetic mechanisms of MMP induction are not as well understood. In this study, we examined solar-simulated UVR (ssUVR)-induced gene expression changes and alterations to histone methylation in the promoters of MMP1 and MMP3 in primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDF). Gene expression changes, including the increased expression of MMP1 and MMP3, were observed using Affymetrix GeneChip arrays and confirmed by qRT-PCR. Using ChIP-PCR, we showed for the first time that in HDF irradiated with 12 J/cm(2) ssUVR, the H3K4me3 transcriptional activating mark increased and the H3K9me2 transcriptional silencing mark decreased in abundance in promoters, correlating with the observed elevation of MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA levels following ssUVR exposure. Changes in mRNA levels due to a single exposure were transient and decreased 5 days after exposure.

  10. A Single-Array-Based Method for Detecting Copy Number Variants Using Affymetrix High Density SNP Arrays and its Application to Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Fu, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence has shown that structural variations, due to insertions, deletions, and inversions of DNA, may contribute considerably to the development of complex human diseases, such as breast cancer. High-throughput genotyping technologies, such as Affymetrix high density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, have produced large amounts of genetic data for genome-wide SNP genotype calling and copy number estimation. Meanwhile, there is a great need for accurate and efficient statistical methods to detect copy number variants. In this article, we introduce a hidden-Markov-model (HMM)-based method, referred to as the PICR-CNV, for copy number inference. The proposed method first estimates copy number abundance for each single SNP on a single array based on the raw fluorescence values, and then standardizes the estimated copy number abundance to achieve equal footing among multiple arrays. This method requires no between-array normalization, and thus, maintains data integrity and independence of samples among individual subjects. In addition to our efforts to apply new statistical technology to raw fluorescence values, the HMM has been applied to the standardized copy number abundance in order to reduce experimental noise. Through simulations, we show our refined method is able to infer copy number variants accurately. Application of the proposed method to a breast cancer dataset helps to identify genomic regions significantly associated with the disease. PMID:26279618

  11. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  12. A Cross-Species Gene Expression Marker-Based Genetic Map and QTL Analysis in Bambara Groundnut.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hui Hui; Ho, Wai Kuan; Graham, Neil; May, Sean; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2017-02-22

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an underutilised legume crop, which has long been recognised as a protein-rich and drought-tolerant crop, used extensively in Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in agronomic and drought-related traits using an expression marker-based genetic map based on major crop resources developed in soybean. The gene expression markers (GEMs) were generated at the (unmasked) probe-pair level after cross-hybridisation of bambara groundnut leaf RNA to the Affymetrix Soybean Genome GeneChip. A total of 753 markers grouped at an LOD (Logarithm of odds) of three, with 527 markers mapped into linkage groups. From this initial map, a spaced expression marker-based genetic map consisting of 13 linkage groups containing 218 GEMs, spanning 982.7 cM (centimorgan) of the bambara groundnut genome, was developed. Of the QTL detected, 46% were detected in both control and drought treatment populations, suggesting that they are the result of intrinsic trait differences between the parental lines used to construct the cross, with 31% detected in only one of the conditions. The present GEM map in bambara groundnut provides one technically feasible route for the translation of information and resources from major and model plant species to underutilised and resource-poor crops.

  13. A Cross-Species Gene Expression Marker-Based Genetic Map and QTL Analysis in Bambara Groundnut

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Hui Hui; Ho, Wai Kuan; Graham, Neil; May, Sean; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.) is an underutilised legume crop, which has long been recognised as a protein-rich and drought-tolerant crop, used extensively in Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) involved in agronomic and drought-related traits using an expression marker-based genetic map based on major crop resources developed in soybean. The gene expression markers (GEMs) were generated at the (unmasked) probe-pair level after cross-hybridisation of bambara groundnut leaf RNA to the Affymetrix Soybean Genome GeneChip. A total of 753 markers grouped at an LOD (Logarithm of odds) of three, with 527 markers mapped into linkage groups. From this initial map, a spaced expression marker-based genetic map consisting of 13 linkage groups containing 218 GEMs, spanning 982.7 cM (centimorgan) of the bambara groundnut genome, was developed. Of the QTL detected, 46% were detected in both control and drought treatment populations, suggesting that they are the result of intrinsic trait differences between the parental lines used to construct the cross, with 31% detected in only one of the conditions. The present GEM map in bambara groundnut provides one technically feasible route for the translation of information and resources from major and model plant species to underutilised and resource-poor crops. PMID:28241413

  14. Suppression of RNA silencing by a geminivirus nuclear protein, AC2, correlates with transactivation of host genes.

    PubMed

    Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R; Shivaprasad, P V; Akbergenov, Rashid; Oakeley, Edward J; Veluthambi, K; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2005-02-01

    Bipartite geminiviruses encode a small protein, AC2, that functions as a transactivator of viral transcription and a suppressor of RNA silencing. A relationship between these two functions had not been investigated before. We characterized both of these functions for AC2 from Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV). When transiently expressed in plant protoplasts, MYMV AC2 strongly transactivated the viral promoter; AC2 was detected in the nucleus, and a split nuclear localization signal (NLS) was mapped. In a model Nicotiana benthamiana plant, in which silencing can be triggered biolistically, AC2 reduced local silencing and prevented its systemic spread. Mutations in the AC2 NLS or Zn finger or deletion of its activator domain abolished both these effects, suggesting that suppression of silencing by AC2 requires transactivation of host suppressor(s). In line with this, in Arabidopsis protoplasts, MYMV AC2 or its homologue from African cassava mosaic geminivirus coactivated >30 components of the plant transcriptome, as detected with Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips. Several corresponding promoters cloned from Arabidopsis were strongly induced by both AC2 proteins. These results suggest that silencing suppression and transcription activation by AC2 are functionally connected and that some of the AC2-inducible host genes discovered here may code for components of an endogenous network that controls silencing.

  15. Transcriptome profiling and expression analyses of genes critical to wheat adaptation to low temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: To identify the genes involved in the development of low temperature (LT) tolerance in hexaploid wheat, we examined the global changes in expression in response to cold of the 55,052 potentially unique genes represented in the Affymetrix Wheat Genome microarray. We compared the expressi...

  16. Microgravity and Immunity: Changes in Lymphocyte Gene Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Ward, N. E.; Risin, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    Earlier studies had shown that modeled and true microgravity (MG) cause multiple direct effects on human lymphocytes. MG inhibits lymphocyte locomotion, suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific activation, affects signal transduction mechanisms, as well as activation-induced apoptosis. In this study we assessed changes in gene expression associated with lymphocyte exposure to microgravity in an attempt to identify microgravity-sensitive genes (MGSG) in general and specifically those genes that might be responsible for the functional and structural changes observed earlier. Two sets of experiments targeting different goals were conducted. In the first set, T-lymphocytes from normal donors were activated with antiCD3 and IL2 and then cultured in 1g (static) and modeled MG (MMG) conditions (Rotating Wall Vessel bioreactor) for 24 hours. This setting allowed searching for MGSG by comparison of gene expression patterns in zero and 1 g gravity. In the second set - activated T-cells after culturing for 24 hours in 1g and MMG were exposed three hours before harvesting to a secondary activation stimulus (PHA) thus triggering the apoptotic pathway. Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy isolation kit (Qiagen, Valencia, CA). Affymetrix Gene Chips (U133A), allowing testing for 18,400 human genes, were used for microarray analysis. In the first set of experiments MMG exposure resulted in altered expression of 89 genes, 10 of them were up-regulated and 79 down-regulated. In the second set, changes in expression were revealed in 85 genes, 20 were up-regulated and 65 were down-regulated. The analysis revealed that significant numbers of MGS genes are associated with signal transduction and apoptotic pathways. Interestingly, the majority of genes that responded by up- or down-regulation in the alternative sets of experiments were not the same, possibly reflecting different functional states of the examined T-lymphocyte populations. The responder genes (MGSG) might play an

  17. Phycocyanobilin promotes PC12 cell survival and modulates immune and inflammatory genes and oxidative stress markers in acute cerebral hypoperfusion in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Marín-Prida, Javier; Riva, Federica; Pentón-Arias, Eduardo

    2013-10-01

    Since the inflammatory response and oxidative stress are involved in the stroke cascade, we evaluated here the effects of Phycocyanobilin (PCB, the C-Phycocyanin linked tetrapyrrole) on PC12 cell survival, the gene expression and the oxidative status of hypoperfused rat brain. After the permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (BCCAo), the animals were treated with saline or PCB, taking samples 24 h post-surgery. Global gene expression was analyzed with GeneChip Rat Gene ST 1.1 from Affymetrix; the expression of particular genes was assessed by the Fast SYBR Green RT-PCR Master Mix and Bioplex methods; and redox markers (MDA, PP, CAT, SOD) were evaluated spectrophotometrically. The PCB treatment prevented the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glutamate induced PC12 cell injury assessed by the MTT assay, and modulated 190 genes (93 up- and 97 down-regulated) associated to several immunological and inflammatory processes in BCCAo rats. Furthermore, PCB positively modulated 19 genes mostly related to a detrimental pro-inflammatory environment and counteracted the oxidative imbalance in the treated BCCAo animals. Our results support the view of an effective influence of PCB on major inflammatory mediators in acute cerebral hypoperfusion. These results suggest that PCB has a potential to be a treatment for ischemic stroke for which further studies are needed. - Highlights: • Phycocyanobilin (PCB) prevents H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glutamate induced PC12 cell viability loss. • Anterior cortex and striatum are highly vulnerable to cerebral hypoperfusion (CH). • PCB modulates 190 genes associated to inflammation in acute CH. • PCB regulates 19 genes mostly related to a detrimental pro-inflammatory environment. • PCB restores redox and immune balances showing promise as potential stroke therapy.

  18. Core temperature correlates with expression of selected stress and immunomodulatory genes in febrile patients with sepsis and noninfectious SIRS.

    PubMed

    Sonna, Larry A; Hawkins, Lauren; Lissauer, Matthew E; Maldeis, Pam; Towns, Michael; Johnson, Steven B; Moore, Richard; Singh, Ishwar S; Cowan, Mark J; Hasday, Jeffrey D

    2010-01-01

    Environmental hyperthermia and exercise produce extensive changes in gene expression in human blood cells, but it is unknown whether this also happens during febrile-range hyperthermia. We tested the hypothesis that heat shock protein (HSP) and immunomodulatory stress gene expression correlate with fever in intensive care unit patients. Whole blood messenger RNA was obtained over consecutive days from 100 hospitalized patients suffering from sepsis or noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) as defined by conventional criteria. The most abnormal body temperature in the preceding 24 h was recorded for each sample. Expression analysis was performed using the Affymetrix U133 chip. ANCOVA followed by correlation analysis was performed on a subset of 278 prospectively identified sequences of interest. Temperature affected expression of 60 sequences, either independently or as a function of clinical diagnosis. Forty-eight of these (representing 38 genes) were affected by temperature only, including several HSPs, transcription factors heat shock factor (HSF)-1 and HSF-4, cellular adhesion molecules such as ICAM1/CD54 and JAM3, toll receptors TLR-6 and TLR-7, ribosomal proteins, and a number of molecules involved in inflammatory pathways. Twelve sequences demonstrated temperature-dependent responses that differed significantly between patients with sepsis and noninfectious SIRS: CXCL-13; heat shock proteins DNAJB12 and DNAJC4; the F11 receptor; folate hydrolase 1; HSF-2; HSP 70 proteins HSPA1A, HSPA1B, and HSPA1L; interleukin 8; lipopolysaccharide binding protein; and prostaglandin E synthase. Febrile-range temperatures achieved during sepsis and noninfectious SIRS correlate with detectable changes in stress gene expression in vivo, suggesting that fever can activate HSP gene expression and modify innate immune responses. For some genes, it appears that clinical condition can alter temperature-sensitive gene expression. Collectively, these data

  19. Molecular Characterization of Thyroid Toxicity: Anchoring Gene Expression Profiles to Biochemical and Pathologic End Points

    PubMed Central

    Glatt, Christine M.; Ouyang, Ming; Welsh, William; Green, John W.; Connor, John O; Frame, Steven R.; Everds, Nancy E.; Poindexter, Greg; Snajdr, Suzanne; Delker, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Organic iodides have been shown to induce thyroid hypertrophy and increase alterations in colloid in rats, although the mechanism involved in this toxicity is unclear. To evaluate the effect that free iodide has on thyroid toxicity, we exposed rats for 2 weeks by daily gavage to sodium iodide (NaI). To compare the effects of compounds with alternative mechanisms (increased thyroid hormone metabolism and decreased thyroid hormone synthesis, respectively), we also examined phenobarbital (PB) and propylthiouracil (PTU) as model thyroid toxicants. Follicular cell hypertrophy and pale-staining colloid were present in thyroid glands from PB-treated rats, and more severe hypertrophy/colloid changes along with diffuse hyperplasia were present in thyroid glands from PTU-treated rats. In PB-and PTU-treated rats, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels were significantly elevated, and both thyroxine and triiodothyronine hormone levels were significantly decreased. PB induced hepatic uridine diphosphate-glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT) activity almost 2-fold, whereas PTU reduced hepatic 5′-deiodinase I (5′-DI) activity to < 10% of control in support of previous reports regarding the mechanism of action of each chemical. NaI also significantly altered liver weights and UDPGT activity but did not affect thyroid hormone levels or thyroid pathology. Thyroid gene expression analyses using Affymetrix U34A GeneChips, a regularized t-test, and Gene Map Annotator and Pathway Profiler demonstrated significant changes in rhodopsin-like G-protein–coupled receptor transcripts from all chemicals tested. NaI demonstrated dose-dependent changes in multiple oxidative stress–related genes, as also determined by principal component and linear regression analyses. Differential transcript profiles, possibly relevant to rodent follicular cell tumor outcomes, were observed in rats exposed to PB and PTU, including genes involved in Wnt signaling and ribosomal protein expression. PMID:16203246

  20. In vitro gene expression data supporting a DNA non-reactive genotoxic mechanism for ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Arbillaga, Leire; Lopez de Cerain, Adela . E-mail: acerain@unav.es

    2007-04-15

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin often found in cereals and agricultural products. There is unequivocal evidence of renal carcinogenicity of OTA in male rats, although the mechanism of action is unknown. At present, available data support an epigenetic mechanism (DNA non-reactive) resulting from oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, because a direct OTA interaction with DNA has not been demonstrated. Genotoxic mechanism (DNA-reactive vs. DNA non-reactive) may have implications on human risk assessment. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to identify biological pathways modulated by OTA in vitro in a human renal cell line (HK-2) to contribute to the elucidation of the mechanism of OTA toxicity. For that purpose, cells were exposed to 50 {mu}M OTA during 6 and 24 h, and gene expression profiles were analyzed using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 A 2.0 Gene Chips. Under the same experimental conditions, genotoxicity was evaluated by the modified comet assay using FPG and Endo III to detect oxidative DNA damage, and intracellular ROS level by the H{sub 2}DCF assay. After 6 h, with slight cytotoxicity (83% survival), genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain were up-regulated; and after 24 h, with a more pronounced cytotoxicity (51% survival), genes implicated in oxidative stress response were also up-regulated. Increase in intracellular ROS level and oxidative DNA damage was evident at both exposure times being more pronounced with high cytotoxicity. On the contrary, up-regulation of genes implicated in DNA damage response, as cell cycle control or apoptosis, was not detected at any exposure time. In conclusion, these results support a DNA non-reactive mechanism of OTA genotoxicity.

  1. Global Characteristics of CSIG-Associated Gene Expression Changes in Human HEK293 Cells and the Implications for CSIG Regulating Cell Proliferation and Senescence.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liwei; Zhao, Wenting; Zhu, Feng; Yuan, Fuwen; Xie, Nan; Li, Tingting; Wang, Pingzhang; Tong, Tanjun

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence-inhibited gene (CSIG), also named as ribosomal_L1 domain-containing 1 (RSL1D1), is implicated in various processes including cell cycle regulation, cellular senescence, apoptosis, and tumor metastasis. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism underlying its functions. To screen important targets and signaling pathways modulated by CSIG, we compared the gene expression profiles in CSIG-silencing and control HEK293 cells using Affymetrix microarray Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChips. A total of 590 genes displayed statistically significant expression changes, with 279 genes up-regulated and 311 down-regulated, respectively. These genes are involved in a broad array of biological processes, mainly in transcriptional regulation, cell cycle, signal transduction, oxidation reduction, development, and cell adhesion. The differential expression of genes such as ZNF616, KPNA5, and MAP3K3 was further validated by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Furthermore, we investigated the correlated expression patterns of Cdc14B, ESCO1, KPNA5, MAP3K3, and CSIG during cell cycle and senescence progression, which imply the important pathways CSIG regulating cell cycle and senescence. The mechanism study showed that CSIG modulated the mRNA half-life of Cdc14B, CASP7, and CREBL2. This study shows that expression profiling can be used to identify genes that are transcriptionally or post-transcriptionally modified following CSIG knockdown and to reveal the molecular mechanism of cell proliferation and senescence regulated by CSIG.

  2. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  3. Glial inflammation and neurodegeneration induced by candoxin, a novel neurotoxin from Bungarus candidus venom: global gene expression analysis using microarray.

    PubMed

    Pachiappan, A; Thwin, M M; Manikandan, J; Gopalakrishnakone, P

    2005-12-15

    Candoxin (PDB #1JGK), a three-finger neurotoxin from Bungarus candidus venom, inhibits post-synaptic neuromuscular and neuronal alpha7nACh-receptors, and induces delayed cell-death throughout the glial population. When applied to cultured human glial cell lines, candoxin (CDX) induced cell death in a concentration (EC(50) approximately 1muM) and time dependent manner. Results of TUNEL-histochemistry further confirm CDX-induced brain (hippocampus, frontal cortex, and temporal regions) damage when administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v) in adult mice. In this study, we explored differential gene expression profiles following exposure of human glial (Hs 683) cell lines to CDX at various time intervals using Affymetrix-GeneChips. By means of MAS and GeneSpring analyses, 105 genes whose expression was significantly (P<0.01) altered by at least 3-fold were selected. Results of the genome analysis reveal that the potential role of CDX at molecular level involves the regulation of genes in signal transduction, ubiquitin-inflammation, mitochondrial-dysfunction, and damage-response pathways. In addition, using QRT-PCR and rationally designed specific CDX-binding peptide (P-NT.II), we identified the genes-IL7R, IL13RA2, IL-1beta, TNFRSF12A, GADD45A, CD44 and IFI44-that might play an important role in CDX-induced glial inflammation, DNA-damage and degeneration. These findings reveal new insight into the molecular mechanisms of glial-driven neurodegeneration after exposure to neurotoxins.

  4. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection).

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Meeghan A; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E; Lawton, Michael P; Manautou, José E

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400mg/kg) and then challenged 48h later with 600mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430_2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection.

  5. Metabolic gene profile in early human fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Iruretagoyena, J I; Davis, W; Bird, C; Olsen, J; Radue, R; Teo Broman, A; Kendziorski, C; Splinter BonDurant, S; Golos, T; Bird, I; Shah, D

    2014-07-01

    The primitive cardiac tube starts beating 6-8 weeks post fertilization in the developing embryo. In order to describe normal cardiac development during late first and early second trimester in human fetuses this study used microarray and pathways analysis and created a corresponding 'normal' database. Fourteen fetal hearts from human fetuses between 10 and 18 weeks of gestational age (GA) were prospectively collected at the time of elective termination of pregnancy. RNA from recovered tissues was used for transcriptome analysis with Affymetrix 1.0 ST microarray chip. From the amassed data we investigated differences in cardiac development within the 10-18 GA period dividing the sample by GA in three groups: 10-12 (H1), 13-15 (H2) and 16-18 (H3) weeks. A fold change of 2 or above adjusted for a false discovery rate of 5% was used as initial cutoff to determine differential gene expression for individual genes. Test for enrichment to identify functional groups was carried out using the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Array analysis correctly identified the cardiac specific genes, and transcripts reported to be differentially expressed were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Single transcript and Ontology analysis showed first trimester heart expression of myosin-related genes to be up-regulated >5-fold compared with second trimester heart. In contrast the second trimester hearts showed further gestation-related increases in many genes involved in energy production and cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, fetal heart development during the first trimester was dominated by heart-specific genes coding for myocardial development and differentiation. During the second trimester, transcripts related to energy generation and cardiomyocyte communication for contractile coordination/proliferation were more dominant. Transcripts related to fatty acid metabolism can be seen as early as 10 weeks and clearly increase as the heart matures. Retinol

  6. Changes of gene expression profiles in the cervical spinal cord by acupuncture in an MPTP-intoxicated mouse model: microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeong-Gon; Yeo, Sujung; Hong, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2011-07-15

    It has been shown that acupuncture at acupoints GB34 and LR3 inhibits the degeneration of nigrostriatal neurons in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. The degeneration of spinal cord was reported to be induced in the MPTP-treated pre-symptomatic mouse. In this study, the gene expression profile changes following acupuncture at the acupoints were investigated in the cervical spinal cord of an MPTP-induced parkinsonism model using a whole transcript array (Affymetrix GeneChip mouse gene 1.0 ST array). It was shown that 8 of the probes up-regulated in MPTP, as compared to the control, were down-regulated after acupuncture at the acupoints. Of these 8 probes, 6 probes (4 annotated genes in 6 probes: Ctla2a, EG383229, Ppbp and Ube2l6) were exclusively down-regulated by acupuncture at the specific acupoints except for 2 probes as these 2 probes were commonly down-regulated by acupuncture at both the acupoints and the non-acupoints. In addition, 11 of the probes down-regulated in MPTP, as compared to the control, were up-regulated by acupuncture at the acupoints. Of these 11 probes, 10 probes (5 annotated genes in 10 probes: EG665033, ENSMUSG00000055323, Obox6, Pbp2 and Tmem150) were exclusively up-regulated by acupuncture at the specific acupoints except for the Fut11 because the Fut11 was commonly up-regulated by acupuncture at both the acupoints and the non-acupoints. The expression levels of the representative genes in the microarray were validated by real-time RT-PCR. These data suggest that the expression of these exclusively regulated 16 probes (9 genes) may be, at least in part, affected by acupuncture at the acupoints in the cervical spinal cord which can be damaged by MPTP intoxication.

  7. Mitigating effects of L-selenomethionine on low-dose iron ion radiation-induced changes in gene expression associated with cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Nuth, Manunya; Kennedy, Ann R

    2013-07-01

    Ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy (HZE) particles poses a danger to astronauts during space travel. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the patterns of gene expression associated with cellular exposure to low-dose iron ion irradiation, in the presence and absence of L-selenomethionine (SeM). Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were exposed to low-dose iron ion (1 GeV/n) irradiation at 10 or 20 cGy with or without SeM pretreatment. The cells were harvested 6 and 16 h post-irradiation and analyzed by the Affymetrix U133Av2 gene chip arrays. Genes exhibiting a 1.5-fold expression cut-off and 5% false discovery rate (FDR) were considered statistically significant and subsequently analyzed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) for pathway analysis. Representative genes were further validated by real-time RT-PCR. Even at low doses of radiation from iron ions, global genome profiling of the irradiated cells revealed the upregulation of genes associated with the activation of stress-related signaling pathways (ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, p53 signaling, cell cycle and apoptosis), which occurred in a dose-dependent manner. A 24-h pretreatment with SeM was shown to reduce the radiation effects by mitigating stress-related signaling pathways and downregulating certain genes associated with cell adhesion. The mechanism by which SeM prevents radiation-induced transformation in vitro may involve the suppression of the expression of genes associated with stress-related signaling and certain cell adhesion events.

  8. Effect of the difference in vehicles on gene expression in the rat liver--analysis of the control data in the Toxicogenomics Project Database.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Kayoko; Mizukawa, Yumiko; Morishita, Katsumi; Okuyama, Manabu; Kasahara, Toshihiko; Toritsuka, Naoki; Miyagishima, Toshikazu; Nagao, Taku; Urushidani, Tetsuro

    2006-05-08

    The Toxicogenomics Project is a 5-year collaborative project by the Japanese government and pharmaceutical companies in 2002. Its aim is to construct a large-scale toxicology database of 150 compounds orally administered to rats. The test consists of a single administration test (3, 6, 9 and 24 h) and a repeated administration test (3, 7, 14 and 28 days), and the conventional toxicology data together with the gene expression data in liver as analyzed by using Affymetrix GeneChip are being accumulated. In the project, either methylcellulose or corn oil is employed as vehicle. We examined whether the vehicle itself affects the analysis of gene expression and found that corn oil alone affected the food consumption and biochemical parameters mainly related to lipid metabolism, and this accompanied typical changes in the gene expression. Most of the genes modulated by corn oil were related to cholesterol or fatty acid metabolism (e.g., CYP7A1, CYP8B1, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase, squalene epoxidase, angiopoietin-like protein 4, fatty acid synthase, fatty acid binding proteins), suggesting that the response was physiologic to the oil intake. Many of the lipid-related genes showed circadian rhythm within a day, but the expression pattern of general clock genes (e.g., period 2, arylhydrocarbon nuclear receptor translocator-like, D site albumin promoter binding protein) were unaffected by corn oil, suggesting that the effects are specific for lipid metabolism. These results would be useful for usage of the database especially when drugs with different vehicle control are compared.

  9. Curcumin alters gene expression-associated DNA damage, cell cycle, cell survival and cell migration and invasion in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-Tsang; Wang, Wei-Shu; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Su-Tso; Tang, Nou-Ying; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality and new cases are on the increase worldwide. However, the treatment of lung cancer remains unsatisfactory. Curcumin has been shown to induce cell death in many human cancer cells, including human lung cancer cells. However, the effects of curcumin on genetic mechanisms associated with these actions remain unclear. Curcumin (2 µM) was added to NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells and the cells were incubated for 24 h. Total RNA was extracted from isolated cells for cDNA synthesis, labeling, microarray hybridization and flour‑labeled cDNA hybridized on chip. Localized concentrations of fluorescent molecules were detected and quantified using Expression Console software (Affymetrix) with default RMA parameters. GeneGo software was used for the key genes involved and their possible interaction pathways. The results showed that ~170 genes were significantly upregulated and 577 genes were significantly downregulated in curcumin‑treated cells. Specifically, the up‑ and downregulated genes included CCNE2, associated with DNA damage; ID3, associated with cell survival and 146 genes with a >2- to 3-fold change including the TP53INP1 gene, associated with DNA damage; CDC6, CDCA5, TAKMIP2, CDK14, CDK5, CDCA76, CDC25A, CDC5L and SKP2, associated with cell cycle; the CARD6, ID1 and ID2 genes, associated with cell survival and the BRMS1L, associated with cell migration and invasion. Additionally, 59 downregulated genes exhibited a >4-fold change, including the DDIT3 gene, associated with DNA damage; while 97 genes had a >3- to 4-fold change including the DDIT4 gene, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle and 321 genes with a >2- to 3-fold including the GADD45A and CGREF1 genes, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle, the TNFRSF10B, GAS5, TSSC1 and TNFRSF11B gene, associated with cell survival and the ARHAP29 and CADM2 genes, associated with cell migration

  10. Global gene expression profiling of dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis: from pathological and biochemical data to microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Li-Jen; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Yang, Jyh-Shyue; Tseng, Huei-Hun; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Huang, Chi-Ying F

    2006-01-01

    The development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is generally preceded by cirrhosis, which occurs at the end stage of fibrosis. This is a common and potentially lethal problem of chronic liver disease in Asia. The development of microarrays permits us to monitor transcriptomes on a genome-wide scale; this has dramatically speeded up a comprehensive understanding of the disease process. Here we used dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), a nongenotoxic hepatotoxin, to induce rat necroinflammatory and hepatic fibrosis. During the 6-week time course, histopathological, biochemical, and quantitative RT-PCR analyses confirmed the incidence of necroinflammatory and hepatic fibrosis in this established rat model system. Using the Affymetrix microarray chip, 256 differentially expressed genes were identified from the liver injury samples. Hierarchical clustering of gene expression using a gene ontology database allowed the identification of several stage-specific characters and functionally related clusters that encode proteins related to metabolism, cell growth/maintenance, and response to external challenge. Among these genes, we classified 44 potential necroinflammatory-related genes and 62 potential fibrosis-related markers or drug targets based on histopathological scores. We also compared the results with other data on well-known markers and various other microarray datasets that are available. In conclusion, we believe that the molecular picture of necroinflammatory and hepatic fibrosis from this study may provide novel biological insights into the development of early liver damage molecular classifiers than can be used for basic research and in clinical applications. A public accessible website is available at http://LiverFibrosis.nchc.org.tw:8080/LF.

  11. Alteration of gene expression in mammary gland tissue of dairy cows in response to dietary unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mach, N; Jacobs, A A A; Kruijt, L; van Baal, J; Smits, M A

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of supplementing unprotected dietary unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) from different plant oils on gene expression in the mammary gland of grazing dairy cows. A total of 28 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows in mid-lactation were blocked according to parity, days in milk, milk yield and fat percentage. The cows were then randomly assigned to four UFA sources based on rapeseed, soybean, linseed or a mixture of the three oils for 23 days, after which, all 28 cows were switched to a control diet for an additional 28 days. On the last day of both periods, mammary gland biopsies were taken to study genome-wide differences in gene expression on Affymetrix GeneChip® Bovine Genome Arrays (no. 900493) by ServiceXS (Leiden, The Netherlands). Supplementation with UFAs resulted in increased milk yield but decreased milk fat and protein percentages. Furthermore, the proportion of de novo fatty acids (FAs) in the milk was reduced, whereas that of long-chain FAs increased. Applying a statistical cut-off of false discovery rate of q-values <0.05 together with an absolute fold change of 1.3, a total of 972 genes were found to be significantly affected through UFA supplementation, indicating that large transcriptional adaptations occurred in the mammary gland when grazing dairy cows were supplemented with unprotected dietary UFA. Gene sets related to cell development and remodeling, apoptosis, nutrient metabolic process, as well as immune system response were predominantly downregulated during UFA supplementation. Such molecular knowledge on the physiology of the mammary gland might provide the basis for further functional research on dairy cows.

  12. Transcriptional Profiling of Murine Organ Genes in Response to Infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames Spores

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Scott T.; Yeager, Linsey A.; Lawrence, William S.; Ponce, Cindy; Galindo, Cristi L.; Garner, Harold R.; Baze, Wallace B.; Suarez, Giovanni; Peterson, Johnny W.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2008-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the gram positive, spore-forming etiological agent of anthrax, an affliction studied because of its importance as a potential bioweapon. Although in vitro transcriptional responses of macrophages to either spore or anthrax toxins have been previously reported, little is known regarding the impact of infection on gene expression in host tissues. We infected Swiss-Webster mice intranasally with 5 LD50 of B. anthracis virulent Ames spores and observed the global transcriptional profiles of various tissues over a 48 hr time period. RNA was extracted from spleen, lung, and heart tissues of infected and control mice and examined by Affymetrix GeneChip analysis. Approximately 580 host genes were significantly over or under expressed among the lung, spleen, and heart tissues at 8 hr and 48 hr time points. Expression of genes encoding for surfactant and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presentation was diminished during the early phase of infection in lungs. By 48 hr, a significant number of genes were modulated in the heart, including up-regulation of calcium-binding related gene expression, and down-regulation of multiple genes related to cell adhesion, formation of the extracellular matrix, and the cell cytoskeleton. Interestingly, the spleen 8 hr post-infection showed striking increases in the expression of genes that encode hydrolytic enzymes, and these levels remained elevated throughout infection. Further, genes involving antigen presentation and interferon responses were down-regulated in the spleen at 8 hr. In late stages of infection, splenic genes related to the inflammatory response were up-regulated. This study is the first to describe the in vivo global transcriptional response of multiple organs during inhalational anthrax. Although numerous genes related to the host immunological response and certain protection mechanisms were up-regulated in these organs, a vast list of genes important for fully developing and maintaining this

  13. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  14. Global gene expression in neuroendocrine tumors from patients with the MEN1 syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dilley, William G; Kalyanaraman, Somasundaram; Verma, Sulekha; Cobb, J Perren; Laramie, Jason M; Lairmore, Terry C

    2005-01-01

    Background Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1, OMIM 131100) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by endocrine tumors of the parathyroids, pancreatic islets and pituitary. The disease is caused by the functional loss of the tumor suppressor protein menin, coded by the MEN1 gene. The protein sequence has no significant homology to known consensus motifs. In vitro studies have shown menin binding to JunD, Pem, Smad3, NF-kappaB, nm23H1, and RPA2 proteins. However, none of these binding studies have led to a convincing theory of how loss-of-menin leads to neoplasia. Results Global gene expression studies on eight neuroendocrine tumors from MEN1 patients and 4 normal islet controls was performed utilizing Affymetrix U95Av2 chips. Overall hierarchical clustering placed all tumors in one group separate from the group of normal islets. Within the group of tumors, those of the same type were mostly clustered together. The clustering analysis also revealed 19 apoptosis-related genes that were under-expressed in the group of tumors. There were 193 genes that were increased/decreased by at least 2-fold in the tumors relative to the normal islets and that had a t-test significance value of p < = 0.005. Forty-five of these genes were increased and 148 were decreased in the tumors relative to the controls. One hundred and four of the genes could be classified as being involved in cell growth, cell death, or signal transduction. The results from 11 genes were selected for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. The average correlation coefficient was 0.655 (range 0.235–0.964). Conclusion This is the first analysis of global gene expression in MEN1-associated neuroendocrine tumors. Many genes were identified which were differentially expressed in neuroendocrine tumors arising in patients with the MEN1 syndrome, as compared with normal human islet cells. The expression of a group of apoptosis-related genes was significantly suppressed, suggesting that these genes may

  15. Integrated polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Hsien; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Huang, Fu-Chun; Chen, Yi-Yu; Lin, Jr-Lung

    2006-09-01

    This study reports an integrated microfluidic chip for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) applications utilizing digital microfluidic chip (DMC) technology. Several crucial procedures including sample transportation, mixing, and DNA amplification were performed on the integrated chip using electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) effect. An innovative concept of hydrophobic/hydrophilic structure has been successfully demonstrated to integrate the DMC chip with the on-chip PCR device. Sample droplets were generated, transported and mixed by the EWOD-actuation. Then the mixture droplets were transported to a PCR chamber by utilizing the hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface to generate required surface tension gradient. A micro temperature sensor and two micro heaters inside the PCR chamber along with a controller were used to form a micro temperature control module, which could perform precise PCR thermal cycling for DNA amplification. In order to demonstrate the performance of the integrated DMC/PCR chips, a detection gene for Dengue II virus was successfully amplified and detected. The new integrated DMC/PCR chips only required an operation voltage of 12V(RMS) at a frequency of 3 KHz for digital microfluidic actuation and 9V(DC) for thermal cycling. When compared to its large-scale counterparts for DNA amplification, the developed system consumed less sample and reagent and could reduce the detection time. The developed chips successfully demonstrated the feasibility of Lab-On-a-Chip (LOC) by utilizing EWOD-based digital microfluidics.

  16. Bufalin alters gene expressions associated DNA damage, cell cycle, and apoptosis in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shin-Hwar; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Chen, Jaw-Chyum; Lin, Ju-Hwa; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Hsia, Te-Chun; Yang, Su-Tso; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2014-05-13

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death and there is no effective treatment to date. Bufalin has been shown effective in inducing apoptosis and DNA damage in lung cancer cells. However, the genetic mechanisms underlying these actions have not been elucidated yet. Cultured NCI-H460 cells were treated with or without 2 μM of bufalin for 24 h. The total RNA was extracted from each treatment for cDNA synthesis and labeling, microarray hybridization, and then followed by flour-labeled cDNA hybridized on chip. The localized concentrations of fluorescent molecules were detected and quantitated and analyzed by Expression Console software (Affymetrix) with default RMA parameters. The key genes involved and their possible interaction pathways were mapped by GeneGo software. About 165 apoptosis-related genes were affected. CASP9 was up-regulated by 5.51 fold and THAP1 by 2.75-fold while CCAR1 was down-regulated by 2.24 fold. 107 genes related to DNA damage/repair were affected. MDC1 was down-regulated by 2.22-fold, DDIT4 by 2.52 fold while GADD45B up-regulated by 3.72 fold. 201 genes related to cell cycles were affected. CCPG1 was down-regulated by 2.11 fold and CDCA7L by 2.71 fold. Many genes about apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and DNA repair are changed significantly following bufalin treatment in NCI-H460 cells. These changes provide an in depth understanding of cytotoxic mechanism of bufalin in genetic level and also offer many potentially useful biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer in future.

  17. [DNA chip technology and its application in toxicology [correction of toxiology

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-guang; Liang, Hong

    2002-10-01

    DNA chip is a new molecular biology technology rapidly developed in recent years. It fixes thousands of oligonucleotide on a silicon chip of 1 cm2, hybridizes the measuring materials marked with fluorescein or isotope with probe in DNA chip, and gets the fluorescent signal of hybridized probe through the scan of confocalmicroscope. This technology has been extensively used in HGP, DNA sequencing, transcript analysis, gene diagnosis etc. Toxicology is an important branch of life science. DNA chip can be extensively used in the toxicological [correction of toxiological] field. This paper reviewed the DNA chip technology in mechanism, manufacturing method, signal check, advantages and application prospect in toxicology.

  18. Effect of Ovarian Hormones on Genes Promoting Dendritic Spines In Laser Captured Serotonin Neurons From Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Reddy, Arubala P.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the elementary structural units of neuronal plasticity and the cascades that promote dendrite spine remodeling center on Rho GTPases and downstream effectors of actin dynamics. In a model of hormone replacement therapy (HT), we sought the effect of estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) on gene expression in these cascades in laser captured serotonin neurons from rhesus macaques with cDNA array analysis. Spayed rhesus macaques were treated with either placebo, E or E+P via Silastic implant for 1 month prior to euthanasia after which the midbrain was obtained, sectioned and immunostained for TPH. TPH-positive neurons were laser captured using an Arcturus Laser Dissection Microscope (PixCell II). RNA from laser captured serotonin neurons (n=2 animals/treatment) was hybridized to Rhesus Affymetrix GeneChips. There was a significant change in 744 probe sets (ANOVA, p < 0.05), but 10,493 probe sets exhibited a 2-fold or greater change. Pivotal changes in pathways leading to dendrite spine proliferation and transformation included 2-fold or greater increases in expression of the Rho GTPases called CDC42, Rac1 and RhoA. In addition, 2-fold or greater increases occurred in downstream effectors of actin dynamics including PAK1, ROCK, PIP5K, IRSp53, WASP, WAVE, MLC, cofilin, gelsolin, profilin and 3 subunits of ARP2/3. Finally, 2-fold or greater decreases occurred in CRIPAK, LIMK2 and MLCK. The regulation of RhoA, Rac1, CDC42, ROCK, PIP5k, IRSp53, WASP, WAVE, LIMK2, CRIPAK1, MLCK, ARP2/3 subunit 3, gelsolin, profilin and cofilin was confirmed with nested qRT-PCR on laser captured RNA (n=3 animals/treatment). The data indicate that ovarian steroids target gene expression of the Rho GTPases and pivotal downstream proteins that in turn, would promote dendritic spine proliferation and stabilization on serotonin neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus. PMID:19687787

  19. Knockdown of CSE1L Gene in Colorectal Cancer Reduces Tumorigenesis in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Pimiento, Jose M; Neill, Kevin G; Henderson-Jackson, Evita; Eschrich, Steven A; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Husain, Kazim; Shibata, David; Coppola, Domenico; Malafa, Mokenge P

    2016-10-01

    Human cellular apoptosis susceptibility (chromosomal segregation 1-like, CSE1L) gene plays a role in nuclear-to-cytoplasm transport and chromosome segregation during mitosis, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. CSE1L is involved in colon carcinogenesis. CSE1L gene expression was assessed with three data sets using Affymetrix U133 + gene chips on normal human colonic mucosa (NR), adenomas (ADs), and colorectal carcinoma (CRC). CSE1L protein expression in CRC, AD, and NR from the same patients was measured by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray. We evaluated CSE1L expression in CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, and HT29) and its biological functions. CSE1L mRNA was significantly increased in all AD and CRC compared with NR (P < 0.001 and P = 0.02, respectivly). We observed a change in CSE1L staining intensity and cellular localization by immunohistochemistry. CSE1L was significantly increased during the transition from AD to CRC when compared with NR in a CRC tissue microarray (P = 0.01 and P < 0.001). HCT116, SW480, and HT29 cells also expressed CSE1L protein. CSE1L knockdown by shRNA inhibited protein, resulting in decreased cell proliferation, reduced colony formation in soft agar, and induction of apoptosis. CSE1L protein is expressed early and across all stages of CRC development. shRNA knockdown of CSE1L was associated with inhibition of tumorigenesis in CRC cells. CSE1L may represent a potential target for treatment of CRC.

  20. Altered expression of cell proliferation-related and interferon-stimulated genes in colon cancer cells resistant to SN38.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Céline; Candeil, Laurent; Vezzio, Nadia; Copois, Virginie; Denis, Vincent; Breil, Corinne; Molina, Franck; Fraslon, Caroline; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Pau, Bernard; Martineau, Pierre; Del Rio, Maguy

    2008-06-01

    Irinotecan is a topoisomerase I inhibitor widely used as an anticancer agent in the treatment of metastatic colon cancer. However, its efficacy is often limited by the development of resistance. We have isolated a colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116-SN6, which displays a 6-fold higher resistance to SN38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. In this paper, we studied the molecular mechanisms that cause resistance to SN38 in the HCT116-SN6 cell line. First, we analyzed proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, topoisomerase I expression and activity in SN38-resistant (HCT116-SN6) and sensitive (HCT116-s cells). We showed that the SN38-induced apoptosis and the SN38-activated cell cycle checkpoints leading to G(2)/M cell cycle arrest were similar in both cell lines. Topoisomerase I expression and catalytic activity were also unchanged. Then, we compared mRNA expression profiles in the two cell lines using the Affymetrix Human Genome GeneChip arrays U133A and B. Microarray analysis showed that among the genes, which were differentially expressed in HCT116-s and HCT116-SN6 cells, 27% were related to cell proliferation suggesting that proliferation might be the main target in the development of resistance to SN38. This result correlates with the phenotypic observation of a reduced growth rate in HCT116-SN6 resistant cells. Furthermore, 29% of the overexpressed genes were Interferon Stimulated Genes and we demonstrate that their overexpression is, at least partially, due to endogenous activation of the p38 MAP kinase pathway in SN38 resistant cells. In conclusion, a slower cell proliferation rate may be a major cause of acquired resistance to SN38 via a reduction of cell cycle progression through the S phase which is mandatory for the cytotoxic action of SN38. This lower growth rate could be due to the endogenous activation of p38.

  1. Feline immunodeficiency virus OrfA alters gene expression of splicing factors and proteasome-ubiquitination proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, Magnus; Chatterji, Udayan; Schaffer, Lana; Rozieres, Sohela de; Elder, John H.

    2008-02-20

    Expression of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) accessory protein OrfA (or Orf2) is critical for efficient viral replication in lymphocytes, both in vitro and in vivo. OrfA has been reported to exhibit functions in common with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) accessory proteins Vpr and Tat, although the function of OrfA has not been fully explained. Here, we use microarray analysis to characterize how OrfA modulates the gene expression profile of T-lymphocytes. The primary IL-2-dependent T-cell line 104-C1 was transduced to express OrfA. Functional expression of OrfA was demonstrated by trans complementation of the OrfA-defective clone, FIV-34TF10. OrfA-expressing cells had a slightly reduced cell proliferation rate but did not exhibit any significant alteration in cell cycle distribution. Reverse-transcribed RNA from cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP + OrfA were hybridized to Affymetrix HU133 Plus 2.0 microarray chips representing more than 47,000 genome-wide transcripts. By using two statistical approaches, 461 (Rank Products) and 277 (ANOVA) genes were identified as modulated by OrfA expression. The functional relevance of the differentially expressed genes was explored by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The analyses revealed alterations in genes critical for RNA post-transcriptional modifications and protein ubiquitination as the two most significant functional outcomes of OrfA expression. In these two groups, several subunits of the spliceosome, cellular splicing factors and family members of the proteasome-ubiquitination system were identified. These findings provide novel information on the versatile function of OrfA during FIV infection and indicate a fine-tuning mechanism of the cellular environment by OrfA to facilitate efficient FIV replication.

  2. The membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A (MS4A) gene cluster contains a common variant associated with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to identify novel loci associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in the Spanish population. Methods We genotyped 1,128 individuals using the Affymetrix Nsp I 250K chip. A sample of 327 sporadic AD patients and 801 controls with unknown cognitive status from the Spanish general population were included in our initial study. To increase the power of the study, we combined our results with those of four other public GWAS datasets by applying identical quality control filters and the same imputation methods, which were then analyzed with a global meta-GWAS. A replication sample with 2,200 sporadic AD patients and 2,301 controls was genotyped to confirm our GWAS findings. Results Meta-analysis of our data and independent replication datasets allowed us to confirm a novel genome-wide significant association of AD with the membrane-spanning 4-domains subfamily A (MS4A) gene cluster (rs1562990, P = 4.40E-11, odds ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 0.91, n = 10,181 cases and 14,341 controls). Conclusions Our results underscore the importance of international efforts combining GWAS datasets to isolate genetic loci for complex diseases. PMID:21627779

  3. UW VLSI chip tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Neil

    1989-12-01

    We present a design for a low-cost, functional VLSI chip tester. It is based on the Apple MacIntosh II personal computer. It tests chips that have up to 128 pins. All pin drivers of the tester are bidirectional; each pin is programmed independently as an input or an output. The tester can test both static and dynamic chips. Rudimentary speed testing is provided. Chips are tested by executing C programs written by the user. A software library is provided for program development. Tests run under both the Mac Operating System and A/UX. The design is implemented using Xilinx Logic Cell Arrays. Price/performance tradeoffs are discussed.

  4. Microarray analysis of ox-LDL (oxidized low-density lipoprotein)-regulated genes in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Minta, Joe; Jungwon Yun, James; St Bernard, Rosanne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that circulating LDL (low-density lipoproteins) play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and the oxidized form (ox-LDL) is highly atherogenic. Deposits of ox-LDL have been found in atherosclerotic plaques, and ox-LDL has been shown to promote monocyte recruitment, foam cell formation and the transition of quiescent and contractile vascular SMCs (smooth muscle cells) to the migratory and proliferative phenotype. SMC phenotype transition and hyperplasia are the pivotal events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. To comprehend the complex molecular mechanisms involved in ox-LDL-mediated SMC phenotype transition, we have compared the differential gene expression profiles of cultured quiescent human coronary artery SMCs with cells induced with ox-LDL for 3 and 21 h using Affymetrix HG-133UA cDNA microarray chips. Assignment of the regulated genes into functional groups indicated that several genes involved in metabolism, membrane transport, cell-cell interactions, signal transduction, transcription, translation, cell migration, proliferation and apoptosis were differentially expressed. Our data suggests that the interaction of ox-LDL with its cognate receptors on SMCs modulates the induction of several growth factors and cytokines, which activate a variety of intracellular signalling mechanisms (including PI3K, MAPK, Jak/STAT, sphingosine, Rho kinase pathways) that contribute to SMC transition from the quiescent and contractile phenotype to the proliferative and migratory phenotype. Our study has also identified several genes (including CDC27, cyclin A1, cyclin G2, glypican 1, MINOR, p15 and apolipoprotein) not previously implicated in ox-LDL-induced SMC phenotype transition and substantially extends the list of potential candidate genes involved in atherogenesis.

  5. Pathway Analysis using Gene-expression Profiles of HPV-positive and HPV-negative Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients in a Hispanic Population: Methodological Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Erick; González, Lorena; Pérez-Mitchell, Carlos; Ortiz, Ana P.; Ramírez-Sola, Maricarmen; Acosta, Jaime; Bernabe-Dones, Raúl D.; González-Aquino, Carlos; Montes-Rodríguez, Ingrid; Cadilla, Carmen L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The incidence of oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer in Puerto Rican men is higher than it is in the men of any other ethnic/racial group in the United States of America (US). The information regarding the effect of the human papilloma virus (HPV) in the gene-expression profile among patients with this cancer is limited in Hispanic community. We aim to describe the methodology for future studies to identify the molecular networks for determining overrepresented signaling and metabolic canonical pathways, based on the differential gene-expression profiles of HPV+ and HPV− samples from patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in Puerto Rico. Methods We analyzed the RNA expression of 5 tissue samples from subjects diagnosed with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, 2 HPV+ and 3 HPV−, using Affymetrix GeneChips. The relative difference between the average gene expressions of the HPV+ and HPV− samples was assessed, based on the fold change (log2-scale). Results Our analysis revealed 10 up regulated molecules (Mup1, LRP1, P14KA, ALYREF, and BHMT) and 5 down regulated ones (PSME4, KEAP1, ELK3, FAM186B, and PRELID1), at a cutoff of 1.5-fold change. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed the following biological functions to be affected in the HPV+ samples: cancer, hematological disease, and RNA post-transcriptional modification. QRT-PCR analysis confirmed only the differential regulation of ALYREF, KEAP1, and FAM186B genes. Conclusion The relevant methodological procedures described are sufficient to detect the most significant biological functions and pathways according to the HPV status in patients with oropharyngeal cancer in Puerto Rico. PMID:26932277

  6. A Prospective Study of Comparing Multi-Gene Biomarker Chip and Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen in the Postoperative Surveillance for Patients with Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Tang; Huang, Ming-Yii; Yeh, Yung-Sung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating biomarkers can predict clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of our multigene biomarker chip for detecting circulating tumor cells for postoperative surveillance of stage I–III colorectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods In total, 298 stage I–III colorectal cancer patients were analyzed after curative resection between June 2010 and October 2014. During each follow-up, a postoperative surveillance strategy, including ESMO Guidelines Working Group recommendations and the biochip, was used. Results After a 28.4-month median follow-up, 48 (16.1%) patients had postoperative relapse. Univariate analysis revealed that the postoperative relapse risk factors were rectal tumor, perineural invasion, elevated preoperative and postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, and positive biochip results (all P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that postoperative relapse correlated significantly with elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (odds ratio = 4.136, P = 0.008) and positive biochip results (odds ratio = 66.878, P < 0.001). However, the sensitivity (P = 0.003), specificity (P = 0.003), positive (P = 0.002) and negative (P = 0.006) predictive values, and accuracy (P < 0.001) of the biochip for predicting postoperative relapse were significantly higher than those of elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. Moreover, the median lead time between positive biochip result and postoperative relapse detection was significantly earlier than that between elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and postoperative relapse detection (10.7 vs. 2.8 months, P < 0.001). Furthermore, positive biochip results correlated strongly with lower disease-free survival and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients (both P < 0.001). Conclusion Compared with conventional serum carcinoembryonic antigen detection, our multigene

  7. Adiposity is associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Marian, Catalin; Nie, Jing; Brasky, Theodore M; Goerlitz, David S; Trevisan, Maurizio; Edge, Stephen B; Winston, Janet; Berry, Deborah L; Kallakury, Bhaskar V; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the p53 gene are among the most frequent genetic events in human cancer and may be triggered by environmental and occupational exposures. We examined the association of clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors and breast cancer risk factors according to the prevalence and type of p53 mutations. Using tumor blocks from incident cases from a case-control study in western New York, we screened for p53 mutations in exons 2-11 using the Affymetrix p53 Gene Chip array and analyzed case-case comparisons using logistic regression. The p53 mutation frequency among cases was 28.1 %; 95 % were point mutations (13 % of which were silent) and the remainder were single base pair deletions. Sixty seven percent of all point mutations were transitions; 24 % of them are G:C>A:T at CpG sites. Positive p53 mutation status was associated with poorer differentiation (OR, 95 % CI 2.29, 1.21-4.32), higher nuclear grade (OR, 95 % CI 1.99, 1.22-3.25), and increased Ki-67 status (OR, 95 % CI 1.81, 1.10-2.98). Cases with P53 mutations were more likely to have a combined ER-positive and PR-negative status (OR, 95 % CI 1.65, 1.01-2.71), and a combined ER-negative and PR-negative status (OR, 95 % CI 2.18, 1.47-3.23). Body mass index >30 kg/m(2), waist circumference >79 cm, and waist-to-hip ratio >0.86 were also associated with p53 status; obese breast cancer cases are more likely to have p53 mutations (OR, 95 % CI 1.78, 1.19-2.68). We confirmed that p53 mutations are associated with less favorable tumor characteristics and identified an association of p53 mutation status and adiposity.

  8. A GENOME WIDE ASSOCIATION STUDY FOR DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY GENES IN AFRICAN AMERICANS

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Caitrin W.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Roh, Bong H.; An, S. Sandy; Cooke, Jessica N.; Hester, Jessica M.; Wing, Maria R.; Bostrom, Meredith A.; Rudock, Megan E.; Lewis, Joshua P.; Talbert, Matthew E.; Blevins, Rebecca A.; Lu, Lingyi; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Sale, Michele M.; Divers, Jasmin; Langefeld, Carl D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study was performed using the Affymetrix 6.0 chip to identify genes associated with diabetic nephropathy in African Americans. Association analysis was performed adjusting for admixture in 965 type 2 diabetic African American patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and in 1029 African Americans without type 2 diabetes or kidney disease as controls. The top 724 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with evidence of association to diabetic nephropathy were then genotyped in a replication sample of an additional 709 type 2 diabetes-ESRD patients and 690 controls. SNPs with evidence of association in both the original and replication studies were tested in additional African American cohorts consisting of 1246 patients with type 2 diabetes without kidney disease and 1216 with non-diabetic ESRD to differentiate candidate loci for type 2 diabetes-ESRD, type 2 diabetes, and/or all-cause ESRD. Twenty-five SNPs were significantly associated with type 2 diabetes-ESRD in the genome-wide association and initial replication. Although genome-wide significance with type 2 diabetes was not found for any of these 25 SNPs, several genes, including RPS12, LIMK2, and SFI1 are strong candidates for diabetic nephropathy. A combined analysis of all 2890 patients with ESRD showed significant association SNPs in LIMK2 and SFI1 suggesting that they also contribute to all-cause ESRD. Thus, our results suggest that multiple loci underlie susceptibility to kidney disease in African Americans with type 2 diabetes and some may also contribute to all-cause ESRD. PMID:21150874

  9. The role of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase and phytoene synthase gene family in citrus carotenoid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Gang; Wang, Chunyan; Song, Song; Fu, Xiumin; Azam, Muhammad; Grierson, Don; Xu, Changjie

    2013-10-01

    Three 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthases (DXS) and three phytoene synthases (PSY) were identified in citrus, from Affymetrix GeneChip Citrus Genome Array, GenBank and public orange genome databases. Tissue-specific expression analysis of these genes was carried out on fruit peel and flesh, flower and leaf of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) in order to determine their roles in carotenoid accumulation in different tissues. Expression of CitDXS1 and CitPSY1 was highest in all test tissues, while that of CitDXS2 and CitPSY2 was lower, and that of CitDXS3 and CitPSY3 undetectable. The transcript profiles of CitDXS1 and CitPSY1 paralleled carotenoid accumulation in flesh of Satsuma mandarin and orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) during fruit development, and CitPSY1 expression was also associated with carotenoid accumulation in peel, while the CitDXS1 transcript level was only weakly correlated with carotenoid accumulation in peel. Similar results were obtained following correlation analysis between expression of CitDXS1 and CitPSY1 and carotenoid accumulation in peel and flesh of 16 citrus cultivars. These findings identify CitPSY1 and CitDXS1 as the main gene members controlling carotenoid biosynthesis in citrus fruit. Furthermore, chromoplasts were extracted from flesh tissue of these citrus, and chromoplasts of different shape (spindle or globular), different size, and color depth were observed in different cultivars, indicating chromoplast abundance, number per gram tissue, size and color depth were closely correlated with carotenoid content in most cultivars. The relationship between carotenoid biosynthesis and chromoplast development was discussed.

  10. Gene expression profiles following exposure to a developmental neurotoxicant, Aroclor 1254: Pathway analysis for possible mode(s) of action

    SciTech Connect

    Royland, Joyce E.; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.

    2008-09-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that low levels of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure can adversely affect neurocognitive development. In animal models, perturbations in calcium signaling, neurotransmitters, and thyroid hormones have been postulated as potential mechanisms for PCB-induced developmental neurotoxicity. In order to understand the role of these proposed mechanisms and to identify other mechanisms in PCB-induced neurotoxicity, we have chosen a global approach utilizing oligonucleotide microarrays to examine gene expression profiles in the brain following developmental exposure to Aroclor 1254 (0 or 6 mg/kg/day from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21) in Long-Evans rats. Gene expression levels in the cerebellum and hippocampus from PNDs 7 and 14 animals were determined on Affymetrix rat 230A{sub 2}.0 chips. In the cerebellum, 87 transcripts were altered at PND7 compared to 27 transcripts at PND14 by Aroclor 1254 exposure, with only one transcript affected at both ages. In hippocampus, 175 transcripts and 50 transcripts were altered at PND7 and PND14, respectively, by Aroclor 1254 exposure with five genes commonly affected. Functional analysis suggests that pathways related to calcium homeostasis (Gng3, Ryr2, Trdn, Cacna1a), intracellular signaling (Camk2d, Stk17b, Pacsin2, Ryr2, Trio, Fert2, Ptk2b), axonal guidance (Lum, Mxd3, Akap11, Gucy1b3), aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling (Nfia, Col1a2), and transcripts involved in cell proliferation (Gspt2, Cdkn1c, Ptk2b) and differentiation (Ifitm31, Hpca, Zfp260, Igsf4a, Hes5) leading to the development of nervous system were significantly altered by Aroclor 1254 exposure. Of the two brain regions examined, Aroclor 1254-induced genomic changes were greater in the hippocampus than the cerebellum. The genomic data suggests that PCB-induced neurotoxic effects were due to disruption of normal ontogenetic pattern of nervous system growth and development by altering intracellular signaling pathways

  11. Macrophage and T-cell gene expression in a model of early infection with the protozoan Leishmania chagasi.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Nicholas A; Wilson, Mary E

    2008-06-25

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a potentially fatal infectious disease caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum/chagasi in the New World, or by L. donovani or L. infantum/chagasi in the Old World. Infection leads to a variety of outcomes ranging from asymptomatic infection to active disease, characterized by fevers, cachexia, hepatosplenomegaly and suppressed immune responses. We reasoned that events occurring during the initial few hours when the parasite encounters cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems are likely to influence the eventual immune response that develops. Therefore, we performed gene expression analysis using Affymetrix U133Plus2 microarray chips to investigate a model of early infection with human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) challenged with wild-type L. chagasi parasites, with or without subsequent co-culture with Leishmania-naïve, autologous T-cells. Microarray data generated from total RNA were analyzed with software from the Bioconductor Project and functional clustering and pathway analysis were performed with DAVID and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), respectively. Many transcripts were down-regulated by infection in cultures containing macrophages alone, and the pattern indicated a lack of a classically activated phenotype. By contrast, the addition of autologous Leishmania-naïve T cells to infected macrophages resulted in a pattern of gene expression including many markers of type 1 immune cytokine activation (IFN-gamma, IL-6, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta). There was simultaneous up-regulation of a few markers of immune modulation (IL-10 cytokine accumulation; TGF-beta Signaling Pathway). We suggest that the initial encounter between L. chagasi and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system stimulates primarily type 1 immune cytokine responses, despite a lack of classical macrophage activation. This local microenvironment at the site of parasite inoculation may determine the initial course of immune T

  12. CHIP, CHIP, ARRAY! THREE CHIPS FOR POST-GENOMIC RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cambridge Healthtech Institute recently held the 4th installment of their popular "Lab-on-a-Chip" series in Zurich, Switzerland. As usual, it was enthusiastically received and over 225 people attended the 2-1/2 day meeting to see and hear about some of the latest developments an...

  13. Comparison of Nanostring nCounter® Data on FFPE Colon Cancer Samples and Affymetrix Microarray Data on Matched Frozen Tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Deane, Natasha G; Lewis, Keeli B; Li, Jiang; Zhu, Jing; Washington, M Kay; Beauchamp, R Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) stage II and III patients remains a challenge due to the difficulties of finding robust biomarkers suitable for testing clinical samples. The majority of published gene signatures of CRC have been generated on fresh frozen colorectal tissues. Because collection of frozen tissue is not practical for routine surgical pathology practice, a clinical test that improves prognostic capabilities beyond standard pathological staging of colon cancer will need to be designed for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. The NanoString nCounter® platform is a gene expression analysis tool developed for use with FFPE-derived samples. We designed a custom nCounter® codeset based on elements from multiple published fresh frozen tissue microarray-based prognostic gene signatures for colon cancer, and we used this platform to systematically compare gene expression data from FFPE with matched microarray array data from frozen tissues. Our results show moderate correlation of gene expression between two platforms and discovery of a small subset of genes as candidate biomarkers for colon cancer prognosis that are detectable and quantifiable in FFPE tissue sections.

  14. Chip, a widely expressed chromosomal protein required for segmentation and activity of a remote wing margin enhancer in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Morcillo, Patrick; Rosen, Christina; Baylies, Mary K.; Dorsett, Dale

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms allowing remote enhancers to regulate promoters several kilobase pairs away are unknown but are blocked by the Drosophila suppressor of Hairy-wing protein (Suhw) that binds to gypsy retrovirus insertions between enhancers and promoters. Suhw bound to a gypsy insertion in the cut gene also appears to act interchromosomally to antagonize enhancer–promoter interactions on the homologous chromosome when activity of the Chip gene is reduced. This implicates Chip in enhancer–promoter communication. We cloned Chip and find that it encodes a homolog of the recently discovered mouse Nli/Ldb1/Clim-2 and Xenopus Xldb1 proteins that bind nuclear LIM domain proteins. Chip protein interacts with the LIM domains in the Apterous homeodomain protein, and Chip interacts genetically with apterous, showing that these interactions are important for Apterous function in vivo. Importantly, Chip also appears to have broad functions beyond interactions with LIM domain proteins. Chip is present in all nuclei examined and at numerous sites along the salivary gland polytene chromosomes. Embryos without Chip activity lack segments and show abnormal gap and pair–rule gene expression, although no LIM domain proteins are known to regulate segmentation. We conclude that Chip is a ubiquitous chromosomal factor required for normal expression of diverse genes at many stages of development. We suggest that Chip cooperates with different LIM domain proteins and other factors to structurally support remote enhancer–promoter interactions. PMID:9334334

  15. Gene chip/PCR-array analysis of tissue response to 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer surfaces in a mouse subcutaneous transplantation system.

    PubMed

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Sakai, Yusuke; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Fujisato, Toshia; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the in vivo foreign body reaction to bio-inert 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymers, MPC polymer-coated porous substrates, with large surface area, were implanted subcutaneously in mice for 7 and 28 days, and the surrounding tissue response and cells infiltrating into the porous structure were evaluated. The MPC polymer surface induced low angiogenesis and thin encapsulation around the porous substrate, and slightly suppressed cell infiltration into the porous substrate. M1-type macrophage specific gene (CCR7) expression was suppressed by the MPC polymer surface after 7 days, resulting in the suppression of inflammatory cytokine/chemokine gene expression. However, the expression of these genes on the MPC polymer surface was higher than on the non-coated surface after 28 days. These findings suggest that MPC polymer surfaces successfully inhibit inflammatory responses during the early stage of tissue response, and seem to retard its occurrence over time.

  16. Wnt5a participates in hepatic stellate cell activation observed by gene expression profile and functional assays

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wu-Jun; Hu, Li-Juan; Jian, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Li-Jing; Jiang, Ming; Li, Wei; He, Yi

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify differentially expressed genes in quiescent and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and explore their functions. METHODS: HSCs were isolated from the normal Sprague Dawley rats by in suit perfusion of collagenase and pronase and density Nycodenz gradient centrifugation. Total RNA and mRNA of quiescent HSCs, and culture-activated HSCs were extracted, quantified and reversely transcripted into cDNA. The global gene expression profile was analyzed by microarray with Affymetrix rat genechip. Differentially expressed genes were annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) and analyzed with Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Microarray data were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The function of Wnt5a on human HSCs line LX-2 was assessed with lentivirus-mediated Wnt5a RNAi. The expression of Wnt5a in fibrotic liver of a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced fibrosis rat model was also analyzed with Western blotting. RESULTS: Of the 28 700 genes represented on this chip, 2566 genes displayed at least a 2-fold increase or decrease in expression at a P < 0.01 level with a false discovery rate. Of these, 1396 genes were upregulated, while 1170 genes were downregulated in culture-activated HSCs. These differentially expressed transcripts were grouped into 545 GO based on biological process GO terms. The most enriched GO terms included response to wounding, wound healing, regulation of cell growth, vasculature development and actin cytoskeleton organization. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that Wnt5a signaling pathway participated in the activation of HSCs. Wnt5a was significantly increased in culture-activated HSCs as compared with quiescent HSCs. qRT-PCR validated the microarray data. Lentivirus-mediated suppression of Wnt5a expression in activated LX-2 resulted in significantly impaired proliferation, downregulated expressions of

  17. Gene expression profiles of progressive pancreatic endocrine tumours and their liver metastases reveal potential novel markers and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Capurso, G; Lattimore, S; Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T; Panzuto, F; Milione, M; Bhakta, V; Campanini, N; Swift, S M; Bordi, C; Delle Fave, G; Lemoine, N R

    2006-06-01

    The intrinsic nature of tumour behaviour (stable vs progressive) and the presence of liver metastases are key factors in determining the outcome of patients with a pancreatic endocrine tumour (PET). Previous expression profile analyses of PETs were limited to non-homogeneous groups or to primary lesions only. The aim of this study was to investigate the gene expression profiles of a more uniform series of sporadic, non-functioning (NF) PETs with progressive disease and, for the first time, their liver metastases, on the Affymetrix human genome U133A and B GeneChip set. Thirteen NF PET samples (eight primaries and five liver metastases) from ten patients with progressive, metastatic disease, three cell lines (BON, QGP and CM) and four purified islet samples were analysed. The same samples were employed for confirmation of candidate gene expression by means of quantitative RT-PCR, while a further 37 PET and 15 carcinoid samples were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of genes differentially expressed between islets and primaries and metastases revealed 667 up- and 223 down-regulated genes, most of which have not previously been observed in PETs, and whose gene ontology molecular function has been detailed. Overexpression of bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) and protein Z dependent protease inhibitor (SERPINA10) which may represent useful biomarkers, and of lymphocyte specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) and bone marrow stromal cell antigen (BST2) which could be used as therapeutic targets, has been validated. When primary tumours were compared with metastatic lesions, no significantly differentially expressed genes were found, in accord with cluster analysis which revealed a striking similarity between primary and metastatic lesions, with the cell lines clustering separately. We have provided a comprehensive list of differentially expressed genes in a uniform set of aggressive NF PETs. A number of dysregulated genes deserve further in-depth study as potentially

  18. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Meeghan A.; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430{sub 2} GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene

  19. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  20. Signal processor chip implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraud, J. P.

    1985-03-01

    Advances in technology have made it now possible to integrate very large microprocessors on a single chip. Two basic design methodologies are available, including gate array and custom design. The present paper is concerned with a signal processor (SP) chip which is based on a mixture of the two technologies. Involved is a high-density chip which requires little manual effort for its production. The SP is characterized by separate instruction and data memories. The SP consists of three main parts which operate simultaneously. These parts include the sequencer, the address generator, and the computer portion. The chip comprises a library of predesigned building blocks. Attention is given to a signal processor block diagram, the basic TTL gate, a two-input master-slave latch, the physical library, aspects of logical design, the multiplier basic cell and adder line organization, and physical design methodology.

  1. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  2. Chipping citrus wood for gasifiction

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, D.B.; Hedden, S.L.; Whitney, J.D.; Shaw, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    Both green and dead citrus trees were used for chipping. Chip moisture content, fuel analysis, drying time, and data on fuel/tonne of chips were obtained. The average moisture contents of green and dead trees when chipped were 25% and 16% (wet basis) respectively. Chips were sized to a minimum of 0.32 squared cm x 0.32 cm thick to a maximum of 5.0 cm squared x 0.32 cm thick and normally required 4 weeks to air dry to 14% (wet basis) moisture content before use. Approximately 50% of the total tree by weight could be made into usable chips. 9 references.

  3. Separation-Type Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Chip for Detecting Male Infertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Mo; Ju, Jin-Kyoung; Ahn, Yoomin; Hwang, Seung Young

    2008-06-01

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) biochip is presented in this paper. In this PCR chip, the glass substrate integrated with the microheater and microsensor is separable from the reaction chamber where the sample is injected, which now makes repeated reuse of the glass substrate possible. The heat transfer efficiency and target gene amplification of the proposed separable PCR chip was compared with that of the conventional united PCR chip. The results showed that the sex-determining Y chromosome (SRY) gene PCR for detecting male infertility was successfully performed in the separable chip. However, repeated multiplex PCR was successful for only two genes, SPGY1 and SRY, but not for gene SY586. Future work is needed for a multiplex PCR with more than three genes.

  4. Gene expression responses over 24 h to lengthening and shortening contractions in human muscle: major changes in CSRP3, MUSTN1, SIX1, and FBXO32.

    PubMed

    Kostek, Matthew C; Chen, Yi-Wen; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Shi, Rongye; Fedele, Mark J; Esser, Karyn A; Rennie, Michael J

    2007-09-19

    Resistance training using lengthening (eccentric) contractions induces greater increases in muscle size than shortening (concentric) contractions, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not clear. Using temporal expression profiling, we compared changes in gene expression within 24 h of an acute bout of each type of contractions conducted simultaneously in the quadriceps of different legs. Five healthy young men performed shortening contractions with one leg while the contralateral leg performed lengthening contractions. Biopsies were taken from both legs before exercise and 3, 6, and 24 h afterwards, in the fed state. Expression profiling (n = 3) was performed using a custom-made Affymetrix MuscleChip containing probe sets of approximately 3,300 known genes and expressed sequence tags expressed in skeletal muscle. We identified 51 transcripts differentially regulated between the two exercise modes. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, we identified four distinct clusters, three of which corresponded to unique functional categories (protein synthesis, stress response/early growth, and sarcolemmal structure). Using quantitative RT-PCR (n = 5), we verified expression changes (lengthening/shortening) in SIX1 (3 h, -1.9-fold, P < 0.001), CSRP3 (6 h, 2.9-fold, P < 0.05), and MUSTN1 (24 h, 4.3-fold, P < 0.05). We examined whether FBXO32/atrogin-1/MAFbx, a known regulator of protein breakdown and of muscle atrophy was differentially expressed: the gene was downregulated after lengthening contractions (3 h, 2.7-fold, P < 0.05; 6 h, 3.3-fold, P < 0.05; 24 h, 2.3-fold, P < 0.05). The results suggested that lengthening and shortening contractions activated distinct molecular pathways as early as 3 h postexercise. The molecular differences might contribute to mechanisms underlying the physiological adaptations seen with training using the two modes of exercise.

  5. CHIP Regulates Osteoclast Formation through Promoting TRAF6 Protein Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Shu, Bing; Zhang, Yanquan; Li, Jia; Guo, Junwei; Wang, Yinyin; Ren, Fangli; Xiao, Guozhi; Chang, Zhijie; Chen, Di

    2014-01-01

    Objective Carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP or STUB1) is an E3 ligase and regulates the stability of several proteins which are involved in tumor growth and metastasis. However, the role of CHIP in bone growth and bone remodeling in vivo has not been reported. The objective of this study is to investigate the role and mechanism of CHIP in regulation of bone mass and bone remodeling. Methods The bone phenotype of Chip−/− mice was examined by histology, histomorphometry and micro-CT analyses. The regulatory mechanism of CHIP on the degradation of TRAF6 and the inhibition of NF-κB signaling was examined by immunoprecipitation (IP), western blotting and luciferase reporter assays. Results In this study, we found that deletion of the Chip gene leads to osteopenic phenotype and increased osteoclast formation. We further found that TRAF6, as a novel substrate of CHIP, is up-regulated in Chip−/− osteoclasts. TRAF6 is critical for RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. TRAF6 is an adaptor protein which functions as an E3 ligase to regulate the activation of TAK1 and the I-κB kinase (IKK) and is a key regulator of NF-κB signaling. CHIP interacts with TRAF6 to promote TRAF6 ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. CHIP inhibits p65 nuclear translocation, leading to the repression of the TRAF6-mediated NF-κB transcription. Conclusion CHIP inhibits NF-κB signaling via promoting TRAF6 degradation and plays an important role in osteoclastogenesis and bone remodeling, suggesting that it may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of bone loss associated diseases. PMID:24578159

  6. Effects of high-sulphur water on hepatic gene expression of steers fed fibre-based diets.

    PubMed

    Kessler, K L; Olson, K C; Wright, C L; Austin, K J; McInnerney, K; Johnson, P S; Cockrum, R R; Jons, A M; Cammack, K M

    2013-10-01

    Sulphur-induced polioencephalomalacia (sPEM), a neurological disorder affecting ruminants, is frequently associated with the consumption of high-sulphur (S) water and subsequent poor performance. Currently, there is no economical method for S removal from surface water sources, and alternative water sources are typically neither readily available nor cost-effective. Determination of genes differentially expressed in response to high-S water consumption may provide a better understanding of the physiology corresponding to high dietary S and ultimately lead to the development of treatment and prevention strategies. The objective of this study was to determine changes in gene expression in the liver, an organ important for S metabolism, of fibre-fed steers consuming high-S water. For this study, liver tissues were collected on the final day of a trial from yearling steers randomly assigned to low-S water control (566 mg/kg SO4 ; n = 24), high-S water (3651 mg/kg SO4 ; n = 24) or high-S water plus clinoptilolite supplemented at either 2.5% (n = 24) or 5.0% (n = 24) of diet dry matter (DM). Microarray analyses on randomly selected healthy low-S control (n = 4) and high-S (n = 4; no clinoptilolite) steers using the Affymetrix GeneChip Bovine Genome Array revealed 488 genes upregulated (p < 0.05) and 154 genes downregulated (p < 0.05) in response to the high- vs. low-S water consumption. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed the upregulation (p < 0.10) of seven genes involved in inflammatory response and immune functions. Changes in such genes suggest that ruminant animals administered high-S water may be undergoing an inflammation or immune response, even if signs of sPEM or compromised health are not readily observed. Further study of these, and other affected genes, may deliver new insights into the physiology underlying the response to high dietary S, ultimately leading to the development of treatments for high S-affected ruminant

  7. Differential gene expression and a functional analysis of PCB-exposed children: Understanding disease and disorder development

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sisir K; Mitra, Partha S; Ghosh, Somiranjan; Zang, Shizhu; Sonneborn, Dean; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Trnovec, Tomas; Palkovicova, Lubica; Sovcikova, Eva; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to understand the probable molecular mechanism of toxicities and the associated pathways related to observed pathophysiology in high PCB-exposed populations. We have performed a microarray-based differential gene expression analysis of children (mean age 46.1 months) of Central European descent from Slovak Republic in a well-defined study cohort. The subset of children having high blood PCB concentrations (>75 percentile) were compared against their low PCB counterparts (<25 percentile), with mean lipid-adjusted PCB values of 3.02±1.3 and 0.06±0.03 ng/mg of serum lipid, for the two groups, respectively (18.1±4.4 and 0.3±0.1 ng/ml of serum). The microarray was conducted with the total RNA from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the children using an Affymetrix platform (GeneChip Human genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array) and was analyzed by Gene Spring (GX 10.0). A highly significant set of 162 differentially expressed genes between high and low PCB groups (p value <0.00001) were identified and subsequently analyzed using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. The results indicate that Cell-To-Cell Signaling and Interaction, Cellular Movement, Cell Signaling, Molecular Transport, and Vitamin and Mineral Metabolism were the major molecular and cellular functions associated with the differentially altered gene set in high PCB-exposed children. The differential gene expressions appeared to play a pivotal role in the development of probable diseases and disorders, including cardiovascular disease and cancer, in the PCB-exposed population. The analyses also pointed out possible organ-specific effects, e.g., cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity, in high PCB-exposed subjects. A few notable genes, such as BCL2, PON1, and ITGB1, were significantly altered in our study, and the related pathway analysis explained their plausible involvement in the respective disease processes, as mentioned. Our results provided insight into

  8. Chip packaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraj, Kumaraswamy (Inventor); Noll, Thomas E. (Inventor); Lockwood, Harry F. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A hermetically sealed package for at least one semiconductor chip is provided which is formed of a substrate having electrical interconnects thereon to which the semiconductor chips are selectively bonded, and a lid which preferably functions as a heat sink, with a hermetic seal being formed around the chips between the substrate and the heat sink. The substrate is either formed of or includes a layer of a thermoplastic material having low moisture permeability which material is preferably a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) and is a multiaxially oriented LCP material for preferred embodiments. Where the lid is a heat sink, the heat sink is formed of a material having high thermal conductivity and preferably a coefficient of thermal expansion which substantially matches that of the chip. A hermetic bond is formed between the side of each chip opposite that connected to the substrate and the heat sink. The thermal bond between the substrate and the lid/heat sink may be a pinched seal or may be provided, for example by an LCP frame which is hermetically bonded or sealed on one side to the substrate and on the other side to the lid/heat sink. The chips may operate in the RF or microwave bands with suitable interconnects on the substrate and the chips may also include optical components with optical fibers being sealed into the substrate and aligned with corresponding optical components to transmit light in at least one direction. A plurality of packages may be physically and electrically connected together in a stack to form a 3D array.

  9. Smart vision chips: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Christof

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents four working analog VLSI vision chips: (1) time-derivative retina, (2) zero-crossing chip, (3) resistive fuse, and (4) figure-ground chip; work in progress on computing motion and neuromorphic systems; and conceptual and practical lessons learned.

  10. Chipping citrus wood for gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, D.B.; Hedden, S.L.; Whitney, J.D.; Shaw, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    Non-productive citrus trees were chipped with a portable fly-wheel-type chipper powered by a 45 kW engine. Chips were air dried under an open shed to 14% (w.b.) moisture content. By weight, approximately 50% of the total tree could be made into usable chips. The root system averaged 36% of the total tree weight.

  11. Identification of Potential Anticancer Activities of Novel Ganoderma lucidum Extracts Using Gene Expression and Pathway Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chi H J; Bishop, Karen S; Xu, Yuanye; Han, Dug Yeo; Murray, Pamela M; Marlow, Gareth J; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (lingzhi) has been used for the general promotion of health in Asia for many centuries. The common method of consumption is to boil lingzhi in water and then drink the liquid. In this study, we examined the potential anticancer activities of G. lucidum submerged in two commonly consumed forms of alcohol in East Asia: malt whiskey and rice wine. The anticancer effect of G. lucidum, using whiskey and rice wine-based extraction methods, has not been previously reported. The growth inhibition of G. lucidum whiskey and rice wine extracts on the prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and DU145, was determined. Using Affymetrix gene expression assays, several biologically active pathways associated with the anticancer activities of G. lucidum extracts were identified. Using gene expression analysis (real-time polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) and protein analysis (Western blotting), we confirmed the expression of key genes and their associated proteins that were initially identified with Affymetrix gene expression analysis.

  12. Gene expression profiling of Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammation in human whole blood: The role of complement and CD14-mediated innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Corinna; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-09-01

    Non-sterile pathogen-induced sepsis and sterile inflammation like in trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury may both coincide with the life threatening systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multi-organ failure. Consequently, there is an urgent need for specific biomarkers in order to distinguish sepsis from sterile conditions. The overall aim of this study was to uncover putative sepsis biomarkers and biomarker pathways, as well as to test the efficacy of combined inhibition of innate immunity key players complement and Toll-like receptor co-receptor CD14 as a possible therapeutic regimen for sepsis. We performed whole blood gene expression analyses using microarray in order to profile Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammatory responses in an ex vivo human whole blood model. The experiments were performed in the presence or absence of inhibitors of complement proteins (C3 and CD88 (C5a receptor 1)) and CD14, alone or in combination. In addition, we used blood from a C5-deficient donor. Anti-coagulated whole blood was challenged with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli for 2 h, total RNA was isolated and microarray analyses were performed on the Affymetrix GeneChip Gene 1.0 ST Array platform. The initial experiments were performed in duplicates using blood from two healthy donors. C5-deficiency is very rare, and only one donor could be recruited. In order to increase statistical power, a technical replicate of the C5-deficient samples was run. Subsequently, log2-transformed intensities were processed by robust multichip analysis and filtered using a threshold of four. In total, 73 microarray chips were run and analyzed. The normalized and filtered raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and are accessible with GEO Series accession number GSE55537. Linear models for microarray data were applied to estimate fold changes between data sets and the respective multiple testing adjusted p-values (FDR q-values). The interpretation of the

  13. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  14. Identification of a novel splice-site mutation in the Lebercilin (LCA5) gene causing Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramprasad, Vedam Lakshmi; Soumittra, Nagasamy; Nancarrow, Derek; Sen, Parveen; McKibbin, Martin; Williams, Grange A; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Lakshmipathy, Praveena; Inglehearn, Chris F

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the most common causes of hereditary blindness in infants. To date, mutations in 13 known genes and at two other loci have been implicated in LCA causation. An examination of the known genes highlights several processes which, when defective, cause LCA, including photoreceptor development and maintenance, phototransduction, vitamin A metabolism, and protein trafficking. In addition, it has been known for some time that defects in sensory cilia can cause syndromes involving hereditary blindness. More recently evidence has come to light that non-syndromic LCA can also be a “ciliopathy.” Methods Here we present a homozygosity mapping analysis in a consanguineous sibship that led to the identification of a mutation in the recently discovered LCA5 gene. Homozygosity mapping was done using Affymetrix 10K Xba I Gene Chip and a 24.5cM region on chromosome 6 (6q12- q16.3) was identified to be significantly homozygous. The LCA5 gene on this region was sequenced and cDNA sequencing also done to characterize the mutation. Results A c.955G>A missense mutation in the last base of exon 6 causing disruption of the splice donor site was identified in both the affected sibs. Since there is a second consensus splice donor sequence 5 bp into the adjacent intron, this mutation results in a transcript with a 5 bp insertion of intronic sequence, leading to a frameshift and premature truncation. Conclusions We report a missense mutation functionally altering the splice donor site and leading to a truncated protein. This is the second report of LCA5 mutations causing LCA. It may also be significant that one affected child died at eleven months of age due to asphyxia during sleep. To date the only phenotype unambiguously associated with mutations in this gene is LCA. However the LCA5 gene is known to be expressed in nasopharynx, trachea and lungs and was originally identified in the proteome of bronchial epithelium ciliary axonemes. The

  15. Comparative quantification of pharmacodynamic parameters of chiral compounds (RRR- vs. all-rac-alpha tocopherol) by global gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Muller, Patrick Y; Netscher, Thomas; Frank, Jan; Stoecklin, Elisabeth; Rimbach, Gerald; Barella, Luca

    2005-07-01

    Pharmacologically active compounds (e.g. from the groups of pharmaceutical drugs, cofactors or vitamins) often consist of two or more stereoisomers (enantiomers or diastereoisomers) which may differ in their pharmacodynamic/kinetic, toxicological and biological properties. A well-known example is vitamin E which is predominantly administered as two different forms, one derived from natural sources (mainly soybeans), and one from production by chemical total-synthesis. While vitamin E from natural sources occurs as a single stereoisomer (RRR-alpha-tocopherol), synthetic vitamin E (all-rac-alpha-tocopherol) is an equimolar mixture of eight stereoisomers. Based on a number of animal studies it has been suggested that the biological potency of natural-source vitamin E is 1.36 greater compared to its counterpart produced by chemical synthesis. In this study, we have used the Affymetrix GeneChip technology to evaluate the feasibility of a new bio-assay where the gene regulatory activities of RRR-alpha-tocopherol and all-rac-alpha-tocopherol were quantified and compared on the genome-wide level. For this purpose, HepG2 cells were supplemented with increasing amounts of RRR- or all-rac-alpha-tocopherol for 7 days. Genes showing a dose-related induction/repression were identified by global gene expression profiling. Our findings show that RRR- and all-rac-alpha-tocopherol share an identical transcriptional activity, i.e. induce/repress the expression of the same set of genes. Based on the transcriptional dose-response data, EC50 and IC50 values were determined for each of these genes. The feasibility of calculating a "transcriptional potency factor" of RRR- vs. all-rac-e-tocopherol was evaluated by dividing the EC50/IC50 of RRR-alpha-tocopherol by the corresponding EC50/IC50 of all-rac-alpha-tocopherol for every of the vitamin E responsive genes. Using this approach we have calculated 215 single biopotency ratios. Subsequently, the mean of all potency ratios was found to be

  16. GeoChips for Analysis of Microbial Functional Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-09-30

    Functional gene arrays (FGA) are microarrays that contain probes for genes encoding proteins or enzymes involved in functions of interest and allow for the study of thousands of genes at one time. The most comprehensive FGA to date is the GeoChip, which contains ~;;24,000 probes for ~;;10,000 genes involved in the geochemical cycling of C, N, P, and S, as well as genes involved in metal resistance and reduction and contaminant degradation. This chapter details the methods necessary for GeoChip analysis. Methods covered include preparation of DNA (whole community genome amplification and labeling), array setup (prehybridization steps), hybridization (sample and hybridization buffers), and post hybridization steps (slide washing and array scanning).

  17. World with Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Although we are well advised to look at the future 1 day at a time, we have seen in the chapters of this book, and they necessarily could cover only a selection on the features and applications of those tiny chips, that their potential continues to grow at the exceptional rates of the past. However, the new commitment has to be towards Sustainable Nanoelectronics, guided by creating sensing, computing, memory, and communication functions, which move just a few electrons per operation, each operation consuming energy less than one or a few femtojoule, less than any of the 1014 synapses in our brains. At these energy levels, chips can serve everywhere, making them ubiquitous, pervasive, certainly wireless, and often energy-autonomous. The expected six Billion users of these chips in 2020, through their mobile, intelligent companions, will benefit from global and largely equal access to information, education, knowledge, skills, and care.

  18. Global Gene Expression Profiling of Endothelium Exposed to Heme Reveals an Organ-Specific Induction of Cytoprotective Enzymes in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianwei; Li, Yuhua; Adisa, Olufolake; Mosunjac, Mario; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by hemolysis, vaso-occlusion and ischemia reperfusion injury. These events cause endothelial dysfunction and vasculopathies in multiple systems. However, the lack of atherosclerotic lesions has led to the idea that there are adaptive mechanisms that protect the endothelium from major vascular insults in SCD patients. The molecular bases for this phenomenon are poorly defined. This study was designed to identify the global profile of genes induced by heme in the endothelium, and assess expression of the heme-inducible cytoprotective enzymes in major organs impacted by SCD. Methods and Findings Total RNA isolated from heme-treated endothelial monolayers was screened with the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 chip, and the microarray data analyzed using multiple bioinformatics software. Hierarchical cluster analysis of significantly differentially expressed genes successfully segregated heme and vehicle-treated endothelium. Validation studies showed that the induction of cytoprotective enzymes by heme was influenced by the origin of endothelial cells, the duration of treatment, as well as the magnitude of induction of individual enzymes. In agreement with these heterogeneities, we found that induction of two major Nrf2-regulated cytoprotective enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 is organ-specific in two transgenic mouse models of SCD. This data was confirmed in the endothelium of post-mortem lung tissues of SCD patients. Conclusions Individual organ systems induce unique profiles of cytoprotective enzymes to neutralize heme in SCD. Understanding this heterogeneity may help to develop effective therapies to manage vasculopathies of individual systems. PMID:21483798

  19. Chip connectivity verification program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Josh (Inventor); Patterson, George (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for testing electrical connectivity between conductive structures on a chip that is preferably layered with conductive and nonconductive layers. The method includes determining the layer on which each structure is located and defining the perimeter of each structure. Conductive layer connections between each of the layers are determined, and, for each structure, the points of intersection between the perimeter of that structure and the perimeter of each other structure on the chip are also determined. Finally, electrical connections between the structures are determined using the points of intersection and the conductive layer connections.

  20. Cytometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.

    2011-01-01

    A cytometer now under development exploits spatial sorting of sampled cells on a microarray chip followed by use of grating-coupled surface-plasmon-resonance imaging (GCSPRI) to detect the sorted cells. This cytometer on a chip is a prototype of contemplated future miniature cytometers that would be suitable for rapidly identifying pathogens and other cells of interest in both field and laboratory applications and that would be attractive as alternatives to conventional flow cytometers. The basic principle of operation of a conventional flow cytometer requires fluorescent labeling of sampled cells, stringent optical alignment of a laser beam with a narrow orifice, and flow of the cells through the orifice, which is subject to clogging. In contrast, the principle of operation of the present cytometer on a chip does not require fluorescent labeling of cells, stringent optical alignment, or flow through a narrow orifice. The basic principle of operation of the cytometer on a chip also reduces the complexity, mass, and power of the associated laser and detection systems, relative to those needed in conventional flow cytometry. Instead of making cells flow in single file through a narrow flow orifice for sequential interrogation as in conventional flow cytometry, a liquid containing suspended sampled cells is made to flow over the front surface of a microarray chip on which there are many capture spots. Each capture spot is coated with a thin (.50-nm) layer of gold that is, in turn, coated with antibodies that bind to cell-surface molecules characteristic of the cell species of interest. The multiplicity of capture spots makes it possible to perform rapid, massively parallel analysis of a large cell population. The binding of cells to each capture spot gives rise to a minute change in the index of refraction at the surface of the chip. This change in the index of refraction is what is sensed in GCSPRI, as described briefly below. The identities of the various species in

  1. Cytometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.

    2011-01-01

    A cytometer now under development exploits spatial sorting of sampled cells on a microarray chip followed by use of grating-coupled surface-plasmon-resonance imaging (GCSPRI) to detect the sorted cells. This cytometer on a chip is a prototype of contemplated future miniature cytometers that would be suitable for rapidly identifying pathogens and other cells of interest in both field and laboratory applications and that would be attractive as alternatives to conventional flow cytometers. The basic principle of operation of a conventional flow cytometer requires fluorescent labeling of sampled cells, stringent optical alignment of a laser beam with a narrow orifice, and flow of the cells through the orifice, which is subject to clogging. In contrast, the principle of operation of the present cytometer on a chip does not require fluorescent labeling of cells, stringent optical alignment, or flow through a narrow orifice. The basic principle of operation of the cytometer on a chip also reduces the complexity, mass, and power of the associated laser and detection systems, relative to those needed in conventional flow cytometry. Instead of making cells flow in single file through a narrow flow orifice for sequential interrogation as in conventional flow cytometry, a liquid containing suspended sampled cells is made to flow over the front surface of a microarray chip on which there are many capture spots. Each capture spot is coated with a thin (approximately 50-nm) layer of gold that is, in turn, coated with antibodies that bind to cell-surface molecules characteristic of one the cell species of interest. The multiplicity of capture spots makes it possible to perform rapid, massively parallel analysis of a large cell population. The binding of cells to each capture spot gives rise to a minute change in the index of refraction at the surface of the chip. This change in the index of refraction is what is sensed in GCSPRI, as described briefly below. The identities of the

  2. MICROELECTRONICS: Flip the Chip.

    PubMed

    Wong, C P; Luo, S; Zhang, Z

    2000-12-22

    As integrated circuit fabrication advances rapidly and the market for faster, lighter, smaller, yet less expensive electronic products accelerates, electronic packaging faces its own challenges. In this Perspective, Wong, Luo, and Zhang describe recent advances in flip chip packaging. This technology has many advantages over the conventional wire bonding technology and offers the possibility of low-cost electronic assembly for modern electronic products.

  3. [Wood chip alveolitis].

    PubMed

    Müller-Wening, D; Renck, T; Neuhauss, M

    1999-07-01

    A 52 year old farmer was referred to us for investigation of suspected farmer's lung. For many years the farmer had been exposed to hay, straw, pigeons, and fuel chip dust. Under exertion he suffered from shortness of breath. In the farmer's own fuel chips we could identify Aspergillus fumigatus, Paecilomyces species and Mucor species. In the farmer's blood we found IgG-antibodies against his own fuel chips, thermophilic actinomycetes, Penicillium species, Mucor species and Aspergillus fumigatus. We did not detect any IgG-antibodies against pigeon serum or pigeon faeces. In order to determine the responsible allergen we performed two challenge tests. In the first test the farmer had to inhale his own hay and straw dust for one hour. This provocation was negative. A second one-hour inhalative challenge was carried out 16 days later using his own fuel chips. This time he experienced significant pulmonary and systemic reactions: body temperature rose by 3.3 degrees C, leucocytes by 12,200/mm3; PO2 fell by 39.4 mmHg, vital capacity by 52%, DLCO by 36%. After the challenge the farmer complained of coughing and dyspnoea. Rales could be heard on auscultation, and an interstitial infiltrate was seen to develop on chest x-rays. After the challenge the patient had to be treated with oxygen and systemic corticosteroids. We diagnosed a fuel chip-induced exogenous allergic alveolitis (EAA). Eight days later the parameters were back to normal and the farmer was discharged from our hospital with further corticosteroid medication. This method of inhalative provocation is very important in diagnosing an EAA. Problems arise when the mode and duration of exposure to substances has to be chosen. Because of the risk of severe reactions, inhalative provocations relating to EAAs should only be performed in special centres with an intensive care unit. In this paper we present a diagnosis of fuel chip lung, which is rarely seen in Germany. However, with the rising use of fuel chips as

  4. Optimization of direct whole blood PCR amplification with applications on a static thermostat chip.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bai-Yan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Tian, Xiao-Xi; Chen, Kun; Fang, Fang

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, direct whole blood PCR amplifications on a static chip thermostat without sample purifications are demonstrated; in these amplifications, problems such as cross-interferences and contaminations could be avoided. The amplification conditions, such as the compositions of reagents and thermal programs, were investigated systematically by a GeneAmp PCR system with a native p53 gene segment (about 543 bp) of human genome and an exterior lambda DNA segment (about 500 bp) as targets. Direct amplifications of p53 and K-ras (about 157 bp) gene segments from 0.5 microL blood samples were successfully demonstrated by a static PCR chip with an indium tin oxide glass substrate. The chip thermostat has a typical size of 25 mm x 25 mm, and a polyethylene tube was used as the PCR vial on the glass surface of the chip. Fuzzy proportional integration-differentiation algorithms were adopted in temperature controls of the chip with an aid of a micro-Pt100 sensor. In the direct PCR with the thermostat chip, the whole process only involves automatic thermal programs. This work demonstrated that a chip PCR for field test without desktop facilities is possible either for a point of care test or for forensic analysis.

  5. Chip-scale microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoan

    2012-08-01

    Chip-scale microscopy imaging platforms are pivotal for improving the efficiency of modern biomedical and bioscience experiments. Their integration with other lab-on-a-chip techniques would allow rapid, reliable and high-throughput sample analysis for applications in diverse disciplines. In typical chip-scale microscopy imaging platforms, the light path can be generalized to the following steps: photons leave the light source, interact with the sample and finally are detected by the sensor. Based on the light path of these platforms, the current review aims to provide some insights on design strategies for chip-scale microscopy. Specifically, we analyze current chip-scale microscopy approaches from three aspects: illumination design, sample manipulation and substrate/imager modification. We also discuss some opportunities for future developments of chip-scale microscopy, such as time multiplexed structured illumination and hydrodynamic focusing for high throughput sample manipulation.

  6. On-Chip Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems have been rapidly emerging to pave the way toward ultra-compact, efficient, mass producible and cost-effective biomedical research and diagnostic tools. Although such microfluidic and micro electromechanical systems achieved high levels of integration, and are capable of performing various important tasks on the same chip, such as cell culturing, sorting and staining, they still rely on conventional microscopes for their imaging needs. Recently several alternative on-chip optical imaging techniques have been introduced, which have the potential to substitute conventional microscopes for various lab-on-a-chip applications. Here we present a critical review of these recently emerging on-chip biomedical imaging modalities, including contact shadow imaging, lensfree holographic microscopy, fluorescent on-chip microscopy and lensfree optical tomography. PMID:23558399

  7. Comparison of TCDD-elicited genome-wide hepatic gene expression in Sprague–Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nault, Rance; Kim, Suntae; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2013-03-01

    Although the structure and function of the AhR are conserved, emerging evidence suggests that downstream effects are species-specific. In this study, rat hepatic gene expression data from the DrugMatrix database (National Toxicology Program) were compared to mouse hepatic whole-genome gene expression data following treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). For the DrugMatrix study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were gavaged daily with 20 μg/kg TCDD for 1, 3 and 5 days, while female C57BL/6 ovariectomized mice were examined 1, 3 and 7 days after a single oral gavage of 30 μg/kg TCDD. A total of 649 rat and 1386 mouse genes (|fold change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) ≥ 0.99) were differentially expressed following treatment. HomoloGene identified 11,708 orthologs represented across the rat Affymetrix 230 2.0 GeneChip (12,310 total orthologs), and the mouse 4 × 44K v.1 Agilent oligonucleotide array (17,578 total orthologs). Comparative analysis found 563 and 922 orthologs differentially expressed in response to TCDD in the rat and mouse, respectively, with 70 responses associated with immune function and lipid metabolism in common to both. Moreover, QRTPCR analysis of Ceacam1, showed divergent expression (induced in rat; repressed in mouse) functionally consistent with TCDD-elicited hepatic steatosis in the mouse but not the rat. Functional analysis identified orthologs involved in nucleotide binding and acetyltransferase activity in rat, while mouse-specific responses were associated with steroid, phospholipid, fatty acid, and carbohydrate metabolism. These results provide further evidence that TCDD elicits species-specific regulation of distinct gene networks, and outlines considerations for future comparisons of publicly available microarray datasets. - Highlights: ► We performed a whole-genome comparison of TCDD-regulated genes in mice and rats. ► Previous species comparisons were extended using data from the DrugMatrix database. ► Less than 15% of TCDD

  8. Chip-Based Sensors for Disease Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhichao

    Nucleic acid analysis is one of the most important disease diagnostic approaches in medical practice, and has been commonly used in cancer biomarker detection, bacterial speciation and many other fields in laboratory. Currently, the application of powerful research methods for genetic analysis, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, and gene expression profiling using fluorescence microarrays, are not widely used in hospitals and extended-care units due to high-cost, long detection times, and extensive sample preparation. Bioassays, especially chip-based electrochemical sensors, may be suitable for the next generation of rapid, sensitive, and multiplexed detection tools. Herein, we report three different microelectrode platforms with capabilities enabled by nano- and microtechnology: nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs), nanostructured microelectrodes (NMEs), and hierarchical nanostructured microelectrodes (HNMEs), all of which are able to directly detect unpurified RNA in clinical samples without enzymatic amplification. Biomarkers that are cancer and infectious disease relevant to clinical medicine were chosen to be the targets. Markers were successfully detected with clinically-relevant sensitivity. Using peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) as probes and an electrocatalytic reporter system, NEEs were able to detect prostate cancer-related gene fusions in tumor tissue samples with 100 ng of RNA. The development of NMEs improved the sensitivity of the assay further to 10 aM of DNA target, and multiplexed detection of RNA sequences of different prostate cancer-related gene fusion types was achieved on the chip-based NMEs platform. An HNMEs chip integrated with a bacterial lysis device was able to detect as few as 25 cfu bacteria in 30 minutes and monitor the detection in real time. Bacterial detection could also be performed in neat urine samples. The development of these versatile clinical diagnostic tools could be extended to the detection of various

  9. Forensic Analysis of BIOS Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershteyn, Pavel; Davis, Mark; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Data can be hidden in BIOS chips without hindering computer performance. This feature has been exploited by virus writers and computer game enthusiasts. Unused BIOS storage can also be used by criminals, terrorists and intelligence agents to conceal secrets. However, BIOS chips are largely ignored in digital forensic investigations. Few techniques exist for imaging BIOS chips and no tools are available specifically for analyzing BIOS data.

  10. Lab-on-a-Chip Multiplex Assays.

    PubMed

    Peter, Harald; Wienke, Julia; Bier, Frank F

    2017-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip multiplex assays allow a rapid identification of multiple parameters in an automated manner. Here we describe a lab-based preparation followed by a rapid and fully automated DNA microarray hybridization and readout in less than 10 min using the Fraunhofer in vitro diagnostics (ivD) platform to enable rapid identification of bacterial species and detection of antibiotic resistance. The use of DNA microarrays allows a fast adaptation of new biomarkers enabling the identification of different genes as well as single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes. In this protocol we describe a DNA microarray developed for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and the mecA resistance gene.

  11. An Affymetrix Microarray Design for Microbial Genotyping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum APRT Okra 5 Clostridium botulinum A str. ATCC 19397 5 Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 40 Clostridium botulinum B str. Eklund 17B 5...Clostridium botulinum SNP B1 str. Okra plasmid pCLD 20 Clostridium botulinum B1 str. Okra plasmid pCLD 5 Clostridium botulinum Bf 5 Clostridium...botulinum HPT Eklund 17B 10 Clostridium botulinum HPT Loch Maree 20 Clostridium botulinum HPT Okra 5 Clostridium botulinum A3 str. Loch Maree 5

  12. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  13. Chronic Lunar Dust Exposure on Rat Cornea: Evaluation by Gene Expression Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theriot, C. A.; Glass, A.; Lam, C-W.; James, J.; Zanello, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Lunar dust is capable of entering habitats and vehicle compartments by sticking to spacesuits or other objects that are transferred into the spacecraft from the lunar surface and has been reported to cause irritation upon exposure. During the Apollo missions, crewmembers reported irritation specifically to the skin and eyes after contamination of the lunar and service modules. It has since been hypothesized that ocular irritation and abrasion might occur as a result of such exposure, impairing crew vision. Recent work has shown that both ultrafine and unground lunar dust exhibited minimal irritancy of the ocular surface (i.e., cornea); however, the assessment of the severity of ocular damage resulting from contact of lunar dust particles to the cornea has focused only on macroscopic signs of mechanical irritancy and cytotoxicity. Given the chemical reactive properties of lunar dust, exposure of the cornea may contribute to detrimental effects at the molecular level including but not limited to oxidative damage. Additionally, low level chronic exposures may confound any results obtained in previous acute studies. We report here preliminary results from a tissue sharing effort using 10-week-old Fischer 344 male rats chronically exposed to filtered air or jet milled lunar dust collected during Apollo 14 using a Jaeger-NYU nose-only chamber for a total of 120 hours (6 hours daily, 5 days a week) over a 4-week period. RNA was isolated from corneas collected from rats at 1 day and 7 days after being exposed to concentrations of 0, 20, and 60 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Microarray analysis was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array with Affymetrix Expression Console and Transcriptome Analysis Console used for normalization and secondary analysis. An Ingenuity iReport"TM" was then generated for canonical pathway identification. The number of differentially expressed genes identified increases with dose compared to controls suggesting a more severe

  14. Nonspecific hybridization scaling of microarray expression estimates: a physicochemical approach for chip-to-chip normalization.

    PubMed

    Binder, Hans; Brücker, Jan; Burden, Conrad J

    2009-03-05

    The problem of inferring accurate quantitative estimates of transcript abundances from gene expression microarray data is addressed. Particular attention is paid to correcting chip-to-chip variations arising mainly as a result of unwanted nonspecific background hybridization to give transcript abundances measured in a common scale. This study verifies and generalizes a model of the mutual dependence between nonspecific background hybridization and the sensitivity of the specific signal using an approach based on the physical chemistry of surface hybridization. We have analyzed GeneChip oligonucleotide microarray data taken from a set of five benchmark experiments including dilution, Latin Square, and "Golden spike" designs. Our analysis concentrates on the important effect of changes in the unwanted nonspecific background inherent in the technology due to changes in total RNA target concentration and/or composition. We find that incremental changes in nonspecific background entail opposite sign incremental changes in the effective specific binding constant. This effect, which we refer to as the "up-down" effect, results from the subtle interplay of competing interactions between the probes and specific and nonspecific targets at the chip surface and in bulk solution. We propose special rules for proper normalization of expression values considering the specifics of the up-down effect. Particularly for normalization one has to level the expression values of invariant expressed probes. Existing heuristic normalization techniques which do not exclude absent probes, level intensities instead of expression values, and/or use low variance criteria for identifying invariant sets of probes lead to biased results. Strengths and pitfalls of selected normalization methods are discussed. We also find that the extent of the up-down effect is modified if RNA targets are replaced by DNA targets, in that microarray sensitivity and specificity are improved via a decrease in

  15. Changes in gene expression in human renal proximal tubule cells exposed to low concentrations of S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, a metabolite of trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Edward A. . E-mail: e.lock@ljmu.ac.uk; Barth, Jeremy L.; Argraves, Scott W.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2006-10-15

    Epidemiology studies suggest that there may be a weak association between high level exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) and renal tubule cell carcinoma. Laboratory animal studies have shown an increased incidence of renal tubule carcinoma in male rats but not mice. TCE can undergo metabolism via glutathione (GSH) conjugation to form metabolites that are known to be nephrotoxic. The GSH conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione (DCVG), is processed further to the cysteine conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), which is the penultimate nephrotoxic species. We have cultured human renal tubule cells (HRPTC) in serum-free medium under a variety of different culture conditions and observed growth, respiratory control and glucose transport over a 20 day period in medium containing low glucose. Cell death was time- and concentration-dependent, with the EC{sub 5} for DCVG being about 3 {mu}M and for DCVC about 7.5 {mu}M over 10 days. Exposure of HRPTC to sub-cytotoxic doses of DCVC (0.1 {mu}M and 1 {mu}M for 10 days) led to a small number of changes in gene expression, as determined by transcript profiling with Affymetrix human genome chips. Using the criterion of a mean 2-fold change over control for the four samples examined, 3 genes at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC increased, namely, adenosine kinase, zinc finger protein X-linked and an enzyme with lyase activity. At 1 {mu}M DCVC, two genes showed a >2-fold decrease, N-acetyltransferase 8 and complement factor H. At a lower stringency (1.5-fold change), a total of 63 probe sets were altered at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC and 45 at 1 {mu}M DCVC. Genes associated with stress, apoptosis, cell proliferation and repair and DCVC metabolism were altered, as were a small number of genes that did not appear to be associated with the known mode of action of DCVC. Some of these genes may serve as molecular markers of TCE exposure and effects in the human kidney.

  16. The effect of culture medium and carrier on explant culture of human limbal epithelium: A comparison of ultrastructure, keratin profile and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Meeta; Olstad, O K; Drolsum, Liv; Moe, Morten C; Smorodinova, Natalia; Kalasova, Sarka; Jirsova, Katerina; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Noer, Agate

    2016-12-01

    Patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) often experience pain and photophobia due to recurrent epithelial defects and chronic inflammation of the cornea. Successfully restoring a healthy corneal surface in these patients by transplantation of ex vivo expanded human limbal epithelial cells (LECs) may alleviate these symptoms and significantly improve their quality of life. The clinical outcome of transplantation is known to be influenced by the quality of transplanted cells. Presently, several different protocols for cultivation and transplantation of LECs are in use. However, no consensus on an optimal protocol exists. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of culture medium and carrier on the morphology, staining of selected keratins and global gene expression in ex vivo cultured LECs. Limbal biopsies from cadaveric donors were cultured for three weeks on human amniotic membrane (HAM) or on tissue culture coated plastic (PL) in either a complex medium (COM), containing recombinant growth factors, hormones, cholera toxin and fetal bovine serum, or in medium supplemented only with human serum (HS). The expanded LECs were examined by light microscopy (LM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunohistochemistry (IHC) for keratins K3, K7, K8, K12, K13, K14, K15 and K19, as well as microarray and qRT-PCR analysis. The cultured LECs exhibited similar morphology and keratin staining on LM, TEM and IHC examination, regardless of the culture condition. The epithelium was multilayered, with cuboidal basal cells and flattened superficial cells. Cells were attached to each other by desmosomes. Adhesion complexes were observed between basal cells and the underlying carrier in LECs cultured on HAM, but not in LECs cultured on PL. GeneChip Human Gene 2.0 ST microarray (Affymetrix) analysis revealed that 18,653 transcripts were ≥2 fold up or downregulated (p ≤ 0.05). Cells cultured in the same medium (COM or HS) showed more similarities in gene

  17. A polymer lab-on-a-chip for genetic analysis using the arrayed primer extension on microarray chips.

    PubMed

    Marasso, Simone L; Mombello, Domenico; Cocuzza, Matteo; Casalena, Davide; Ferrante, Ivan; Nesca, Alessandro; Poiklik, Piret; Rekker, Kadri; Aaspollu, Anu; Ferrero, Sergio; Pirri, Candido F

    2014-10-01

    In this work a polymer lab-on-a-chip (LOC), fabricated through MEMS technology, was employed to execute a genetic protocol for the Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) detection. The LOC was made in Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and has two levels: the lower one for the insertion and mixing of the reagents, the upper one for the interfacing with the DNA microarray chip. The hereditary hearing loss was chosen as case of study, since the demand for testing such a particular disorder is high and genetics behind the condition is quite clear. The Arrayed Primer EXtension (APEX) genetic protocol was implemented on the LOC to analyze the SNPs. A low density (for detection of up to 10 mutations) and a high density microarray chips (for detection of 245 mutations in 12 genes), containing the primers for the extension, were employed to carry out the APEX reaction on the LOC. Both the microarray chips provide a signal to noise ratio and efficiency comparable with a detection obtained in a conventional protocol in standard conditions. Moreover, significant reduction of the employed PCR volume (from 30 μL to 10 μL) was obtained using the low density chip.

  18. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for genodermatoses: Recent progress and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hongzhou, Cui; Shuping, Guo; Wenju, Wang; Li, Li; Lulu, Wei; Linjun, Deng; Jingmin, Li; Xiaoli, Ren; Li, Bai

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, molecular biology has proven to be a great asset in our understanding of mechanisms in genodermatoses. However, bench to bedside translation research lags far behind. Advances in lab-on-a-chip technologies enabled programmable, reconfigurable, and scalable manipulation of a variety of laboratory procedures. Sample preparation, microfluidic reactions, and continuous monitoring systems can be integrated on a small chip. These advantages have attracted attention in various fields of clinical application including diagnosis of inherited skin diseases. This review lists an overview of the underlying genes and mutations and describes prospective application of lab-on-a-chip technologies as solutions to challenges for point-of-care genodematoses diagnosis.

  19. Single chip camera active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Timothy (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Olson, Brita (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Panicacci, Roger A. (Inventor); Mansoorian, Barmak (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A totally digital single chip camera includes communications to operate most of its structure in serial communication mode. The digital single chip camera include a D/A converter for converting an input digital word into an analog reference signal. The chip includes all of the necessary circuitry for operating the chip using a single pin.

  20. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.; Malba, Vincent; Riddle, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder.

  1. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.; Malba, V.; Riddle, R.A.

    1997-08-05

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules is disclosed. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder. 10 figs.

  2. Ablation of Stat3 by siRNA alters gene expression profiles in JEG-3 cells: a systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Jiang, K; Krous, L C; Knowlton, N; Chen, Y; Frank, M B; Cadwell, C; Centola, M; Jarvis, J N

    2009-09-01

    Control of inflammation at the maternal-fetal interface is a critical element in mammalian pregnancy. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that Stat3 may be a placental mediator involved in maintaining immunologic homeostasis at the maternal-fetal interface. The aim of the current study is to further elucidate the role of Stat3 in response to inflammation. As ablation of Stat3 in mice results in embryonic lethality, we evaluated the role of Stat3 in vitro using an siRNA approach. Trophoblast-like JEG-3 cells were transfected with an siRNA construct specific to Stat3. Experimental and control cells were exposed to conditioned medium from PHA-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and incubated for 45 min. Cells were then collected and RNA isolated for transcriptional profiling using human Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 GeneChips. Differences in gene expression between control and Stat3-ablated cells were evaluated using conventional statistical methods. Fifty-two genes were detected as up-regulated in conditioned medium in both mock transfected and in Stat3 siRNA transfected JEG-3 cells. Two genes (EPAS1 and RASGEF1B) were up-regulated only in cells transfected with negative control siRNA, while 36 genes were up-regulated only in cells transfected with Stat3 siRNA. Sixty genes were differentially expressed between Stat3 siRNA transfected cells relative to mock transfected cells both in basal and conditioned medium. These included 31 genes up-regulated with Stat3 siRNA transfected cells and 29 genes down-regulated with Stat3 siRNA. Eleven genes were differentially expressed only in basal medium. Seven of these were up-regulated in the presence of Stat3 siRNA and four were down-regulated. Nine genes were differentially expressed only in conditioned medium. Six of these were up-regulated and three down-regulated in the presence of Stat3 siRNA. Off-target effects were excluded in a second set of experiments in which Stat3 mRNA was targeted at a different site and

  3. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Aakalu, Vinay Kumar; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Bahroos, Neil; Shah, Dhara; Ali, Marwan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Background The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development. Methods We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium. Results The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described. Conclusions Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas. PMID:28081151

  4. Development of HuMiChip for Functional Profiling of Human Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qichao; He, Zhili; Li, Yan; Chen, Yanfei; Deng, Ye; Lin, Lu; Hemme, Christopher L.; Yuan, Tong; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Xuedong; Shi, Wenyuan; Li, Lanjuan; Xu, Jian; Zhou, Jizhong

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the diversity, composition, structure, function, and dynamics of human microbiomes in individual human hosts is crucial to reveal human-microbial interactions, especially for patients with microbially mediated disorders, but challenging due to the high diversity of the human microbiome. Here we have developed a functional gene-based microarray for profiling human microbiomes (HuMiChip) with 36,802 probes targeting 50,007 protein coding sequences for 139 key functional gene families. Computational evaluation suggested all probes included are highly specific to their target sequences. HuMiChip was used to analyze human oral and gut microbiomes, showing significantly different functional gene profiles between oral and gut microbiome. Obvious shifts of microbial functional structure and composition were observed for both patients with dental caries and periodontitis from moderate to advanced stages, suggesting a progressive change of microbial communities in response to the diseases. Consistent gene family profiles were observed by both HuMiChip and next generation sequencing technologies. Additionally, HuMiChip was able to detect gene families at as low as 0.001% relative abundance. The results indicate that the developed HuMiChip is a useful and effective tool for functional profiling of human microbiomes. PMID:24595026

  5. Effect of Retinoic Acid on Gene Expression in Human Conjunctival Epithelium: Secretory phospholipase A2 mediates retinoic acid induction of MUC16.

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Yuichi; Spurr-Michaud, Sandra J.; Russo, Cindy Leigh; Argüeso, Pablo; Gipson, Ilene K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. How vitamin A contributes to the maintenance of the wet-surfaced phenotype at the ocular surface is not well understood. We sought to identify vitamin A responsive genes in ocular surface epithelia using gene microarray analysis of cultures of a human conjunctival epithelial cell line (HCjE) grown with all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). The analysis showed that secretory phospholipase A2 Group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was the gene most upregulated by RA, followed by the membrane-associated mucin MUC16 at a later time point. Since eicosanoids, the product of arachidonic acid generated by the phospholipase A2 family, have been shown to increase mucin production, we sought to determine if sPLA2 mediates the RA induction of MUC16. Methods. HCjE cells were cultured with or without RA for 3, 6, 24 and 48 hours. Complementary RNA prepared from RNA of the HCjE cells was hybridized to human gene chips (HG-U133A; Affymetrix) and analyzed using Rosetta Resolver software. Microarray data on mucin expression were validated by real-time PCR. To investigate whether sPLA2 is associated with RA-induced MUC16 upregulation, HCjE cells were incubated with RA and the broad spectrum PLA2 inhibitor, aristolochic acid (ArA) or the specific sPLA2-IIA inhibitor LY315920, followed by analysis of MUC16 mRNA and protein by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Results. After RA addition, 28 transcripts were upregulated and 6 downregulated by over 2.0-fold (p < 0.01) at both 3 and 6 hours (early phase). Eighty gene transcripts were upregulated and 45 downregulated at both 24 and 48 hours (late phase). Group IIA sPLA2, significantly upregulated by 24 hours, and MUC16 were the most upregulated RNAs by RA at 48 hours. sPLA2 upregulation by RA was confirmed by Western blot analysis. When HCjE cells were incubated with RA plus ArA or specific inhibitor of sPLA2-IIA, LY315920, the RA-induced MUC16 mRNA was significantly reduced (p < 0.01). Conclusion. The retinoic acid-associated upregulation of

  6. Development and application of a rat ovarian gene expression database.

    PubMed

    Jo, Misung; Gieske, Mary C; Payne, Charles E; Wheeler-Price, Sarah E; Gieske, Joseph B; Ignatius, Ignatius V; Curry, Thomas E; Ko, Chemyong

    2004-11-01

    The pituitary gonadotropins play a key role in follicular development and ovulation through the induction of specific genes. To identify these genes, we have constructed a genome-wide rat ovarian gene expression database (rOGED). The database was constructed from total RNA isolated from intact ovaries, granulosa cells, or residual ovarian tissues collected from immature pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG)/human chorionic gonadotropin-treated rats at 0 h (no PMSG), 12 h, and 48 h post PMSG, as well as 6 and 12 h post human chorionic gonadotropin. The total RNA was used for DNA microarray analysis using Affymetrix Rat Expression Arrays 230A and 230B (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). The microarray data were compiled and used for display of individual gene expression profiles through specially developed software. The final rOGED provides immediate analysis of temporal gene expression profiles for over 28,000 genes in intact ovaries, granulosa cells, and residual ovarian tissue during follicular growth and the preovulatory period. The accuracy of the rOGED was validated against the gene profiles for over 20 known genes. The utility of the rOGED was demonstrated by identifying six genes that have not been described in the rat periovulatory ovary. The mRNA expression patterns and cellular localization for each of these six genes (estrogen sulfotransferase, synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa, runt-related transcription factor, calgranulin B, alpha1-macroglobulin, and MAPK phosphotase-3) were confirmed by Northern blot analyses and in situ hybridization, respectively. The current findings demonstrate that the rOGED can be used as an instant reference for ovarian gene expression profiles, as well as a reliable resource for identifying important yet, to date, unknown ovarian genes.

  7. IDENTIFICATION OF INTERSPECIES CONCORDANCE OF MECHANISMS OF ARSENIC-INDUCED BLADDER CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to arsenic causes cancer by inducing a variety of responses that affect the expression of genes associated with numerous biological pathways leading to altered cell growth and proliferation, signaling, apoptosis and oxidative stress response. Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays ...

  8. Comparative immune responses of pigs to infection with Salmonella enterica serovars of food safety (Typhimurium) and animal health (Choleraesuis) importance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella infections cause food safety concerns for humans as well as production problems for swine. Our team has used suppression hybridization (SSH), long oligonucleotide Qiagen and Affymetrix porcine GeneChip® arrays, and real time gene expression (Q-PCR) to understand the host response to, and ...

  9. ANALYSIS OF PORCINE TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE TO SALMONELLA ENTERICA SEROVAR CHOLERAESUIS SUGGESTS NOVEL TARGETS OF NFKAPPAB ARE ACTIVATED IN THE MESENTERIC LYMPH NODE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Affymetrix GeneChip® porcine genome array was used to identify differentially expressed genes in pig mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) responding to infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis (S. Choleraesuis) at acute (8 hours (h), 24h and 48h post-inoculation (pi)) and chronic stages (...

  10. Characterizing the porcine transcriptional regulatory response to infection by Salmonella: identifying putative new NFkB direct targets through comparative bioinformatics.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have collected data on host response to infection from RNA prepared from mesenteric lymph node of swine infected with either Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) or S. Choleraesuis (SC) using the porcine Affymetrix GeneChip. We identified 848 (ST) and 1,853 (SC) genes with statistical evi...

  11. Packaging commercial CMOS chips for lab on a chip integration.

    PubMed

    Datta-Chaudhuri, Timir; Abshire, Pamela; Smela, Elisabeth

    2014-05-21

    Combining integrated circuitry with microfluidics enables lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices to perform sensing, freeing them from benchtop equipment. However, this integration is challenging with small chips, as is briefly reviewed with reference to key metrics for package comparison. In this paper we present a simple packaging method for including mm-sized, foundry-fabricated dies containing complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits within LOCs. The chip is embedded in an epoxy handle wafer to yield a level, large-area surface, allowing subsequent photolithographic post-processing and microfluidic integration. Electrical connection off-chip is provided by thin film metal traces passivated with parylene-C. The parylene is patterned to selectively expose the active sensing area of the chip, allowing direct interaction with a fluidic environment. The method accommodates any die size and automatically levels the die and handle wafer surfaces. Functionality was demonstrated by packaging two different types of CMOS sensor ICs, a bioamplifier chip with an array of surface electrodes connected to internal amplifiers for recording extracellular electrical signals and a capacitance sensor chip for monitoring cell adhesion and viability. Cells were cultured on the surface of both types of chips, and data were acquired using a PC. Long term culture (weeks) showed the packaging materials to be biocompatible. Package lifetime was demonstrated by exposure to fluids over a longer duration (months), and the package was robust enough to allow repeated sterilization and re-use. The ease of fabrication and good performance of this packaging method should allow wide adoption, thereby spurring advances in miniaturized sensing systems.

  12. A Cytomorphic Chip for Quantitative Modeling of Fundamental Bio-Molecular Circuits.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    We describe a 0.35 μm BiCMOS silicon chip that quantitatively models fundamental molecular circuits via efficient log-domain cytomorphic transistor equivalents. These circuits include those for biochemical binding with automatic representation of non-modular and loading behavior, e.g., in cascade and fan-out topologies; for representing variable Hill-coefficient operation and cooperative binding; for representing inducer, transcription-factor, and DNA binding; for probabilistic gene transcription with analogic representations of log-linear and saturating operation; for gain, degradation, and dynamics of mRNA and protein variables in transcription and translation; and, for faithfully representing biological noise via tunable stochastic transistor circuits. The use of on-chip DACs and ADCs enables multiple chips to interact via incoming and outgoing molecular digital data packets and thus create scalable biochemical reaction networks. The use of off-chip digital processors and on-chip digital memory enables programmable connectivity and parameter storage. We show that published static and dynamic MATLAB models of synthetic biological circuits including repressilators, feed-forward loops, and feedback oscillators are in excellent quantitative agreement with those from transistor circuits on the chip. Computationally intensive stochastic Gillespie simulations of molecular production are also rapidly reproduced by the chip and can be reliably tuned over the range of signal-to-noise ratios observed in biological cells.

  13. PBMC transcriptome profiles identifies potential candidate genes and functional networks controlling the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRSV vaccine in Pietrain pig

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Aminul; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Pröll, Maren Julia; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Aqter Rony, Sharmin; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Hoelker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Neuhoff, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a devastating viral disease affecting swine production, health and welfare throughout the world. A synergistic action of the innate and the adaptive immune system of the host is essential for mounting a durable protective immunity through vaccination. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate the transcriptome profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to characterize the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRS Virus (PRRSV) vaccination in Pietrain pigs. The Affymetrix gene chip porcine gene 1.0 ST array was used for the transcriptome profiling of PBMCs collected at immediately before (D0), at one (D1) and 28 days (D28) post PRRSV vaccination with three biological replications. With FDR <0.05 and log2 fold change ±1.5 as cutoff criteria, 295 and 115 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in PBMCs during the stage of innate and adaptive response, respectively. The microarray expression results were technically validated by qRT-PCR. The gene ontology terms such as viral life cycle, regulation of lymphocyte activation, cytokine activity and inflammatory response were enriched during the innate immunity; cytolysis, T cell mediated cytotoxicity, immunoglobulin production were enriched during adaptive immunity to PRRSV vaccination. Significant enrichment of cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, signaling by interleukins, signaling by the B cell receptor (BCR), viral mRNA translation, IFN-gamma pathway and AP-1 transcription factor network pathways were indicating the involvement of altered genes in the antiviral defense. Network analysis revealed that four network modules were functionally involved with the transcriptional network of innate immunity, and five modules were linked to adaptive immunity in PBMCs. The innate immune transcriptional network was found to be regulated by LCK, STAT3, ATP5B, UBB and RSP17. While TGFß1, IL7R, RAD21, SP1 and GZMB are likely to

  14. PBMC transcriptome profiles identifies potential candidate genes and functional networks controlling the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRSV vaccine in Pietrain pig.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Aminul; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Pröll, Maren Julia; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Aqter Rony, Sharmin; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Hoelker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Neuhoff, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a devastating viral disease affecting swine production, health and welfare throughout the world. A synergistic action of the innate and the adaptive immune system of the host is essential for mounting a durable protective immunity through vaccination. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate the transcriptome profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to characterize the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRS Virus (PRRSV) vaccination in Pietrain pigs. The Affymetrix gene chip porcine gene 1.0 ST array was used for the transcriptome profiling of PBMCs collected at immediately before (D0), at one (D1) and 28 days (D28) post PRRSV vaccination with three biological replications. With FDR <0.05 and log2 fold change ±1.5 as cutoff criteria, 295 and 115 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in PBMCs during the stage of innate and adaptive response, respectively. The microarray expression results were technically validated by qRT-PCR. The gene ontology terms such as viral life cycle, regulation of lymphocyte activation, cytokine activity and inflammatory response were enriched during the innate immunity; cytolysis, T cell mediated cytotoxicity, immunoglobulin production were enriched during adaptive immunity to PRRSV vaccination. Significant enrichment of cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, signaling by interleukins, signaling by the B cell receptor (BCR), viral mRNA translation, IFN-gamma pathway and AP-1 transcription factor network pathways were indicating the involvement of altered genes in the antiviral defense. Network analysis revealed that four network modules were functionally involved with the transcriptional network of innate immunity, and five modules were linked to adaptive immunity in PBMCs. The innate immune transcriptional network was found to be regulated by LCK, STAT3, ATP5B, UBB and RSP17. While TGFß1, IL7R, RAD21, SP1 and GZMB are likely to

  15. A novel method for ABO genotyping using a DNA chip.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ken; Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Koichi; Motani, Hisako; Iwase, Hirotaro; Kaneko, Hiroto; Fukushima, Hisayo; Akutsu, Tomoko; Sakurada, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    ABO genotyping is often performed to identify the blood type of decomposed samples, which is difficult to be determined by a serological test. In this study, we developed a simple method for ABO genotyping using a DNA chip. In this method, polymerase chain reaction-amplified and fluorescent-labeled fragments in the ABO gene and primate-specific D17Z1 were hybridized with DNA probes on a chip designed to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ABO gene and part of the D17Z1 sequence. Using blood samples from 42 volunteers and 10 animal species, we investigated whether the chip could be used to detect SNPs in the ABO gene and the D17Z1 sequence. This method was then applied to various forensic samples, and it was confirmed that this method was suitable for the simultaneous analyses of ABO genotyping and species identification. This method fulfills the recent need for the development of rapid and convenient methods for criminal investigations.

  16. Analysis Methods of Magnesium Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmann, Sven; Ditze, André; Scharf, Christiane

    2015-11-01

    The quality of recycled magnesium from chips depends strongly on their exposure to inorganic and organic impurities that are added during the production processes. Different kinds of magnesium chips from these processes were analyzed by several methods. In addition, the accuracy and effectiveness of the methods are discussed. The results show that the chips belong either to the AZ91, AZ31, AM50/60, or AJ62 alloy. Some kinds of chips show deviations from the above-mentioned normations. Different impurities result mainly from transition metals and lime. The water and oil content does not exceed 25%, and the chip size is not more than 4 mm in the diameter. The sieve analysis shows good results for oily and wet chips. The determination of oil and water shows better results for the application of a Soxhlet compared with the addition of lime and vacuum distillation. The most accurate values for the determination of water and oil are obtained by drying at 110°C (for water) and washing with acetone (for oil) by hand.

  17. Processing ChIP-chip data: from the scanner to the browser.

    PubMed

    Cauchy, Pierre; Benoukraf, Touati; Ferrier, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    High-density tiling microarrays are increasingly used in combination with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to delineate the regulation of gene expression. Besides the technical challenges inherent to such complex biological assays, a critical, often daunting issue is the correct interpretation of the sheer amount of raw data generated by utilizing computational methods. Here, we go through the main steps of this intricate process, including optimized chromatin immunoprecipitation on chip (ChIP-chip) data normalization, peak detection, as well as quality control reports. We also describe convenient standalone software suites, including our own, CoCAS, which works on the latest generation of Agilent high-density arrays, allows dye-swap, replicate correlation, and easy connection with genome browsers for results interpretation, or with, e.g., other peak detection algorithms. Overall, the guidelines described herein provide an effective introduction to ChIP-chip technology and analysis.

  18. Digital PCR on an integrated self-priming compartmentalization chip.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiangyuan; Qiu, Lin; Yu, Bingwen; Xu, Yanan; Gao, Yibo; Pan, Tingting; Tian, Qingchang; Song, Qi; Jin, Wei; Jin, Qinhan; Mu, Ying

    2014-03-21

    An integrated on-chip valve-free and power-free microfluidic digital PCR device is for the first time developed by making use of a novel self-priming compartmentalization and simple dehydration control to realize 'divide and conquer' for single DNA molecule detection. The high gas solubility of PDMS is exploited to provide the built-in power of self-priming so that the sample and oil are sequentially sucked into the device to realize sample self-compartmentalization based on surface tension. The lifespan of its self-priming capability was about two weeks tested using an air-tight packaging bottle sealed with a small amount of petroleum jelly, which is significant for a practical platform. The SPC chip contains 5120 independent 5 nL microchambers, allowing the samples to be compartmentalized completely. Using this platform, three different abundances of lung cancer related genes are detected to demonstrate the feasibility and flexibility of the microchip for amplifying a single nucleic acid molecule. For maximal accuracy, within less than 5% of the measurement deviation, the optimal number of positive chambers is between 400 and 1250 evaluated by the Poisson distribution, which means one panel can detect an average of 480 to 4804 template molecules. This device without world-to-chip connections eliminates the constraint of the complex pipeline control, and is an integrated on-chip platform, which would be a significant improvement to digital PCR automation and more user-friendly.

  19. On-chip Magnetic Separation and Cell Encapsulation in Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Byvank, T.; Bharde, A.; Miller, B. L.; Chalmers, J. J.; Sooryakumar, R.; Chang, W.-J.; Bashir, R.

    2012-02-01

    The demand for high-throughput single cell assays is gaining importance because of the heterogeneity of many cell suspensions, even after significant initial sorting. These suspensions may display cell-to-cell variability at the gene expression level that could impact single cell functional genomics, cancer, stem-cell research and drug screening. The on-chip monitoring of individual cells in an isolated environment could prevent cross-contamination, provide high recovery yield and ability to study biological traits at a single cell level These advantages of on-chip biological experiments contrast to conventional methods, which require bulk samples that provide only averaged information on cell metabolism. We report on a device that integrates microfluidic technology with a magnetic tweezers array to combine the functionality of separation and encapsulation of objects such as immunomagnetically labeled cells or magnetic beads into pico-liter droplets on the same chip. The ability to control the separation throughput that is independent of the hydrodynamic droplet generation rate allows the encapsulation efficiency to be optimized. The device can potentially be integrated with on-chip labeling and/or bio-detection to become a powerful single-cell analysis device.

  20. Sensitive on-chip quantitative real-time PCR performed on an adaptable and robust platform.

    PubMed

    Lund-Olesen, Torsten; Dufva, Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Collas, Philippe; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2008-12-01

    A robust, flexible and efficient system for performing high sensitivity quantitative on-chip real-time PCR for research purposes is presented. The chips used consist of microchannels etched in silicon. The surface in the channels is a thermally grown silicon dioxide and the channel is sealed by a glass lid. The chips contain four PCR chambers but this number can be increased for further multiplexing. Contrary to PCR chips with oil covered open chambers, these channel-like chambers are easily integrated in lab-on-a-chip devices. The temperature is controlled by a Peltier element and the fluorochrome detector system is a commercially available fluorescence stereo microscope equipped with a CCD camera. The setup shows an excellent signal-to-noise ratio of about 400 compared to that of about 150 obtained in a commercial real time PCR machine. A detection limit of a few copies of target molecules is found, which is 100 to 100,000-fold better than other on-chip real-time PCR systems presented in the literature. This demonstrates that the PCR system can be used for critical applications. We also demonstrate that high quality melting curves can be obtained. Such curves are important in lab-on-a-chip systems for identification of amplified product. The usability of the system is validated by performing quantitative on-chip measurements of the amount of specific gene sequences co-immunoprecipitated with various posttranslationally modified histone proteins. Similar results are obtained from on-chip experiments and experiments carried out in a commercial system on larger sample volumes.

  1. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOEpatents

    Malba, Vincent

    1998-01-01

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: 1) holding individual chips for batch processing, 2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, 3) opening vias in the dielectric, 4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and 5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume.

  2. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOEpatents

    Malba, V.

    1998-11-10

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: (1) holding individual chips for batch processing, (2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, (3) opening vias in the dielectric, (4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and (5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume. 3 figs.

  3. An introduction to DNA chips: principles, technology, applications and analysis.

    PubMed

    Gabig, M; Wegrzyn, G

    2001-01-01

    This review describes the recently developed GeneChip technology that provides efficient access to genetic information using miniaturised, high-density arrays of DNA or oligonucleotide probes. Such microarrays are powerful tools to study the molecular basis of interactions on a scale that would be impossible using conventional analysis. The recent development of the microarray technology has greatly accelerated the investigation of gene regulation. Arrays are mostly used to identify which genes are turned on or off in a cell or tissue, and also to evaluate the extent of a gene's expression under various conditions. Indeed, this technology has been successfully applied to investigate simultaneous expression of many thousands of genes and to the detection of mutations or polymorphisms, as well as for their mapping and sequencing.

  4. A chip of fiber optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Heming; Hu, Huizhu; Zhang, Lei; Ge, Xiaojia; Shen, Yu

    2016-10-01

    A chip of fiber optical trap paves the way to realize the miniaturization and portability of devices based on dual beam optical trap, without loss of stability. We have designed two types of chip of fiber optical trap according to our theoretical simulation. The first one integrates dual beam optical trap with microfluidic chip, called a chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap. It is generally used in chemical, biological, medical and other high-throughput experiments. The second one is a chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap. It is used to measure precisely the coefficient of viscosity or the Brownian movement of micro-object's in liquid. This paper focuses on the chip of fiber optical trap. We present two types of chips of fiber optical trap and detail their designs, fabrication and validation. The chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap is integrated with optical fiber and microfluidic chip made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). We have achieved the micro-sized alignment of optical paths and the trapping of micro-sized particles in the chip of semi-sealing fiber optical trap. In addition, it is easy to fabrication and clean. The chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap was based on a cubic micro-cavity made by a rectangular capillary tube and sealed by PDMS. We have achieved micro-sized alignment accuracy, high trapping efficiency and better trapping stability in the chip of full-sealing fiber optical trap as well.

  5. Lab-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station. Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  6. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  7. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology.

  8. Camera-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory's research on a second generation, solid-state image sensor technology has resulted in the Complementary Metal- Oxide Semiconductor Active Pixel Sensor (CMOS), establishing an alternative to the Charged Coupled Device (CCD). Photobit Corporation, the leading supplier of CMOS image sensors, has commercialized two products of their own based on this technology: the PB-100 and PB-300. These devices are cameras on a chip, combining all camera functions. CMOS "active-pixel" digital image sensors offer several advantages over CCDs, a technology used in video and still-camera applications for 30 years. The CMOS sensors draw less energy, they use the same manufacturing platform as most microprocessors and memory chips, and they allow on-chip programming of frame size, exposure, and other parameters.

  9. Global changes in expression of grapefruit peel tissue in response to the yeast biocontrol agent, Metschnikowia fructicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes taking place in citrus fruit tissue following the application of the yeast biocontrol agent, Metschnikowia fructicola, microarray analysis was performed on grapefruit surface wounds using an Affymetrix Citrus GeneChip. Using a cut off of p<0.0...

  10. Surveying expression level polymorphism and single-feature polymorphism in near-isogenic wheat lines differing for the Yr5 stripe rust resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA polymorphisms are valuable for several applications including genotyping, molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection. The Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip was used to survey expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) and single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) between two near-isogenic wheat genotypes (BC7...

  11. Surveying expression level polymorphism and single-feature polymorphism in near-isogenic wheat lines differing for the Yr5 stripe rust resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA polymorphisms are valuable for several applications including genotyping, molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection. The Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip was used to survey expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) and single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) between two near-isogenic wheat genotypes (BC...

  12. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiate between O3 and herbicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using published data based on Affymetrix ATH1 Gene-Chips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia to O3 and a few other major environmental stresses including oxidative stress . A set of 101 markers could be extracted which provided a compo...

  13. transcriptional response of pigs to Salmonella infection: Comparison of responses to infection with Salmonella eimerica serotype Typhimurium as that observed in S. choleraesuis infection.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine responses to, and control of, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (ST) infection have been compared to S. enterica serotype Choleraesuis (SC) infection. Using subtractive suppression hybridization (SSH), long oligonucleotide Qiagen and Affymetrix porcine GeneChip® arrays, and real time ge...

  14. Research on security vulnerability of chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhifeng; Li, Qingbao; Li, Zhou

    2013-03-01

    The 21st century is the information era. IC (Integrated Circuit) is the basis of the modern information industry. The security vulnerability or back door of IC is directly related to the entire information system security. From the perspective of information security, security vulnerability of chip is led out through the practical examples and then the importance of security vulnerability of chip is emphasized. By comparing the security vulnerability of chip with the software virus, the characteristics of the chip vulnerabilities are summed up. Moreover, this paper describes the security vulnerability models of different control logic chips, combinational and sequential logic chips models. Finally it puts forward two kinds of detecting methods of security vulnerability of chip against the two models.

  15. Programmable synaptic chip for electronic neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moopenn, A.; Langenbacher, H.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    A binary synaptic matrix chip has been developed for electronic neural networks. The matrix chip contains a programmable 32X32 array of 'long channel' NMOSFET binary connection elements implemented in a 3-micron bulk CMOS process. Since the neurons are kept off-chip, the synaptic chip serves as a 'cascadable' building block for a multi-chip synaptic network as large as 512X512 in size. As an alternative to the programmable NMOSFET (long channel) connection elements, tailored thin film resistors are deposited, in series with FET switches, on some CMOS test chips, to obtain the weak synaptic connections. Although deposition and patterning of the resistors require additional processing steps, they promise substantial savings in silicon area. The performance of synaptic chip in a 32-neuron breadboard system in an associative memory test application is discussed.

  16. CMOS foveal image sensor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Cesar (Inventor); Scott, Peter (Inventor); Sridhar, Ramalingam (Inventor); Xia, Shu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A foveal image sensor integrated circuit comprising a plurality of CMOS active pixel sensors arranged both within and about a central fovea region of the chip. The pixels in the central fovea region have a smaller size than the pixels arranged in peripheral rings about the central region. A new photocharge normalization scheme and associated circuitry normalizes the output signals from the different size pixels in the array. The pixels are assembled into a multi-resolution rectilinear foveal image sensor chip using a novel access scheme to reduce the number of analog RAM cells needed. Localized spatial resolution declines monotonically with offset from the imager's optical axis, analogous to biological foveal vision.

  17. Programmable Multi-Chip Module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2005-05-24

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  18. Programmable Multi-Chip Module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2004-11-16

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  19. Identification of Cancer Related Genes Using a Comprehensive Map of Human Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Torrente, Aurora; Lukk, Margus; Xue, Vincent; Parkinson, Helen; Rung, Johan; Brazma, Alvis

    2016-01-01

    Rapid accumulation and availability of gene expression datasets in public repositories have enabled large-scale meta-analyses of combined data. The richness of cross-experiment data has provided new biological insights, including identification of new cancer genes. In this study, we compiled a human gene expression dataset from ∼40,000 publicly available Affymetrix HG-U133Plus2 arrays. After strict quality control and data normalisation the data was quantified in an expression matrix of ∼20,000 genes and ∼28,000 samples. To enable different ways of sample grouping, existing annotations where subjected to systematic ontology assisted categorisation and manual curation. Groups like normal tissues, neoplasmic tissues, cell lines, homoeotic cells and incompletely differentiated cells were created. Unsupervised analysis of the data confirmed global structure of expression consistent with earlier analysis but with more details revealed due to increased resolution. A suitable mixed-effects linear model was used to further investigate gene expression in solid tissue tumours, and to compare these with the respective healthy solid tissues. The analysis identified 1,285 genes with systematic expression change in cancer. The list is significantly enriched with known cancer genes from large, public, peer-reviewed databases, whereas the remaining ones are proposed as new cancer gene candidates. The compiled dataset is publicly available in the ArrayExpress Archive. It contains the most diverse collection of biological samples, making it the largest systematically annotated gene expression dataset of its kind in the public domain.

  20. Atom chip gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  1. Trehalose improves human fibroblast deficits in a new CHIP-mutation related ataxia.

    PubMed

    Casarejos, Maria Jose; Perucho, Juan; López-Sendón, Jose Luis; García de Yébenes, Justo; Bettencourt, Conceição; Gómez, Ana; Ruiz, Carolina; Heutink, Peter; Rizzu, Patrizia; Mena, Maria Angeles

    2014-01-01

    In this work we investigate the role of CHIP in a new CHIP-mutation related ataxia and the therapeutic potential of trehalose. The patient's fibroblasts with a new form of hereditary ataxia, related to STUB1 gene (CHIP) mutations, and three age and sex-matched controls were treated with epoxomicin and trehalose. The effects on cell death, protein misfolding and proteostasis were evaluated. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in STUB-1 gene lead to a growing list of molecular defects as deregulation of protein quality, inhibition of proteasome, cell death, decreased autophagy and alteration in CHIP and HSP70 levels. In this CHIP-mutant patient fibroblasts the inhibition of proteasome with epoxomicin induced severe pathophysiological age-associated changes, cell death and protein ubiquitination. Additionally, treatment with epoxomicin produced a dose-dependent increase in the number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells. However, co-treatment with trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose present in a wide variety of organisms and known as a autophagy enhancer, reduced these pathological events. Trehalose application also increased CHIP and HSP70 expression and GSH free radical levels. Furthermore, trehalose augmented macro and chaperone mediated autophagy (CMA), rising the levels of LC3, LAMP2, CD63 and increasing the expression of Beclin-1 and Atg5-Atg12. Trehalose treatment in addition increased the percentage of immunoreactive cells to HSC70 and LAMP2 and reduced the autophagic substrate, p62. Although this is an individual case based on only one patient and the statistical comparisons are not valid between controls and patient, the low variability among controls and the obvious differences with this patient allow us to conclude that trehalose, through its autophagy activation capacity, anti-aggregation properties, anti-oxidative effects and lack of toxicity, could be very promising for the treatment of CHIP-mutation related ataxia, and possibly a wide spectrum

  2. Chipped Paint Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 April 2003

    In the high northern latitudes NW of Alba Patera, a smooth mantle of material that covers the landscape appears chipped away from the rim of a large crater. The prominent scarp that has formed from the retreat of the mantle lacks the rounded appearance of other ice-rich mantles found in the mid-latitudes. The nature of this mantling layer therefore is more enigmatic.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 62.9, Longitude 226.2 East (133.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  3. Imputing gene expression to maximize platform compatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weizhuang; Han, Lichy; Altman, Russ B

    2017-02-15

    Microarray measurements of gene expression constitute a large fraction of publicly shared biological data, and are available in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Many studies use GEO data to shape hypotheses and improve statistical power. Within GEO, the Affymetrix HG-U133A and HG-U133 Plus 2.0 are the two most commonly used microarray platforms for human samples; the HG-U133 Plus 2.0 platform contains 54 220 probes and the HG-U133A array contains a proper subset (21 722 probes). When different platforms are involved, the subset of common genes is most easily compared. This approach results in the exclusion of substantial measured data and can limit downstream analysis. To predict the expression values for the genes unique to the HG-U133 Plus 2.0 platform, we constructed a series of gene expression inference models based on genes common to both platforms. Our model predicts gene expression values that are within the variability observed in controlled replicate studies and are highly correlated with measured data. Using six previously published studies, we also demonstrate the improved performance of the enlarged feature space generated by our model in downstream analysis.

  4. Implementation of a color-capable optofluidic microscope on a RGB CMOS color sensor chip substrate.

    PubMed

    Pang, Shuo; Cui, Xiquan; DeModena, John; Wang, Ying Min; Sternberg, Paul; Yang, Changhuei

    2010-02-21

    We report the implementation of a color-capable on-chip lensless microscope system, termed color optofluidic microscope (color OFM), and demonstrate imaging of double stained Caenorhabditis elegans with lacZ gene expression at a light intensity about 10 mW/cm(2).

  5. On-chip random spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, B.; Liew, S. F.; Sarma, R.; Cao, H.

    2014-05-01

    Spectrometers are widely used tools in chemical and biological sensing, material analysis, and light source characterization. The development of a high-resolution on-chip spectrometer could enable compact, low-cost spectroscopy for portable sensing as well as increasing lab-on-a-chip functionality. However, the spectral resolution of traditional grating-based spectrometers scales with the optical pathlength, which translates to the linear dimension or footprint of the system, which is limited on-chip. In this work, we utilize multiple scattering in a random photonic structure fabricated on a silicon chip to fold the optical path, making the effective pathlength much longer than the linear dimension of the system and enabling high spectral resolution with a small footprint. Of course, the random spectrometer also requires a different operating paradigm, since different wavelengths are not spatially separated by the random structure, as they would be by a grating. Instead, light transmitted through the random structure produces a wavelengthdependent speckle pattern which can be used as a fingerprint to identify the input spectra after calibration. In practice, these wavelength-dependent speckle patterns are experimentally measured and stored in a transmission matrix, which describes the spectral-to-spatial mapping of the spectrometer. After calibrating the transmission matrix, an arbitrary input spectrum can be reconstructed from its speckle pattern. We achieved sub-nm resolution with 25 nm bandwidth at a wavelength of 1500 nm using a scattering medium with largest dimension of merely 50 μm.

  6. Silicon ball grid array chip carrier

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, David W.; Gassman, Richard A.; Chu, Dahwey

    2000-01-01

    A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

  7. Ataxia and hypogonadism caused by the loss of ubiquitin ligase activity of the U box protein CHIP

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chang-He; Schisler, Jonathan C.; Rubel, Carrie E.; Tan, Song; Song, Bo; McDonough, Holly; Xu, Lei; Portbury, Andrea L.; Mao, Cheng-Yuan; True, Cadence; Wang, Rui-Hao; Wang, Qing-Zhi; Sun, Shi-Lei; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Patterson, Cam; Xu, Yu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a rare Mendelian neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia and hypogonadism. Recently, it was suggested that disordered ubiquitination underlies GHS though the discovery of exome mutations in the E3 ligase RNF216 and deubiquitinase OTUD4. We performed exome sequencing in a family with two of three siblings afflicted with ataxia and hypogonadism and identified a homozygous mutation in STUB1 (NM_005861) c.737C→T, p.Thr246Met, a gene that encodes the protein CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein). CHIP plays a central role in regulating protein quality control, in part through its ability to function as an E3 ligase. Loss of CHIP function has long been associated with protein misfolding and aggregation in several genetic mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders; however, a role for CHIP in human neurological disease has yet to be identified. Introduction of the Thr246Met mutation into CHIP results in a loss of ubiquitin ligase activity measured directly using recombinant proteins as well as in cell culture models. Loss of CHIP function in mice resulted in behavioral and reproductive impairments that mimic human ataxia and hypogonadism. We conclude that GHS can be caused by a loss-of-function mutation in CHIP. Our findings further highlight the role of disordered ubiquitination and protein quality control in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease and demonstrate the utility of combining whole-exome sequencing with molecular analyses and animal models to define causal disease polymorphisms. PMID:24113144

  8. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuefel; Kang, Huining; Fields, Chris; Cowie, Jim R.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Xu, Yuexian; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul; Andries, Erik; Ar, Kerem; Potter, Jeffrey; Willman, Cheryl L.; Murphy, Maurice H.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  9. Microarrays (DNA chips) for the classroom laboratory.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; Bondurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-09-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The primary adaptation is the use of a simulated cDNA target. The low density DNA array we discuss here was used to demonstrate differential expression of several Arabidopsis thaliana genes related to photosynthesis and photomorphogenesis. The methods we present here can be used with any biological organism whose sequence is known. Furthermore, these methods can be adapted to exhibit a variety of differential gene expression patterns under different experimental conditions. The materials and tools we discuss have been applied in classrooms at West High School in Madison, WI. We have also shared these materials with high school teachers attending professional development courses at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  10. Emulating human microcapillaries in a multi-organ-chip platform.

    PubMed

    Hasenberg, Tobias; Mühleder, Severin; Dotzler, Andrea; Bauer, Sophie; Labuda, Krystyna; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Redl, Heinz; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe

    2015-12-20

    Current microfluidic chip-based tissue culture systems lack a capillary endothelial vessel system, which would enable perfusion with blood. We utilise spatial cell cultures to populate a perfused multi-organ-chip platform-a microfluidic device recently introduced for substance testing. Complete biological vascularization of such culture systems is vital to properly emulate physiological tissue behaviour. In this study, we incorporated a fibrin scaffold into the two-organ-chip design. Herein, adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) directed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to organise into tube-like structures. The ASCs induced tube formation of HUVECs in static and dynamic conditions. The replacement of full medium enriched with growth factors and foetal calf serum with basal medium resulted in viable cells with similar gene expression profiles. We regard this as a prerequisite for studies with organ constructs that have a need for a different medium formulation. Furthermore, we here address stability issues of the fibrin gel and fibrin composition for optimal microvessel formation.

  11. Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Transformation by Rho GTPase Through a Novel Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    and scanning were performed by Microarray Core Facility, Northwestern University. Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 chips (containing >47,000...annotation of the HG- U133 Plus 2 microarray was updated using the Entrez gene database at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Raw...gene expression profiles of normal hMECs with those of cells immortalized using RhoA-WT, G14V, or T37A using the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0

  12. Transcriptome analysis of common gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells derived from four different origins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Hao; Lee, Yun-Shien; Hwang, Shiaw-Min

    2011-01-01

    We have used Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze common transcriptomes and thereby learn about the core gene expression profile in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from different tissues, including fetal amniotic fluid-derived MSC, term pregnancy amniotic membrane-derived MSC, term pregnancy umbilical cord blood-derived MSC, and adult bone marrow-derived MSC. The beauty of microarray analysis of gene expression (MAGE) is that it can be used to discover associating genes that were previously thought to be unrelated to a physiological or pathological event. However, interpreting complex biological processes from gene expression profiles often requires extensive knowledge mining in biomedical literature. In this chapter, we describe, step-by-step, how to use a commercially available biological database and software program, MetaCore (GeneGo Inc.), for functional network analysis.

  13. Mechanics of formation of sawtooth chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Amitabh

    Formation of sawtooth chips was studied while machining case carburized 8620 steel (of varying degrees of hardness--upto Rc62), Titanium and Brass. Cutting forces were measured and an attempt was made to measure temperature during machining of case carburized 8620 steel. Conventional tool-chip thermocouple technique was modified to accommodate the effects due to design of Cubic Boron Nitride (CBN) cutting inserts. The chips produced were examined under Optical Microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope and Transmission Electron Microscope. A technique was developed for specimen preparation to study the microstructure of a non-etching white layer under a transmission electron microscope. All the experiments done during this study for an investigation into the root cause of a sawtooth chip formation suggest that a cyclic crack formation on the free surface side of the chip is responsible for the formation of the sawtooth chips; contrary to the widely accepted view of adiabatic shear being the root cause of the sawtooth chip formation. A Quick-Stop device was also used to determine the mechanism of the sawtooth chip formation. A new method of evaluating cutting ratio for the sawtooth chips is proposed and was verified experimentally.

  14. Chip level simulation of fault tolerant computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Chip level modeling techniques, functional fault simulation, simulation software development, a more efficient, high level version of GSP, and a parallel architecture for functional simulation are discussed.

  15. Fermilab silicon strip readout chip for BTev

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, Raymond; Hoff, Jim; Mekkaoui, Abderrezak; Manghisoni, Massimo; Re, Valerio; Angeleri, Valentina; Manfredi, Pier Francesco; Ratti, Lodovico; Speziali, Valeria; /Fermilab /Bergamo U. /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U.

    2005-05-01

    A chip has been developed for reading out the silicon strip detectors in the new BTeV colliding beam experiment at Fermilab. The chip has been designed in a 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology for high radiation tolerance. Numerous programmable features have been added to the chip, such as setup for operation at different beam crossing intervals. A full size chip has been fabricated and successfully tested. The design philosophy, circuit features, and test results are presented in this paper.

  16. Preliminary Results from the CHIPS Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, M.; Sasseen, T.; Marchant, W.; Sirk, M.; UC Berkeley CHIPS Instrument Team; SpaceDev Inc. CHIPS Spacecraft Team

    2003-03-01

    We present preliminary results from the Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer (``CHIPS") mission. CHIPS contains a grazing incidence spectrometer optimized for diffuse emission in the extreme ultraviolet band between 90 and 260 Angstroms, with a peak resolution of about 1.4 Angstroms. The spectrometer should provide unique and important new data on hot gas within the ``local bubble" of the interstellar medium. At the time this abstract was submitted, CHIPS had been successfully launched into a polar orbit, but commissioning of the spacecraft had only just begun. CHIPS is supported by NASA grant NAG5-5213.

  17. Vehicle detection system using artificial retina chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Koichi; Tamura, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Ken-ichi; Kyuma, Kazuo

    2001-05-01

    The AR chip is a versatile CMOS image sensor, functions are not only normal image acquisition but also on-chip image processing. Such features can accelerate algorithms of image processing and the controls of proper image. We have developed the low-cost and compact vehicle detection system using he AR chips. The system is composed of a processing module and an AR camera module. The AR Camera module has dual artificial retina chips to cover the wide dynamic range of the outdoor brightness environment. The ND filter is coated on the lens of one of the chips, each AR chip covers different range of the brightness. The control algorithm of image acquisition is designed to select an adequate chip based on the image quality. The images of the selected chip are processed by on-chip functions for pre-processing and they are transferred to the processing module. Finally the processing module judges the existence of vehicles and detects several kinds of attributive information of the detected vehicle such as moving direction. In our paper, we describe details of the system and the algorithm and we show several result data through field experiments under the real road environment.

  18. Cross polarization compatible dialysis chip.

    PubMed

    Kornreich, Micha; Heymann, Michael; Fraden, Seth; Beck, Roy

    2014-10-07

    We visualize birefringence in microliter sample volumes using a microfluidic dialysis chip optimized for cross polarization microscopy. The chip is composed of two overlapping polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channels separated by a commercial cellulose ester membrane. Buffer exchange in the sample chamber is achieved within minutes by dialyzing under continuous reservoir flow. Using fd virus as a birefringent model system, we monitor the fd virus isotropic to liquid crystal phase transition as a function of ionic strength. We show that the reorientation of the fd virus spans a few tens of seconds, indicative of fast ion exchange across the membrane. Complete phase separation reorganization takes minutes to hours as it involves diffusive virus mass transport within the storage chamber.

  19. Atom-Chip Fountain Gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abend, S.; Gebbe, M.; Gersemann, M.; Ahlers, H.; Müntinga, H.; Giese, E.; Gaaloul, N.; Schubert, C.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Ertmer, W.; Schleich, W. P.; Rasel, E. M.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate a quantum gravimeter by combining the advantages of an atom chip for the generation, delta-kick collimation, and coherent manipulation of freely falling Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with an innovative launch mechanism based on Bloch oscillations and double Bragg diffraction. Our high-contrast BEC interferometer realizes tens of milliseconds of free fall in a volume as little as a one centimeter cube and paves the way for measurements with sub-μ Gal accuracies in miniaturized, robust devices.

  20. Real-time PCR array chip with capillary-driven sample loading and reactor sealing for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Naveen; Liu, Hao-Bing; Dai, Chang-Chun; Jiang, Yu; Wang, Hui; Wang, Qinghui; M Hui, Kam; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2009-10-01

    A major challenge for the lab-on-a-chip (LOC) community is to develop point-of-care diagnostic chips that do not use instruments. Such instruments include pumping or liquid handling devices for distribution of patient's nucleic-acid test sample among an array of reactors and microvalves or mechanical parts to seal these reactors. In this paper, we report the development of a primer pair pre-loaded PCR array chip, in which the loading of the PCR mixture into an array of reactors and subsequent sealing of the reactors were realized by a novel capillary-based microfluidics with a manual two-step pipetting operations. The chip is capable of performing simultaneous (parallel) analyses of multiple gene targets and its performance was tested by amplifying twelve different gene targets against cDNA template from human hepatocellular carcinoma using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye. The versatility and reproducibility of the PCR-array chip are demonstrated by real-time PCR amplification of the BNI-1 fragment of SARS cDNA cloned in a plasmid vector. The reactor-to-reactor diffusion of the pre-loaded primer pairs in the chip is investigated to eliminate the possibility of primer cross-contamination. Key technical issues such as PCR mixture loss in gas-permeable PDMS chip layer and bubble generation due to different PDMS-glass bonding methods are investigated.

  1. GECKO: a complete large-scale gene expression analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    Theilhaber, Joachim; Ulyanov, Anatoly; Malanthara, Anish; Cole, Jack; Xu, Dapeng; Nahf, Robert; Heuer, Michael; Brockel, Christoph; Bushnell, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Background Gecko (Gene Expression: Computation and Knowledge Organization) is a complete, high-capacity centralized gene expression analysis system, developed in response to the needs of a distributed user community. Results Based on a client-server architecture, with a centralized repository of typically many tens of thousands of Affymetrix scans, Gecko includes automatic processing pipelines for uploading data from remote sites, a data base, a computational engine implementing ~ 50 different analysis tools, and a client application. Among available analysis tools are clustering methods, principal component analysis, supervised classification including feature selection and cross-validation, multi-factorial ANOVA, statistical contrast calculations, and various post-processing tools for extracting data at given error rates or significance levels. On account of its open architecture, Gecko also allows for the integration of new algorithms. The Gecko framework is very general: non-Affymetrix and non-gene expression data can be analyzed as well. A unique feature of the Gecko architecture is the concept of the Analysis Tree (actually, a directed acyclic graph), in which all successive results in ongoing analyses are saved. This approach has proven invaluable in allowing a large (~ 100 users) and distributed community to share results, and to repeatedly return over a span of years to older and potentially very complex analyses of gene expression data. Conclusions The Gecko system is being made publicly available as free software . In totality or in parts, the Gecko framework should prove useful to users and system developers with a broad range of analysis needs. PMID:15588317

  2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled to detection by quantitative real-time PCR to study transcription factor binding to DNA in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Arnab; Deplancke, Bart; Walhout, Albertha J M; Tissenbaum, Heidi A

    2009-01-01

    In order to determine how signaling pathways differentially regulate gene expression, it is necessary to identify the interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their cognate cis-regulatory DNA elements. Here, we have outlined a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol for use in whole Caenorhabditis elegans extracts. We discuss optimization of the procedure, including growth and harvesting of the worms, formaldehyde fixation, TF immunoprecipitation and analysis of bound sequences through real-time PCR. It takes ∼10–12 d to obtain the worm culture for ChIP; the ChIP procedure is spaced out over a period of 2.5 d with two overnight incubations. PMID:18388953

  3. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Helen Cole, the project manager for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development program, and Lisa Monaco, the project scientist for the program, insert a lab on a chip into the Caliper 42 which is specialized equipment that controls processes on commercial chips to support development of lab-on-a-chip applications. The system has special microscopes and imaging systems, so scientists can process and study different types of fluid, chemical, and medical tests conducted on chips. For example, researchers have examined fluorescent bacteria as it flows through the chips' fluid channels or microfluidic capillaries. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have been studying how the lab-on-a-chip technology can be used for microbial detection, water quality monitoring, and detecting biosignatures of past or present life on Mars. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for not only space applications, but for many Earth applications, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  4. Radiation Behavior of Analog Neural Network Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langenbacher, H.; Zee, F.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A.

    1996-01-01

    A neural network experiment conducted for the Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1) 1-b launched in June 1994. Identical sets of analog feed-forward neural network chips was used to study and compare the effects of space and ground radiation on the chips. Three failure mechanisms are noted.

  5. Designing Test Chips for Custom Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Griswold, T. W.; Pina, C. A.; Timoc, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Collection of design and testing procedures partly automates development of built-in test chips for CMOS integrated circuits. Testchip methodology intended especially for users of custom integratedcircuit wafers. Test-Chip Designs and Testing Procedures (including datareduction procedures) generated automatically by computer from programed design and testing rules and from information supplied by user.

  6. Microluminometer chip and method to measure bioluminescence

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Paulus, Michael J [Knoxville, TN; Sayler, Gary S [Blaine, TN; Applegate, Bruce M [West Lafayette, IN; Ripp, Steven A [Knoxville, TN

    2008-05-13

    An integrated microluminometer includes an integrated circuit chip having at least one n-well/p-substrate junction photodetector for converting light received into a photocurrent, and a detector on the chip for processing the photocurrent. A distributed electrode configuration including a plurality of spaced apart electrodes disposed on an active region of the photodetector is preferably used to raise efficiency.

  7. Microchannel cooling of face down bounded chips

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1992-12-31

    The present invention relates to cooling high power integrated circuits; and particularly to microchannel cooling of integrated circuits bonded face down on circuit boards, such as by flip-chip bonding. Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multichip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

  8. Microchannel cooling of face down bonded chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1993-06-08

    Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multi chip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

  9. Teaching Quality Control with Chocolate Chip Cookies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ardith

    2014-01-01

    Chocolate chip cookies are used to illustrate the importance and effectiveness of control charts in Statistical Process Control. By counting the number of chocolate chips, creating the spreadsheet, calculating the control limits and graphing the control charts, the student becomes actively engaged in the learning process. In addition, examining…

  10. Extreme Ultraviolet Solar Spectroscopy with CHIPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Mark V.; Sasseen, T. P.; Sirk, M.; Marchant, W.; McDonald, J.; Thorsness, J.; Lewis, M.; Woods, T.

    2006-12-01

    The Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer (CHIPS) can be utilized to collect extreme ultraviolet spectra of the full solar disk. CHIPS has been collecting solar spectra since late 2005, although the observation geometry was not standardized until April 2006. Since that time, CHIPS has been accumulating spectra on nearly a daily basis. As for the diffuse emission that CHIPS was designed to observe, the bandpass is about 90 to 260 Å, with a peak resolution (λ/Δλ) of about 100. The instrumental efficiency as a function of wavelength is expected to be stable, but is subject to an overall scale factor that is less certain. We explain how CHIPS can collect these spectra, and present representative results.

  11. CHIPS: The Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, W. V.; Hurwitz, M.; Jelinsky, P.; Welsh, B. Y.; Edelstein, J. E.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; McKee, C. F.; Malina, R. F.; Hawkins, I.; Vallerga, J. V.; Breitschwerdt, D.; Slavin, J.

    1998-12-01

    The Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer (CHIPS), a University-Class Explorer (UNEX) mission, will carry out all-sky spectroscopy of the diffuse background at wavelengths from 90 to 260 Angstroms with a peak resolution of lambda / 150 (about 0.5 eV). CHIPS data will help determine the electron temperature, ionization conditions, and cooling mechanisms of the million-degree plasma believed to fill the local interstellar bubble. The majority of the luminosity from diffuse million-degree plasma is expected to emerge in the poorly-explored CHIPS band, making CHIPS data of relevance in a wide variety of Galactic and extragalactic astrophysical environments. The compact CHIPS instrument will be accommodated aboard a commercial FAISAT communications spacecraft currently scheduled for launch in mid to late 2001.

  12. 75 FR 447 - In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Chips With Minimized Chip Package Size and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Certain Semiconductor Chips With Minimized Chip Package Size and Products Containing Same (III); Notice of... States after importation of certain semiconductor chips with minimized chip package size or products... Semiconductor Corporation of Hsinchu, Taiwan; ProMOS Technologies, Inc. of Hsinchu, Taiwan; Ramaxel...

  13. Identification of Potential Anticancer Activities of Novel Ganoderma lucidum Extracts Using Gene Expression and Pathway Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chi H.J.; Bishop, Karen S.; Xu, Yuanye; Han, Dug Yeo; Murray, Pamela M.; Marlow, Gareth J.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (lingzhi) has been used for the general promotion of health in Asia for many centuries. The common method of consumption is to boil lingzhi in water and then drink the liquid. In this study, we examined the potential anticancer activities of G. lucidum submerged in two commonly consumed forms of alcohol in East Asia: malt whiskey and rice wine. The anticancer effect of G. lucidum, using whiskey and rice wine-based extraction methods, has not been previously reported. The growth inhibition of G. lucidum whiskey and rice wine extracts on the prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and DU145, was determined. Using Affymetrix gene expression assays, several biologically active pathways associated with the anticancer activities of G. lucidum extracts were identified. Using gene expression analysis (real-time polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) and protein analysis (Western blotting), we confirmed the expression of key genes and their associated proteins that were initially identified with Affymetrix gene expression analysis. PMID:27006591

  14. Gender-specific gene expression in post-mortem human brain: localization to sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Vawter, Marquis P; Evans, Simon; Choudary, Prabhakara; Tomita, Hiroaki; Meador-Woodruff, Jim; Molnar, Margherita; Li, Jun; Lopez, Juan F; Myers, Rick; Cox, David; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Bunney, William E

    2004-02-01

    Gender differences in brain development and in the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression have been reported. Gender differences in human brain might be related to patterns of gene expression. Microarray technology is one useful method for investigation of gene expression in brain. We investigated gene expression, cell types, and regional expression patterns of differentially expressed sex chromosome genes in brain. We profiled gene expression in male and female dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and cerebellum using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platform. Differentially expressed genes between males and females on the Y chromosome (DBY, SMCY, UTY, RPS4Y, and USP9Y) and X chromosome (XIST) were confirmed using real-time PCR measurements. In situ hybridization confirmed the differential expression of gender-specific genes and neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY in three brain regions examined. The XIST gene, which silences gene expression on regions of the X chromosome, is expressed in a subset of neurons. Since a subset of neurons express gender-specific genes, neural subpopulations may exhibit a subtle sexual dimorphism at the level of differences in gene regulation and function. The distinctive pattern of neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY and other sex chromosome genes in neuronal subpopulations may possibly contribute to gender differences in prevalence noted for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of the protein expression of these sex-chromosome-linked genes in brain tissue are required to address the functional consequences of the observed gene expression differences.

  15. Analysis of baseline gene expression levels from ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The use of gene expression profiling to predict chemical mode of action would be enhanced by better characterization of variance due to individual, environmental, and technical factors. Meta-analysis of microarray data from untreated or vehicle-treated animals within the control arm of toxicogenomics studies has yielded useful information on baseline fluctuations in gene expression. A dataset of control animal microarray expression data was assembled by a working group of the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's Technical Committee on the Application of Genomics in Mechanism Based Risk Assessment in order to provide a public resource for assessments of variability in baseline gene expression. Data from over 500 Affymetrix microarrays from control rat liver and kidney were collected from 16 different institutions. Thirty-five biological and technical factors were obtained for each animal, describing a wide range of study characteristics, and a subset were evaluated in detail for their contribution to total variability using multivariate statistical and graphical techniques. The study factors that emerged as key sources of variability included gender, organ section, strain, and fasting state. These and other study factors were identified as key descriptors that should be included in the minimal information about a toxicogenomics study needed for interpretation of results by an independent source. Genes that are the most and least variable, gender-selectiv

  16. Temporal Changes in Gene Expression Profile during Mature Adipocyte Dedifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Julie Anne; Guénard, Frédéric; Lessard, Julie; Lapointe, Marc; Biron, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To characterize changes in gene expression profile during human mature adipocyte dedifferentiation in ceiling culture. Methods. Subcutaneous (SC) and omental (OM) adipose tissue samples were obtained from 4 participants paired for age and BMI. Isolated adipocytes were dedifferentiated in ceiling culture. Gene expression analysis at days 0, 4, 7, and 12 of the cultures was performed using Affymetrix Human Gene 2.0 STvi arrays. Hierarchical clustering according to similarity of expression changes was used to identify overrepresented functions. Results. Four clusters gathered genes with similar expression between day 4 to day 7 but decreasing expression from day 7 to day 12. Most of these genes coded for proteins involved in adipocyte functions (LIPE, PLIN1, DGAT2, PNPLA2, ADIPOQ, CEBPA, LPL, FABP4, SCD, INSR, and LEP). Expression of several genes coding for proteins implicated in cellular proliferation and growth or cell cycle increased significantly from day 7 to day 12 (WNT5A, KITLG, and FGF5). Genes coding for extracellular matrix proteins were differentially expressed between days 0, 4, 7, and 12 (COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL6A3, MMP1, and TGFB1). Conclusion. Dedifferentiation is associated with downregulation of transcripts encoding proteins involved in mature adipocyte functions and upregulation of genes involved in matrix remodeling, cellular development, and cell cycle.

  17. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM.

  18. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Malba, V.

    1999-08-03

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips is disclosed. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM. 12 figs.

  19. Analysis of the toxicogenomic effects of exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Slovakian girls: correlations between gene expression and disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Partha Sarathi; Ghosh, Somiranjan; Zang, Shizhu; Sonneborn, Dean; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Trnovec, Tomas; Palkovicova, Lubica; Sovcikova, Eva; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Hoffman, Eric; Dutta, Sisir K.

    2011-01-01

    . Global gene expression analysis using a microarray (Affymetrix Gene Chip Human genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array) platform was conducted on the total RNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the girls. The results were analyzed by Partek GS, Louis, MI, which identified twelve genes (ATAD2B, BIVM, CD96, CXorf39, CYTH1 ETNK1, FAM13A, HIRA, INO80B, ODG1, RAD23B, and TSGA14) and two unidentified probe sets, as regulated differentially in both the PCB and OTP groups against the control group. The qRT-PCR method was used to validate the microarray results. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software package identified the possible molecular impairments and disease risks associated with each gene set. Connective tissue disorders, genetic disorders, skeletal muscular disorders and neurological diseases were associated with the 12 common genes. The data therefore identified the potential molecular effects of POP exposure on a genomic level. This report underscores the importance of further study to validate the results in a random population and to evaluate the use of the identified genes as biomarkers for POP exposure. PMID:22208759

  20. Self-powered integrated systems-on-chip (energy chip)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. M.; Fahad, H.; Rojas, J.; Hasan, M.; Talukdar, A.; Oommen, J.; Mink, J.

    2010-04-01

    In today's world, consumer driven technology wants more portable electronic gadgets to be developed, and the next big thing in line is self-powered handheld devices. Therefore to reduce the power consumption as well as to supply sufficient power to run those devices, several critical technical challenges need to be overcome: a. Nanofabrication of macro/micro systems which incorporates the direct benefit of light weight (thus portability), low power consumption, faster response, higher sensitivity and batch production (low cost). b. Integration of advanced nano-materials to meet the performance/cost benefit trend. Nano-materials may offer new functionalities that were previously underutilized in the macro/micro dimension. c. Energy efficiency to reduce power consumption and to supply enough power to meet that low power demand. We present a pragmatic perspective on a self-powered integrated System on Chip (SoC). We envision the integrated device will have two objectives: low power consumption/dissipation and on-chip power generation for implementation into handheld or remote technologies for defense, space, harsh environments and medical applications. This paper provides insight on materials choices, intelligent circuit design, and CMOS compatible integration.

  1. Analysis of DNA-chip and antigen-chip data: studies of cancer, stem cells and autoimmune diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domany, Eytan

    2005-07-01

    Biology has undergone a revolution during the past decade. Deciphering the human genome has opened new horizons, among which the advent of DNA microarrays has been perhaps the most significant. These miniature measuring devices report the levels at which tens of thousands of genes are expressed in a collection of cells of interest (such as tissue from a tumor). I describe here briefly this technology and present an example of how analysis of data obtained from such high throughput experiments provides insights of possible clinical and therapeutic relevance for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Next, I describe how gene expression data is used to deduce a new design principle, " Just In Case", used by stem cells. Finally I briefly review a different novel technology, of antigen chips, which provide a fingerprint of a subject's immune system and may become a predictive clinical tool. The work reviewed here was done in collaboration with numerous colleagues and students.

  2. Three dimensional, multi-chip module

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Petersen, R.W.

    1992-12-31

    The present invention relates to integrated circuit packaging technology, and particularly to three dimensional packages involving high density stacks of integrated circuits. A plurality of multi-chip modules are stacked and bonded around the perimeter by sold-bump bonds to adjacent modules on, for instance, three sides of the perimeter. The fourth side can be used for coolant distribution, for more interconnect structures, or other features, depending on particular design considerations of the chip set. The multi-chip modules comprise a circuit board, having a planarized interconnect structure formed on a first major surface, and integrated circuit chips bonded to the planarized interconnect surface. Around the periphery of each circuit board, long, narrow ``dummy chips`` are bonded to the finished circuit board to form a perimeter wall. The wall is higher than any of the chips on the circuit board, so that the flat back surface of the board above will only touch the perimeter wall. Module-to-module interconnect is laser-patterned on the sides of the boards and over the perimeter wall in the same way and at the same time that chip to board interconnect may be laser-patterned.

  3. Microchannel cooling of face down bonded chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1993-01-01

    Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multichip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

  4. Construction of a versatile SNP array for pyramiding useful genes of rice.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Yusuke; Noda, Tomonori; Yamagata, Yoshiyuki; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn; Sunohara, Hidehiko; Uehara, Kanako; Furuta, Tomoyuki; Nagai, Keisuke; Jena, Kshirod Kumar; Yasui, Hideshi; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Doi, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection (MAS) has become an indispensable component of breeding. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are the most frequent polymorphism in the rice genome. However, SNP markers are not readily employed in MAS because of limitations in genotyping platforms. Here the authors report a Golden Gate SNP array that targets specific genes controlling yield-related traits and biotic stress resistance in rice. As a first step, the SNP genotypes were surveyed in 31 parental varieties using the Affymetrix Rice 44K SNP microarray. The haplotype information for 16 target genes was then converted to the Golden Gate platform with 143-plex markers. Haplotypes for the 14 useful allele are unique and can discriminate among all other varieties. The genotyping consistency between the Affymetrix microarray and the Golden Gate array was 92.8%, and the accuracy of the Golden Gate array was confirmed in 3 F2 segregating populations. The concept of the haplotype-based selection by using the constructed SNP array was proofed.

  5. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTURE TOOTH MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The applicability of the edge chipping method to denture tooth materials was assessed. These are softer materials than those usually tested by edge chipping. The edge chipping fracture resistances of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) based and two filled resin composite denture tooth materials were compared. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to chip rectangular blocks and flattened anterior denture teeth. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Between 20 and 65 chips were made per condition depending upon the material, the scatter, and the indenter type. Different indenter types were used including Rockwell C, sharp conical 120°, Knoop, and Vickers. The edge toughness, Te, was evaluated for different indenter types. Results The edge chipping data collected on the blocks matched the data collected from flattened teeth. High scatter, particularly at large distances and loads, meant that many tests (up to 64) were necessary to compare the denture tooth materials and to ascertain the appropriate data trends. A linear force – distance trend analysis was adequate for comparing these materials. A power law trend might be more appropriate, but the large scatter obscured the definitive determination of the precise trend. Different indenters produce different linear trends, with the ranking of: sharp conical 120°, Rockwell C, and Knoop, from lowest to highest edge toughness. Vickers indenter data were extremely scattered and a sensible trend could not be obtained. Edge toughness was inversely correlated to hardness. Significance Edge chipping data collected either from simple laboratory scale test blocks or from actual denture teeth may be used to evaluate denture materials. The edge chipping method’s applicability has been extended to another class of restorative materials. PMID:24674342

  6. Chip-based Three-dimensional Cell Culture in Perfused Micro-bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Gottwald, Eric; Lahni, Brigitte; Thiele, David; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Welle, Alexander; Weibezahn, Karl-Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a chip-based cell culture system for the three-dimensional cultivation of cells. The chip is typically manufactured from non-biodegradable polymers, e.g., polycarbonate or polymethyl methacrylate by micro injection molding, micro hot embossing or micro thermoforming. But, it can also be manufactured from bio-degradable polymers. Its overall dimensions are 0.7 1 x 20 x 20 x 0.7 1 mm (h x w x l). The main features of the chips used are either a grid of up to 1156 cubic micro-containers (cf-chip) each the size of 120-300 x 300 x 300 μ (h x w x l) or round recesses with diameters of 300 μ and a depth of 300 μ (r-chip). The scaffold can house 10 Mio. cells in a three-dimensional configuration. For an optimal nutrient and gas supply, the chip is inserted in a bioreactor housing. The bioreactor is part of a closed steril circulation loop that, in the simplest configuration, is additionaly comprised of a roller pump and a medium reservoir with a gas supply. The bioreactor can be run in perfusion, superfusion, or even a mixed operation mode. We have successfully cultivated cell lines as well as primary cells over periods of several weeks. For rat primary liver cells we could show a preservation of organotypic functions for more than 2 weeks. For hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines we could show the induction of liver specific genes not or only slightly expressed in standard monolayer culture. The system might also be useful as a stem cell cultivation system since first differentiation experiments with stem cell lines were promising. PMID:19066592

  7. Physiologically relevant organs on chips.

    PubMed

    Yum, Kyungsuk; Hong, Soon Gweon; Healy, Kevin E; Lee, Luke P

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in integrating microengineering and tissue engineering have generated promising microengineered physiological models for experimental medicine and pharmaceutical research. Here we review the recent development of microengineered physiological systems, or also known as "ogans-on-chips", that reconstitute the physiologically critical features of specific human tissues and organs and their interactions. This technology uses microengineering approaches to construct organ-specific microenvironments, reconstituting tissue structures, tissue-tissue interactions and interfaces, and dynamic mechanical and biochemical stimuli found in specific organs, to direct cells to assemble into functional tissues. We first discuss microengineering approaches to reproduce the key elements of physiologically important, dynamic mechanical microenvironments, biochemical microenvironments, and microarchitectures of specific tissues and organs in microfluidic cell culture systems. This is followed by examples of microengineered individual organ models that incorporate the key elements of physiological microenvironments into single microfluidic cell culture systems to reproduce organ-level functions. Finally, microengineered multiple organ systems that simulate multiple organ interactions to better represent human physiology, including human responses to drugs, is covered in this review. This emerging organs-on-chips technology has the potential to become an alternative to 2D and 3D cell culture and animal models for experimental medicine, human disease modeling, drug development, and toxicology.

  8. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kangning; Dai, Wen; Zhou, Jianhua; Su, Jing; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-05-17

    Although microfluidics has shown exciting potential, its broad applications are significantly limited by drawbacks of the materials used to make them. In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents. Compared with other microfluidic materials [e.g., poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)] the whole-Teflon chip has a few more advantages, such as no absorption of small molecules, little adsorption of biomolecules onto channel walls, and no leaching of residue molecules from the material bulk into the solution in the channel. Various biological cells have been cultured in the whole-Teflon channel. Adherent cells can attach to the channel bottom, spread, and proliferate well in the channels (with similar proliferation rate to the cells in PDMS channels with the same dimensions). The moderately good gas permeability of the Teflon materials makes it suitable to culture cells inside the microchannels for a long time.

  9. Apoptosis-related genes change their expression with age and hearing loss in the mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Sherif F.; D’Souza, Mary; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2010-01-01

    To understand possible causative roles of apoptosis gene regulation in age-related hearing loss (presbycusis), apoptotic gene expression patterns in the CBA mouse cochlea of four different age and hearing loss groups were compared, using GeneChip and real-time (qPCR) microarrays. GeneChip transcriptional expression patterns of 318 apoptosis-related genes were analyzed. Thirty eight probes (35 genes) showed significant differences in expression. The significant gene families include Caspases, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma2 family, P53, Cal-pains, Mitogen activated protein kinase family, Jun oncogene, Nuclear factor of kappa light chain gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor-related and tumor necrosis factor-related genes. The GeneChip results of 31 genes were validated using the new TaqMan® Low Density Array (TLDA). Eight genes showed highly correlated results with the GeneChip data. These genes are: activating transcription factor3, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma2, Bcl2-like1, caspase4 apoptosis-related cysteine protease 4, Calpain2, dual specificity phosphatase9, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member12a, and Tumor necrosis factor superfamily member13b, suggesting they may play critical roles in inner ear aging. PMID:18839313

  10. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  11. A palmtop PCR system with a disposable polymer chip operated by the thermosiphon effect.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kwang Hyo; Park, Se Ho; Choi, Yo Han

    2010-01-21

    A small thermocyling system to perform DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is presented in this report. PCR reactants are convected along a triangular closed-loop channel in a polymer chip by the thermosiphon effect. In an effort to develop a convection-based PCR for real application, we adopted a molded channel to define the flow path inside the chip, so that the chip may be suitable for disposability together with the merits of LOC; mass production, versatile integration and facile handling. We developed the geometry of the flow loop that made it easier to load the PCR reactants without air pockets inside. Based on systematic simulations and theoretical considerations of buoyant flows, the loop channel was designed to acquire an optimized flow for PCR. A PCR sample was dropped on a chip to fill the loop channel, and the chip was inserted into a slot of a heating block unit that was composed of three metal blocks with different temperatures. The temperature differences within the closed loop gave rise to buoyancy differences and the liquid reactant continuously circulated along the closed loop by the thermosiphon effect. Because there was no loss of time among the temperature shifts in the reaction steps, approximately 10 min were sufficient for the detectable amplification of 127 bp target gene from 10 pg microl(-1) of PCR fragments. In addition, it took 20 min for the mass amplification of 470 bp gene from PCR fragments or genomic DNA. The entire PCR system is compact enough even to be palmtop because it requires only a tiny temperature controller for a self-actuated thermosiphon flow. This thermocycling system would be a prototypical model for the field application of PCR.

  12. Voltage Regulator Chip: Power Supplies on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: CPES at Virginia Tech is finding ways to save real estate on a computer's motherboard that could be used for other critical functions. Every computer processor today contains a voltage regulator that automatically maintains a constant level of electricity entering the device. These regulators contain bulky components and take up about 30% of a computer's motherboard. CPES at Virginia Tech is developing a voltage regulator that uses semiconductors made of gallium nitride on silicon (GaN-on-Si) and high-frequency soft magnetic material. These materials are integrated on a small, 3D chip that can handle the same amount of power as traditional voltage regulators at 1/10 the size and with improved efficiency. The small size also frees up to 90% of the motherboard space occupied by current voltage regulators.

  13. Accelerator on a Chip: How It Works

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-30

    In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice.

  14. Transformation optics: Gravitational lens on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    2013-11-01

    Massive objects in space act as gravitational lenses, bending and focusing light. Scientists have now created a photonic analogue of a gravitational lens on a chip, and have shown that it is strong enough to force light into orbits.

  15. IC chip stress during plastic package molding

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Benson, D.A.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

    1998-02-01

    Approximately 95% of the world`s integrated chips are packaged using a hot, high pressure transfer molding process. The stress created by the flow of silica powder loaded epoxy can displace the fine bonding wires and can even distort the metalization patterns under the protective chip passivation layer. In this study the authors developed a technique to measure the mechanical stress over the surface of an integrated circuit during the molding process. A CMOS test chip with 25 diffused resistor stress sensors was applied to a commercial lead frame. Both compression and shear stresses were measured at all 25 locations on the surface of the chip every 50 milliseconds during molding. These measurements have a fine time and stress resolution which should allow comparison with computer simulation of the molding process, thus allowing optimization of both the manufacturing process and mold geometry.

  16. Fundamental optics: On-chip Casimir effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.

    2017-02-01

    Measurement of the forces that arise from quantum vacuum fluctuations between closely spaced surfaces typically requires large apparatus, making applications difficult. Now, an experiment on a silicon chip to measure the Casimir force has been realized.

  17. The processing technology of PMMA micro-fluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lili; Rong, Li; Guo, Shuheng; Liu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    In order to enrich the production method of micro-fluidic chip and simplify its processing technology, the paper discussed the double-sided adhesive layer for channel layer, with PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) for fabrication of microfluidic chip with the cover plate and the bottom plate. Taking 40 mm (long) x 20 mm (wide) x 2.2 mm (thick) liquid drop to separate the microfluidic chip as an example, details the design and machining process of the chip. Experiments show that surface quality is high and processing speed is fast when using this technology to process the chip. Thus, it can realize the mass production of micro fluidic chip.

  18. Identification of Cancer Related Genes Using a Comprehensive Map of Human Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lukk, Margus; Xue, Vincent; Parkinson, Helen; Rung, Johan; Brazma, Alvis

    2016-01-01

    Rapid accumulation and availability of gene expression datasets in public repositories have enabled large-scale meta-analyses of combined data. The richness of cross-experiment data has provided new biological insights, including identification of new cancer genes. In this study, we compiled a human gene expression dataset from ∼40,000 publicly available Affymetrix HG-U133Plus2 arrays. After strict quality control and data normalisation the data was quantified in an expression matrix of ∼20,000 genes and ∼28,000 samples. To enable different ways of sample grouping, existing annotations where subjected to systematic ontology assisted categorisation and manual curation. Groups like normal tissues, neoplasmic tissues, cell lines, homoeotic cells and incompletely differentiated cells were created. Unsupervised analysis of the data confirmed global structure of expression consistent with earlier analysis but with more details revealed due to increased resolution. A suitable mixed-effects linear model was used to further investigate gene expression in solid tissue tumours, and to compare these with the respective healthy solid tissues. The analysis identified 1,285 genes with systematic expression change in cancer. The list is significantly enriched with known cancer genes from large, public, peer-reviewed databases, whereas the remaining ones are proposed as new cancer gene candidates. The compiled dataset is publicly available in the ArrayExpress Archive. It contains the most diverse collection of biological samples, making it the largest systematically annotated gene expression dataset of its kind in the public domain. PMID:27322383

  19. Protocol: Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) methodology to investigate histone modifications in two model diatom species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this report we describe a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol for two fully sequenced model diatom species Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. This protocol allows the extraction of satisfactory amounts of chromatin and gives reproducible results. We coupled the ChIP assay with real time quantitative PCR. Our results reveal that the two major histone marks H3K4me2 and H3K9me2 exist in P. tricornutum and T. pseudonana. As in other eukaryotes, H3K4me2 marks active genes whereas H3K9me2 marks transcriptionally inactive transposable elements. Unexpectedly however, T. pseudonana housekeeping genes also show a relative enrichment of H3K9me2. We also discuss optimization of the procedure, including growth conditions, cross linking and sonication. Validation of the protocol provides a set of genes and transposable elements that can be used as controls for studies using ChIP in each diatom species. This protocol can be easily adapted to other diatoms and eukaryotic phytoplankton species for genetic and biochemical studies. PMID:23217141

  20. Microarray analysis of Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours reveals characteristic gene expression signatures associated with metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Karl-Ludwig; Eisenacher, Martin; Braun, Yvonne; Brachwitz, Kristin; Wai, Daniel H; Dirksen, Uta; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Juergens, Heribert; Herrero, David; Stegmaier, Sabine; Koscielniak, Ewa; Eggert, Angelika; Nathrath, Michaela; Gosheger, Georg; Schneider, Dominik T; Bury, Carsten; Diallo-Danebrock, Raihanatou; Ottaviano, Laura; Gabbert, Helmut E; Poremba, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    In Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours (ESFT), the clinically most adverse prognostic parameters are the presence of tumour metastasis at time of diagnosis and poor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. To identify genes differentially regulated between metastatic and localised tumours, we analysed 27 ESFT specimens using Affymetrix microarrays. Functional annotation of differentially regulated genes revealed 29 over-represented pathways including PDGF, TP53, NOTCH, and WNT1-signalling. Regression of primary tumours (n=20) induced by polychemotherapy was found to be correlated with the expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, apoptosis, ubiquitin proteasome pathway, and PI3 kinase and p53 pathways. These findings could be confirmed by in vitro cytotoxicity assays. A set of 46 marker genes correctly classifies these 20 tumours as responding versus non-responding. We conclude that expression signatures of initial tumour biopsies can help to identify ESFT patients at high risk to develop tumour metastasis or to suffer from a therapy refractory cancer.

  1. Microfabrication of human organs-on-chips.

    PubMed

    Huh, Dongeun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Fraser, Jacob P; Shea, Daniel E; Khan, Mohammed; Bahinski, Anthony; Hamilton, Geraldine A; Ingber, Donald E

    2013-11-01

    'Organs-on-chips' are microengineered biomimetic systems containing microfluidic channels lined by living human cells, which replicate key functional units of living organs to reconstitute integrated human organ-level pathophysiology in vitro. These microdevices can be used to test efficacy and toxicity of drugs and chemicals, and to create in vitro models of human disease. Thus, they potentially represent low-cost alternatives to conventional animal models for pharmaceutical, chemical and environmental applications. Here we describe a protocol for the fabrication, microengineering and operation of these microfluidic organ-on-chip systems. First, microengineering is used to fabricate a multilayered microfluidic device that contains two parallel elastomeric microchannels separated by a thin porous flexible membrane, along with two full-height, hollow vacuum chambers on either side; this requires ∼3.5 d to complete. To create a 'breathing' lung-on-a-chip that mimics the mechanically active alveolar-capillary interface of the living human lung, human alveolar epithelial cells and microvascular endothelial cells are cultured in the microdevice with physiological flow and cyclic suction applied to the side chambers to reproduce rhythmic breathing movements. We describe how this protocol can be easily adapted to develop other human organ chips, such as a gut-on-a-chip lined by human intestinal epithelial cells that experiences peristalsis-like motions and trickling fluid flow. Also, we discuss experimental techniques that can be used to analyze the cells in these organ-on-chip devices.

  2. Advanced atom chips with two metal layers.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Benito, Francisco M.; Biedermann, Grant

    2010-12-01

    A design concept, device layout, and monolithic microfabrication processing sequence have been developed for a dual-metal layer atom chip for next-generation positional control of ultracold ensembles of trapped atoms. Atom chips are intriguing systems for precision metrology and quantum information that use ultracold atoms on microfabricated chips. Using magnetic fields generated by current carrying wires, atoms are confined via the Zeeman effect and controllably positioned near optical resonators. Current state-of-the-art atom chips are single-layer or hybrid-integrated multilayer devices with limited flexibility and repeatability. An attractive feature of multi-level metallization is the ability to construct more complicated conductor patterns and thereby realize the complex magnetic potentials necessary for the more precise spatial and temporal control of atoms that is required. Here, we have designed a true, monolithically integrated, planarized, multi-metal-layer atom chip for demonstrating crossed-wire conductor patterns that trap and controllably transport atoms across the chip surface to targets of interest.

  3. Miniaturization of Chip-Scale Photonic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamek, Steve

    Chip-scale photonic circuits promise to alleviate some fundamental physical barriers encountered in many areas of the life sciences and information technologies. This work investigates routes to miniaturization of chip-scale optical devices. Two new techniques and devices based thereon are introduced for the first time. One technique makes use of integrated metallic mirrors to construct reflectors which are by an order of magnitude smaller than their counterparts. Another technique is based on folding of chip-scale devices to fit long structures into small area on a chip. Although both techniques are demonstrated on some specific examples, the developed toolkit is applicable to a wide range of chip-scale devices including modulators, filters, channel add-drop multiplexers, detectors, and others. The major part of this Thesis focuses on miniaturization of waveguide reflectors and the devices based thereon. Fitting long waveguide Bragg gratings into a small area on a chip is demonstrated based on curved waveguide Bragg gratings; theory and analytical model of such structures is developed. In the second part of the Thesis, integrated metallic mirrors are proposed as reflectors with properties complementary to Bragg gratings - low polarization sensitivity, high reflectivity for different transverse modes, and good manufacturability. The feasibility of the proposed ideas is tested in both simulations and experiments. The demonstrated devices including biochemical sensors, micro-resonators, and inline filters are promising for applications in the life sciences and information technologies.

  4. Oligonucleotide-arrayed TFT photosensor applicable for DNA chip technology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Hatakeyama, Keiichi; Sawaguchi, Masahiro; Iwadate, Akihito; Mizutani, Yasushi; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Tateishi, Naofumi; Takeyama, Haruko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2006-09-05

    A thin film transistor (TFT) photosensor fabricated by semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) technology was applied to DNA chip technology. The surface of the TFT photosensor was coated with TiO2 using a vapor deposition technique for the fabrication of optical filters. The immobilization of thiolated oligonucleotide probes onto a TiO2-coated TFT photosensor using gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and N-(gamma-maleimidobutyloxy) sulfosuccinimide ester (GMBS) was optimized. The coverage value of immobilized oligonucleotides reached a plateau at 33.7 pmol/cm2, which was similar to a previous analysis using radioisotope-labeled oligonucleotides. The lowest detection limits were 0.05 pmol/cm2 for quantum dot and 2.1 pmol/cm2 for Alexa Fluor 350. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection was examined using the oligonucleotide-arrayed TFT photosensor. A SNP present in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene was used as a target. The SNPs in ALDH2*1 and ALDH2*2 target DNA were detected successfully using the TFT photosensor. DNA hybridization in the presence of both ALDH2*1 and ALDH2*2 target DNA was observed using both ALDH2*1 and ALDH2*2 detection oligonucleotides-arrayed TFT photosensor. Use of the TFT photosensor will allow the development of a disposable photodetecting device for DNA chip systems.

  5. BLOOD-ON-A-CHIP

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Mehmet; Irimia, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, fast, and affordable analysis of the cellular component of blood is of prime interest for medicine and research. Yet, most often sample preparation procedures for blood analysis involve handling steps prone to introducing artifacts, whereas analysis methods commonly require skilled technicians and well-equipped, expensive laboratories. Developing more gentle protocols and affordable instruments for specific blood analysis tasks is becoming possible through the recent progress in the area of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip-type devices. Precise control over the cell microenvironment during separation procedures and the ability to scale down the analysis to very small volumes of blood are among the most attractive capabilities of the new approaches. Here we review some of the emerging principles for manipulating blood cells at microscale and promising high-throughput approaches to blood cell separation using microdevices. Examples of specific single-purpose devices are described together with integration strategies for blood cell separation and analysis modules. PMID:16004567

  6. Microfluidic organs-on-chips.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Ingber, Donald E

    2014-08-01

    An organ-on-a-chip is a microfluidic cell culture device created with microchip manufacturing methods that contains continuously perfused chambers inhabited by living cells arranged to simulate tissue- and organ-level physiology. By recapitulating the multicellular architectures, tissue-tissue interfaces, physicochemical microenvironments and vascular perfusion of the body, these devices produce levels of tissue and organ functionality not possible with conventional 2D or 3D culture systems. They also enable high-resolution, real-time imaging and in vitro analysis of biochemical, genetic and metabolic activities of living cells in a functional tissue and organ context. This technology has great potential to advance the study of tissue development, organ physiology and disease etiology. In the context of drug discovery and development, it should be especially valuable for the study of molecular mechanisms of action, prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing and biomarker identification.

  7. Chip Scale Package Implementation Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    1998-01-01

    The JPL-led MicrotypeBGA Consortium of enterprises representing government agencies and private companies have jointed together to pool in-kind resources for developing the quality and reliability of chip scale packages (CSPs) for a variety of projects. In the process of building the Consortium CSP test vehicles, many challenges were identified regarding various aspects of technology implementation. This paper will present our experience in the areas of technology implementation challenges, including design and building both standard and microvia boards, and assembly of two types of test vehicles. We also discuss the most current package isothermal aging to 2,000 hours at 100 C and 125 C and thermal cycling test results to 1,700 cycles in the range of -30 to 100 C.

  8. Effects of neonatal stress and morphine on murine hippocampal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sandra E; Beyer, Richard P; Bammler, Theo K; Farin, Federico M; Gleason, Christine A

    2011-04-01

    Critically ill preterm infants experience multiple stressors while hospitalized. Morphine is commonly prescribed to ameliorate their pain and stress. We hypothesized that neonatal stress will have a dose-dependent effect on hippocampal gene expression, and these effects will be altered by morphine treatment. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to five treatment conditions between postnatal d 5 and 9: 1) control, 2) mild stress + saline, 3) mild stress + morphine, 4) severe stress + saline, and 5) severe stress + morphine. Hippocampal RNA was extracted and analyzed using Affymetrix Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Single gene analysis and gene set analysis were used to compare groups with validation by qPCR. Stress resulted in enrichment of gene sets related to fear response, oxygen carrying capacity, and NMDA receptor synthesis. Morphine down-regulated gene sets related to immune function. Stress + morphine resulted in enrichment of mitochondrial electron transport gene sets and down-regulation of gene sets related to brain development and growth. We conclude that neonatal stress alone influences hippocampal gene expression, and morphine alters a subset of stress-related changes in gene expression and influences other gene sets. Stress + morphine show interaction effects not present with either stimulus alone. These changes may alter neurodevelopment.

  9. On-chip positionable photonic waveguides for chip-to-chip optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Tjitte-Jelte; Tichem, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on the progress related to a multichannel photonic alignment concept, aiming for sub-micrometer precision in the alignment of the waveguides of two photonic integrated circuits (PICs). The concept consists of two steps: chip-to-chip positioning and chip bonding provide a coarse alignment after which waveguide-to-waveguide positioning and fixing result in a fine alignment. For the waveguide-to-waveguide alignment, an alignment functionality is developed and integrated in one of the PICs, consisting of mechanically flexible waveguides and MEMS actuators. This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of a mechanically flexible waveguide array that can be positioned by two out-of-plane actuators. Thermal actuators are integrated with mechanically flexible waveguide beams to enable positioning them with high precision. By adding a poly-Si pattern on top of SiO2 beams, an out-of-plane bimorph actuator can be realized. An analytical model enables estimating the curvature and the deflection of a single bimorph beam. Acquiring a small initial deflection while having a large motion range of the actuator proves to have conflicting demands on the poly-Si/SiO2 thickness ratio. In this paper, we show that suspended waveguide arrays with integrated alignment functionality have an initial deflection- they curl up- due to residual stress in the materials. The actuators can be operated using a driving voltage between 0V to 45V, corresponding to ~50mW. Using higher voltages brings the risk of permanently changing the material properties of the heaters. The actuators can accomplish an out-of-plane crossbar translation up to 6.5 μm at ~50mW as well as a rotation around the propagation direction of the light ranging from -0:1° to 0.1°. At a constant actuation power of ~50mW, the crossbar shows a drift in vertical deflection of 0.16 μm over a time of 30 min.

  10. Vertical chip-to-chip coupling between silicon photonic integrated circuits using cantilever couplers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Reano, Ronald M

    2011-02-28

    We demonstrate vertical chip-to-chip light coupling using silicon strip waveguide cantilever couplers. The guided-wave couplers consist of silicon strip waveguides embedded within silicon dioxide cantilevers. The cantilevers deflect 90° out-of-plane via residual stress, allowing vertical light coupling between separate chips. A chip-to-chip coupling loss of 2.5 dB per connection is measured for TE polarization and 1.1 dB for TM polarization at 1550 nm wavelength. The coupling loss varies by less than±0.8 dB within the wavelength range from 1500 nm to 1565 nm for both polarizations. The couplers enable broadband and compact system architectures involving high speed vertical data transport between photonic integrated circuits.

  11. The RootChip: an integrated microfluidic chip for plant science.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Guido; Guo, Woei-Jiun; Ehrhardt, David W; Frommer, Wolf B; Sit, Rene V; Quake, Stephen R; Meier, Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Studying development and physiology of growing roots is challenging due to limitations regarding cellular and subcellular analysis under controlled environmental conditions. We describe a microfluidic chip platform, called RootChip, that integrates live-cell imaging of growth and metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana roots with rapid modulation of environmental conditions. The RootChip has separate chambers for individual regulation of the microenvironment of multiple roots from multiple seedlings in parallel. We demonstrate the utility of The RootChip by monitoring time-resolved growth and cytosolic sugar levels at subcellular resolution in plants by a genetically encoded fluorescence sensor for glucose and galactose. The RootChip can be modified for use with roots from other plant species by adapting the chamber geometry and facilitates the systematic analysis of root growth and metabolism from multiple seedlings, paving the way for large-scale phenotyping of root metabolism and signaling.

  12. Microarray Data Analysis of Space Grown Arabidopsis Leaves for Genes Important in Vascular Patterning. Analysis of Space Grown Arabidopsis with Microarray Data from GeneLab: Identification of Genes Important in Vascular Patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitzel, A. J.; Wyatt, S. E.; Parsons-Wingerter, P.

    2016-01-01

    Venation patterning in leaves is a major determinant of photosynthesis efficiency because of its dependency on vascular transport of photo-assimilates, water, and minerals. Arabidopsis thaliana grown in microgravity show delayed growth and leaf maturation. Gene expression data from the roots, hypocotyl, and leaves of A. thaliana grown during spaceflight vs. ground control analyzed by Affymetrix microarray are available through NASA's GeneLab (GLDS-7). We analyzed the data for differential expression of genes in leaves resulting from the effects of spaceflight on vascular patterning. Two genes were found by preliminary analysis to be up-regulated during spaceflight that may be related to vascular formation. The genes are responsible for coding an ARGOS (Auxin-Regulated Gene Involved in Organ Size)-like protein (potentially affecting cell elongation in the leaves), and an F-box/kelch-repeat protein (possibly contributing to protoxylem specification). Further analysis that will focus on raw data quality assessment and a moderated t-test may further confirm up-regulation of the two genes and/or identify other gene candidates. Plants defective in these genes will then be assessed for phenotype by the mapping and quantification of leaf vascular patterning by NASA's VESsel GENeration (VESGEN) software to model specific vascular differences of plants grown in spaceflight.

  13. Advanced Flip Chips in Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2010-01-01

    The use of underfill materials is necessary with flip-chip interconnect technology to redistribute stresses due to mismatching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) between dissimilar materials in the overall assembly. Underfills are formulated using organic polymers and possibly inorganic filler materials. There are a few ways to apply the underfills with flip-chip technology. Traditional capillary-flow underfill materials now possess high flow speed and reduced time to cure, but they still require additional processing steps beyond the typical surface-mount technology (SMT) assembly process. Studies were conducted using underfills in a temperature range of -190 to 85 C, which resulted in an increase of reliability by one to two orders of magnitude. Thermal shock of the flip-chip test articles was designed to induce failures at the interconnect sites (-40 to 100 C). The study on the reliability of flip chips using underfills in the extreme temperature region is of significant value for space applications. This technology is considered as an enabling technology for future space missions. Flip-chip interconnect technology is an advanced electrical interconnection approach where the silicon die or chip is electrically connected, face down, to the substrate by reflowing solder bumps on area-array metallized terminals on the die to matching footprints of solder-wettable pads on the chosen substrate. This advanced flip-chip interconnect technology will significantly improve the performance of high-speed systems, productivity enhancement over manual wire bonding, self-alignment during die joining, low lead inductances, and reduced need for attachment of precious metals. The use of commercially developed no-flow fluxing underfills provides a means of reducing the processing steps employed in the traditional capillary flow methods to enhance SMT compatibility. Reliability of flip chips may be significantly increased by matching/tailoring the CTEs of the substrate

  14. On-chip single-copy real-time reverse-transcription PCR in isolated picoliter droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Wheeler, E; Lee-Houghton, L; Watkins, N; Nasarabadi, S; Hebert, N; Leung, P; Arnold, D; Bailey, C; Colston, B

    2007-12-19

    The first lab-on-chip system for picoliter droplet generation and RNA isolation, followed by reverse transcription, and PCR amplification with real-time fluorescence detection in the trapped droplets has been developed. The system utilized a shearing T-junction in a fused silica device to generate a stream of monodisperse picoliter-scale droplets that were isolated from the microfluidic channel walls and each other by the oil phase carrier. An off-chip valving system stopped the droplets on-chip, allowing thermal cycling for reverse transcription and subsequent PCR amplification without droplet motion. This combination of the established real-time reverse transcription-PCR assay with digital microfluidics is ideal for isolating single-copy RNA and virions from a complex environment, and will be useful in viral discovery and gene-profiling applications.

  15. Enhancer-promoter communication mediated by Chip during Pannier-driven proneural patterning is regulated by Osa.

    PubMed

    Heitzler, Pascal; Vanolst, Luc; Biryukova, Inna; Ramain, Philippe

    2003-03-01

    The GATA factor Pannier activates proneural achaete/scute (ac/sc) expression during development of the sensory organs of Drosophila through enhancer binding. Chip bridges Pannier with the (Ac/Sc)-Daughterless heterodimers bound to the promoter and facilitates the enhancer-promoter communication required for proneural development. We show here that this communication is regulated by Osa, which is recruited by Pannier and Chip. Osa belongs to Brahma chromatin remodeling complexes and we show that Osa negatively regulates ac/sc. Consequently, Pannier and Chip also play an essential role during repression of proneural gene expression. Our study suggests that altering chromatin structure is essential for regulation of enhancer-promoter communication.

  16. Use of functional gene arrays for elucidating in situ biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Nostrand, Joy D. Van; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays have revolutionized the study of microbiology by providing a high-throughput method for examining thousands of genes with a single test and overcome the limitations of many culture-independent approaches. Functional gene arrays (FGA) probe a wide range of genes involved in a variety of functions of interest to microbial ecology (e.g., carbon degradation, N fixation, metal resistance) from many different microorganisms, cultured and uncultured. The most comprehensive FGA to date is the GeoChip array, which targets tens of thousands of genes involved in the geochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur, metal resistance and reduction, energy processing, antibiotic resistance and contaminant degradation as well as phylogenetic information (gyrB). Since the development of GeoChips, many studies have been performed using this FGA and have shown it to be a powerful tool for rapid, sensitive, and specific examination of microbial communities in a high-throughput manner. As such, the GeoChip is well-suited for linking geochemical processes with microbial community function and structure. This technology has been used successfully to examine microbial communities before, during, and after in situ bioremediation at a variety of contaminated sites. These studies have expanded our understanding of biodegradation and bioremediation processes and the associated microorganisms and environmental conditions responsible. This review provides an overview of FGA development with a focus on the GeoChip and highlights specific GeoChip studies involving in situ bioremediation. PMID:23049526

  17. Genome-Wide Screening of Alpha-Tocopherol Sensitive Genes in Heart Tissue from Alpha-Tocopherol Transfer Protein Null Mice (ATTP−/−)

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Vihas T.; Hobson, Brad; Gohil, Kishorchandra; Cross, Carroll E.

    2009-01-01

    Alpha tocopherol transfer protein (ATTP) null mice (ATTP−/−) have a systemic deficiency of alpha-tocopherol (AT). The heart AT levels of ATTP−/− are <10% of those in ATTP+/+ mice. The genomic responses of heart to AT deficiency were determined in 3 months old male ATTP−/− mice and compared with their ATTP+/+ littermate controls using Affymetrix 430A 2.0 high density oligonucleotide arrays. Differential analysis of ~13,000 genes identified repression of genes related to immune system and activation of genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammation with no significant change in the expression of classical antioxidant genes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) in ATTP−/− as compared to ATTP+/+ mice. The present data identifies novel classes of AT sensitive genes in heart tissue. PMID:17382327

  18. GeoChip 3.0: A High Throughput Tool for Analyzing Microbial Community, Composition, Structure, and Functional Activity

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhili; Deng, Ye; Nostrand, Joy Van; Tu, Qichao; Xu, Meiying; Hemme, Chris; Wu, Liyou; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Xingyuan; Gentry, Terry; Yin, Yifeng; Liebich, Jost

    2010-05-17

    Microarray-based genomic technology has been widely used for microbial community analysis, and it is expected that microarray-based genomic technologies will revolutionize the analysis of microbial community structure, function and dynamics. A new generation of functional gene arrays (GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with 27,812 probes covering 56,990 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance, and organic contaminant degradation. Those probes were derived from 2,744, 140, and 262 species for bacteria, archaea, and fungi, respectively. GeoChip 3.0 has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating, and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Our computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes had a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Also, experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036percent-0.025percent false positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which demonstrated that the structure, composition, and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. All results indicate that GeoChip 3.0 is a high throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning. To our knowledge, GeoChip 3.0 is the most comprehensive microarrays currently available for studying microbial communities associated with geobiochemical cycling, global climate change, bioenergy

  19. Chip forwarder for mobile in-woods chippers

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.R.; Gibson, H.G.; Krutz, G.W.; Pope, P.E.

    1984-01-01

    A forwarder-based prehauler to service a mobile, wholetree chip harvester was designed. The vacuum pneumatic conveyor uses airflow to load and unload chips, chips being fed into the airflow by rotating pipes with feed scoops and internal augers. Initial tests measured main parameters and confirmed concept feasibility. 12 references.

  20. 7. VIEW OF THE CHIP ROASTER LOCATED IN BUILDING 447. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF THE CHIP ROASTER LOCATED IN BUILDING 447. THE CHIP ROASTER BURNED URANIUM CHIPS FROM MACHINING AREAS TO AN OXIDE, A MORE STABLE FORM FOR DISPOSAL. (4/27/55) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  1. MicroRNA expression analysis using the Affymetrix Platform.

    PubMed

    Dee, Suzanne; Getts, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays have been used extensively for messenger RNA expression monitoring. Recently, microarrays have been designed to interrogate expression levels of noncoding RNAs. Here, we describe methods for RNA labeling and the use of a miRNA array to identify and measure microRNA present in RNA samples.

  2. Materials for microfluidic chip fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kangning; Zhou, Jianhua; Wu, Hongkai

    2013-11-19

    Through manipulating fluids using microfabricated channel and chamber structures, microfluidics is a powerful tool to realize high sensitive, high speed, high throughput, and low cost analysis. In addition, the method can establish a well-controlled microenivroment for manipulating fluids and particles. It also has rapid growing implementations in both sophisticated chemical/biological analysis and low-cost point-of-care assays. Some unique phenomena emerge at the micrometer scale. For example, reactions are completed in a shorter amount of time as the travel distances of mass and heat are relatively small; the flows are usually laminar; and the capillary effect becomes dominant owing to large surface-to-volume ratios. In the meantime, the surface properties of the device material are greatly amplified, which can lead to either unique functions or problems that we would not encounter at the macroscale. Also, each material inherently corresponds with specific microfabrication strategies and certain native properties of the device. Therefore, the material for making the device plays a dominating role in microfluidic technologies. In this Account, we address the evolution of materials used for fabricating microfluidic chips, and discuss the application-oriented pros and cons of different materials. This Account generally follows the order of the materials introduced to microfluidics. Glass and silicon, the first generation microfluidic device materials, are perfect for capillary electrophoresis and solvent-involved applications but expensive for microfabriaction. Elastomers enable low-cost rapid prototyping and high density integration of valves on chip, allowing complicated and parallel fluid manipulation and in-channel cell culture. Plastics, as competitive alternatives to elastomers, are also rapid and inexpensive to microfabricate. Their broad variety provides flexible choices for different needs. For example, some thermosets support in-situ fabrication of

  3. Utilisation of chip thickness models in grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Roger

    Grinding is now a well established process utilised for both stock removal and finish applications. Although significant research is performed in this field, grinding still experiences problems with burn and high forces which can lead to poor quality components and damage to equipment. This generally occurs in grinding when the process deviates from its safe working conditions. In milling, chip thickness parameters are utilised to predict and maintain process outputs leading to improved control of the process. This thesis looks to further the knowledge of the relationship between chip thickness and the grinding process outputs to provide an increased predictive and maintenance modelling capability. Machining trials were undertaken using different chip thickness parameters to understand how these affect the process outputs. The chip thickness parameters were maintained at different grinding wheel diameters for a constant productivity process to determine the impact of chip thickness at a constant material removal rate.. Additional testing using a modified pin on disc test rig was performed to provide further information on process variables. The different chip thickness parameters provide control of different process outputs in the grinding process. These relationships can be described using contact layer theory and heat flux partitioning. The contact layer is defined as the immediate layer beneath the contact arc at the wheel workpiece interface. The size of the layer governs the force experienced during the process. The rate of contact layer removal directly impacts the net power required from the system. It was also found that the specific grinding energy of a process is more dependent on the productivity of a grinding process

  4. Reliability evaluation of CIF (chip-in-flex) and COF (chip-on-flex) packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jae-Won; Suk, Kyoung-Lim; Paik, Kyung-Wook; Lee, Soon-Bok

    2010-03-01

    CIF (chip-in-flex) and COF (chip-on-flex) packages have the advantages of fine pitch capability, and flexibility. Anisotropic conductive films (ACFs) are used for the interconnection between chip and substrate. Display, mobile device, and semiconductor industry require for smaller and more integrated packages. Both CIF and COF packages are an alternative for the demands. However, there are some reliability problems of interconnection between the chip and substrate because the packages are subjected to various loading conditions. These may degrade the functionality of the packages. Therefore, reliability assessment of both packages is necessary. In this study, experimental tests were performed to evaluate the reliability of interconnection between the chip and substrate of CIF and COF packages. Thermal cycling tests were performed to evaluate the resistance against thermal fatigue. The shape and warpage of the chip of CIF and COF packages were observed using optical methods (e.g., shadow Moiré and Twyman/Green interferometry). These optical Moiré techniques are widely used for measuring small deformations in microelectronic packages. The stress distribution around the chip was evaluated through FEA (finite element analysis). In addition, we suggested modifying design parameter of CIF packages for the reliability enhancement.

  5. Reliability evaluation of CIF (chip-in-flex) and COF (chip-on-flex) packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jae-Won; Suk, Kyoung-Lim; Paik, Kyung-Wook; Lee, Soon-Bok

    2009-12-01

    CIF (chip-in-flex) and COF (chip-on-flex) packages have the advantages of fine pitch capability, and flexibility. Anisotropic conductive films (ACFs) are used for the interconnection between chip and substrate. Display, mobile device, and semiconductor industry require for smaller and more integrated packages. Both CIF and COF packages are an alternative for the demands. However, there are some reliability problems of interconnection between the chip and substrate because the packages are subjected to various loading conditions. These may degrade the functionality of the packages. Therefore, reliability assessment of both packages is necessary. In this study, experimental tests were performed to evaluate the reliability of interconnection between the chip and substrate of CIF and COF packages. Thermal cycling tests were performed to evaluate the resistance against thermal fatigue. The shape and warpage of the chip of CIF and COF packages were observed using optical methods (e.g., shadow Moiré and Twyman/Green interferometry). These optical Moiré techniques are widely used for measuring small deformations in microelectronic packages. The stress distribution around the chip was evaluated through FEA (finite element analysis). In addition, we suggested modifying design parameter of CIF packages for the reliability enhancement.

  6. On-chip temperature gradient interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Yang; Xie, Jun; He, Qing; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2006-04-14

    This paper reports the first integrated microelectromechanical system (MEMS) HPLC chip that consists of a parylene high-pressure LC column, an electrochemical sensor, a resistive heater and a thermal-isolation structure for on-chip temperature gradient interaction chromatography application. The separation column was 8 mm long, 100 microm wide, 25 microm high and was packed with 5 microm sized, C18-coated beads using conventional slurry-packing technique. A novel parylene-enhanced, air-gap thermal isolation technology was used to reduce heater power consumption by 58% and to reduce temperature rise in the off-column area by 67%. The fabricated chip consumed 400 mW when operated at 100 degrees C. To test the chromatography performance of the fabricated system, a mixture of derivatized amino acids was chosen for separation. A temporal temperature gradient scanning from 25 to 65 degrees C with a ramping rate of 3.6 degrees C/min was applied to the column during separation. Successful chromatographic separation of derivatized amino acids was carried out using our chip. Compared with conventional temperature gradient HPLC system which incorporates "macro oven" to generate temporal temperature gradient on the column, our chip's thermal performance, i.e., power consumption and thermal response, is greatly improved without sacrificing chromatography quality.

  7. Gene expression profiles of bronchoalveolar cells in Pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Bindu; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Belitskaya-Lévy, Ilana; Dawson, Rod; Ress, Stanley; Gold, Jeffrey A.; Condos, Rany; Pine, Richard; Brown, Stuart; Nolan, Anna; Rom, William N.; Weiden, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis includes macrophage activation, inflammation with increased immune effector cells, tissue necrosis and cavity formation, and fibrosis, distortion, and bronchiectasis. To evaluate the molecular basis of the immune response in the lungs of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), we used bronchoalveolar lavage to obtain cells at the site of infection. Affymetrix Genechip micro-arrays and cDNA nylon filter microarrays interrogated gene expression in BAL cells from 11 healthy controls and 17 patients with active pulmonary TB. We found altered gene expression for 69 genes in TB versus normal controls that included cell surface markers, cytokines, chemokines, receptors, transcription factors, and complement components. In addition, TB BAL cell gene expression patternssegregated into 2 groups: one suggestive of a T helper type 1 (Th1) cellular immune response with increased STAT-4, IFN-γ receptor, and MIG expression with increased IFN-γ protein levels in BAL fluid; the other group displayed characteristics of Th2 immunity with increased STAT-6, CD81, and IL-10 receptor expression. We were able to demonstrate that a Th2 presentation could change to a Th1 pattern after anti-tuberculous treatment in one TB patient studied serially. These gene expression data support the conclusion that pulmonary TB produces a global change in the BAL cell transcriptome with manifestations of either Th1 or Th2 immunity. PMID:17921069

  8. 'Fluorescent Cell Chip' for immunotoxicity testing: Development of the c-fos expression reporter cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Trzaska, Dominika; Zembek, Patrycja; Olszewski, Maciej; Adamczewska, Violetta; Ulleras, Erik; Dastych, JarosIaw . E-mail: jdastych@cbm.pan.pl

    2005-09-01

    The Fluorescent Cell Chip for in vitro immunotoxicity testing employs cell lines derived from lymphocytes, mast cells, and monocytes-macrophages transfected with various EGFP cytokine reporter gene constructs. While cytokine expression is a valid endpoint for in vitro immunotoxicity screening, additional marker for the immediate-early response gene expression level could be of interest for further development and refinement of the Fluorescent Cell Chip. We have used BW.5147.3 murine thymoma transfected with c-fos reporter constructs to obtain reporter cell lines expressing ECFP under the control of murine c-fos promoter. These cells upon serum withdrawal and readdition and incubation with heavy metal compounds showed paralleled induction of c-Fos expression as evidenced by Real-Time PCR and ECFP fluorescence as evidenced by computer-supported fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we developed fluorescent reporter cell lines that could be employed in a simple and time-efficient screening assay for possible action of chemicals on c-Fos expression in lymphocytes. The evaluation of usefulness of these cells for the Fluorescent Cell Chip-based detection of immunotoxicity will require additional testing with a larger number of chemicals.

  9. CHIP: A new modulator of human malignant disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qianqian; Yang, Gang; Zheng, Lianfang; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) is known as a chaperone-associated E3 for a variety of protein substrates. It acts as a link between molecular chaperones and ubiquitin–proteasome system. Involved in the process of protein clearance, CHIP plays a critical role in maintaining protein homeostasis in diverse conditions. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of our current understanding of CHIP and summarize recent advances in CHIP biology, with a focus on CHIP in the setting of malignancies. PMID:27007160

  10. Chip-based quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Sibson, P; Erven, C; Godfrey, M; Miki, S; Yamashita, T; Fujiwara, M; Sasaki, M; Terai, H; Tanner, M G; Natarajan, C M; Hadfield, R H; O'Brien, J L; Thompson, M G

    2017-02-09

    Improvement in secure transmission of information is an urgent need for governments, corporations and individuals. Quantum key distribution (QKD) promises security based on the laws of physics and has rapidly grown from proof-of-concept to robust demonstrations and deployment of commercial systems. Despite these advances, QKD has not been widely adopted, and large-scale deployment will likely require chip-based devices for improved performance, miniaturization and enhanced functionality. Here we report low error rate, GHz clocked QKD operation of an indium phosphide transmitter chip and a silicon oxynitride receiver chip-monolithically integrated devices using components and manufacturing processes from the telecommunications industry. We use the reconfigurability of these devices to demonstrate three prominent QKD protocols-BB84, Coherent One Way and Differential Phase Shift-with performance comparable to state-of-the-art. These devices, when combined with integrated single photon detectors, pave the way for successfully integrating QKD into future telecommunications networks.

  11. Time of flight system on a chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschalidis, Nicholas P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A CMOS time-of-flight TOF system-on-a-chip SoC for precise time interval measurement with low power consumption and high counting rate has been developed. The analog and digital TOF chip may include two Constant Fraction Discriminators CFDs and a Time-to-Digital Converter TDC. The CFDs can interface to start and stop anodes through two preamplifiers and perform signal processing for time walk compensation (110). The TDC digitizes the time difference with reference to an off-chip precise external clock (114). One TOF output is an 11-bit digital word and a valid event trigger output indicating a valid event on the 11-bit output bus (116).

  12. A Microfluidic Chip for ICPMS Sample Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Verboket, Pascal E.; Borovinskaya, Olga; Meyer, Nicole; Günther, Detlef; Dittrich, Petra S.

    2015-01-01

    This protocol discusses the fabrication and usage of a disposable low cost microfluidic chip as sample introduction system for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The chip produces monodisperse aqueous sample droplets in perfluorohexane (PFH). Size and frequency of the aqueous droplets can be varied in the range of 40 to 60 µm and from 90 to 7,000 Hz, respectively. The droplets are ejected from the chip with a second flow of PFH and remain intact during the ejection. A custom-built desolvation system removes the PFH and transports the droplets into the ICPMS. Here, very stable signals with a narrow intensity distribution can be measured, showing the monodispersity of the droplets. We show that the introduction system can be used to quantitatively determine iron in single bovine red blood cells. In the future, the capabilities of the introduction device can easily be extended by the integration of additional microfluidic modules. PMID:25867751

  13. Multisensor smart system on a chip.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Louiza; Newcomb, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Sensors are becoming of considerable importance in several areas, particularly in health care. Therefore, the development of inexpensive and miniaturized sensors that are highly selective and sensitive, and for which control and analysis is present all on one chip is very desirable. These types of sensors can be implemented with microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and because they are fabricated on a semiconductor substrate, additional signal processing circuitry can easily be integrated into the chip, thereby readily providing additional functions, such as multiplexing and analog-to-digital conversion. Here, we present a general framework for the design of a multisensor system on a chip, which includes intelligent signal processing, as well as a built-in self-test and parameter adjustment units. Specifically, we outline the system architecture and develop a transistorized bridge biosensor for monitoring changes in the dielectric constant of a fluid, which could be used for in-home monitoring of kidney function of patients with renal failure.

  14. CHIPS Neutrino Detector Research and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Ramon; Vahle, Patricia; Chips Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The CHIPS R&D project is an effort to develop affordable megaton-scale neutrino detectors. The CHIPS strategy calls for submerging water Cherenkov detectors deep under water. The surrounding water acts as structural support, minimizing large initial investments in costly infrastructure, and serves as an overburden, shielding the detector from cosmic rays and eliminating the need for expensive underground construction. Additional cost savings will be achieved through photodetector development and optimization of readout geometry. In summer 2014 a small prototype of the CHIPS detector was deployed in the flooded Wentworth Mine Pit in Northern Minnesota. The detector has been recording data underwater throughout the fall and winter. In this talk, we will discuss lessons learned from the prototyping experience and the plans for submerging much larger detectors in future years.

  15. Chip-based quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, P.; Erven, C.; Godfrey, M.; Miki, S.; Yamashita, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Sasaki, M.; Terai, H.; Tanner, M. G.; Natarajan, C. M.; Hadfield, R. H.; O'Brien, J. L.; Thompson, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    Improvement in secure transmission of information is an urgent need for governments, corporations and individuals. Quantum key distribution (QKD) promises security based on the laws of physics and has rapidly grown from proof-of-concept to robust demonstrations and deployment of commercial systems. Despite these advances, QKD has not been widely adopted, and large-scale deployment will likely require chip-based devices for improved performance, miniaturization and enhanced functionality. Here we report low error rate, GHz clocked QKD operation of an indium phosphide transmitter chip and a silicon oxynitride receiver chip--monolithically integrated devices using components and manufacturing processes from the telecommunications industry. We use the reconfigurability of these devices to demonstrate three prominent QKD protocols--BB84, Coherent One Way and Differential Phase Shift--with performance comparable to state-of-the-art. These devices, when combined with integrated single photon detectors, pave the way for successfully integrating QKD into future telecommunications networks.

  16. A microfluidic chip for ICPMS sample introduction.

    PubMed

    Verboket, Pascal E; Borovinskaya, Olga; Meyer, Nicole; Günther, Detlef; Dittrich, Petra S

    2015-03-05

    This protocol discusses the fabrication and usage of a disposable low cost microfluidic chip as sample introduction system for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The chip produces monodisperse aqueous sample droplets in perfluorohexane (PFH). Size and frequency of the aqueous droplets can be varied in the range of 40 to 60 µm and from 90 to 7,000 Hz, respectively. The droplets are ejected from the chip with a second flow of PFH and remain intact during the ejection. A custom-built desolvation system removes the PFH and transports the droplets into the ICPMS. Here, very stable signals with a narrow intensity distribution can be measured, showing the monodispersity of the droplets. We show that the introduction system can be used to quantitatively determine iron in single bovine red blood cells. In the future, the capabilities of the introduction device can easily be extended by the integration of additional microfluidic modules.

  17. An integrated system CisGenome for analyzing ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongkai; Jiang, Hui; Ma, Wenxiu; Johnson, David S.; Myers, Richard M.; Wong, Wing H.

    2008-01-01

    CisGenome is a software system for analyzing genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data. It is designed to meet all basic needs of ChIP data analyses, including visualization, data normalization, peak detection, false discovery rate (FDR) computation, gene-peak association, and sequence and motif analysis. In addition to implementing previously published ChIP-chip analysis methods, the software contains new statistical methods designed specifically for ChIP-seq data. CisGenome has a modular design so that it supports interactive analyses through a graphic user interface as well as customized batch-mode computation for advanced data mining. A built-in browser allows visualization of array images, signals, gene structure, conservation, and DNA sequence and motif information. We illustrate the use of these tools by a comparative analysis of ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq data for the transcription factor NRSF/REST, a study of ChIP-seq analysis without negative control sample, and an analysis of a novel motif in Nanog- and Sox2-binding regions. PMID:18978777

  18. Fast detection of genetic information by an optimized PCR in an interchangeable chip.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinbo; Kodzius, Rimantas; Xiao, Kang; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we report the construction of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device for fast amplification and detection of DNA. This device consists of an interchangeable PCR chamber, a temperature control component as well as an optical detection system. The DNA amplification happens on an interchangeable chip with the volumes as low as 1.25 μl, while the heating and cooling rate was as fast as 12.7°C/second ensuring that the total time needed of only 25 min to complete the 35 cycle PCR amplification. An optimized PCR with two-temperature approach for denaturing and annealing (Td and Ta) of DNA was also formulated with the PCR chip, with which the amplification of male-specific sex determining region Y (SRY) gene marker by utilizing raw saliva was successfully achieved and the genetic identification was in-situ detected right after PCR by the optical detection system.

  19. Gene expression profiling in response to the histone deacetylase inhibitor BL1521 in neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ruijter, Annemieke J.M. de; Kemp, Stephan . E-mail: a.b.vankuilenburg@amc.uva.nl

    2005-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood tumor with a poor survival in advanced stage disease despite intensive chemotherapeutic regimes. The new histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor BL1521 has shown promising results in neuroblastoma. Inhibition of HDAC resulted in a decrease in proliferation and metabolic activity, induction of apoptosis and differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. In order to elucidate the mechanism mediating the effects of BL1521 on neuroblastoma cells, we investigated the gene expression profile of an MYCN single copy (SKNAS) and an MYCN amplified (IMR32) neuroblastoma cell line after treatment with BL1521 using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide array U133A. An altered expression of 255 genes was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines. The majority of these genes were involved in gene expression, cellular metabolism, and cell signaling. We observed changes in the expression of vital genes belonging to the cell cycle (cyclin D1 and CDK4) and apoptosis (BNIP3, BID, and BCL2) pathway in response to BL1521. The expression of 37 genes was altered by both BL1521 and Trichostatin A, which could indicate a common gene set regulated by different HDAC inhibitors. BL1521 treatment changed the expression of a number of MYCN-associated genes. Several genes in the Wnt and the Delta/Notch pathways were changed in response to BL1521 treatment, suggesting that BL1521 is able to induce the differentiation of neuroblastoma cells into a more mature phenotype.

  20. FlyAtlas: database of gene expression in the tissues of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Scott W; Herzyk, Pawel; Dow, Julian A T; Leader, David P

    2013-01-01

    The FlyAtlas resource contains data on the expression of the genes of Drosophila melanogaster in different tissues (currently 25-17 adult and 8 larval) obtained by hybridization of messenger RNA to Affymetrix Drosophila Genome 2 microarrays. The microarray probe sets cover 13,250 Drosophila genes, detecting 12,533 in an unambiguous manner. The data underlying the original web application (http://flyatlas.org) have been restructured into a relational database and a Java servlet written to provide a new web interface, FlyAtlas 2 (http://flyatlas.gla.ac.uk/), which allows several additional queries. Users can retrieve data for individual genes or for groups of genes belonging to the same or related ontological categories. Assistance in selecting valid search terms is provided by an Ajax 'autosuggest' facility that polls the database as the user types. Searches can also focus on particular tissues, and data can be retrieved for the most highly expressed genes, for genes of a particular category with above-average expression or for genes with the greatest difference in expression between the larval and adult stages. A novel facility allows the database to be queried with a specific gene to find other genes with a similar pattern of expression across the different tissues.

  1. Comprehensive gene expression atlas for the Arabidopsis MAP kinase signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Menges, Margit; Dóczi, Róbert; Okrész, László; Morandini, Piero; Mizzi, Luca; Soloviev, Mikhail; Murray, James A H; Bögre, László

    2008-01-01

    * Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are signal transduction modules with layers of protein kinases having c. 120 genes in Arabidopsis, but only a few have been linked experimentally to functions. * We analysed microarray expression data for 114 MAPK signalling genes represented on the ATH1 Affymetrix arrays; determined their expression patterns during development, and in a wide range of time-course microarray experiments for their signal-dependent transcriptional regulation and their coregulation with other signalling components and transcription factors. * Global expression correlation of the MAPK genes with each of the represented 21 692 Arabidopsis genes was determined by calculating Pearson correlation coefficients. To group MAPK signalling genes based on similarities in global regulation, we performed hierarchical clustering on the pairwise correlation values. This should allow inferring functional information from well-studied MAPK components to functionally uncharacterized ones. Statistical overrepresentation of specific gene ontology (GO) categories in the gene lists showing high expression correlation values with each of the MAPK components predicted biological themes for the gene functions. * The combination of these methods provides functional information for many uncharacterized MAPK genes, and a framework for complementary future experimental dissection of the function of this complex family.

  2. Analysis of human breast milk cells: gene expression profiles during pregnancy, lactation, involution, and mastitic infection.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julie A; Lefèvre, Christophe; Watt, Ashalyn; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2016-05-01

    The molecular processes underlying human milk production and the effects of mastitic infection are largely unknown because of limitations in obtaining tissue samples. Determination of gene expression in normal lactating women would be a significant step toward understanding why some women display poor lactation outcomes. Here, we demonstrate the utility of RNA obtained directly from human milk cells to detect mammary epithelial cell (MEC)-specific gene expression. Milk cell RNA was collected from five time points (24 h prepartum during the colostrum period, midlactation, two involutions, and during a bout of mastitis) in addition to an involution series comprising three time points. Gene expression profiles were determined by use of human Affymetrix arrays. Milk cells collected during milk production showed that the most highly expressed genes were involved in milk synthesis (e.g., CEL, OLAH, FOLR1, BTN1A1, and ARG2), while milk cells collected during involution showed a significant downregulation of milk synthesis genes and activation of involution associated genes (e.g., STAT3, NF-kB, IRF5, and IRF7). Milk cells collected during mastitic infection revealed regulation of a unique set of genes specific to this disease state, while maintaining regulation of milk synthesis genes. Use of conventional epithelial cell markers was used to determine the population of MECs within each sample. This paper is the first to describe the milk cell transcriptome across the human lactation cycle and during mastitic infection, providing valuable insight into gene expression of the human mammary gland.

  3. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station (ISS). Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. The portable, handheld Lab-on-a Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) made its debut flight aboard Discovery during the STS-116 mission launched December 9, 2006. The system allowed crew members to monitor their environment for problematic contaminants such as yeast, mold, and even E.coli, and salmonella. Once LOCAD-PTS reached the ISS, the Marshall team continued to manage the experiment, monitoring the study from a console in the Payload Operations Center at MSFC. The results of these studies will help NASA researchers refine the technology for future Moon and Mars missions. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  4. Developments of optimum flip-chip bonding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dong H.; Kang, Sa Y.; Lee, Y. M.; Oh, S. Y.

    1997-08-01

    Flip-chip soldering is the critical technology for solving the current issues of electronic packaging industries that require the high I/O's. In order to increase the manufacturing ability of flip-chip technology, however, yield and reliability tissues should overcome. In this study, optimum flip-chip bonding process has been developed by using the test chips that had the electroplated solder bumps. Test chips are composed of three different types that are i) peripheral array pad chip, ii) peripheral array pad chip, and iii) area array pad chip. Each test chip has the daisy chain to consider the effect of reliability test. The electrical resistance was measured before and after reliability test. Based on these measurement, failure mode resulted from the moisture absorption was studied using scanning acoustic microscope. To achieve an optimum reflow profile of solder bump, correct temperature profile was set up with respect to the resin base flux. Different bonding forces were tested. Four underfill encapsulants were evaluated for minimum voids that caused the severe defects after reliability test. Also, the gap heights were measured with respect to applied bonding force after underfill was performed. Results from the moisture absorption and thermal cycling were discussed for flip-chip bonding on BT-resin substrates. The test vehicles using flip-chip technology have passed moisture preconditioning and temperature cycling tests.

  5. Novel PbS detector chip pattern with extinction function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fengjin; Si, Junjie; Su, Xianjun; Lv, Yanqiu; Shi, Zhengfeng

    2015-10-01

    A novel chip pattern with extinction function in Lead salt detectors is specified. Lead Sulfide (PbS) polycrystalline film is prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition (CMD) on a transparent substrate, then a special figure and structure is saved by lithography techonology on the substrate. As a quaternion detector chip that made by PbS thin film for example in this paper, whose performance including signal, noise, weak-peaks and the uniformity of the chip are too poor to meet the detecting system at the initial stage of research, and the qualified ratio of chips is only 3% .This paper explains the reason why the performance and qualified ratio of chips were so poor, focuses on a novel chip pattern with extinction which avoided the disadvantages of traditional one. the novel chip pattern has been applied in detectors. The novel chip pattern is prepared with PbS thin film which both "extinction slice" and detector chip are based on a same substrate , which not only had absorbed the jumbled light , improved the uniformity and other performance of photosensitive elements, but also had left out the assembly diffculty and precision demand when a extinction slice assembly in the restricted space of inswept detector chip, omitted the production process of extinction slice and shorten the assembly process of the detectors, and the qualified ratio of chips had been improved from 3% to 98%.

  6. Modulated Tool-Path (MTP) Chip Breaking System

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, K. B.

    2010-04-01

    The Modulated Tool-Path (MTP) Chip Breaking System produces user-selectable chip lengths and workpiece finishes and is compatible with any material, workpiece shape, and depth of cut. The MTP chip breaking system consistently creates the desired size of chips regardless of workpiece size, shape, or material, and the machine operator does not need to make any adjustments during the machining operation. The system's programmer configures the part program that commands the machine tool to move in a specific fashion to deliver the desired part size, shape, chip length, and workpiece surface finish. The MTP chip breaking system helps manufacturers avoid the detrimental effects of continuous chips, including expensive repair costs, delivery delays, and hazards to personnel.

  7. Investigation of formation mechanisms of chips in orthogonal cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, W.

    2012-08-01

    This work investigates the formation mechanisms of chips in orthogonal cutting of mild steel and the transformation conditions between various morphology chips. It is supposed that the modeling material follows the Johnson-Cook constitutive model. In orthogonal cutting process, both the plastic flow and the instability behaviors of chip materials are caused by the plane strain loadings. Therefore, the general instability behaviors of materials in plane strain state are first analyzed with linear perturbation method and a universal instability criterion is established. Based on the analytical results, the formation mechanisms of chips and the transformation conditions between continuous and serrated chips are further studied by instability phase diagram method. The results show that the chip formation strongly depends on the intensity ratios between shear and normal stresses. The ratios of dissipative rates of plastic work done by compression and shear stresses govern the transformation from continuous to serrated chips. These results are verified by the numerical simulations on the orthogonal cutting process.

  8. Bio-inspired cell concentration and deformability monitoring chips.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Ho; Youn, Sechan; Lee, Dong Woo

    2007-11-01

    The paper presents a couple of biofluidic devices, whose functions are inspired from biological cell concentration and deformability monitoring functions. The cell concentration monitoring chip is inspired from RBC control mechanism in kidney, performing cell concentration monitoring functions. The cell deformability chip, inspired from selective RBC destruction mechanism in spleen, performs mechanical cell deformability monitoring functions. The structures and principles of the bio-inspired chips are presented and compared with those of the biological organs. The unique features and performance characteristics of the bio-inspired chips are analyzed and verified from experimental study. The bio-inspired cell concentration monitoring chips perform flow-rate insensitive concentration measurement, while the bio-inspired cell deformability monitoring chips achieve size-independent cell deformability measurement. Common advantages of the bio-inspired chips include simple structures, digital signals and high integrability, thus making them suitable for use in integrated digital biomedical systems.

  9. Rapid prototyping of glass microfluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotz, Frederik; Plewa, Klaus; Bauer, Werner; Hanemann, Thomas; Waldbaur, Ansgar; Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Neumann, Christiane; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2015-03-01

    In academia the rapid and flexible creation of microfluidic chips is of great importance for microfluidic research. Besides polymers glass is a very important material especially when high chemical and temperature resistance are required. However, glass structuring is a very hazardous process which is not accessible to most members of the microfluidic community. We therefore sought a new method for the rapid and simple creation of transparent microfluidic glass chips by structuring and sintering amorphous silica suspensions. The whole process from a digital mask layout to a microstructured glass sheet can be done within two days. In this paper we show the applicability of this process to fabricate capillary driven microfluidic systems.

  10. MCMII and the TriP chip

    SciTech Connect

    Juan Estrada et al.

    2003-12-19

    We describe the development of the electronics that will be used to read out the Fiber Tracker and Preshower detectors in Run IIb. This electronics is needed for operation at 132ns bunch crossing, and may provide a measurement of the z coordinate of the Fiber Tracker hits when operating at 396ns bunch crossing. Specifically, we describe the design and preliminary tests of the Trip chip, MCM IIa, MCM IIb and MCM IIc. This document also serves as a user manual for the Trip chip and the MCM.

  11. Transcriptome analysis of human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC) from umbilical cords of gestational diabetic mothers reveals candidate sites for an epigenetic modulation of specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ambra, R; Manca, S; Palumbo, M C; Leoni, G; Natarelli, L; De Marco, A; Consoli, A; Pandolfi, A; Virgili, F

    2014-01-01

    Within the complex pathological picture associated to diabetes, high glucose (HG) has "per se" effects on cells and tissues that involve epigenetic reprogramming of gene expression. In fetal tissues, epigenetic changes occur genome-wide and are believed to induce specific long term effects. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) obtained at delivery from gestational diabetic women were used to study the transcriptomic effects of chronic hyperglycemia in fetal vascular cells using Affymetrix microarrays. In spite of the small number of samples analyzed (n=6), genes related to insulin sensing and extracellular matrix reorganization were found significantly affected by HG. Quantitative PCR analysis of gene promoters identified a significant differential DNA methylation in TGFB2. Use of Ea.hy926 endothelial cells confirms data on HUVEC. Our study corroborates recent evidences suggesting that epigenetic reprogramming of gene expression occurs with persistent HG and provides a background for future investigations addressing genomic consequences of chronic HG.

  12. Stem-end chip defect in response to high temperature stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem-end chip defect is a serious quality concern for the potato chip industry. Chips with stem-end chip defect are unacceptably dark along the vasculature at the tuber stem end and in adjacent tissues. Tubers that produce stem-end defect chips are undesirable to processors and increase financial ri...

  13. Microfluidic chips with reversed-phase monoliths for solid phase extraction and on-chip labeling.

    PubMed

    Nge, Pamela N; Pagaduan, Jayson V; Yu, Ming; Woolley, Adam T

    2012-10-26

    The integration of sample preparation methods into microfluidic devices provides automation necessary for achieving complete micro total analysis systems. We have developed a technique that combines on-chip sample enrichment with fluorescence labeling and purification. Polymer monoliths made from butyl methacrylate were fabricated in cyclic olefin copolymer microdevices and used for solid phase extraction. We studied the retention of fluorophores, amino acids and proteins on these columns. The retained samples were subsequently labeled with both Alexa Fluor 488 and Chromeo P503, and unreacted dye was rinsed off the column before sample elution. Additional purification was obtained from the differential retention of proteins and fluorescent labels. A linear relation between the eluted peak areas and concentrations of on-chip labeled heat shock protein 90 samples demonstrated the utility of this method for on-chip quantitation. Our fast and simple method of simultaneously concentrating and labeling samples on-chip is compatible with miniaturization and desirable for automated analysis.

  14. Simulating the Effect of Modulated Tool-Path Chip Breaking On Surface Texture and Chip Length

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.S.; McFarland, J.T.; Tursky, D. A.; Assaid, T. S.; Barkman, W. E.; Babelay, Jr., E. F.

    2010-04-30

    One method for creating broken chips in turning processes involves oscillating the cutting tool in the feed direction utilizing the CNC machine axes. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte and the Y-12 National Security Complex have developed and are refining a method to reliably control surface finish and chip length based on a particular machine's dynamic performance. Using computer simulations it is possible to combine the motion of the machine axes with the geometry of the cutting tool to predict the surface characteristics and map the surface texture for a wide range of oscillation parameters. These data allow the selection of oscillation parameters to simultaneously ensure broken chips and acceptable surface characteristics. This paper describes the machine dynamic testing and characterization activities as well as the computational method used for evaluating and predicting chip length and surface texture.

  15. Changes in winter depression phenotype correlate with white blood cell gene expression profiles: a combined metagene and gene ontology approach.

    PubMed

    Bosker, Fokko J; Terpstra, Peter; Gladkevich, Anatoliy V; Janneke Dijck-Brouwer, D A; te Meerman, Gerard; Nolen, Willem A; Schoevers, Robert A; Meesters, Ybe

    2015-04-03

    In the present study we evaluate the feasibility of gene expression in white blood cells as a peripheral marker for winter depression. Sixteen patients with winter type seasonal affective disorder were included in the study. Blood was taken by venous puncture at three time points; in winter prior and following bright light therapy and in summer. RNA was isolated, converted into cRNA, amplified and hybridized on Illumina® gene expression arrays. The raw optical array data were quantile normalized and thereafter analyzed using a metagene approach, based on previously published Affymetrix gene array data. The raw data were also subjected to a secondary analysis focusing on circadian genes and genes involved in serotonergic neurotransmission. Differences between the conditions were analyzed, using analysis of variance on the principal components of the metagene score matrix. After correction for multiple testing no statistically significant differences were found. Another approach uses the correlation between metagene factor weights and the actual expression values, averaged over conditions. When comparing the correlations of winter vs. summer and bright light therapy vs. summer significant changes for several metagenes were found. Subsequent gene ontology analyses (DAVID and GeneTrail) of 5 major metagenes suggest an interaction between brain and white blood cells. The hypothesis driven analysis with a smaller group of genes failed to demonstrate any significant effects. The results from the combined metagene and gene ontology analyses support the idea of communication between brain and white blood cells. Future studies will need a much larger sample size to obtain information at the level of single genes.

  16. Cloning and characterization of carboxyl terminus of heat shock cognate 70-interacting protein gene from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Shota; Tsunakawa, Akane; Shibano, Yuka; Kawasaki, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    Carboxyl terminus of heat shock cognate 70-interacting protein (CHIP) is an evolutionarily conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase across different eukaryotic species and is known to play a key role in protein quality control. CHIP has two distinct functional domains, an N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) and a C-terminal U-box domain, which are required for the ubiquitination of numerous labile client proteins that are chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock cognate proteins (HSCs). During our screen for CHIP-like proteins in the Bombyx mori databases, we found a novel silkworm gene, Bombyx mori CHIP. Phylogenetic analysis showed that BmCHIP belongs to Lepidopteran lineages. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that BmCHIP was relatively highly expressed in the gonad and fat body. A pull-down experiment and auto-ubiquitination assay showed that BmCHIP interacted with BmHSC70 and had E3 ligase activity. Additionally, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that BmCHIP was partially co-localized with ubiquitin in BmN4 cells. These data support that BmCHIP plays an important role in the ubiquitin proteasome system as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in B. mori.

  17. COXPRESdb: a database of coexpressed gene networks in mammals.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Takeshi; Hayashi, Shinpei; Shibaoka, Masayuki; Saeki, Motoshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2008-01-01

    A database of coexpressed gene sets can provide valuable information for a wide variety of experimental designs, such as targeting of genes for functional identification, gene regulation and/or protein-protein interactions. Coexpressed gene databases derived from publicly available GeneChip data are widely used in Arabidopsis research, but platforms that examine coexpression for higher mammals are rather limited. Therefore, we have constructed a new database, COXPRESdb (coexpressed gene database) (http://coxpresdb.hgc.jp), for coexpressed gene lists and networks in human and mouse. Coexpression data could be calculated for 19 777 and 21 036 genes in human and mouse, respectively, by using the GeneChip data in NCBI GEO. COXPRESdb enables analysis of the four types of coexpression networks: (i) highly coexpressed genes for every gene, (ii) genes with the same GO annotation, (iii) genes expressed in the same tissue and (iv) user-defined gene sets. When the networks became too big for the static picture on the web in GO networks or in tissue networks, we used Google Maps API to visualize them interactively. COXPRESdb also provides a view to compare the human and mouse coexpression patterns to estimate the conservation between the two species.

  18. A versatile snap chip for high-density sub-nanoliter chip-to-chip reagent transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiyan; Munzar, Jeffrey D.; Ng, Andy; Juncker, David

    2015-07-01

    The coordinated delivery of minute amounts of different reagents is important for microfluidics and microarrays, but is dependent on advanced equipment such as microarrayers. Previously, we developed the snap chip for the direct transfer of reagents, thus realizing fluidic operations by only manipulating microscope slides. However, owing to the misalignment between arrays spotted on different slides, millimeter spacing was needed between spots and the array density was limited. In this work, we have developed a novel double transfer method and have transferred 625 spots cm-2, corresponding to >10000 spots for a standard microscope slide. A user-friendly snapping system was manufactured to make liquid handling straightforward. Misalignment, which for direct transfer ranged from 150-250 μm, was reduced to <40 μm for double transfer. The snap chip was used to quantify 50 proteins in 16 samples simultaneously, yielding limits of detection in the pg/mL range for 35 proteins. The versatility of the snap chip is illustrated with a 4-plex homogenous enzyme inhibition assay analyzing 128 conditions with precise timing. The versatility and high density of the snap chip with double transfer allows for the development of high throughput reagent transfer protocols compatible with a variety of applications.

  19. A versatile snap chip for high-density sub-nanoliter chip-to-chip reagent transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiyan; Munzar, Jeffrey D.; Ng, Andy; Juncker, David

    2015-01-01

    The coordinated delivery of minute amounts of different reagents is important for microfluidics and microarrays, but is dependent on advanced equipment such as microarrayers. Previously, we developed the snap chip for the direct transfer of reagents, thus realizing fluidic operations by only manipulating microscope slides. However, owing to the misalignment between arrays spotted on different slides, millimeter spacing was needed between spots and the array density was limited. In this work, we have developed a novel double transfer method and have transferred 625 spots cm−2, corresponding to >10000 spots for a standard microscope slide. A user-friendly snapping system was manufactured to make liquid handling straightforward. Misalignment, which for direct transfer ranged from 150–250 μm, was reduced to <40 μm for double transfer. The snap chip was used to quantify 50 proteins in 16 samples simultaneously, yielding limits of detection in the pg/mL range for 35 proteins. The versatility of the snap chip is illustrated with a 4-plex homogenous enzyme inhibition assay analyzing 128 conditions with precise timing. The versatility and high density of the snap chip with double transfer allows for the development of high throughput reagent transfer protocols compatible with a variety of applications. PMID:26148566

  20. Imaging Spectrometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu; Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Zheng, Xinyu

    2007-01-01

    A proposed visible-light imaging spectrometer on a chip would be based on the concept of a heterostructure comprising multiple layers of silicon-based photodetectors interspersed with long-wavelength-pass optical filters. In a typical application, this heterostructure would be replicated in each pixel of an image-detecting integrated circuit of the active-pixel-sensor type (see figure). The design of the heterostructure would exploit the fact that within the visible portion of the spectrum, the characteristic depth of penetration of photons increases with wavelength. Proceeding from the front toward the back, each successive long-wavelength-pass filter would have a longer cutoff wavelength, and each successive photodetector would be made thicker to enable it to absorb a greater proportion of incident longer-wavelength photons. Incident light would pass through the first photodetector and encounter the first filter, which would reflect light having wavelengths shorter than its cutoff wavelength and pass light of longer wavelengths. A large portion of the incident and reflected shorter-wavelength light would be absorbed in the first photodetector. The light that had passed through the first photodetector/filter pair of layers would pass through the second photodetector and encounter the second filter, which would reflect light having wavelengths shorter than its cutoff wavelength while passing light of longer wavelengths. Thus, most of the light reflected by the second filter would lie in the wavelength band between the cutoff wavelengths of the first and second filters. Thus, further, most of the light absorbed in the second photodetector would lie in this wavelength band. In a similar manner, each successive photodetector would detect, predominantly, light in a successively longer wavelength band bounded by the shorter cutoff wavelength of the preceding filter and the longer cutoff wavelength of the following filter.

  1. On-chip concentration of bacteria using a 3D dielectrophoretic chip and subsequent laser-based DNA extraction in the same chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-hyeong; Lee, Jeong-Gun

    2010-06-01

    We report the on-chip concentration of bacteria using a dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip with 3D electrodes and subsequent laser-based DNA extraction in the same chip. The DEP chip has a set of interdigitated Au post electrodes with 50 µm height to generate a network of non-uniform electric fields for the efficient trapping by DEP. The metal post array was fabricated by photolithography and subsequent Ni and Au electroplating. Three model bacteria samples (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans) were tested and over 80-fold concentrations were achieved within 2 min. Subsequently, on-chip DNA extraction from the concentrated bacteria in the 3D DEP chip was performed by laser irradiation using the laser-irradiated magnetic bead system (LIMBS) in the same chip. The extracted DNA was analyzed with silicon chip-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The total process of on-chip bacteria concentration and the subsequent DNA extraction can be completed within 10 min including the manual operation time.

  2. Identification and characterization of Bacillus anthracis by multiplex PCR on DNA chip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Hua; Wen, Ji-Kai; Zhou, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Yang, Rui-Fu; Zhang, Ji-Bin; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Xian-En

    2004-11-01

    Bacillus anthracis can be identified by detecting virulence factor genes located on two plasmids, pXO1 and pXO2. Combining multiplex PCR with arrayed anchored primer PCR and biotin-avidin alkaline phosphatase indicator system, we developed a qualitative DNA chip method for characterization of B. anthracis, and simultaneous confirmation of the species identity independent of plasmid contents. The assay amplifies pag gene (in pXO1), cap gene (in pXO2) and Ba813 gene (a B. anthracis specific chromosomal marker), and the results were indicated by an easy-to-read profile based on the color reaction of alkaline phosphatase. About 1 pg of specific DNA fragments on the chip wells could be detected after PCR. With the proposed method, the avirulent (pXO1+/2-, pXO1-/2+ and pXO1-/2-) strains of B. anthracis and distinguished 'anthrax-like' strains from other B. cereus group bacteria were unambiguously identified, while the genera other than Bacillus gave no positive signal.

  3. Genetic Evaluation of Schizophrenia Using the Illumina HumanExome Chip

    PubMed Central

    Moons, Tim; De Hert, Marc; Gellens, Edith; Gielen, Leen; Sweers, Kim; Jacqmaert, Sigrun; van Winkel, Ruud; Vandekerckhove, Philippe; Claes, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Schizophrenia is a genetically heterogeneous disorder that is associated with several common and rare genetic variants. As technology involved, cost advantages of chip based genotyping was combined with information about rare variants, resulting in the Infinium HumanExome Beadchip. Using this chip, a sample of 493 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 484 healthy controls was genotyped. Results From the initial 242901 SNVs, 88306 had at least one minor allele and passed quality control. No variant reached genomewide-significant results (p<10-8). The SNP with the lowest p-value was rs1230345 in WISP3 (p = 3.05*10−6), followed by rs9311525 in CACNA2D3 (p = 1.03*10−5) and rs1558557 (p = 3.85*10−05) on chromosome 7. At the gene level, 3 genes were of interest: WISP3, on chromosome 6q21, a signally protein from the extracellular matrix. A second candidate gene is CACNA2D3, a regulator of the intracerebral calcium pathway. A third gene is TNFSF10, associated with p53 mediated apoptosis. PMID:27028512

  4. GeoChip 3.0 as a high-thoughput tool for analyzing microbial community composition, structure, and functional activity

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Deng, Y.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Tu, Q.; Xu, M.; Hemme, C.L.; Li, X.; Wu, L.; Gentry, T.J.; Yin, Y.; Liebich, J.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-04-01

    A new generation of functional gene arrays (FGAs; GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with {approx}28,000 probes covering approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. GeoChip 3.0 also has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes would have a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036-0.025% false-positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which showed that the structure, composition and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning.

  5. Mechanical Unloading of Mouse Bone in Microgravity Significantly Alters Cell Cycle Gene Set Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Kaplan, Warren; Burns, Brnedan

    2012-07-01

    unloading in spaceflight, we conducted genome wide microarray analysis of total RNA isolated from the mouse pelvis. Specifically, 16 week old mice were subjected to 15 days spaceflight onboard NASA's STS-131 space shuttle mission. The pelvis of the mice was dissected, the bone marrow was flushed and the bones were briefly stored in RNAlater. The pelvii were then homogenized, and RNA was isolated using TRIzol. RNA concentration and quality was measured using a Nanodrop spectrometer, and 0.8% agarose gel electrophoresis. Samples of cDNA were analyzed using an Affymetrix GeneChip\\S Gene 1.0 ST (Sense Target) Array System for Mouse and GenePattern Software. We normalized the ST gene arrays using Robust Multichip Average (RMA) normalization, which summarizes perfectly matched spots on the array through the median polish algorithm, rather than normalizing according to mismatched spots. We also used Limma for statistical analysis, using the BioConductor Limma Library by Gordon Smyth, and differential expression analysis to identify genes with significant changes in expression between the two experimental conditions. Finally we used GSEApreRanked for Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), with Kolmogorov-Smirnov style statistics to identify groups of genes that are regulated together using the t-statistics derived from Limma. Preliminary results show that 6,603 genes expressed in pelvic bone had statistically significant alterations in spaceflight compared to ground controls. These prominently included cell cycle arrest molecules p21, and p18, cell survival molecule Crbp1, and cell cycle molecules cyclin D1, and Cdk1. Additionally, GSEA results indicated alterations in molecular targets of cyclin D1 and Cdk4, senescence pathways resulting from abnormal laminin maturation, cell-cell contacts via E-cadherin, and several pathways relating to protein translation and metabolism. In total 111 gene sets out of 2,488, about 4%, showed statistically significant set alterations. These

  6. Gene expression in cortex and hippocampus during acute pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Coimbra, Roney S; Voisin, Veronique; de Saizieu, Antoine B; Lindberg, Raija LP; Wittwer, Matthias; Leppert, David; Leib, Stephen L

    2006-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high mortality (~30%) and morbidity. Up to 50% of survivors are affected by neurological sequelae due to a wide spectrum of brain injury mainly affecting the cortex and hippocampus. Despite this significant disease burden, the genetic program that regulates the host response leading to brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis is largely unknown. We used an infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis to assess gene expression profiles in cortex and hippocampus at 22 and 44 hours after infection and in controls at 22 h after mock-infection with saline. To analyze the biological significance of the data generated by Affymetrix DNA microarrays, a bioinformatics pipeline was used combining (i) a literature-profiling algorithm to cluster genes based on the vocabulary of abstracts indexed in MEDLINE (NCBI) and (ii) the self-organizing map (SOM), a clustering technique based on covariance in gene expression kinetics. Results Among 598 genes differentially regulated (change factor ≥ 1.5; p ≤ 0.05), 77% were automatically assigned to one of 11 functional groups with 94% accuracy. SOM disclosed six patterns of expression kinetics. Genes associated with growth control/neuroplasticity, signal transduction, cell death/survival, cytoskeleton, and immunity were generally upregulated. In contrast, genes related to neurotransmission and lipid metabolism were transiently downregulated on the whole. The majority of the genes associated with ionic homeostasis, neurotransmission, signal transduction and lipid metabolism were differentially regulated specifically in the hippocampus. Of the cell death/survival genes found to be continuously upregulated only in hippocampus, the majority are pro-apoptotic, while those continuously upregulated only in cortex are anti-apoptotic. Conclusion Temporal and spatial analysis of gene expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis identified potential targets for therapy. PMID

  7. Identification of differentially expressed genes in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma by microarray expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Nindl, Ingo; Dang, Chantip; Forschner, Tobias; Kuban, Ralf J; Meyer, Thomas; Sterry, Wolfram; Stockfleth, Eggert

    2006-01-01

    Background Carcinogenesis is a multi-step process indicated by several genes up- or down-regulated during tumor progression. This study examined and identified differentially expressed genes in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Results Three different biopsies of 5 immunosuppressed organ-transplanted recipients each normal skin (all were pooled), actinic keratosis (AK) (two were pooled), and invasive SCC and additionally 5 normal skin tissues from immunocompetent patients were analyzed. Thus, total RNA of 15 specimens were used for hybridization with Affymetrix HG-U133A microarray technology containing 22,283 genes. Data analyses were performed by prediction analysis of microarrays using nearest shrunken centroids with the threshold 3.5 and ANOVA analysis was independently performed in order to identify differentially expressed genes (p < 0.05). Verification of 13 up- or down-regulated genes was performed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and genes were additionally confirmed by sequencing. Broad coherent patterns in normal skin vs. AK and SCC were observed for 118 genes. Conclusion The majority of identified differentially expressed genes in cutaneous SCC were previously not described. PMID:16893473

  8. Inhibiting AP-1 activity alters cocaine induced gene expression and potentiates sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Paletzki, Ronald F.; Myakishev, Max V.; Polesskaya, Oksana; Orosz, Andras; Hyman, Steven E.; Vinson, Charles

    2008-01-01

    We have expressed A-FOS, an inhibitor of AP-1 DNA binding, in adult mouse striatal neurons. We observe normal behavior including locomotion and exploratory activities. Following a single injection of cocaine, locomotion increased similarly in both the A-FOS expressing and littermate controls. However, following repeated injections of cocaine, the A-FOS expressing mice showed increased locomotion relative to littermate controls, an increase that persisted following a week of withdrawal and subsequent cocaine administration. These results indicate that AP-1 suppresses this behavioral responses to cocaine. We analyzed mRNA from the striatum before and 4 and 24 hours after a single cocaine injection in both A-FOS and control striata using Affymetrix microarrays (430 2.0 Array) to identify genes mis-regulated by A-FOS that may mediate the increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine. A-FOS expression did not change gene expression in the basal state or 4 hours following cocaine treatment relative to controls. However, 24 hours after an acute cocaine treatment, 84 genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the A-FOS and control mice. 56 gene are down regulated while 28 genes are up regulated including previously identified candidates for addiction including BDNF and Per1. Using a random sample of identified genes, quantitative PCR was used to verify the microarray studies. The chromosomal location of these 84 genes was compared to human genome scans of addiction to identify potential genes in humans that are involved in addiction. PMID:18355967

  9. Microarray Data Analysis of Space Grown Arabidopsis Leaves for Genes Important in Vascular Patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitzeal, A. J.; Wyatt, S. E.; Parsons-Wingerter, P.

    2016-01-01

    Venation patterning in leaves is a major determinant of photosynthesis efficiency because of its dependency on vascular transport of photoassimilates, water, and minerals. Arabidopsis thaliana grown in microgravity show delayed growth and leaf maturation. Gene expression data from the roots, hypocotyl, and leaves of A. thaliana grown during spaceflight vs. ground control analyzed by Affymetrix microarray are available through NASA's GeneLab (GLDS-7). We analyzed the data for differential expression of genes in leaves resulting from the effects of spaceflight on vascular patterning. Two genes were found by preliminary analysis to be upregulated during spaceflight that may be related to vascular formation. The genes are responsible for coding an ARGOS like protein (potentially affecting cell elongation in the leaves), and an F-box/kelch-repeat protein (possibly contributing to protoxylem specification). Further analysis that will focus on raw data quality assessment and a moderated t-test may further confirm upregulation of the two genes and/or identify other gene candidates. Plants defective in these genes will then be assessed for phenotype by the mapping and quantification of leaf vascular patterning by NASA's VESsel GENeration (VESGEN) software to model specific vascular differences of plants grown in spaceflight.

  10. Microarray Data Analysis of Space Grown Arabidopsis Leaves for Genes Important in Vascular Patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitzeal, A. J.; Wyatt, S. E.; Parsons-Wingerter, P.

    2016-01-01

    Venation patterning in leaves is a major determinant of photosynthesis efficiency because of its dependency on vascular transport of photoassimilates, water, and minerals. Arabidopsis thaliana grown in microgravity show delayed growth and leaf maturation. Gene expression data from the roots, hypocotyl, and leaves of A. thaliana grown during spaceflight vs. ground control analyzed by Affymetrix microarray are available through NASAs GeneLab (GLDS-7). We analyzed the data for differential expression of genes in leaves resulting from the effects of spaceflight on vascular patterning. Two genes were found by preliminary analysis to be upregulated during spaceflight that may be related to vascular formation. The genes are responsible for coding an ARGOS like protein (potentially affecting cell elongation in the leaves), and an F-boxkelch-repeat protein (possibly contributing to protoxylem specification). Further analysis that will focus on raw data quality assessment and a moderated t-test may further confirm upregulation of the two genes and/or identify other gene candidates. Plants defective in these genes will then be assessed for phenotype by the mapping and quantification of leaf vascular patterning by NASAs VESsel GENeration (VESGEN) software to model specific vascular differences of plants grown in spaceflight.

  11. The V-Chip--Victory or Vendetta?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ron

    1997-01-01

    Parents can install the v-chip microchip in their televisions to block out programs high in violence, sex, or other objectional material. Examines the views of supporters, who see it as a coping tool for the information age and of detractors who see it as an affront to the First Amendment guarantee of free speech. (SM)

  12. Microelectronic Chips For Radiation-Dose Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Lin, Yu-Sang; Ray, Kevin P.; Sokoloski, Martin M.

    1993-01-01

    Custom-made single-chip complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit designed to reveal effects of ionizing radiation on itself and similar integrated circuits. Potential terrestrial use: safety-oriented monitoring of ionizing radiation at nuclear powerplants, nuclear-waste sites, and the like.

  13. System-on-Chip Design and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackenbury, L. E. M.; Plana, L. A.; Pepper, J.

    2010-01-01

    The system-on-chip module described here builds on a grounding in digital hardware and system architecture. It is thus appropriate for third-year undergraduate computer science and computer engineering students, for post-graduate students, and as a training opportunity for post-graduate research students. The course incorporates significant…

  14. Microarrays (DNA Chips) for the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The…

  15. Writing for a Change, Writing for Chip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Patrick W.

    2014-01-01

    What does it mean to write for change? How do we negotiate the space between hope and critique? Drawing on Dewey's notion of a common faith, this article contemplates what the author learned from Chip Bruce. It suggests that when we compartmentalize the ideal and the everyday, the hopeful and the critical, we reduce the complexity of human…

  16. Light-colored, Low Acrylamide Potato Chips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato tubers are stored at cold temperatures to prevent sprouting, minimize disease losses and increase the marketing window. Cold storage also causes an accumulation of reducing sugars, a phenomenon referred to as cold-induced sweetening. Unacceptable, dark colored chips and fries are formed durin...

  17. Potato zebra chip disease: a phytopathological tale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato zebra chip (ZC) disease is a relative newcomer to the world of important potato diseases. First reported in Mexico in the 1990s, by 2004-2005 the disease was causing serious economic damage in parts of Texas. ZC is now widespread in the western United States, Mexico, Central America, and wa...

  18. Laser soldering of flip-chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordás, K.; Pap, A. E.; Tóth, G.; Pudas, M.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Uusimäki, A.; Vähäkangas, J.

    2006-02-01

    A novel process for laser soldering of flip-chips on transparent printed circuit board assemblies is presented. The experiments were carried out on silver test patterns printed on glass wafers using a roller-type gravure offset printing method. The contact pads, where the bumps of the flip-chips are positioned, were covered with a thin layer of additional solder paste. The aligned samples (solder pad—solder paste—chip bump) were illuminated through the glass substrate using an Ar + laser beam ( λ=488 nm, P=0.6-3.0 W, d=100 μm at 1/e) to heat the printed pad and melt the solder paste, thus forming a joint between the printed pad and the chip bump. The heat-affected zone was modeled using computer-assisted finite element method. The solder joint cross-sections were analyzed using optical and electron microscopy as well as energy dispersive X-ray element analyses. The laser-soldered joints were of good mechanical and electrical quality and the process proved to be suitable for manufacturing customized circuit prototypes.

  19. On-chip entangled photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Bisson, Scott E.

    2016-11-22

    Various technologies pertaining to an on-chip entangled photon source are described herein. A light source is used to pump two resonator cavities that are resonant at two different respective wavelengths and two different respective polarizations. The resonator cavities are coupled to a four-wave mixing cavity that receives the light at the two wavelengths and outputs polarization-entangled photons.

  20. Sensing systems using chip-based spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitkowski, Arthur; Preston, Kyle J.; Sherwood-Droz, Nicolás.; Behr, Bradford B.; Bismilla, Yusuf; Cenko, Andrew T.; DesRoches, Brandon; Meade, Jeffrey T.; Munro, Elizabeth A.; Slaa, Jared; Schmidt, Bradley S.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2014-06-01

    Tornado Spectral Systems has developed a new chip-based spectrometer called OCTANE, the Optical Coherence Tomography Advanced Nanophotonic Engine, built using a planar lightwave circuit with integrated waveguides fabricated on a silicon wafer. While designed for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) systems, the same miniaturized technology can be applied to many other spectroscopic applications. The field of integrated optics enables the design of complex optical systems which are monolithically integrated on silicon chips. The form factors of these systems can be significantly smaller, more robust and less expensive than their equivalent free-space counterparts. Fabrication techniques and material systems developed for microelectronics have previously been adapted for integrated optics in the telecom industry, where millions of chip-based components are used to power the optical backbone of the internet. We have further adapted the photonic technology platform for spectroscopy applications, allowing unheard-of economies of scale for these types of optical devices. Instead of changing lenses and aligning systems, these devices are accurately designed programmatically and are easily customized for specific applications. Spectrometers using integrated optics have large advantages in systems where size, robustness and cost matter: field-deployable devices, UAVs, UUVs, satellites, handheld scanning and more. We will discuss the performance characteristics of our chip-based spectrometers and the type of spectral sensing applications enabled by this technology.

  1. Hybrid photonic chip interferometer for embedded metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Martin, H.; Maxwell, G.; Jiang, X.

    2014-03-01

    Embedded metrology is the provision of metrology on the manufacturing platform, enabling measurement without the removal of the work piece. Providing closer integration of metrology upon the manufacturing platform can lead to the better control and increased throughput. In this work we present the development of a high precision hybrid optical chip interferometer metrology device. The complete metrology sensor system is structured into two parts; optical chip and optical probe. The hybrid optical chip interferometer is based on a silica-on-silicon etched integrated-optic motherboard containing waveguide structures and evanescent couplers. Upon the motherboard, electro-optic components such as photodiodes and a semiconductor gain block are mounted and bonded to provide the required functionality. The key structure in the device is a tunable laser module based upon an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL). Within the cavity is a multi-layer thin film filter which is rotated to select the longitudinal mode at which the laser operates. An optical probe, which uses a blazed diffracting grating and collimating objective lens, focuses light of different wavelengths laterally over the measurand. Incident laser light is then tuned in wavelength time to effectively sweep an `optical stylus' over the surface. Wavelength scanning and rapid phase shifting can then retrieve the path length change and thus the surface height. We give an overview of the overall design of the final hybrid photonic chip interferometer, constituent components, device integration and packaging as well as experimental test results from the current version now under evaluation.

  2. Integrated particle detection chip for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ho; Park, Dongho; Hwang, Jungho; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports an integrated particle detection chip for low-cost and point-of-interest environmental monitoring; it consists of a micro virtual impactor and a micro corona discharger. With this system, airborne particles are introduced into the micro virtual impactor of the chip where they are classified according to their aerodynamic diameters. The particles are then charged and their number-concentration is detected in the micro corona discharger from the electrical current carried by the charged particles. The characteristics of each component were first analyzed, and the components were then integrated into a single chip. The micro virtual impactor was designed to have a cut-off diameter of 600 nm or 1.0 microm. Its classification characteristics were examined by classifying polydisperse particles-dioctyl sebacate particles ranging in diameter from 100 to 600 nm and carbon particles ranging in diameter from 0.6 to 10 microm. From the classification results, the cut-off diameter of the micro virtual impactor was measured to be either 550 nm or 1.1 microm. The micro corona discharger was fabricated based on a sharp silicon tip and a planar electrode and charged particles at 1.3 kV. Using the integrated particle detection chip comprising the micro virtual impactor and the micro corona discharger, the sensitivity for monodisperse particles-500 nm dioctyl sebacate in diameter-was measured to be 8 x 10(-7) pA/(particle cm(-3)).

  3. Increasing security in inter-chip communication

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nathan J; Hamlet, Jason; Bauer, Todd; Helinski, Ryan

    2014-10-28

    An apparatus for increasing security in inter-chip communication includes a sending control module, a communication bus, and a receiving control module. The communication bus is coupled between the sending control module and the receiving control module. The sending control module operates to send data on the communication bus, disable the communication bus when threats are detected, or both.

  4. Graphene oxide-based SPR biosensor chip for immunoassay applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Huang, Teng-Yi; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Liu, Kou-Chen

    2014-08-01

    This work develops a highly sensitive immunoassay sensor for use in graphene oxide sheet (GOS)-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chips. This sensing film, which is formed by chemically modifying a GOS surface, has covalent bonds that strongly interact with the bovine serum albumin (BSA), explaining why it has a higher sensitivity. This GOS film-based SPR chip has a BSA concentration detection limit that is 100 times higher than that of the conventional Au-film-based sensor. The affinity constants ( K A) on the GOS film-based SPR chip and the conventional SPR chip for 100 μg/ml BSA are 80.82 × 106 M-1 and 15.67 × 106 M-1, respectively. Therefore, the affinity constant of the GOS film-based SPR chip is 5.2 times higher than that of the conventional chip. With respect to the protein-protein interaction, the SPR sensor capability to detect angle changes at a low concentration anti-BSA of 75.75 nM on the GOS film-based SPR chip and the conventional SPR chip is 36.1867 and 26.1759 mdeg, respectively. At a high concentration, anti-BSA of 378.78 nM on the GOS film-based SPR chip and the conventional SPR chip reveals two times increases in the SPR angle shift. Above results demonstrate that the GOS film is promising for highly sensitive clinical diagnostic applications.

  5. HPV 9G DNA chip: 100% clinical sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    An, Heejung; Song, Keum-Soo; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Kim, Junghoon; Nguyen, Van-Thuan; Ta, Van-Thao; Sayyed, Danishmalik Rafiq; Kim, Taisun

    2012-03-01

    We describe a novel HPV 9G DNA chip test for the accurate and reliable genotyping of human papillomavirus (HPV). The HPV 9G DNA chip test established its efficiency in terms of a signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of 200, which is 50 times superior to commercial HPV DNA chips, and 100% target-specific hybridization at 25°C. We compared the genotyping results for the 439 clinical samples by the HPV 9G DNA chip test with the sequencing results for the MY11/GP6+ (M2) primer set-mediated PCR products. The discrimination of HPV genotypes in the 151 HPV-positive clinical samples by the HPV 9G DNA chip test were 100% identical with the sequencing analysis. The clinical sensitivities of HPV genotyping by the HPV 9G DNA chip test and a commercial HPV DNA chip test were 100% and 88%, respectively. However, the clinical specificities of HPV genotyping by the HPV 9G DNA chip test and the commercial HPV DNA chip test were 100% and 94%, respectively. The 100% clinical sensitivity and specificity of the HPV 9G DNA chip test make it a promising diagnostic tool for HPV genotyping.

  6. Engineering cortical neuron polarity with nanomagnets on a chip.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Anja; Tseng, Peter; Godzich, Chanya; Murray, Coleman; Caputo, Anna; Schweizer, Felix E; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Intra- and extracellular signaling play critical roles in cell polarity, ultimately leading to the development of functional cell-cell connections, tissues, and organs. In the brain, pathologically oriented neurons are often the cause for disordered circuits, severely impacting motor function, perception, and memory. Aside from control through gene expression and signaling pathways, it is known that nervous system development can be manipulated by mechanical stimuli (e.g., outgrowth of axons through externally applied forces). The inverse is true as well: intracellular molecular signals can be converted into forces to yield axonal outgrowth. The complete role played by mechanical signals in mediating single-cell polarity, however, remains currently unclear. Here we employ highly parallelized nanomagnets on a chip to exert local mechanical stimuli on cortical neurons, independently of the amount of superparamagnetic nanoparticles taken up by the cells. The chip-based approach was utilized to quantify the effect of nanoparticle-mediated forces on the intracellular cytoskeleton as visualized by the distribution of the microtubule-associated protein tau. While single cortical neurons prefer to assemble tau proteins following poly-L-lysine surface cues, an optimal force range of 4.5-70 pN by the nanomagnets initiated a tau distribution opposed to the pattern cue. In larger cell clusters (groups comprising six or more cells), nanoparticle-mediated forces induced tau repositioning in an observed range of 190-270 pN, and initiation of magnetic field-directed cell displacement was observed at forces above 300 pN. Our findings lay the groundwork for high-resolution mechanical encoding of neural networks in vitro, mechanically driven cell polarization in brain tissues, and neurotherapeutic approaches using functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles to potentially restore disordered neural circuits.

  7. 75 FR 16507 - In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory... certain semiconductor chips having synchronous dynamic random access memory controllers and products... section 337 by importing certain semiconductor chips having synchronous dynamic random access...

  8. 75 FR 44989 - In the Matter of Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers and Products... chips having synchronous dynamic random access memory controllers and product containing the same by... importing certain semiconductor chips having synchronous dynamic random access memory controllers...

  9. "NeuroStem Chip": a novel highly specialized tool to study neural differentiation pathways in human stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Anisimov, Sergey V; Christophersen, Nicolaj S; Correia, Ana S; Li, Jia-Yi; Brundin, Patrik

    2007-01-01

    Background Human stem cells are viewed as a possible source of neurons for a cell-based therapy of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. Several protocols that generate different types of neurons from human stem cells (hSCs) have been developed. Nevertheless, the cellular mechanisms that underlie the development of neurons in vitro as they are subjected to the specific differentiation protocols are often poorly understood. Results We have designed a focused DNA (oligonucleotide-based) large-scale microarray platform (named "NeuroStem Chip") and used it to study gene expression patterns in hSCs as they differentiate into neurons. We have selected genes that are relevant to cells (i) being stem cells, (ii) becoming neurons, and (iii) being neurons. The NeuroStem Chip has over 1,300 pre-selected gene targets and multiple controls spotted in quadruplicates (~46,000 spots total). In this study, we present the NeuroStem Chip in detail and describe the special advantages it offers to the fields of experimental neurology and stem cell biology. To illustrate the utility of NeuroStem Chip platform, we have characterized an undifferentiated population of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, cell line SA02). In addition, we have performed a comparative gene expression analysis of those cells versus a heterogeneous population of hESC-derived cells committed towards neuronal/dopaminergic differentiation pathway by co-culturing with PA6 stromal cells for 16 days and containing a few tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopaminergic neurons. Conclusion We characterized the gene expression profiles of undifferentiated and dopaminergic lineage-committed hESC-derived cells using a highly focused custom microarray platform (NeuroStem Chip) that can become an important research tool in human stem cell biology. We propose that the areas of application for NeuroStem microarray platform could be the following: (i) characterization of the expression of established

  10. Lensless fluorescent microscopy on a chip.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Ahmet F; Su, Ting-Wei; Sencan, Ikbal; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-08-17

    On-chip lensless imaging in general aims to replace bulky lens-based optical microscopes with simpler and more compact designs, especially for high-throughput screening applications. This emerging technology platform has the potential to eliminate the need for bulky and/or costly optical components through the help of novel theories and digital reconstruction algorithms. Along the same lines, here we demonstrate an on-chip fluorescent microscopy modality that can achieve e.g., <4 μm spatial resolution over an ultra-wide field-of-view (FOV) of >0.6-8 cm(2) without the use of any lenses, mechanical-scanning or thin-film based interference filters. In this technique, fluorescent excitation is achieved through a prism or hemispherical-glass interface illuminated by an incoherent source. After interacting with the entire object volume, this excitation light is rejected by total-internal-reflection (TIR) process that is occurring at the bottom of the sample micro-fluidic chip. The fluorescent emission from the excited objects is then collected by a fiber-optic faceplate or a taper and is delivered to an optoelectronic sensor array such as a charge-coupled-device (CCD). By using a compressive-sampling based decoding algorithm, the acquired lensfree raw fluorescent images of the sample can be rapidly processed to yield e.g., <4 μm resolution over an FOV of >0.6-8 cm(2). Moreover, vertically stacked micro-channels that are separated by e.g., 50-100 μm can also be successfully imaged using the same lensfree on-chip microscopy platform, which further increases the overall throughput of this modality. This compact on-chip fluorescent imaging platform, with a rapid compressive decoder behind it, could be rather valuable for high-throughput cytometry, rare-cell research and microarray-analysis.

  11. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Renita E.; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics. PMID:26808388

  12. Biomechanical Strain Exacerbates Inflammation on a Progeria-on-a-Chip Model.

    PubMed

    Ribas, João; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Pitrez, Patrícia R; Leijten, Jeroen; Miscuglio, Mario; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Nissan, Xavier; Ferreira, Lino; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-02-17

    Organ-on-a-chip platforms seek to recapitulate the complex microenvironment of human organs using miniaturized microfluidic devices. Besides modeling healthy organs, these devices have been used to model diseases, yielding new insights into pathophysiology. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disease showing accelerated vascular aging, leading to the death of patients due to cardiovascular diseases. HGPS targets primarily vascular cells, which reside in mechanically active tissues. Here, a progeria-on-a-chip model is developed and the effects of biomechanical strain are examined in the context of vascular aging and disease. Physiological strain induces a contractile phenotype in primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs), while a pathological strain induces a hypertensive phenotype similar to that of angiotensin II treatment. Interestingly, SMCs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells of HGPS donors (HGPS iPS-SMCs), but not from healthy donors, show an exacerbated inflammatory response to strain. In particular, increased levels of inflammation markers as well as DNA damage are observed. Pharmacological intervention reverses the strain-induced damage by shifting gene expression profile away from inflammation. The progeria-on-a-chip is a relevant platform to study biomechanics in vascular biology, particularly in the setting of vascular disease and aging, while simultaneously facilitating the discovery of new drugs and/or therapeutic targets.

  13. 75 FR 51843 - In the Matter of Certain Large Scale Integrated Circuit Semiconductor Chips and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Matter of Certain Large Scale Integrated Circuit Semiconductor Chips and Products Containing the Same... certain large scale integrated circuit semiconductor chips and products containing same by reason...

  14. Flip-chip light emitting diode with resonant optical microcavity

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Bogart, Katherine H.A.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2005-11-29

    A flip-chip light emitting diode with enhanced efficiency. The device structure employs a microcavity structure in a flip-chip configuration. The microcavity enhances the light emission in vertical modes, which are readily extracted from the device. Most of the rest of the light is emitted into waveguided lateral modes. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on dielectric substrates (e.g., gallium nitride LEDs grown on sapphire substrates) in general due to better thermal dissipation and lower series resistance. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for microcavity LEDs in particular because (a) one of the reflectors is a high-reflectivity metal ohmic contact that is already part of the flip-chip configuration, and (b) current conduction is only required through a single distributed Bragg reflector. Some of the waveguided lateral modes can also be extracted with angled sidewalls used for the interdigitated contacts in the flip-chip configuration.

  15. The security implications of VeriChip cloning.

    PubMed

    Halamka, John; Juels, Ari; Stubblefield, Adam; Westhues, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The VeriChip is a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) tag produced commercially for implantation in human beings. Its proposed uses include identification of medical patients, physical access control, contactless retail payment, and even the tracing of kidnapping victims. As the authors explain, the VeriChip is vulnerable to simple, over-the-air spoofing attacks. In particular, an attacker capable of scanning a VeriChip, eavesdropping on its signal, or simply learning its serial number can create a spoof device whose radio appearance is indistinguishable from the original. We explore the practical implications of this security vulnerability. The authors argue that:1 The VeriChip should serve exclusively for identification, and not authentication or access control. 2 Paradoxically, for bearer safety, a VeriChip should be easy to spoof; an attacker then has less incentive to coerce victims or extract VeriChips from victims' bodies.

  16. Thermoacoustic chips with carbon nanotube thin yarn arrays.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yang; Lin, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Kaili; Liu, Peng; Li, Qunqing; Fan, Shoushan

    2013-10-09

    Aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) films drawn from CNT arrays have shown the potential as thermoacoustic loudspeakers. CNT thermoacoustic chips with robust structures are proposed to promote the applications. The silicon-based chips can play sound and fascinating rhythms by feeding alternating currents and audio signal to the suspending CNT thin yarn arrays across grooves in them. In additional to the thin yarns, experiments further revealed more essential elements of the chips, the groove depth and the interdigital electrodes. The sound pressure depends on the depth of the grooves, and the thermal wavelength can be introduced to define the influence-free depth. The interdigital fingers can effectively reduce the driving voltage, making the chips safe and easy to use. The chips were successfully assembled into earphones and have been working stably for about one year. The thermoacoustic chips can find many applications in consumer electronics and possibly improve the audiovisual experience.

  17. A primary battery-on-a-chip using monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iost, Rodrigo M.; Crespilho, Frank N.; Kern, Klaus; Balasubramanian, Kannan

    2016-07-01

    We present here a bottom-up approach for realizing on-chip on-demand batteries starting out with chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene. Single graphene monolayers contacted by electrode lines on a silicon chip serve as electrodes. The anode and cathode are realized by electrodeposition of zinc and copper respectively onto graphene, leading to the realization of a miniature graphene-based Daniell cell on a chip. The electrolyte is housed partly in a gel and partly in liquid form in an on-chip enclosure molded using a 3d printer or made out of poly(dimethylsiloxane). The realized batteries provide a stable voltage (∼1.1 V) for many hours and exhibit capacities as high as 15 μAh, providing enough power to operate a pocket calculator. The realized batteries show promise for deployment as on-chip power sources for autonomous systems in lab-on-a-chip or biomedical applications.

  18. Bulk-micromachined submicroliter-volume PCR chip with very rapid thermal response and low power consumption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Sik; Park, Se Ho; Yang, Haesik; Chung, Kwang-Hyo; Yoon, Tae Hwan; Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Kyuwon; Kim, Youn Tae

    2004-08-01

    The current paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a micromachined submicroliter-volume polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip with a fast thermal response and very low power consumption. The chip consists of a bulk-micromachined Si component and hot-embossed poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) component. The Si component contains an integral microheater and temperature sensor on a thermally well-isolated membrane, while the PMMA component contains a submicroliter-volume PCR chamber, valves, and channels. The micro hot membrane under the submicroliter-volume chamber is a silicon oxide/silicon nitride/silicon oxide (O/N/O) diaphragm with a thickness of 1.9 microm, resulting in a very low thermal mass. In experiments, the proposed chip only required 45 mW to heat the reaction chamber to 92 degrees C, the denaturation temperature of DNA, plus the heating and cooling rates are about 80 degrees C s(-1) and 60 degrees C s(-1), respectively. We validated, from the fluorescence results from DNA stained with SYBR Green I, that the proposed chip amplified the DNA from vector clone, containing tumor suppressor gene BRCA 1 (127 base pairs at 11th exon), after 30 thermal cycles of 3 s, 5 s, and 5 s at 92 degrees C, 55 degrees C, and 72 degrees C, respectively, in a 200 nL-volume chamber. As for specificity of DNA products, owing to difficulty in analyzing the very small volume PCR results from the micro chip, we vicariously employed the larger volume PCR products after cycling with the same sustaining temperatures as with the micro chip but with much slower ramping rates (3.3 degrees C s(-1) when rising, 2.5 degrees C s(-1) when cooling) within circa 20 minutes on a commercial PCR machine and confirmed the specificity to BRCA 1 (127 base pairs) with agarose gel electrophoresis. Accordingly, the fabricated micro chip demonstrated a very low power consumption and rapid thermal response, both of which are crucial to the development of a fully integrated and battery

  19. ChIP-on-chip significance analysis reveals large-scale binding and regulation by human transcription factor oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Adam A.; Palomero, Teresa; Sumazin, Pavel; Califano, Andrea; Ferrando, Adolfo A.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    ChIP-on-chip has emerged as a powerful tool to dissect the complex network of regulatory interactions between transcription factors and their targets. However, most ChIP-on-chip analysis methods use conservative approaches aimed at minimizing false-positive transcription factor targets. We present a model with improved sensitivity in detecting binding events from ChIP-on-chip data. Its application to human T cells, followed by extensive biochemical validation, reveals that 3 oncogenic transcription factors, NOTCH1, MYC, and HES1, bind to several thousand target gene promoters, up to an order of magnitude increase over conventional analysis methods. Gene expression profiling upon NOTCH1 inhibition shows broad-scale functional regulation across the entire range of predicted target genes, establishing a closer link between occupancy and regulation. Finally, the increased sensitivity reveals a combinatorial regulatory program in which MYC cobinds to virtually all NOTCH1-bound promoters. Overall, these results suggest an unappreciated complexity of transcriptional regulatory networks and highlight the fundamental importance of genome-scale analysis to represent transcriptional programs. PMID:19118200

  20. ChIP-on-chip significance analysis reveals large-scale binding and regulation by human transcription factor oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Margolin, Adam A; Palomero, Teresa; Sumazin, Pavel; Califano, Andrea; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2009-01-06

    ChIP-on-chip has emerged as a powerful tool to dissect the complex network of regulatory interactions between transcription factors and their targets. However, most ChIP-on-chip analysis methods use conservative approaches aimed at minimizing false-positive transcription factor targets. We present a model with improved sensitivity in detecting binding events from ChIP-on-chip data. Its application to human T cells, followed by extensive biochemical validation, reveals that 3 oncogenic transcription factors, NOTCH1, MYC, and HES1, bind to several thousand target gene promoters, up to an order of magnitude increase over conventional analysis methods. Gene expression profiling upon NOTCH1 inhibition shows broad-scale functional regulation across the entire range of predicted target genes, establishing a closer link between occupancy and regulation. Finally, the increased sensitivity reveals a combinatorial regulatory program in which MYC cobinds to virtually all NOTCH1-bound promoters. Overall, these results suggest an unappreciated complexity of transcriptional regulatory networks and highlight the fundamental importance of genome-scale analysis to represent transcriptional programs.

  1. Gene expression profiles in liver of mouse after chronic exposure to drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Dayong; Zhang, Xuxiang; Kong, Zhiming; Cheng, Shupei

    2009-10-01

    cDNA micorarray approach was applied to hepatic transcriptional profile analysis in male mouse (Mus musculus, ICR) to assess the potential health effects of drinking water in Nanjing, China. Mice were treated with continuous exposure to drinking water for 90 days. Hepatic gene expression was analyzed with Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 arrays, and pathway analysis was carried out by Molecule Annotation System 2.0 and KEGG pathway database. A total of 836 genes were found to be significantly altered (1.5-fold, P < or = 0.05), including 294 up-regulated genes and 542 down-regulated genes. According to biological pathway analysis, drinking water exposure resulted in aberration of gene expression and biological pathways linked to xenobiotic metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle and oxidative stress response. Further, deregulation of several genes associated with carcinogenesis or tumor progression including Ccnd1, Egfr, Map2k3, Mcm2, Orc2l and Smad2 was observed. Although transcription changes in identified genes are unlikely to be used as a sole indicator of adverse health effects, the results of this study could enhance our understanding of early toxic effects of drinking water exposure and support future studies on drinking water safety.

  2. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Elferink, M.G.L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E.M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W.G.; Heisterkamp, S.H.; Groothuis, G.M.M.

    2011-05-15

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be directly extrapolated to humans due to species differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate precision-cut human liver slices as in vitro method for the prediction of human specific toxicity by toxicogenomics. The liver slices contain all cell types of the liver in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process. Previously we showed that toxicogenomic analysis of rat liver slices is highly predictive for rat in vivo toxicity. In this study we investigated the levels of gene expression during incubation up to 24 h with Affymetrix microarray technology. The analysis was focused on a broad spectrum of genes related to stress and toxicity, and on genes encoding for phase-I, -II and -III metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Observed changes in gene expression were associated with cytoskeleton remodeling, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion, but for the ADME-Tox related genes only minor changes were observed. PCA analysis showed that changes in gene expression were not associated with age, sex or source of the human livers. Slices treated with acetaminophen showed patterns of gene expression related to its toxicity. These results indicate that precision-cut human liver slices are relatively stable during 24 h of incubation and represent a valuable model for human in vitro hepatotoxicity testing despite the human inter-individual variability.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling in the Type 1 Diabetes Rat Diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    van Lunteren, Erik; Moyer, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Respiratory muscle contractile performance is impaired by diabetes, mechanisms of which included altered carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and changes in membrane electrophysiology. The present study examined to what extent these cellular perturbations involve changes in gene expression. Methodology/Principal Findings Diaphragm muscle from streptozotocin-diabetic rats was analyzed with Affymetrix gene expression arrays. Diaphragm from diabetic rats had 105 genes with at least ±2-fold significantly changed expression (55 increased, 50 decreased), and these were assigned to gene ontology groups based on over-representation analysis using DAVID software. There was increased expression of genes involved in palmitoyl-CoA hydrolase activity (a component of lipid metabolism) (P = 0.037, n = 2 genes, fold change 4.2 to 27.5) and reduced expression of genes related to carbohydrate metabolism (P = 0.000061, n = 8 genes, fold change −2.0 to −8.5). Other gene ontology groups among upregulated genes were protein ubiquitination (P = 0.0053, n = 4, fold change 2.2 to 3.4), oxidoreductase activity (P = 0.024, n = 8, fold change 2.1 to 6.0), and morphogenesis (P = 0.012, n = 10, fold change 2.1 to 4.3). Other downregulated gene groups were extracellular region (including extracellular matrix and collagen) (P = 0.00032, n = 13, fold change −2.2 to −3.7) and organogenesis (P = 0.032, n = 7, fold change −2.1 to −3.7). Real-time PCR confirmed the directionality of changes in gene expression for 30 of 31 genes tested. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that in diaphragm muscle type 1 diabetes increases expression of genes involved in lipid energetics, oxidative stress and protein ubiquitination, decreases expression of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, and has little effect on expression of ion channel genes. Reciprocal changes in expression of genes involved in

  4. Association of candidate genes with antisocial drug dependence in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Robin P.; Zeiger, Joanna S.; Crowley, Thomas; Ehringer, Marissa A.; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.; Lessem, Jeffrey; McQueen, Matthew B.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Smolen, Andrew; Stallings, Michael C.; Young, Susan E.; Krauter, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    The Colorado Center for Antisocial Drug Dependence (CADD) is using several research designs and strategies in its study of the genetic basis for antisocial drug dependence in adolescents. This study reports Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) association results from a Targeted Gene Assay (SNP chip) of 231 Caucasian male probands in treatment with antisocial drug dependence and a matched set of community controls. The SNP chip was designed to assay 1500 SNPs distributed across 50 candidate genes that have had associations with substance use disorders and conduct disorder. There was an average gene-wide inter-SNP interval of 3000 base pairs. After eliminating SNPs with poor signals and low minor allele frequencies, 60 nominally significant associations were found among the remaining 1073 SNPs in 18 of 49 candidate genes. Although none of the SNPs achieved genome-wide association significance levels (defined as p < .000001), two genes probed with multiple SNPs (OPRM1 and CHRNA2) emerged as plausible candidates for a role in antisocial drug dependence after gene-based permutation tests. The custom-designed SNP chip served as an effective and flexible platform for rapid interrogation of a large number of plausible candidate genes. PMID:18384978

  5. Gene Therapy for Fracture Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    relative transgene expression efficiencies for the MLV-based and lentiviral-based vectors, the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) was used as...for both Cy3 and Cy5 2,-15i Hybridized to to Aigilent Rat -s 2-- Gene Chip - iGnTrr. . tea 2 ug universal RNAw silx sl59 (?es) Cy310-0 (control) 1...fractures were also examined at sacrifice for evidence of fibrosis due to irritation or migration of the stabilizing pin. None was observed and the fracture

  6. Lithographic chip identification: meeting the failure analysis challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Lynn; Riddell, Kevin G.; Flack, Warren W.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes a novel method using stepper photolithography to uniquely identify individual chips for permanent traceability. A commercially available 1X stepper is used to mark chips with an identifier or `serial number' which can be encoded with relevant information for the integrated circuit manufacturer. The permanent identification of individual chips can improve current methods of quality control, failure analysis, and inventory control. The need for this technology is escalating as manufacturers seek to provide six sigma quality control for their products and trace fabrication problems to their source. This need is especially acute for parts that fail after packaging and are returned to the manufacturer for analysis. Using this novel approach, failure analysis data can be tied back to a particular batch, wafer, or even a position within a wafer. Process control can be enhanced by identifying the root cause of chip failures. Chip identification also addresses manufacturers concerns with increasing incidences of chip theft. Since chips currently carry no identification other than the manufacturer's name and part number, recovery efforts are hampered by the inability to determine the sales history of a specific packaged chip. A definitive identifier or serial number for each chip would address this concern. The results of chip identification (patent pending) are easily viewed through a low power microscope. Batch number, wafer number, exposure step, and chip location within the exposure step can be recorded, as can dates and other items of interest. An explanation of the chip identification procedure and processing requirements are described. Experimental testing and results are presented, and potential applications are discussed.

  7. Evaluation of the MIDTAL microarray chip for monitoring toxic microalgae in the Orkney Islands, U.K.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joe D; Berzano, Marco; Percy, Linda; Lewis, Jane

    2013-10-01

    Harmful or nuisance algal blooms can cause economic damage to fisheries and tourism. Additionally, toxins produced by harmful algae and ingested via contaminated shellfish can be potentially fatal to humans. The seas around the Orkney Islands, UK currently hold a number of toxic algal species which cause shellfishery closures in most years. Extensive and costly monitoring programs are carried out to detect harmful microalgae before they reach action levels. However, the ability to distinguish between toxic and non-toxic strains of some algae is not possible using these methods. The microarrays for the detection of toxic algae (MIDTAL) microarray contains rRNA probes for toxic algal species/strains which have been adapted and optimized for microarray use. In order to investigate the use of the chip for monitoring in the Orkney Islands, samples were collected between 2009 and 2011 from Brings Deep, Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands, UK; RNA was extracted and hybridized with generation 2 and 3.1 of the chip. The data were then compared to cell counts performed under light microscopy and in the case of Alexandrium tamarense to qPCR data targeting the saxitoxin gene and the LSU-rRNA gene. A good agreement between cell numbers and microarray signal was found for A. tamarense, Pseudo-nitzschia sp., Dinophysis sp. (r<0.5, for all) in addition to this there the chip successfully detected a large bloom of Karenia mikimotoi (r<0.70) in August and September 2011. Overall, there was good improvement in probe signal between generation 2 and generation 3.1 of the chip with much less variability and more consistent results and better correlation between the probes. The chip performed well for A. tamarense group I signal to cell numbers in calibrations (r>0.9). However, in field samples, this correlation was slightly lower suggesting interactions between all species in the sample may affect signal. Overall, the chip showed it could identify the presence of target species in field samples

  8. Identification of genes and candidate agents associated with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-sheng; Liu, Zhen; Sun, Shao-long; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignant neoplasm originating from transformed cells arising in tissues forming the pancreas. A major challenge in current cancer research is biological interpretation of complexity of cancer somatic mutation profiles. It has been suggested that several molecular alterations may play important roles in pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this study, by using the GSE28735 affymetrix microarray data accessible from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between paired pancreatic cancer tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues, followed the protein-protein interaction of the DEGs. Our study identified thousands of DEGs involved in regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis in progression of pancreatic cancer. Sp1 was predicted to be the major regulator by transcription factors analysis. From the protein-protein interaction networks, we found that Tk1 might play an important role in the progression of pancreatic cancer. Finally, we predicted candidate agents, including tomatidine and nialamide, which may be used as drugs to treat pancreatic cancer. In conclusion, our data provide a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of genes and pathways which may be involved in the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Improving chip-to-chip precision in disposable microchip capillary electrophoresis devices with internal standards.

    PubMed

    Bidulock, Allison C E; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2015-03-01

    To realize portable systems for routine measurements in point-of-care settings, MCE methods are required to be robust across many single-use chips. While it is well-known internal standards (ISTDs) improve run-to-run precision, a systematic investigation is necessary to determine the significance of chip-to-chip imprecision in MCE and how ISTDs account for it. This paper addresses this question by exploring the reproducibility of Na quantification across six basic, in-house fabricated microchips. A dataset of 900 electrophoerograms was collected from analyzing five concentrations of NaCl with two ISTDs (CsCl and LiCl). While both improved the peak area reproducibility, the Na/Cs ratio was superior to the Na/Li ratio (improving the RSD by a factor of 2-4, depending on the Na concentration). We attribute this to the significant variation in microchannel surface properties, which was accounted for by cesium but not lithium. Microchip dimension and detector variations were only a few percent, and could be improved through commercial fabrication over in-house made microchips. These results demonstrate that ISTDs not only correct for intrachip imprecision, but are also a viable means to correct for chip-to-chip imprecision inherent in disposable, point-of-care MCE devices. However, as expected, the internal standard must be carefully chosen.

  10. Differential expression of toll-like receptor genes: sepsis compared with sterile inflammation 1 day before sepsis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, Matthew E; Johnson, Steven B; Bochicchio, Grant V; Feild, Carinda J; Cross, Alan S; Hasday, Jeffrey D; Whiteford, Craig C; Nussbaumer, William A; Towns, Michael; Scalea, Thomas M

    2009-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical components of innate immunity. This study was designed to evaluate differential expression of genes for TLR and associated signal transduction molecules in critically ill patients developing sepsis compared with those with sterile inflammation. Uninfected critically ill patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome were prospectively followed daily for development of sepsis. They were divided into two groups and compared in a case-control manner: (a) preseptic patients (n = 45) who subsequently developed sepsis, and (b) uninfected systemic inflammatory response syndrome patients (n = 45) who remained uninfected. Whole blood RNA was collected (PAXGene tube) at study entry and 1, 2, and 3 days before clinical sepsis diagnosis (or time-matched uninfected control) and analyzed via Affymetrix Hg_U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Genes were considered differentially expressed if they met univariate significance controlled for multiple comparisons at P < 0.005. Differentially expressed probes were uploaded into the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. The TLR pathway (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes-KEGG) significance was determined via Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer (EASE) scoring. A total of 2,974 Affymetrix probes representing 2,190 unique genes were differentially expressed 1 day before sepsis diagnosis. Thirty-six probes representing 25 genes were annotated to the TLR pathway (KEGG) via the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery with an EASE score at P < 0.0004. Notable TLR genes demonstrating increased expression include TLR-4 (median, 1.43-fold change), TLR-5 (2.08-fold change), and MAPK14 (1.90-fold change). An additional 11 unique genes were manually annotated into the TLR pathway based on known relevance such as TLR-8 (1.54-fold change). The total 36 genes contained 28 showing increased expression and 8 showing decreased expression. Differential gene

  11. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips ide