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Sample records for affymetrix gene expression

  1. Qualitative assessment of gene expression in affymetrix genechip arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix Genechip microarrays are used widely to determine the simultaneous expression of genes in a given biological paradigm. Probes on the Genechip array are atomic entities which by definition are randomly distributed across the array and in turn govern the gene expression. In the present study, we make several interesting observations. We show that there is considerable correlation between the probe intensities across the array which defy the independence assumption. While the mechanism behind such correlations is unclear, we show that scaling behavior and the profiles of perfect match (PM) as well as mismatch (MM) probes are similar and immune-to-background subtraction. We believe that the observed correlations are possibly an outcome of inherent non-stationarities or patchiness in the array devoid of biological significance. This is demonstrated by inspecting their scaling behavior and profiles of the PM and MM probe intensities obtained from publicly available Genechip arrays from three eukaryotic genomes, namely: Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), Homo sapiens (humans) and Mus musculus (house mouse) across distinct biological paradigms and across laboratories, with and without background subtraction. The fluctuation functions were estimated using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) with fourth-order polynomial detrending. The results presented in this study provide new insights into correlation signatures of PM and MM probe intensities and suggests the choice of DFA as a tool for qualitative assessment of Affymetrix Genechip microarrays prior to their analysis. A more detailed investigation is necessary in order to understand the source of these correlations.

  2. Gene Expression in the Rat Brain during Sleep Deprivation and Recovery Sleep: An Affymetrix GeneChip® Study

    PubMed Central

    Terao, A.; Wisor, J.P.; Peyron, C.; Apte-Deshpande, A.; Wurts, S.W.; Edgar, D.M.; Kilduff, T.S.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that macromolecular synthesis in the brain is modulated in association with the occurrence of sleep and wakefulness. Similarly, the spectral composition of electroencephalographic activity that occurs during sleep is dependent on the duration of prior wakefulness. Since this homeostatic relationship between wake and sleep is highly conserved across mammalian species, genes that are truly involved in the electroencephalographic response to sleep deprivation (SD) might be expected to be conserved across mammalian species. Therefore, in the rat cerebral cortex, we have studied the effects of SD on the expression of immediate early gene (IEG) and heat shock protein (HSP) mRNAs previously shown to be upregulated in the mouse brain in SD and in recovery sleep (RS) after SD. We find that the molecular response to SD and RS in the brain is highly conserved between these two mammalian species, at least in terms of expression of IEG and HSP family members. Using Affymetrix Neurobiology U34 GeneChips®, we also screened the rat cerebral cortex, basal forebrain, and hypothalamus for other genes whose expression may be modulated by SD or RS. We find that the response of the basal forebrain to SD is more similar to that of the cerebral cortex than to the hypothalamus. Together, these results suggest that sleep-dependent changes in gene expression in the cerebral cortex are similar across rodent species and therefore may underlie sleep history-dependent changes in sleep electroencephalographic activity. PMID:16257491

  3. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  4. Global Expression Patterns of Three Festuca Species Exposed to Different Doses of Glyphosate Using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

    PubMed Central

    Cebeci, Ozge; Budak, Hikmet

    2009-01-01

    Glyphosate has been shown to act as an inhibitor of an aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway, while other pathways that may be affected by glyphosate are not known. Cross species hybridizations can provide a tool for elucidating biological pathways conserved among organisms. Comparative genome analyses have indicated a high level of colinearity among grass species and Festuca, on which we focus here, and showed rearrangements common to the Pooideae family. Based on sequence conservation among grass species, we selected the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array as a tool for the analysis of expression profiles of three Festuca (fescue) species with distinctly different tolerances to varying levels of glyphosate. Differences in transcript expression were recorded upon foliar glyphosate application at 1.58 mM and 6.32 mM, representing 5% and 20%, respectively, of the recommended rate. Differences highlighted categories of general metabolic processes, such as photosynthesis, protein synthesis, stress responses, and a larger number of transcripts responded to 20% glyphosate application. Differential expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the shikimic acid pathway could not be identified by cross hybridization. Microarray data were confirmed by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analyses. This is the first report to analyze the potential of cross species hybridization in Fescue species and the data and analyses will help extend our knowledge on the cellular processes affected by glyphosate. PMID:20182642

  5. A comparison of statistical tests for detecting differential expression using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Blakemore, Steven J; Clark, Steven M; Ghosh, Sujoy; Stephens, Richard J; Rajagopalan, Dilip

    2006-01-01

    Signal quantification and detection of differential expression are critical steps in the analysis of Affymetrix microarray data. Many methods have been proposed in the literature for each of these steps. The goal of this paper is to evaluate several signal quantification methods (GCRMA, RSVD, VSN, MAS5, and Resolver) and statistical methods for differential expression (t test, Cyber-T, SAM, LPE, RankProducts, Resolver RatioBuild). Our particular focus is on the ability to detect differential expression via statistical tests. We have used two different datasets for our evaluation. First, we have used the HG-U133 Latin Square spike in dataset developed by Affymetrix. Second, we have used data from an in-house rat liver transcriptomics study following 30 different drug treatments generated using the Affymetrix RAE230A chip. Our overall recommendation based on this study is to use GCRMA for signal quantification. For detection of differential expression, GCRMA coupled with Cyber-T or SAM is the best approach, as measured by area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The integrated pipeline in Resolver RatioBuild combining signal quantification and detection of differential expression is an equally good alternative for detecting differentially expressed genes. For most of the differential expression algorithms we considered, the performance using MAS5 signal quantification was inferior to that of the other methods we evaluated. PMID:17233564

  6. Motif effects in Affymetrix GeneChips seriously affect probe intensities

    PubMed Central

    Upton, Graham J. G.; Harrison, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    An Affymetrix GeneChip consists of an array of hundreds of thousands of probes (each a sequence of 25 bases) with the probe values being used to infer the extent to which genes are expressed in the biological material under investigation. In this article, we demonstrate that these probe values are also strongly influenced by their precise base sequence. We use data from >28 000 CEL files relating to 10 different Affymetrix GeneChip platforms and involving nearly 1000 experiments. Our results confirm known effects (those due to the T7-primer and the formation of G-quadruplexes) but reveal other effects. We show that there can be huge variations from one experiment to another, and that there may also be sizeable disparities between batches within an experiment and between CEL files within a batch. PMID:22904084

  7. Using probe secondary structure information to enhance Affymetrix GeneChip background estimates

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Fodor, Anthony A.; Gibas, Cynthia J.

    2007-01-01

    High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are a primary research tool for assessing global gene expression. Background noise on microarrays comprises a significant portion of the measured raw data. A number of statistical techniques have been developed to correct for this background noise. Here, we demonstrate that probe minimum folding energy and structure can be used to enhance a previously existing model for background noise correction. We estimate that probe secondary structure accounts for up to 3% of all variation on Affymetrix microarrays. PMID:17387043

  8. SFP Genotyping from Affymetrix Arrays is Robust but Largely Detects Cis-acting Expression Regulators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent development of Affymetrix chips designed from assembled EST sequences has spawned considerable interest in identifying single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) from transcriptome data. SFPs are valuable genetic markers that potentially offer a physical link to the structural genes themselves....

  9. Using The Affymetrix Wheat Microarray As An Oat Expression Platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in sequencing have resulted in the sequence of a large number of plant expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to entire plant genomes. Using these EST sequences, oligonucleotide microarray chips have been developed for several species including barley (Hordeum vulgare), maize (Zea mays), ric...

  10. MMBGX: a method for estimating expression at the isoform level and detecting differential splicing using whole-transcript Affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    Turro, Ernest; Lewin, Alex; Rose, Anna; Dallman, Margaret J.; Richardson, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Affymetrix has recently developed whole-transcript GeneChips—‘Gene’ and ‘Exon’ arrays—which interrogate exons along the length of each gene. Although each probe on these arrays is intended to hybridize perfectly to only one transcriptional target, many probes match multiple transcripts located in different parts of the genome or alternative isoforms of the same gene. Existing statistical methods for estimating expression do not take this into account and are thus prone to producing inflated estimates. We propose a method, Multi-Mapping Bayesian Gene eXpression (MMBGX), which disaggregates the signal at ‘multi-match’ probes. When applied to Gene arrays, MMBGX removes the upward bias of gene-level expression estimates. When applied to Exon arrays, it can further disaggregate the signal between alternative transcripts of the same gene, providing expression estimates of individual splice variants. We demonstrate the performance of MMBGX on simulated data and a tissue mixture data set. We then show that MMBGX can estimate the expression of alternative isoforms within one experimental condition, confirming our results by RT-PCR. Finally, we show that our method for detecting differential splicing has a lower error rate than standard exon-level approaches on a previously validated colon cancer data set. PMID:19854940

  11. Large-scale analysis of antisense transcription in wheat using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are transcripts of the opposite DNA strand to the sense-strand either at the same locus (cis-encoded) or a different locus (trans-encoded). They can affect gene expression at multiple stages including transcription, RNA processing and transport, and translation....

  12. Performance of the Affymetrix GeneChip HIV PRT 440 Platform for Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Genotyping of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Clades and Viral Isolates with Length Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Vahey, Maryanne; Nau, Martin E.; Barrick, Sandra; Cooley, John D.; Sawyer, Robert; Sleeker, Alex A.; Vickerman, Peter; Bloor, Stuart; Larder, Brendan; Michael, Nelson L.; Wegner, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of a silica chip-based resequencing method, the Affymetrix HIV PRT 440 assay (hereafter referred to as the Affymetrix assay), was evaluated on a panel of well-characterized nonclade B viral isolates and on isolates exhibiting length polymorphisms. Sequencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol cDNAs from clades A, C, D, E, and F resulted in clade-specific regions of base-calling ambiguities in regions not known to be associated with resistance polymorphisms, as well as a small number of spurious resistance polymorphisms. The Affymetrix assay failed to detect the presence of additional serine codons distal to reverse transcriptase (RT) codon 68 that are associated with multinucleoside RT inhibitor resistance. The increasing prevalence of non-clade B HIV-1 strains in the United States and Europe and the identification of clinically relevant pol gene length polymorphisms will impact the generalizability of the Affymetrix assay, emphasizing the need to accommodate this expanding pool of pol genotypes in future assay versions. PMID:10405396

  13. COMPARISON OF GENE EXPRESSION IN TILLER AND RHIZOME MERISTEMS OF PERENNIAL LEYMUS WILDRYES USING AFFYMETRIX GENECHIPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizomes and tillers grow from underground axillary meristems, which are important determinants of perennial growth habit and architecture in grasses. Leymus cinereus grows from intravaginal axillary meristems (tillers), forming a compact tussock year after year. Conversely, L. triticoides grow fr...

  14. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  15. Development and Evaluation of an Affymetrix array for Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-species Affymetrix GeneChip array was developed to study development, metabolism and pathogenicity of A. flavus. This chip based on the whole genome sequence of A. flavus, contains 13,000 A. flavus genes, 8,000 maize genes and 25 human and mouse innate immune response genes, as well as the ...

  16. Gene Expression Profiling and Functional Analysis of Spore Germination in Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A full genome study on conidia and ascospores has been carried out using F. graminearum Affymetrix GeneChips to compare gene expression during germination in complete medium at 0, 2, 8, 24 hours and after 10 days of drought stress. The total number of genes detected in at least one time point was si...

  17. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  18. GENE EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF CONIDIUM MATURATION AND GERMINATION IN FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To understand the infection cycle of the head blight pathogen F. graminearum, gene expression profiles were monitored in newly formed conidia, conidia that had been desiccated for 10 days and germinating conidia using the 18K feature F. graminearum Affymetrix GeneChip. A total of 6,384 positive sign...

  19. A Microarray Analysis for Differential Gene Expression in the Soybean Genome Using Bioconductor and R

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes specific procedures for conducting quality assessment of Affymetrix GeneChip® soybean genome data and performing analyses to determine differential gene expression using the open-source R language and environment in conjunction with the open-source Bioconductor package. Procedu...

  20. Transcriptome profiling and expression analyses of genes critical to wheat adaptation to low temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: To identify the genes involved in the development of low temperature (LT) tolerance in hexaploid wheat, we examined the global changes in expression in response to cold of the 55,052 potentially unique genes represented in the Affymetrix Wheat Genome microarray. We compared the expressi...

  1. Comparison of Gene Expression in Leymus Tiller and Rhizome Meristems Using Heterologous Affymetrix Wheat and Barley Gene Chips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial Leymus wildrye tillers and rhizomes develop from similar underground axillary meristems, but display different response to gravity and perhaps other cues that govern branch angle and overall patterns of subterranean growth. Corresponding variation in growth habit is an important component...

  2. Gene expression in bovine mammary gland in response to increased milking frequency as determined by microarray and SAGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcript profiling was performed by Affymetrix microarray analysis and SAGE to characterize changes in gene expression in the bovine mammary gland in response to 4× versus 2× daily milking during the first week of lactation. These changes in gene expression may contribute to the increased milk pro...

  3. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the μ-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in μ-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power

  4. Gene Expression and Genetic Variation in Human Atria

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Honghuang; Dolmatova, Elena V.; Morley, Michael P.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; McManus, David D.; Magnani, Jared W.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Hakonarson, Hakon; del Monte, Federica; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The human left and right atria have different susceptibilities to develop atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the molecular events related to structural and functional changes that enhance AF susceptibility are still poorly understood. Objective To characterize gene expression and genetic variation in human atria. Methods We studied the gene expression profiles and genetic variations in 53 left atrial and 52 right atrial tissue samples collected from the Myocardial Applied Genomics Network (MAGNet) repository. The tissues were collected from heart failure patients undergoing transplantation and from unused organ donor hearts with normal ventricular function. Gene expression was profiled using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133A Array. Genetic variation was profiled using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results We found that 109 genes were differentially expressed between left and right atrial tissues. A total of 187 and 259 significant cis-associations between transcript levels and genetic variants were identified in left and right atrial tissues, respectively. We also found that a SNP at a known AF locus, rs3740293, was associated with the expression of MYOZ1 in both left and right atrial tissues. Conclusion We found a distinct transcriptional profile between the right and left atrium, and extensive cis-associations between atrial transcripts and common genetic variants. Our results implicate MYOZ1 as the causative gene at the chromosome 10q22 locus for AF. PMID:24177373

  5. Gene expression profiling of soybean near-isogenic lines contrasting in seed protein and oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean profitability is affected by protein and oil content. Thus, an understanding of the genetic controls on protein and oil yield is important for future soybean improvement. In this study, we used Affymetrix soybean genome arrays with >37,500 Glycine max probe sets to compare gene expression pr...

  6. Gene expression profiling in adipose tissue from growing broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Hausman, Gary J; Barb, C Rick; Fairchild, Brian D; Gamble, John; Lee-Rutherford, Laura

    2014-01-01

    In this study, total RNA was collected from abdominal adipose tissue samples obtained from ten broiler chickens at 3, 4, 5, and 6 weeks of age and prepared for gene microarray analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays (Affymetrix) and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Studies of global gene expression in chicken adipose tissue were initiated since such studies in many animal species show that adipose tissue expresses and secretes many factors that can influence growth and physiology. Microarray results indicated 333 differentially expressed adipose tissue genes between 3 and 6 wk, 265 differentially expressed genes between 4 and 6 wk and 42 differentially expressed genes between 3 and 4 wk. Enrichment scores of Gene Ontology Biological Process categories indicated strong age upregulation of genes involved in the immune system response. In addition to microarray analysis, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to confirm the influence of age on the expression of adipose tissue CC chemokine ligands (CCL), toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF factor (LITAF), chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 8 (CCR8), and several other genes. Between 3 and 6 wk of age CCL5, CCL1, and CCR8 expression increased (P = 0.0001) with age. Furthermore, TLR2, CCL19, and LITAF expression increased between 4 and 6 wk of age (P = 0.001). This is the first demonstration of age related changes in CCL, LITAF, and TLR2 gene expression in chicken adipose tissue. Future studies are needed to elucidate the role of these adipose tissue genes in growth and the immune system. PMID:26317054

  7. CEL_INTERROGATOR: A FREE AND OPEN SOURCE PACKAGE FOR AFFYMETRIX CEL FILE PARSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CEL_Interrogator Package is a suite of programs designed to extract the average probe intensity and other information for each probe sequence from an Affymetrix GeneChip CEL file and unite them with their human-readable Affymetrix consensus sequence names. The resulting text file is suitable for di...

  8. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform. PMID:21498550

  9. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuefel; Kang, Huining; Fields, Chris; Cowie, Jim R.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Xu, Yuexian; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul; Andries, Erik; Ar, Kerem; Potter, Jeffrey; Willman, Cheryl L.; Murphy, Maurice H.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  10. The Medicago truncatula gene expression atlas web server

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Legumes (Leguminosae or Fabaceae) play a major role in agriculture. Transcriptomics studies in the model legume species, Medicago truncatula, are instrumental in helping to formulate hypotheses about the role of legume genes. With the rapid growth of publically available Affymetrix GeneChip Medicago Genome Array GeneChip data from a great range of tissues, cell types, growth conditions, and stress treatments, the legume research community desires an effective bioinformatics system to aid efforts to interpret the Medicago genome through functional genomics. We developed the Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA) web server for this purpose. Description The Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA) web server is a centralized platform for analyzing the Medicago transcriptome. Currently, the web server hosts gene expression data from 156 Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago genome arrays in 64 different experiments, covering a broad range of developmental and environmental conditions. The server enables flexible, multifaceted analyses of transcript data and provides a range of additional information about genes, including different types of annotation and links to the genome sequence, which help users formulate hypotheses about gene function. Transcript data can be accessed using Affymetrix probe identification number, DNA sequence, gene name, functional description in natural language, GO and KEGG annotation terms, and InterPro domain number. Transcripts can also be discovered through co-expression or differential expression analysis. Flexible tools to select a subset of experiments and to visualize and compare expression profiles of multiple genes have been implemented. Data can be downloaded, in part or full, in a tabular form compatible with common analytical and visualization software. The web server will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate new gene expression data and genome annotation, and is accessible at: http://bioinfo.noble.org/gene

  11. Power enhancement via multivariate outlier testing with gene expression arrays

    PubMed Central

    Asare, Adam L.; Carey, Vincent J.; Wang, Richard; Seyfert-Margolis, Vicki

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: As the use of microarrays in human studies continues to increase, stringent quality assurance is necessary to ensure accurate experimental interpretation. We present a formal approach for microarray quality assessment that is based on dimension reduction of established measures of signal and noise components of expression followed by parametric multivariate outlier testing. Results: We applied our approach to several data resources. First, as a negative control, we found that the Affymetrix and Illumina contributions to MAQC data were free from outliers at a nominal outlier flagging rate of α=0.01. Second, we created a tunable framework for artificially corrupting intensity data from the Affymetrix Latin Square spike-in experiment to allow investigation of sensitivity and specificity of quality assurance (QA) criteria. Third, we applied the procedure to 507 Affymetrix microarray GeneChips processed with RNA from human peripheral blood samples. We show that exclusion of arrays by this approach substantially increases inferential power, or the ability to detect differential expression, in large clinical studies. Availability: http://bioconductor.org/packages/2.3/bioc/html/arrayMvout.html and http://bioconductor.org/packages/2.3/bioc/html/affyContam.html affyContam (credentials: readonly/readonly) Contact: aasare@immunetolerance.org; stvjc@channing.harvard.edu PMID:19015138

  12. Nanobarcode gene expression monitoring system for potential miniaturized space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Weiming; Eastman, P. Scott; Cooke, Patrick A.; Park, Jennifer S.; Chu, Julia S. F.; Gray, Joe W.; Li, Song; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    Manned mission to space has been threatened by various cosmos risks including radiation, mirogravity, vacuum, confinement, etc., which may cause genetic variations of astronauts and eventually lead to damages of their health. Thus, the development of small biomedical devices, which can monitor astronaut gene expression changes, is useful for future long-term space missions. Using magnetic microbeads packed with nanocrystal quantum dots at controlled ratios, we were able to generate highly multiplexed nanobarcodes, which can encode a flexible panel of genes. Also, by using a reporter quantum dot, this nanobarcode platform can monitor and quantify gene expression level with improved speed and sensitivity. As a comparison, we studied TGF-β1 induced transcription changes in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with both the nanobarcode microbead system and the Affymetrix GeneChip ® HTA system, which is currently considered as the industrial standard. Though using only 1/20 of the sample RNA, the nanobarcode system showed sensitivity equivalent to Affymetrix GeneChip ® system. The coefficient of variation, dynamic range, and accuracy of the nanobarcodes measurement is equivalent to that of the GeneChip ® HTA system. Therefore, this newly invented nanobarcode microbead platform is thought to be sensitive, flexible, cost-effective and accurate in a level equivalent to the conventional methods. As an extension of the use of this new platform, spacecrafts may carry this miniaturized system as a diagnostic tool for the astronauts.

  13. Comparison of L1000 and Affymetrix Microarray for In Vitro Concentration-Response Gene Expression Profiling (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in high-throughput screening technologies and in vitro systems have opened doors for cost-efficient evaluation of chemical effects on a diversity of biological endpoints. However, toxicogenomics platforms remain too costly to evaluate large libraries of chemicals in conc...

  14. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world’s most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a “guilt-by-association” principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related biological processes may exhibit similar expression patterns across diverse sets of experimental conditions. While bioinformatics resources such as GCN analysis are widely available for efficient gene function prediction in model plant species including Arabidopsis, soybean and rice, in citrus these tools are not yet developed. Results We have constructed a comprehensive GCN for citrus inferred from 297 publicly available Affymetrix Genechip Citrus Genome microarray datasets, providing gene co-expression relationships at a genome-wide scale (33,000 transcripts). The comprehensive citrus GCN consists of a global GCN (condition-independent) and four condition-dependent GCNs that survey the sweet orange species only, all citrus fruit tissues, all citrus leaf tissues, or stress-exposed plants. All of these GCNs are clustered using genome-wide, gene-centric (guide) and graph clustering algorithms for flexibility of gene function prediction. For each putative cluster, gene ontology (GO) enrichment and gene expression specificity analyses were performed to enhance gene function, expression and regulation pattern prediction. The guide-gene approach was used to infer novel roles of genes involved in disease susceptibility and vitamin C metabolism, and graph-clustering approaches were used to investigate isoprenoid/phenylpropanoid metabolism in citrus peel, and citric acid catabolism via the GABA shunt in citrus fruit. Conclusions Integration of citrus gene co-expression networks

  15. Prevalence of gene expression additivity in genetically stable wheat allohexaploids.

    PubMed

    Chelaifa, Houda; Chagué, Véronique; Chalabi, Smahane; Mestiri, Imen; Arnaud, Dominique; Deffains, Denise; Lu, Yunhai; Belcram, Harry; Huteau, Virginie; Chiquet, Julien; Coriton, Olivier; Just, Jérémy; Jahier, Joseph; Chalhoub, Boulos

    2013-02-01

    The reprogramming of gene expression appears as the major trend in synthetic and natural allopolyploids where expression of an important proportion of genes was shown to deviate from that of the parents or the average of the parents. In this study, we analyzed gene expression changes in previously reported, highly stable synthetic wheat allohexaploids that combine the D genome of Aegilops tauschii and the AB genome extracted from the natural hexaploid wheat Triticum aestivum. A comprehensive genome-wide analysis of transcriptional changes using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array was conducted. Prevalence of gene expression additivity was observed where expression does not deviate from the average of the parents for 99.3% of 34,820 expressed transcripts. Moreover, nearly similar expression was observed (for 99.5% of genes) when comparing these synthetic and natural wheat allohexaploids. Such near-complete additivity has never been reported for other allopolyploids and, more interestingly, for other synthetic wheat allohexaploids that differ from the ones studied here by having the natural tetraploid Triticum turgidum as the AB genome progenitor. Our study gave insights into the dynamics of additive gene expression in the highly stable wheat allohexaploids. PMID:23278496

  16. GENE EXPRESSION NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Gene expression network" is the term used to describe the interplay, simple or complex, between two or more gene products in performing a specific cellular function. Although the delineation of such networks is complicated by the existence of multiple and subtle types of intera...

  17. CGO: utilizing and integrating gene expression microarray data in clinical research and data management.

    PubMed

    Bumm, Klaus; Zheng, Mingzhong; Bailey, Clyde; Zhan, Fenghuang; Chiriva-Internati, M; Eddlemon, Paul; Terry, Julian; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D

    2002-02-01

    Clinical GeneOrganizer (CGO) is a novel windows-based archiving, organization and data mining software for the integration of gene expression profiling in clinical medicine. The program implements various user-friendly tools and extracts data for further statistical analysis. This software was written for Affymetrix GeneChip *.txt files, but can also be used for any other microarray-derived data. The MS-SQL server version acts as a data mart and links microarray data with clinical parameters of any other existing database and therefore represents a valuable tool for combining gene expression analysis and clinical disease characteristics. PMID:11847084

  18. Global Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Karen E.; Dunman, Paul M.; McAleese, Fionnuala; Macapagal, Daphne; Murphy, Ellen; Projan, Steven J.; Blevins, Jon S.; Smeltzer, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mutation of the staphylococcal accessory regulator (sarA) in a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus (UAMS-1) results in an impaired capacity to form a biofilm in vitro (K. E. Beenken, J. S. Blevins, and M. S. Smeltzer, Infect. Immun. 71:4206-4211, 2003). In this report, we used a murine model of catheter-based biofilm formation to demonstrate that a UAMS-1 sarA mutant also has a reduced capacity to form a biofilm in vivo. Surprisingly, mutation of the UAMS-1 ica locus had little impact on biofilm formation in vitro or in vivo. In an effort to identify additional loci that might be relevant to biofilm formation and/or the adaptive response required for persistence of S. aureus within a biofilm, we isolated total cellular RNA from UAMS-1 harvested from a biofilm grown in a flow cell and compared the transcriptional profile of this RNA to RNA isolated from both exponential- and stationary-phase planktonic cultures. Comparisons were done using a custom-made Affymetrix GeneChip representing the genomic complement of six strains of S. aureus (COL, N315, Mu50, NCTC 8325, EMRSA-16 [strain 252], and MSSA-476). The results confirm that the sessile lifestyle associated with persistence within a biofilm is distinct by comparison to the lifestyles of both the exponential and postexponential phases of planktonic culture. Indeed, we identified 48 genes in which expression was induced at least twofold in biofilms over expression under both planktonic conditions. Similarly, we identified 84 genes in which expression was repressed by a factor of at least 2 compared to expression under both planktonic conditions. A primary theme that emerged from the analysis of these genes is that persistence within a biofilm requires an adaptive response that limits the deleterious effects of the reduced pH associated with anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:15231800

  19. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  20. Gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of microarrays and next-generation biotechnologies, the use of gene expression data has become ubiquitous in biological research. One potential drawback of these data is that they are very rich in features or genes though cost considerations allow for the use of only relatively small sample sizes. A useful way of getting at biologically meaningful interpretations of the environmental or toxicological condition of interest would be to make inferences at the level of a priori defined biochemical pathways or networks of interacting genes or proteins that are known to perform certain biological functions. This chapter describes approaches taken in the literature to make such inferences at the biochemical pathway level. In addition this chapter describes approaches to create hypotheses on genes playing important roles in response to a treatment, using organism level gene coexpression or protein-protein interaction networks. Also, approaches to reverse engineer gene networks or methods that seek to identify novel interactions between genes are described. Given the relatively small sample numbers typically available, these reverse engineering approaches are generally useful in inferring interactions only among a relatively small or an order 10 number of genes. Finally, given the vast amounts of publicly available gene expression data from different sources, this chapter summarizes the important sources of these data and characteristics of these sources or databases. In line with the overall aims of this book of providing practical knowledge to a researcher interested in analyzing gene expression data from a network perspective, the chapter provides convenient publicly accessible tools for performing analyses described, and in addition describe three motivating examples taken from the published literature that illustrate some of the relevant analyses. PMID:23086841

  1. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14). Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center). Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to swarm center cells, tendril

  2. The Effect of Statins on Blood Gene Expression in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Obeidat, Ma’en; Fishbane, Nick; Nie, Yunlong; Chen, Virginia; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Bossé, Yohan; Ng, Raymond T.; Miller, Bruce E.; McManus, Bruce; Rennard, Stephen; Paré, Peter D.; Sin, Don D.

    2015-01-01

    Background COPD is currently the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. Statins are lipid lowering agents with documented cardiovascular benefits. Observational studies have shown that statins may have a beneficial role in COPD. The impact of statins on blood gene expression from COPD patients is largely unknown. Objective Identify blood gene signature associated with statin use in COPD patients, and the pathways underpinning this signature that could explain any potential benefits in COPD. Methods Whole blood gene expression was measured on 168 statin users and 451 non-users from the ECLIPSE study using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST microarray chips. Factor Analysis for Robust Microarray Summarization (FARMS) was used to process the expression data. Differential gene expression analysis was undertaken using the Linear Models for Microarray data (Limma) package adjusting for propensity score and surrogate variables. Similarity of the expression signal with published gene expression profiles was performed in ProfileChaser. Results 25 genes were differentially expressed between statin users and non-users at an FDR of 10%, including LDLR, CXCR2, SC4MOL, FAM108A1, IFI35, FRYL, ABCG1, MYLIP, and DHCR24. The 25 genes were significantly enriched in cholesterol homeostasis and metabolism pathways. The resulting gene signature showed correlation with Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and acute myeloid leukemia gene signatures. Conclusion The blood gene signature of statins’ use in COPD patients was enriched in cholesterol homeostasis pathways. Further studies are needed to delineate the role of these pathways in lung biology. PMID:26462087

  3. Pulmonary arteriole gene expression signature in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nina M; Kawut, Steven M; Jelic, Sanja; Arcasoy, Selim M; Lederer, David J; Borczuk, Alain C

    2013-06-01

    A third of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) develop pulmonary hypertension (PH-IPF), which is associated with increased mortality. Whether an altered gene expression profile in the pulmonary vasculature precedes the clinical onset of PH-IPF is unknown. We compared gene expression in the pulmonary vasculature of IPF patients with and without PH with controls. Pulmonary arterioles were isolated using laser capture microdissection from 16 IPF patients: eight with PH (PH-IPF) and eight with no PH (NPH-IPF), and seven controls. Probe was prepared from extracted RNA, and hybridised to Affymetrix Hu133 2.0 Plus genechips. Biometric Research Branch array tools and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software were used for analysis of the microarray data. Univariate analysis revealed 255 genes that distinguished IPF arterioles from controls (p<0.001). Mediators of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell proliferation, Wnt signalling and apoptosis were differentially expressed in IPF arterioles. Unsupervised and supervised clustering analyses revealed similar gene expression in PH-IPF and NPH-IPF arterioles. The pulmonary arteriolar gene expression profile is similar in IPF patients with and without coexistent PH. Pathways involved in vascular proliferation and aberrant apoptosis, which may contribute to pulmonary vascular remodelling, are activated in IPF patients. PMID:23728404

  4. Differential gene expression between visceral and subcutaneous fat depots.

    PubMed

    Atzmon, G; Yang, X M; Muzumdar, R; Ma, X H; Gabriely, I; Barzilai, N

    2002-01-01

    Abdominal obesity has been linked to the development of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). By surgical removal of visceral fat (VF) in a variety of rodent models, we prevented insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, establishing a cause-effect relationship between VF and the metabolic syndrome. To characterize the biological differences between visceral and peripheral fat depots, we obtained perirenal visceral (VF) and subcutaneous (SC) fat from 5 young rats. We extracted mRNA from the fat tissue and performed gene array hybridization using Affymetrix technology with a platform containing 9 000 genes. Out of the 1 660 genes that were expressed in fat tissue, 297 (17.9 %) genes show a two-fold or higher difference in their expression between the two tissues. We present the 20 genes whose expression is higher in VF fat (by 3 - 7 fold) and the 20 genes whose expression is higher in SC fat (by 3 - 150 fold), many of which are predominantly involved in glucose homeostasis, insulin action, and lipid metabolism. We confirmed the findings of gene array expression and quantified the changes in expression in VF of genes involved in insulin resistance (PPARgamma leptin) and its syndrome (angiotensinogen and plasminogen activating inhibitor-1, PAI-1) by real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) technology. Finally, we demonstrated increased expression of resistin in VF by around 12-fold and adiponectin by around 4-fold, peptides that were not part of the gene expression platform. These results indicate that visceral fat and subcutaneous fat are biologically distinct. PMID:12660871

  5. Discovery and mapping of single feature polymorphisms in wheat using affymetrix arrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single feature polymorphisms (SFPs) can be a rich source of markers for gene mapping and function studies. To explore the feasibility of using the Affymetrix GeneChip to discover and map SFPs in the large hexaploid wheat genome, six wheat varieties of diverse origins were analyzed for significant pr...

  6. Identification and Interpretation of Longitudinal Gene Expression Changes in Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rajicic, Natasa; Cuschieri, Joseph; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.; Hayden, Douglas; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Moore, Ernest; O'Keefe, Grant; Pelik, Kimberly; Warren, H. Shaw; Schoenfeld, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The relationship between leukocyte gene expression and recovery of respiratory function after injury may provide information on the etiology of multiple organ dysfunction. Objectives To find a list of genes for which expression after injury predicts respiratory recovery, and to identify which networks and pathways characterize these genes. Methods Blood was sampled at 12 hours and at 1, 4, 7, 21 and 28 days from 147 patients who had been admitted to the hospital after blunt trauma. Leukocyte gene expression was measured using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. A linear model, fit to each probe-set expression value, was used to impute the gene expression trajectory over the entire follow-up period. The proportional hazards model score test was used to calculate the statistical significance of each probe-set trajectory in predicting respiratory recovery. A list of genes was determined such that the expected proportion of false positive results was less than 10%. These genes were compared to the Gene Ontology for ‘response to stimulus’ and, using Ingenuity software, were mapped into networks and pathways. Measurements and Main Results The median time to respiratory recovery was 6 days. There were 170 probe-sets representing 135 genes that were found to be related to respiratory recovery. These genes could be mapped to nine networks. Two known pathways that were activated were antigen processing and presentation and JAK- signaling. Conclusions The examination of the relationship of gene expression over time with a patient's clinical course can provide information which may be useful in determining the mechanism of recovery or lack of recovery after severe injury. PMID:21187951

  7. Microarray analysis of relative gene expression stability for selection of internal reference genes in the rhesus macaque brain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Normalization of gene expression data refers to the comparison of expression values using reference standards that are consistent across all conditions of an experiment. In PCR studies, genes designated as "housekeeping genes" have been used as internal reference genes under the assumption that their expression is stable and independent of experimental conditions. However, verification of this assumption is rarely performed. Here we assess the use of gene microarray analysis to facilitate selection of internal reference sequences with higher expression stability across experimental conditions than can be expected using traditional selection methods. We recently demonstrated that relative gene expression from qRT-PCR data normalized using GAPDH, ALG9 and RPL13A expression values mirrored relative expression using quantile normalization in Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) on the Affymetrix® GeneChip® rhesus Macaque Genome Array. Having shown that qRT-PCR and Affymetrix® GeneChip® data from the same hormone replacement therapy (HRT) study yielded concordant results, we used quantile-normalized gene microarray data to identify the most stably expressed among probe sets for prospective internal reference genes across three brain regions from the HRT study and an additional study of normally menstruating rhesus macaques (cycle study). Gene selection was limited to 575 previously published human "housekeeping" genes. Twelve animals were used per study, and three brain regions were analyzed from each animal. Gene expression stabilities were determined using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper software packages. Results Sequences co-annotated for ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27A), and ubiquitin were among the most stably expressed under all conditions and selection criteria used for both studies. Higher annotation quality on the human GeneChip® facilitated more targeted analysis than could be accomplished using the rhesus GeneChip®. In the cycle study, multiple

  8. Changes in skeletal muscle gene expression following clenbuterol administration

    PubMed Central

    Spurlock, Diane M; McDaneld, Tara G; McIntyre, Lauren M

    2006-01-01

    Background Beta-adrenergic receptor agonists (BA) induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy, yet specific mechanisms that lead to this effect are not well understood. The objective of this research was to identify novel genes and physiological pathways that potentially facilitate BA induced skeletal muscle growth. The Affymetrix platform was utilized to identify gene expression changes in mouse skeletal muscle 24 hours and 10 days after administration of the BA clenbuterol. Results Administration of clenbuterol stimulated anabolic activity, as indicated by decreased blood urea nitrogen (BUN; P < 0.01) and increased body weight gain (P < 0.05) 24 hours or 10 days, respectively, after initiation of clenbuterol treatment. A total of 22,605 probesets were evaluated with 52 probesets defined as differentially expressed based on a false discovery rate of 10%. Differential mRNA abundance of four of these genes was validated in an independent experiment by quantitative PCR. Functional characterization of differentially expressed genes revealed several categories that participate in biological processes important to skeletal muscle growth, including regulators of transcription and translation, mediators of cell-signalling pathways, and genes involved in polyamine metabolism. Conclusion Global evaluation of gene expression after administration of clenbuterol identified changes in gene expression and overrepresented functional categories of genes that may regulate BA-induced muscle hypertrophy. Changes in mRNA abundance of multiple genes associated with myogenic differentiation may indicate an important effect of BA on proliferation, differentiation, and/or recruitment of satellite cells into muscle fibers to promote muscle hypertrophy. Increased mRNA abundance of genes involved in the initiation of translation suggests that increased levels of protein synthesis often associated with BA administration may result from a general up-regulation of translational initiators. Additionally

  9. Gene Expression Profiling in Dermatitis Herpetiformis Skin Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dolcino, M.; Cozzani, E.; Riva, S.; Parodi, A.; Tinazzi, E.; Lunardi, C.; Puccetti, A.

    2012-01-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is an autoimmune blistering skin disease associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy (CD). In order to investigate the pathogenesis of skin lesions at molecular level, we analysed the gene expression profiles in skin biopsies from 6 CD patients with DH and 6 healthy controls using Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 arrays. 486 genes were differentially expressed in DH skin compared to normal skin: 225 were upregulated and 261 were downregulated. Consistently with the autoimmune origin of DH, functional classification of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) indicates a B- and T-cell immune response (LAG3, TRAF5, DPP4, and NT5E). In addition, gene modulation provides evidence for a local inflammatory response (IL8, PTGFR, FSTL1, IFI16, BDKRD2, and NAMPT) with concomitant leukocyte recruitment (CCL5, ENPP2), endothelial cell activation, and neutrophil extravasation (SELL, SELE). DEGs also indicate overproduction of matrix proteases (MMP9, ADAM9, and ADAM19) and proteolytic enzymes (CTSG, ELA2, CPA3, TPSB2, and CMA1) that may contribute to epidermal splitting and blister formation. Finally, we observed modulation of genes involved in cell growth inhibition (CGREF1, PA2G4, and PPP2R1B), increased apoptosis (FAS, TNFSF10, and BASP1), and reduced adhesion at the dermal epidermal junction (PLEC1, ITGB4, and LAMA5). In conclusion, our results identify genes that are involved in the pathogenesis of DH skin lesions. PMID:22991566

  10. Gene expression profiling in dermatitis herpetiformis skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Dolcino, M; Cozzani, E; Riva, S; Parodi, A; Tinazzi, E; Lunardi, C; Puccetti, A

    2012-01-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is an autoimmune blistering skin disease associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy (CD). In order to investigate the pathogenesis of skin lesions at molecular level, we analysed the gene expression profiles in skin biopsies from 6 CD patients with DH and 6 healthy controls using Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 arrays. 486 genes were differentially expressed in DH skin compared to normal skin: 225 were upregulated and 261 were downregulated. Consistently with the autoimmune origin of DH, functional classification of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) indicates a B- and T-cell immune response (LAG3, TRAF5, DPP4, and NT5E). In addition, gene modulation provides evidence for a local inflammatory response (IL8, PTGFR, FSTL1, IFI16, BDKRD2, and NAMPT) with concomitant leukocyte recruitment (CCL5, ENPP2), endothelial cell activation, and neutrophil extravasation (SELL, SELE). DEGs also indicate overproduction of matrix proteases (MMP9, ADAM9, and ADAM19) and proteolytic enzymes (CTSG, ELA2, CPA3, TPSB2, and CMA1) that may contribute to epidermal splitting and blister formation. Finally, we observed modulation of genes involved in cell growth inhibition (CGREF1, PA2G4, and PPP2R1B), increased apoptosis (FAS, TNFSF10, and BASP1), and reduced adhesion at the dermal epidermal junction (PLEC1, ITGB4, and LAMA5). In conclusion, our results identify genes that are involved in the pathogenesis of DH skin lesions. PMID:22991566

  11. Obesity in BSB mice is correlated with expression of genes foriron homeostasis and leptin

    SciTech Connect

    Farahani, Poupak; Chiu, Sally; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Boffelli,Dario; Lee, Eric; Fisler, Janis S.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Warden, Craig H.

    2003-04-01

    Obesity is a complex disease. To date, over 100 chromosomal loci for body weight, body fat, regional white adipose tissue weight, and other obesity-related traits have been identified in humans and in animal models. For most loci, the underlying genes are not yet identified; some of these chromosomal loci will be alleles of known obesity genes, whereas many will represent alleles of unknown genes. Microarray analysis allows simultaneous multiple gene and pathway discovery. cDNA and oligonucleotide arrays are commonly used to identify differentially expressed genes by surveys of large numbers of known and unnamed genes. Two papers previously identified genes differentially expressed in adipose tissue of mouse models of obesity and diabetes by analysis of hybridization to Affymetrix oligonucleotide chips.

  12. Age and Diet Affect Gene Expression Profile in Canine Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Middelbos, Ingmar S.; Vester, Brittany M.; Karr-Lilienthal, Lisa K.; Schook, Lawrence B.; Swanson, Kelly S.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated gene transcription in canine skeletal muscle (biceps femoris) using microarray analysis to identify effects of age and diet on gene expression. Twelve female beagles were used (six 1-year olds and six 12-year olds) and they were fed one of two experimental diets for 12 months. One diet contained primarily plant-based protein sources (PPB), whereas the second diet contained primarily animal-based protein sources (APB). Affymetrix GeneChip Canine Genome Arrays were used to hybridize extracted RNA. Age had the greatest effect on gene transcription (262 differentially expressed genes), whereas the effect of diet was relatively small (22 differentially expressed genes). Effects of age (regardless of diet) were most notable on genes related to metabolism, cell cycle and cell development, and transcription function. All these genes were predominantly down-regulated in geriatric dogs. Age-affected genes that were differentially expressed on only one of two diets were primarily noted in the PPB diet group (144/165 genes). Again, genes related to cell cycle (22/35) and metabolism (15/19) had predominantly decreased transcription in geriatric dogs, but 6/8 genes related to muscle development had increased expression. Effects of diet on muscle gene expression were mostly noted in geriatric dogs, but no consistent patterns in transcription were observed. The insight these data provide into gene expression profiles of canine skeletal muscle as affected by age, could serve as a foundation for future research pertaining to age-related muscle diseases. PMID:19221602

  13. Identification of Cancer Related Genes Using a Comprehensive Map of Human Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lukk, Margus; Xue, Vincent; Parkinson, Helen; Rung, Johan; Brazma, Alvis

    2016-01-01

    Rapid accumulation and availability of gene expression datasets in public repositories have enabled large-scale meta-analyses of combined data. The richness of cross-experiment data has provided new biological insights, including identification of new cancer genes. In this study, we compiled a human gene expression dataset from ∼40,000 publicly available Affymetrix HG-U133Plus2 arrays. After strict quality control and data normalisation the data was quantified in an expression matrix of ∼20,000 genes and ∼28,000 samples. To enable different ways of sample grouping, existing annotations where subjected to systematic ontology assisted categorisation and manual curation. Groups like normal tissues, neoplasmic tissues, cell lines, homoeotic cells and incompletely differentiated cells were created. Unsupervised analysis of the data confirmed global structure of expression consistent with earlier analysis but with more details revealed due to increased resolution. A suitable mixed-effects linear model was used to further investigate gene expression in solid tissue tumours, and to compare these with the respective healthy solid tissues. The analysis identified 1,285 genes with systematic expression change in cancer. The list is significantly enriched with known cancer genes from large, public, peer-reviewed databases, whereas the remaining ones are proposed as new cancer gene candidates. The compiled dataset is publicly available in the ArrayExpress Archive. It contains the most diverse collection of biological samples, making it the largest systematically annotated gene expression dataset of its kind in the public domain. PMID:27322383

  14. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine. PMID:16886903

  15. High magnetic field induced changes of gene expression in arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J; Meisel, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    Background High magnetic fields are becoming increasingly prevalent components of non-invasive, biomedical imaging tools (such as MRI), thus, an understanding of the molecular impacts associated with these field strengths in biological systems is of central importance. The biological impact of magnetic field strengths up to 30 Tesla were investigated in this study through the use of transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Methods Magnetic field induced Adh/GUS activity was evaluated with histochemical staining to assess tissue specific expression and distribution, and with quantitative, spectrofluometric assays to measure degree of activation. The evaluation of global changes in the Arabidopsis genome in response to exposure to high magnetic fields was facilitated with Affymetrix Gene Chip microarrays. Quantitative analyses of gene expression were performed with quantitative real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Field strengths in excess of about 15 Tesla induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. From the microarray analyses that surveyed 8000 genes, 114 genes were differentially expressed to a degree greater than 2.5 fold over the control. These results were quantitatively corroborated by qRT-PCR examination of 4 of the 114 genes. Conclusion The data suggest that magnetic fields in excess of 15 Tesla have far-reaching effect on the genome. The wide-spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism, are prominent examples. The roles of magnetic field orientation of macromolecules and magnetophoretic effects are discussed as possible factors that contribute to the mounting of this response. PMID:17187667

  16. Detection of transcriptional difference of porcine imprinted genes using different microarray platforms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presently, multiple options exist for conducting gene expression profiling studies in swine. In order to determine the performance of some of the existing platforms, Affymetrix Porcine, Affymetrix Human U133+2.0, and the U.S. Pig Genome Coordination Program spotted glass oligonucleotide microarray p...

  17. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  18. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  19. Systematic bioinformatic analysis of expression levels of 17,330 human genes across 9,783 samples from 175 types of healthy and pathological tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kilpinen, Sami; Autio, Reija; Ojala, Kalle; Iljin, Kristiina; Bucher, Elmar; Sara, Henri; Pisto, Tommi; Saarela, Matti; Skotheim, Rolf I; Björkman, Mari; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Haapa-Paananen, Saija; Vainio, Paula; Edgren, Henrik; Wolf, Maija; Astola, Jaakko; Nees, Matthias; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2008-01-01

    Our knowledge on tissue- and disease-specific functions of human genes is rather limited and highly context-specific. Here, we have developed a method for the comparison of mRNA expression levels of most human genes across 9,783 Affymetrix gene expression array experiments representing 43 normal human tissue types, 68 cancer types, and 64 other diseases. This database of gene expression patterns in normal human tissues and pathological conditions covers 113 million datapoints and is available from the GeneSapiens website. PMID:18803840

  20. Atrial Fibrillation, Neurocognitive Decline and Gene Expression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Rahul S.; Sabe, Ashraf A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Ramlawi, Basel; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline are common complications after cardiopulmonary bypass. By utilizing genomic microarrays we investigate whether gene expression is associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline. METHODS Twenty one cardiac surgery patients were prospectively matched and underwent neurocognitive assessments pre-operatively and four days postoperatively. The whole blood collected in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass, 6 hours after-cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the 4th postoperative day was hybridized to Affymetrix Gene Chip U133 Plus 2.0 Microarrays. Gene expression in patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline (n=6; POAF+NCD) was compared with gene expression in patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation and normal cognitive function (n=5; POAF+NORM) and patients with sinus rhythm and normal cognitive function (n=10; SR+NORM). Regulated genes were identified using JMP Genomics 4.0 with a false discovery rate of 0.05 and fold change of >1.5 or <-1.5. RESULTS Eleven patients developed postoperative atrial fibrillation. Six of these also developed neurocognitive decline. Of the 12 patients with sinus rhythm, only 2 developed neurocognitive decline. POAF+NCD patients had unique regulation of 17 named genes preoperatively, 60 named genes six hours after cardiopulmonary bypass, and 34 named genes four days postoperatively (P<0.05) compared with normal patients. Pathway analysis demonstrated that these genes are involved in cell death, inflammation, cardiac remodeling and nervous system function. CONCLUSION Patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline after cardiopulmonary bypass may have differential genomic responses compared to normal patients and patients with only postoperative atrial fibrillation, suggesting common pathophysiology for these conditions. Further exploration of these genes may provide insight into the

  1. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Elferink, M.G.L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E.M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W.G.; Heisterkamp, S.H.; Groothuis, G.M.M.

    2011-05-15

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be directly extrapolated to humans due to species differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate precision-cut human liver slices as in vitro method for the prediction of human specific toxicity by toxicogenomics. The liver slices contain all cell types of the liver in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process. Previously we showed that toxicogenomic analysis of rat liver slices is highly predictive for rat in vivo toxicity. In this study we investigated the levels of gene expression during incubation up to 24 h with Affymetrix microarray technology. The analysis was focused on a broad spectrum of genes related to stress and toxicity, and on genes encoding for phase-I, -II and -III metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Observed changes in gene expression were associated with cytoskeleton remodeling, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion, but for the ADME-Tox related genes only minor changes were observed. PCA analysis showed that changes in gene expression were not associated with age, sex or source of the human livers. Slices treated with acetaminophen showed patterns of gene expression related to its toxicity. These results indicate that precision-cut human liver slices are relatively stable during 24 h of incubation and represent a valuable model for human in vitro hepatotoxicity testing despite the human inter-individual variability.

  2. Serial analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velculescu, V E; Zhang, L; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1995-10-20

    The characteristics of an organism are determined by the genes expressed within it. A method was developed, called serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. To demonstrate this strategy, short diagnostic sequence tags were isolated from pancreas, concatenated, and cloned. Manual sequencing of 1000 tags revealed a gene expression pattern characteristic of pancreatic function. New pancreatic transcripts corresponding to novel tags were identified. SAGE should provide a broadly applicable means for the quantitative cataloging and comparison of expressed genes in a variety of normal, developmental, and disease states. PMID:7570003

  3. Gene expression analysis of tuberous sclerosis complex cortical tubers reveals increased expression of adhesion and inflammatory factors

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Karin; Crino, Peter B.; Gorter, Jan A.; Nellist, Mark; Jansen, Floor E.; Spliet, Wim G.M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Wittink, Floyd R.A.; Breit, Timo M.; Troost, Dirk; Wadman, Wytse J.; Aronica, Eleonora

    2009-01-01

    Cortical tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are associated with disabling neurological manifestations, including intractable epilepsy. While these malformations are believed to result from the effects of TSC1 or TSC2 gene mutations, the molecular mechanisms leading to tuber formation, as well as the onset of seizures remain largely unknown. We used the Affymetrix Gene Chip platform to provide the first genome wide investigation of gene expression in surgically resected tubers, compared with histological normal perituberal tissue from the same patients or autopsy control tissue. We identified 2501 differentially expressed genes in cortical tubers compared with autopsy controls. Expression of genes associated with cell adhesion e.g., VCAM1, integrins and CD44, or with the inflammatory response, including complement factors, serpinA3, CCL2 and several cytokines, was increased in cortical tubers, whereas genes related to synaptic transmission e.g., the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1, and voltage-gated channel activity, exhibited lower expression. Gene expression in perituberal cortex was distinct from autopsy control cortex suggesting that even in the absence of tissue pathology the transcriptome is altered in TSC. Changes in gene expression yield insights into new candidate genes that may contribute to tuber formation or seizure onset, representing new targets for potential therapeutic development. PMID:19912235

  4. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  5. Gene Expression Profiles from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Are Sensitive to Short Processing Delays

    PubMed Central

    Grom, Alexei A.; Griffin, Thomas A.; Colbert, Robert A.; Thompson, Susan D.

    2010-01-01

    In the analysis of peripheral blood gene expression, timely processing of samples is essential to ensure that measurements reflect in vivo biology, rather than ex vivo sample processing variables. The effect of processing delays on global gene expression patterns in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was assessed by isolating and stabilizing PBMC-derived RNA from 3 individuals either immediately after phlebotomy or after a 4 h delay. RNA was labeled using NuGEN Ovation labeling and probed using the Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip®. Comparison of gene expression levels (≥2-fold expression change and P < 0.05) identified 307 probe sets representing genes with increased expression and 46 indicating decreased expression after 4 h. These differentially expressed genes include many that are important to inflammatory, immunologic, and cancer pathways. Among others, CCR2, CCR5, TLR10, CD180, and IL-16 have decreased expression, whereas VEGF, IL8, SOCS2, SOCS3, CD69, and CD83 have increased expression after a 4 h processing delay. The trends in expression patterns associated with delayed processing were also apparent in an independent set of 276 arrays of RNA from human PBMC samples with varying processing times. These data indicate that the time between sample acquisition, initiation of processing, and when the RNA is stabilized should be a prime consideration when designing protocols for translational studies involving PBMC gene expression analysis. PMID:21743826

  6. Gene Expression Profiles from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Are Sensitive to Short Processing Delays.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael G; Grom, Alexei A; Griffin, Thomas A; Colbert, Robert A; Thompson, Susan D

    2010-09-29

    In the analysis of peripheral blood gene expression, timely processing of samples is essential to ensure that measurements reflect in vivo biology, rather than ex vivo sample processing variables. The effect of processing delays on global gene expression patterns in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was assessed by isolating and stabilizing PBMC-derived RNA from 3 individuals either immediately after phlebotomy or after a 4 h delay. RNA was labeled using NuGEN Ovation labeling and probed using the Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip(®). Comparison of gene expression levels (≥2-fold expression change and P < 0.05) identified 307 probe sets representing genes with increased expression and 46 indicating decreased expression after 4 h. These differentially expressed genes include many that are important to inflammatory, immunologic, and cancer pathways. Among others, CCR2, CCR5, TLR10, CD180, and IL-16 have decreased expression, whereas VEGF, IL8, SOCS2, SOCS3, CD69, and CD83 have increased expression after a 4 h processing delay. The trends in expression patterns associated with delayed processing were also apparent in an independent set of 276 arrays of RNA from human PBMC samples with varying processing times. These data indicate that the time between sample acquisition, initiation of processing, and when the RNA is stabilized should be a prime consideration when designing protocols for translational studies involving PBMC gene expression analysis. PMID:21743826

  7. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  8. Gene expression profile of bladder tissue of patients with ulcerative interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Gamper, Marianne; Viereck, Volker; Geissbühler, Verena; Eberhard, Jakob; Binder, Jochen; Moll, Carlo; Rehrauer, Hubert; Moser, René

    2009-01-01

    Background Interstitial cystitis (IC), a chronic bladder disease with an increasing incidence, is diagnosed using subjective symptoms in combination with cystoscopic and histological evidence. By cystoscopic examination, IC can be classified into an ulcerative and a non-ulcerative subtype. To better understand this debilitating disease on a molecular level, a comparative gene expression profile of bladder biopsies from patients with ulcerative IC and control patients has been performed. Results Gene expression profiles from bladder biopsies of five patients with ulcerative IC and six control patients were generated using Affymetrix GeneChip expression arrays (AffymetrixGeneChip® Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0). More than 31,000 of > 54,000 tested probe sets were present (detection p-value < 0.05). The difference between the two groups was significant for over 3,500 signals (t-test p-value < 0.01), and approximately 2,000 of the signals (corresponding to approximately 1,000 genes) showed an IC-to-healthy expression ratio greater than two. The IC pattern had similarities to patterns from immune system, lymphatic, and autoimmune diseases. The dominant biological processes were the immune and inflammatory responses. Many of the up-regulated genes were expressed in leukocytes, suggesting that leukocyte invasion into the bladder wall is a dominant feature of ulcerative IC. Histopathological data supported these findings. Conclusion GeneChip expression arrays present a global picture of ulcerative IC and provide us with a series of marker genes characteristic for this subtype of the disease. Evaluation of biopsies from other bladder patients with similar symptoms (e.g. patients with non-ulcerative IC) will further indicate whether the data presented here will be valuable for the diagnosis of IC. PMID:19400928

  9. Using gene expression to predict differences in the secretome of human omental vs. subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Hoggard, Nigel; Cruickshank, Morven; Moar, Kim-Marie; Bashir, Shabina; Mayer, Claus-Dieter

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize differences in the secretome of human omental compared with subcutaneous adipose tissue using global gene expression profiling. Gene expression was measured using Affymetrix microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) in subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue in two independent experiments (n = 5 and n = 3 independent subjects; n = 16 arrays in total, 2 for each subject). Predictive bioinformatic algorithms were employed to identify secreted proteins. Microarray analysis identified 22 gene probe sets whose expression was significantly different with a fold change (FC) greater than 5 in expression in both experiments between omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Using bioinformatic predictive programs 11 of these 22 probe sets potentially coded for secreted proteins. Pathway network analysis of the secreted proteins showed that three of the proteins are part of a common pathway network. These proteins gremlin 1 (GREM1), pleiotrophin (PTN), and secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI) are expressed respectively 43×, 23×, and 5× in omental adipose tissue relative to subcutaneous adipose tissue as determined by real-time PCR. The presence of GREM1, PTN, and SLPI protein in human adipose tissue was confirmed by western blotting. All three proteins are expressed in the human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) preadipocyte cell line. The expression of GREM1, PTN, and SLPI changed with the differentiation of the preadipocytes into mature adipocytes. Gene expression coupled with predictive bioinformatic algorithms have identified several genes coding for secreted proteins which are expressed differently in omental adipose tissue compared to subcutaneous adipose tissue proving a valid alternative approach to help further define the adipocyte secretome. PMID:22286531

  10. Gene Expression in Oligodendroglial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Elisabeth J.; Haylock, Brian; Husband, David; du Plessis, Daniel; Sibson, D. Ross; Warnke, Peter C.; Walker, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss are more likely to be chemosensitive and have longer survival than those with intact 1p/19q, but not all respond to chemotherapy, warranting investigation of the biological basis of chemosensitivity. Methods: Gene expression profiling was performed using amplified antisense RNA from 28 oligodendroglial tumors treated with chemotherapy (26 serial stereotactic biopsy, 2 resection). Expression of differentially expressed genes was validated by real-time PCR. Results: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clustering of multiple samples from the same case in 14/17 cases and identified subgroups associated with tumor grade and 1p/19q status. 176 genes were differentially expressed, 164 being associated with 1p/19q loss (86% not on 1p or 19q). 94 genes differed between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy; 12 were not associated with 1p/19q loss. Significant differential expression was confirmed in 11/13 selected genes. Novel genes associated with response to therapy included SSBP2, GFRA1, FAP and RASD1. IQGAP1, INA, TGIF1, NR2F2 and MYCBP were differentially expressed in oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss. Conclusion: Gene expression profiling using serial stereotactic biopsies indicated greater homogeneity within tumors than between tumors. Genes associated with 1p/19q status or response were identified warranting further elucidation of their role in oligodendroglial tumors. PMID:20966545

  11. Impact of persistent cytomegalovirus infection on human neuroblastoma cell gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hoever, Gerold; Vogel, Jens-Uwe; Lukashenko, Polina; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Komor, Martina; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2005-01-14

    In a model of human neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines persistently infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) we previously showed that persistent HCMV infection is associated with an increased malignant phenotype, enhanced drug resistance, and invasive properties. To gain insights into the mechanisms of increased malignancy we analyzed the global changes in cellular gene expression induced by persistent HCMV infection of human neuroblastoma cells by use of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays (HG-U133A, Affymetrix) and RT-PCR. Comparing the gene expression of different NB cell lines with persistently infected cell sub-lines revealed 11 host cell genes regulated in a similar manner throughout all infected samples. Nine of these 11 genes may contribute to the previously observed changes in malignant phenotype of persistently HCMV infected NB cells by influencing invasive growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and proliferation. Thus, this work provides the basis for further functional studies. PMID:15582591

  12. A gene expression atlas of the domestic pig

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This work describes the first genome-wide analysis of the transcriptional landscape of the pig. A new porcine Affymetrix expression array was designed in order to provide comprehensive coverage of the known pig transcriptome. The new array was used to generate a genome-wide expression atlas of pig tissues derived from 62 tissue/cell types. These data were subjected to network correlation analysis and clustering. Results The analysis presented here provides a detailed functional clustering of the pig transcriptome where transcripts are grouped according to their expression pattern, so one can infer the function of an uncharacterized gene from the company it keeps and the locations in which it is expressed. We describe the overall transcriptional signatures present in the tissue atlas, where possible assigning those signatures to specific cell populations or pathways. In particular, we discuss the expression signatures associated with the gastrointestinal tract, an organ that was sampled at 15 sites along its length and whose biology in the pig is similar to human. We identify sets of genes that define specialized cellular compartments and region-specific digestive functions. Finally, we performed a network analysis of the transcription factors expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and demonstrate how they sub-divide into functional groups that may control cellular gastrointestinal development. Conclusions As an important livestock animal with a physiology that is more similar than mouse to man, we provide a major new resource for understanding gene expression with respect to the known physiology of mammalian tissues and cells. The data and analyses are available on the websites http://biogps.org and http://www.macrophages.com/pig-atlas. PMID:23153189

  13. Gene Expression Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of 16,000 Barley Genes Reveals a Complex Pattern of Genome-wide Transcriptional Regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcript abundance data from cRNA hybridizations to Affymetrix microarrays can be used for simultaneous marker development and genome-wide eQTL (expression Quantitative Trait Loci) analysis of crops. We have shown that it is easily possible to use the information from Affymetrix expression arrays ...

  14. Chronic alcohol exposure alters gene expression in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Pochareddy, Sirisha; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Liver is the primary site of alcohol metabolism and is highly vulnerable to injuries due to chronic alcohol abuse. Several molecular mechanisms, including oxidative stress and altered cellular metabolism, have been implicated in the development and progression of alcoholic liver disease. We sought to gain further insight into the molecular pathogenesis by studying the effects of ethanol exposure on global gene expression in HepG2 cells. Methods HepG2 cells were cultured in the presence or absence of 75 mM ethanol for nine days, with fresh media daily. Global gene expression changes were studied using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression differences were validated for thirteen genes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. To identify biological pathways affected by ethanol treatment, differentially expressed genes were analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Results Long term ethanol exposure altered the expression of 1093 genes (FDR ≤ 3%); many of these changes were modest. Long term ethanol exposure affected several pathways, including acute phase response, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and lipid metabolism. Conclusions Global measurements of gene expression show that a large number of genes are affected by chronic ethanol, although most show modest effect. These data provide insight into the molecular pathology resulting from extended alcohol exposure. PMID:22150570

  15. Gene expression profiling in response to the histone deacetylase inhibitor BL1521 in neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ruijter, Annemieke J.M. de; Kemp, Stephan . E-mail: a.b.vankuilenburg@amc.uva.nl

    2005-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood tumor with a poor survival in advanced stage disease despite intensive chemotherapeutic regimes. The new histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor BL1521 has shown promising results in neuroblastoma. Inhibition of HDAC resulted in a decrease in proliferation and metabolic activity, induction of apoptosis and differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. In order to elucidate the mechanism mediating the effects of BL1521 on neuroblastoma cells, we investigated the gene expression profile of an MYCN single copy (SKNAS) and an MYCN amplified (IMR32) neuroblastoma cell line after treatment with BL1521 using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide array U133A. An altered expression of 255 genes was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines. The majority of these genes were involved in gene expression, cellular metabolism, and cell signaling. We observed changes in the expression of vital genes belonging to the cell cycle (cyclin D1 and CDK4) and apoptosis (BNIP3, BID, and BCL2) pathway in response to BL1521. The expression of 37 genes was altered by both BL1521 and Trichostatin A, which could indicate a common gene set regulated by different HDAC inhibitors. BL1521 treatment changed the expression of a number of MYCN-associated genes. Several genes in the Wnt and the Delta/Notch pathways were changed in response to BL1521 treatment, suggesting that BL1521 is able to induce the differentiation of neuroblastoma cells into a more mature phenotype.

  16. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  17. Variations in the progranulin gene affect global gene expression in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Geser, Felix; Plotkin, Joshua B; Clark, Chris M; Kwong, Linda K; Yuan, Wuxing; Grossman, Murray; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2008-05-15

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that results in progressive decline in behavior, executive function and sometimes language. Disease mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently, however, the DNA- and RNA-binding protein TDP-43 has been identified as the major protein present in the hallmark inclusion bodies of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions (FTLD-U), suggesting a role for transcriptional dysregulation in FTLD-U pathophysiology. Using the Affymetrix U133A microarray platform, we profiled global gene expression in both histopathologically affected and unaffected areas of human FTLD-U brains. We then characterized differential gene expression with biological pathway analyses, cluster and principal component analyses, and subgroup analyses based on brain region and progranulin (GRN) gene status. Comparing 17 FTLD-U brains to 11 controls, we identified 414 upregulated and 210 downregulated genes in frontal cortex (P-value < 0.001). Moreover, cluster and principal component analyses revealed that samples with mutations or possibly pathogenic variations in the GRN gene (GRN+, 7/17) had an expression signature that was distinct from both normal controls and FTLD-U samples lacking GRN gene variations (GRN-, 10/17). Within the subgroup of GRN+ FTLD-U, we found >1300 dysregulated genes in frontal cortex (P-value < 0.001), many participating in pathways uniquely dysregulated in the GRN+ cases. Our findings demonstrate a distinct molecular phenotype for GRN+ FTLD-U, not readily apparent on clinical or histopathological examination, suggesting distinct pathophysiological mechanisms for GRN+ and GRN- subtypes of FTLD-U. In addition, these data from a large number of human brains provide a valuable resource for future testing of disease hypotheses. PMID:18223198

  18. Microgravity and Immunity: Changes in Lymphocyte Gene Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.; Ward, N. E.; Risin, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    Earlier studies had shown that modeled and true microgravity (MG) cause multiple direct effects on human lymphocytes. MG inhibits lymphocyte locomotion, suppresses polyclonal and antigen-specific activation, affects signal transduction mechanisms, as well as activation-induced apoptosis. In this study we assessed changes in gene expression associated with lymphocyte exposure to microgravity in an attempt to identify microgravity-sensitive genes (MGSG) in general and specifically those genes that might be responsible for the functional and structural changes observed earlier. Two sets of experiments targeting different goals were conducted. In the first set, T-lymphocytes from normal donors were activated with antiCD3 and IL2 and then cultured in 1g (static) and modeled MG (MMG) conditions (Rotating Wall Vessel bioreactor) for 24 hours. This setting allowed searching for MGSG by comparison of gene expression patterns in zero and 1 g gravity. In the second set - activated T-cells after culturing for 24 hours in 1g and MMG were exposed three hours before harvesting to a secondary activation stimulus (PHA) thus triggering the apoptotic pathway. Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy isolation kit (Qiagen, Valencia, CA). Affymetrix Gene Chips (U133A), allowing testing for 18,400 human genes, were used for microarray analysis. In the first set of experiments MMG exposure resulted in altered expression of 89 genes, 10 of them were up-regulated and 79 down-regulated. In the second set, changes in expression were revealed in 85 genes, 20 were up-regulated and 65 were down-regulated. The analysis revealed that significant numbers of MGS genes are associated with signal transduction and apoptotic pathways. Interestingly, the majority of genes that responded by up- or down-regulation in the alternative sets of experiments were not the same, possibly reflecting different functional states of the examined T-lymphocyte populations. The responder genes (MGSG) might play an

  19. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression. PMID:24789080

  20. Gene family analysis of the Arabidopsis pollen transcriptome reveals biological implications for cell growth, division control, and gene expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Pina, Cristina; Pinto, Francisco; Feijó, José A; Becker, Jörg D

    2005-06-01

    Upon germination, pollen forms a tube that elongates dramatically through female tissues to reach and fertilize ovules. While essential for the life cycle of higher plants, the genetic basis underlying most of the process is not well understood. We previously used a combination of flow cytometry sorting of viable hydrated pollen grains and GeneChip array analysis of one-third of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome to define a first overview of the pollen transcriptome. We now extend that study to approximately 80% of the genome of Arabidopsis by using Affymetrix Arabidopsis ATH1 arrays and perform comparative analysis of gene family and gene ontology representation in the transcriptome of pollen and vegetative tissues. Pollen grains have a smaller and overall unique transcriptome (6,587 genes expressed) with greater proportions of selectively expressed (11%) and enriched (26%) genes than any vegetative tissue. Relative gene ontology category representations in pollen and vegetative tissues reveal a functional skew of the pollen transcriptome toward signaling, vesicle transport, and the cytoskeleton, suggestive of a commitment to germination and tube growth. Cell cycle analysis reveals an accumulation of G2/M-associated factors that may play a role in the first mitotic division of the zygote. Despite the relative underrepresentation of transcription-associated transcripts, nonclassical MADS box genes emerge as a class with putative unique roles in pollen. The singularity of gene expression control in mature pollen grains is further highlighted by the apparent absence of small RNA pathway components. PMID:15908605

  1. Normalization of Affymetrix miRNA Microarrays for the Analysis of Cancer Samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Gantier, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    microRNA (miRNA) microarray normalization is a critical step for the identification of truly differentially expressed miRNAs. This is particularly important when dealing with cancer samples that have a global miRNA decrease. In this chapter, we provide a simple step-by-step procedure that can be used to normalize Affymetrix miRNA microarrays, relying on robust normal-exponential background correction with cyclic loess normalization. PMID:25971910

  2. Gene expression in human oral squamous cell carcinoma is influenced by risk factor exposure.

    PubMed

    Cheong, S C; Chandramouli, G V R; Saleh, A; Zain, R B; Lau, S H; Sivakumaren, S; Pathmanathan, R; Prime, S S; Teo, S H; Patel, V; Gutkind, J S

    2009-08-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a world health problem and is associated with exposure to different risk factors. In the west, smoking and alcohol consumption are considered to be the main risk factors whilst in India and southeast Asia, betel quid (BQ) chewing is predominant. In this study, we compared the gene expression patterns of oral cancers associated with BQ chewing to those caused by smoking using Affymetrix microarrays. We found that 281 genes were differentially expressed between OSCC and normal oral mucosa regardless of aetiological factors including MMP1, PLAU, MAGE-D4, GNA12, IFITM3 and NMU. Further, we identified 168 genes that were differentially expressed between the BQ and smoking groups including CXCL-9, TMPRSS2, CA12 and RNF24. The expression of these genes was validated using qPCR using independent tissue samples. The results demonstrate that whilst common genes/pathways contribute to the development of oral cancer, there are also other gene expression changes that are specific to certain risk factors. The findings suggest that different carcinogens activate or inhibit specific pathways during cancer development and progression. These unique gene expression profiles should be taken into consideration when developing biomarkers for future use in prognostic or therapeutic applications. PMID:19147396

  3. Differential Gene Expression in the Oxyntic and Pyloric Mucosa of the Young Pig

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Michela; Priori, Davide; Trevisi, Paolo; Bosi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The stomach is often considered a single compartment, although morphological differences among specific areas are well known. Oxyntic mucosa (OXY) and pyloric mucosa (PYL, in other species called antral mucosa) are primarily equipped for acid secretion and gastrin production, respectively, while it is not yet clear how the remainder of genes expressed differs in these areas. Here, the differential gene expression between OXY and PYL mucosa was assessed in seven starter pigs. Total RNA expression was analyzed by whole genome Affymetrix Porcine Gene 1.1_ST array strips. Exploratory functional analysis of gene expression values was done by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, comparing OXY and PYL. Normalized enrichment scores (NESs) were calculated for each gene (statistical significance defined when False Discovery Rate % <25 and P-values of NES<0.05). Expression values were selected for a set of 44 genes and the effect of point of gastric sample was tested by analysis of variance with the procedure for repeated measures. In OXY, HYDROGEN ION TRANSMEMBRANE TRANSPORTER ACTIVITY gene set was the most enriched set compared to PYL, including the two genes for H+/K+-ATPase. Pathways related to mitochondrial activity and feeding behavior were also enriched (primarily cholecystokinin receptors and ghrelin). Aquaporin 4 was the top-ranking gene. In PYL, two gene sets were enriched compared with OXY: LYMPHOCYTE ACTIVATION and LIPID RAFT, a gene set involved in cholesterol-rich microdomains of the plasma membrane. The single most differentially expressed genes were gastrin and secretoglobin 1A, member 1, presumably located in the epithelial line, to inactivate inflammatory mediators. Several genes related to mucosal integrity, immune response, detoxification and epithelium renewal were also enriched in PYL (P<0.05). The data indicate that there is significant differential gene expression between OXY of the young pig and PYL and further functional studies are needed to confirm their

  4. Global gene expression profiling of JMJD6- and JMJD4-depleted mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Jie; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests Jumonji domain-containing proteins are epigenetic regulators in diverse biological processes including cellular differentiation and proliferation. RNA interference-based analyses combined with gene expression profiling can effectively characterize the cellular functions of these enzymes. We found that the depletion of Jumonji domain-containing protein 6 (JMJD6) and its paralog protein Jumonji domain-containing protein 4 (JMJD4) individually by small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) slowed cell proliferation of mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts. We subsequently performed gene expression profiling on both JMJD6- and JMJD4-depleted mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts using the Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Exon 1.0 ST Array. Here we report the gene profiling datasets along with the experimental procedures. The information can be used to further investigate how JMJD6 and JMJD4 affect gene expression and cellular physiology. PMID:27071056

  5. Genome-wide expression analysis of rice aquaporin genes and development of a functional gene network mediated by aquaporin expression in roots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Xuan; Moon, Sunok; Jung, Ki-Hong

    2013-10-01

    The world population continually faces challenges of water scarcity for agriculture. A common strategy called water-balance control has evolved to adapt plant growth to these challenges. Aquaporins are a family of integral membrane proteins that play a central role in water-balance control. In this study, we identified 34 members of the rice aquaporin gene family, adding a novel member to the previous list. A combination of phylogenetic tree and anatomical meta-expression profiling data consisting of 983 Affymetrix arrays and 209 Agilent 44 K arrays was used to identify tissue-preferred aquaporin genes and evaluate functional redundancy among aquaporin family members. Eight aquaporins showed root-preferred expression in the vegetative growth stage, while 4 showed leaf/shoot-preferred expression. Integrating stress-induced expression patterns into phylogenetic tree and semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that 3 rice aquaporin genes were markedly downregulated and 4 were upregulated by water deficiency in the root, suggesting that these candidate genes are key regulators of water uptake from the soil. Finally, we constructed a functional network of genes mediated by water stress and refined the network by confirming the differential expression using RT-PCR and real-time PCR. Our data will be useful to elucidate the molecular mechanism of water-balance control in rice root. PMID:23801298

  6. VTCdb: a gene co-expression database for the crop species Vitis vinifera (grapevine)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene expression datasets in model plants such as Arabidopsis have contributed to our understanding of gene function and how a single underlying biological process can be governed by a diverse network of genes. The accumulation of publicly available microarray data encompassing a wide range of biological and environmental conditions has enabled the development of additional capabilities including gene co-expression analysis (GCA). GCA is based on the understanding that genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related biological processes may exhibit comparable expression patterns over a range of experimental conditions, developmental stages and tissues. We present an open access database for the investigation of gene co-expression networks within the cultivated grapevine, Vitis vinifera. Description The new gene co-expression database, VTCdb (http://vtcdb.adelaide.edu.au/Home.aspx), offers an online platform for transcriptional regulatory inference in the cultivated grapevine. Using condition-independent and condition-dependent approaches, grapevine co-expression networks were constructed using the latest publicly available microarray datasets from diverse experimental series, utilising the Affymetrix Vitis vinifera GeneChip (16 K) and the NimbleGen Grape Whole-genome microarray chip (29 K), thus making it possible to profile approximately 29,000 genes (95% of the predicted grapevine transcriptome). Applications available with the online platform include the use of gene names, probesets, modules or biological processes to query the co-expression networks, with the option to choose between Affymetrix or Nimblegen datasets and between multiple co-expression measures. Alternatively, the user can browse existing network modules using interactive network visualisation and analysis via CytoscapeWeb. To demonstrate the utility of the database, we present examples from three fundamental biological processes (berry development, photosynthesis and

  7. Nuclear Neighborhoods and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Bodnar, Megan S.; Spector, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic nucleus is a highly compartmentalized and dynamic environment. Chromosome territories are arranged non-randomly within the nucleus and numerous studies have indicated that a gene’s position in the nucleus can impact its transcriptional activity. Here, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the influence of specific nuclear neighborhoods on gene expression or repression. Nuclear neighborhoods associated with transcriptional repression include the inner nuclear membrane/nuclear lamina and peri-nucleolar chromatin, whereas neighborhoods surrounding the nuclear pore complex, PML nuclear bodies, and nuclear speckles seem to be transcriptionally permissive. While nuclear position appears to play an important role in gene expression, it is likely to be only one piece of a flexible puzzle that incorporates numerous parameters. We are still at a very early, yet exciting stage in our journey toward deciphering the mechanism(s) that govern the permissiveness of gene expression/repression within different nuclear neighborhoods. PMID:19339170

  8. Differential Gene Expression in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2014-01-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell–matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system. PMID:24985133

  9. Establishment of the Lotus japonicus Gene Expression Atlas (LjGEA) and its use to explore legume seed maturation.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Jerome; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Wang, Mingyi; Andriankaja, Andry; Allen, Stacy N; He, Ji; Tang, Yuhong; Murray, Jeremy D; Udvardi, Michael K

    2013-04-01

    Lotus japonicus is a model species for legume genomics. To accelerate legume functional genomics, we developed a Lotus japonicus Gene Expression Atlas (LjGEA), which provides a global view of gene expression in all organ systems of this species, including roots, nodules, stems, petioles, leaves, flowers, pods and seeds. Time-series data covering multiple stages of developing pod and seed are included in the LjGEA. In addition, previously published L. japonicus Affymetrix data are included in the database, making it a 'one-stop shop' for transcriptome analysis of this species. The LjGEA web server (http://ljgea.noble.org/) enables flexible, multi-faceted analyses of the transcriptome. Transcript data may be accessed using the Affymetrix probe identification number, DNA sequence, gene name, functional description in natural language, and GO and KEGG annotation terms. Genes may be discovered through co-expression or differential expression analysis. Users may select a subset of experiments and visualize and compare expression profiles of multiple genes simultaneously. Data may be downloaded in a tabular form compatible with common analytical and visualization software. To illustrate the power of LjGEA, we explored the transcriptome of developing seeds. Genes represented by 36 474 probe sets were expressed at some stage during seed development, and almost half of these genes displayed differential expression during development. Among the latter were 624 transcription factor genes, some of which are orthologs of transcription factor genes that are known to regulate seed development in other species, while most are novel and represent attractive targets for reverse genetics approaches to determine their roles in this important organ. PMID:23452239

  10. A Microarray-Based Gene Expression Analysis to Identify Diagnostic Biomarkers for Unknown Primary Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kurahashi, Issei; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Arao, Tokuzo; Kurata, Takayasu; Koh, Yasuhiro; Sakai, Kazuko; Matsumoto, Koji; Tanioka, Maki; Takeda, Koji; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Tsuya, Asuka; Matsubara, Nobuaki; Mukai, Hirofumi; Minami, Hironobu; Chayahara, Naoko; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro; Miwa, Keisuke; Takahashi, Shin; Takahashi, Shunji; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nishio, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    Background The biological basis for cancer of unknown primary (CUP) at the molecular level remains largely unknown, with no evidence of whether a common biological entity exists. Here, we assessed the possibility of identifying a common diagnostic biomarker for CUP using a microarray gene expression analysis. Methods Tumor mRNA samples from 60 patients with CUP were analyzed using the Affymetrix U133A Plus 2.0 GeneChip and were normalized by asinh (hyperbolic arc sine) transformation to construct a mean gene-expression profile specific to CUP. A gene-expression profile specific to non-CUP group was constructed using publicly available raw microarray datasets. The t-tests were performed to compare the CUP with non-CUP groups and the top 59 CUP specific genes with the highest fold change were selected (p-value<0.001). Results Among the 44 genes that were up-regulated in the CUP group, 6 genes for ribosomal proteins were identified. Two of these genes (RPS7 and RPL11) are known to be involved in the Mdm2–p53 pathway. We also identified several genes related to metastasis and apoptosis, suggesting a biological attribute of CUP. Conclusions The protein products of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes identified in this study may be clinically useful as unique biomarkers for CUP. PMID:23671674

  11. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  12. Identification of Potential Anticancer Activities of Novel Ganoderma lucidum Extracts Using Gene Expression and Pathway Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chi H J; Bishop, Karen S; Xu, Yuanye; Han, Dug Yeo; Murray, Pamela M; Marlow, Gareth J; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (lingzhi) has been used for the general promotion of health in Asia for many centuries. The common method of consumption is to boil lingzhi in water and then drink the liquid. In this study, we examined the potential anticancer activities of G. lucidum submerged in two commonly consumed forms of alcohol in East Asia: malt whiskey and rice wine. The anticancer effect of G. lucidum, using whiskey and rice wine-based extraction methods, has not been previously reported. The growth inhibition of G. lucidum whiskey and rice wine extracts on the prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and DU145, was determined. Using Affymetrix gene expression assays, several biologically active pathways associated with the anticancer activities of G. lucidum extracts were identified. Using gene expression analysis (real-time polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) and protein analysis (Western blotting), we confirmed the expression of key genes and their associated proteins that were initially identified with Affymetrix gene expression analysis. PMID:27006591

  13. Identification of Potential Anticancer Activities of Novel Ganoderma lucidum Extracts Using Gene Expression and Pathway Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chi H.J.; Bishop, Karen S.; Xu, Yuanye; Han, Dug Yeo; Murray, Pamela M.; Marlow, Gareth J.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (lingzhi) has been used for the general promotion of health in Asia for many centuries. The common method of consumption is to boil lingzhi in water and then drink the liquid. In this study, we examined the potential anticancer activities of G. lucidum submerged in two commonly consumed forms of alcohol in East Asia: malt whiskey and rice wine. The anticancer effect of G. lucidum, using whiskey and rice wine-based extraction methods, has not been previously reported. The growth inhibition of G. lucidum whiskey and rice wine extracts on the prostate cancer cell lines, PC3 and DU145, was determined. Using Affymetrix gene expression assays, several biologically active pathways associated with the anticancer activities of G. lucidum extracts were identified. Using gene expression analysis (real-time polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]) and protein analysis (Western blotting), we confirmed the expression of key genes and their associated proteins that were initially identified with Affymetrix gene expression analysis. PMID:27006591

  14. Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the setting of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a relatively common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that leads to progressive narrowing of the lumen of leg arteries. Circulating monocytes are in contact with the arterial wall and can serve as reporters of vascular pathology in the setting of PAD. We performed gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with PAD and controls without PAD to identify differentially regulated genes. Methods PAD was defined as an ankle brachial index (ABI) ≤0.9 (n = 19) while age and gender matched controls had an ABI > 1.0 (n = 18). Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix HG-U133 plus 2.0 gene chips and analyzed using GeneSpring GX 11.0. Gene expression data was normalized using Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) normalization method, differential expression was defined as a fold change ≥1.5, followed by unpaired Mann-Whitney test (P < 0.05) and correction for multiple testing by Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes was performed using an integrated bioinformatics pipeline with tools for enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, pathway analysis using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), molecular event enrichment using Reactome annotations and network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suite. Extensive biocuration was also performed to understand the functional context of genes. Results We identified 87 genes differentially expressed in the setting of PAD; 40 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated. We employed an integrated bioinformatics pipeline coupled with literature curation to characterize the functional coherence of differentially regulated genes. Conclusion Notably, upregulated genes mediate immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, stress response, phosphorylation, hemostasis, platelet activation and platelet aggregation. Downregulated genes included several genes from

  15. Bronchial airway gene expression in smokers with lung or head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, Eric; Nazarov, Petr V; Muller, Arnaud; Nicot, Nathalie; Bosseler, Manon; Pierson, Sandrine; Van Moer, Kris; Palissot, Valérie; Mascaux, Céline; Knolle, Ulrich; Ninane, Vincent; Nati, Romain; Bremnes, Roy M; Vallar, Laurent; Berchem, Guy; Schlesser, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major cause of cancers of the respiratory tract, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck cancer (HNC). In order to better understand carcinogenesis of the lung and upper airways, we have compared the gene expression profiles of tumor-distant, histologically normal bronchial biopsy specimens obtained from current smokers with NSCLC or HNC (SC, considered as a single group), as well as nonsmokers (NS) and smokers without cancer (SNC). RNA from a total of 97 biopsies was used for gene expression profiling (Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array). Differentially expressed genes were used to compare NS, SNC, and SC, and functional analysis was carried out using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Smoking-related cancer of the respiratory tract was found to affect the expression of genes encoding xenobiotic biotransformation proteins, as well as proteins associated with crucial inflammation/immunity pathways and other processes that protect the airway from the chemicals in cigarette smoke or contribute to carcinogenesis. Finally, we used the prediction analysis for microarray (PAM) method to identify gene signatures of cigarette smoking and cancer, and uncovered a 15-gene signature that distinguished between SNC and SC with an accuracy of 83%. Thus, gene profiling of histologically normal bronchial biopsy specimens provided insight into cigarette-induced carcinogenesis of the respiratory tract and gene signatures of cancer in smokers. PMID:24497500

  16. Quality Control Usage in High-Density Microarrays Reveals Differential Gene Expression Profiles in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Ruiz, Vanessa; Moreno, Jose; Jacome-Lopez, Karina; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Juarez-Mendez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    There are several existing reports of microarray chip use for assessment of altered gene expression in different diseases. In fact, there have been over 1.5 million assays of this kind performed over the last twenty years, which have influenced clinical and translational research studies. The most commonly used DNA microarray platforms are Affymetrix GeneChip and Quality Control Software along with their GeneChip Probe Arrays. These chips are created using several quality controls to confirm the success of each assay, but their actual impact on gene expression profiles had not been previously analyzed until the appearance of several bioinformatics tools for this purpose. We here performed a data mining analysis, in this case specifically focused on ovarian cancer, as well as healthy ovarian tissue and ovarian cell lines, in order to confirm quality control results and associated variation in gene expression profiles. The microarray data used in our research were downloaded from ArrayExpress and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and analyzed with Expression Console Software using RMA, MAS5 and Plier algorithms. The gene expression profiles were obtained using Partek Genomics Suite v6.6 and data were visualized using principal component analysis, heat map, and Venn diagrams. Microarray quality control analysis showed that roughly 40% of the microarray files were false negative, demonstrating over- and under-estimation of expressed genes. Additionally, we confirmed the results performing second analysis using independent samples. About 70% of the significant expressed genes were correlated in both analyses. These results demonstrate the importance of appropriate microarray processing to obtain a reliable gene expression profile. PMID:27268623

  17. Gene Expression Changes With Time in Skeletal Muscle of Severely Burned Children

    PubMed Central

    Dasu, Mohan R. K.; Barrow, Robert E.; Herndon, David N.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify gene-expression changes in leg muscle for up to 24 months after a severe thermal injury. Summary Background Data: Hypermetabolism associated with severe burns was thought to cease with wound healing and closure. It has been recently shown that hypermetabolism does not completely resolve after healing, and muscle catabolism continues after hospital discharge; however, just how long after discharge has not been established. Methods: Six children, admitted to our hospital within 1 week after injury, were studied. Patients ranged in age from 3 to 18 years, with flame or scald burns covering more than 40% of their body surface area. At 1.5, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postburn, a biopsy of the vastus lateralis muscle was taken and snap frozen at −80°C. Total RNA was isolated and in vitro transcribed and hybridized to HG-U95 Av.2 Affymetrix arrays. The images were scanned and analyzed using Affymetrix GeneChip Analysis Suite 5.2 and dChip programs. Using 1 to 7 days after injury as baseline, comparisons were made of expression profiles at the various time intervals after injury. Results: When comparisons are made to nonburned children, 38 genes were significantly altered at 1.5 months, 10 genes remained altered at 6 months, 4 remained altered at 12 months, and 2 at 18 months. No differences could be shown at 24 months. Western blot analysis of β-2 microglobulin and myosin light chain was used to corroborate the microarray data. Conclusions: Gene changes can be identified for up to 18 months after burn but not at 24 months. These gene changes may provide information concerning what genes in skeletal muscle contribute to recovery from burn trauma. PMID:15798467

  18. RASSF1C modulates the expression of a stem cell renewal gene, PIWIL1

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RASSF1A and RASSF1C are two major isoforms encoded by the Ras association domain family 1 (RASSF1) gene through alternative promoter selection and mRNA splicing. RASSF1A is a well established tumor suppressor gene. Unlike RASSF1A, RASSF1C appears to have growth promoting actions in lung cancer. In this article, we report on the identification of novel RASSF1C target genes in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Over-expression and siRNA techniques were used to alter RASSF1C expression in human lung cancer cells, and Affymetrix-microarray study was conducted using NCI-H1299 cells over-expressing RASSF1C to identify RASSF1C target genes. Results The microarray study intriguingly shows that RASSF1C modulates the expression of a number of genes that are involved in cancer development, cell growth and proliferation, cell death, and cell cycle. We have validated the expression of some target genes using qRT-PCR. We demonstrate that RASSF1C over-expression increases, and silencing of RASSF1C decreases, the expression of PIWIL1 gene in NSCLC cells using qRT-PCR, immunostaining, and Western blot analysis. We also show that RASSF1C over-expression induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in lung cancer cells, and inhibition of the MEK-ERK1/2 pathway suppresses the expression of PIWIL1 gene expression, suggesting that RASSF1C may exert its activities on some target genes such as PIWIL1 through the activation of the MEK-ERK1/2 pathway. Also, PIWIL1 expression is elevated in lung cancer cell lines compared to normal lung epithelial cells. Conclusions Taken together, our findings provide significant data to propose a model for investigating the role of RASSF1C/PIWIL1 proteins in initiation and progression of lung cancer. PMID:22591718

  19. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  20. Brain region-specific gene expression changes after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and early withdrawal in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Roberto I; McGinty, Jacqueline F; Kalivas, Peter W; Becker, Howard C

    2012-03-01

    Neuroadaptations that participate in the ontogeny of alcohol dependence are likely a result of altered gene expression in various brain regions. The present study investigated brain region-specific changes in the pattern and magnitude of gene expression immediately following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure and 8 hours following final ethanol exposure [i.e. early withdrawal (EWD)]. High-density oligonucleotide microarrays (Affymetrix 430A 2.0, Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and bioinformatics analysis were used to characterize gene expression and function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HPC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) of C57BL/6J mice (Jackson Laboratories, Bar Harbor, ME, USA). Gene expression levels were determined using gene chip robust multi-array average followed by statistical analysis of microarrays and validated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Results indicated that immediately following CIE exposure, changes in gene expression were strikingly greater in the PFC (284 genes) compared with the HPC (16 genes) and NAc (32 genes). Bioinformatics analysis revealed that most of the transcriptionally responsive genes in the PFC were involved in Ras/MAPK signaling, notch signaling or ubiquitination. In contrast, during EWD, changes in gene expression were greatest in the HPC (139 genes) compared with the PFC (four genes) and NAc (eight genes). The most transcriptionally responsive genes in the HPC were involved in mRNA processing or actin dynamics. Of the few genes detected in the NAc, the most representatives were involved in circadian rhythms. Overall, these findings indicate that brain region-specific and time-dependent neuroadaptive alterations in gene expression play an integral role in the development of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. PMID:21812870

  1. Brain region-specific gene expression changes after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and early withdrawal in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, Roberto I.; McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Kalivas, Peter W.; Becker, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroadaptations that participate in the ontogeny of alcohol dependence are likely a result of altered gene expression in various brain regions. The present study investigated brain region-specific changes in the pattern and magnitude of gene expression immediately following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure and 8 hours following final ethanol exposure [i.e. early withdrawal (EWD)]. High-density oligonucleotide microarrays (Affymetrix 430A 2.0, Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and bioinformatics analysis were used to characterize gene expression and function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HPC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) of C57BL/6J mice (Jackson Laboratories, Bar Harbor, ME, USA). Gene expression levels were determined using gene chip robust multi-array average followed by statistical analysis of microarrays and validated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Results indicated that immediately following CIE exposure, changes in gene expression were strikingly greater in the PFC (284 genes) compared with the HPC (16 genes) and NAc (32 genes). Bioinformatics analysis revealed that most of the transcriptionally responsive genes in the PFC were involved in Ras/MAPK signaling, notch signaling or ubiquitination. In contrast, during EWD, changes in gene expression were greatest in the HPC (139 genes) compared with the PFC (four genes) and NAc (eight genes). The most transcriptionally responsive genes in the HPC were involved in mRNA processing or actin dynamics. Of the few genes detected in the NAc, the most representatives were involved in circadian rhythms. Overall, these findings indicate that brain region-specific and time-dependent neuroadaptive alterations in gene expression play an integral role in the development of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. PMID:21812870

  2. Gene expression during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Igaz, Lionel Muller; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Vianna, Monica M R; Izquierdo, Ivan; Medina, Jorge H

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, neuroscientists have provided many clues that point out the involvement of de novo gene expression during the formation of long-lasting forms of memory. However, information regarding the transcriptional response networks involved in memory formation has been scarce and fragmented. With the advent of genome-based technologies, combined with more classical approaches (i.e., pharmacology and biochemistry), it is now feasible to address those relevant questions--which gene products are modulated, and when that processes are necessary for the proper storage of memories--with unprecedented resolution and scale. Using one-trial inhibitory (passive) avoidance training of rats, one of the most studied tasks so far, we found two time windows of sensitivity to transcriptional and translational inhibitors infused into the hippocampus: around the time of training and 3-6 h after training. Remarkably, these periods perfectly overlap with the involvement of hippocampal cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) signaling pathways in memory consolidation. Given the complexity of transcriptional responses in the brain, particularly those related to processing of behavioral information, it was clearly necessary to address this issue with a multi-variable, parallel-oriented approach. We used cDNA arrays to screen for candidate inhibitory avoidance learning-related genes and analyze the dynamic pattern of gene expression that emerges during memory consolidation. These include genes involved in intracellular kinase networks, synaptic function, DNA-binding and chromatin modification, transcriptional activation and repression, translation, membrane receptors, and oncogenes, among others. Our findings suggest that differential and orchestrated hippocampal gene expression is necessary in both early and late periods of long-term memory consolidation. Additionally, this kind of studies may lead to the identification and characterization of genes that are relevant for the pathogenesis

  3. GeneMesh: a web-based microarray analysis tool for relating differentially expressed genes to MeSH terms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important objective of DNA microarray-based gene expression experimentation is determining inter-relationships that exist between differentially expressed genes and biological processes, molecular functions, cellular components, signaling pathways, physiologic processes and diseases. Results Here we describe GeneMesh, a web-based program that facilitates analysis of DNA microarray gene expression data. GeneMesh relates genes in a query set to categories available in the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) hierarchical index. The interface enables hypothesis driven relational analysis to a specific MeSH subcategory (e.g., Cardiovascular System, Genetic Processes, Immune System Diseases etc.) or unbiased relational analysis to broader MeSH categories (e.g., Anatomy, Biological Sciences, Disease etc.). Genes found associated with a given MeSH category are dynamically linked to facilitate tabular and graphical depiction of Entrez Gene information, Gene Ontology information, KEGG metabolic pathway diagrams and intermolecular interaction information. Expression intensity values of groups of genes that cluster in relation to a given MeSH category, gene ontology or pathway can be displayed as heat maps of Z score-normalized values. GeneMesh operates on gene expression data derived from a number of commercial microarray platforms including Affymetrix, Agilent and Illumina. Conclusions GeneMesh is a versatile web-based tool for testing and developing new hypotheses through relating genes in a query set (e.g., differentially expressed genes from a DNA microarray experiment) to descriptors making up the hierarchical structure of the National Library of Medicine controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH. The system further enhances the discovery process by providing links between sets of genes associated with a given MeSH category to a rich set of html linked tabular and graphic information including Entrez Gene summaries, gene ontologies, intermolecular interactions

  4. Data Mining in Networks of Differentially Expressed Genes during Sow Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ligang; Zhang, Longchao; Li, Yong; Li, Wen; Luo, Weizhen; Cheng, Duxue; Yan, Hua; Ma, Xiaojun; Liu, Xin; Song, Xin; Liang, Jing; Zhao, Kebin; Wang, Lixian

    2012-01-01

    Small to moderate gains in Pig fertility can mean large returns in overall efficiency, and developing methods to improve it is highly desirable. High fertility rates depend on completion of successful pregnancies. To understand the molecular signals associated with pregnancy in sows, expression profiling experiments were conducted to identify differentially expressed genes in ovary and myometrium at different pregnancy periods using the Affymetrix Porcine GeneChipTM. A total of 974, 1800, 335 and 710 differentially expressed transcripts were identified in the myometrium during early pregnancy (EP) and late pregnancy (LP), and in the ovary during EP and LP, respectively. Self-Organizing Map (SOM) clusters indicated the differentially expressed genes belonged to 7 different functional groups. Based on BLASTX searches and Gene Ontology (GO) classifications, 129 unique genes closely related to pregnancy showed differential expression patterns. GO analysis also indicated that there were 21 different molecular function categories, 20 different biological process categories, and 8 different cellular component categories of genes differentially expressed during sow pregnancy. Gene regulatory network reconstruction provided us with an interaction model of known genes such as insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) gene, estrogen receptor (ESR) gene, retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) gene, and several unknown candidate genes related to reproduction. Several pitch point genes were selected for association study with reproduction traits. For instance, DPPA5 g.363 T>C was found to associate with litter born weight at later parities in Beijing Black pigs significantly (p < 0.05). Overall, this study contributes to elucidating the mechanism underlying pregnancy processes, which maybe provide valuable information for pig reproduction improvement. PMID:22532788

  5. Developmental and Environmental Regulation of Aquaporin Gene Expression across Populus Species: Divergence or Redundancy?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice; Vialet-Chabrand, Silvère; Merret, Rémy; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Moretti, Sébastien; Bizet, François; Guilliot, Agnès; Hummel, Irène

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane channels belonging to the major intrinsic proteins family and are known for their ability to facilitate water movement. While in Populus trichocarpa, AQP proteins form a large family encompassing fifty-five genes, most of the experimental work focused on a few genes or subfamilies. The current work was undertaken to develop a comprehensive picture of the whole AQP gene family in Populus species by delineating gene expression domain and distinguishing responsiveness to developmental and environmental cues. Since duplication events amplified the poplar AQP family, we addressed the question of expression redundancy between gene duplicates. On these purposes, we carried a meta-analysis of all publicly available Affymetrix experiments. Our in-silico strategy controlled for previously identified biases in cross-species transcriptomics, a necessary step for any comparative transcriptomics based on multispecies design chips. Three poplar AQPs were not supported by any expression data, even in a large collection of situations (abiotic and biotic constraints, temporal oscillations and mutants). The expression of 11 AQPs was never or poorly regulated whatever the wideness of their expression domain and their expression level. Our work highlighted that PtTIP1;4 was the most responsive gene of the AQP family. A high functional divergence between gene duplicates was detected across species and in response to tested cues, except for the root-expressed PtTIP2;3/PtTIP2;4 pair exhibiting 80% convergent responses. Our meta-analysis assessed key features of aquaporin expression which had remained hidden in single experiments, such as expression wideness, response specificity and genotype and environment interactions. By consolidating expression profiles using independent experimental series, we showed that the large expansion of AQP family in poplar was accompanied with a strong divergence of gene expression, even if some cases of functional redundancy

  6. Progesterone-regulated changes in endometrial gene expression contribute to advanced conceptus development in cattle.

    PubMed

    Forde, N; Carter, F; Fair, T; Crowe, M A; Evans, A C O; Spencer, T E; Bazer, F W; McBride, R; Boland, M P; O'Gaora, P; Lonergan, P; Roche, J F

    2009-10-01

    The postovulatory rise in circulating progesterone (P4) concentrations is associated with increased pregnancy success in beef and dairy cattle. Our study objective was to determine how elevated P4 alters endometrial gene expression to advance conceptus development. Synchronized heifers were inseminated (Day 0) and randomly assigned to pregnant high P4 or to pregnant normal P4. All high P4 groups received a P4-release intravaginal device on Day 3 after insemination that increased P4 concentrations up to Day 7 (P < 0.05). Tissue was collected on Day 5, 7, 13, or 16 of pregnancy, and endometrial gene expression was analyzed using the bovine Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) microarrays. Microarray analyses demonstrated that the largest number of P4-regulated genes coincided with the day when the P4 profiles were different for the longest period. Genes with the largest fold change increase (such as DGAT2 and MSTN [also known as GDF8]) were associated with triglyceride synthesis and glucose transport, which can be utilized as an energy source for the developing embryo. Temporal changes occurred at different stages of early pregnancy, with the greatest difference occurring between well-separated stages of conceptus development. Validation of a number of genes by quantitative real-time PCR indicated that P4 supplementation advances endometrial gene expression by altering the time (FABP, DGAT2, and MSTN) or duration (CRYGS) of expression pattern for genes that contribute to the composition of histotroph. PMID:19553605

  7. Differential gene expression in mouse liver associated with the hepatoprotective effect of clofibrate

    SciTech Connect

    Moffit, Jeffrey S.; Koza-Taylor, Petra H.; Holland, Ricky D.; Thibodeau, Michael S.; Beger, Richard D.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, Jose E. . E-mail: jose.manautou@uconn.edu

    2007-07-15

    Pretreatment of mice with the peroxisome proliferator clofibrate (CFB) protects against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Previous studies have shown that activation of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is required for this effect. The present study utilizes gene expression profile analysis to identify potential pathways contributing to PPAR{alpha}-mediated hepatoprotection. Gene expression profiles were compared between wild type and PPAR{alpha}-null mice pretreated with vehicle or CFB (500 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 10 days) and then challenged with APAP (400 mg/kg, p.o.). Total hepatic RNA was isolated 4 h after APAP treatment and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MGU74 v2.0 GeneChips. Gene expression analysis was performed utilizing GeneSpring (registered) software. Our analysis identified 53 genes of interest including vanin-1, cell cycle regulators, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, an acetaminophen binding protein. Vanin-1 could be important for CFB-mediated hepatoprotection because this protein is involved in the synthesis of cysteamine and cystamine. These are potent antioxidants capable of ameliorating APAP toxicity in rodents and humans. HPLC-ESI/MS/MS analysis of liver extracts indicates that enhanced vanin-1 gene expression results in elevated cystamine levels, which could be mechanistically associated with CFB-mediated hepatoprotection.

  8. Gene expression profiling of cancer stem cell in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong-Cheol; Sung, Ji-Min; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Seo, Kun-Ho; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Dong-Ku; Kim, Jin-Suk; El-Aty AM, Abd; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2007-01-01

    Background The studies on cancer-stem-cells (CSCs) have attracted so much attention in recent years as possible therapeutic implications. This study was carried out to investigate the gene expression profile of CSCs in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Results We isolated CSCs from A549 cell line of which side population (SP) phenotype revealed several stem cell properties. After staining the cell line with Hoechst 33342 dye, the SP and non-side population (non-SP) cells were sorted using flow cytometric analysis. The mRNA expression profiles were measured using an Affymetrix GeneChip® oligonucleotide array. Among the sixty one differentially expressed genes, the twelve genes inclusive three poor prognostic genes; Aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1/C2 (AKR1C1/C2), Transmembrane 4 L six family member 1 nuclear receptor (TM4SF1), and Nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (NR0B1) were significantly up-regulated in SP compared to non-SP cells. Conclusion This is the first report indicating the differences of gene expression pattern between SP and non-SP cells in A549 cells. We suggest that the up-regulations of the genes AKR1C1/C2, TM4SF1 and NR0B1 in SP of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells could be a target of poor prognosis in anti-cancer therapy. PMID:18034892

  9. Whole Blood Gene Expression and Atrial Fibrillation: The Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Honghuang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Dupuis, Josée; McManus, David D.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Magnani, Jared W.; Joehanes, Roby; Munson, Peter J.; Larson, Martin G.; Levy, Daniel; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) involves substantial electrophysiological, structural and contractile remodeling. We hypothesize that characterizing gene expression might uncover important pathways related to AF. Methods and Results We performed genome-wide whole blood transcriptomic profiling (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array) of 2446 participants (mean age 66±9 years, 55% women) from the Offspring cohort of Framingham Heart Study. The study included 177 participants with prevalent AF, 143 with incident AF during up to 7 years follow up, and 2126 participants with no AF. We identified seven genes statistically significantly up-regulated with prevalent AF. The most significant gene, PBX1 (P = 2.8×10−7), plays an important role in cardiovascular development. We integrated differential gene expression with gene-gene interaction information to identify several signaling pathways possibly involved in AF-related transcriptional regulation. We did not detect any statistically significant transcriptomic associations with incident AF. Conclusion We examined associations of gene expression with AF in a large community-based cohort. Our study revealed several genes and signaling pathways that are potentially involved in AF-related transcriptional regulation. PMID:24805109

  10. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  11. Control of Renin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Pan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Renin, as part of the renin-angiotensin system, plays a critical role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte homeostasis, mammalian renal development and progression of fibrotic/hypertrophic diseases. Renin gene transcription is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Initial studies using the mouse As4.1 cell line, which has many characteristics of the renin-expressing juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, have identified a proximal promoter region (−197 to −50 bp) and an enhancer (−2866 to −2625 bp) upstream of the Ren-1c gene, which are critical for renin gene expression. The proximal promoter region contains several transcription factor-binding sites including a binding site for the products of the developmental control genes Hox. The enhancer consists of at least 11 transcription factor-binding sites and is responsive to various signal transduction pathways including cAMP, retinoic acid, endothelin-1, and cytokines, all of which are known to alter renin mRNA levels. Furthermore, in vivo models have validated several of these key components found within the proximal promoter region and the enhancer as well as other key sites necessary for renin gene transcription. PMID:22576577

  12. Gene Expression Analysis of Peripheral Cells for Subclassification of Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Remission

    PubMed Central

    van Lierop, Pieter P. E.; Swagemakers, Sigrid M.; de Bie, Charlotte I.; Middendorp, Sabine; van Baarlen, Peter; Samsom, Janneke N.; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; Escher, Johanna C.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In current clinical practice, optimal treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) aims at the induction and maintenance of clinical remission. Clinical remission is apparent when laboratory markers of inflammation are normal and clinical symptoms are absent. However, sub-clinical inflammation can still be present. A detailed analysis of the immune status during this inactive state of disease may provide a useful tool to categorize patients with clinical remission into subsets with variable states of immune activation. Design By using Affymetrix GeneChips, we analysed RNA gene expression profiles of peripheral blood leukocytes from pediatric IBD patients in clinical remission and controls. We performed (un)supervised clustering analysis of IBD-associated genes and applied Ingenuity® pathway software to identify specific molecular profiles between patients. Results Pediatric IBD patients with disease in clinical remission display heterogeneously distributed gene expression profiles that are significantly distinct from controls. We identified three clusters of IBD patients, each displaying specific expression profiles of IBD-associated genes. Conclusion The expression of immune- and IBD-associated genes in peripheral blood leukocytes from pediatric IBD patients in clinical remission was different from healthy controls, indicating that sub-clinical immune mechanisms are still active during remission. As such, RNA profiling of peripheral blood may allow for non-invasive patient subclassification and new perspectives in treatment regimes of IBD patients in the future. PMID:24260248

  13. Coordinated patterns of gene expression for substrate and energy metabolism in skeletal muscle of diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yechoor, Vijay K.; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Saccone, Robert; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic abnormalities underlying diabetes are primarily the result of the lack of adequate insulin action and the associated changes in protein phosphorylation and gene expression. To define the full set of alterations in gene expression in skeletal muscle caused by diabetes and the loss of insulin action, we have used Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays and streptozotocin-diabetic mice. Of the genes studied, 235 were identified as changed in diabetes, with 129 genes up-regulated and 106 down-regulated. Analysis revealed a coordinated regulation at key steps in glucose and lipid metabolism, mitochondrial electron transport, transcriptional regulation, and protein trafficking. mRNAs for all of the enzymes of the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway were increased, whereas those for GLUT4, hexokinase II, the E1 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, and subunits of all four complexes of the mitochondrial electron transport chain were all coordinately down-regulated. Only about half of the alterations in gene expression in diabetic mice could be corrected toward normal after 3 days of insulin treatment and euglycemia. These data point to as of yet undefined mechanisms for highly coordinated regulation of gene expression by insulin and potential new targets for therapy of diabetes mellitus. PMID:12149437

  14. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes) relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation) the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases). Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development. PMID:21356103

  15. Neuronatin: A New Inflammation Gene Expressed on the Aortic Endothelium of Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mzhavia, Nino; Yu, Shuiqing; Ikeda, Shota; Chu, Tehua T.; Goldberg, Ira; Dansky, Hayes M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Identification of arterial genes and pathways altered in obesity and diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Aortic gene expression profiles of obese and diabetic db/db, high-fat diet–fed C57BL/6J, and control mice were obtained using mouse Affymetrix arrays. Neuronatin (Nnat) was selected for further analysis. To determine the function of Nnat, a recombinant adenovirus (Ad-Nnat) was used to overexpress the Nnat gene in primary endothelial cells and in the mouse aorta in vivo. RESULTS—Nnat, a gene of unknown vascular function, was upregulated in the aortas of db/db and high-fat diet–fed mice. Nnat gene expression was increased in db/db mouse aorta endothelial cells. Nnat protein was localized to aortic endothelium and was selectively increased in the endothelium of db/db mice. Infection of primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with Ad-Nnat increased expression of a panel of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-regulated genes, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion molecules. Infection of mouse carotid arteries in vivo with the Ad-Nnat increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 protein. Nnat activation of NF-κB and inflammatory gene expression in HAECs was mediated through pathways distinct from tumor necrosis factor-α. Nnat expression stimulated p38, Jun NH2-terminal kinase, extracellular signal–related kinase, and AKT kinase phosphorylation. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and p38 inhibitors prevented Nnat-mediated activation of NF-κB–induced gene expression. CONCLUSIONS—Nnat expression is increased in endothelial cells of obese and diabetic mouse blood vessels. The effects of Nnat on inflammatory pathways in vitro and in vivo suggest a pathophysiological role of this new gene in diabetic vascular diseases. PMID:18591389

  16. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  17. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  18. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  19. Hepatic gene expression analysis of mice exposed to raw water from Meiliang Bay, Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Liu, Su; Cheng, Shupei; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xuxiang

    2013-12-01

    Lake water is a micro-polluted water system, and characterization of its toxicity remains difficult. Microarray-based determination of altered gene expression might be an alterative approach. We chose raw water from Meiliang Bay, Lake Taihu, China as the target water. Male mice were exposed to the lake water for 90 days. Total hepatic RNA was applied to interrogate the Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430A 2.0 array. Gene ontology analysis, pathway analysis and gene network analysis were used to identify biological effects of differently expressed genes. The results showed that the expressions of 170 genes were altered. Nine biological processes and nine biological pathways were significantly perturbed (P ≤ 0.01), mainly linked to the regulation of cell processes, DNA repair, chromatin modification, oxidative reduction and carbohydrate metabolism. Important genes, such as Prkca, Pik3r1, Fgfr1 and Zbtb16, were identified by gene network analysis. This study provided excellent insights into early toxicological effects related to raw Lake Taihu water, and illustrated that the toxicogenomic approach might be a useful tool to evaluate potential environmental health effects of raw lake water. PMID:22899542

  20. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, M.; Myers, C.; Faith, J.

    2008-05-01

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  1. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Myers, C. Faith, J.

    2008-05-15

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  2. miRNAs in multiple myeloma – a survival relevant complex regulator of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Seckinger, Anja; MeiΔner, Tobias; Moreaux, Jérôme; Benes, Vladimir; Hillengass, Jens; Castoldi, Mirco; Zimmermann, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Jauch, Anna; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard; Hose, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose microRNAs regulate gene-expression in biological and pathophysiological processes, including multiple myeloma. Here we address i) What are the number and magnitude of changes in miRNA-expression between normal plasma cells and myeloma- or MGUS-samples, and the latter two? ii) What is the biological relevance and how does miRNA-expression impact on gene-expression? iii) Is there a prognostic significance, and what is its background? Experimental design Ninety-two purified myeloma-, MGUS-, normal plasma cell- and myeloma cell line-samples were investigated using miChip-arrays interrogating 559 human miRNAs. Impact on gene-expression was assessed by Affymetrix DNA-microarrays in two cohorts of myeloma patients (n = 677); chromosomal aberrations were assessed by iFISH, survival for 592 patients undergoing up-front high-dose chemotherapy. Results Compared to normal plasma cells, 67/559 miRNAs (12%) with fold changes of 4.6 to −3.1 are differentially expressed in myeloma-, 20 (3.6%) in MGUS-samples, and three (0.5%) between MGUS and myeloma. Expression of miRNAs is associated with proliferation, chromosomal aberrations, tumor mass, and gene expression-based risk-scores. This holds true for target-gene signatures of regulated mRNAs. miRNA-expression confers prognostic significance for event-free and overall survival, as do respective target-gene signatures. Conclusions The myeloma-miRNome confers a pattern of small changes of individual miRNAs impacting on gene-expression, biological functions, and survival. PMID:26472281

  3. Novel definition files for human GeneChips based on GeneAnnot

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Francesco; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Coppe, Alessandro; Sirota, Alexandra; Safran, Marilyn; Shmoish, Michael; Ferrari, Sergio; Lancet, Doron; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Bicciato, Silvio

    2007-01-01

    Background Improvements in genome sequence annotation revealed discrepancies in the original probeset/gene assignment in Affymetrix microarray and the existence of differences between annotations and effective alignments of probes and transcription products. In the current generation of Affymetrix human GeneChips, most probesets include probes matching transcripts from more than one gene and probes which do not match any transcribed sequence. Results We developed a novel set of custom Chip Definition Files (CDF) and the corresponding Bioconductor libraries for Affymetrix human GeneChips, based on the information contained in the GeneAnnot database. GeneAnnot-based CDFs are composed of unique custom-probesets, including only probes matching a single gene. Conclusion GeneAnnot-based custom CDFs solve the problem of a reliable reconstruction of expression levels and eliminate the existence of more than one probeset per gene, which often leads to discordant expression signals for the same transcript when gene differential expression is the focus of the analysis. GeneAnnot CDFs are freely distributed and fully compliant with Affymetrix standards and all available software for gene expression analysis. The CDF libraries are available from , along with supplementary information (CDF libraries, installation guidelines and R code, CDF statistics, and analysis results). PMID:18005434

  4. Steroidogenesis-related gene expression in the rat ovary exposed to melatonin supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Gisele Negro; Maganhin, Carla Cristina; Simões, Ricardo Santos; Baracat, Maria Cândida Pinheiro; da Silva Sasso, Gisela Rodrigues; Fuchs, Luiz Fernando Portugal; de Jesus Simões, Manuel; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Júnior, José Maria Soares

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze steroidogenesis-related gene expression in the rat ovary exposed to melatonin supplementation. METHODS: Thirty-two virgin adult female rats were randomized to two groups as follows: the control group GI received vehicle and the experimental group GII received melatonin supplementation (10 µg/night per animal) for 60 consecutive days. After the treatment, animals were anesthetized and the collected ovaries were immediately placed in liquid nitrogen for complementary deoxyribonucleic acid microarray analyses. A GeneChip® Kit Rat Genome 230 2.0 Affymetrix Array was used for gene analysis and the experiment was repeated three times for each group. The results were normalized with the GeneChip® Operating Software program and confirmed through analysis with the secondary deoxyribonucleic acid-Chip Analyzer (dChip) software. The data were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Genes related to ovarian function were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: We found the upregulation of the type 9 adenylate cyclase and inhibin beta B genes and the downregulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element modulator and cytochrome P450 family 17a1 genes in the ovarian tissue of GII compared to those of the control group. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that melatonin supplementation decreases gene expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which changes ovarian steroidogenesis. PMID:25789524

  5. Gene expression profiling in the skin of zebrafish infected with Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Lü, Aijun; Hu, Xiucai; Xue, Jun; Zhu, Jingrong; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Guangzhou

    2012-02-01

    Skin is considered the largest immunologically active organ, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear in fish. Here, Affymetrix Zebrafish GeneChip was used to assess gene expression in the skin of zebrafish (Danio rerio) infected with the bacterium Citrobacter freundii. The results showed that 229 genes were differentially expressed, of which 196 genes were upregulated and 33 genes were downregulated. Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analyses indicated 88 genes significantly associated with skin immunity involved in complement activation and acute phase response, defense and immune response, response to stress and stimulus, antigen processing and presentation, cell adhesion and migration, platelet activation and coagulation factors, regulation of autophagy and apoptosis. When compared with transcriptional profiles of previously reported carp (Cyprinus carpio) skin, a similar innate immunity (e.g., interferon, lectin, heat shock proteins, complements), and several different acute phase proteins (transferrin, ceruloplasmin, vitellogenin and alpha-1-microglobulin, etc.) were detected in zebrafish skin. The validity of the microarray results was verified by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of nine representative genes. This is first report that skin play important roles in innate immune responses to bacterial infection, which contribute to understanding the defense mechanisms of the skin in fish. PMID:22155693

  6. Stress, and pathogen response gene expression in modeled microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Immune suppression in microgravity has been well documented. With the advent of human exploration and long-term space travel, the immune system of the astronaut must be optimally maintained. It is important to investigate the expression patterns of cytokine genes, because they are directly related to immune response. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also called stress proteins, are a group of proteins that are present in the cells of every life form. These proteins are induced when a cell responds to stressors such as heat, cold and oxygen deprivation. Microgravity is another stressor that may regulate HSPs. Heat shock proteins trigger immune response through activities that occur both inside the cell (intracellular) and outside the cell (extracellular). Knowledge about these two gene groups could lead to establishment of a blueprint of the immune response and adaptation-related genes in the microgravity environment. Methods: Human peripheral blood cells were cultured in 1g (T flask) and modeled microgravity (MMG, rotating-wall vessel) for 24 and 72 hours. Cell samples were collected and subjected to gene array analysis using the Affymetrix HG_U95 array. Data was collected and subjected to a two-way analysis of variance. The genes related to immune and stress responses were analyzed. Results and Conclusions: HSP70 was up-regulated by more than two fold in microgravity culture, while HSP90 was significantly down-regulated. HSP70 is not typically expressed in all kinds of cells, but it is expressed at high levels in stress conditions. HSP70 participates in translation, protein translocation, proteolysis and protein folding, suppressing aggregation and reactivating denatured proteins. Increased serum HSP70 levels correlate with a better outcome for heat-stroke or severe trauma patients. At the same time, elevated serum levels of HSP70 have been detected in patients with peripheral or renal vascular disease. HSP90 has been identified in the cytosol, nucleus and

  7. Gene expression profiles of prostate cancer reveal involvement of multiple molecular pathways in the metastatic process

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Uma R; Ma, Changqing; Dhir, Rajiv; Bisceglia, Michelle; Lyons-Weiler, Maureen; Liang, Wenjing; Michalopoulos, George; Becich, Michael; Monzon, Federico A

    2007-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is characterized by heterogeneity in the clinical course that often does not correlate with morphologic features of the tumor. Metastasis reflects the most adverse outcome of prostate cancer, and to date there are no reliable morphologic features or serum biomarkers that can reliably predict which patients are at higher risk of developing metastatic disease. Understanding the differences in the biology of metastatic and organ confined primary tumors is essential for developing new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. Methods Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, we analyzed gene expression profiles of 24 androgen-ablation resistant metastatic samples obtained from 4 patients and a previously published dataset of 64 primary prostate tumor samples. Differential gene expression was analyzed after removing potentially uninformative stromal genes, addressing the differences in cellular content between primary and metastatic tumors. Results The metastatic samples are highly heterogenous in expression; however, differential expression analysis shows that 415 genes are upregulated and 364 genes are downregulated at least 2 fold in every patient with metastasis. The expression profile of metastatic samples reveals changes in expression of a unique set of genes representing both the androgen ablation related pathways and other metastasis related gene networks such as cell adhesion, bone remodelling and cell cycle. The differentially expressed genes include metabolic enzymes, transcription factors such as Forkhead Box M1 (FoxM1) and cell adhesion molecules such as Osteopontin (SPP1). Conclusion We hypothesize that these genes have a role in the biology of metastatic disease and that they represent potential therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. PMID:17430594

  8. New insights into the pathogenesis of cystic follicles in cattle: microarray analysis of gene expression in granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Grado-Ahuir, J A; Aad, P Y; Spicer, L J

    2011-06-01

    Ovarian follicular growth and development are regulated by extraovarian and intraovarian factors, which influence granulosa cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the molecular mechanisms that drive follicular growth are not completely understood. Ovarian follicular cysts are one of the most common causes of reproductive failure in dairy cattle. Nevertheless, the primary cause of cyst formation has not been clearly established. A gene expression comparison may aid in elucidating the causes of ovarian cyst disease. Our objective was to identify differentially expressed genes in ovarian granulosa cells between normal dominant and cystic follicles of cattle. Granulosa cells and follicular fluid were isolated from dominant and cystic follicles collected via either ultrasound-guided aspiration from dairy cows (n = 24) or slaughterhouse ovaries from beef cows (n = 23). Hormonal analysis for progesterone, estradiol, and androstenedione in follicular fluid was performed by RIA. Total RNA was extracted and hybridized to 6 Affymetrix GeneChip Bovine Genome Arrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Abundance of mRNA for differentially expressed selected genes was determined through quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Follicular cysts showed greater (P < 0.05) progesterone, lesser (P < 0.05) estradiol, and no differences (P > 0.10) in androstenedione concentrations compared with noncystic follicles. A total of 163 gene sequences were differentially expressed (P < 0.01), with 19 upregulated and 144 downregulated. From selected target genes, quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR confirmed angiogenin, PGE(2) receptor 4, and G-protein coupled receptor 34 genes as upregulated in cystic follicles, and Indian hedgehog protein precursor and secreted frizzled-related protein 4 genes as downregulated in cystic follicles. Further research is required to elucidate the role of these factors in follicular development and cyst formation. PMID:21239663

  9. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  10. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  11. Gene expression signature in organized and growth arrested mammaryacini predicts good outcome in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Martin, Katherine J.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Xhaja, Kris; Bosch, Irene; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-02-08

    To understand how non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) transit from a disorganized proliferating to an organized growth arrested state, and to relate this process to the changes that occur in breast cancer, we studied gene expression changes in non-malignant HMEC grown in three-dimensional cultures, and in a previously published panel of microarray data for 295 breast cancer samples. We hypothesized that the gene expression pattern of organized and growth arrested mammary acini would share similarities with breast tumors with good prognoses. Using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarrays, we analyzed the expression of 22,283 gene transcripts in two HMEC cell lines, 184 (finite life span) and HMT3522 S1 (immortal non-malignant), on successive days post-seeding in a laminin-rich extracellular matrix assay. Both HMECs underwent growth arrest in G0/G1 and differentiated into polarized acini between days 5 and 7. We identified gene expression changes with the same temporal pattern in both lines. We show that genes that are significantly lower in the organized, growth arrested HMEC than in their proliferating counterparts can be used to classify breast cancer patients into poor and good prognosis groups with high accuracy. This study represents a novel unsupervised approach to identifying breast cancer markers that may be of use clinically.

  12. Identification of genes preferentially expressed by microglia and upregulated during cuprizone-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Andréanne; Tremblay, Pierrot; Chernomoretz, Ariel; Vallières, Luc

    2007-06-01

    Microglia, monocytes, and peripheral macrophages share a common origin and many characteristics, but what distinguishes them from each other at the level of gene expression remains largely unknown. In this study, we compared the transcriptional profiles of freshly purified microglia, monocytes, and spleen macrophages using Affymetrix Mouse Genome arrays to identify genes predominantly expressed by microglia. Among tens of thousands of genes assayed, 127 potential candidates were found, including nine newly discovered genes encoding plasma membrane and extracellular proteins. In the brain, the latter were selectively expressed by microglia, as revealed by in situ hybridization. Three of them were confirmed to be exclusively (MSR2) or predominantly (GPR12, GPR34) expressed in the brain compared to the other tissues examined. Furthermore, all of these genes were upregulated in activated microglia after treatment with the demyelinating toxin cuprizone, suggesting that they play roles in neuroinflammation. In conclusion, this study reports the identification of new selective markers for microglia, which should prove useful not only to identify and isolate these cells, but also to better understand their distinctive properties. PMID:17285589

  13. Characterization of DNA reactive and non-DNA reactive anticancer drugs by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Le Fevre, Anne-Celine; Boitier, Eric; Marchandeau, Jean-Pierre; Sarasin, Alain; Thybaud, Veronique

    2007-06-01

    Gene expression profiling technology is expected to advance our understanding of genotoxic mechanisms involving direct or indirect interaction with DNA. We exposed human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells to 14 anticancer drugs (vincristine, paclitaxel, etoposide, daunorubicin, camptothecin, amsacrine, cytosine arabinoside, hydroxyurea, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU), 1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU), and bleomycin) for 4-h and examined them immediately or after a 20-h recovery period. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively, were evaluated by cell counting and by in vitro micronucleus assay at 24h. Effects on the cell cycle were determined by flow cytometry at 4 and 24h. Gene expression was profiled at both sampling times by using human Affymetrix U133A GeneChips (22K). Bioanalysis was done with Resolver/Rosetta software and an in-house annotation program. Cell cycle analysis and gene expression profiling allowed us to classify the drugs according to their mechanisms of action. The molecular signature is composed of 28 marker genes mainly involved in signal transduction and cell cycle pathways. Our results suggest that these marker genes could be used as a predictive model to classify genotoxins according to their direct or indirect interaction with DNA. PMID:17374387

  14. Brain gene expression differences are associated with abnormal tail biting behavior in pigs.

    PubMed

    Brunberg, E; Jensen, P; Isaksson, A; Keeling, L J

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge about gene expression in animals involved in abnormal behaviors can contribute to the understanding of underlying biological mechanisms. This study aimed to explore the motivational background to tail biting, an abnormal injurious behavior and severe welfare problem in pig production. Affymetrix microarrays were used to investigate gene expression differences in the hypothalamus and prefrontal cortex of pigs performing tail biting, pigs receiving bites to the tail and neutral pigs who were not involved in the behavior. In the hypothalamus, 32 transcripts were differentially expressed (P < 0.05) when tail biters were compared with neutral pigs, 130 when comparing receiver pigs with neutrals, and two when tail biters were compared with receivers. In the prefrontal cortex, seven transcripts were differently expressed in tail biters when compared with neutrals, seven in receivers vs. neutrals and none in the tail biters vs. receivers. In total, 19 genes showed a different expression pattern in neutral pigs when compared with both performers and receivers. This implies that the functions of these may provide knowledge about why the neutral pigs are not involved in tail biting behavior as performers or receivers. Among these 19 transcripts were genes associated with production traits in pigs (PDK4), sociality in humans and mice (GTF2I) and novelty seeking in humans (EGF). These are in line with hypotheses linking tail biting with reduced back fat thickness and explorative behavior. PMID:23146156

  15. Changes in winter depression phenotype correlate with white blood cell gene expression profiles: a combined metagene and gene ontology approach.

    PubMed

    Bosker, Fokko J; Terpstra, Peter; Gladkevich, Anatoliy V; Janneke Dijck-Brouwer, D A; te Meerman, Gerard; Nolen, Willem A; Schoevers, Robert A; Meesters, Ybe

    2015-04-01

    In the present study we evaluate the feasibility of gene expression in white blood cells as a peripheral marker for winter depression. Sixteen patients with winter type seasonal affective disorder were included in the study. Blood was taken by venous puncture at three time points; in winter prior and following bright light therapy and in summer. RNA was isolated, converted into cRNA, amplified and hybridized on Illumina® gene expression arrays. The raw optical array data were quantile normalized and thereafter analyzed using a metagene approach, based on previously published Affymetrix gene array data. The raw data were also subjected to a secondary analysis focusing on circadian genes and genes involved in serotonergic neurotransmission. Differences between the conditions were analyzed, using analysis of variance on the principal components of the metagene score matrix. After correction for multiple testing no statistically significant differences were found. Another approach uses the correlation between metagene factor weights and the actual expression values, averaged over conditions. When comparing the correlations of winter vs. summer and bright light therapy vs. summer significant changes for several metagenes were found. Subsequent gene ontology analyses (DAVID and GeneTrail) of 5 major metagenes suggest an interaction between brain and white blood cells. The hypothesis driven analysis with a smaller group of genes failed to demonstrate any significant effects. The results from the combined metagene and gene ontology analyses support the idea of communication between brain and white blood cells. Future studies will need a much larger sample size to obtain information at the level of single genes. PMID:25455571

  16. Parallel Gene Expression Changes in Sarcoidosis Involving the Lacrimal Gland, Orbital Tissue, or Blood

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, James T.; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Harrington, Christina A.; Sibley, Cailin H.; Dailey, Roger A.; Ng, John D.; Steele, Eric A.; Czyz, Craig N.; Foster, Jill A.; Tse, David; Alabiad, Chris; Dubovy, Sander; Parekh, Prashant; Harris, Gerald J.; Kazim, Michael; Patel, Payal; White, Valerie; Dolman, Peter; Korn, Bobby S.; Kikkawa, Don; Edward, Deepak P.; Alkatan, Hind; al-Hussain, Hailah; Yeatts, R. Patrick; Selva, Dinesh; Stauffer, Patrick; Planck, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Sarcoidosis is a major cause of ocular or periocular inflammation. The pathogenesis of sarcoidosis is incompletely understood and diagnosis often requires a biopsy. OBJECTIVE To determine how gene expression in either orbital adipose tissue or the lacrimal gland affected by sarcoidosis compares with gene expression in other causes of orbital disease and how gene expression in tissue affected by sarcoidosis compares with gene expression in peripheral blood samples obtained from patients with sarcoidosis. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a multicenter, international, observational study, gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed biopsy specimens, using GeneChipp U133 Plus 2 microarrays (Affymetrix), was conducted between October 2012 and January 2014 on tissues biopsied from January 2000 through June 2013. Participants included 12 patients with orbital sarcoidosis (7 in adipose tissue; 5 affecting the lacrimal gland) as well as comparable tissue from 6 healthy individuals serving as controls or patients with thyroid eye disease, nonspecific orbital inflammation, or granulomatosis with polyangiitis. In addition, results were compared with gene expression in peripheral blood samples obtained from 12 historical individuals with sarcoidosis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Significantly differentially expressed transcripts defined as a minimum of a 1.5-fold increase or a comparable decrease and a false discovery rate of P < .05. RESULTS Signals from 2449 probe sets (transcripts from approximately 1522 genes) were significantly increased in the orbital adipose tissue from patients with sarcoidosis. Signals from 4050 probe sets (approximately 2619 genes) were significantly decreased. Signals from 3069 probe sets (approximately 2001 genes) were significantly higher and 3320 (approximately 2283 genes) were significantly lower in the lacrimal gland for patients with sarcoidosis. Ninety-two probe sets (approximately 69 genes) had significantly elevated signals and

  17. Comparative analysis of temporal gene expression patterns in the developing ovary of the embryonic chicken

    PubMed Central

    YU, Minli; XU, Yali; YU, Defu; YU, Debing; DU, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Many genes participate in the process of ovarian germ cell development, while the combined action mechanisms of these molecular regulators still need clarification. The present study was focused on determination of differentially expressed genes and gene functions at four critical time points in chicken ovarian development. Comparative transcriptional profiling of ovaries from embryonic day 5.5 (E5.5), E12.5, E15.5 and E18.5 was performed using an Affymetrix GeneChip chicken genome microarray. Differential expression patterns for genes specifically depleted and enriched in each stage were identified. The results showed that most of the up- and downregulated genes were involved in the metabolism of retinoic acid (RA) and synthesis of hormones. Among them, a higher number of up- and downregulated genes in the E15.5 ovary were identified as being involved in steroid biosynthesis and retinol metabolism, respectively. To validate gene changes, expressions of twelve candidate genes related to germ cell development were examined by real-time PCR and found to be consistent with the of GeneChip data. Moreover, the immunostaining results suggested that ovarian development during different stages was regulated by different genes. Furthermore, a Raldh2 knockdown chicken model was produced to investigate the fundamental role of Raldh2 in meiosis initiation. It was found that meiosis occurred abnormally in Raldh2 knockdown ovaries, but the inhibitory effect on meiosis was reversed by the addition of exogenous RA. This study offers insights into the profile of gene expression and mechanisms regulating ovarian development, especially the notable role of Raldh2 in meiosis initiation in the chicken. PMID:25736178

  18. Glomerulonephritis-induced changes in kidney gene expression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pavkovic, Mira; Riefke, Björn; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Gröticke, Ina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated a glomerulonephritis (GN) model in rats induced by nephrotoxic serum (NTS) which contains antibodies against the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The anti-GBM GN model in rats is widely used since its biochemical and histopathological characteristics are similar to crescentic nephritis and Goodpasture's disease in humans (Pusey, 2003[2]). Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were dosed once with 1, 2.5 and 5 ml/kg nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or 1.5 and 5 ml/kg NTS, respectively. GN and tubular damage were observed histopathologically in all treated rats after 14 days. To obtain insight into molecular processes during GN pathogenesis, mRNA expression was investigated in WKY and SD kidneys using Affymetrix's GeneChip Rat genome 230_2.0 arrays (GSE64265). The immunopathological processes during GN are still not fully understood and likely involve both innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, several hundred mRNAs were found deregulated, which functionally were mostly associated with inflammation and regeneration. The β-chain of the major histocompatibility complex class II RT1.B (Rt1-Bb) and complement component 6 (C6) were identified as two mRNAs differentially expressed between WKY and SD rat strains which could be related to known different susceptibilities to NTS of different rat strains; both were increased in WKY and decreased in SD rats (Pavkovic et al., 2015 [1]). Increased Rt1-Bb expression in WKY rats could indicate a stronger and more persistent cellular reaction of the adaptive immune system in this strain, in line with findings indicating adaptive immune reactions during GN. The complement cascade is also known to be essential for GN development, especially terminal cascade products like C6. PMID:26697341

  19. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular. PMID:25232028

  20. Seasonal Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Anita; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Henders, Anjali K.; McRae, Allan F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Powell, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Many health conditions, ranging from psychiatric disorders to cardiovascular disease, display notable seasonal variation in severity and onset. In order to understand the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon, we have examined seasonal variation in the transcriptome of 606 healthy individuals. We show that 74 transcripts associated with a 12-month seasonal cycle were enriched for processes involved in DNA repair and binding. An additional 94 transcripts demonstrated significant seasonal variability that was largely influenced by blood cell count levels. These transcripts were enriched for immune function, protein production, and specific cellular markers for lymphocytes. Accordingly, cell counts for erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and CD19 cells demonstrated significant association with a 12-month seasonal cycle. These results demonstrate that seasonal variation is an important environmental regulator of gene expression and blood cell composition. Notable changes in leukocyte counts and genes involved in immune function indicate that immune cell physiology varies throughout the year in healthy individuals. PMID:26023781

  1. Correlations Between Gene Expression and Mercury Levels in Blood of Boys With and Without Autism

    PubMed Central

    Green, Peter G.; Tian, Yingfang; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Pessah, Isaac N.; Hansen, Robin; Yang, Xiaowei; Teng, Jennifer; Gregg, Jeffrey P.; Ashwood, Paul; Van de Water, Judy; Sharp, Frank R.

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in blood was correlated with mercury levels in blood of 2- to 5-year-old boys with autism (AU) compared to age-matched typically developing (TD) control boys. This was done to address the possibility that the two groups might metabolize toxicants, such as mercury, differently. RNA was isolated from blood and gene expression assessed on whole genome Affymetrix Human U133 expression microarrays. Mercury levels were measured using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed and partial correlations between gene expression and mercury levels were calculated, after correcting for age and batch effects. To reduce false positives, only genes shared by the ANCOVA models were analyzed. Of the 26 genes that correlated with mercury levels in both AU and TD boys, 11 were significantly different between the groups (P(Diagnosis*Mercury) ≤ 0.05). The expression of a large number of genes (n = 316) correlated with mercury levels in TD but not in AU boys (P ≤ 0.05), the most represented biological functions being cell death and cell morphology. Expression of 189 genes correlated with mercury levels in AU but not in TD boys (P ≤ 0.05), the most represented biological functions being cell morphology, amino acid metabolism, and antigen presentation. These data and those in our companion study on correlation of gene expression and lead levels show that AU and TD children display different correlations between transcript levels and low levels of mercury and lead. These findings might suggest different genetic transcriptional programs associated with mercury in AU compared to TD children. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12640-009-9137-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19937285

  2. Endometrial gene expression profiling in pregnant Meishan and Yorkshire pigs on day 12 of gestation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Litter size in pigs is a major factor affecting the profitability in the pig industry. The peri-implantation window in pigs is characterized by the coordinated interactions between the maternal uterine endometrium and the rapidly elongating conceptuses and represents a period of time during which a large percentage of the developing conceptuses are lost. However, the gene expression and regulatory networks in the endometrium contributing to the establishment of the maternal: placental interface remain poorly understood. Results We characterized the endometrial gene expression profile during the peri-implantation stage of development by comparing two breeds that demonstrate very different reproductive efficiencies. We employed the porcine Affymetrix GeneChip® to assay the transcriptomic profiles of genes expressed in the uterine endometrium obtained from Meishan and Yorkshire gilts (n = 4 for each breed) on day 12 of gestation (M12 and Y12, respectively). Total of 17,076 probesets were identified as "present" in at least two arrays. A mixed model-based statistical analysis predicted a total of 2,656 (q < 0.1) transcripts as differentially expressed between Meishan and Yorkshire pigs. Eighteen differentially expressed transcripts of interest were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Gene ontology (GO) annotation revealed that the known functions of the differentially expressed genes were involved in a series of important biological processes relevant to early pregnancy establishment in the pig. Conclusions The results identified endometrial gene expression profiles of two breeds differing in litter size and identified candidate genes that are related to known physiological pathways related to reproductive prolificacy. These findings provide a deeper understanding of molecular pathways differing between two breeds at the critical peri-implantation stage of pregnancy, which can be utilized to better understand the events contributing to

  3. Altered Gene Expression Pattern in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kiliszek, Marek; Burzynska, Beata; Michalak, Marcin; Gora, Monika; Winkler, Aleksandra; Maciejak, Agata; Leszczynska, Agata; Gajda, Ewa; Kochanowski, Janusz; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite a substantial progress in diagnosis and therapy, acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a major cause of mortality in the general population. A novel insight into the pathophysiology of myocardial infarction obtained by studying gene expression should help to discover novel biomarkers of MI and to suggest novel strategies of therapy. The aim of our study was to establish gene expression patterns in leukocytes from acute myocardial infarction patients. Methods and Results Twenty-eight patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were included. The blood was collected on the 1st day of myocardial infarction, after 4–6 days, and after 6 months. Control group comprised 14 patients with stable coronary artery disease, without history of myocardial infarction. Gene expression analysis was performed with Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST microarrays and GCS3000 TG system. Lists of genes showing altered expression levels (fold change >1.5, p<0.05) were submitted to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Gene lists from each group were examined for canonical pathways and molecular and cellular functions. Comparing acute phase of MI with the same patients after 6 months (stable phase) and with control group we found 24 genes with changed expression. In canonical analysis three pathways were highlighted: signaling of PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), IL-10 and IL-6 (interleukin 10 and 6). Conclusions In the acute phase of STEMI, dozens of genes from several pathways linked with lipid/glucose metabolism, platelet function and atherosclerotic plaque stability show altered expression. Up-regulation of SOCS3 and FAM20 genes in the first days of myocardial infarction is observed in the vast majority of patients. PMID:23185530

  4. MRI of Transgene Expression: Correlation to Therapeutic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Högemanny, Dagmar; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Tyminski, Edyta; Terada, Kinya; Weissleder, Ralph; Chiocca, E Antonio; Basilion, James P

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution 3D maps of structural and functional information, yet its use of mapping in vivo gene expression has only recently been explored. A potential application for this technology is to noninvasively image transgene expression. The current study explores the latter using a nonregulatable internalizing engineered transferrin receptor (ETR) whose expression can be probed for with a superparamagnetic Tf-CLIO probe. Using an HSV-based amplicon vector system for transgene delivery, we demonstrate that: 1) ETR is a sensitive MR marker gene; 2) several transgenes can be efficiently expressed from a single amplicon; 3) expression of each transgene results in functional gene product; and 4) ETR gene expression correlates with expression of therapeutic genes when the latter are contained within the same amplicon. These data, taken together, suggest that MRI of ETR expression can serve as a surrogate for measuring therapeutic transgene expression. PMID:12407446

  5. Orbital pseudotumor can be a localized form of granulomatosis with polyangiitis as revealed by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Harrington, Christina A; Sibley, Cailin H; Dailey, Roger A; Ng, John D; Steele, Eric A; Czyz, Craig N; Foster, Jill A; Tse, David; Alabiad, Chris; Dubovy, Sander; Parekh, Prashant K; Harris, Gerald J; Kazim, Michael; Patel, Payal J; White, Valerie A; Dolman, Peter J; Korn, Bobby S; Kikkawa, Don O; Edward, Deepak P; Alkatan, Hind M; al-Hussain, Hailah; Yeatts, R Patrick; Selva, Dinesh; Stauffer, Patrick; Planck, Stephen R

    2015-10-01

    Biopsies and ANCA testing for limited forms of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) are frequently non-diagnostic. We characterized gene expression in GPA and other causes of orbital inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that a sub-set of patients with non-specific orbital inflammation (NSOI, also known as pseudotumor) mimics a limited form of GPA. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded orbital biopsies were obtained from controls (n=20) and patients with GPA (n=6), NSOI (n=25), sarcoidosis (n=7), or thyroid eye disease (TED) (n=20) and were divided into discovery and validation sets. Transcripts in the tissues were quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Distinct gene expression profiles for controls and subjects with GPA, TED, or sarcoidosis were evident by principal coordinate analyses. Compared with healthy controls, 285 probe sets had elevated signals in subjects with GPA and 1472 were decreased (>1.5-fold difference, false discovery rate adjusted p<0.05). The immunoglobulin family of genes had the most dramatic increase in expression. Although gene expression in GPA could be readily distinguished from gene expression in TED, sarcoidosis, or controls, a comparison of gene expression in GPA versus NSOI found no statistically significant differences. Thus, forms of orbital inflammation can be distinguished based on gene expression. NSOI/pseudotumor is heterogeneous but often may be an unrecognized, localized form of GPA. PMID:26163757

  6. Endometrial gene expression in high- and low-fertility heifers in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle and a comparison with midluteal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Aideen P; Diskin, Michael G; Morris, Dermot G; Kenny, David A; Waters, Sinéad M

    2016-04-01

    Embryonic mortality is a major constraint to improving reproductive efficiency and profitability in livestock enterprises. We previously reported differential expression of genes with identified roles in cellular growth and proliferation, lipid metabolism, endometrial remodeling, inflammation, angiogenesis, and metabolic exchange in endometrial tissue on day 7 of the estrous cycle (D7), between heifers ranked as either high (HF) or low (LF) for fertility. The aim of the current study was to further elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to early embryo loss by examining differential endometrial gene expression in HF or LF heifers at a later stage of the estrous cycle;day 14(D14). A second objective was to compare these expression profiles with those from midluteal HF and LF endometrium. Using the same animal model as employed in the previous study, we slaughtered HF and LF animals on D14, harvested endometrial tissue, and carried out global gene expression analysis using the Affymetrix Bovine GeneChip. Microarray analysis detected 430 differentially expressed genes (DEG) between HF and LF animals. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed enrichment for a host of biological pathways including lipid metabolism, molecular transport, immune response, cell morphology and development, and cell growth and proliferation. Important DEG includedALB, BMPR2, CCL28, COL4A3/4, FADS1, ITGA6, LDLR, PLCB3, PPARG, PTGS2, and SLC27A4 Furthermore, DEG expressed on both D7 and D14 included:PCCB,SLC25A24,DAP, and COL4A4 This study highlights some of the pathways and mechanisms underpinning late luteal bovine endometrial physiology and endometrial-related conception rate variance. PMID:26850042

  7. Genetic Background Modulates Gene Expression Profile Induced by Skin Irradiation in Ptch1 Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna; Dragani, Tommaso A.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Ptch1 germ-line mutations in mice predispose to radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma of the skin, with tumor incidence modulated by the genetic background. Here, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying skin response to radiation in F1 progeny of Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice crossed with either skin tumor-susceptible (Car-S) or -resistant (Car-R) mice and X-irradiated (3 Gy) at 2 days of age or left untreated. Methods and Materials: We conducted a gene expression profile analysis in mRNA samples extracted from the skin of irradiated or control mice, using Affymetrix whole mouse genome expression array. Confirmation of the results was done using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Analysis of the gene expression profile of normal skin of F1 mice at 4 weeks of age revealed a similar basal profile in the nonirradiated mice, but alterations in levels of 71 transcripts in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-R cross and modulation of only eight genes in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-S cross. Conclusions: These results indicate that neonatal irradiation causes a persistent change in the gene expression profile of the skin. The tendency of mice genetically resistant to skin tumorigenesis to show a more complex pattern of transcriptional response to radiation than do genetically susceptible mice suggests a role for this response in genetic resistance to basal cell tumorigenesis.

  8. Analyzing multiple-probe microarray: estimation and application of gene expression indexes

    PubMed Central

    Maadooliat, Mehdi; Huang, Jianhua Z.; Hu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Gene expression index estimation is an essential step in analyzing multiple probe microarray data. Various modeling methods have been proposed in this area. Amidst all, a popular method proposed in Li and Wong (2001) is based on a multiplicative model, which is similar to the additive model discussed in Irizarry et al. (2003a) at the logarithm scale. Along this line, Hu et al. (2006) proposed data transformation to improve expression index estimation based on an ad hoc entropy criteria and naive grid search approach. In this work, we re-examined this problem using a new profile likelihood-based transformation estimation approach that is more statistically elegant and computationally efficient. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method using a benchmark Affymetrix U95A spiked-in experiment. Moreover, We introduced a new multivariate expression index and used the empirical study to shows its promise in terms of improving model fitting and power of detecting differential expression over the commonly used univariate expression index. As the other important content of the work, we discussed two generally encountered practical issues in application of gene expression index: normalization and summary statistic used for detecting differential expression. Our empirical study shows somewhat different findings from the MAQC project (MAQC, 2006). PMID:22834966

  9. Form-Deprivation Myopia in Chick Induces Limited Changes in Retinal Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    McGlinn, Alice M.; Baldwin, Donald A.; Tobias, John W.; Budak, Murat T.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Stone, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Evidence has implicated the retina as a principal controller of refractive development. In the present study, the retinal transcriptome was analyzed to identify alterations in gene expression and potential signaling pathways involved in form-deprivation myopia of the chick. Methods One-week-old white Leghorn chicks wore a unilateral image-degrading goggle for 6 hours or 3 days (n = 6 at each time). Total RNA from the retina/(retinal pigment epithelium) was used for expression profiling with chicken gene microarrays (Chicken GeneChips; Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). To identify gene expression level differences between goggled and contralateral nongoggled eyes, normalized microarray signal intensities were analyzed by the significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) approach. Differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in independent biological replicates. Results Small changes were detected in differentially expressed genes in form-deprived eyes. In chickens that had 6 hours of goggle wear, downregulation of bone morphogenetic protein 2 and connective tissue growth factor was validated. In those with 3 days of goggle wear, downregulation of bone morphogenetic protein 2, vasoactive intestinal peptide, preopro-urotensin II–related peptide and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 2 was validated, and upregulation of endothelin receptor type B and interleukin-18 was validated. Conclusions Form-deprivation myopia, in its early stages, is associated with only minimal changes in retinal gene expression at the level of the transcriptome. While the list of validated genes is short, each merits further study for potential involvement in the signaling cascade mediating myopia development. PMID:17652709

  10. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes with enriched expression in the mouse central Extended Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jérôme A. J.; Befort, Katia; Blad, Clara; Filliol, Dominique; Ghate, Aditee; Dembele, Doulaye; Thibault, Christelle; Koch, Muriel; Muller, Jean; Lardenois, Aurélie; Poch, Olivier; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2008-01-01

    The central Extended Amygdala (EAc) is an ensemble of highly interconnected limbic structures of the anterior brain, and forms a cellular continuum including the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis (BNST), the central nucleus of the Amygdala (CeA) and the Nucleus Accumbens shell (AcbSh). This neural network is a key site for interactions between brain reward and stress systems, and has been implicated in several aspects of drug abuse. In order to increase our understanding of EAc function at the molecular level, we undertook a genome-wide screen (Affymetrix) to identify genes whose expression is enriched in the EAc. We focused on the less-well known BNST-CeA areas of the EAc, and identified 121 genes that exhibit more than 2-fold higher expression level in the EAc compared to whole brain. Among these, forty-three genes have never been described to be expressed in the EAc. We mapped these genes throughout the brain, using non-radioactive in situ hybridization, and identified eight genes with a unique and distinct rostro-caudal expression pattern along AcbSh, BNST and CeA. Q-PCR analysis performed in brain and peripheral organ tissues indicated that, with the exception of one (Spata13), all these genes are predominantly expressed in brain. These genes encode signaling proteins (Adora2, GPR88, Arpp21 and Rem2), a transcription factor (Limh6) or proteins of unknown function (Rik130, Spata13 and Wfs1). The identification of genes with enriched expression expands our knowledge of EAc at a molecular level, and provides useful information to towards genetic manipulations within the EAc. PMID:18786617

  11. Inhibiting activator protein-1 activity alters cocaine-induced gene expression and potentiates sensitization.

    PubMed

    Paletzki, R F; Myakishev, M V; Polesskaya, O; Orosz, A; Hyman, S E; Vinson, C

    2008-04-01

    We have expressed A-FOS, an inhibitor of activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding, in adult mouse striatal neurons. We observed normal behavior including locomotion and exploratory activities. Following a single injection of cocaine, locomotion increased similarly in both the A-FOS expressing and littermate controls. However, following repeated injections of cocaine, the A-FOS expressing mice showed increased locomotion relative to littermate controls, an increase that persisted following a week of withdrawal and subsequent cocaine administration. These results indicate that AP-1 suppresses this behavioral response to cocaine. We analyzed mRNA from the striatum before and 4 and 24 h after a single cocaine injection in both A-FOS and control striata using Affymetrix microarrays (430 2.0 Array) to identify genes mis-regulated by A-FOS that may mediate the increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine. A-FOS expression did not change gene expression in the basal state or 4 h following cocaine treatment relative to controls. However, 24 h after an acute cocaine treatment, 84 genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the A-FOS and control mice. Fifty-six genes are down-regulated while 28 genes are up-regulated including previously identified candidates for addiction including brain-derived neurotrophic factor and period homolog 1. Using a random sample of identified genes, quantitative PCR was used to verify the microarray studies. The chromosomal location of these 84 genes was compared with human genome scans of addiction to identify potential genes in humans that are involved in addiction. PMID:18355967

  12. Placental Gene Expression Responses to Maternal Protein Restriction in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, Ciprian P.; Goyal, Ravi; Holweger, Joshua D.; Longo, Lawrence D.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Maternal protein restriction has been shown to have deleterious effects on placental development, and has long-term consequences for the progeny. We tested the hypothesis that, by the use of microarray technology, we could identify specific genes and cellular pathways in the developing placenta that are responsive to maternal protein deprivation, and propose a potential mechanism for observed gene expression changes. METHODS We fed pregnant FVB/NJ mice from day post coitum 10.5 (DPC10.5) to DPC17.5, an isocaloric diet containing 50% less protein than normal chow. We used the Affymetrix Mouse 430A_2.0 array to measure gene expression changes in the placenta. We functionally annotated the regulated genes, and examined over-represented functional categories and performed pathway analysis. For selected genes, we confirmed the microarray results by use of qPCR. RESULTS We observed 244 probe sets, corresponding to 235 genes, regulated by protein restriction (p < 0.001), with ninety-one genes being up-regulated, and 153 down-regulated. Up-regulated genes included those involved in the p53 pathway, apoptosis, negative regulators of cell growth, negative regulators of cell metabolism and genes related to epigenetic control. Down-regulated genes included those involved in nucleotide metabolism. CONCLUSIONS Microarray analysis has allowed us to describe the genetic response to maternal protein deprivation in the mouse placenta. We observed that negative regulators of cell growth and metabolism in conjunction with genes involved in epigenesis were up-regulated, suggesting that protein deprivation may contribute to growth restriction and long-term epigenetic changes in stressed tissues and organs. The challenge will be to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of these gene expression responses. PMID:19362366

  13. Comparative gene expression profiling analysis of urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis and bladder

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Urothelial carcinoma (UC) can arise at any location along the urothelial tract, including the urethra, bladder, ureter, or renal pelvis. Although tumors arising in these various locations have similar morphology, it is unclear whether the gene expression profiles are similar between the upper-tract (ureter and renal pelvis) and lower-tract (bladder and urethra) carcinomas. Because differences may facilitate different screening and treatment modalities, we sought to examine the relationship between urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis (rUC) and urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (bUC). Methods Fresh tumor tissue was collected from patients with bUC (n = 10) and benign mucosa from the bladder of individuals undergoing resection for non-UC conditions (n = 7). Gene expression profiles from these samples were determined using high-throughput Affymetrix gene expression microarray chips. Bioinformatic approaches were used to compare the gene expression profiles of these samples with those of rUC samples and normal kidney samples that had been described previously. Results Using unsupervised analytic approaches, rUC and bUC were indistinguishable. Yet when a supervised analytic approach was used, a small number of differentially expressed genes were identified; these differences were most likely limited to a single pathway--the chloride ion binding activity pathway--which was more frequently activated in rUC than in bUC. Conclusions We found that the gene expression profiles of UCs from the upper and lower tract were extremely similar, suggesting that similar pathogenic mechanisms likely function in the development of these tumors. The differential expression of genes in the identified pathway may represent a new avenue for detection of upper-tract tumors. PMID:21159190

  14. Gene expression in the mouse eye: an online resource for genetics using 103 strains of mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Freeman-Anderson, Natalie E.; Templeton, Justin P.; Nassr, Mohamed; Wang, Xusheng; Gu, Weikuan; Jiao, Yan; Williams, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Individual differences in patterns of gene expression account for much of the diversity of ocular phenotypes and variation in disease risk. We examined the causes of expression differences, and in their linkage to sequence variants, functional differences, and ocular pathophysiology. Methods mRNAs from young adult eyes were hybridized to oligomer microarrays (Affymetrix M430v2). Data were embedded in GeneNetwork with millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms, custom array annotation, and information on complementary cellular, functional, and behavioral traits. The data include male and female samples from 28 common strains, 68 BXD recombinant inbred lines, as well as several mutants and knockouts. Results We provide a fully integrated resource to map, graph, analyze, and test causes and correlations of differences in gene expression in the eye. Covariance in mRNA expression can be used to infer gene function, extract signatures for different cells or tissues, to define molecular networks, and to map quantitative trait loci that produce expression differences. These data can also be used to connect disease phenotypes with sequence variants. We demonstrate that variation in rhodopsin expression efficiently predicts candidate genes for eight uncloned retinal diseases, including WDR17 for the human RP29 locus. Conclusions The high level of strain variation in gene expression is a powerful tool that can be used to explore and test molecular networks underlying variation in structure, function, and disease susceptibility. The integration of these data into GeneNetwork provides users with a workbench to test linkages between sequence differences and eye structure and function. PMID:19727342

  15. Analysis of human breast milk cells: gene expression profiles during pregnancy, lactation, involution, and mastitic infection.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julie A; Lefèvre, Christophe; Watt, Ashalyn; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2016-05-01

    The molecular processes underlying human milk production and the effects of mastitic infection are largely unknown because of limitations in obtaining tissue samples. Determination of gene expression in normal lactating women would be a significant step toward understanding why some women display poor lactation outcomes. Here, we demonstrate the utility of RNA obtained directly from human milk cells to detect mammary epithelial cell (MEC)-specific gene expression. Milk cell RNA was collected from five time points (24 h prepartum during the colostrum period, midlactation, two involutions, and during a bout of mastitis) in addition to an involution series comprising three time points. Gene expression profiles were determined by use of human Affymetrix arrays. Milk cells collected during milk production showed that the most highly expressed genes were involved in milk synthesis (e.g., CEL, OLAH, FOLR1, BTN1A1, and ARG2), while milk cells collected during involution showed a significant downregulation of milk synthesis genes and activation of involution associated genes (e.g., STAT3, NF-kB, IRF5, and IRF7). Milk cells collected during mastitic infection revealed regulation of a unique set of genes specific to this disease state, while maintaining regulation of milk synthesis genes. Use of conventional epithelial cell markers was used to determine the population of MECs within each sample. This paper is the first to describe the milk cell transcriptome across the human lactation cycle and during mastitic infection, providing valuable insight into gene expression of the human mammary gland. PMID:26909879

  16. Microarray Analyses of Gene Expression during Chondrocyte Differentiation Identifies Novel Regulators of Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    James, Claudine G.; Appleton, C. Thomas G.; Ulici, Veronica; Underhill, T. Michael; Beier, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Ordered chondrocyte differentiation and maturation is required for normal skeletal development, but the intracellular pathways regulating this process remain largely unclear. We used Affymetrix microarrays to examine temporal gene expression patterns during chondrogenic differentiation in a mouse micromass culture system. Robust normalization of the data identified 3300 differentially expressed probe sets, which corresponds to 1772, 481, and 249 probe sets exhibiting minimum 2-, 5-, and 10-fold changes over the time period, respectively. GeneOntology annotations for molecular function show changes in the expression of molecules involved in transcriptional regulation and signal transduction among others. The expression of identified markers was confirmed by RT-PCR, and cluster analysis revealed groups of coexpressed transcripts. One gene that was up-regulated at later stages of chondrocyte differentiation was Rgs2. Overexpression of Rgs2 in the chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 resulted in accelerated hypertrophic differentiation, thus providing functional validation of microarray data. Collectively, these analyses provide novel information on the temporal expression of molecules regulating endochondral bone development. PMID:16135533

  17. The effect of PrPSc accumulation on inflammatory gene expression within sheep peripheral lymphoid tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Anton G.; Hopkins, John

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of the misfolded prion protein, PrPSc in the central nervous system (CNS) is strongly linked to progressive neurodegenerative disease. For many transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), peripheral lymphoid tissue is an important site of PrPSc amplification but without gross immunological consequence. Susceptible VRQ homozygous New Zealand Cheviot sheep were infected with SSBP/1 scrapie by inoculation in the drainage area of the prescapular lymph nodes. The earliest time that PrPSc was consistently detected by immunohistology in these nodes was D50 post infection. This transcriptomic study of lymph node taken before (D10) and after (D50) the detection of PrPSc, aimed to identify the genes and physiological pathways affected by disease progression within the nodes as assessed by PrPSc detection. Affymetrix Ovine Gene arrays identified 75 and 80 genes as differentially-expressed at D10 and D50, respectively, in comparison with control sheep inoculated with uninfected brain homogenate. Approximately 70% of these were repressed at each time point. RT-qPCR analysis of seven genes showed statistically significant correlation with the array data, although the results for IL1RN and TGIF were different between the two technologies. The ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) and general low level of repression of gene expression in lymphoid tissue, including many inflammatory genes, contrasts with the pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic events that occur within the CNS at equivalent stages of disease progression as assessed by PrPSc accumulation. PMID:26507419

  18. GeneChip expression profiling reveals the alterations of energy metabolism related genes in osteocytes under large gradient high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis. PMID:25635858

  19. GeneChip Expression Profiling Reveals the Alterations of Energy Metabolism Related Genes in Osteocytes under Large Gradient High Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis. PMID:25635858

  20. Comparative prion disease gene expression profiling using the prion disease mimetic, cuprizone

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Laura R; Herbst, Allen J; Yoo, Han Sang; Vanderloo, Joshua P

    2009-01-01

    Identification of genes expressed in response to prion infection may elucidate biomarkers for disease, identify factors involved in agent replication, mechanisms of neuropathology and therapeutic targets. Although several groups have sought to identify gene expression changes specific to prion disease, expression profiles rife with cell population changes have consistently been identified. Cuprizone, a neurotoxicant, qualitatively mimics the cell population changes observed in prion disease, resulting in both spongiform change and astrocytosis. The use of cuprizone-treated animals as an experimental control during comparative expression profiling allows for the identification of transcripts whose expression increases during prion disease and remains unchanged during cuprizone-triggered neuropathology. In this study, expression profiles from the brains of mice preclinically and clinically infected with Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) mouse-adapted scrapie agent and age-matched controls were profiled using Affymetrix gene arrays. In total, 164 genes were differentially regulated during prion infection. Eighty-three of these transcripts have been previously undescribed as differentially regulated during prion disease. A 0.4% cuprizone diet was utilized as a control for comparative expression profiling. Cuprizone treatment induced spongiosis and astrocyte proliferation as indicated by glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap) transcriptional activation and immunohistochemistry. Gene expression profiles from brain tissue obtained from cuprizone-treated mice identified 307 differentially regulated transcript changes. After comparative analysis, 17 transcripts unaffected by cuprizone treatment but increasing in expression from preclinical to clinical prion infection were identified. Here we describe the novel use of the prion disease mimetic, cuprizone, to control for cell population changes in the brain during prion infection. PMID:19535908

  1. Gene Expression Profiling of Microdissected Pancreatic Ductal Carcinomas Using High-Density DNA Microarrays1,3

    PubMed Central

    Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian; Ammerpohl, Ole; Lüttges, Jutta; Böhme, Armin; Sipos, Bence; Foerder, Melanie; Alldinger, Ingo; Jahnke, Beatrix; Schackert, Hans Konrad; Kalthoff, Holger; Kremer, Bernd; Klöppel, Günter; Saeger, Hans Detlev

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains an important cause of malignancy-related death and is the eighth most common cancer with the lowest overall 5-year relative survival rate. To identify new molecular markers and candidates for new therapeutic regimens, we investigated the gene expression profile of microdissected cells from 11 normal pancreatic ducts, 14 samples of PDAC, and 4 well-characterized pancreatic cancer cell lines using the Affymetrix U133 GeneChip set. RNA was extracted from microdissected samples and cell lines, amplified, and labeled using a repetitive in vitro transcription protocol. Differentially expressed genes were identified using the significance analysis of microarrays program. We found 616 differentially expressed genes. Within these, 140 were also identified in PDAC by others, such as Galectin-1, Galectin-3, and MT-SP2. We validated the differential expression of several genes (e.g., CENPF, MCM2, MCM7, RAMP, IRAK1, and PTTG1) in PDAC by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We present a whole genome expression study of microdissected tissues from PDAC, from microdissected normal ductal pancreatic cells and pancreatic cancer cell lines using highdensity microarrays. Within the panel of genes, we identified novel differentially expressed genes, which have not been associated with the pathogenesis of PDAC before. PMID:15548371

  2. Gene Expression Signatures in Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Demonstrate Disease Heterogeneity and Offer a Molecular Classification of Disease Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Thomas A.; Barnes, Michael G.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Olson, Judyann C.; Sherry, David D.; Gottlieb, Beth S.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Pavlidis, Paul; Hinze, Claas; Thornton, Sherry; Thompson, Susan D.; Grom, Alexei A.; Colbert, Robert A.; Glass, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Microarray analysis was used to determine whether children with recent onset polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) exhibit biologically or clinically informative gene expression signatures in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 59 healthy children and 61 children with polyarticular JIA prior to treatment with second-line medications, such as methotrexate or biological agents. RNA was extracted from Ficoll-isolated mononuclear cells, fluorescently labeled and hybridized to Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChips. Data were analyzed using ANOVA at a 5% false discovery rate threshold after Robust Multi-Array Average pre-processing and Distance Weighted Discrimination normalization. Results Initial analysis revealed 873 probe sets for genes that were differentially expressed between polyarticular JIA and controls. Hierarchical clustering of these probe sets distinguished three subgroups within polyarticular JIA. Prototypical subjects within each subgroup were identified and used to define subgroup-specific gene expression signatures. One of these signatures was associated with monocyte markers, another with transforming growth factor β-inducible genes, and a third with immediate-early genes. Correlation of gene expression signatures with clinical and biological features of JIA subgroups suggests relevance to aspects of disease activity and supports the division of polyarticular JIA into distinct subsets. Conclusions PBMC gene expression signatures in recent onset polyarticular JIA reflect discrete disease processes and offer a molecular classification of disease. PMID:19565504

  3. A Replication Study for Genome-Wide Gene Expression Levels in Two Layer Lines Elucidates Differentially Expressed Genes of Pathways Involved in Bone Remodeling and Immune Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Habig, Christin; Geffers, Robert; Distl, Ottmar

    2014-01-01

    The current replication study confirmed significant differences in gene expression profiles of the cerebrum among the two commercial layer lines Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL) and Lohmann Brown (LB). Microarray analyses were performed for 30 LSL and another 30 LB laying hens kept in the small group housing system Eurovent German. A total of 14,103 microarray probe sets using customized Affymetrix ChiGene-1_0-st Arrays with 20,399 probe sets were differentially expressed among the two layer lines LSL and LB (FDR adjusted P-value <0.05). An at least 2-fold change in expression levels could be observed for 388 of these probe sets. In LSL, 214 of the 388 probe sets were down- and 174 were up-regulated and vice versa for the LB layer line. Among the 174 up-regulated probe sets in LSL, we identified 51 significantly enriched Gene ontology (GO) terms of the biological process category. A total of 63 enriched GO-terms could be identified for the 214 down-regulated probe sets of the layer line LSL. We identified nine genes significantly differentially expressed between the two layer lines in both microarray experiments. These genes play a crucial role in protection of neuronal cells from oxidative stress, bone mineral density and immune response among the two layer lines LSL and LB. Thus, the different regulation of these genes may significantly contribute to phenotypic trait differences among these layer lines. In conclusion, these novel findings provide a basis for further research to improve animal welfare in laying hens and these layer lines may be of general interest as an animal model. PMID:24922511

  4. GTI: A Novel Algorithm for Identifying Outlier Gene Expression Profiles from Integrated Microarray Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Mpindi, John Patrick; Sara, Henri; Haapa-Paananen, Saija; Kilpinen, Sami; Pisto, Tommi; Bucher, Elmar; Ojala, Kalle; Iljin, Kristiina; Vainio, Paula; Björkman, Mari; Gupta, Santosh; Kohonen, Pekka; Nees, Matthias; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Background Meta-analysis of gene expression microarray datasets presents significant challenges for statistical analysis. We developed and validated a new bioinformatic method for the identification of genes upregulated in subsets of samples of a given tumour type (‘outlier genes’), a hallmark of potential oncogenes. Methodology A new statistical method (the gene tissue index, GTI) was developed by modifying and adapting algorithms originally developed for statistical problems in economics. We compared the potential of the GTI to detect outlier genes in meta-datasets with four previously defined statistical methods, COPA, the OS statistic, the t-test and ORT, using simulated data. We demonstrated that the GTI performed equally well to existing methods in a single study simulation. Next, we evaluated the performance of the GTI in the analysis of combined Affymetrix gene expression data from several published studies covering 392 normal samples of tissue from the central nervous system, 74 astrocytomas, and 353 glioblastomas. According to the results, the GTI was better able than most of the previous methods to identify known oncogenic outlier genes. In addition, the GTI identified 29 novel outlier genes in glioblastomas, including TYMS and CDKN2A. The over-expression of these genes was validated in vivo by immunohistochemical staining data from clinical glioblastoma samples. Immunohistochemical data were available for 65% (19 of 29) of these genes, and 17 of these 19 genes (90%) showed a typical outlier staining pattern. Furthermore, raltitrexed, a specific inhibitor of TYMS used in the therapy of tumour types other than glioblastoma, also effectively blocked cell proliferation in glioblastoma cell lines, thus highlighting this outlier gene candidate as a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results support the GTI as a novel approach to identify potential oncogene outliers and drug targets. The algorithm is implemented in

  5. Cross-species comparison of genomewide gene expression profiles reveals induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive genes in iron-deprived intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zihua; Gulec, Sukru

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms mediating the induction of metal ion homeostasis-related genes in the mammalian intestine during iron deficiency remain unknown. To elucidate relevant regulatory pathways, genomewide gene expression profiles were determined in fully differentiated human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Cells were deprived of iron (or not) for 6 or 18 h, and Gene Chip analyses were subsequently performed (Affymetrix). More than 2,000 genes were differentially expressed; genes related to monosaccharide metabolism, regulation of gene expression, hypoxia, and cell death were upregulated, while those related to mitotic cell cycle were downregulated. A large proportion of induced genes are hypoxia responsive, and promoter enrichment analyses revealed a statistical overrepresentation of hypoxia response elements (HREs). Immunoblot experiments demonstrated a >60-fold increase in HIF2α protein abundance in iron-deprived cells; HIF1α levels were unchanged. Furthermore, comparison of the Caco-2 cell data set with a Gene Chip data set from iron-deficient rat intestine revealed 29 common upregulated genes; the majority are hypoxia responsive, and their promoters are enriched for HREs. We conclude that the compensatory response of the intestinal epithelium to iron deprivation relates to hypoxia and that stabilization of HIF2α may be the primary event mediating metabolic and morphological changes observed during iron deficiency. PMID:20702690

  6. Gene Expression: Sizing it all up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic architecture appears to be a largely unexplored component of gene expression. Although surely not the end of the story, we are learning that when it comes to gene expression, size is important. We have been surprised to find that certain patterns of expression, tissue-specific versus constit...

  7. Maternal age effects on myometrial expression of contractile proteins, uterine gene expression, and contractile activity during labor in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, Matthew; Szyszka, Alexandra; Pauliat, Caroline; Clifford, Bethan; Daniel, Zoe; Cheng, Zhangrui; Wathes, Claire; McMullen, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Advanced maternal age of first time pregnant mothers is associated with prolonged and dysfunctional labor and significant risk of emergency cesarean section. We investigated the influence of maternal age on myometrial contractility, expression of contractile associated proteins (CAPs), and global gene expression in the parturient uterus. Female Wistar rats either 8 (YOUNG n = 10) or 24 (OLDER n = 10) weeks old were fed laboratory chow, mated, and killed during parturition. Myometrial strips were dissected to determine contractile activity, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglycerides (TAG) content, protein expression of connexin-43 (GJA1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), and caveolin 1 (CAV-1). Maternal plasma concentrations of prostaglandins PGE2, PGF2α, and progesterone were determined by RIA. Global gene expression in uterine samples was compared using Affymetrix Genechip Gene 2.0 ST arrays and Ingenuity Pathway analysis (IPA). Spontaneous contractility in myometrium exhibited by YOUNG rats was threefold greater than OLDER animals (P < 0.027) but maternal age had no significant effect on myometrial CAP expression, lipid profiles, or pregnancy-related hormones. OLDER myometrium increased contractile activity in response to PGF2α, phenylephrine, and carbachol, a response absent in YOUNG rats (all P < 0.002). Microarray analysis identified that maternal age affected expression of genes related to immune and inflammatory responses, lipid transport and metabolism, steroid metabolism, tissue remodeling, and smooth muscle contraction. In conclusion YOUNG laboring rat myometrium seems primed to contract maximally, whereas activity is blunted in OLDER animals and requires stimulation to meet contractile potential. Further work investigating maternal age effects on myometrial function is required with focus on lipid metabolism and inflammatory pathways. PMID:25876907

  8. Amniotic fluid RNA gene expression profiling provides insights into the phenotype of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Massingham, Lauren J; Johnson, Kirby L; Scholl, Thomas M; Slonim, Donna K; Wick, Heather C; Bianchi, Diana W

    2014-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy with characteristic malformations. Amniotic fluid, a complex biological material, could contribute to the understanding of Turner syndrome pathogenesis. In this pilot study, global gene expression analysis of cell-free RNA in amniotic fluid supernatant was utilized to identify specific genes/organ systems that may play a role in Turner syndrome pathophysiology. Cell-free RNA from amniotic fluid of five mid-trimester Turner syndrome fetuses and five euploid female fetuses matched for gestational age was extracted, amplified, and hybridized onto Affymetrix(®) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Significantly differentially regulated genes were identified using paired t tests. Biological interpretation was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and BioGPS gene expression atlas. There were 470 statistically significantly differentially expressed genes identified. They were widely distributed across the genome. XIST was significantly down-regulated (p < 0.0001); SHOX was not differentially expressed. One of the most highly represented organ systems was the hematologic/immune system, distinguishing the Turner syndrome transcriptome from other aneuploidies we previously studied. Manual curation of the differentially expressed gene list identified genes of possible pathologic significance, including NFATC3, IGFBP5, and LDLR. Transcriptomic differences in the amniotic fluid of Turner syndrome fetuses are due to genome-wide dysregulation. The hematologic/immune system differences may play a role in early-onset autoimmune dysfunction. Other genes identified with possible pathologic significance are associated with cardiac and skeletal systems, which are known to be affected in females with Turner syndrome. The discovery-driven approach described here may be useful in elucidating novel mechanisms of disease in Turner syndrome. PMID:24850140

  9. Uncovering the Arabidopsis thaliana nectary transcriptome: investigation of differential gene expression in floral nectariferous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kram, Brian W; Xu, Wayne W; Carter, Clay J

    2009-01-01

    Background Many flowering plants attract pollinators by offering a reward of floral nectar. Remarkably, the molecular events involved in the development of nectaries, the organs that produce nectar, as well as the synthesis and secretion of nectar itself, are poorly understood. Indeed, to date, no genes have been shown to directly affect the de novo production or quality of floral nectar. To address this gap in knowledge, the ATH1 Affymetrix® GeneChip array was used to systematically investigate the Arabidopsis nectary transcriptome to identify genes and pathways potentially involved in nectar production. Results In this study, we identified a large number of genes differentially expressed between secretory lateral nectaries and non-secretory median nectary tissues, as well as between mature lateral nectaries (post-anthesis) and immature lateral nectaries (pre-anthesis). Expression within nectaries was also compared to thirteen non-nectary reference tissues, from which 270 genes were identified as being significantly upregulated in nectaries. The expression patterns of 14 nectary-enriched genes were also confirmed via RT PCR. Upon looking into functional groups of upregulated genes, pathways involved in gene regulation, carbohydrate metabolism, and lipid metabolism were particularly enriched in nectaries versus reference tissues. Conclusion A large number of genes preferentially expressed in nectaries, as well as between nectary types and developmental stages, were identified. Several hypotheses relating to mechanisms of nectar production and regulation thereof are proposed, and provide a starting point for reverse genetics approaches to determine molecular mechanisms underlying nectar synthesis and secretion. PMID:19604393

  10. Control of RANKL Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts are highly specialized cells capable of degrading mineralized tissue and form at different regions of bone to meet different physiological needs, such as mobilization of calcium, modeling of bone structure, and remodeling of bone matrix. Osteoclast production is elevated in a number of pathological conditions, many of which lead to loss of bone mass. Whether normal or pathological, osteoclastogenesis strictly depends upon support from accessory cells which supply cytokines required for osteoclast differentiation. Only one of these cytokines, receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL), is absolutely essential for osteoclast formation throughout life and is thus expressed by all cell types that support osteoclast differentiation. The central role of RANKL in bone resorption is highlighted by the fact that it is the basis for a new therapy to inhibit bone loss. This review will discuss mechanisms that control RANKL gene expression in different osteoclast-support cells and how the study of such mechanisms may lead to a better understanding of the cellular interactions that drive normal and pathological bone resorption. PMID:19716455

  11. Medicago truncatula and Glomus intraradices gene expression in cortical cells harboring arbuscules in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, S Karen; Javot, Hélène; Deewatthanawong, Prasit; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Tang, Yuhong; Blancaflor, Elison B; Udvardi, Michael K; Harrison, Maria J

    2009-01-01

    Background Most vascular flowering plants have the capacity to form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. The symbiosis develops in the roots where AM fungi colonize the root cortex and form arbuscules within the cortical cells. Arbuscules are enveloped in a novel plant membrane and their establishment requires the coordinated cellular activities of both symbiotic partners. The arbuscule-cortical cell interface is the primary functional interface of the symbiosis and is of central importance in nutrient exchange. To determine the molecular events the underlie arbuscule development and function, it is first necessary to identify genes that may play a role in this process. Toward this goal we used the Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array to document the M. truncatula transcript profiles associated with AM symbiosis, and then developed laser microdissection (LM) of M. truncatula root cortical cells to enable analyses of gene expression in individual cell types by RT-PCR. Results This approach led to the identification of novel M. truncatula and G. intraradices genes expressed in colonized cortical cells and in arbuscules. Within the arbuscule, expression of genes associated with the urea cycle, amino acid biosynthesis and cellular autophagy was detected. Analysis of gene expression in the colonized cortical cell revealed up-regulation of a lysine motif (LysM)-receptor like kinase, members of the GRAS transcription factor family and a symbiosis-specific ammonium transporter that is a likely candidate for mediating ammonium transport in the AM symbiosis. Conclusion Transcript profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array provided new insights into gene expression in M. truncatula roots during AM symbiosis and revealed the existence of several G. intraradices genes on the M. truncatula GeneChip®. A laser microdissection protocol that incorporates low-melting temperature Steedman's wax, was developed to enable laser

  12. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2008-06-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  13. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  14. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  15. An Integrated View of Gene Expression and Solute Profiles of Arabidopsis Tumors: A Genome-Wide Approach[W

    PubMed Central

    Deeken, Rosalia; Engelmann, Julia C.; Efetova, Marina; Czirjak, Tina; Müller, Tobias; Kaiser, Werner M.; Tietz, Olaf; Krischke, Markus; Mueller, Martin J.; Palme, Klaus; Dandekar, Thomas; Hedrich, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    Transformation of plant cells with T-DNA of virulent agrobacteria is one of the most extreme triggers of developmental changes in higher plants. For rapid growth and development of resulting tumors, specific changes in the gene expression profile and metabolic adaptations are required. Increased transport and metabolic fluxes are critical preconditions for growth and tumor development. A functional genomics approach, using the Affymetrix whole genome microarray (∼22,800 genes), was applied to measure changes in gene expression. The solute pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana tumors and uninfected plant tissues was compared with the respective gene expression profile. Increased levels of anions, sugars, and amino acids were correlated with changes in the gene expression of specific enzymes and solute transporters. The expression profile of genes pivotal for energy metabolism, such as those involved in photosynthesis, mitochondrial electron transport, and fermentation, suggested that tumors produce C and N compounds heterotrophically and gain energy mainly anaerobically. Thus, understanding of gene-to-metabolite networks in plant tumors promotes the identification of mechanisms that control tumor development. PMID:17172353

  16. Regulatory Patterns of a Large Family of Defensin-Like Genes Expressed in Nodules of Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Nallu, Sumitha; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Samac, Deborah A.; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Vance, Carroll P.; VandenBosch, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Root nodules are the symbiotic organ of legumes that house nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Many genes are specifically induced in nodules during the interactions between the host plant and symbiotic rhizobia. Information regarding the regulation of expression for most of these genes is lacking. One of the largest gene families expressed in the nodules of the model legume Medicago truncatula is the nodule cysteine-rich (NCR) group of defensin-like (DEFL) genes. We used a custom Affymetrix microarray to catalog the expression changes of 566 NCRs at different stages of nodule development. Additionally, bacterial mutants were used to understand the importance of the rhizobial partners in induction of NCRs. Expression of early NCRs was detected during the initial infection of rhizobia in nodules and expression continued as nodules became mature. Late NCRs were induced concomitantly with bacteroid development in the nodules. The induction of early and late NCRs was correlated with the number and morphology of rhizobia in the nodule. Conserved 41 to 50 bp motifs identified in the upstream 1,000 bp promoter regions of NCRs were required for promoter activity. These cis-element motifs were found to be unique to the NCR family among all annotated genes in the M. truncatula genome, although they contain sub-regions with clear similarity to known regulatory motifs involved in nodule-specific expression and temporal gene regulation. PMID:23573247

  17. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  18. Comparison of In Vivo Gene Expression Profiling of RPE/Choroid following Intravitreal Injection of Dexamethasone and Triamcinolone Acetonide

    PubMed Central

    Smit-McBride, Zeljka; Moisseiev, Elad; Modjtahedi, Sara P.; Telander, David G.; Hjelmeland, Leonard M.; Morse, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To identify retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/choroid genes and their relevant expression pathways affected by intravitreal injections of dexamethasone and triamcinolone acetonide in mice at clinically relevant time points for patient care. Methods. Differential gene expression of over 34,000 well-characterized mouse genes in the RPE/choroid of 6-week-old C57BL/6J mice was analyzed after intravitreal steroid injections at 1 week and 1 month postinjection, using Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 microarrays. The data were analyzed using GeneSpring GX 12.5 and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) microarray analysis software for biologically relevant changes. Results. Both triamcinolone and dexamethasone caused differential activation of genes involved in “Circadian Rhythm Signaling” pathway at both time points tested. Triamcinolone (TAA) uniquely induced significant changes in gene expression in “Calcium Signaling” (1 week) and “Glutamate Receptor Signaling” pathways (1 month). In contrast, dexamethasone (Dex) affected the “GABA Receptor Signaling” (1 week) and “Serotonin Receptor Signaling” (1 month) pathways. Understanding how intraocular steroids affect the gene expression of RPE/choroid is clinically relevant. Conclusions. This in vivo study has elucidated several genes and pathways that are potentially altering the circadian rhythms and several other neurotransmitter pathways in RPE/choroid during intravitreal steroid injections, which likely has consequences in the dysregulation of RPE function and neurodegeneration of the retina. PMID:27429799

  19. Comparison of In Vivo Gene Expression Profiling of RPE/Choroid following Intravitreal Injection of Dexamethasone and Triamcinolone Acetonide.

    PubMed

    Smit-McBride, Zeljka; Moisseiev, Elad; Modjtahedi, Sara P; Telander, David G; Hjelmeland, Leonard M; Morse, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To identify retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/choroid genes and their relevant expression pathways affected by intravitreal injections of dexamethasone and triamcinolone acetonide in mice at clinically relevant time points for patient care. Methods. Differential gene expression of over 34,000 well-characterized mouse genes in the RPE/choroid of 6-week-old C57BL/6J mice was analyzed after intravitreal steroid injections at 1 week and 1 month postinjection, using Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 microarrays. The data were analyzed using GeneSpring GX 12.5 and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) microarray analysis software for biologically relevant changes. Results. Both triamcinolone and dexamethasone caused differential activation of genes involved in "Circadian Rhythm Signaling" pathway at both time points tested. Triamcinolone (TAA) uniquely induced significant changes in gene expression in "Calcium Signaling" (1 week) and "Glutamate Receptor Signaling" pathways (1 month). In contrast, dexamethasone (Dex) affected the "GABA Receptor Signaling" (1 week) and "Serotonin Receptor Signaling" (1 month) pathways. Understanding how intraocular steroids affect the gene expression of RPE/choroid is clinically relevant. Conclusions. This in vivo study has elucidated several genes and pathways that are potentially altering the circadian rhythms and several other neurotransmitter pathways in RPE/choroid during intravitreal steroid injections, which likely has consequences in the dysregulation of RPE function and neurodegeneration of the retina. PMID:27429799

  20. Optimization of gene expression microarray protocol for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Belder, Nevin; Coşkun, Öznur; Erdoğan, Beyza Doğanay; Savaş, Berna; Ensari, Arzu; Özdağ, Hilal

    2016-03-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a widely available clinical specimen for retrospective studies. The possibility of long-term clinical follow-up of FFPE samples makes them a valuable source to evaluate links between molecular and clinical information. Working with FFPE samples in the molecular research area, especially using high-throughput molecular techniques such as microarray gene expression profiling, has come into prominence. Because of the harmful effects of formalin fixation process such as degradation of nucleic acids, cross-linking with proteins, and chemical modifications on DNA and RNA, there are some limitations in gene expression profiling studies using FFPE samples. To date many studies have been conducted to evaluate gene expression profiling using microarrays (Thomas et al., Thomas et al. (2013) [1]; Scicchitano et al., Scicchitano et al. (2006) [2]; Frank et al., Frank et al. (2007) [3]; Fedorowicz et al., Fedorowicz et al. (2009) [4]). However, there is still no generally accepted, efficient and standardized procedure for microarray analysis of FFPE samples. This paper describes the microarray data presented in our recently accepted to be published article showing a standard protocol from deparaffinization of FFPE tissue sections and RNA extraction to microarray gene expression analysis. Here we represent our data in detail, deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database with the accession number GSE73883. Four combinations of two different cRNA/cDNA preparation and labeling protocols with two different array platforms (Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 and U133_X3P) were evaluated to determine which combination gives the best percentage of present call. The study presents a dataset for comparative analysis which has a potential in terms of providing a robust protocol for gene expression profiling with FFPE tissue samples. PMID:26981433

  1. Optimization of gene expression microarray protocol for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    Belder, Nevin; Coşkun, Öznur; Erdoğan, Beyza Doğanay; Savaş, Berna; Ensari, Arzu; Özdağ, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a widely available clinical specimen for retrospective studies. The possibility of long-term clinical follow-up of FFPE samples makes them a valuable source to evaluate links between molecular and clinical information. Working with FFPE samples in the molecular research area, especially using high-throughput molecular techniques such as microarray gene expression profiling, has come into prominence. Because of the harmful effects of formalin fixation process such as degradation of nucleic acids, cross-linking with proteins, and chemical modifications on DNA and RNA, there are some limitations in gene expression profiling studies using FFPE samples. To date many studies have been conducted to evaluate gene expression profiling using microarrays (Thomas et al., Thomas et al. (2013) [1]; Scicchitano et al., Scicchitano et al. (2006) [2]; Frank et al., Frank et al. (2007) [3]; Fedorowicz et al., Fedorowicz et al. (2009) [4]). However, there is still no generally accepted, efficient and standardized procedure for microarray analysis of FFPE samples. This paper describes the microarray data presented in our recently accepted to be published article showing a standard protocol from deparaffinization of FFPE tissue sections and RNA extraction to microarray gene expression analysis. Here we represent our data in detail, deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database with the accession number GSE73883. Four combinations of two different cRNA/cDNA preparation and labeling protocols with two different array platforms (Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 and U133_X3P) were evaluated to determine which combination gives the best percentage of present call. The study presents a dataset for comparative analysis which has a potential in terms of providing a robust protocol for gene expression profiling with FFPE tissue samples. PMID:26981433

  2. A quinazoline-based HDAC inhibitor affects gene expression pathways involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and mevalonate in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Bishop, K S; Sutherland, H; Marlow, G; Murray, P; Denny, W A; Ferguson, L R

    2016-03-01

    Chronic inflammation can lead to the development of cancers and resolution of inflammation is an ongoing challenge. Inflammation can result from dysregulation of the epigenome and a number of compounds that modify the epigenome are in clinical use. In this study the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of a quinazoline epigenetic-modulator compound were determined in prostate cancer cell lines using a non-hypothesis driven transcriptomics strategy utilising the Affymetrix PrimeView® Human Gene Expression microarray. GATHER and IPA software were used to analyse the data and to provide information on significantly modified biological processes, pathways and networks. A number of genes were differentially expressed in both PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. The top canonical pathways that frequently arose across both cell lines at a number of time points included cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism, and the mevalonate pathway. Targeting of sterol and mevalonate pathways may be a powerful anticancer approach. PMID:26759180

  3. Gene expression in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jansen, R; Penninx, B W J H; Madar, V; Xia, K; Milaneschi, Y; Hottenga, J J; Hammerschlag, A R; Beekman, A; van der Wee, N; Smit, J H; Brooks, A I; Tischfield, J; Posthuma, D; Schoevers, R; van Grootheest, G; Willemsen, G; de Geus, E J; Boomsma, D I; Wright, F A; Zou, F; Sun, W; Sullivan, P F

    2016-03-01

    The search for genetic variants underlying major depressive disorder (MDD) has not yet provided firm leads to its underlying molecular biology. A complementary approach is to study gene expression in relation to MDD. We measured gene expression in peripheral blood from 1848 subjects from The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Subjects were divided into current MDD (N=882), remitted MDD (N=635) and control (N=331) groups. MDD status and gene expression were measured again 2 years later in 414 subjects. The strongest gene expression differences were between the current MDD and control groups (129 genes at false-discovery rate, FDR<0.1). Gene expression differences across MDD status were largely unrelated to antidepressant use, inflammatory status and blood cell counts. Genes associated with MDD were enriched for interleukin-6 (IL-6)-signaling and natural killer (NK) cell pathways. We identified 13 gene expression clusters with specific clusters enriched for genes involved in NK cell activation (downregulated in current MDD, FDR=5.8 × 10(-5)) and IL-6 pathways (upregulated in current MDD, FDR=3.2 × 10(-3)). Longitudinal analyses largely confirmed results observed in the cross-sectional data. Comparisons of gene expression results to the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) MDD genome-wide association study results revealed overlap with DVL3. In conclusion, multiple gene expression associations with MDD were identified and suggest a measurable impact of current MDD state on gene expression. Identified genes and gene clusters are enriched with immune pathways previously associated with the etiology of MDD, in line with the immune suppression and immune activation hypothesis of MDD. PMID:26008736

  4. Galahad: a web server for drug effect analysis from gene expression.

    PubMed

    Laenen, Griet; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; Moreau, Yves; Thorrez, Lieven

    2015-07-01

    Galahad (https://galahad.esat.kuleuven.be) is a web-based application for analysis of drug effects. It provides an intuitive interface to be used by anybody interested in leveraging microarray data to gain insights into the pharmacological effects of a drug, mainly identification of candidate targets, elucidation of mode of action and understanding of off-target effects. The core of Galahad is a network-based analysis method of gene expression. As an input, Galahad takes raw Affymetrix human microarray data from treatment versus control experiments and provides quality control and data exploration tools, as well as computation of differential expression. Alternatively, differential expression values can be uploaded directly. Using these differential expression values, drug target prioritization and both pathway and disease enrichment can be calculated and visualized. Drug target prioritization is based on the integration of the gene expression data with a functional protein association network. The web site is free and open to all and there is no login requirement. PMID:25940630

  5. Analysis of Gene Expression Patterns Using Biclustering.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swarup; Bhattacharyya, Dhruba K; Kalita, Jugal K

    2016-01-01

    Mining microarray data to unearth interesting expression profile patterns for discovery of in silico biological knowledge is an emerging area of research in computational biology. A group of functionally related genes may have similar expression patterns under a set of conditions or at some time points. Biclustering is an important data mining tool that has been successfully used to analyze gene expression data for biologically significant cluster discovery. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce interesting patterns that may be observed in expression data and discuss the role of biclustering techniques in detecting interesting functional gene groups with similar expression patterns. PMID:26350227

  6. Global gene expression profiles of ischemic preconditioning in deceased donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Raza, Ali; Dikdan, George; Desai, Kunj K; Shareef, Asif; Fernandes, Helen; Aris, Virginie; de la Torre, Andrew N; Wilson, Dorian; Fisher, Adrian; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Koneru, Baburao

    2010-05-01

    The benefits of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) in reducing ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) remain indistinct in human liver transplantation (LT). To further understand mechanistic aspects of IPC, we performed microarray analyses as a nested substudy in a randomized trial of 10-minute IPC in 101 deceased donor LTs. Liver biopsies were performed after cold storage and at 90 minutes postreperfusion in 40 of 101 subjects. Global gene expression profiles in 6 biopsy pairs in IPC and work standard organ recovery groups at both time points were compared using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Transcripts with >1.5-fold change and P < 0.05 were considered significant. IPC altered expression of 82 transcripts in antioxidant, immunological, lipid biosynthesis, cell development and growth, and other groups. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting validated our microarray data. IPC-induced overexpression of glutathione S-transferase mu transcripts (GSTM1, GSTM3, GSTM4, and GSTM5) was accompanied by increased protein expression and may contribute to a decrease in oxidative stress. However, the increased expression of fatty acid synthase may increase oxidative stress, and tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 10 may promote apoptosis. These changes, in combination with decreased expression of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, both of which inhibit apoptosis, may increase IRI. In our study of deceased donor LT, IPC induces changes in gene expression, some of which are potentially beneficial but some which are potentially injurious. Thus, our findings of changes in gene expression mirror the outcomes in our clinical trial. PMID:20440768

  7. Analysis of global gene expression changes in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to spores of the allergenic fungus, Alternaria alternata

    PubMed Central

    Babiceanu, M. C.; Howard, B. A.; Rumore, A. C.; Kita, H.; Lawrence, C. B.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure and sensitivity to ubiquitous airborne fungi such as Alternaria alternata have long been implicated in the development, onset, and exacerbation of chronic allergic airway disorders. This present study is the first to investigate global changes in host gene expression during the interaction of cultured human bronchial epithelial cells and live Alternaria spores. In in vitro experiments human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to spores or media alone for 24 h. RNA was collected from three biological replicates per treatment and was used to assess changes in gene expression patterns using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays. In cells treated with Alternaria spores compared to controls, 613 probe sets representing 460 individual genes were found differentially expressed (p ≤ 0.05). In this set of 460 statistically significant, differentially expressed genes, 397 genes were found to be up-regulated and 63 were down-regulated. Of these 397 up-regulated genes, 156 genes were found to be up-regulated ≥2 fold. Interestingly, none of the 63 down-regulated genes were found differentially expressed at ≤−2 fold. Differentially expressed genes were identified following statistical analysis and subsequently used for pathway and network evaluation. Interestingly, many cytokine and chemokine immune response genes were up-regulated with a particular emphasis on interferon-inducible genes. Genes involved in cell death, retinoic acid signaling, and TLR3 response pathways were also significantly up-regulated. Many of the differentially up-regulated genes have been shown in other systems to be associated with innate immunity, inflammation and/or allergic airway diseases. This study now provides substantial information for further investigating specific genes and innate immune system pathways activated by Alternaria in the context of allergic airway diseases. PMID:23882263

  8. Xenbase: gene expression and improved integration.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Jeff B; Snyder, Kevin A; Segerdell, Erik; Jarabek, Chris J; Azam, Kenan; Zorn, Aaron M; Vize, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Xenbase (www.xenbase.org), the model organism database for Xenopus laevis and X. (Silurana) tropicalis, is the principal centralized resource of genomic, development data and community information for Xenopus research. Recent improvements include the addition of the literature and interaction tabs to gene catalog pages. New content has been added including a section on gene expression patterns that incorporates image data from the literature, large scale screens and community submissions. Gene expression data are integrated into the gene catalog via an expression tab and is also searchable by multiple criteria using an expression search interface. The gene catalog has grown to contain over 15,000 genes. Collaboration with the European Xenopus Research Center (EXRC) has resulted in a stock center section with data on frog lines supplied by the EXRC. Numerous improvements have also been made to search and navigation. Xenbase is also the source of the Xenopus Anatomical Ontology and the clearinghouse for Xenopus gene nomenclature. PMID:19884130

  9. Gene Expression Profiling in Peripheral Blood Cells and Synovial Membranes of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Alessandro; Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Elisa; Argentino, Giuseppe; Beri, Ruggero; Lunardi, Claudio; Puccetti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis whose pathogenesis is poorly understood; it is characterized by bone erosions and new bone formation. The diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and diagnostic biomarkers are not yet available. The aim of this work was to clarify some aspects of the disease pathogenesis and to identify specific gene signatures in paired peripheral blood cells (PBC) and synovial biopsies of patients with PsA. Moreover, we tried to identify biomarkers that can be used in clinical practice. Methods PBC and synovial biopsies of 10 patients with PsA were used to study gene expression using Affymetrix arrays. The expression values were validated by Q-PCR, FACS analysis and by the detection of soluble mediators. Results Synovial biopsies of patients showed a modulation of approximately 200 genes when compared to the biopsies of healthy donors. Among the differentially expressed genes we observed the upregulation of Th17 related genes and of type I interferon (IFN) inducible genes. FACS analysis confirmed the Th17 polarization. Moreover, the synovial trascriptome shows gene clusters (bone remodeling, angiogenesis and inflammation) involved in the pathogenesis of PsA. Interestingly 90 genes are modulated in both compartments (PBC and synovium) suggesting that signature pathways in PBC mirror those of the inflamed synovium. Finally the osteoactivin gene was upregulared in both PBC and synovial biopsies and this finding was confirmed by the detection of high levels of osteoactivin in PsA sera but not in other inflammatory arthritides. Conclusions We describe the first analysis of the trancriptome in paired synovial tissue and PBC of patients with PsA. This study strengthens the hypothesis that PsA is of autoimmune origin since the coactivity of IFN and Th17 pathways is typical of autoimmunity. Finally these findings have allowed the identification of a possible disease biomarker, osteoactivin, easily detectable in PsA serum. PMID

  10. Gene Expression Profiling of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Jacob, Harrys K.C.; Jakharia, Aniruddha; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Goel, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Dwivedi, Sutopa; Pathare, Swapnali; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Maharudraiah, Jagadeesha; Singh, Sujay; Sameer Kumar, Ghantasala S; Vijayakumar, M.; Veerendra Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah; Premalatha, Chennagiri Shrinivasamurthy; Tata, Pramila; Hariharan, Ramesh; Roa, Juan Carlos; Prasad, T.S.K; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, both in men and women. A genomewide gene expression analysis was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues as compared to adjacent normal tissues. We used Agilent’s whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray platform representing ~41,000 genes to carry out gene expression analysis. Two-color microarray analysis was employed to directly compare the expression of genes between tumor and normal tissues. Through this approach, we identified several previously known candidate genes along with a number of novel candidate genes in gastric cancer. Testican-1 (SPOCK1) was one of the novel molecules that was 10-fold upregulated in tumors. Using tissue microarrays, we validated the expression of testican-1 by immunohistochemical staining. It was overexpressed in 56% (160/282) of the cases tested. Pathway analysis led to the identification of several networks in which SPOCK1 was among the topmost networks of interacting genes. By gene enrichment analysis, we identified several genes involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation to be significantly upregulated while those corresponding to metabolic pathways were significantly downregulated. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study are candidate biomarkers for gastric adenoacarcinoma. PMID:27030788

  11. HOXB homeobox gene expression in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, R; Garrido, E; Piña, P; Hidalgo, A; Lazos, M; Ochoa, R; Salcedo, M

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox (HOX) genes are a family of transcription factors that bind to specific DNA sequences in target genes regulating gene expression. Thirty-nine HOX genes have been mapped in four conserved clusters: A, B, C, and D; they act as master genes regulating the identity of body segments along the anteroposterior axis of the embryo. The role played by HOX genes in adult cell differentiation is unclear to date, but growing evidence suggests that they may play an important role in the development of cancer. To study the role played by HOX genes in cervical cancer, in the present work, we analyzed the expression of HOXB genes and the localization of their transcripts in human cervical tissues. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and nonradioactive RNA in situ hybridization were used to detect HOXB expression in 11 normal cervical tissues and 17 cervical carcinomas. It was determined that HOXB1, B3, B5, B6, B7, B8, and B9 genes are expressed in normal adult cervical epithelium and squamous cervical carcinomas. Interestingly, HOXB2, HOXB4, and HOXB13 gene expression was found only in tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that the new expression of HOXB2, HOXB4, and B13 genes is involved in cervical cancer. PMID:16445654

  12. Gene expression profiling in developing human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mei, Pinchao; Lou, Rong; Zhang, Michael Q; Wu, Guanyun; Qiang, Boqin; Zhang, Zhengguo; Shen, Yan

    2002-10-15

    The gene expression profile of developing human hippocampus is of particular interest and importance to neurobiologists devoted to development of the human brain and related diseases. To gain further molecular insight into the developmental and functional characteristics, we analyzed the expression profile of active genes in developing human hippocampus. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were selected by sequencing randomly selected clones from an original 3'-directed cDNA library of 150-day human fetal hippocampus, and a digital expression profile of 946 known genes that could be divided into 16 categories was generated. We also used for comparison 14 other expression profiles of related human neural cells/tissues, including human adult hippocampus. To yield more confidence regarding differential expression, a method was applied to attach normalized expression data to genes with a low false-positive rate (<0.05). Finally, hierarchical cluster analysis was used to exhibit related gene expression patterns. Our results are in accordance with anatomical and physiological observations made during the developmental process of the human hippocampus. Furthermore, some novel findings appeared to be unique to our results. The abundant expression of genes for cell surface components and disease-related genes drew our attention. Twenty-four genes are significantly different from adult, and 13 genes might be developing hippocampus-specific candidate genes, including wnt2b and some Alzheimer's disease-related genes. Our results could provide useful information on the ontogeny, development, and function of cells in the human hippocampus at the molecular level and underscore the utility of large-scale, parallel gene expression analyses in the study of complex biological phenomena. PMID:12271469

  13. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Feldmesser, Ester; Olender, Tsviya; Khen, Miriam; Yanai, Itai; Ophir, Ron; Lancet, Doron

    2006-01-01

    Background Olfactory receptors (ORs) are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information. PMID:16716209

  14. Gene Expression Analysis in Human Breast Cancer Associated Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dylan T.; Lechertier, Tanguy; Mitter, Richard; Herbert, John M. J.; Bicknell, Roy; Jones, J. Louise; Li, Ji-Liang; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L.; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5–72 fold) in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of potentially novel

  15. Dengue Virus Induces Novel Changes in Gene Expression of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warke, Rajas V.; Xhaja, Kris; Martin, Katherine J.; Fournier, Marcia F.; Shaw, Sunil K.; Brizuela, Nathaly; de Bosch, Norma; Lapointe, David; Ennis, Francis A.; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cells are permissive to dengue virus (DV) infection in vitro, although their importance as targets of DV infection in vivo remains a subject of debate. To analyze the virus-host interaction, we studied the effect of DV infection on gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by using differential display reverse transcription-PCR (DD-RTPCR), quantitative RT-PCR, and Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays. DD identified eight differentially expressed cDNAs, including inhibitor of apoptosis-1, 2′-5′ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), a 2′-5′ OAS-like (OASL) gene, galectin-9, myxovirus protein A (MxA), regulator of G-protein signaling, endothelial and smooth muscle cell-derived neuropilin-like protein, and phospholipid scramblase 1. Microarray analysis of 22,000 human genes confirmed these findings and identified an additional 269 genes that were induced and 126 that were repressed more than fourfold after DV infection. Broad functional responses that were activated included the stress, defense, immune, cell adhesion, wounding, inflammatory, and antiviral pathways. These changes in gene expression were seen after infection of HUVECs with either laboratory-adapted virus or with virus isolated directly from plasma of DV-infected patients. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, OASL, and MxA and h-IAP1 genes were induced within the first 8 to 12 h after infection, suggesting a direct effect of DV infection. These global analyses of DV effects on cellular gene expression identify potentially novel mechanisms involved in dengue disease manifestations such as hemostatic disturbance. PMID:14557666

  16. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  17. Gene Expression Studies in Lygus lineolaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes are expressed in insect cells, as in all living organisms, by transcription of DNA into RNA followed by translation of RNA into proteins. The intricate patterns of differential gene expression in time and space directly influence the development and function of every aspect of the organism. Wh...

  18. Spatio-Temporal Expression Patterns of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula Defensin-Like Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nallu, Sumitha; Wang, Lin; Botanga, Christopher J.; Gomez, S. Karen; Costa, Liliana M.; Harrison, Maria J.; Samac, Deborah A.; Glazebrook, Jane; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Gutierrez-Marcos, Jose F.; VandenBosch, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant genomes contain several hundred defensin-like (DEFL) genes that encode short cysteine-rich proteins resembling defensins, which are well known antimicrobial polypeptides. Little is known about the expression patterns or functions of many DEFLs because most were discovered recently and hence are not well represented on standard microarrays. We designed a custom Affymetrix chip consisting of probe sets for 317 and 684 DEFLs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, respectively for cataloging DEFL expression in a variety of plant organs at different developmental stages and during symbiotic and pathogenic associations. The microarray analysis provided evidence for the transcription of 71% and 90% of the DEFLs identified in Arabidopsis and Medicago, respectively, including many of the recently annotated DEFL genes that previously lacked expression information. Both model plants contain a subset of DEFLs specifically expressed in seeds or fruits. A few DEFLs, including some plant defensins, were significantly up-regulated in Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Alternaria brassicicola or Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Among these, some were dependent on jasmonic acid signaling or were associated with specific types of immune responses. There were notable differences in DEFL gene expression patterns between Arabidopsis and Medicago, as the majority of Arabidopsis DEFLs were expressed in inflorescences, while only a few exhibited root-enhanced expression. By contrast, Medicago DEFLs were most prominently expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Thus, our data document salient differences in DEFL temporal and spatial expression between Arabidopsis and Medicago, suggesting distinct signaling routes and distinct roles for these proteins in the two plant species. PMID:23527067

  19. Gearbox gene expression and growth rate.

    PubMed

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Tormo, A

    1993-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression in prokaryotic cells usually takes place at the level of transcription initiation. Different forms of RNA polymerase recognizing specific promoters are engaged in the control of many prokaryotic regulons. This also seems to be the case for some Escherichia coli genes that are induced at low growth rates and by nutrient starvation. Their gene products are synthesized at levels inversely proportional to growth rate, and this mode of regulation has been termed gearbox gene expression. This kind of growth-rate modulation is exerted by specific transcriptional initiation signals, the gearbox promoters, and some of them depend on a putative new σ factor (RpoS). Gearbox promoters drive expression of morphogenetic and cell division genes at constant levels per cell and cycle to meet the demands of cell division and septum formation. A mechanism is proposed that could sense the growth rate of the cell to alter gene expression by the action of specific σ factors. PMID:24420108

  20. Quality measures for gene expression biclusters.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Beatriz; Girldez, Ral; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Furthermore, most of biclustering approaches use a measure or cost function that determines the quality of biclusters. Having a suitable quality metric for bicluster is a critical aspect, not only for guiding the search, but also for establishing a comparison criteria among the results obtained by different biclustering techniques. In this paper, we analyse a large number of existing approaches to quality measures for gene expression biclusters, as well as we present a comparative study of them based on their capability to recognize different expression patterns in biclusters. PMID:25763839

  1. Quality Measures for Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Beatriz; Girldez, Ral; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S.

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Furthermore, most of biclustering approaches use a measure or cost function that determines the quality of biclusters. Having a suitable quality metric for bicluster is a critical aspect, not only for guiding the search, but also for establishing a comparison criteria among the results obtained by different biclustering techniques. In this paper, we analyse a large number of existing approaches to quality measures for gene expression biclusters, as well as we present a comparative study of them based on their capability to recognize different expression patterns in biclusters. PMID:25763839

  2. Gene expression profiles in the rat streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model identified using microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Inmaculada; Clayton, Chris L; Graham, Simon J; Life, Paul F; Dickson, Marion C

    2005-01-01

    Experimental arthritis models are considered valuable tools for delineating mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmune phenomena. Use of microarray-based methods represents a new and challenging approach that allows molecular dissection of complex autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. In order to characterize the temporal gene expression profile in joints from the reactivation model of streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rats, total RNA was extracted from ankle joints from naive, SCW injected, or phosphate buffered saline injected animals (time course study) and gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray technology (RAE230A). After normalization and statistical analysis of data, 631 differentially expressed genes were sorted into clusters based on their levels and kinetics of expression using Spotfire profile search and K-mean cluster analysis. Microarray-based data for a subset of genes were validated using real-time PCR TaqMan analysis. Analysis of the microarray data identified 631 genes (441 upregulated and 190 downregulated) that were differentially expressed (Delta > 1.8, P < 0.01), showing specific levels and patterns of gene expression. The genes exhibiting the highest fold increase in expression on days -13.8, -13, or 3 were involved in chemotaxis, inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodelling. Transcriptome analysis identified 10 upregulated genes (Delta > 5), which have not previously been associated with arthritis pathology and are located in genomic regions associated with autoimmune disease. The majority of the downregulated genes were associated with metabolism, transport and regulation of muscle development. In conclusion, the present study describes the temporal expression of multiple disease-associated genes with potential pathophysiological roles in the reactivation model of SCW-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rat. These findings improve our understanding of

  3. Gene expression profiles in the rat streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model identified using microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rioja, Inmaculada; Clayton, Chris L; Graham, Simon J; Life, Paul F; Dickson, Marion C

    2005-01-01

    Experimental arthritis models are considered valuable tools for delineating mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmune phenomena. Use of microarray-based methods represents a new and challenging approach that allows molecular dissection of complex autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. In order to characterize the temporal gene expression profile in joints from the reactivation model of streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rats, total RNA was extracted from ankle joints from naïve, SCW injected, or phosphate buffered saline injected animals (time course study) and gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray technology (RAE230A). After normalization and statistical analysis of data, 631 differentially expressed genes were sorted into clusters based on their levels and kinetics of expression using Spotfire® profile search and K-mean cluster analysis. Microarray-based data for a subset of genes were validated using real-time PCR TaqMan® analysis. Analysis of the microarray data identified 631 genes (441 upregulated and 190 downregulated) that were differentially expressed (Delta > 1.8, P < 0.01), showing specific levels and patterns of gene expression. The genes exhibiting the highest fold increase in expression on days -13.8, -13, or 3 were involved in chemotaxis, inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodelling. Transcriptome analysis identified 10 upregulated genes (Delta > 5), which have not previously been associated with arthritis pathology and are located in genomic regions associated with autoimmune disease. The majority of the downregulated genes were associated with metabolism, transport and regulation of muscle development. In conclusion, the present study describes the temporal expression of multiple disease-associated genes with potential pathophysiological roles in the reactivation model of SCW-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rat. These findings improve our

  4. Detection of differentially expressed genes between Erhualian and Large White placentas on day 75 and 90 of gestation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan-Yong; Fang, Ming-Di; Huang, Ting-Hua; Li, Chang-Chun; Yu, Mei; Zhao, Shu-Hong

    2009-01-01

    Background Placental efficiency is strongly associated with litter size, fetal weight and prenatal mortality. Together with its rapid growth during late gestation, the Large White pig breed shows a significant increase in placental size and weight, but this does not occur in the highly prolific Chinese pig breeds. To understand the molecular basis of placental development during late gestation in Chinese indigenous and Western breeds with different placental efficiency, female placental samples were collected from six pregnant Erhualian gilts at gestation day 75 (E75) and day 90 (E90) and from six pregnant Large White gilts at gestation day 75 (L75) and day 90 (L90). Two female placentas from one sow were used to extract RNA and then pooled in equal volumes. Twelve pooled samples were hybridized to the porcine Affymetrix GeneChip. Results A total of 226 and 577 transcripts were detected that were differentially expressed between E75 and L75 and between E90 and L90 (p < 0.01, q < 0.2), respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed that these genes belong to the class of genes that participate in angiogenesis and development. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of eight selected genes. Significant differential expression of five genes in the VEGF pathway was also detected between the breeds. A search of chromosomal location revealed that 44 differentially expressed genes located to QTL regions related to reproduction. Differential expression of six candidate imprinted genes was also confirmed. Three of the six genes (PLAGL1, DIRAS3, and SLC38A4) showed monoallelic expression in the porcine placenta. Conclusion Our study detected many genes that showed differential expression between placentas of two divergent breed of pigs, and confirmed the imprinting of three genes. These findings help to elucidate the genetic control of placental efficiency and improve the understanding of placental development. PMID:19630995

  5. Aplysia californica neurons express microinjected neuropeptide genes.

    PubMed Central

    DesGroseillers, L; Cowan, D; Miles, M; Sweet, A; Scheller, R H

    1987-01-01

    Neuropeptide genes are expressed in specific subsets of large polyploid neurons in Aplysia californica. We have defined the transcription initiation sites of three of these neuropeptide genes (the R14, L11, and ELH genes) and determined the nucleotide sequence of the promoter regions. The genes contain the usual eucaryotic promoter signals as well as other structures of potential regulatory importance, including inverted and direct repeats. The L11 and ELH genes, which are otherwise unrelated, have homology in the promoter regions, while the R14 promoter was distinct. When cloned plasmids were microinjected into Aplysia neurons in organ culture, transitions between supercoiled, relaxed circular, and linear DNAs occurred along with ligation into high-molecular-weight species. About 20% of the microinjected neurons expressed the genes. The promoter region of the R14 gene functioned in expression of the microinjected DNA in all cells studied. When both additional 5' and 3' sequences were included, the gene was specifically expressed only in R14, suggesting that the specificity of expression is generated by a multicomponent repression system. Finally, the R14 peptide could be expressed in L11, demonstrating that it is possible to alter the transmitter phenotype of these neurons by introduction of cloned genes. Images PMID:3670293

  6. Genome-wide gene expression analysis supports a developmental model of low temperature tolerance gene regulation in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To identify the genes involved in the development of low temperature (LT) tolerance in hexaploid wheat, we examined the global changes in expression in response to cold of the 55,052 potentially unique genes represented in the Affymetrix Wheat Genome microarray. We compared the expression of genes in winter-habit (winter Norstar and winter Manitou) and spring-habit (spring Manitou and spring Norstar)) cultivars, wherein the locus for the vernalization gene Vrn-A1 was swapped between the parental winter Norstar and spring Manitou in the derived near-isogenic lines winter Manitou and spring Norstar. Global expression of genes in the crowns of 3-leaf stage plants cold-acclimated at 6°C for 0, 2, 14, 21, 38, 42, 56 and 70 days was examined. Results Analysis of variance of gene expression separated the samples by genetic background and by the developmental stage before or after vernalization saturation was reached. Using gene-specific ANOVA we identified 12,901 genes (at p < 0.001) that change in expression with respect to both genotype and the duration of cold-treatment. We examined in more detail a subset of these genes (2,771) where expression was highly influenced by the interaction between these two main factors. Functional assignments using GO annotations showed that genes involved in transport, oxidation-reduction, and stress response were highly represented. Clustering based on the pattern of transcript accumulation identified genes that were up or down-regulated by cold-treatment. Our data indicate that the cold-sensitive lines can up-regulate known cold-responsive genes comparable to that of cold-hardy lines. The levels of expression of these genes were highly influenced by the initial rate and the duration of the gene's response to cold. We show that the Vrn-A1 locus controls the duration of gene expression but not its initial rate of response to cold treatment. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Ta.Vrn-A1 and Ta.Vrt1 originally hypothesized to

  7. Methodological Limitations in Determining Astrocytic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Liang; Guo, Chuang; Wang, Tao; Li, Baoman; Gu, Li; Wang, Zhanyou

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, astrocytic mRNA and protein expression are studied by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemically. This led to the concept that astrocytes lack aralar, a component of the malate-aspartate-shuttle. At least similar aralar mRNA and protein expression in astrocytes and neurons isolated by fluorescence-assisted cell sorting (FACS) reversed this opinion. Demonstration of expression of other astrocytic genes may also be erroneous. Literature data based on morphological methods were therefore compared with mRNA expression in cells obtained by recently developed methods for determination of cell-specific gene expression. All Na,K-ATPase-α subunits were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry (IHC), but there are problems with the cotransporter NKCC1. Glutamate and GABA transporter gene expression was well determined immunohistochemically. The same applies to expression of many genes of glucose metabolism, whereas a single study based on findings in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic animals showed very low astrocytic expression of hexokinase. Gene expression of the equilibrative nucleoside transporters ENT1 and ENT2 was recognized by ISH, but ENT3 was not. The same applies to the concentrative transporters CNT2 and CNT3. All were clearly expressed in FACS-isolated cells, followed by biochemical analysis. ENT3 was enriched in astrocytes. Expression of many nucleoside transporter genes were shown by microarray analysis, whereas other important genes were not. Results in cultured astrocytes resembled those obtained by FACS. These findings call for reappraisal of cellular nucleoside transporter expression. FACS cell yield is small. Further development of cell separation methods to render methods more easily available and less animal and cost consuming and parallel studies of astrocytic mRNA and protein expression by ISH/IHC and other methods are necessary, but new methods also need to be thoroughly checked. PMID:24324456

  8. Gene Expression Noise, Fitness Landscapes, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel

    The stochastic (or noisy) process of gene expression can have fitness consequences for living organisms. For example, gene expression noise facilitates the development of drug resistance by increasing the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. The present work investigates the relationship between gene expression noise and the fitness landscape. By incorporating the costs and benefits of gene expression, we track how the fluctuation magnitude and timescale of expression noise evolve in simulations of cell populations under stress. We find that properties of expression noise evolve to maximize fitness on the fitness landscape, and that low levels of expression noise emerge when the fitness benefits of gene expression exceed the fitness costs (and that high levels of noise emerge when the costs of expression exceed the benefits). The findings from our theoretical/computational work offer new hypotheses on the development of drug resistance, some of which are now being investigated in evolution experiments in our laboratory using well-characterized synthetic gene regulatory networks in budding yeast. Nserc Postdoctoral Fellowship (Grant No. PDF-453977-2014).

  9. Visinin-like peptide 1 in adrenal gland of the rat. Gene expression and its hormonal control.

    PubMed

    Trejter, Marcin; Hochol, Anna; Tyczewska, Marianna; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Jopek, Karol; Szyszka, Marta; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; Rucinski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    VSNL1 encodes the calcium-sensor protein visinin-like 1 and was identified previously as an upregulated gene in a sample set of aldosterone-producing adenomas. Recently, by means of microarray studies we demonstrated high expression of Vsnl1 gene in rat adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG). Only scanty data are available on the role of this gene in adrenal function as well as on regulation of its expression by factors affecting adrenal cortex structure and function. Therefore we performed relevant studies aimed at clarifying some of the above issues. By Affymetrix(®) Rat Gene 1.1 ST Array Strip, QPCR and immunohistochemistry we demonstrated that expression levels of Vsnl1 in the rat adrenal ZG are notably higher than in the fasciculata/reticularis zone. In QPCR assay this difference was approximately 10 times higher. Expression of this gene in the rat adrenal gland or adrenocortical cells was acutely down regulated by ACTH, while chronic administration of corticotrophin or dexamethasone did not change Vsnl1 mRNA levels. In enucleation-induced adrenocortical regeneration expression levels of both Vsnl1 and Cyp11b2 were notably lowered and positively correlated. Despite these findings, the physiological significance of adrenal Vsnl1 remains unclear, and requires further investigation. PMID:25451331

  10. Identification of novel highly expressed genes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas through a bioinformatics analysis of expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dengfeng; Hustinx, Steven R; Sui, Guoping; Bala, P; Sato, Norihiro; Martin, Sean; Maitra, Anirban; Murphy, Kathleen M; Cameron, John L; Yeo, Charles J; Kern, Scott E; Goggins, Michael; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hruban, Ralph H

    2004-11-01

    In most microarray experiments, a significant fraction of the differentially expressed mRNAs identified correspond to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and are generally discarded from further analyses. We used careful bioinformatics analyses to characterize those ESTs that were found to be highly overexpressed in a series of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. cDNA was prepared from 60 non-neoplastic samples (normal pancreas [n = 20], normal colon [n = 10], or normal duodenal mucosal [n = 30]) and from 64 pancreatic cancers (resected cancers [n = 50] or cancer cell lines [n = 14]) and hybridized to the complete Affymetrix Human Genome U133 GeneChip(R) set (arrays U133A and B) for simultaneous analysis of 45,000 fragments corresponding to 33,000 known genes and 6,000 ESTs. The GeneExpress(R) software system Fold Change Analysis Tool was used and 60 ESTs were identified that were expressed at levels at least 3-fold greater in the pancreatic cancers as compared to normal tissues. Searches against the human genomic sequence and comparative genomic analysis of human and mouse genomes was carried out using basic local alignment search tools (BLAST), BLASTN, and BLASTX, for identifying protein coding genes corresponding to the ESTs. Subsequently, in order to pick the most relevant candidate genes for a more detailed analysis, we looked for domains/motifs in the open reading frames using SMART and Pfam programs. We were able to definitively map 43 of the 60 ESTs to known or novel genes, and 15 of the ESTs could be localized in close proximity to a gene in the human genome although we were unable to establish that the EST was indeed derived from those genes. The differential expression of a subset of genes was confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemical labeling of tissue microarrays (inhibin beta A [INHBA] and CD29) and/or at the transcript level by RT-PCR (INHBA, AKAP12, ELK3, FOXQ1, EIF5A2, and EFNA5). We conclude that bioinformatics tools can be used to characterize

  11. Effects of yeast cell wall-derived mannan-oligosaccharides on jejunal gene expression in young broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Xiao, R; Power, R F; Mallonee, D; Routt, K; Spangler, L; Pescatore, A J; Cantor, A H; Ao, T; Pierce, J L; Dawson, K A

    2012-07-01

    The use of mannan-oligosaccharides (MOS) as alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) has gained in popularity in recent years due to regulatory restrictions of using AGP in food animal production. Benefits of MOS usage include improvement on animal performance, feed efficiency, and gastrointestinal health. The molecular mechanisms of these functions however are not clear. The goal of the current study was to use a transcriptomics approach to investigate the effects of MOS on the intestinal gene expression profile of young broilers and characterize biological gene pathways responsible for the actions of MOS. One hundred and twenty 1-d-old Cobb 500 broiler chicks were randomly divided into 2 groups and were fed either a standard wheat-soybean meal-based (control) diet or the same diet supplemented with 2.2 g/kg of MOS (Bio-Mos, Alltech, Nicholasville, KY) for 3 wk, followed by jejunal gene expression profiling analysis using chicken-specific Affymetrix microarrays. Results indicated that a total of 672 genes were differentially expressed (P < 0.01 and fold change >1.2) in the jejunum by MOS supplementation. Association analysis indicated that differentially expressed genes are involved in diverse biological functions including energy production, cell death, and protein translation. Expression of 77 protein synthesis-related genes was differentially regulated by MOS in the jejunum. Further pathway analysis indicated that 15 genes related to oxidative phosphorylation were upregulated in the jejunum, and expression of genes important in cellular stress response, such as peroxiredoxin 1, superoxide dismutase 1, and thioredoxin, were also increased by MOS. Differential expression of genes associated with cellular immune processes, including lysozyme, lumican, β 2-microglobin, apolipoprotein A-1, and fibronectin 1, were also observed in MOS-fed broilers. In summary, this study systematically identified biological functions and gene pathways that are important in

  12. A RNA-Seq Analysis of the Rat Supraoptic Nucleus Transcriptome: Effects of Salt Loading on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Yasmmyn D.; Shi, YiJun; Greenwood, Michael; Hoe, See Ziau; Murphy, David; Gainer, Harold

    2015-01-01

    Magnocellular neurons (MCNs) in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) are highly specialized to release large amounts of arginine vasopressin (Avp) or oxytocin (Oxt) into the blood stream and play critical roles in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. The MCNs are osmosensory neurons and are excited by exposure to hypertonic solutions and inhibited by hypotonic solutions. The MCNs respond to systemic hypertonic and hypotonic stimulation with large changes in the expression of their Avp and Oxt genes, and microarray studies have shown that these osmotic perturbations also cause large changes in global gene expression in the HNS. In this paper, we examine gene expression in the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON) under normosmotic and chronic salt-loading SL) conditions by the first time using “new-generation”, RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) methods. We reliably detect 9,709 genes as present in the SON by RNA-Seq, and 552 of these genes were changed in expression as a result of chronic SL. These genes reflect diverse functions, and 42 of these are involved in either transcriptional or translational processes. In addition, we compare the SON transcriptomes resolved by RNA-Seq methods with the SON transcriptomes determined by Affymetrix microarray methods in rats under the same osmotic conditions, and find that there are 6,466 genes present in the SON that are represented in both data sets, although 1,040 of the expressed genes were found only in the microarray data, and 2,762 of the expressed genes are selectively found in the RNA-Seq data and not the microarray data. These data provide the research community a comprehensive view of the transcriptome in the SON under normosmotic conditions and the changes in specific gene expression evoked by salt loading. PMID:25897513

  13. Sexual dimorphism in hepatic gene expression and the response to dietary carbohydrate manipulation in the zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Barrie D.; Drew, Robert E.; Murdoch, Gordon K.; Powell, Madison; Rodnick, Kenneth J.; Settles, Matt; Stone, David; Churchill, Erin; Hill, Rodney A.; Papasani, Madhusudhan R.; Lewis, Solange S.; Hardy, Ronald W.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we tested for the presence of sexual dimorphism in the hepatic transcriptome of the adult zebrafish and examined the effect of long term manipulation of dietary carbohydrate on gene expression in both sexes. Zebrafish were fed diets comprised of 0%, 15%, 25%, or 35% carbohydrate from the larval stage through sexual maturity, then sampled for hepatic tissue, growth, proximate body composition, and retention efficiencies. Using Affymetrix microarrays and qRT-PCR, we observed substantial sexual dimorphism in the hepatic transcriptome. Males up-regulated genes associated with oxidative metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, energy production, and amelioration of oxidative stress, while females had higher expression levels of genes associated with translation. Restriction of dietary carbohydrate (0% diet) significantly affected hepatic gene expression, growth performance, retention efficiencies of protein and energy, and percentages of moisture, lipid, and ash. The response of some genes to dietary manipulation varied by sex; with increased dietary carbohydrate, males up-regulated genes associated with oxidative metabolism (e.g. hadhβ) while females up-regulated genes associated with glucose phosphorylation (e.g. glucokinase). Our data support the use of the zebrafish model for the study of fish nutritional genomics, but highlight the importance of accounting for sexual dimorphism in these studies. PMID:20483215

  14. Global gene expression profiling in larval zebrafish exposed to microcystin-LR and microcystis reveals endocrine disrupting effects of Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Emily D; Henry, Theodore B; Twiner, Michael J; Gouffon, Julia S; McPherson, Jackson T; Boyer, Gregory L; Sayler, Gary S; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2011-03-01

    Microcystis blooms occur worldwide and threaten aquatic ecosystems and human health. Sublethal effects on early developmental stages of fish are largely unknown, and research has mainly focused on microcystin toxins (such as MC-LR) rather than Microcystis cells. We exposed (96 h) zebrafish larvae to purified MC-LR (0-1000 μg/L) or lyophilized Microcystis aeruginosa containing 4.5 μg/L MC-LR and evaluated changes in global gene expression (Affymetrix GeneChip zebrafish genome arrays). Significant changes in gene expression (≥ 1.7-fold change, p < 0.0001) were determined with Rosetta Resolver 7.0, and ontology analysis was conducted with the DAVID bioinformatics tool. The number of differentially expressed genes relative to control increased with MC-LR concentration and included genes related to known mechanisms of action for MC-LR in mammals and older life stages of fish, as well as genes unique to larval zebrafish. Up-regulation of vitellogenin genes (vtg) (19.2-fold to >100-fold on arrays; 619.3-fold confirmed by quantitative PCR) was observed in Microcystis-exposed larvae but not in larvae exposed to MC-LR. Up-regulation of vtg indicates exposure to estrogenic substance(s) and suggests that Microcystis may be a natural source of environmental estrogens. Concerns about effects of Microcystis blooms may extend beyond those associated with the microcystin toxin. PMID:21280650

  15. A comparative gene expression database for invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As whole genome and transcriptome sequencing gets cheaper and faster, a great number of 'exotic' animal models are emerging, rapidly adding valuable data to the ever-expanding Evo-Devo field. All these new organisms serve as a fantastic resource for the research community, but the sheer amount of data, some published, some not, makes detailed comparison of gene expression patterns very difficult to summarize - a problem sometimes even noticeable within a single lab. The need to merge existing data with new information in an organized manner that is publicly available to the research community is now more necessary than ever. Description In order to offer a homogenous way of storing and handling gene expression patterns from a variety of organisms, we have developed the first web-based comparative gene expression database for invertebrates that allows species-specific as well as cross-species gene expression comparisons. The database can be queried by gene name, developmental stage and/or expression domains. Conclusions This database provides a unique tool for the Evo-Devo research community that allows the retrieval, analysis and comparison of gene expression patterns within or among species. In addition, this database enables a quick identification of putative syn-expression groups that can be used to initiate, among other things, gene regulatory network (GRN) projects. PMID:21861937

  16. Gene expression in acute Stanford type A dissection: a comparative microarray study

    PubMed Central

    Weis-Müller, Barbara Theresia; Modlich, Olga; Drobinskaya, Irina; Unay, Derya; Huber, Rita; Bojar, Hans; Schipke, Jochen D; Feindt, Peter; Gams, Emmeran; Müller, Wolfram; Goecke, Timm; Sandmann, Wilhelm

    2006-01-01

    Background We compared gene expression profiles in acutely dissected aorta with those in normal control aorta. Materials and methods Ascending aorta specimen from patients with an acute Stanford A-dissection were taken during surgery and compared with those from normal ascending aorta from multiorgan donors using the BD Atlas™ Human1.2 Array I, BD Atlas™ Human Cardiovascular Array and the Affymetrix HG-U133A GeneChip®. For analysis only genes with strong signals of more than 70 percent of the mean signal of all spots on the array were accepted as being expressed. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to confirm regulation of expression of a subset of 24 genes known to be involved in aortic structure and function. Results According to our definition expression profiling of aorta tissue specimens revealed an expression of 19.1% to 23.5% of the genes listed on the arrays. Of those 15.7% to 28.9% were differently expressed in dissected and control aorta specimens. Several genes that encode for extracellular matrix components such as collagen IV α2 and -α5, collagen VI α3, collagen XIV α1, collagen XVIII α1 and elastin were down-regulated in aortic dissection, whereas levels of matrix metalloproteinases-11, -14 and -19 were increased. Some genes coding for cell to cell adhesion, cell to matrix signaling (e.g., polycystin1 and -2), cytoskeleton, as well as several myofibrillar genes (e.g., α-actinin, tropomyosin, gelsolin) were found to be down-regulated. Not surprisingly, some genes associated with chronic inflammation such as interleukin -2, -6 and -8, were up-regulated in dissection. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the complexity of the dissecting process on a molecular level. Genes coding for the integrity and strength of the aortic wall were down-regulated whereas components of inflammatory response were up-regulated. Altered patterns of gene expression indicate a pre-existing structural failure, which is probably a

  17. Differential placental gene expression in severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Sitras, V; Paulssen, R H; Grønaas, H; Leirvik, J; Hanssen, T A; Vårtun, A; Acharya, G

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the global placental gene expression profile in severe preeclampsia. Twenty-one women were randomly selected from 50 participants with uncomplicated pregnancies to match 21 patients with severe preeclampsia. A 30K Human Genome Survey Microarray v.2.0 (Applied Biosystems) was used to evaluate the gene expression profile. After RNA isolation, five preeclamptic placentas were excluded due to poor RNA quality. The series composed of 37 hybridizations in a one-channel detection system of chemiluminescence emitted by the microarrays. An empirical Bayes analysis was applied to find differentially expressed genes. In preeclamptic placentas 213 genes were significantly (fold-change>or=2 and pexpressed genes were associated with Alzheimer disease, angiogenesis, Notch-, TGFbeta- and VEGF-signalling pathways. Sixteen genes best discriminated preeclamptic from normal placentas. Comparison between early- (<34 weeks) and late-onset preeclampsia showed 168 differentially expressed genes with oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelin signalling pathways mainly involved in early-onset disease. Validation of the microarray results was performed by RT-PCR, quantitative urine hCG measurement and placental histopathologic examination. In summary, placental gene expression is altered in preeclampsia and we provide a comprehensive list of the differentially expressed genes. Placental gene expression is different between early- and late-onset preeclampsia, suggesting differences in pathophysiology. PMID:19249095

  18. Transcriptome analysis of human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC) from umbilical cords of gestational diabetic mothers reveals candidate sites for an epigenetic modulation of specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ambra, R; Manca, S; Palumbo, M C; Leoni, G; Natarelli, L; De Marco, A; Consoli, A; Pandolfi, A; Virgili, F

    2014-01-01

    Within the complex pathological picture associated to diabetes, high glucose (HG) has "per se" effects on cells and tissues that involve epigenetic reprogramming of gene expression. In fetal tissues, epigenetic changes occur genome-wide and are believed to induce specific long term effects. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) obtained at delivery from gestational diabetic women were used to study the transcriptomic effects of chronic hyperglycemia in fetal vascular cells using Affymetrix microarrays. In spite of the small number of samples analyzed (n=6), genes related to insulin sensing and extracellular matrix reorganization were found significantly affected by HG. Quantitative PCR analysis of gene promoters identified a significant differential DNA methylation in TGFB2. Use of Ea.hy926 endothelial cells confirms data on HUVEC. Our study corroborates recent evidences suggesting that epigenetic reprogramming of gene expression occurs with persistent HG and provides a background for future investigations addressing genomic consequences of chronic HG. PMID:24667242

  19. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  20. Time course differential gene expression in response to porcine circovirus type 2 subclinical infection

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Anna; Fernandes, Lana T.; Sánchez, Armand; Segalés, Joaquim

    2009-01-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing the potential differences in gene expression in piglets inoculated with Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), the essential causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. Seven-day-old caesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets were distributed into two groups: control (n = 8) and pigs inoculated with 105.2 TCID50 of the Burgos PCV2 isolate (n = 16). One control and three inoculated pigs were necropsied on days 1, 2, 5, and 8 post-infection (p.i.). The remaining pigs (four of each group) were sequentially bled on days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 29 p.i. (necropsy). Total RNA from the mediastinal lymph node (MLN) and lysed whole blood (LWB) samples were hybridized to Affymetrix Porcine GeneChip®. Forty-three probes were differentially expressed (DE) in MLN samples (FDR < 0.1, fold change > 2) and were distributed into three clusters: globally down-regulated genes, and up-regulated genes at early (first week p.i.) and late (day 29 p.i.) stages of infection. In LWB samples, maximal differences were observed at day 7 p.i., with 54 probes DE between control and inoculated pigs. Main Gene Ontology biological processes assigned to up-regulated genes were related to the immune response. Six common genes were found in both types of samples, all of which belonged to the interferon signaling antiviral effector pathway. Down-regulated genes were mainly related to cell adhesion and migration in MLN, and cellular organization and biogenesis in LWB. Microarray results were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides, for the first time, the characterization of the early and late molecular events taking place in response to a subclinical PCV2 infection. PMID:19825344

  1. Genome-wide temporal-spatial gene expression profiling of drought responsiveness in rice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rice is highly sensitive to drought, and the effect of drought may vary with the different genotypes and development stages. Genome-wide gene expression profiling was used as the initial point to dissect molecular genetic mechanism of this complex trait and provide valuable information for the improvement of drought tolerance in rice. Affymetrix rice genome array containing 48,564 japonica and 1,260 indica sequences was used to analyze the gene expression pattern of rice exposed to drought stress. The transcriptome from leaf, root, and young panicle at three developmental stages was comparatively analyzed combined with bioinformatics exploring drought stress related cis-elements. Results There were 5,284 genes detected to be differentially expressed under drought stress. Most of these genes were tissue- or stage-specific regulated by drought. The tissue-specific down-regulated genes showed distinct function categories as photosynthesis-related genes prevalent in leaf, and the genes involved in cell membrane biogenesis and cell wall modification over-presented in root and young panicle. In a drought environment, several genes, such as GA2ox, SAP15, and Chitinase III, were regulated in a reciprocal way in two tissues at the same development stage. A total of 261 transcription factor genes were detected to be differentially regulated by drought stress. Most of them were also regulated in a tissue- or stage-specific manner. A cis-element containing special CGCG box was identified to over-present in the upstream of 55 common induced genes, and it may be very important for rice plants responding to drought environment. Conclusions Genome-wide gene expression profiling revealed that most of the drought differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were under temporal and spatial regulation, suggesting a crosstalk between various development cues and environmental stimuli. The identification of the differentially regulated DEGs, including TF genes and unique candidate

  2. IL-1beta, but not BMP-7 leads to a dramatic change in the gene expression pattern of human adult articular chondrocytes--portraying the gene expression pattern in two donors.

    PubMed

    Saas, J; Haag, J; Rueger, D; Chubinskaya, S; Sohler, F; Zimmer, R; Bartnik, E; Aigner, T

    2006-10-01

    Anabolic and catabolic cytokines and growth factors such as BMP-7 and IL-1beta play a central role in controlling the balance between degradation and repair of normal and (osteo)arthritic articular cartilage matrix. In this report, we investigated the response of articular chondrocytes to these factors IL-1beta and BMP-7 in terms of changes in gene expression levels. Large scale analysis was performed on primary human adult articular chondrocytes isolated from two human, independent donors cultured in alginate beads (non-stimulated and stimulated with IL-1beta and BMP-7 for 48 h) using Affymetrix gene chips (oligo-arrays). Biostatistical and bioinformatic evaluation of gene expression pattern was performed using the Resolver software (Rosetta). Part of the results were confirmed using real-time PCR. IL-1beta modulated significantly 909 out of 3459 genes detectable, whereas BMP-7 influenced only 36 out of 3440. BMP-7 induced mainly anabolic activation of chondrocytes including classical target genes such as collagen type II and aggrecan, while IL-1beta, both, significantly modulated the gene expression levels of numerous genes; namely, IL-1beta down-regulated the expression of anabolic genes and induced catabolic genes and mediators. Our data indicate that BMP-7 has only a limited effect on differentiated cells, whereas IL-1beta causes a dramatic change in gene expression pattern, i.e. induced or repressed much more genes. This presumably reflects the fact that BMP-7 signaling is effected via one pathway only (i.e. Smad-pathway) whereas IL-1beta is able to signal via a broad variety of intracellular signaling cascades involving the JNK, p38, NFkB and Erk pathways and even influencing BMP signaling. PMID:17161615

  3. Computational Integration of Structural and Functional Genomics Data Across Species to Develop Information on Porcine Inflammatory Gene Regulatory Pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative integration of structural and functional genomic data across species holds great promise in finding genes controlling disease resistance. We are investigating the porcine gut immune response to infection through gene expression profiling. We have collected porcine Affymetrix GeneChip da...

  4. BIOINFORMATIC INTEGRATION OF STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS DATA ACROSS SPECIES TO DEVELOP PORCINE INFLAMMATORY GENE REGULATORY PATHWAY INFORMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of structural and functional genomic data across species holds great promise in finding genes controlling disease resistance. We are investigating the porcine gut immune response to infection through gene expression profiling. We have collected porcine Affymetrix GeneChip data from RNA ...

  5. Computational Integration Of Structural And Functional Genomics Data Across Species To Develop Porcine Inflammatory Gene Regulatory Pathway Information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative integration of structural and functional genomic data across species holds great promise in finding genes controlling disease resistance. We are investigating the porcine gut immune response to infection through gene expression profiling. We have collected porcine Affymetrix GeneChip da...

  6. Mixed-model reanalysis of primate data suggests tissue and species biases in oligonucleotide-based gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Chu, Tzu-Ming; Wolfinger, Russell D; Gibson, Greg

    2003-10-01

    An emerging issue in evolutionary genetics is whether it is possible to use gene expression profiling to identify genes that are associated with morphological, physiological, or behavioral divergence between species and whether these genes have undergone positive selection. Some of these questions were addressed in a recent study (Enard et al. 2002) of the difference in gene expression among human, chimp, and orangutan, which suggested an accelerated rate of divergence in gene expression in the human brain relative to liver. Reanalysis of the Affymetrix data set using analysis of variance methods to quantify the contributions of individuals and species to variation in expression of 12,600 genes indicates that as much as one-quarter of the genome shows divergent expression between primate species at the 5% level. The magnitude of fold change ranges from 1.2-fold up to 8-fold. Similar conclusions apply to reanalysis of Enard et al. 2002 parallel murine data set. However, biases inherent to short oligonucleotide microarray technology may account for some of the tissue and species effects. At high significance levels, more differences were observed in the liver than in the brain in each of the pairwise species comparisons, so it is not clear that expression divergence is accelerated in the human brain. Further, there is an apparent bias toward upregulation of gene expression in the brain in both primates and mice, whereas genes are equally likely to be up- or downregulated in the liver when these species diverge. A small subset of genes that are candidates for adaptive divergence may be identified on the basis of a high ratio of interspecific to intraspecific divergence. PMID:14573485

  7. Transcriptional regulation of secretin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, J; Rindi, G; Lopez, M J; Upchurch, B H; Leiter, A B

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the gene encoding the hormone secretin is restricted to a specific enteroendocrine cell type and to beta-cells in developing pancreatic islets. To characterize regulatory elements in the secretin gene responsible for its expression in secretin-producing cells, we used a series of reporter genes for transient expression assays in transfection studies carried out in secretin-producing islet cell lines. Analysis of the transcriptional activity of deletion mutants identified a positive cis regulatory domain between 174 and 53 base pairs upstream from the transcriptional initiation site which was required for secretin gene expression in secretin-producing HIT insulinoma cells. Within this enhancer were sequences resembling two binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1, as well as a consensus sequence for binding to helix-loop-helix proteins. Analysis of these three elements by site-directed mutagenesis suggests that each is important for full transcriptional activity. The role of proximal enhancer sequences in directing secretin gene expression to appropriate tissues is further supported by studies in transgenic mice revealing that 1.6 kilobases of the secretin gene 5' flanking sequence were sufficient to direct the expression of either human growth hormone or simian virus 40 large T-antigen reporter genes to all major secretin-producing tissues. PMID:8774991

  8. Sexual differences of imprinted genes' expression levels.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Kim, Hana; Kim, Joomyeong

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, genomic imprinting has evolved as a dosage-controlling mechanism for a subset of genes that play critical roles in their unusual reproduction scheme involving viviparity and placentation. As such, many imprinted genes are highly expressed in sex-specific reproductive organs. In the current study, we sought to test whether imprinted genes are differentially expressed between the two sexes. According to the results, the expression levels of the following genes differ between the two sexes of mice: Peg3, Zim1, Igf2, H19 and Zac1. The expression levels of these imprinted genes are usually greater in males than in females. This bias is most obvious in the developing brains of 14.5-dpc embryos, but also detected in the brains of postnatal-stage mice. However, this sexual bias is not obvious in 10.5-dpc embryos, a developmental stage before the sexual differentiation. Thus, the sexual bias observed in the imprinted genes is most likely attributable by gonadal hormones rather than by sex chromosome complement. Overall, the results indicate that several imprinted genes are sexually different in terms of their expression levels, and further suggest that the transcriptional regulation of these imprinted genes may be influenced by unknown mechanisms associated with sexual differentiation. PMID:24125951

  9. High expression hampers horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, Chungoo; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the movement of genetic material from one species to another, is a common phenomenon in prokaryotic evolution. Although the rate of HGT is known to vary among genes, our understanding of the cause of this variation, currently summarized by two rules, is far from complete. The first rule states that informational genes, which are involved in DNA replication, transcription, and translation, have lower transferabilities than operational genes. The second rule asserts that protein interactivity negatively impacts gene transferability. Here, we hypothesize that high expression hampers HGT, because the fitness cost of an HGT to the recipient, arising from the 1) energy expenditure in transcription and translation, 2) cytotoxic protein misfolding, 3) reduction in cellular translational efficiency, 4) detrimental protein misinteraction, and 5) disturbance of the optimal protein concentration or cell physiology, increases with the expression level of the transferred gene. To test this hypothesis, we examined laboratory and natural HGTs to Escherichia coli. We observed lower transferabilities of more highly expressed genes, even after controlling the confounding factors from the two established rules and the genic GC content. Furthermore, expression level predicts gene transferability better than all other factors examined. We also confirmed the significant negative impact of gene expression on the rate of HGTs to 127 of 133 genomes of eubacteria and archaebacteria. Together, these findings establish the gene expression level as a major determinant of horizontal gene transferability. They also suggest that most successful HGTs are initially slightly deleterious, fixed because of their negligibly low costs rather than high benefits to the recipient. PMID:22436996

  10. Gene expression in periodontal tissues following treatment

    PubMed Central

    Beikler, Thomas; Peters, Ulrike; Prior, Karola; Eisenacher, Martin; Flemmig, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    Background In periodontitis, treatment aimed at controlling the periodontal biofilm infection results in a resolution of the clinical and histological signs of inflammation. Although the cell types found in periodontal tissues following treatment have been well described, information on gene expression is limited to few candidate genes. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the expression profiles of immune and inflammatory genes in periodontal tissues from sites with severe chronic periodontitis following periodontal therapy in order to identify genes involved in tissue homeostasis. Gingival biopsies from 12 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were taken six to eight weeks following non-surgical periodontal therapy, and from 11 healthy controls. As internal standard, RNA of an immortalized human keratinocyte line (HaCaT) was used. Total RNA was subjected to gene expression profiling using a commercially available microarray system focusing on inflammation-related genes. Post-hoc confirmation of selected genes was done by Realtime-PCR. Results Out of the 136 genes analyzed, the 5% most strongly expressed genes compared to healthy controls were Interleukin-12A (IL-12A), Versican (CSPG-2), Matrixmetalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), Down syndrome critical region protein-1 (DSCR-1), Macrophage inflammatory protein-2β (Cxcl-3), Inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (BIRC-1), Cluster of differentiation antigen 38 (CD38), Regulator of G-protein signalling-1 (RGS-1), and Finkel-Biskis-Jinkins murine osteosarcoma virus oncogene (C-FOS); the 5% least strongly expressed genes were Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine Kinase-2 (RIP-2), Complement component 3 (C3), Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (COX-2), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Endothelin-1 (EDN-1), Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2), Matrix-metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14), and Interferon regulating factor-7 (IRF-7). Conclusion Gene expression profiles found in periodontal tissues following therapy

  11. Gene expression homeostasis and chromosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2014-01-01

    In rapidly growing populations of bacterial cells, including those of the model organism Escherichia coli, genes essential for growth - such as those involved in protein synthesis - are expressed at high levels; this is in contrast to many horizontally-acquired genes, which are maintained at low transcriptional levels.1 This balance in gene expression states between 2 distinct classes of genes is established by a galaxy of transcriptional regulators, including the so-called nucleoid associated proteins (NAP) that contribute to shaping the chromosome.2 Besides these active players in gene regulation, it is not too far-fetched to anticipate that genome organization in terms of how genes are arranged on the chromosome,3 which is the result of long-drawn transactions among genome rearrangement processes and selection, and the manner in which it is structured inside the cell, plays a role in establishing this balance. A recent study from our group has contributed to the literature investigating the interplay between global transcriptional regulators and genome organization in establishing gene expression homeostasis.4 In particular, we address a triangle of functional interactions among genome organization, gene expression homeostasis and horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25997086

  12. Candidate reference genes for gene expression studies in water lily.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huolin; Chen, Sumei; Wan, Hongjian; Chen, Fadi; Gu, Chunsun; Liu, Zhaolei

    2010-09-01

    The selection of an appropriate reference gene(s) is a prerequisite for the proper interpretation of quantitative Real-Time polymerase chain reaction data. We report the evaluation of eight candidate reference genes across various tissues and treatments in the water lily by the two software packages geNorm and NormFinder. Across all samples, clathrin adaptor complexes medium subunit (AP47) and actin 11 (ACT11) emerged as the most suitable reference genes. Across different tissues, ACT11 and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1alpha) exhibited a stable expression pattern. ACT11 and AP47 also stably expressed in roots subjected to various treatments, but in the leaves of the same plants the most stably expressed genes were ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 16 (UBC16) and ACT11. PMID:20452325

  13. Vascular Injury Post Stent Implantation: Different Gene Expression Modulation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) Model

    PubMed Central

    Campolo, Jonica; Vozzi, Federico; Penco, Silvana; Cozzi, Lorena; Caruso, Raffaele; Domenici, Claudio; Ahluwalia, Arti; Rial, Michela; Marraccini, Paolo; Parodi, Oberdan

    2014-01-01

    To explore whether stent procedure may influence transcriptional response of endothelium, we applied different physical (flow changes) and/or mechanical (stent application) stimuli to human endothelial cells in a laminar flow bioreactor (LFB) system. Gene expression analysis was then evaluated in each experimental condition. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were submitted to low and physiological (1 and 10 dyne/cm2) shear stress in absence (AS) or presence (PS) of stent positioning in a LFB system for 24 h. Different expressed genes, coming from Affymetrix results, were identified based on one-way ANOVA analysis with p values <0.01 and a fold changed >3 in modulus. Low shear stress was compared with physiological one in AS and PS conditions. Two major groups include 32 probes commonly expressed in both 1AS versus 10AS and 1PS versus 10PS comparison, and 115 probes consisting of 83 in addition to the previous 32, expressed only in 1PS versus 10PS comparison. Genes related to cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, and cholesterol transport/metabolism are differently regulated in 1PS versus 10PS condition. Inflammatory and apoptotic mediators seems to be, instead, closely modulated by changes in flow (1 versus 10), independently of stent application. Low shear stress together with stent procedure are the experimental conditions that mainly modulate the highest number of genes in our human endothelial model. Those genes belong to pathways specifically involved in the endothelial dysfunction. PMID:24587287

  14. Sex-related gene expression profiles in the adrenal cortex in the mature rat: Microarray analysis with emphasis on genes involved in steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    TREJTER, MARCIN; HOCHOL, ANNA; TYCZEWSKA, MARIANNA; ZIOLKOWSKA, AGNIESZKA; JOPEK, KAROL; SZYSZKA, MARTA; MALENDOWICZ, LUDWIK K; RUCINSKI, MARCIN

    2015-01-01

    Notable sex-related differences exist in mammalian adrenal cortex structure and function. In adult rats, the adrenal weight and the average volume of zona fasciculata cells of females are larger and secrete greater amounts of corticosterone than those of males. The molecular bases of these sex-related differences are poorly understood. In this study, to explore the molecular background of these differences, we defined zone- and sex-specific transcripts in adult male and female (estrous cycle phase) rats. Twelve-week-old rats of both genders were used and samples were taken from the zona glomerulosa (ZG) and zona fasciculata/reticularis (ZF/R) zones. Transcriptome identification was carried out using the Affymetrix® Rat Gene 1.1 ST Array. The microarray data were compared by fold change with significance according to moderated t-statistics. Subsequently, we performed functional annotation clustering using the Gene Ontology (GO) and Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). In the first step, we explored differentially expressed transcripts in the adrenal ZG and ZF/R. The number of differentially expressed transcripts was notably higher in the female than in the male rats (702 vs. 571). The differentially expressed genes which were significantly enriched included genes involved in steroid hormone metabolism, and their expression levels in the ZF/R of adult female rats were significantly higher compared with those in the male rats. In the female ZF/R, when compared with that of the males, prevailing numbers of genes linked to cell fraction, oxidation/reduction processes, response to nutrients and to extracellular stimuli or steroid hormone stimuli were downregulated. The microarray data for key genes involved directly in steroidogenesis were confirmed by qPCR. Thus, when compared with that of the males, in the female ZF/R, higher expression levels of genes involved directly in steroid hormone synthesis were accompanied by lower

  15. Sex-related gene expression profiles in the adrenal cortex in the mature rat: microarray analysis with emphasis on genes involved in steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Trejter, Marcin; Hochol, Anna; Tyczewska, Marianna; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Jopek, Karol; Szyszka, Marta; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; Rucinski, Marcin

    2015-03-01

    Notable sex-related differences exist in mammalian adrenal cortex structure and function. In adult rats, the adrenal weight and the average volume of zona fasciculata cells of females are larger and secrete greater amounts of corticosterone than those of males. The molecular bases of these sex-related differences are poorly understood. In this study, to explore the molecular background of these differences, we defined zone- and sex-specific transcripts in adult male and female (estrous cycle phase) rats. Twelve-week-old rats of both genders were used and samples were taken from the zona glomerulosa (ZG) and zona fasciculata/reticularis (ZF/R) zones. Transcriptome identification was carried out using the Affymetrix(®) Rat Gene 1.1 ST Array. The microarray data were compared by fold change with significance according to moderated t-statistics. Subsequently, we performed functional annotation clustering using the Gene Ontology (GO) and Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). In the first step, we explored differentially expressed transcripts in the adrenal ZG and ZF/R. The number of differentially expressed transcripts was notably higher in the female than in the male rats (702 vs. 571). The differentially expressed genes which were significantly enriched included genes involved in steroid hormone metabolism, and their expression levels in the ZF/R of adult female rats were significantly higher compared with those in the male rats. In the female ZF/R, when compared with that of the males, prevailing numbers of genes linked to cell fraction, oxidation/reduction processes, response to nutrients and to extracellular stimuli or steroid hormone stimuli were downregulated. The microarray data for key genes involved directly in steroidogenesis were confirmed by qPCR. Thus, when compared with that of the males, in the female ZF/R, higher expression levels of genes involved directly in steroid hormone synthesis were accompanied by lower

  16. Dynamic modeling of gene expression data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holter, N. S.; Maritan, A.; Cieplak, M.; Fedoroff, N. V.; Banavar, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the time evolution of gene expression levels by using a time translational matrix to predict future expression levels of genes based on their expression levels at some initial time. We deduce the time translational matrix for previously published DNA microarray gene expression data sets by modeling them within a linear framework by using the characteristic modes obtained by singular value decomposition. The resulting time translation matrix provides a measure of the relationships among the modes and governs their time evolution. We show that a truncated matrix linking just a few modes is a good approximation of the full time translation matrix. This finding suggests that the number of essential connections among the genes is small.

  17. Dynamic modeling of gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Holter, Neal S.; Maritan, Amos; Cieplak, Marek; Fedoroff, Nina V.; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the time evolution of gene expression levels by using a time translational matrix to predict future expression levels of genes based on their expression levels at some initial time. We deduce the time translational matrix for previously published DNA microarray gene expression data sets by modeling them within a linear framework by using the characteristic modes obtained by singular value decomposition. The resulting time translation matrix provides a measure of the relationships among the modes and governs their time evolution. We show that a truncated matrix linking just a few modes is a good approximation of the full time translation matrix. This finding suggests that the number of essential connections among the genes is small. PMID:11172013

  18. The action of a dietary retinoid on gene expression and cancer induction in electron-irradiated rat skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Fredric J.; Chen, Shuaili; Xu, Guijuan; Wu, Feng; Tang, Moon-Shong

    2002-01-01

    Current models of radiation carcinogenesis generally assume that the DNA is damaged in a variety of ways by the radiation and that subsequent cell divisions contribute to the conversion of the damage to heritable mutations. Cancer may seem complex and intractable, but its complexity provides multiple opportunities for preventive interventions. Mitotic inhibitors are among the strongest cancer preventive agents, not only slowing the growth rate of preneoplasias but also increasing the fidelity of DNA repair processes. Ionizing radiation, including electrons, is a strong inducer of cancer in rat skin, and dietary retinoids have shown potent cancer preventive activity in the same system. A non-toxic dietary dose of retinyl acetate altered gene expression levels 24 hours after electron irradiation of rat skin. Of the 8740 genes on an Affymetrix rat expression array, the radiation significantly (5 fold or higher) altered 188, while the retinoid altered 231, including 16 radiation-altered genes that were reversely altered. While radiation strongly affected the expression of stress response, immune/inflammation and nucleic acid metabolism genes, the retinoid most strongly affected proliferation-related genes, including some significant reversals, such as, keratin 14, retinol binding protein, and calcium binding proteins. These results point to reversal of proliferation-relevant genes as a likely basis for the anti-radiogenic effects of dietary retinyl acetate.

  19. Effect of Chronic Pioglitazone Treatment on Hepatic Gene Expression Profile in Obese C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chunming; Huan, Yi; Liu, Shuainan; Hou, Shaocong; Sun, Sujuan; Li, Caina; Liu, Quan; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Yue; Shen, Zhufang

    2015-01-01

    Pioglitazone, a selective ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), is an insulin sensitizer drug that is being used in a number of insulin-resistant conditions, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, there is a discrepancy between preclinical and clinical data in the literature and the benefits of pioglitazone treatment as well as the precise mechanism of action remain unclear. In the present study, we determined the effect of chronic pioglitazone treatment on hepatic gene expression profile in diet-induced obesity (DIO) C57BL/6J mice in order to understand the mechanisms of NAFLD induced by PPARγ agonists. DIO mice were treated with pioglitazone (25 mg/kg/day) for 38 days, the gene expression profile in liver was evaluated using Affymetrix Mouse GeneChip 1.0 ST array. Pioglitazone treatment resulted in exacerbated hepatic steatosis and increased hepatic triglyceride and free fatty acids concentrations, though significantly increased the glucose infusion rate in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp test. The differentially expressed genes in liver of pioglitazone treated vs. untreated mice include 260 upregulated and 86 downregulated genes. Gene Ontology based enrichment analysis suggests that inflammation response is transcriptionally downregulated, while lipid metabolism is transcriptionally upregulated. This may underlie the observed aggravating liver steatosis and ameliorated systemic insulin resistance in DIO mice. PMID:26035752

  20. Nucleosomal promoter variation generates gene expression noise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher R.; Boeger, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    Gene product molecule numbers fluctuate over time and between cells, confounding deterministic expectations. The molecular origins of this noise of gene expression remain unknown. Recent EM analysis of single PHO5 gene molecules of yeast indicated that promoter molecules stochastically assume alternative nucleosome configurations at steady state, including the fully nucleosomal and nucleosome-free configuration. Given that distinct configurations are unequally conducive to transcription, the nucleosomal variation of promoter molecules may constitute a source of gene expression noise. This notion, however, implies an untested conjecture, namely that the nucleosomal variation arises de novo or intrinsically (i.e., that it cannot be explained as the result of the promoter’s deterministic response to variation in its molecular surroundings). Here, we show—by microscopically analyzing the nucleosome configurations of two juxtaposed physically linked PHO5 promoter copies—that the configurational variation, indeed, is intrinsically stochastic and thus, a cause of gene expression noise rather than its effect. PMID:25468975

  1. A model of binding on DNA microarrays: understanding the combined effect of probe synthesis failure, cross-hybridization, DNA fragmentation and other experimental details of affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays are used both for research and for diagnostics. In research, Affymetrix arrays are commonly used for genome wide association studies, resequencing, and for gene expression analysis. These arrays provide large amounts of data. This data is analyzed using statistical methods that quite often discard a large portion of the information. Most of the information that is lost comes from probes that systematically fail across chips and from batch effects. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive model for hybridization that predicts probe intensities for Affymetrix arrays and that could provide a basis for improved microarray analysis and probe development. The first part of the model calculates probe binding affinities to all the possible targets in the hybridization solution using the Langmuir isotherm. In the second part of the model we integrate details that are specific to each experiment and contribute to the differences between hybridization in solution and on the microarray. These details include fragmentation, wash stringency, temperature, salt concentration, and scanner settings. Furthermore, the model fits probe synthesis efficiency and target concentration parameters directly to the data. All the parameters used in the model have a well-established physical origin. Results For the 302 chips that were analyzed the mean correlation between expected and observed probe intensities was 0.701 with a range of 0.88 to 0.55. All available chips were included in the analysis regardless of the data quality. Our results show that batch effects arise from differences in probe synthesis, scanner settings, wash strength, and target fragmentation. We also show that probe synthesis efficiencies for different nucleotides are not uniform. Conclusions To date this is the most complete model for binding on microarrays. This is the first model that includes both probe synthesis efficiency and hybridization kinetics/cross-hybridization. These

  2. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  3. Efficient ectopic gene expression targeting chick mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Kerby C; Pira, Charmaine U; Revelli, Jean-Pierre; Ratz, Beate; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Eichele, Gregor

    2002-07-01

    The chick model has been instrumental in illuminating genes that regulate early vertebrate development and pattern formation. Targeted ectopic gene expression is critical to dissect further the complicated gene interactions that are involved. In an effort to develop a consistent method to ectopically introduce and focally express genes in chick mesoderm, we evaluated and optimized several gene delivery methods, including implantation of 293 cells laden with viral vectors, direct adenoviral injection, and electroporation (EP). We targeted the mesoderm of chick wing buds between stages 19 and 21 (Hamburger and Hamilton stages) and used beta-galactosidase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) to document gene transfer. Expression constructs using the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, the beta-actin promoter, and vectors with an internal ribosomal entry sequence linked to GFP (IRES-GFP) were also compared. After gene transfer, we monitored expression for up to 3 days. The functionality of ectopic expression was demonstrated with constructs containing the coding sequences for Shh, a secreted signaling protein, or Hoxb-8, a transcription factor, both of which can induce digit duplication when ectopically expressed in anterior limb mesoderm. We identified several factors that enhance mesodermal gene transfer. First, the use of a vector with the beta-actin promoter coupled to the 69% fragment of the bovine papilloma virus yielded superior mesodermal expression both by markers and functional results when compared with several CMV-driven vectors. Second, we found the use of mineral oil to be an important adjuvant for EP and direct viral injection to localize and contain vector within the mesoderm at the injection site. Lastly, although ectopic expression could be achieved with all three methods, we favored EP confined to the mesoderm with insulated microelectrodes (confined microelectroporation- CMEP), because vector construction is rapid, the method is efficient, and results

  4. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  5. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  6. Homeobox genes expressed during echinoderm arm regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ben Khadra, Yousra; Said, Khaled; Thorndyke, Michael; Martinez, Pedro

    2014-04-01

    Regeneration in echinoderms has proved to be more amenable to study in the laboratory than the more classical vertebrate models, since the smaller genome size and the absence of multiple orthologs for different genes in echinoderms simplify the analysis of gene function during regeneration. In order to understand the role of homeobox-containing genes during arm regeneration in echinoderms, we isolated the complement of genes belonging to the Hox class that are expressed during this process in two major echinoderm groups: asteroids (Echinaster sepositus and Asterias rubens) and ophiuroids (Amphiura filiformis), both of which show an extraordinary capacity for regeneration. By exploiting the sequence conservation of the homeobox, putative orthologs of several Hox genes belonging to the anterior, medial, and posterior groups were isolated. We also report the isolation of a few Hox-like genes expressed in the same systems. PMID:24309817

  7. Reading Genomes and Controlling Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libchaber, Albert

    2000-03-01

    Molecular recognition of DNA sequences is achieved by DNA hybridization of complementary sequences. We present various scenarios for optimization, leading to microarrays and global measurement. Gene expression can be controlled using gene constructs immobilized on a template with micron scale temperature heaters. We will discuss and present results on protein microarrays.

  8. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review. This review focuses on the effect(s) of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on gene transcription as determined from data generated using cDNA microarrays. Introduced within the past decade, this methodology allows detection of the expression of thousands of genes simultaneo...

  9. Gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Milner, R J; Sutcliffe, J G

    1983-08-25

    191 randomly selected cDNA clones prepared from rat brain cytoplasmic poly (A)+ RNA were screened by Northern blot hybridization to rat brain, liver and kidney RNA to determine the tissue distribution, abundance and size of the corresponding brain mRNA. 18% hybridized to mRNAs each present equally in the three tissues, 26% to mRNAs differentially expressed in the tissues, and 30% to mRNAs present only in the brain. An additional 26% of the clones failed to detect mRNA in the three tissues at an abundance level of about 0.01%, but did contain rat cDNA as demonstrated by Southern blotting; this class probably represents rare mRNAs expressed in only some brain cells. Therefore, most mRNA expressed in brain is either specific to brain or otherwise displays regulation. Rarer mRNA species tend to be larger than the more abundant species, and tend to be brain specific; the rarest, specific mRNAs average 5000 nucleotides in length. Ten percent of the clones hybridize to multiple mRNAs, some of which are expressed from small multigenic families. From these data we estimate that there are probably at most 30,000 distinct mRNA species expressed in the rat brain, the majority of which are uniquely expressed in the brain. PMID:6193485

  10. Functional gene expression differences between inbred alcohol-preferring and —non-prerats in five brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Kimpel, Mark W.; Strother, Wendy N.; McClintick, Jeanette N.; Carr, Lucinda G.; Liang, Tiebing; Edenberg, Howard J.; McBride, William J.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if there are innate differences in gene expression in selected CNS regions between inbred alcohol-preferring (iP) and —non-preferring (iNP) rats. Gene expression was determined in the nucleus accumbens (ACB), amygdala (AMYG), frontal cortex (FC), caudate-putamen (CPU), and hippocampus (HIPP) of alcohol-naïve adult male iP and iNP rats, using Affymetrix Rat Genome U34A microarrays (n = 6/strain). Using Linear Modeling for Microarray Analysis with a false discovery rate threshold of 0.1, there were 16 genes with differential expression in the ACB, 54 in the AMYG, 8 in the FC, 24 in the CPU, and 21 in the HIPP. When examining the main effect of strain across regions, 296 genes were differentially expressed. Although the relatively small number of genes found significant within individual regions precluded a powerful analysis for over-represented Gene Ontology categories, the much larger list resulting from the main effect of strain analysis produced 17 over-represented categories (P <.05), including axon guidance, gliogenesis, negative regulation of programmed cell death, regulation of programmed cell death, regulation of synapse structure function, and transmission of nerve impulse. Co-citation analysis and graphing of significant genes revealed a network involved in the neuropeptide Y (NPY) transmitter system. Correlation of all significant genes with those located within previously established rat alcohol QTLs revealed that of the total of 313 significant genes, 71 are located within such QTLs. The many regional and overall gene expression differences between the iP and iNP rat lines may contribute to the divergent alcohol drinking phenotypes of these rats. PMID:17517326

  11. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Profiling Reveals Conserved and Novel Molecular Functions of the Stigma in Rice1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meina; Xu, Wenying; Yang, Wenqiang; Kong, Zhaosheng; Xue, Yongbiao

    2007-01-01

    In angiosperms, the stigma provides initial nutrients and guidance cues for pollen grain germination and tube growth. However, little is known about the genes that regulate these processes in rice (Oryza sativa). Here, we generate rice stigma-specific or -preferential gene expression profiles through comparing genome-wide expression patterns of hand-dissected, unpollinated stigma at anthesis with seven tissues, including seedling shoot, seedling root, mature anther, ovary at anthesis, seeds 5 d after pollination, 10-d-old embryo, 10-d-old endosperm, and suspension-cultured cells by using both 57 K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array and 10 K rice cDNA microarray. A high reproducibility of the microarray results was detected between the two different technology platforms. In total, we identified 548 genes to be expressed specifically or predominantly in the stigma papillar cells of rice. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of 34 selected genes all confirmed their stigma-specific expression. The expression of five selected genes was further validated by RNA in situ hybridization. Gene Ontology analysis shows that several auxin-signaling components, transcription, and stress-related genes are significantly overrepresented in the rice stigma gene set. Interestingly, most of them also share several cis-regulatory elements with known stress-responsive genes, supporting the notion of an overlap of genetic programs regulating pollination and stress/defense responses. We also found that genes involved in cell wall metabolism and cellular communication appear to be conserved in the stigma between rice and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Our results indicate that the stigmas appear to have conserved and novel molecular functions between rice and Arabidopsis. PMID:17556504

  12. Control of gene expression in trypanosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, L; Pays, E

    1995-01-01

    Trypanosomes are protozoan agents of major parasitic diseases such as Chagas' disease in South America and sleeping sickness of humans and nagana disease of cattle in Africa. They are transmitted to mammalian hosts by specific insect vectors. Their life cycle consists of a succession of differentiation and growth phases requiring regulated gene expression to adapt to the changing extracellular environment. Typical of such stage-specific expression is that of the major surface antigens of Trypanosoma brucei, procyclin in the procyclic (insect) form and the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) in the bloodstream (mammalian) form. In trypanosomes, the regulation of gene expression is effected mainly at posttranscriptional levels, since primary transcription of most of the genes occurs in long polycistronic units and is constitutive. The transcripts are processed by transsplicing and polyadenylation under the influence of intergenic polypyrimidine tracts. These events show some developmental regulation. Untranslated sequences of the mRNAs seem to play a prominent role in the stage-specific control of individual gene expression, through a modulation of mRNA abundance. The VSG and procyclin transcription units exhibit particular features that are probably related to the need for a high level of expression. The promoters and RNA polymerase driving the expression of these units resemble those of the ribosomal genes. Their mutually exclusive expression is ensured by controls operating at several levels, including RNA elongation. Antigenic variation in the bloodstream is achieved through DNA rearrangements or alternative activation of the telomeric VSG gene expression sites. Recent discoveries, such as the existence of a novel nucleotide in telomeric DNA and the generation of point mutations in VSG genes, have shed new light on the mechanisms and consequences of antigenic variation. PMID:7603410

  13. Cytokine-induced patterns of gene expression in skeletal muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Alon, Tamar; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Socci, Nicholas D

    2003-08-22

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and other cytokines induce a state of negative energy balance leading to the breakdown of skeletal muscle. Leptin, another member of the cytokine superfamily, also induces a state of negative energy balance but does not alter lean body mass. The transcription profile of skeletal muscle was compared in animals treated with TNF-alpha or leptin or in animals pair-fed over a 7-day time course using 11,000-gene microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Ten clusters of skeletal muscle genes were identified, each of which showed significantly different expression between TNF-alpha treatment and pair feeding. Studies comparing leptin treatment and pair feeding revealed that both activate nearly identical programs of gene expression in skeletal muscle. These data indicate that the effects of leptin on skeletal muscle are markedly different from those of TNF-alpha and that the effects of leptin on skeletal muscle can be largely ascribed to its anorectic effects. Subtle differences between leptin and pair feeding were evident only after 7 days of treatment. In general, pair feeding altered gene expression after the 7-day treatment, whereas leptin did not. The effects of TNF-alpha on skeletal muscle are distinct from those of pair feeding, a result consistent with its known catabolic effects on this tissue. Analyses of the data from food-restricted animals also identified a set of transcriptional changes associated with this state. Further studies of many newly identified leptin-, TNF-alpha-, and starvation-regulated genes and the apparent coordinate regulation of these clusters may reveal important insights into the different effects of cytokines on skeletal muscle. PMID:12750389

  14. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent compre...

  15. Microarray profiling for differential gene expression in PMSG-hCG stimulated preovulatory ovarian follicles of Chinese Taihu and Large White sows

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chinese Taihu is one of the most prolific pig breeds in the world, which farrows at least five more piglets per litter than Western pig breeds partly due to a greater ovulation rate. Variation of ovulation rate maybe associated with the differences in the transcriptome of Chinese Taihu and Large White ovaries. In order to understand the molecular basis of the greater ovulation rate of Chinese Taihu sows, expression profiling experiments were conducted to identify differentially expressed genes in ovarian follicles at the preovulatory stage of a PMSG-hCG stimulated estrous cycle from 3 Chinese Taihu and 3 Large White cycling sows by using the Affymetrix Porcine Genechip™. Results One hundred and thirty-three differentially expressed genes were identified between Chinese Taihu and Large White sows by using Affymetrix porcine GeneChip (p ≤ 0.05, Fold change ≥ 2 or ≤ 0.5). Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed that these genes belonged to the class of genes that participated in regulation of cellular process, regulation of biological process, biological regulation, developmental process, cell communication and signal transduction and so on. Significant differential expression of 6 genes including WNT10B and DKK2 in the WNT signaling pathway was detected. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed the expression pattern in seven of eight selected genes. A search of chromosomal location revealed that 92 differentially expressed transcripts located to the intervals of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for reproduction traits. Furthermore, SNPs of two differentially expressed genes- BAX and BMPR1B were showed to be associated with litter size traits in Large White pigs and Chinese DIV line pigs (p ≤ 0.1 or p ≤ 0.05). Conclusions Our study detected many genes that showed differential expression between ovary follicles of two divergent breeds of pigs. Genes involved with regulation of cellular process, regulation of biological process, in addition to several genes not

  16. Gene expression profiling of flag leaves at the booting stage in the japonica hybrid rice Huayou14 and its parental lines by microarray.

    PubMed

    Huangwei, Chu; Fuan, Niu; Can, Cheng; Jihua, Zhou; Xinqi, Wang; Xiaojin, Luo; Qin, Yuan; Liming, Cao

    2015-09-01

    Gene expression profiling using microarray has contributed significantly to heterosis studies. Using the Affymetrix rice genome array, we investigated gene expression profiles in the flag leaves of the japonica hybrid rice Huayou14 and its parental cultivars Shen9A and Fan14 at the booting stage. A total of 2057 genes differentially expressed (fold change ≥2 or ≤0.5) between Huayou14 and its parents were identified. Functional classification of the differentially expressed genes by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis indicated the differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in photosynthesis-related cellular component categories (e.g. photosystem Ⅰ, chloroplast membrane and chloroplast envelope), and biological process categories (e.g. chlorophyll catabolic, chlorophyll biosynthetic and carotenoid biosynthetic processes). These results suggest that the changes in the photosynthetic ability of the japonica hybrid rice Huayou14 may be related to heterosis. Metabolic pathway analysis indicated that differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in photosynthesis-antenna proteins and starch and sucrose metabolic pathways, instead of photosynthesis and carbon fixation pathways as reported previously. These results suggest that different genes or metabolic pathways might contribute to the heterosis of different hybrid combinations. PMID:26399533

  17. Gene expression profiling of dengue infected human primary cells identifies secreted mediators in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Aniuska; Warke, Rajas V.; Martin, Katherine; Xhaja, Kris; de Bosch, Norma; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2009-01-01

    We used gene expression profiling of human primary cells infected in vitro with dengue virus (DENV) as a tool to identify secreted mediators induced in response to the acute infection. Affymetrix Genechip analysis of human primary monocytes, B cells and dendritic cells infected with DENV in vitro revealed a strong induction of monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP-2/CCL8), interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/TNFSF10). The expression of these genes was confirmed in dendritic cells infected with DENV in vitro at mRNA and protein levels. A prospectively enrolled cohort of DENV-infected Venezuelan patients was used to measure the levels of these proteins in serum during three different periods of the disease. Results showed significant increase of MCP-2, IP-10 and TRAIL levels in DENV-infected patients during the febrile period, when compared to healthy donors and patients with other febrile illnesses. MCP-2 and IP-10 levels were still elevated during the post-febrile period while TRAIL levels dropped close to normal after defervescense. Patients with primary infections had higher TRAIL levels than patients with secondary infections during the febrile period of the disease. Increased levels of IP-10, TRAIL and MCP-2 in acute DENV infections suggest a role for these mediators in the immune response to the infection. PMID:19551822

  18. Testosterone-induced permanent changes of hepatic gene expression in female mice sustained during Plasmodium chabaudi malaria infection.

    PubMed

    Delić, Denis; Gailus, Nicole; Vohr, Hans-Werner; Dkhil, Mohamed; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Wunderlich, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Testosterone has been previously shown to induce persistent susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi malaria in otherwise resistant female C57BL/6 mice. Here, we investigate as to whether this conversion coincides with permanent changes of hepatic gene expression profiles. Female mice aged 10-12 weeks were treated with testosterone for 3 weeks; then, testosterone treatment was discontinued for 12 weeks before challenging with 10⁶ P. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes. Hepatic gene expression was examined after 12 weeks of testosterone withdrawal and after subsequent infection with P. chabaudi at peak parasitemia, using Affymetrix microarrays with 22 ,690 probe sets representing 14, 000 genes. The expression of 54 genes was found to be permanently changed by testosterone, which remained changed during malaria infection. Most genes were involved in liver metabolism: the female-prevalent genes Cyp2b9, Cyp2b13, Cyp3a41, Cyp3a44, Fmo3, Sult2a2, Sult3a1, and BC014805 were repressed, while the male-prevalent genes Cyp2d9, Cyp7b1, Cyp4a10, Ugt2b1, Ugt2b38, Hsd3b5, and Slco1a1 were upregulated. Genes encoding different nuclear receptors were not persistently changed. Moreover, testosterone induced persistent upregulation of genes involved in hepatocellular carcinoma such as Lama3 and Nox4, whereas genes involved in immune response such as Ifnγ and Igk-C were significantly decreased. Our data provide evidence that testosterone is able to induce specific and robust long-term changes of gene expression profiles in the female mouse liver. In particular, those changes, which presumably indicate masculinized liver metabolism and impaired immune response, may be critical for the testosterone-induced persistent susceptibility of mice to P. chabaudi malaria. PMID:20844152

  19. Gene expression profiles of lung adenocarcinoma linked to histopathological grading and survival but not to EGF-R status: a microarray study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several different gene expression signatures have been proposed to predict response to therapy and clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma. Herein, we investigate if elements of published gene sets can be reproduced in a small dataset, and how gene expression profiles based on limited sample size relate to clinical parameters including histopathological grade and EGFR protein expression. Methods Affymetrix Human Genome U133A platform was used to obtain gene expression profiles of 28 pathologically and clinically annotated adenocarcinomas of the lung. EGFR status was determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results Using unsupervised clustering algorithms, the predominant gene expression signatures correlated with the histopathological grade but not with EGFR protein expression as detected by immunohistochemistry. In a supervised analysis, the signature of high grade tumors but not of EGFR overexpressing cases showed significant enrichment of gene sets reflecting MAPK activation and other potential signaling cascades downstream of EGFR. Out of four different previously published gene sets that had been linked to prognosis, three showed enrichment in the gene expression signature associated with favorable prognosis. Conclusions In this dataset, histopathological tumor grades but not EGFR status were associated with dominant gene expression signatures and gene set enrichment reflecting oncogenic pathway activation, suggesting that high immunohistochemistry EGFR scores may not necessarily be linked to downstream effects that cause major changes in gene expression patterns. Published gene sets showed association with patient survival; however, the small sample size of this study limited the options for a comprehensive validation of previously reported prognostic gene expression signatures. PMID:20196851

  20. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    PubMed

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching. PMID:2787158

  1. Heterelogous Expression of Plant Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yesilirmak, Filiz; Sayers, Zehra

    2009-01-01

    Heterologous expression allows the production of plant proteins in an organism which is simpler than the natural source. This technology is widely used for large-scale purification of plant proteins from microorganisms for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Additionally expression in well-defined model organisms provides insights into the functions of proteins in complex pathways. The present review gives an overview of recombinant plant protein production methods using bacteria, yeast, insect cells, and Xenopus laevis oocytes and discusses the advantages of each system for functional studies and protein characterization. PMID:19672459

  2. Introduction to the Gene Expression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Segundo-Val, Ignacio San; Sanz-Lozano, Catalina S

    2016-01-01

    In 1941, Beadle and Tatum published experiments that would explain the basis of the central dogma of molecular biology, whereby the DNA through an intermediate molecule, called RNA, results proteins that perform the functions in cells. Currently, biomedical research attempts to explain the mechanisms by which develops a particular disease, for this reason, gene expression studies have proven to be a great resource. Strictly, the term "gene expression" comprises from the gene activation until the mature protein is located in its corresponding compartment to perform its function and contribute to the expression of the phenotype of cell.The expression studies are directed to detect and quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of a specific gene. The development of the RNA-based gene expression studies began with the Northern Blot by Alwine et al. in 1977. In 1969, Gall and Pardue and John et al. independently developed the in situ hybridization, but this technique was not employed to detect mRNA until 1986 by Coghlan. Today, many of the techniques for quantification of RNA are deprecated because other new techniques provide more information. Currently the most widely used techniques are qPCR, expression microarrays, and RNAseq for the transcriptome analysis. In this chapter, these techniques will be reviewed. PMID:27300529

  3. Celecoxib can suppress expression of genes associated with PGE2 pathway in chondrocytes under inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tian-Wen; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor (celecoxib) on the expression of arachidonate-associated inflammatory genes in cultured human normal chondrocytes. Normal chondrocytes were obtained from the cartilage of three different amputated patients without osteoarthritis (OA). Affymetrix Human microarray was used to assess the alterations in gene expression in three groups of cells: untreated cells (negative control group), cells treated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) (positive control group), and cells treated with IL-1β and celecoxib. The patterns of up-regulation and down-regulation of gene expression were further validated by real-time PCR. A total of 1091 up-regulated genes and 1252 down-regulated genes were identified in the positive control group compared with the negative control group. Among them, PTGS2, ADAMTS5, PTGER2, mPTGES and PTGER4 are known to be involved in chondrocyte inflammation, while VEGFA, BCL2, TRAF1, CYR61, BMP6, DAPK1, DUSP7, IL1RN, MMP13 and TNFSF10 were reported being associated with cytokine and chemokine signaling. 189 up-regulated genes and 177 down-regulated genes were identified in the positive control group compared with intervention group. PTGS1, PTGS2, ADAMTS5, PTGER2, mPTGES and PTGER4 were among the genes down-regulated upon the treatment with celecoxib. Our results demonstrated that the OA chondrocytes are the site of active eicosanoid production. IL-1β can activate inflammation in chondrocytes and trigger the production of various proteins involved in cyclooxygenase pathway. The expression of genes corresponding to these proteins can be down-regulated by celecoxib. The findings indicate that the therapy with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-blocking agents may decrease the PGE2 production not only by direct inhibition of COX-2 activity, but also by down-regulating the expression of genes encoding for COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 1 (mPGES-1) and prostaglandin

  4. Diversity in global gene expression and morphology across a watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) germplasm collection: first steps to breeding.

    PubMed

    Payne, Adrienne C; Clarkson, Graham J J; Rothwell, Steve; Taylor, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) is a nutrient intense, leafy crop that is consumed raw or in soups across the globe, but for which, currently no genomic resources or breeding programme exists. Promising morphological, biochemical and functional genomic variation was identified for the first time in a newly established watercress germplasm collection, consisting of 48 watercress accessions sourced from contrasting global locations. Stem length, stem diameter and anti-oxidant (AO) potential varied across the accessions. This variation was used to identify three extreme contrasting accessions for further analysis. Variation in global gene expression was investigated using an Affymetrix Arabidopsis ATH1 microarray gene chip, using the commercial control (C), an accession selected for dwarf phenotype with a high AO potential (dwarfAO, called 'Boldrewood') and one with high AO potential alone. A set of transcripts significantly differentially expressed between these three accessions, were identified, including transcripts involved in the regulation of growth and development and those involved in secondary metabolism. In particular, when differential gene expression was compared between C and dwarfAO, the dwarfAO was characterised by increased expression of genes encoding glucosinolates, which are known precursors of phenethyl isothiocyanate, linked to the anti-carcinogenic effects well-documented in watercress. This study provides the first analysis of natural variation across the watercress genome and has identified important underpinning information for future breeding for enhanced anti-carcinogenic properties and morphology traits in this nutrient-intense crop. PMID:26504575

  5. Diversity in global gene expression and morphology across a watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) germplasm collection: first steps to breeding

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Adrienne C.; Clarkson, Graham J.J.; Rothwell, Steve; Taylor, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) is a nutrient intense, leafy crop that is consumed raw or in soups across the globe, but for which, currently no genomic resources or breeding programme exists. Promising morphological, biochemical and functional genomic variation was identified for the first time in a newly established watercress germplasm collection, consisting of 48 watercress accessions sourced from contrasting global locations. Stem length, stem diameter and anti-oxidant (AO) potential varied across the accessions. This variation was used to identify three extreme contrasting accessions for further analysis. Variation in global gene expression was investigated using an Affymetrix Arabidopsis ATH1 microarray gene chip, using the commercial control (C), an accession selected for dwarf phenotype with a high AO potential (dwarfAO, called ‘Boldrewood’) and one with high AO potential alone. A set of transcripts significantly differentially expressed between these three accessions, were identified, including transcripts involved in the regulation of growth and development and those involved in secondary metabolism. In particular, when differential gene expression was compared between C and dwarfAO, the dwarfAO was characterised by increased expression of genes encoding glucosinolates, which are known precursors of phenethyl isothiocyanate, linked to the anti-carcinogenic effects well-documented in watercress. This study provides the first analysis of natural variation across the watercress genome and has identified important underpinning information for future breeding for enhanced anti-carcinogenic properties and morphology traits in this nutrient-intense crop. PMID:26504575

  6. Altered neuronal gene expression in brain regions differentially affected by Alzheimer’s disease: a reference data set

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Winnie S.; Dunckley, Travis; Beach, Thomas G.; Grover, Andrew; Mastroeni, Diego; Ramsey, Keri; Caselli, Richard J.; Kukull, Walter A.; McKeel, Daniel; Morris, John C.; Hulette, Christine M.; Schmechel, Donald; Reiman, Eric M.; Rogers, Joseph; Stephan, Dietrich A.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is the most widespread form of dementia during the later stages of life. If improved therapeutics are not developed, the prevalence of AD will drastically increase in the coming years as the world’s population ages. By identifying differences in neuronal gene expression profiles between healthy elderly persons and individuals diagnosed with AD, we may be able to better understand the molecular mechanisms that drive AD pathogenesis, including the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this study, we expression profiled histopathologically normal cortical neurons collected with laser capture microdissection (LCM) from six anatomically and functionally discrete postmortem brain regions in 34 AD-afflicted individuals, using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. These regions include the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, middle temporal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, superior frontal gyrus, and primary visual cortex. This study is predicated on previous parallel research on the postmortem brains of the same six regions in 14 healthy elderly individuals, for which LCM neurons were similarly processed for expression analysis. We identified significant regional differential expression in AD brains compared with control brains including expression changes of genes previously implicated in AD pathogenesis, particularly with regards to tangle and plaque formation. Pinpointing the expression of factors that may play a role in AD pathogenesis provides a foundation for future identification of new targets for improved AD therapeutics. We provide this carefully phenotyped, laser capture microdissected intraindividual brain region expression data set to the community as a public resource. PMID:18270320

  7. Dietary exposure to soy or whey proteins alters colonic global gene expression profiles during rat colon tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rijin; Badger, Thomas M; Simmen, Frank A

    2005-01-01

    Background We previously reported that lifetime consumption of soy proteins or whey proteins reduced the incidence of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon tumors in rats. To obtain insights into these effects, global gene expression profiles of colons from rats with lifetime ingestion of casein (CAS, control diet), soy protein isolate (SPI), and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) diets were determined. Results Male Sprague Dawley rats, fed one of the three purified diets, were studied at 40 weeks after AOM injection and when tumors had developed in some animals of each group. Total RNA, purified from non-tumor tissue within the proximal half of each colon, was used to prepare biotinylated probes, which were hybridized to Affymetrix RG_U34A rat microarrays containing probes sets for 8799 rat genes. Microarray data were analyzed using DMT (Affymetrix), SAM (Stanford) and pair-wise comparisons. Differentially expressed genes (SPI and/or WPH vs. CAS) were found. We identified 31 induced and 49 repressed genes in the proximal colons of the SPI-fed group and 44 induced and 119 repressed genes in the proximal colons of the WPH-fed group, relative to CAS. Hierarchical clustering identified the co-induction or co-repression of multiple genes by SPI and WPH. The differential expression of I-FABP (2.92-, 3.97-fold down-regulated in SPI and WPH fed rats; P = 0.023, P = 0.01, respectively), cyclin D1 (1.61-, 2.42-fold down-regulated in SPI and WPH fed rats; P = 0.033, P = 0.001, respectively), and the c-neu proto-oncogene (2.46-, 4.10-fold down-regulated in SPI and WPH fed rats; P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively) mRNAs were confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. SPI and WPH affected colonic neuro-endocrine gene expression: peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon mRNAs were down-regulated in WPH fed rats, whereas somatostatin mRNA and corresponding circulating protein levels, were enhanced by SPI and WPH. Conclusions The identification of transcripts co- or differentially-regulated by SPI

  8. Genome-wide analysis of differentially expressed genes and splicing isoforms in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Valletti, Alessio; Gigante, Margherita; Palumbo, Orazio; Carella, Massimo; Divella, Chiara; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Tullo, Apollonia; Picardi, Ernesto; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Battaglia, Michele; Gesualdo, Loreto; Pesole, Graziano; Ranieri, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common malignant renal epithelial tumor and also the most deadly. To identify molecular changes occurring in ccRCC, in the present study we performed a genome wide analysis of its entire complement of mRNAs. Gene and exon-level analyses were carried out by means of the Affymetrix Exon Array platform. To achieve a reliable detection of differentially expressed cassette exons we implemented a novel methodology that considered contiguous combinations of exon triplets and candidate differentially expressed cassette exons were identified when the expression level was significantly different only in the central exon of the triplet. More detailed analyses were performed for selected genes using quantitative RT-PCR and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our analysis detected over 2,000 differentially expressed genes, and about 250 genes alternatively spliced and showed differential inclusion of specific cassette exons comparing tumor and non-tumoral tissues. We demonstrated the presence in ccRCC of an altered expression of the PTP4A3, LAMA4, KCNJ1 and TCF21 genes (at both transcript and protein level). Furthermore, we confirmed, at the mRNA level, the involvement of CAV2 and SFRP genes that have previously been identified. At exon level, among potential candidates we validated a differentially included cassette exon in DAB2 gene with a significant increase of DAB2 p96 splice variant as compared to the p67 isoform. Based on the results obtained, and their robustness according to both statistical analysis and literature surveys, we believe that a combination of gene/isoform expression signature may remarkably contribute, after suitable validation, to a more effective and reliable definition of molecular biomarkers for ccRCC early diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of therapeutic response. PMID:24194935

  9. Comparison of dorsal root ganglion gene expression in rat models of traumatic and HIV-associated neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Maratou, Klio; Wallace, Victoria C.J.; Hasnie, Fauzia S.; Okuse, Kenji; Hosseini, Ramine; Jina, Nipurna; Blackbeard, Julie; Pheby, Timothy; Orengo, Christine; Dickenson, Anthony H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying peripheral neuropathic pain in the context of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy, we measured gene expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rats subjected to systemic treatment with the anti-retroviral agent, ddC (Zalcitabine) and concomitant delivery of HIV-gp120 to the rat sciatic nerve. L4 and L5 DRGs were collected at day 14 (time of peak behavioural change) and changes in gene expression were measured using Affymetrix whole genome rat arrays. Conventional analysis of this data set and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was performed to discover biological processes altered in this model. Transcripts associated with G protein coupled receptor signalling and cell adhesion were enriched in the treated animals, while ribosomal proteins and proteasome pathways were associated with gene down-regulation. To identify genes that are directly relevant to neuropathic mechanical hypersensitivity, as opposed to epiphenomena associated with other aspects of the response to a sciatic nerve lesion, we compared the gp120 + ddC-evoked gene expression with that observed in a model of traumatic neuropathic pain (L5 spinal nerve transection), where hypersensitivity to a static mechanical stimulus is also observed. We identified 39 genes/expressed sequence tags that are differentially expressed in the same direction in both models. Most of these have not previously been implicated in mechanical hypersensitivity and may represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention. As an external control, the RNA expression of three genes was examined by RT-PCR, while the protein levels of two were studied using western blot analysis. PMID:18606552

  10. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-01-15

    All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  11. Core temperature correlates with expression of selected stress and immunomodulatory genes in febrile patients with sepsis and noninfectious SIRS

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Lauren; Lissauer, Matthew E.; Maldeis, Pam; Towns, Michael; Johnson, Steven B.; Moore, Richard; Singh, Ishwar S.; Cowan, Mark J.; Hasday, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental hyperthermia and exercise produce extensive changes in gene expression in human blood cells, but it is unknown whether this also happens during febrile-range hyperthermia. We tested the hypothesis that heat shock protein (HSP) and immunomodulatory stress gene expression correlate with fever in intensive care unit patients. Whole blood messenger RNA was obtained over consecutive days from 100 hospitalized patients suffering from sepsis or noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) as defined by conventional criteria. The most abnormal body temperature in the preceding 24 h was recorded for each sample. Expression analysis was performed using the Affymetrix U133 chip. ANCOVA followed by correlation analysis was performed on a subset of 278 prospectively identified sequences of interest. Temperature affected expression of 60 sequences, either independently or as a function of clinical diagnosis. Forty-eight of these (representing 38 genes) were affected by temperature only, including several HSPs, transcription factors heat shock factor (HSF)-1 and HSF-4, cellular adhesion molecules such as ICAM1/CD54 and JAM3, toll receptors TLR-6 and TLR-7, ribosomal proteins, and a number of molecules involved in inflammatory pathways. Twelve sequences demonstrated temperature-dependent responses that differed significantly between patients with sepsis and noninfectious SIRS: CXCL-13; heat shock proteins DNAJB12 and DNAJC4; the F11 receptor; folate hydrolase 1; HSF-2; HSP 70 proteins HSPA1A, HSPA1B, and HSPA1L; interleukin 8; lipopolysaccharide binding protein; and prostaglandin E synthase. Febrile-range temperatures achieved during sepsis and noninfectious SIRS correlate with detectable changes in stress gene expression in vivo, suggesting that fever can activate HSP gene expression and modify innate immune responses. For some genes, it appears that clinical condition can alter temperature-sensitive gene expression. Collectively, these data

  12. Comparison of the effects of early pregnancy with human interferon, alpha 2 (IFNA2), on gene expression in bovine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Bauersachs, Stefan; Ulbrich, Susanne E; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Reichenbach, Myriam; Büttner, Mathias; Meyer, Heinrich H D; Spencer, Thomas E; Minten, Megan; Sax, Gerhard; Winter, Gerhard; Wolf, Eckhard

    2012-02-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT), a type I IFN similar to alpha IFNs (IFNA), is the pregnancy recognition signal produced by the ruminant conceptus. To elucidate specific effects of bovine IFNT and of other conceptus-derived factors, endometrial gene expression changes during early pregnancy were compared to gene expression changes after intrauterine application of human IFNA2. In experiment 1, endometrial tissue samples were obtained on Day (D) 12, D15, and D18 postmating from nonpregnant or pregnant heifers. In experiment 2, heifers were treated from D14 to D16 of the estrous cycle with an intrauterine device releasing IFNA2 or, as controls, placebo lipid extrudates or PBS only. Endometrial biopsies were performed after flushing the uterus. All samples from both experiments were analyzed with an Affymetrix Bovine Genome Array. Experiment 1 revealed differential gene expression between pregnant and nonpregnant endometria on D15 and D18. In experiment 2, IFNA2 treatment resulted in differential gene expression in the bovine endometrium. Comparison of the data sets from both studies identified genes that were differentially expressed in response to IFNA2 but not in response to pregnancy on D15 or D18. In addition, genes were found that were differentially expressed during pregnancy but not after IFNA2 treatment. In experiment 3, spatiotemporal alterations in expression of selected genes were determined in uteri from nonpregnant and early pregnant heifers using in situ hybridization. The overall findings of this study suggest differential effects of bovine IFNT compared to human IFNA2 and that some pregnancy-specific changes in the endometrium are elicited by conceptus-derived factors other than IFNT. PMID:22034527

  13. Gene expression from plants grown on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimpson, Alexander; Pereira, Rhea; Kiss, John Z.; Correll, Melanie

    Three experiments were performed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2006 as part of the TROPI experiments. These experiments were performed to study graviTROPIsm and photoTROPIsm responses of Arabidopsis in microgravity (µg). Seedlings were grown with a variety of light and gravitational treatments for approximately five days. The frozen samples were returned to Earth during three space shuttle missions in 2007 and stored at -80° C. Due to the limited amount of plant biomass returned, new protocols were developed to minimize the amount of material needed for RNA extraction as a preparation for microarray analysis. Using these new protocols, RNA was extracted from several sets of seedlings grown in red light followed by blue light with one sample from 1.0g treatment and the other at µg. Using a 2-fold change criterion, microarray (Affymetrix, GeneChip) results showed that 613 genes were upregulated in the µg sample while 757 genes were downregulated. Upregulated genes in response to µg included transcription factors from the WRKY (15 genes), MYB (3) and ZF (8) families as well as those that are involved in auxin responses (10). Downregulated genes also included transcription factors such as MYB (5) and Zinc finger (10) but interestingly only two WRKY family genes were down-regulated during the µg treatment. Studies are underway to compare these results with other samples to identify the genes involved in the gravity and light signal transduction pathways (this project is Supported By: NASA NCC2-1200).

  14. Patterns of global gene expression in rat skeletal muscle during unloading and low-intensity ambulatory activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Lionel; Akunuri, Nagabhavani; Zhao, Po; Hoffman, Eric P.; Hamilton, Deborah G.; Hamilton, Marc T.

    2003-01-01

    Physical inactivity and unloading lead to diverse skeletal muscle alterations. Our goal was to identify the genes in skeletal muscle whose expression is most sensitive to periods of unloading/reduced physical activity and that may be involved in triggering initial responses before phenotypic changes are evident. The ability of short periods of physical activity/loading as an effective countermeasure against changes in gene expression mediated by inactivity was also tested. Affymetrix microarrays were used to compare mRNA levels in the soleus muscle under three experimental treatments (n = 20-29 rats each): 12-h hindlimb unloading (HU), 12-h HU followed by 4 h of intermittent low-intensity ambulatory and postural activity (4-h reloading), and control (with ambulatory and postural activity). Using a combination of criteria, we identified a small set of genes (approximately 1% of 8,738 genes on the array or 4% of significant expressed genes) with the most reproducible and largest responses to altered activity. Analysis revealed a coordinated regulation of transcription for a large number of key signaling proteins and transcription factors involved in protein synthesis/degradation and energy metabolism. Most (21 of 25) of the gene expression changes that were downregulated during HU returned at least to control levels during the reloading. In surprising contrast, 27 of 38 of the genes upregulated during HU remained significantly above control, but most showed trends toward reversal. This introduces a new concept that, in general, genes that are upregulated during unloading/inactivity will be more resistant to periodic reloading than those genes that are downregulated. This study reveals genes that are the most sensitive to loading/activity in rat skeletal muscle and indicates new targets that may initiate muscle alterations during inactivity.

  15. Dexamethasone-induced expression of the glucocorticoid response gene lipocalin 2 in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Owen, H C; Roberts, S J; Ahmed, S F; Farquharson, C

    2008-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs, but long-term use can result in marked growth retardation in children due to their actions on growth plate chondrocytes. To gain an insight into the mechanisms involved in GC-induced growth retardation, we performed Affymetrix microarray analysis of the murine chondrogenic cell line ATDC5, incubated with 10(-6) M dexamethasone (Dex) for 24 h. Downregulated genes included secreted frizzled-related protein and IGF-I, and upregulated genes included serum/GC-regulated kinase, connective-tissue growth factor, and lipocalin 2. Lipocalin 2 expression increased 40-fold after 24-h Dex treatment. Expression increased further after 48-h (75-fold) and 96-h (84-fold) Dex treatment, and this response was Dex concentration dependent. Lipocalin 2 was immunolocalized to both proliferating and hypertrophic growth plate zones, and its expression was increased by Dex in primary chondrocytes at 6 h (3-fold, P < 0.05). The lipocalin 2 response was blocked by the GC-receptor antagonist RU-486 and was increased further by the protein synthesis blocker cycloheximide. Proliferation in lipocalin 2-overexpressing cells was less than in control cells (49%, P < 0.05), and overexpression caused an increase in collagen type X expression (4-fold, P < 0.05). The effects of lipocalin 2 overexpression on chondrocyte proliferation (64%, P < 0.05) and collagen type X expression (8-fold, P < 0.05) were further exacerbated with the addition of 10(-6) M Dex. This synergistic effect may be explained by a further increase in lipocalin 2 expression with Dex treatment of transfected cells (45%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that lipocalin 2 may mediate Dex effects on chondrocytes and provides a potential novel mechanism for GC-induced growth retardation. PMID:18381927

  16. Aminoglycoside uptake increased by tet gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, T L; Davis, G E; Anderson, W L; Moyzis, R K; Griffith, J K

    1989-01-01

    The expression of extrachromosomal tet genes not only confers tetracycline resistance but also increases the susceptibilities of gram-negative bacteria to commonly used aminoglycoside antibiotics. We investigated the possibility that tet expression increases aminoglycoside susceptibility by increasing bacterial uptake of aminoglycoside. Studies of [3H]gentamicin uptake in paired sets of Escherichia coli HB101 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 expressing and not expressing tet showed that tet expression accelerates energy-dependent [3H]gentamicin uptake. Increased [3H]gentamicin uptake was accompanied by decreased bacterial protein synthesis and bacterial growth. Increased aminoglycoside uptake occurred whether tet expression was constitutive or induced, whether the tet gene was class B or C, and whether the tet gene was plasmid borne or integrated into the bacterial chromosome. tet expression produced no measurable change in membrane potential, suggesting that tet expression increases aminoglycoside uptake either by increasing the availability of specific carriers or by lowering the minimum membrane potential that is necessary for uptake. PMID:2684011

  17. Inferring differentiation pathways from gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ivan G.; Roepcke, Stefan; Hafemeister, Christoph; Schliep, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The regulation of proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells into mature cells is central to developmental biology. Gene expression measured in distinguishable developmental stages helps to elucidate underlying molecular processes. In previous work we showed that functional gene modules, which act distinctly in the course of development, can be represented by a mixture of trees. In general, the similarities in the gene expression programs of cell populations reflect the similarities in the differentiation path. Results: We propose a novel model for gene expression profiles and an unsupervised learning method to estimate developmental similarity and infer differentiation pathways. We assess the performance of our model on simulated data and compare it with favorable results to related methods. We also infer differentiation pathways and predict functional modules in gene expression data of lymphoid development. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time how, in principal, the incorporation of structural knowledge about the dependence structure helps to reveal differentiation pathways and potentially relevant functional gene modules from microarray datasets. Our method applies in any area of developmental biology where it is possible to obtain cells of distinguishable differentiation stages. Availability: The implementation of our method (GPL license), data and additional results are available at http://algorithmics.molgen.mpg.de/Supplements/InfDif/ Contact: filho@molgen.mpg.de, schliep@molgen.mpg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data is available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18586709

  18. Identification of Novel Cellular Targets in Biliary Tract Cancers Using Global Gene Expression Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hansel, Donna E.; Rahman, Ayman; Hidalgo, Manuel; Thuluvath, Paul J.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Shulick, Richard; Ku, Ja-Lok; Park, Jae-Gahb; Miyazaki, Kohje; Ashfaq, Raheela; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Varma, Ram; Hawthorne, Lesleyann; Geradts, Joseph; Argani, Pedram; Maitra, Anirban

    2003-01-01

    Biliary tract carcinoma carries a poor prognosis, and difficulties with clinical management in patients with advanced disease are often due to frequent late-stage diagnosis, lack of serum markers, and limited information regarding biliary tumor pathogenesis. RNA-based global analyses of gene expression have led to the identification of a large number of up-regulated genes in several cancer types. We have used the recently developed Affymetrix U133A gene expression microarrays containing nearly 22,000 unique transcripts to obtain global gene expression profiles from normal biliary epithelial scrapings (n = 5), surgically resected biliary carcinomas (n = 11), and biliary cancer cell lines (n = 9). Microarray hybridization data were normalized using dCHIP (http://www.dCHIP.org) to identify differentially up-regulated genes in primary biliary cancers and biliary cancer cell lines and their expression profiles was compared to that of normal epithelial scrapings using the dCHIP software as well as Significance Analysis of Microarrays or SAM (http://www-stat.stanford.edu/∼tibs/SAM/). Comparison of the dCHIP and SAM datasets revealed an overlapping list of 282 genes expressed at greater than threefold levels in the cancers compared to normal epithelium (t-test P <0.1 in dCHIP, and median false discovery rate <10 in SAM). Several pathways integral to tumorigenesis were up-regulated in the biliary cancers, including proliferation and cell cycle antigens (eg, cyclins D2 and E2, cdc2/p34, and geminin), transcription factors (eg, homeobox B7 and islet-1), growth factors and growth factor receptors (eg, hepatocyte growth factor, amphiregulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor), and enzymes modulating sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents (eg, cystathionine β synthase, dCMP deaminase, and CTP synthase). In addition, we identified several “pathway” genes that are rapidly emerging as novel therapeutic targets in cancer (eg, cytosolic phospholipase A2, an upstream

  19. Gene expression following acute morphine administration.

    PubMed

    Loguinov, A V; Anderson, L M; Crosby, G J; Yukhananov, R Y

    2001-08-28

    The long-term response to neurotropic drugs depends on drug-induced neuroplasticity and underlying changes in gene expression. However, alterations in neuronal gene expression can be observed even following single injection. To investigate the extent of these changes, gene expression in the medial striatum and lumbar part of the spinal cord was monitored by cDNA microarray following single injection of morphine. Using robust and resistant linear regression (MM-estimator) with simultaneous prediction confidence intervals, we detected differentially expressed genes. By combining the results with cluster analysis, we have found that a single morphine injection alters expression of two major groups of genes, for proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and for cytoskeleton-related proteins. RNAs for these proteins were mostly downregulated both in the medial striatum and in lumbar part of the spinal cord. These transitory changes were prevented by coadministration of the opioid antagonist naloxone. Data indicate that microarray analysis by itself is useful in describing the effect of well-known substances on the nervous system and provides sufficient information to propose a potentially novel pathway mediating its activity. PMID:11526201

  20. Cumulus Cells Gene Expression Profiling in Terms of Oocyte Maturity in Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation Using GnRH Agonist or GnRH Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Devjak, Rok; Fon Tacer, Klementina; Juvan, Peter; Virant Klun, Irma; Rozman, Damjana; Vrtačnik Bokal, Eda

    2012-01-01

    In in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) is established by gonadotropins in combination with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists or antagonists, to prevent premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. The aim of our study was to improve the understanding of gene expression profile of cumulus cells (CC) in terms of ovarian stimulation protocol and oocyte maturity. We applied Affymetrix gene expression profiling in CC of oocytes at different maturation stages using either GnRH agonists or GnRH antagonists. Two analyses were performed: the first involved CC of immature metaphase I (MI) and mature metaphase II (MII) oocytes where 359 genes were differentially expressed, and the second involved the two GnRH analogues where no differentially expressed genes were observed at the entire transcriptome level. A further analysis of 359 differentially genes was performed, focusing on anti-Müllerian hormone receptor 2 (AMHR2), follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC) and serine protease inhibitor E2 (SERPINE2). Among other differentially expressed genes we observed a marked number of new genes connected to cell adhesion and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, glycine and γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). No differential expression in CC between the two GnRH analogues supports the findings of clinical studies where no significant difference in live birth rates between both GnRH analogues has been proven. PMID:23082142

  1. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  2. Effects of aging on apoptosis gene expression in oral mucosal tissues.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Octavio A; Novak, M John; Kirakodu, Sreenatha; Stromberg, Arnold J; Shen, Shu; Orraca, Luis; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2013-03-01

    Apoptotic processes are important for physiologic renewal of an intact epithelial barrier and contribute some antimicrobial resistance for bacteria and viruses, as well as anti-inflammatory effects that benefits the mucosa. The oral cavity presents a model of host-bacterial interactions at mucosal surfaces, in which a panoply of microorganisms colonizes various niches in the oral cavity and creates complex multispecies biofilms that challenge the gingival tissues. This report details gene expression in apoptotic pathways that occur in oral mucosal tissues across the lifespan, using a nonhuman primate model. Macaca mulatta primates from 2 to 23 years of age (n = 23) were used in a cross-sectional study to obtain clinical healthy gingival tissues specimens. Further, mRNA was prepared and evaluated using the Affymetrix Rhesus GeneChip and 88 apoptotic pathway genes were evaluated. The results identified significant positive correlations with age in 12 genes and negative correlations with an additional five genes. The gene effects were predicted to alter apoptosis receptor levels, extrinsic apoptotic pathways through caspases, cytokine effects on apoptotic events, Ca(+2)-induced death signaling, cell cycle checkpoints, and potential effects of survival factors. Both the positively and negatively correlated genes within the apoptotic pathways provided evidence that healthy tissues in aging animals exhibit decreased apoptotic potential compared to younger animals. The results suggested that decreased physiologic apoptotic process in the dynamic septic environment of the oral mucosal tissues could increase the risk of aging tissues to undergo destructive disease processes through dysregulated inflammatory responses to the oral microbial burden. PMID:23334583

  3. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  4. Whole genome co-expression analysis of soybean cytochrome P450 genes identifies nodulation-specific P450 monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) catalyze oxidation of various substrates using oxygen and NAD(P)H. Plant P450s are involved in the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites performing diverse biological functions. The recent availability of the soybean genome sequence allows us to identify and analyze soybean putative P450s at a genome scale. Co-expression analysis using an available soybean microarray and Illumina sequencing data provides clues for functional annotation of these enzymes. This approach is based on the assumption that genes that have similar expression patterns across a set of conditions may have a functional relationship. Results We have identified a total number of 332 full-length P450 genes and 378 pseudogenes from the soybean genome. From the full-length sequences, 195 genes belong to A-type, which could be further divided into 20 families. The remaining 137 genes belong to non-A type P450s and are classified into 28 families. A total of 178 probe sets were found to correspond to P450 genes on the Affymetrix soybean array. Out of these probe sets, 108 represented single genes. Using the 28 publicly available microarray libraries that contain organ-specific information, some tissue-specific P450s were identified. Similarly, stress responsive soybean P450s were retrieved from 99 microarray soybean libraries. We also utilized Illumina transcriptome sequencing technology to analyze the expressions of all 332 soybean P450 genes. This dataset contains total RNAs isolated from nodules, roots, root tips, leaves, flowers, green pods, apical meristem, mock-inoculated and Bradyrhizobium japonicum-infected root hair cells. The tissue-specific expression patterns of these P450 genes were analyzed and the expression of a representative set of genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR. We performed the co-expression analysis on many of the 108 P450 genes on the Affymetrix arrays. First we confirmed that CYP93C5 (an isoflavone synthase gene) is

  5. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. Results We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages) seed coats (globular and torpedo stages) and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages) and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST) (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011) were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152) had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. Conclusions We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid clones that comprise

  6. Combining mouse mammary gland gene expression and comparative mapping for the identification of candidate genes for QTL of milk production traits in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Micha; Israeli, Galit; Seroussi, Eyal; Weller, Joel I; Gregg, Jeffrey P; Shani, Moshe; Medrano, Juan F

    2007-01-01

    Background Many studies have found segregating quantitative trait loci (QTL) for milk production traits in different dairy cattle populations. However, even for relatively large effects with a saturated marker map the confidence interval for QTL location by linkage analysis spans tens of map units, or hundreds of genes. Combining mapping and arraying has been suggested as an approach to identify candidate genes. Thus, gene expression analysis in the mammary gland of genes positioned in the confidence interval of the QTL can bridge the gap between fine mapping and quantitative trait nucleotide (QTN) determination. Results We hybridized Affymetrix microarray (MG-U74v2), containing 12,488 murine probes, with RNA derived from mammary gland of virgin, pregnant, lactating and involuting C57BL/6J mice in a total of nine biological replicates. We combined microarray data from two additional studies that used the same design in mice with a total of 75 biological replicates. The same filtering and normalization was applied to each microarray data using GeneSpring software. Analysis of variance identified 249 differentially expressed probe sets common to the three experiments along the four developmental stages of puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. 212 genes were assigned to their bovine map positions through comparative mapping, and thus form a list of candidate genes for previously identified QTLs for milk production traits. A total of 82 of the genes showed mammary gland-specific expression with at least 3-fold expression over the median representing all tissues tested in GeneAtlas. Conclusion This work presents a web tool for candidate genes for QTL (cgQTL) that allows navigation between the map of bovine milk production QTL, potential candidate genes and their level of expression in mammary gland arrays and in GeneAtlas. Three out of four confirmed genes that affect QTL in livestock (ABCG2, DGAT1, GDF8, IGF2) were over expressed in the target organ. Thus, cg

  7. Redox signaling: globalization of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jeong-Il; Kaplan, Samuel

    2000-01-01

    Here we show that the extent of electron flow through the cbb3 oxidase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is inversely related to the expression levels of those photosynthesis genes that are under control of the PrrBA two-component activation system: the greater the electron flow, the stronger the inhibitory signal generated by the cbb3 oxidase to repress photosynthesis gene expression. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that intramolecular electron transfer within the cbb3 oxidase is involved in signal generation and transduction and this signal does not directly involve the intervention of molecular oxygen. In addition to the cbb3 oxidase, the redox state of the quinone pool controls the transcription rate of the puc operon via the AppA–PpsR antirepressor–repressor system. Together, these interacting regulatory circuits are depicted in a model that permits us to understand the regulation by oxygen and light of photosynthesis gene expression in R.sphaeroides. PMID:10944106

  8. Altered gene expression in dry age-related macular degeneration suggests early loss of choroidal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, S. Scott; Braun, Terry A.; Skeie, Jessica M.; Haas, Christine M.; Sohn, Elliott H.; Stone, Edwin M.; Scheetz, Todd E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in developed countries. The molecular pathogenesis of early events in AMD is poorly understood. We investigated differential gene expression in samples of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choroid from early AMD and control maculas with exon-based arrays. Methods Gene expression levels in nine human donor eyes with early AMD and nine control human donor eyes were assessed using Affymetrix Human Exon ST 1.0 arrays. Two controls did not pass quality control and were removed. Differentially expressed genes were annotated using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID), and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed on RPE-specific and endothelium-associated gene sets. The complement factor H (CFH) genotype was also assessed, and differential expression was analyzed regarding high AMD risk (YH/HH) and low AMD risk (YY) genotypes. Results Seventy-five genes were identified as differentially expressed (raw p value <0.01; ≥50% fold change, mean log2 expression level in AMD or control ≥ median of all average gene expression values); however, no genes were significant (adj. p value <0.01) after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Of 52 genes with decreased expression in AMD (fold change <0.5; raw p value <0.01), 18 genes were identified by DAVID analysis as associated with vision or neurologic processes. The GSEA of the RPE-associated and endothelium-associated genes revealed a significant decrease in genes typically expressed by endothelial cells in the early AMD group compared to controls, consistent with previous histologic and proteomic studies. Analysis of the CFH genotype indicated decreased expression of ADAMTS9 in eyes with high-risk genotypes (fold change = –2.61; raw p value=0.0008). Conclusions GSEA results suggest that RPE transcripts are preserved or elevated in early AMD, concomitant with loss of endothelial cell marker

  9. Global Changes in Gene Expression of Barrett's Esophagus Compared to Normal Squamous Esophagus and Gastric Cardia Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Paula L.; Hu, Nan; Rotunno, Melissa; Su, Hua; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Lemin; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Gherman, Barbara; Giffen, Carol; Dykes, Cathy; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Abnet, Christian C.; Johnson, Kathryn M.; Acosta, Ruben D.; Young, Patrick E.; Cash, Brooks D.; Taylor, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a metaplastic precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA), the most rapidly increasing cancer in western societies. While the prevalence of BE is increasing, the vast majority of EA occurs in patients with undiagnosed BE. Thus, we sought to identify genes that are altered in BE compared to the normal mucosa of the esophagus, and which may be potential biomarkers for the development or diagnosis of BE. Design We performed gene expression analysis using HG-U133A Affymetrix chips on fresh frozen tissue samples of Barrett's metaplasia and matched normal mucosa from squamous esophagus (NE) and gastric cardia (NC) in 40 BE patients. Results Using a cut off of 2-fold and P<1.12E-06 (0.05 with Bonferroni correction), we identified 1324 differentially-expressed genes comparing BE vs NE and 649 differentially-expressed genes comparing BE vs NC. Except for individual genes such as the SOXs and PROM1 that were dysregulated only in BE vs NE, we found a subset of genes (n = 205) whose expression was significantly altered in both BE vs NE and BE vs NC. These genes were overrepresented in different pathways, including TGF-β and Notch. Conclusion Our findings provide additional data on the global transcriptome in BE tissues compared to matched NE and NC tissues which should promote further understanding of the functions and regulatory mechanisms of genes involved in BE development, as well as insight into novel genes that may be useful as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of BE in the future. PMID:24714516

  10. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  11. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  12. Differential alterations in gene expression profiles contribute to time-dependent effects of nandrolone to prevent denervation atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anabolic steroids, such as nandrolone, slow muscle atrophy, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. Their effects on muscle size and gene expression depend upon time, and the cause of muscle atrophy. Administration of nandrolone for 7 days beginning either concomitantly with sciatic nerve transection (7 days) or 29 days later (35 days) attenuated denervation atrophy at 35 but not 7 days. We reasoned that this model could be used to identify genes that are regulated by nandrolone and slow denervation atrophy, as well as genes that might explain the time-dependence of nandrolone effects on such atrophy. Affymetrix microarrays were used to profile gene expression changes due to nandrolone at 7 and 35 days and to identify major gene expression changes in denervated muscle between 7 and 35 days. Results Nandrolone selectively altered expression of 124 genes at 7 days and 122 genes at 35 days, with only 20 genes being regulated at both time points. Marked differences in biological function of genes regulated by nandrolone at 7 and 35 days were observed. At 35, but not 7 days, nandrolone reduced mRNA and protein levels for FOXO1, the mTOR inhibitor REDD2, and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN2 and increased those for ApoD. At 35 days, correlations between mRNA levels and the size of denervated muscle were negative for RCAN2, and positive for ApoD. Nandrolone also regulated genes for Wnt signaling molecules. Comparison of gene expression at 7 and 35 days after denervation revealed marked alterations in the expression of 9 transcriptional coregulators, including Ankrd1 and 2, and many transcription factors and kinases. Conclusions Genes regulated in denervated muscle after 7 days administration of nandrolone are almost entirely different at 7 versus 35 days. Alterations in levels of FOXO1, and of genes involved in signaling through calcineurin, mTOR and Wnt may be linked to the favorable action of nandrolone on denervated muscle. Marked

  13. Gene expression analysis of whole blood, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and lymphoblastoid cell lines from the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D.; Barb, Jennifer J.; Raghavachari, Nalini; Liu, Poching; Woodhouse, Kimberly A.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Munson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite a growing number of reports of gene expression analysis from blood-derived RNA sources, there have been few systematic comparisons of various RNA sources in transcriptomic analysis or for biomarker discovery in the context of cardiovascular disease (CVD). As a pilot study of the Systems Approach to Biomarker Research (SABRe) in CVD Initiative, this investigation used Affymetrix Exon arrays to characterize gene expression of three blood-derived RNA sources: lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), whole blood using PAXgene tubes (PAX), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Their performance was compared in relation to identifying transcript associations with sex and CVD risk factors, such as age, high-density lipoprotein, and smoking status, and the differential blood cell count. We also identified a set of exons that vary substantially between participants, but consistently in each RNA source. Such exons are thus stable phenotypes of the participant and may potentially become useful fingerprinting biomarkers. In agreement with previous studies, we found that each of the RNA sources is distinct. Unlike PAX and PBMC, LCL gene expression showed little association with the differential blood count. LCL, however, was able to detect two genes related to smoking status. PAX and PBMC identified Y-chromosome probe sets similarly and slightly better than LCL. PMID:22045913

  14. Sequence-matched probes produce increased cross-platform consistency and more reproducible biological results in microarray-based gene expression measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mecham, Brigham H.; Klus, Gregory T.; Strovel, Jeffrey; Augustus, Meena; Byrne, David; Bozso, Peter; Wetmore, Daniel Z.; Mariani, Thomas J.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Szallasi, Zoltan

    2004-01-01

    Cancer derived microarray data sets are routinely produced by various platforms that are either commercially available or manufactured by academic groups. The fundamental difference in their probe selection strategies holds the promise that identical observations produced by more than one platform prove to be more robust when validated by biology. However, cross-platform comparison requires matching corresponding probe sets. We are introducing here sequence-based matching of probes instead of gene identifier-based matching. We analyzed breast cancer cell line derived RNA aliquots using Agilent cDNA and Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platforms to assess the advantage of this method. We show, that at different levels of the analysis, including gene expression ratios and difference calls, cross-platform consistency is significantly improved by sequence- based matching. We also present evidence that sequence-based probe matching produces more consistent results when comparing similar biological data sets obtained by different microarray platforms. This strategy allowed a more efficient transfer of classification of breast cancer samples between data sets produced by cDNA microarray and Affymetrix gene-chip platforms. PMID:15161944

  15. Sequence-matched probes produce increased cross-platform consistency and more reproducible biological results in microarray-based gene expression measurements.

    PubMed

    Mecham, Brigham H; Klus, Gregory T; Strovel, Jeffrey; Augustus, Meena; Byrne, David; Bozso, Peter; Wetmore, Daniel Z; Mariani, Thomas J; Kohane, Isaac S; Szallasi, Zoltan

    2004-01-01

    Cancer derived microarray data sets are routinely produced by various platforms that are either commercially available or manufactured by academic groups. The fundamental difference in their probe selection strategies holds the promise that identical observations produced by more than one platform prove to be more robust when validated by biology. However, cross-platform comparison requires matching corresponding probe sets. We are introducing here sequence-based matching of probes instead of gene identifier-based matching. We analyzed breast cancer cell line derived RNA aliquots using Agilent cDNA and Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platforms to assess the advantage of this method. We show, that at different levels of the analysis, including gene expression ratios and difference calls, cross-platform consistency is significantly improved by sequence- based matching. We also present evidence that sequence-based probe matching produces more consistent results when comparing similar biological data sets obtained by different microarray platforms. This strategy allowed a more efficient transfer of classification of breast cancer samples between data sets produced by cDNA microarray and Affymetrix gene-chip platforms. PMID:15161944

  16. Facilitated diffusion buffers noise in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Schoech, Armin P.; Zabet, Nicolae Radu

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors perform facilitated diffusion (3D diffusion in the cytosol and 1D diffusion on the DNA) when binding to their target sites to regulate gene expression. Here, we investigated the influence of this binding mechanism on the noise in gene expression. Our results showed that, for biologically relevant parameters, the binding process can be represented by a two-state Markov model and that the accelerated target finding due to facilitated diffusion leads to a reduction in both the mRNA and the protein noise. PMID:25314467

  17. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  18. 3' tag digital gene expression profiling of human brain and universal reference RNA using Illumina Genome Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Massive parallel sequencing has the potential to replace microarrays as the method for transcriptome profiling. Currently there are two protocols: full-length RNA sequencing (RNA-SEQ) and 3'-tag digital gene expression (DGE). In this preliminary effort, we evaluated the 3' DGE approach using two reference RNA samples from the MicroArray Quality Control Consortium (MAQC). Results Using Brain RNA sample from multiple runs, we demonstrated that the transcript profiles from 3' DGE were highly reproducible between technical and biological replicates from libraries constructed by the same lab and even by different labs, and between two generations of Illumina's Genome Analyzers. Approximately 65% of all sequence reads mapped to mitochondrial genes, ribosomal RNAs, and canonical transcripts. The expression profiles of brain RNA and universal human reference RNA were compared which demonstrated that DGE was also highly quantitative with excellent correlation of differential expression with quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, one lane of 3' DGE sequencing, using the current sequencing chemistry and image processing software, had wider dynamic range for transcriptome profiling and was able to detect lower expressed genes which are normally below the detection threshold of microarrays. Conclusion 3' tag DGE profiling with massive parallel sequencing achieved high sensitivity and reproducibility for transcriptome profiling. Although it lacks the ability of detecting alternative splicing events compared to RNA-SEQ, it is much more affordable and clearly out-performed microarrays (Affymetrix) in detecting lower abundant transcripts. PMID:19917133

  19. Visualizing Gene Expression In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.

    1998-11-02

    Visualizing bacterial cells and describing their responses to the environment are difficult tasks. Their small size is the chief reason for the difficulty, which means that we must often use many millions of cells in a sample in order to determine what the average response of the bacteria is. However, an average response can sometimes mask important events in bacterial physiology, which means that our understanding of these organisms will suffer. We have used a variety of instruments to visualize bacterial cells, all of which tell us something different about the sample. We use a fluorescence activated cell sorter to sort cells based on the fluorescence provided by bioreporter genes, and these can be used to select for particular genetic mutations. Cells can be visualized by epifluorescent microscopy, and sensitive photodetectors can be added that allow us to find a single bacterial cell that is fluorescent or bioluminescent. We have also used standard photomultipliers to examine cell aggregates as field bioreporter microorganisms. Examples of each of these instruments show how our understanding of bacterial physiology has changed with the technology.

  20. Preliminary study of the expression of genes connected with the orexigenic and anorexigenic system using microarray technique in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Janas-Kozik, Malgorzata; Stachowicz, Malgorzata; Mazurek, Urszula; Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Krupka-Matuszczyk, Irena; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa (AN) is still poorly understood. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) classification differentiates 2 AN types: the restricting type (AN-R) and the binge eating/purging type (AN-BP). We investigated 4 young women suffering from AN (2 with AN-R and 2 with AN-BP). Four women, age matched, with other psychiatric disorders (paranoid schizophrenia, adjustment disorder, mental retardation) served as the reference group. The oligonucleotide microarray method (HG-U133A, Affymetrix) was used to determine the expression profile of 13 genes connected with the orexigenic and anorexigenic system: leptin, leptin receptor-coding gene, hypocretin (orexin) receptor-coding gene, hypocretin (orexin) neuropeptide precursor-coding gene and growth hormone secretagogue receptor. A hierarchical analysis of the results showed that AN-BP and AN-R patients were grouped into different clusters. Also, expression levels of leptin receptor-coding gene showed significant differences between AN-BP and AN-R patients and between AN-R and control subjects. This preliminary study suggests that the microarray technique may contribute to elucidating molecular genetics of the pathogenesis of both types of AN. PMID:18552512

  1. Changes in Soybean Global Gene Expression after Application of Lipo-Chitooligosaccharide from Bradyrhizobium japonicum under Sub-Optimal Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan; Khan, Wajahatullah; Smith, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    Lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs), signal compounds produced by N2-fixing rhizobacteria after isoflavone induction, initiate nodule formation in host legumes. Given LCOs' structural similarity to pathogen-response-eliciting chitin oligomers, foliar application of LCOs was tested for ability to induce stress-related genes under optimal growth conditions. In order to study the effects of LCO foliar spray under stressed conditions, soybean (Glycine max) seedlings grown at optimal temperature were transferred to sub-optimal temperature. After a 5-day acclimation period, the first trifoliate leaves were sprayed with 10−7 M LCO (NodBj-V (C18∶1, MeFuc)) purified from genistein-induced Bradyrhizobium japonicum culture, and harvested at 0 and 48 h following treatment. Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip® Soybean Genome Arrays. Compared to the control at 48 h after LCO treatment, a total of 147 genes were differentially expressed as a result of LCO treatment, including a number of stress-related genes and transcription factors. In addition, during the 48 h time period following foliar spray application, over a thousand genes exhibited differential expression, including hundreds of those specific to the LCO-treated plants. Our results indicated that the dynamic soybean foliar transcriptome was highly responsive to LCO treatment. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) validated the microarray data. PMID:22348109

  2. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  3. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows

    PubMed Central

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L.; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  4. Validation and implementation of a method for microarray gene expression profiling of minor B-cell subpopulations in man

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This report describes a method for the generation of global gene expression profiles from low frequent B-cell subsets by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and RNA amplification. However, some of the differentiating compartments involve a low number of cells and therefore it is important to optimize and validate each step in the procedure. Methods Normal lymphoid tissues from blood, tonsils, thymus and bone marrow were immunophenotyped by the 8-colour Euroflow panel using multiparametric flow cytometry. Subsets of B-cells containing cell numbers ranging from 800 to 33,000 and with frequencies varying between 0.1 and 10 percent were sorted, subjected to mRNA purification, amplified by the NuGEN protocol and finally analysed by the Affymetrix platform. Results Following a step by step strategy, each step in the workflow was validated and the sorting/storage conditions optimized as described in this report. First, an analysis of four cancer cell lines on Affymetrix arrays, using either 100 ng RNA labelled with the Ambion standard protocol or 1 ng RNA amplified and labelled by the NuGEN protocol, revealed a significant correlation of gene expressions (r ≥ 0.9 for all). Comparison of qPCR data in samples with or without amplification for 8 genes showed that a relative difference between six cell lines was preserved (r ≥ 0.9). Second, a comparison of cells sorted into PrepProtect, RNAlater or directly into lysis/binding buffer showed a higher yield of purified mRNA following storage in lysis/binding buffer (p < 0.001). Third, the identity of the B-cell subsets validated by the cluster of differentiation (CD) membrane profile was highly concordant with the transcriptional gene expression (p-values <0.001). Finally, in normal bone marrow and tonsil samples, eight evaluated genes were expressed in accordance with the biology of lymphopoiesis (p-values < 0.001), which enabled the generation of a gene-specific B-cell atlas. Conclusion A

  5. Effects of High Fat Feeding on Adipose Tissue Gene Expression in Diabetic Goto-Kakizaki Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bai; Nie, Jing; Wang, Xi; DuBois, Debra C; Jusko, William J; Almon, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    Development and progression of type 2 diabetes is a complex interaction between genetics and environmental influences. High dietary fat is one environmental factor that is conducive to the development of insulin-resistant diabetes. In the present report, we compare the responses of lean poly-genic, diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats to those of control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats fed a high fat diet from weaning to 20 weeks of age. This comparison included a wide array of physiological measurements along with gene expression profiling of abdominal adipose tissue using Affymetrix gene array chips. Animals of both strains fed a high fat diet or a normal diet were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks for this comparison. The microarray analysis revealed that the two strains developed different adaptations to increased dietary fat. WKY rats decrease fatty acid synthesis and lipogenic processes whereas GK rats increase lipid elimination. However, on both diets the major differences between the two strains remained essentially the same. Specifically relative to the WKY strain, the GK strain showed lipoatrophy, chronic inflammation, and insulin resistance. PMID:26309393

  6. Gene expression variations during Drosophila metamorphosis in real and simulated gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, R.; Leandro-García, L. J.; Benguría, A.; Herranz, R.; Zeballos, A.; Gassert, G.; van Loon, J. J.; Medina, F. J.

    Establishing the extent and significance of the effects of the exposure to microgravity of complex living organisms is a critical piece of information if the long-term exploration of near-by planets involving human beings is going to take place in the Future As a first step in this direction we have started to look into the patterns of gene expression during Drosophila development in real and simulated microgravity using microarray analysis of mRNA isolated from samples exposed to different environmental conditions In these experiments we used Affymetrix chips version 1 0 containing probes for more than 14 000 genes almost the complete Drosophila genome 55 of which are tagged with some molecular or functional designation while 45 are still waiting to be identified in functional terms The real microgravity exposure was imposed on the samples during the crew exchanging Soyuz 8 Mission to the ISS in October 2003 when after 11 days in Microgravity the Spanish-born astronaut Pedro Duque returned in the Soyuz 7 capsule carrying the experiments prepared by our Team Due to the constraints in the current ISS experiments in these Missions we limited the stages explored in our experiment to the developmental processes occurring during Drosophila metamorphosis As the experimental conditions at the launch site Baikonour were fairly limited we prepared the experiment in Madrid Toulouse and transp o rted the samples at 15 C in a temperature controlled container to slow down the developmental process a

  7. Feline immunodeficiency virus OrfA alters gene expression of splicing factors and proteasome-ubiquitination proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, Magnus; Chatterji, Udayan; Schaffer, Lana; Rozieres, Sohela de; Elder, John H.

    2008-02-20

    Expression of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) accessory protein OrfA (or Orf2) is critical for efficient viral replication in lymphocytes, both in vitro and in vivo. OrfA has been reported to exhibit functions in common with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) accessory proteins Vpr and Tat, although the function of OrfA has not been fully explained. Here, we use microarray analysis to characterize how OrfA modulates the gene expression profile of T-lymphocytes. The primary IL-2-dependent T-cell line 104-C1 was transduced to express OrfA. Functional expression of OrfA was demonstrated by trans complementation of the OrfA-defective clone, FIV-34TF10. OrfA-expressing cells had a slightly reduced cell proliferation rate but did not exhibit any significant alteration in cell cycle distribution. Reverse-transcribed RNA from cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP + OrfA were hybridized to Affymetrix HU133 Plus 2.0 microarray chips representing more than 47,000 genome-wide transcripts. By using two statistical approaches, 461 (Rank Products) and 277 (ANOVA) genes were identified as modulated by OrfA expression. The functional relevance of the differentially expressed genes was explored by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The analyses revealed alterations in genes critical for RNA post-transcriptional modifications and protein ubiquitination as the two most significant functional outcomes of OrfA expression. In these two groups, several subunits of the spliceosome, cellular splicing factors and family members of the proteasome-ubiquitination system were identified. These findings provide novel information on the versatile function of OrfA during FIV infection and indicate a fine-tuning mechanism of the cellular environment by OrfA to facilitate efficient FIV replication.

  8. Feline immunodeficiency virus OrfA alters gene expression of splicing factors and proteasome-ubiquitination proteins.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, Magnus; Chatterji, Udayan; Schaffer, Lana; de Rozières, Sohela; Elder, John H

    2008-02-20

    Expression of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) accessory protein OrfA (or Orf2) is critical for efficient viral replication in lymphocytes, both in vitro and in vivo. OrfA has been reported to exhibit functions in common with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) accessory proteins Vpr and Tat, although the function of OrfA has not been fully explained. Here, we use microarray analysis to characterize how OrfA modulates the gene expression profile of T-lymphocytes. The primary IL-2-dependent T-cell line 104-C1 was transduced to express OrfA. Functional expression of OrfA was demonstrated by trans complementation of the OrfA-defective clone, FIV-34TF10. OrfA-expressing cells had a slightly reduced cell proliferation rate but did not exhibit any significant alteration in cell cycle distribution. Reverse-transcribed RNA from cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP+OrfA were hybridized to Affymetrix HU133 Plus 2.0 microarray chips representing more than 47,000 genome-wide transcripts. By using two statistical approaches, 461 (Rank Products) and 277 (ANOVA) genes were identified as modulated by OrfA expression. The functional relevance of the differentially expressed genes was explored by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The analyses revealed alterations in genes critical for RNA post-transcriptional modifications and protein ubiquitination as the two most significant functional outcomes of OrfA expression. In these two groups, several subunits of the spliceosome, cellular splicing factors and family members of the proteasome-ubiquitination system were identified. These findings provide novel information on the versatile function of OrfA during FIV infection and indicate a fine-tuning mechanism of the cellular environment by OrfA to facilitate efficient FIV replication. PMID:17963812

  9. The urologic epithelial stem cell database (UESC) – a web tool for cell type-specific gene expression and immunohistochemistry images of the prostate and bladder

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Laura E; Deutsch, Eric W; Campbell, David S; Korb, Martin; True, Lawrence D; Liu, Alvin Y

    2007-01-01

    Background Public databases are crucial for analysis of high-dimensional gene and protein expression data. The Urologic Epithelial Stem Cells (UESC) database is a public database that contains gene and protein information for the major cell types of the prostate, prostate cancer cell lines, and a cancer cell type isolated from a primary tumor. Similarly, such information is available for urinary bladder cell types. Description Two major data types were archived in the database, protein abundance localization data from immunohistochemistry images, and transcript abundance data principally from DNA microarray analysis. Data results were organized in modules that were made to operate independently but built upon a core functionality. Gene array data and immunostaining images for human and mouse prostate and bladder were made available for interrogation. Data analysis capabilities include: (1) CD (cluster designation) cell surface protein data. For each cluster designation molecule, a data summary allows easy retrieval of images (at multiple magnifications). (2) Microarray data. Single gene or batch search can be initiated with Affymetrix Probeset ID, Gene Name, or Accession Number together with options of coalescing probesets and/or replicates. Conclusion Databases are invaluable for biomedical research, and their utility depends on data quality and user friendliness. UESC provides for database queries and tools to examine cell type-specific gene expression (normal vs. cancer), whereas most other databases contain only whole tissue expression datasets. The UESC database provides a valuable tool in the analysis of differential gene expression in prostate cancer genes in cancer progression. PMID:18072977

  10. Transgenic control of perforin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenheld, M.G.; Podack, E.R.; Levy, R.B.

    1995-03-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming effector molecule of CTL and NK cells. To characterize perforin gene expression and its transcriptional control mechanisms in vivo, expression of a cell surface tag, i.e., human CD4, was driven by 5.1 kb of the murin perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region in transgenic mice. Six out of seven transgenic lines expressed the perforin-tag hybrid gene at low to intermediate levels, depending on the integration site. Transgene expression occurred in all cells that physiologically are able to express perforin. At the whole organ level, significant amounts of transgenic mRNA and endogenous perforin mRNA were co-expressed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the lung, the ileum, the oviduct/uterus, and the bone marrow. At the single cell level, the perforin tag was present on NK cells and on CD8{sup +}, as well as on CD4{sup +} cells. Also targeted were Thy-1.2{sup +} {gamma}{delta} T cells, but not Thy-1.2{sup -} {gamma}{delta} T cells, B cells, nor monocytes. During thymic T cell development, transgene expression occurred in double negative (CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}) thymocytes and was detected at all subsequent stages, but exceeded the expression levels of the endogenous gene in the thymus. In conclusion, the analyzed perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region contains important cis-acting sequences that restrict perforin expression to T cells and NK cells, and therefore provides a unique tool for manipulating T cell and/or Nk cell-mediated immune responses in transgenic mice. On the other hand, the normal control of perforin gene expression involves at least one additional negative control mechanism that was not mediated by the transgenic promoter and upstream region. This control restricts perforin gene expression in thymically developing T cells and in most resting peripheral T cells, but can be released upon T cell activation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Antiphospholipid antibodies in a large population-based cohort: genome-wide associations and effects on monocyte gene expression.

    PubMed

    Müller-Calleja, Nadine; Rossmann, Heidi; Müller, Christian; Wild, Philipp; Blankenberg, Stefan; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Binder, Harald; Beutel, Manfred E; Manukyan, Davit; Zeller, Tanja; Lackner, Karl J

    2016-07-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterised by venous and/or arterial thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in women combined with the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). We aimed to identify genetic factors associated with the presence of aPL in a population based cohort. Furthermore, we wanted to clarify if the presence of aPL affects gene expression in circulating monocytes. Titres of IgG and IgM against cardiolipin, β2glycoprotein 1 (anti-β2GPI), and IgG against domain 1 of β2GPI (anti-domain 1) were determined in approx. 5,000 individuals from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) a population based cohort of German descent. Genotyping was conducted on Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 arrays. Monocyte gene expression was determined in a subgroup of 1,279 individuals by using the Illumina HT-12 v3 BeadChip. Gene expression data were confirmed in vitro and ex vivo by qRT-PCR. Genome wide analysis revealed significant associations of anti-β2GPI IgG and APOH on chromosome 17, which had been previously identified by candidate gene approaches, and of anti-domain1 and MACROD2 on chromosome 20 which has been listed in a previous GWAS as a suggestive locus associated with the occurrence of anti-β2GPI antibodies. Expression analysis confirmed increased expression of TNFα in monocytes and identified and confirmed neuron navigator 3 (NAV3) as a novel gene induced by aPL. In conclusion, MACROD2 represents a novel genetic locus associated with aPL. Furthermore, we show that aPL induce the expression of NAV3 in monocytes and endothelial cells. This will stimulate further research into the role of these genes in the APS. PMID:27098658

  12. Gene expression profiling analysis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    YIN, JI-GANG; LIU, XIAN-YING; WANG, BIN; WANG, DAN-YANG; WEI, MAN; FANG, HUA; XIANG, MEI

    2016-01-01

    As a gynecological oncology, ovarian cancer has high incidence and mortality. To study the mechanisms of ovarian cancer, the present study analyzed the GSE37582 microarray. GSE37582 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included data from 74 ovarian cancer cases and 47 healthy controls. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using linear models for microarray data package in R and were further screened for functional annotation. Next, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was conducted. The interaction associations of the proteins encoded by the DEGs were searched using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes, and the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized by Cytoscape. Moreover, module analysis of the PPI network was performed using the BioNet analysis tool in R. A total of 284 DEGs were screened, consisting of 145 upregulated genes and 139 downregulated genes. In particular, downregulated FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) was an oncogene, while downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) was a tumor suppressor gene and upregulated cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) was classed as an ‘other’ gene. The enriched functions included collagen catabolic process, stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade and insulin receptor signaling pathway. Meanwhile, FOS (degree, 15), CD44 (degree, 9), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2; degree, 7), CDKN1A (degree, 7) and matrix metallopeptidase 3 (MMP3; degree, 6) had higher connectivity degrees in the PPI network for the DEGs. These genes may be involved in ovarian cancer by interacting with other genes in the module of the PPI network (e.g., BCL2-FOS, BCL2-CDKN1A, FOS-CDKN1A, FOS-CD44, MMP3-MMP7 and MMP7-CD44). Overall, BCL2, FOS, CDKN1A, CD44, MMP3 and MMP7 may be correlated with ovarian cancer. PMID:27347159

  13. Conditional Gene Expression in Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Mélanie; Singh, Anil Kumar; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Nassif, Xavier; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging human pathogen responsible for lung infections, skin and soft-tissue infections and disseminated infections in immunocompromised patients. It may exist either as a smooth (S) or rough (R) morphotype, the latter being associated with increased pathogenicity in various models. Genetic tools for homologous recombination and conditional gene expression are desperately needed to allow the study of M. abscessus virulence. However, descriptions of knock-out (KO) mutants in M. abscessus are rare, with only one KO mutant from an S strain described so far. Moreover, of the three major tools developed for homologous recombination in mycobacteria, only the one based on expression of phage recombinases is working. Several conditional gene expression tools have recently been engineered for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis, but none have been tested yet in M. abscessus. Based on previous experience with genetic tools allowing homologous recombination and their failure in M. abscessus, we evaluated the potential interest of a conditional gene expression approach using a system derived from the two repressors system, TetR/PipOFF. After several steps necessary to adapt TetR/PipOFF for M. abscessus, we have shown the efficiency of this system for conditional expression of an essential mycobacterial gene, fadD32. Inhibition of fadD32 was demonstrated for both the S and R isotypes, with marginally better efficiency for the R isotype. Conditional gene expression using the dedicated TetR/PipOFF system vectors developed here is effective in S and R M. abscessus, and may constitute an interesting approach for future genetic studies in this pathogen. PMID:22195042

  14. Analysis of genomic aberrations and gene expression profiling identifies novel lesions and pathways in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rice, K L; Lin, X; Wolniak, K; Ebert, B L; Berkofsky-Fessler, W; Buzzai, M; Sun, Y; Xi, C; Elkin, P; Levine, R; Golub, T; Gilliland, D G; Crispino, J D; Licht, J D; Zhang, W

    2011-01-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, are myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) with distinct clinical features and are associated with the JAK2V617F mutation. To identify genomic anomalies involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders, we profiled 87 MPN patients using Affymetrix 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Aberrations affecting chr9 were the most frequently observed and included 9pLOH (n=16), trisomy 9 (n=6) and amplifications of 9p13.3–23.3 (n=1), 9q33.1–34.13 (n=1) and 9q34.13 (n=6). Patients with trisomy 9 were associated with elevated JAK2V617F mutant allele burden, suggesting that gain of chr9 represents an alternative mechanism for increasing JAK2V617F dosage. Gene expression profiling of patients with and without chr9 abnormalities (+9, 9pLOH), identified genes potentially involved in disease pathogenesis including JAK2, STAT5B and MAPK14. We also observed recurrent gains of 1p36.31–36.33 (n=6), 17q21.2–q21.31 (n=5) and 17q25.1–25.3 (n=5) and deletions affecting 18p11.31–11.32 (n=8). Combined SNP and gene expression analysis identified aberrations affecting components of a non-canonical PRC2 complex (EZH1, SUZ12 and JARID2) and genes comprising a ‘HSC signature' (MLLT3, SMARCA2 and PBX1). We show that NFIB, which is amplified in 7/87 MPN patients and upregulated in PV CD34+ cells, protects cells from apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal. PMID:22829077

  15. Integrating heterogeneous gene expression data for gene regulatory network modelling.

    PubMed

    Sîrbu, Alina; Ruskin, Heather J; Crane, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are complex biological systems that have a large impact on protein levels, so that discovering network interactions is a major objective of systems biology. Quantitative GRN models have been inferred, to date, from time series measurements of gene expression, but at small scale, and with limited application to real data. Time series experiments are typically short (number of time points of the order of ten), whereas regulatory networks can be very large (containing hundreds of genes). This creates an under-determination problem, which negatively influences the results of any inferential algorithm. Presented here is an integrative approach to model inference, which has not been previously discussed to the authors' knowledge. Multiple heterogeneous expression time series are used to infer the same model, and results are shown to be more robust to noise and parameter perturbation. Additionally, a wavelet analysis shows that these models display limited noise over-fitting within the individual datasets. PMID:21948152

  16. Multiple Stochastic Point Processes in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Rajamanickam

    2008-04-01

    We generalize the idea of multiple-stochasticity in chemical reaction systems to gene expression. Using Chemical Langevin Equation approach we investigate how this multiple-stochasticity can influence the overall molecular number fluctuations. We show that the main sources of this multiple-stochasticity in gene expression could be the randomness in transcription and translation initiation times which in turn originates from the underlying bio-macromolecular recognition processes such as the site-specific DNA-protein interactions and therefore can be internally regulated by the supra-molecular structural factors such as the condensation/super-coiling of DNA. Our theory predicts that (1) in case of gene expression system, the variances ( φ) introduced by the randomness in transcription and translation initiation-times approximately scales with the degree of condensation ( s) of DNA or mRNA as φ ∝ s -6. From the theoretical analysis of the Fano factor as well as coefficient of variation associated with the protein number fluctuations we predict that (2) unlike the singly-stochastic case where the Fano factor has been shown to be a monotonous function of translation rate, in case of multiple-stochastic gene expression the Fano factor is a turn over function with a definite minimum. This in turn suggests that the multiple-stochastic processes can also be well tuned to behave like a singly-stochastic point processes by adjusting the rate parameters.

  17. Population-level control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Adams, Rhys; van Itallie, Elizabeth; Bennett, Matthew; Balazsi, Gabor

    2011-03-01

    Gene expression is the process that translates genetic information into proteins, that determine the way cells live, function and even die. It was demonstrated that cells with identical genomes exposed to the same environment can differ in their protein composition and therefore phenotypes. Protein levels can vary between cells due to the stochastic nature of intracellular biochemical events, indicating that the genotype-phenotype connection is not deterministic at the cellular level. We asked whether genomes could encode isogenic cell populations more reliably than single cells. To address this question, we built two gene circuits to control three cell population-level characteristics: gene expression mean, coefficient of variation and non-genetic memory of previous expression states. Indeed, we found that these population-level characteristics were more predictable than the gene expression of single cells in a well-controlled environment. This research was supported by the NIH Director's New Innovator Award 1DP2 OD006481-01 and Welch Foundation Grant C-1729.

  18. Current Gene Expression Studies in Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Jiang, Yao-Guang

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma is one of the deadliest cancers with highly aggressive potency, ranking as the sixth most common cancer among males and ninth most common cancer among females globally. Due to metastasis and invasion of surrounding tissues in early stage, the 5-year overall survival rate (14%) of esophageal cancer remains poor, even in comparison with the dismal survival rates (4%) from the 1970s. Numerous genes and proteins with abnormal expression and function involve in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer, but the concrete process remains unclear. Microarray technique has been applied to investigating esophageal cancer. Many gene expression studies have been undertaken to look at the specific patterns of gene transcript levels in esophageal cancer. Human tissues and cell lines were used in these geneprofiling studies and a very valuable and interesting set of data has resulted from various microarray experiments. These expression studies have provided increased understanding of the complex pathological mechanisms involved in esophageal cancer. The eventual goal of microarray is to discover new markers for therapy and to customize therapy based on an individual tumor genetic composition. This review summarized the current state of gene expression profile studies in esophageal cancer. PMID:20514215

  19. Gene expression analysis of the embryonic subplate

    PubMed Central

    Oeschger, Franziska M.; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Lee, Sheena; García-Moreno, Fernando; Goffinet, André M.; Arbones, Mariona; Rakic, Sonia; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The subplate layer of the cerebral cortex is comprised of a heterogeneous population of cells and contains some of the earliest-generated neurons. In the embryonic brain, subplate cells contribute to the guidance and areal targeting of thalamocortical axons. At later stages, they are involved in the maturation and plasticity of the cortical circuitry and the establishment of functional modules. We aimed to further characterize the embryonic murine subplate population by establishing a gene expression profile at embryonic day 15.5 using laser capture microdissection and microarrays. The microarray identified over 300 transcripts with higher expression in the subplate compared to the cortical plate at this stage. Using quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we have confirmed specific expression in the E15.5 subplate for 13 selected genes which have not been previously associated with this compartment (Abca8a, Cdh10, Cdh18, Csmd3, Gabra5, Kcnt2, Ogfrl1, Pls3, Rcan2, Sv2b, Slc8a2, Unc5c and Zdhhc2). In the reeler mutant, the expression of the majority of these genes (9 out of 13) was shifted in accordance with the altered position of subplate. These genes belong to several functional groups and likely contribute to the maturation and electrophysiological properties of subplate cells and to axonal growth and guidance. PMID:21862448

  20. The Low Noise Limit in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Roy D.; Razooky, Brandon S.; Weinberger, Leor S.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i) the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii) the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiency can–and in the case of E. coli does–control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. These results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1) a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2) high noise distributed to only a select group of genes. PMID:26488303

  1. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. PMID:22882155

  2. Gene expression analysis of the embryonic subplate.

    PubMed

    Oeschger, Franziska M; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Lee, Sheena; García-Moreno, Fernando; Goffinet, André M; Arbonés, Maria L; Rakic, Sonja; Molnár, Zoltán

    2012-06-01

    The subplate layer of the cerebral cortex is comprised of a heterogeneous population of cells and contains some of the earliest-generated neurons. In the embryonic brain, subplate cells contribute to the guidance and areal targeting of thalamocortical axons. At later developmental stages, they are predominantly involved in the maturation and plasticity of the cortical circuitry and the establishment of functional modules. We aimed to further characterize the embryonic murine subplate population by establishing a gene expression profile at embryonic day (E) 15.5 using laser capture microdissection and microarrays. The microarray identified over 300 transcripts with higher expression in the subplate compared with the cortical plate at this stage. Using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization (ISH), and immunohistochemistry (IHC), we have confirmed specific expression in the E15.5 subplate for 13 selected genes, which have not been previously associated with this compartment (Abca8a, Cdh10, Cdh18, Csmd3, Gabra5, Kcnt2, Ogfrl1, Pls3, Rcan2, Sv2b, Slc8a2, Unc5c, and Zdhhc2). In the reeler mutant, the expression of the majority of these genes (9 of 13) was shifted in accordance with the altered position of subplate. These genes belong to several functional groups and likely contribute to synapse formation and axonal growth and guidance in subplate cells. PMID:21862448

  3. The low noise limit in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Weinberger, Leor S.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Razooky, Brandon S.

    2015-10-21

    Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i) the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii) the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiency can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. Lastly, these results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1) a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2) high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.

  4. The low noise limit in gene expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dar, Roy D.; Weinberger, Leor S.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Razooky, Brandon S.

    2015-10-21

    Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i) the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii) the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiencymore » can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. Lastly, these results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1) a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2) high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.« less

  5. Digital gene expression signatures for maize development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide expression signatures detect specific perturbations in developmental programs and contribute to functional resolution of key regulatory networks. In maize (Zea mays) inflorescences, mutations in the RAMOSA (RA) genes affect determinacy of axillary meristems and thus alter branching patt...

  6. Identification of differentially expressed genes between developing seeds of different soybean cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rongshuang; Glazebrook, Jane; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Orf, James H; Gibson, Susan I

    2015-12-01

    Soybean is a major source of protein and oil and a primary feedstock for biodiesel production. Research on soybean seed composition and yield has revealed that protein, oil and yield are controlled quantitatively and quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified for each of these traits. However, very limited information is available regarding the genetic mechanisms controlling seed composition and yield. To help address this deficiency, we used Affymetrix Soybean GeneChips® to identify genes that are differentially expressed between developing seeds of the Minsoy and Archer soybean cultivars, which differ in seed weight, yield, protein content and oil content. A total of 700 probe sets were found to be expressed at significantly different (defined as having an adjusted p-value below or equal to 0.05 and an at least 2-fold difference) levels between the two cultivars at one or more of the three developmental stages and in at least one of the two years assayed. Comparison of data from soybeans collected in two different years revealed that 97 probe sets were expressed at significantly different levels in both years. Functional annotations were assigned to 78% of these 97 probe sets based on the SoyBase Affymetrix™ GeneChip® Soybean Genome Array Annotation. Genes involved in receptor binding/activity and protein binding are overrepresented among the group of 97 probe sets that were differentially expressed in both years assayed. Probe sets involved in growth/development, signal transduction, transcription, defense/stress response and protein and lipid metabolism were also identified among the 97 probe sets and their possible implications in the regulation of agronomic traits are discussed. As the Minsoy and Archer soybean cultivars differ with respect to seed size, yield, protein content and lipid content, some of the differentially expressed probe sets identified in this study may thus play important roles in controlling these traits. Others of these probe

  7. Expression of mouse metallothionein genes in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Yeargan, R.; Wagner, G.J.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1990-05-01

    We have expressed a mouse metallothionein (NT) gene in tobacco under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and a pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) gene promoter. Seedlings in which MT gene expression is driven by the 35S promoter are resistant to toxic levels of cadmium. Mature plants carrying the 35S-MT gene accumulate less Cd in their leaves when exposed to low levels of Cd in laboratory growth conditions. Plants with the rbcS-MT construction express this gene in a light-regulated and tissue-specific manner, as expected. Moreover, the MT levels in leaves in these plants are about 20% of those seen in 35S-MT plants. These plants are currently being tested for Cd resistance. In addition, a small field evaluation of 35S-MT lines for Cd levels is being evaluated. These experiments will address the possibility of using MTs to alter Cd levels in crop species.

  8. Coordination of plastid and nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, John C; Sullivan, James A; Wang, Jun-Hui; Jerome, Cheryl A; MacLean, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The coordinated expression of genes distributed between the nuclear and plastid genomes is essential for the assembly of functional chloroplasts. Although the nucleus has a pre-eminent role in controlling chloroplast biogenesis, there is considerable evidence that the expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthesis-related proteins is regulated by signals from plastids. Perturbation of several plastid-located processes, by inhibitors or in mutants, leads to decreased transcription of a set of nuclear photosynthesis-related genes. Characterization of arabidopsis gun (genomes uncoupled) mutants, which express nuclear genes in the presence of norflurazon or lincomycin, has provided evidence for two separate signalling pathways, one involving tetrapyrrole biosynthesis intermediates and the other requiring plastid protein synthesis. In addition, perturbation of photosynthetic electron transfer produces at least two different redox signals, as part of the acclimation to altered light conditions. The recognition of multiple plastid signals requires a reconsideration of the mechanisms of regulation of transcription of nuclear genes encoding photosynthesis-related proteins. PMID:12594922

  9. Gene expression variation and expression quantitative trait mapping of human chromosome 21 genes.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Samuel; Lyle, Robert; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Attar, Homa; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Gehrig, Corinne; Parand, Leila; Gagnebin, Maryline; Rougemont, Jacques; Jongeneel, C Victor; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2005-12-01

    Inter-individual differences in gene expression are likely to account for an important fraction of phenotypic differences, including susceptibility to common disorders. Recent studies have shown extensive variation in gene expression levels in humans and other organisms, and that a fraction of this variation is under genetic control. We investigated the patterns of gene expression variation in a 25 Mb region of human chromosome 21, which has been associated with many Down syndrome (DS) phenotypes. Taqman real-time PCR was used to measure expression variation of 41 genes in lymphoblastoid cells of 40 unrelated individuals. For 25 genes found to be differentially expressed, additional analysis was performed in 10 CEPH families to determine heritabilities and map loci harboring regulatory variation. Seventy-six percent of the differentially expressed genes had significant heritabilities, and genomewide linkage analysis led to the identification of significant eQTLs for nine genes. Most eQTLs were in trans, with the best result (P=7.46 x 10(-8)) obtained for TMEM1 on chromosome 12q24.33. A cis-eQTL identified for CCT8 was validated by performing an association study in 60 individuals from the HapMap project. SNP rs965951 located within CCT8 was found to be significantly associated with its expression levels (P=2.5 x 10(-5)) confirming cis-regulatory variation. The results of our study provide a representative view of expression variation of chromosome 21 genes, identify loci involved in their regulation and suggest that genes, for which expression differences are significantly larger than 1.5-fold in control samples, are unlikely to be involved in DS-phenotypes present in all affected individuals. PMID:16251198

  10. Gene expression during normal and FSHD myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a dominant disease linked to contraction of an array of tandem 3.3-kb repeats (D4Z4) at 4q35. Within each repeat unit is a gene, DUX4, that can encode a protein containing two homeodomains. A DUX4 transcript derived from the last repeat unit in a contracted array is associated with pathogenesis but it is unclear how. Methods Using exon-based microarrays, the expression profiles of myogenic precursor cells were determined. Both undifferentiated myoblasts and myoblasts differentiated to myotubes derived from FSHD patients and controls were studied after immunocytochemical verification of the quality of the cultures. To further our understanding of FSHD and normal myogenesis, the expression profiles obtained were compared to those of 19 non-muscle cell types analyzed by identical methods. Results Many of the ~17,000 examined genes were differentially expressed (> 2-fold, p < 0.01) in control myoblasts or myotubes vs. non-muscle cells (2185 and 3006, respectively) or in FSHD vs. control myoblasts or myotubes (295 and 797, respectively). Surprisingly, despite the morphologically normal differentiation of FSHD myoblasts to myotubes, most of the disease-related dysregulation was seen as dampening of normal myogenesis-specific expression changes, including in genes for muscle structure, mitochondrial function, stress responses, and signal transduction. Other classes of genes, including those encoding extracellular matrix or pro-inflammatory proteins, were upregulated in FSHD myogenic cells independent of an inverse myogenesis association. Importantly, the disease-linked DUX4 RNA isoform was detected by RT-PCR in FSHD myoblast and myotube preparations only at extremely low levels. Unique insights into myogenesis-specific gene expression were also obtained. For example, all four Argonaute genes involved in RNA-silencing were significantly upregulated during normal (but not FSHD) myogenesis relative to non

  11. Differential expression of myrosinase gene families.

    PubMed Central

    Lenman, M; Falk, A; Rödin, J; Höglund, A S; Ek, B; Rask, L

    1993-01-01

    In mature seeds of Brassica napus three major and three minor myrosinase isoenzymes were identified earlier. These myrosinases are known to be encoded by at least two different families of myrosinase genes, denoted MA and MB. In the work described in this paper the presence of different myrosinase isoenzymes in embryos, seedlings, and vegetative mature tissues of B. napus was studied and related to the expression of myrosinase MA and MB genes in the same tissues to facilitate future functional studies of these enzymes. In developing seeds, myrosinases of 75, 73, 70, 68, 66, and 65 kD were present. During seedling development there was a turnover of the myrosinase pool such that in 5-d-old seedlings the 75-, 70-, 66-, and 65-kD myrosinases were present, with the 70- and 75-kD myrosinases predominating. In 21-d-old seedlings the same myrosinases were present, but the 66- and 65-kD myrosinase species were most abundant. At flowering the mature organs of the plant contained only a 72-kD myrosinase. MA genes were expressed only in developing seeds, whereas MB genes were most highly expressed in seeds, seedling cotyledons, young leaves, and to a lesser extent other organs of the mature plant. During embryogenesis of B. napus, myrosinase MA and MB gene transcripts started to accumulate approximately 20 d after pollination and reached their highest level approximately 15 d later. MB transcripts accumulated to about 3 times the amount of MA transcripts. In situ hybridization analysis of B. napus embryos showed that MA transcripts were present predominatly in myrosin cells in the axis, whereas MB genes were expressed in myrosin cells of the entire embryo. The embryo axiz contained 75-, 70-, and 65-kD myrosinases, whereas the cotyledons contained mainly 70- and 65-kD myrosinases. Amino acid sequencing revealed the 75-kD myrosinase to be encoded by the MA gene family. The high degree of cell and tissue specificity of the expression of myrosinase genes suggests that studies of

  12. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid mechanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  13. Control mechanisms of plastid gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Gruissem, W.; Tonkyn, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Plastid DNAs of higher plants contain approximately 150 genes that encode RNAs and proteins for genetic and photosynthetic functions of the organelle. Results published in the last few years illustrate that the spatial and temporal expression of these plastid genes is regulated, in part, at the transcriptional level, but that developmentally controlled changes in mRNA stability, translational activity, and protein phosphorylation also have an important role in the control of plastid functions. This comprehensive review summarizes and discusses the mechanisms by which regulation of gene expression is exerted at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. It provides an overview of our current knowledge, but also emphasizes areas that are controversial and in which information on regulatory mechanisms is still incomplete. 455 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow–induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs. PMID:25360054

  15. Methods to improve cardiac gene therapy expression.

    PubMed

    Scimia, Maria Cecilia; Sydnes, Kate E; Zuppo, Daniel A; Koch, Walter J

    2014-11-01

    Gene therapy strategies are becoming a valuable approach for the treatment of heart failure. Some trials are ongoing and others are being organized. Vascular access in clinical experimentation is still the chosen modality of delivery, but many other approaches are in research and development. A successful gene therapy strategy involves not only the choice of the right vector and gene, but also the correct delivery strategy that allows for transduction of the highest percentage of cardiomyocytes, limited spilling of virus into other organs and the possibility to correlate the amount of injected virus to the rate of the expression within the cardiac tissue. The authors will first concentrate on clarifying what the barriers are that the virus has to overcome in order to reach the nuclei of the target organs and methodologies that have been tested to improve the range of expression. PMID:25340284

  16. Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 p30II alters cellular gene expression to selectively enhance signaling pathways that activate T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M; Hiraragi, Hajime; Shen, Lei; Feuer, Gerold; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen; Lairmore, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in the virus life cycle or HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Proviral clones of the virus with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. Exogenous expression of p30II differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and represses tax/rex RNA nuclear export. Results Herein, we further characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression, using stable p30II expression system employing lentiviral vectors to test cellular gene expression with Affymetrix U133A arrays, representing ~33,000 human genes. Reporter assays in Jurkat T cells and RT-PCR in Jurkat and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes were used to confirm selected gene expression patterns. Our data reveals alterations of interrelated pathways of cell proliferation, T-cell signaling, apoptosis and cell cycle in p30II expressing Jurkat T cells. In all categories, p30II appeared to be an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively increasing the expression of certain key regulatory genes. Conclusions We are the first to demonstrate that p30II, while repressing the expression of many genes, selectively activates key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Collectively, our data suggests that this complex retrovirus, associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, relies upon accessory gene products to modify cellular environment to promote clonal expansion of the virus genome and thus maintain proviral loads in vivo. PMID:15560845

  17. Sex-specific patterns and deregulation of endocrine pathways in the gene expression profiles of Bangladeshi adults exposed to arsenic contaminated drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, Alexandra; Chervona, Yana; Hall, Megan; Kluz, Thomas; Gamble, Mary V.; Costa, Max

    2015-05-01

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water occurs globally and is associated with numerous diseases including skin, lung and bladder cancers, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research indicates that arsenic may be an endocrine disruptor. This study was conducted to evaluate the nature of gene expression changes among males and females exposed to arsenic contaminated water in Bangladesh at high and low doses. Twenty-nine (55% male) Bangladeshi adults with water arsenic exposure ranging from 50 to 1000 μg/L were selected from the Folic Acid Creatinine Trial. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells for gene expression profiling using Affymetrix 1.0 ST arrays. Differentially expressed genes were assessed between high and low exposure groups for males and females separately and findings were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. There were 534 and 645 differentially expressed genes (p < 0.05) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of males and females, respectively, when high and low water arsenic exposure groups were compared. Only 43 genes overlapped between the two sexes, with 29 changing in opposite directions. Despite the difference in gene sets both males and females exhibited common biological changes including deregulation of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, deregulation of genes downstream of Sp1 (specificity protein 1) transcription factor, and prediction of estrogen receptor alpha as a key hub in cardiovascular networks. Arsenic-exposed adults exhibit sex-specific gene expression profiles that implicate involvement of the endocrine system. Due to arsenic's possible role as an endocrine disruptor, exposure thresholds for arsenic may require different parameters for males and females. - Highlights: • Males and females exhibit unique gene expression changes in response to arsenic. • Only 23 genes are common among the differentially expressed genes for the sexes. • Male and female gene lists exhibit common biological

  18. From gene expressions to genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2009-03-01

    A method based on the principle of entropy maximization is used to identify the gene interaction network with the highest probability of giving rise to experimentally observed transcript profiles [1]. In its simplest form, the method yields the pairwise gene interaction network, but it can also be extended to deduce higher order correlations. Analysis of microarray data from genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultures exhibiting energy metabollic oscillations identifies a gene interaction network that reflects the intracellular communication pathways. These pathways adjust cellular metabolic activity and cell division to the limiting nutrient conditions that trigger metabolic oscillations. The success of the present approach in extracting meaningful genetic connections suggests that the maximum entropy principle is a useful concept for understanding living systems, as it is for other complex, nonequilibrium systems. The time-dependent behavior of the genetic network is found to involve only a few fundamental modes [2,3]. [4pt] REFERENCES:[0pt] [1] T. R. Lezon, J. R. Banavar, M. Cieplak, A. Maritan, and N. Fedoroff, Using the principle of entropy maximization to infer genetic interaction networks from gene expression patterns, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA) 103, 19033-19038 (2006) [0pt] [2] N. S. Holter, M. Mitra, A. Maritan, M. Cieplak, J. R. Banavar, and N. V. Fedoroff, Fundamental patterns underlying gene expression profiles: simplicity from complexity, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 8409-8414 (2000) [0pt] [3] N. S. Holter, A. Maritan, M. Cieplak, N. V. Fedoroff, and J. R. Banavar, Dynamic modeling of gene expression data, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 1693-1698 (2001)

  19. In vitro gene expression data supporting a DNA non-reactive genotoxic mechanism for ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Arbillaga, Leire; Lopez de Cerain, Adela . E-mail: acerain@unav.es

    2007-04-15

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin often found in cereals and agricultural products. There is unequivocal evidence of renal carcinogenicity of OTA in male rats, although the mechanism of action is unknown. At present, available data support an epigenetic mechanism (DNA non-reactive) resulting from oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, because a direct OTA interaction with DNA has not been demonstrated. Genotoxic mechanism (DNA-reactive vs. DNA non-reactive) may have implications on human risk assessment. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to identify biological pathways modulated by OTA in vitro in a human renal cell line (HK-2) to contribute to the elucidation of the mechanism of OTA toxicity. For that purpose, cells were exposed to 50 {mu}M OTA during 6 and 24 h, and gene expression profiles were analyzed using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 A 2.0 Gene Chips. Under the same experimental conditions, genotoxicity was evaluated by the modified comet assay using FPG and Endo III to detect oxidative DNA damage, and intracellular ROS level by the H{sub 2}DCF assay. After 6 h, with slight cytotoxicity (83% survival), genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain were up-regulated; and after 24 h, with a more pronounced cytotoxicity (51% survival), genes implicated in oxidative stress response were also up-regulated. Increase in intracellular ROS level and oxidative DNA damage was evident at both exposure times being more pronounced with high cytotoxicity. On the contrary, up-regulation of genes implicated in DNA damage response, as cell cycle control or apoptosis, was not detected at any exposure time. In conclusion, these results support a DNA non-reactive mechanism of OTA genotoxicity.

  20. Negative energy balance alters global gene expression and immune responses in the uterus of postpartum dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Wathes, D. Claire; Cheng, Zhangrui; Chowdhury, Waliul; Fenwick, Mark A.; Fitzpatrick, Richard; Morris, Dermot G.; Patton, Joe; Murphy, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Most dairy cows suffer uterine microbial contamination postpartum. Persistent endometritis often develops, associated with reduced fertility. We used a model of differential feeding and milking regimes to produce cows in differing negative energy balance status in early lactation (mild or severe, MNEB or SNEB). Blood hematology was assessed preslaughter at 2 wk postpartum. RNA expression in endometrial samples was compared using bovine Affymetrix arrays. Data were mapped using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Circulating concentrations of IGF-I remained lower in the SNEB group, whereas blood nonesterified fatty acid and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were raised. White blood cell count and lymphocyte number were reduced in SNEB cows. Array analysis of endometrial samples identified 274 differentially expressed probes representing 197 recognized genes between the energy balance groups. The main canonical pathways affected related to immunological and inflammatory disease and connective tissue disorders. Inflammatory response genes with major upregulation in SNEB cows included matrix metalloproteinases, chemokines, cytokines, and calgranulins. Expression of several interferon-inducible genes including ISG20, IFIH1, MX1, and MX2 were also significantly increased in the SNEB cows. These results provide evidence that cows in SNEB were still undergoing an active uterine inflammatory response 2 wk postpartum, whereas MNEB cows had more fully recovered from their energy deficit, with their endometrium reaching a more advanced stage of repair. SNEB may therefore prevent cows from mounting an effective immune response to the microbial challenge experienced after calving, prolonging the time required for uterine recovery and compromising subsequent fertility. PMID:19567787

  1. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    SciTech Connect

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  2. Global Gene Expression Profiling and Alternative Splicing Events during the Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Cartilage Endplate-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jin; Fan, Xin; Shangguan, Lei; Liu, Huan; Zhou, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a very prevalent disease and degenerative disc diseases (DDDs) usually account for the LBP. However, the pathogenesis of DDDs is complicated and difficult to elucidate. Alternative splicing is a sophisticated regulatory process which greatly increases cellular complexity and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic organisms. In addition, the cartilage endplate-derived stem cells have been discovered and identified by our research group. In this paper, we continue to investigate gene expression profiling and alternative splicing events during chondrogenic differentiation of cartilage endplate-derived stem cells. We adopted Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 (HTA 2.0) to compare the transcriptional and splicing changes between the control and differentiated samples. RT-PCR and quantitative PCR are used to validate the microarray results. The GO and KEGG pathway analysis was also performed. After bioinformatics analysis of the data, we detected 1953 differentially expressed genes. In terms of alternative splicing, the Splicing Index algorithm was used to select alternatively spliced genes. We detected 4411 alternatively spliced genes. GO and KEGG pathway analysis also revealed several functionally involved biological processes and signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the alternative splicing mechanisms in chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells on a genome-wide scale. PMID:26649308

  3. Fibroblasts from patients with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia show abnormal expression of genes involved in protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Avondo, Federica; Roncaglia, Paola; Crescenzio, Nicoletta; Krmac, Helena; Garelli, Emanuela; Armiraglio, Marta; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Campagnoli, Maria Francesca; Ramenghi, Ugo; Gustincich, Stefano; Santoro, Claudio; Dianzani, Irma

    2009-01-01

    Background Diamond-Blackfan anaemia (DBA) is a rare inherited red cell hypoplasia characterised by a defect in the maturation of erythroid progenitors and in some cases associated with malformations. Patients have an increased risk of solid tumors. Mutations have been found in several ribosomal protein (RP) genes, i.e RPS19, RPS24, RPS17, RPL5, RPL11, RPL35A. Studies in haematopoietic progenitors from patients show that haplo-insufficiency of an RP impairs rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis. DBA lymphocytes show reduced protein synthesis and fibroblasts display abnormal rRNA processing and impaired proliferation. Results To evaluate the involvement of non-haematopoietic tissues in DBA, we have analysed global gene expression in fibroblasts from DBA patients compared to healthy controls. Microarray expression profiling using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133A 2.0 Arrays revealed that 421 genes are differentially expressed in DBA patient fibroblasts. These genes include a large cluster of ribosomal proteins and factors involved in protein synthesis and amino acid metabolism, as well as genes associated to cell death, cancer and tissue development. Conclusion This analysis reports for the first time an abnormal gene expression profile in a non-haematopoietic cell type in DBA. These data support the hypothesis that DBA may be due to a defect in general or specific protein synthesis. PMID:19765279

  4. Topological features in cancer gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, S; Krishnamoorthy, B

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for exploring cancer gene expression data based on tools from algebraic topology. Our method selects a small relevant subset from tens of thousands of genes while simultaneously identifying nontrivial higher order topological features, i.e., holes, in the data. We first circumvent the problem of high dimensionality by dualizing the data, i.e., by studying genes as points in the sample space. Then we select a small subset of the genes as landmarks to construct topological structures that capture persistent, i.e., topologically significant, features of the data set in its first homology group. Furthermore, we demonstrate that many members of these loops have been implicated for cancer biogenesis in scientific literature. We illustrate our method on five different data sets belonging to brain, breast, leukemia, and ovarian cancers. PMID:25592573

  5. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sushma S; Makar, Karen W; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Yang, Peiying; Levy, Lisa; Rudolph, Rebecca Y; Lampe, Paul D; Yan, Min; Markowitz, Sanford D; Bigler, Jeannette; Lampe, Johanna W; Potter, John D

    2015-12-01

    Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133 + 2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d) on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) - accession number GSE71571 - was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]). PMID:26697360

  6. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data.

    PubMed

    Ezer, Daphne; Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-08-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  7. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  8. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  9. [Modifications of gene expression by tumor promoters].

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Zhao, Q; Guo, S; Zhao, M; Cheng, S

    1995-02-01

    The modifications of gene expression by tumor promoters were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. The results of slot blot hybridizations showed that tumor promoter TPA induced c-fos and c-myc expressions in mouse fibroblast cell line BALB/3T3 and rat liver, decreased the levels of Rb RNA in BALB/3T3 cell line and of alpha 1-I3 RNA in rat liver. It was also demonstrated that tumor promoter phenobarbital influenced c-fos and c-myc expressions and decreased alpha 1I3 mRNA level in rat liver during a long term experiment. Phenobarbital was found to have no effect on c-fos and c-myc expressions in rat liver during a short experiment. Tumor promoters induced the expressions of c-fos and c-myc which were positively-related to cancer formation and inhibited the expressions of Rb and alpha 1-I3 which were negatively-related to cancer formation. This implied that tumor promotion played an important role in cancer development and tumor promoters exerted their effects selectively according to the attributes of different genes. PMID:7540119

  10. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots. PMID:26663562

  11. Salt induced gene expression in Prosopis farcta

    SciTech Connect

    Heimer, I.M.; Golan, A.; Lips, H.

    1987-04-01

    The authors hypothesize that in facultative halophytes, the genes which impart salt tolerance are expressed when the plants are exposed to salt. As a first step towards possible identification of these genes, they examined salt induced changes of gene expression in the facultative halophyte Prosopis farcta at the protein level, by SDS-PAGE. Exposure to salt of aseptically grown, two-week old seedlings, was carried out in one of two ways: (1) a one step transfer of seedlings from medium without salt to that with the indicated concentrations followed by 5 hr or 24 hr incubation periods. During the last 2 hrs of each incubation period the seedlings were pulse-labelled with /sup 35/S Sulfate or L-Methionine; (2) a gradual increase of the salt concentration at 50 mM increments at 2-4 day intervals. Two days after reaching the desired salt concentration, the seedlings were pulse-labelled for 2 hrs with /sup 35/S sulfate or L-methionine. Protein from roots were extracted and analyzed. Polypeptides were visualized by staining with coomassie blue or by fluorography. Qualitative as well as quantitative changes of gene expression as induced by salt could be observed. Their significance regarding salt tolerance will be discussed.

  12. Global gene expression profiling of two switchgrass cultivars following inoculation with Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN.

    PubMed

    Lara-Chavez, Alejandra; Lowman, Scott; Kim, Seonhwa; Tang, Yuhong; Zhang, Jiyi; Udvardi, Michael; Nowak, Jerzy; Flinn, Barry; Mei, Chuansheng

    2015-07-01

    Improvement and year-to-year stabilization of biomass yields are primary objectives for the development of a low-input switchgrass feedstock production system using microbial endophytes. An earlier investigation of the effect of Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN on switchgrass germplasm demonstrated differential responses between genotypes. PsJN inoculation of cv. Alamo (lowland ecotype) increased the plant root system, shoot length, and biomass yields, whereas it had no beneficial effect on cv. Cave-in-Rock (upland ecotype). To understand the gene networks governing plant growth promotion responses triggered by PsJN, the gene expression profiles were analysed in these two hosts, following seedling inoculation. The Affymetrix platform switchgrass expressed sequence tag (EST) microarray chip representing 122 972 probe sets, developed by the DOE BioEnergy Science Center, was employed to assess transcript abundance at 0.5, 2, 4, and 8 DAI (days after PsJN inoculation). Approximately 20 000 switchgrass probe sets showed significant responses in either cultivar. Switchgrass identifiers were used to map 19 421 genes in MapMan software. There were apparent differences in gene expression profiling between responsive and non-responsive cultivars after PsJN inoculation. Overall, there were 14 984 and 9691 genes affected by PsJN inoculation in Alamo and Cave-in-Rock, respectively. Of these, 394 are annotated as pathogenesis-related genes. In the responsive cv. Alamo, 68 pathogenesis-related genes were affected, compared with only 10 in the non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock. At the very early stage at 0.5 DAI, both cultivars exhibited similar recognition and defence responses, such as genes in signalling and proteolysis, after which the defence reaction in the responsive cv. Alamo became weaker while it was sustained in non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock. PMID:25788737

  13. Delineating the angiogenic gene expression profile before pulmonary vascular remodeling in a lamb model of congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Fratz, Sohrab; Hou, Yali; Lu, Qing; Görlach, Agnes; Hess, John; Schreiber, Christian; Datar, Sanjeev A.; Oishi, Peter; Nechtman, John; Podolsky, Robert; She, Jin-Xiong; Fineman, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Disordered angiogenesis is implicated in pulmonary vascular remodeling secondary to congenital heart diseases (CHD). However, the underlying genes are not well delineated. We showed previously that an ovine model of CHD with increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF, Shunt) has an “angiogenesis burst” between 1 and 4 wk of age. Thus we hypothesized that the increased PBF elicited a proangiogenic gene expression profile before onset of vessel growth. To test this we utilized microarray analysis to identify genes that could be responsible for the angiogenic response. Total RNA was isolated from lungs of Shunt and control lambs at 3 days of age and hybridized to Affymetrix gene chips for microarray analyses (n = 8/group). Eighty-nine angiogenesis-related genes were found to be upregulated and 26 angiogenesis-related genes downregulated in Shunt compared with control lungs (cutting at 1.2-fold difference, P < 0.05). We then confirmed upregulation of proangiogenic genes FGF2, Angiopoietin2 (Angpt2), and Birc5 at mRNA and protein levels and upregulation of ccl2 at mRNA level in 3-day Shunt lungs. Furthermore, we found that pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) isolated from fetal lambs exhibited increased expression of FGF2, Angpt2, Birc5, and ccl2 and enhanced angiogenesis when exposed to elevated shear stress (35 dyn/cm2) compared with cells exposed to more physiological shear stress (20 dyn/cm2). Finally, we demonstrated that blocking FGF2, Angpt2, Birc5, or ccl2 signaling with neutralizing antibodies or small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreased the angiogenic response induced by shear stress. In conclusion, we have identified a “proangiogenic” gene expression profile in a lamb model of CHD with increased PBF that precedes onset of pulmonary vascular remodeling. Our data indicate that FGF2, Angpt2, Birc5, and ccl2 may play important roles in the angiogenic response. PMID:20978110

  14. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  15. Nitrogen Fixation Mutants of Medicago truncatula Fail to Support Plant and Bacterial Symbiotic Gene Expression1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Starker, Colby G.; Parra-Colmenares, Adriana L.; Smith, Lucinda; Mitra, Raka M.; Long, Sharon R.

    2006-01-01

    The Rhizobium-legume symbiosis culminates in the exchange of nutrients in the root nodule. Bacteria within the nodule reduce molecular nitrogen for plant use and plants provide bacteria with carbon-containing compounds. Following the initial signaling events that lead to plant infection, little is known about the plant requirements for establishment and maintenance of the symbiosis. We screened 44,000 M2 plants from fast neutron-irradiated Medicago truncatula seeds and isolated eight independent mutant lines that are defective in nitrogen fixation. The eight mutants are monogenic and represent seven complementation groups. To monitor bacterial status in mutant nodules, we assayed Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis gene promoters (nodF, exoY, bacA, and nifH) in the defective in nitrogen fixation mutants. Additionally, we used an Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray to monitor gene expression changes in wild-type and three mutant plants during the nodulation process. These analyses suggest the mutants can be separated into three classes: one class that supports little to no nitrogen fixation and minimal bacterial expression of nifH; another class that supports no nitrogen fixation and minimal bacterial expression of nodF, bacA, and nifH; and a final class that supports low levels of both nitrogen fixation and bacterial nifH expression. PMID:16407449

  16. Gene expression profiling in sinonasal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sinonasal adenocarcinomas are uncommon tumors which develop in the ethmoid sinus after exposure to wood dust. Although the etiology of these tumors is well defined, very little is known about their molecular basis and no diagnostic tool exists for their early detection in high-risk workers. Methods To identify genes involved in this disease, we performed gene expression profiling using cancer-dedicated microarrays, on nine matched samples of sinonasal adenocarcinomas and non-tumor sinusal tissue. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry on two additional sets of tumors. Results Among the genes with significant differential expression we selected LGALS4, ACS5, CLU, SRI and CCT5 for further exploration. The overexpression of LGALS4, ACS5, SRI, CCT5 and the downregulation of CLU were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed for LGALS4 (Galectin 4), ACS5 (Acyl-CoA synthetase) and CLU (Clusterin) proteins: LGALS4 was highly up-regulated, particularly in the most differentiated tumors, while CLU was lost in all tumors. The expression of ACS5, was more heterogeneous and no correlation was observed with the tumor type. Conclusion Within our microarray study in sinonasal adenocarcinoma we identified two proteins, LGALS4 and CLU, that were significantly differentially expressed in tumors compared to normal tissue. A further evaluation on a new set of tissues, including precancerous stages and low grade tumors, is necessary to evaluate the possibility of using them as diagnostic markers. PMID:19903339

  17. Expression Profile of Drug and Nutrient Absorption Related Genes in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) Cells Grown under Differentiation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Yong; Jin, Yisheng; Faria, Teresa N.; Tilford, Charles A.; He, Aiqing; Wall, Doris A.; Smith, Ronald L.; Vig, Balvinder S.

    2012-01-01

    The expression levels of genes involved in drug and nutrient absorption were evaluated in the Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) in vitro drug absorption model. MDCK cells were grown on plastic surfaces (for 3 days) or on Transwell® membranes (for 3, 5, 7, and 9 days). The expression profile of genes including ABC transporters, SLC transporters, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was determined using the Affymetrix® Canine GeneChip®. Expression of genes whose probe sets passed a stringent confirmation process was examined. Expression of a few transporter (MDR1, PEPT1 and PEPT2) genes in MDCK cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. The overall gene expression profile was strongly influenced by the type of support the cells were grown on. After 3 days of growth, expression of 28% of the genes was statistically different (1.5-fold cutoff, p < 0.05) between the cells grown on plastic and Transwell® membranes. When cells were differentiated on Transwell® membranes, large changes in gene expression profile were observed during the early stages, which then stabilized after 5–7 days. Only a small number of genes encoding drug absorption related SLC, ABC, and CYP were detected in MDCK cells, and most of them exhibited low hybridization signals. Results from this study provide valuable reference information on endogenous gene expression in MDCK cells that could assist in design of drug-transporter and/or drug-enzyme interaction studies, and help interpret the contributions of various transporters and metabolic enzymes in studies with MDCK cells. PMID:24300234

  18. Consensus gene regulatory networks: combining multiple microarray gene expression datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeling, Emma; Tucker, Allan

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we present a method for modelling gene regulatory networks by forming a consensus Bayesian network model from multiple microarray gene expression datasets. Our method is based on combining Bayesian network graph topologies and does not require any special pre-processing of the datasets, such as re-normalisation. We evaluate our method on a synthetic regulatory network and part of the yeast heat-shock response regulatory network using publicly available yeast microarray datasets. Results are promising; the consensus networks formed provide a broader view of the potential underlying network, obtaining an increased true positive rate over networks constructed from a single data source.

  19. Gene expression profiling analysis of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H.; Ma, J.; Wu, J.; Chen, L.; Sun, F.; Qu, C.; Zheng, D.; Xu, S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study screened potential genes related to lung adenocarcinoma, with the aim of further understanding disease pathogenesis. The GSE2514 dataset including 20 lung adenocarcinoma and 19 adjacent normal tissue samples from 10 patients with lung adenocarcinoma aged 45-73 years was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two groups were screened using the t-test. Potential gene functions were predicted using functional and pathway enrichment analysis, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks obtained from the STRING database were constructed with Cytoscape. Module analysis of PPI networks was performed through MCODE in Cytoscape. In total, 535 upregulated and 465 downregulated DEGs were identified. These included ATP5D, UQCRC2, UQCR11 and genes encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which are mainly associated with mitochondrial ATP synthesis coupled electron transport, and which were enriched in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Other DEGs were associated with DNA replication (PRIM1, MCM3, and RNASEH2A), cell surface receptor-linked signal transduction and the enzyme-linked receptor protein signaling pathway (MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1), and regulation of the cytoskeleton and phosphatidylinositol signaling system (PIP5K1B, PIP5K1C, and PIP4K2B). Our findings suggest that DEGs encoding subunits of NADH, PRIM1, MCM3, MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1 might be associated with the development of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26840709

  20. The Affymetrix DMET Plus Platform Reveals Unique Distribution of ADME-Related Variants in Ethnic Arabs

    PubMed Central

    Wakil, Salma M.; Nguyen, Cao; Muiya, Nzioka P.; Andres, Editha; Lykowska-Tarnowska, Agnieszka; Baz, Batoul; Meyer, Brian F.; Morahan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus Premier Pack has been designed to genotype 1936 gene variants thought to be essential for screening patients in personalized drug therapy. These variants include the cytochrome P450s (CYP450s), the key metabolizing enzymes, many other enzymes involved in phase I and phase II pharmacokinetic reactions, and signaling mediators associated with variability in clinical response to numerous drugs not only among individuals, but also between ethnic populations. Materials and Methods. We genotyped 600 Saudi individuals for 1936 variants on the DMET platform to evaluate their clinical potential in personalized medicine in ethnic Arabs. Results. Approximately 49% each of the 437 CYP450 variants, 56% of the 581 transporters, 56% of 419 transferases, 48% of the 104 dehydrogenases, and 58% of the remaining 390 variants were detected. Several variants, such as rs3740071, rs6193, rs258751, rs6199, rs11568421, and rs8187797, exhibited significantly either higher or lower minor allele frequencies (MAFs) than those in other ethnic groups. Discussion. The present study revealed some unique distribution trends for several variants in Arabs, which displayed partly inverse allelic prevalence compared to other ethnic populations. The results point therefore to the need to verify and ascertain the prevalence of a variant as a prerequisite for engaging it in clinical routine screening in personalized medicine in any given population. PMID:25802476

  1. A novel circadianly expressed Drosophila melanogaster gene dependent on the period gene for its rhythmic expression.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, R N; Krasnow, M A

    1996-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster period (per) gene is required for expression of endogenous circadian rhythms of locomotion and eclosion. per mRNA is expressed with a circadian rhythm that is dependent on Per protein; this feedback loop has been proposed to be essential to the central circadian pacemaker. This model would suggest the Per protein also controls the circadian expression of other genetic loci to generate circadian behavior and physiology. In this paper we describe Dreg-5, a gene whose mRNA is expressed in fly heads with a circadian rhythm nearly identical to that of the per gene. Dreg-5 mRNA continues to cycle in phase with that of per mRNA in conditions of total darkness and also when the daily feeding time is altered. Like per mRNA, Dreg-5 mRNA is not expressed rhythmically in per null mutant flies. Dreg-5 encodes a novel 298 residue protein and Dreg-5 protein isoforms also oscillate in abundance with a circadian rhythm. The phase of Dreg-5 protein oscillation, however, is different from that of Per protein expression, suggesting that Dreg-5 and per have common translational but different post-translational control mechanisms. These results demonstrate that the per gene is capable of modulating the rhythmic expression of other genes; this activity may form the basis of the output of circadian rhythmicity in Drosophila. Images PMID:8612586

  2. Life stage differences in mammary gland gene expression profile in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Sielker, Sonja; Wood, Charles E.; Register, Thomas C.; Lees, Cynthia J.; Dewi, Fitriya N.; Williams, J. Koudy; Wagner, Janice D.; Stefenelli, Ulrich; Cline, J. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common malignancy of women in the developed world. To better understand its pathogenesis, knowledge of normal breast development is crucial, as BC is the result of disregulation of physiologic processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of reproductive life stages on the transcriptional profile of the mammary gland in a primate model. Comparative transcriptomic analyses were carried out using breast tissues from 28 female cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) at the following life stages: prepubertal (n = 5), adolescent (n = 4), adult luteal (n = 5), pregnant (n = 6), lactating (n = 3), and postmenopausal (n = 5). Mammary gland RNA was hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip® Rhesus Macaque Genome Arrays. Differential gene expression was analyzed using ANOVA and cluster analysis. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed distinct separation of life stage groups. More than 2,225 differentially expressed mRNAs were identified. Gene families or pathways that changed across life stages included those related to estrogen and androgen (ESR1, PGR, TFF1, GREB1, AR, 17HSDB2, 17HSDB7, STS, HSD11B1, AKR1C4), prolactin (PRLR, ELF5, STAT5, CSN1S1), insulin-like growth factor signaling (IGF1, IGFBP1, IGFBP5), extracellular matrix (POSTN, TGFB1, COL5A2, COL12A1, FOXC1, LAMC1, PDG-FRA, TGFB2), and differentiation (CD24, CD29, CD44, CD61, ALDH1, BRCA1, FOXA1, POSTN, DICER1, LIG4, KLF4, NOTCH2, RIF1, BMPR1A, TGFB2). Pregnancy and lactation displayed distinct patterns of gene expression. ESR1 and IGF1 were significantly higher in the adolescent compared to the adult animals, whereas differentiation pathways were overrepresented in adult animals and pregnancy-associated life stages. Few individual genes were distinctly different in postmenopausal animals. Our data demonstrate characteristic patterns of gene expression during breast development. Several of the pathways activated during pubertal development have been implicated in cancer

  3. Thyroid hormone action in the adult brain: gene expression profiling of the effects of single and multiple doses of triiodo-L-thyronine in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Diez, Diego; Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Agretti, Patrizia; De Marco, Giuseppina; Tonacchera, Massimo; Pinchera, Aldo; de Escobar, Gabriella Morreale; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2008-08-01

    Thyroid hormones have profound effects on mood and behavior, but the molecular basis of thyroid hormone action in the adult brain is relatively unknown. In particular, few thyroid hormone-dependent genes have been identified in the adult brain despite extensive work carried out on the developing brain. In this work we performed global analysis of gene expression in the adult rat striatum in search for genomic changes taking place after administration of T(3) to hypothyroid rats. The hormone was administered in two different schedules: 1) a single, large dose of 25 microg per 100 g body weight (SD) or 2) 1.5 microg per 100 g body weight once daily for 5 d (RD). Twenty-four hours after the single or last of multiple doses, gene expression in the striatum was analyzed using Codelink microarrays. SD caused up-regulation of 149 genes and down-regulation of 88 genes. RD caused up-regulation of 18 genes and down-regulation of one gene. The results were confirmed by hybridization to Affymetrix microarrays and by TaqMan PCR. Among the genes identified are genes involved in circadian regulation and the regulation of signaling pathways in the striatum. These results suggest that thyroid hormone is involved in regulation of striatal physiology at multiple control points. In addition, they may explain the beneficial effects of large doses of thyroid hormone in bipolar disorders. PMID:18467437

  4. Impact of brief exercise on peripheral blood NK cell gene and microRNA expression in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Zaldivar, Frank; Haddad, Fadia; Cooper, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killers (NK) cells are unique innate immune cells that increase up to fivefold in the circulating blood with brief exercise and are known to play a key role in first-response defense against pathogens and cancer immunosurveillance. Whether exercise alters NK cell gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression is not known. Thirteen healthy men (20–29 yr old) performed ten 2-min bouts of cycle ergometer exercise at a constant work equivalent to an average of 77% of maximum O2 consumption interspersed with 1-min rest. Blood was drawn before and immediately after the exercise challenge. NK cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using a negative magnetic cell separation method. We used Affymetrix U133+2.0 arrays for gene expression and Agilent Human miRNA V2 Microarray for miRNAs. A stringent statistical approach (false discovery rate < 0.05) was used to determine that exercise significantly altered the expression of 986 genes and 23 miRNAs. Using in silico analysis, we found exercise-related gene pathways where there was a high likelihood of gene-miRNA interactions. These pathways were predominantly associated with cancer and cell communication, including p53 signaling pathway, melanoma, glioma, prostate cancer, adherens junction, and focal adhesion. These data support the hypothesis that exercise affects the gene and miRNA expression pattern in the population of NK cells in the circulation and suggest mechanisms through which physical activity could alter health through the innate immune system. PMID:23288554

  5. Identifying Driver Genes in Cancer by Triangulating Gene Expression, Gene Location, and Survival Data

    PubMed Central

    Rouam, Sigrid; Miller, Lance D; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Driver genes are directly responsible for oncogenesis and identifying them is essential in order to fully understand the mechanisms of cancer. However, it is difficult to delineate them from the larger pool of genes that are deregulated in cancer (ie, passenger genes). In order to address this problem, we developed an approach called TRIAngulating Gene Expression (TRIAGE through clinico-genomic intersects). Here, we present a refinement of this approach incorporating a new scoring methodology to identify putative driver genes that are deregulated in cancer. TRIAGE triangulates – or integrates – three levels of information: gene expression, gene location, and patient survival. First, TRIAGE identifies regions of deregulated expression (ie, expression footprints) by deriving a newly established measure called the Local Singular Value Decomposition (LSVD) score for each locus. Driver genes are then distinguished from passenger genes using dual survival analyses. Incorporating measurements of gene expression and weighting them according to the LSVD weight of each tumor, these analyses are performed using the genes located in significant expression footprints. Here, we first use simulated data to characterize the newly established LSVD score. We then present the results of our application of this refined version of TRIAGE to gene expression data from five cancer types. This refined version of TRIAGE not only allowed us to identify known prominent driver genes, such as MMP1, IL8, and COL1A2, but it also led us to identify several novel ones. These results illustrate that TRIAGE complements existing tools, allows for the identification of genes that drive cancer and could perhaps elucidate potential future targets of novel anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25949096

  6. Molecular imaging of in vivo gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in imaging technologies have taken a prominent role in experimental and translational research and provide essential information on how changes in gene expression are related to downstream developmental and disease states. Discussion Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents and optical probes developed to enhance signal intensity in the presence of a specific enzyme, genetic marker, second messenger or metabolite can prove a facile method of advancing the understanding of molecular events in disease progression. Conclusion The ability to detect changes in gene expression at the early stages of disease will lead to a greater understanding of disease progression, the use of early therapeutic intervention to increase patient survival, and tailored therapies to the detected genetic alterations in individual patients. PMID:21426178

  7. DNA supercoiling and bacterial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Charles J

    2006-01-01

    DNA in bacterial cells is maintained in a negatively supercoiled state. This contributes to the organization of the bacterial nucleoid and also influences the global gene expression pattern in the cell through modulatory effects on transcription. Supercoiling arises as a result of changes to the linking number of the relaxed double-stranded DNA molecule and is set and reset by the action of DNA topoisomerases. This process is subject to a multitude of influences that are usually summarized as environmental stress. Responsiveness of linking number change to stress offers the promise of a mechanism for the wholesale adjustment of the transcription programme of the cell as the bacterium experiences different environments. Recent data from DNA microarray experiments support this proposition. The emerging picture is one of DNA supercoiling acting at or near the apex of a regulatory hierarchy where it collaborates with nucleoid-associated proteins and transcription factors to determine the gene expression profile of the cell. PMID:17338437

  8. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells. PMID:26869315

  9. Altered gene expression of the innate immune, neuroendocrine, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) systems is associated with posttraumatic stress disorder in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Guardado, Pedro; Olivera, Anlys; Rusch, Heather L; Roy, Michael; Martin, Christiana; Lejbman, Natasha; Lee, Hwyunhwa; Gill, Jessica M

    2016-03-01

    Whole transcriptome analysis provides an unbiased examination of biological activity, and likely, unique insight into the mechanisms underlying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comorbid depression and traumatic brain injury. This study compared gene-expression profiles in military personnel with PTSD (n=28) and matched controls without PTSD (n=27) using HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays (Affymetrix), which contain 54,675 probe sets representing more than 38,500 genes. Analysis of expression profiles revealed 203 differentially expressed genes in PTSD, of which 72% were upregulated. Using Partek Genomics Suite 6.6, differentially expressed transcription clusters were filtered based on a selection criterion of ≥1.5 relative fold change at a false discovery rate of ≤5%. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Qiagen) of the differentially expressed genes indicated a dysregulation of genes associated with the innate immune, neuroendocrine, and NF-κB systems. These findings provide novel insights that may lead to new pharmaceutical agents for PTSD treatments and help mitigate mental and physical comorbidity risk. PMID:26751122

  10. The Effects of Royal Jelly on Fitness Traits and Gene Expression in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, John R.; Geisz, Matthew; Özsoy, Ergi; Magwire, Michael M.; Carbone, Mary Anna; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Royal Jelly (RJ) is a product made by honey bee workers and is required for queen differentiation and accompanying changes in queen body size, development time, lifespan and reproductive output relative to workers. Previous studies have reported similar changes in Drosophila melanogaster in response to RJ. Here, we quantified viability, development time, body size, productivity, lifespan and genome wide transcript abundance of D. melanogaster reared on standard culture medium supplemented with increasing concentrations of RJ. We found that lower concentrations of RJ do induce significant differences in body size in both sexes; higher concentrations reduce size, increase mortality, shorten lifespan and reduce productivity. Increased concentrations of RJ also consistently lengthened development time in both sexes. RJ is associated with changes in expression of 1,581 probe sets assessed using Affymetrix Drosophila 2.0 microarrays, which were enriched for genes associated with metabolism and amino acid degradation. The transcriptional changes are consistent with alterations in cellular processes to cope with excess nutrients provided by RJ, including biosynthesis and detoxification, which might contribute to accelerated senescence and reduced lifespan. PMID:26226016

  11. Imaging gene expression in single living cells

    PubMed Central

    Shav-Tal, Yaron; Singer, Robert H.; Darzacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Technical advances in the field of live-cell imaging have introduced the cell biologist to a new, dynamic, subcellular world. The static world of molecules in fixed cells has now been extended to the time dimension. This allows the visualization and quantification of gene expression and intracellular trafficking events of the studied molecules and the associated enzymatic processes in individual cells, in real time. PMID:15459666

  12. The systemic control of circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gerber, A; Saini, C; Curie, T; Emmenegger, Y; Rando, G; Gosselin, P; Gotic, I; Gos, P; Franken, P; Schibler, U

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a central pacemaker in the brain's suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subsidiary oscillators in nearly all body cells. The SCN clock, which is adjusted to geophysical time by the photoperiod, synchronizes peripheral clocks through a wide variety of systemic cues. The latter include signals depending on feeding cycles, glucocorticoid hormones, rhythmic blood-borne signals eliciting daily changes in actin dynamics and serum response factor (SRF) activity, and sensors of body temperature rhythms, such as heat shock transcription factors and the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein CIRP. To study these systemic signalling pathways, we designed and engineered a novel, highly photosensitive apparatus, dubbed RT-Biolumicorder. This device enables us to record circadian luciferase reporter gene expression in the liver and other organs of freely moving mice over months in real time. Owing to the multitude of systemic signalling pathway involved in the phase resetting of peripheral clocks the disruption of any particular one has only minor effects on the steady state phase of circadian gene expression in organs such as the liver. Nonetheless, the implication of specific pathways in the synchronization of clock gene expression can readily be assessed by monitoring the phase-shifting kinetics using the RT-Biolumicorder. PMID:26332965

  13. Nuclear structure, gene expression and development.

    PubMed

    Brown, K

    1999-01-01

    This article considers the extent to which features of nuclear structure are involved in the regulation of genome function. The recent renaissance in imaging technology has inspired a new determination to assign specific functions to nuclear domains or structures, many of which have been described as "factories" to express the idea that they coordinate nuclear processes in an efficient way. Visual data have been combined with genetic and biochemical information to support the idea that nuclear organization has functional significance. Particular DNA sequences or chromatin structures may nucleate domains that are permissive or restrictive of transcription, to which active or inactive loci could be recruited. Associations within the nucleus, as well as many nuclear structures, are transient and change dynamically during cell cycle progression and development. Despite this complexity, elucidation of the possible structural basis of epigenetic phenomena, such as the inheritance of a "cellular memory" of gene expression status, is an important goal for cell biology. Topics for discussion include the regulatory effect of chromatin structure on gene expression, putative "nuclear addresses" for genes and proteins, the functional significance of nuclear bodies, and the role of the nuclear matrix in nuclear compartmentalization. PMID:10651237

  14. Carbon Nanomaterials Alter Global Gene Expression Profiles.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Sara; Short, John C W; McDermott, Hyoeun; Linan, Alexander; Bartlett, Katelyn; Gadila, Shiva Kumar Goud; Schmelzle, Katie; Wanekaya, Adam; Kim, Kyoungtae

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), which include carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their derivatives, have diverse technological and biomedical applications. The potential toxicity of CNMs to cells and tissues has become an important emerging question in nanotechnology. To assess the toxicity of CNTs and fullerenol C60(OH)24, we in the present work used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the simplest eukaryotic organisms that share fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. We found that treatment with CNMs, regardless of their physical shape, negatively affected the growth rates, end-point cell densities and doubling times of CNM-exposed yeast cells when compared to unexposed cells. To investigate potential mechanisms behind the CNMs-induced growth defects, we performed RNA-Seq dependent transcriptional analysis and constructed global gene expression profiles of fullerenol C60(OH)24- and CNT-treated cells. When compared to non-treated control cells, CNM-treated cells displayed differential expression of genes whose functions are implicated in membrane transporters and stress response, although differentially expressed genes were not consistent between CNT- and fullerenol C60(OH)24-treated groups, leading to our conclusion that CNMs could serve as environmental toxic factors to eukaryotic cells. PMID:27483901

  15. Transition Metals in Control of Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    1993-08-01

    Metalloproteins play structural and catalytic roles in gene expression. The metalloregulatory proteins are a subclass that exerts metal-responsive control of genes involved in respiration, metabolism, and metal-specific homeostasis or stress-response systems, such as iron uptake and storage, copper efflux, and mercury detoxification. Two allosteric mechanisms for control of gene expression were first discovered in metalloregulatory systems: an iron-responsive translational control mechanism for ferritin production and a mercury-responsive DNA-distortion mechanism for transcriptional control of detoxification genes. These otherwise unrelated mechanisms give rise to a rapid physiological response when metal ion concentrations exceed a dangerous threshold. Molecular recognition in these allosteric metal ion receptors is achieved through atypical coordination geometries, cluster formation, or complexes with prosthetic groups, such as sulfide and heme. Thus, many of the inorganic assemblies that otherwise buttress the structure of biopolymers or catalyze substrate transformation in active sites of enzymes have also been adapted to serve sensor functions in the metalloregulatory proteins. Mechanistic studies of these metal-sensor protein interactions are providing new insights into fundamental aspects of inorganic chemistry, molecular biology, and cellular physiology.

  16. Gene expression profiling of inflammatory bladder disorders.

    PubMed

    Saban, Marcia R; Nguyen, Ngoc-Bich; Hurst, Robert E; Saban, Ricardo

    2003-03-01

    Inflammation underlies all major bladder pathologies including malignancy and represents a defense reaction to injury caused by physical damage, chemical substances, micro-organisms or other agents. During acute inflammation, activation of specific molecular pathways leads to an increased expression of selected genes whose products attack the insult, but ultimately should protect the tissue from the noxious stimulus. However, once the stimulus ceases, gene-expression should return to basal levels to avoid tissue damage, fibrosis, loss of function, and chronic inflammation. If this down-regulation does not occur, tissue fibrosis occurs as a serious complication of chronic inflammation. Although sensory nerve and most cells products are known to be key parts of the inflammatory puzzle, other key molecules are constantly being described that have a role in bladder inflammation. Therefore, as the database describing the repertoire of inflammatory mediators implicated in bladder inflammation increases, the central mechanisms by which injury can induce inflammation, cell damage, and repair often becomes less rather than more clear. To make sense of the vast knowledge of the genes involved in the inflammatory response may require analysis of the patterns of change and the elucidation of gene networks far more than definition of additional members of inflammatory cascades. This review discuss the appropriate use of microarray technology, which promises to solve both of these problems as well as identifying key molecules and mechanisms involved in the transition between acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:12647997

  17. Expression of selected genes involved in steroidogenesis in the course of enucleation-induced rat adrenal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tyczewska, Marianna; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Trejter, Marcin; Szyszka, Marta; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2014-03-01

    The enucleation-induced (EI) rapid proliferation of adrenocortical cells is followed by their differentiation, the degree of which may be characterized by the expression of genes directly and indirectly involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis. In this study, out of 30,000 transcripts of genes identified by means of Affymetrix Rat Gene 1.1 ST Array, we aimed to select genes (either up- or downregulated) involved in steroidogenesis in the course of enucleation-induced adrenal regeneration. On day 1, we found 32 genes with altered expression levels, 15 were upregulated and 17 were downregulated [i.e., 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (Hsd3β), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (Nr0b1), cytochrome P450 aldosterone synthase (Cyp11b2) and sterol O-acyltransferase 1 (Soat1)]. On day 15, the expression of only 2 genes was increased and that of 3 was decreased. The investigated genes were clustered according to an hierarchical clustering algorithm and 4 clusters were obtained. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) confirmed the much lower mRNA expression levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) during the regeneration process compared to the control, while the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (cholesterol desmolase; Cyp11a1) and Hsd3β genes presented similar expression profiles throughout the entire regeneration process. Cyp11b2 mRNA levels remained very low during the whole regeneration period. Fatty acid binding protein 6 (Fabp6) was markedly upregulated, whereas hormone-sensitive lipase (Lipe) was downregulated. The expression of Soat1 was lowest on regeneration day 1 and, subsequently, its expression increased from there on, reaching levels higher than the control. Dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1 (Dax-1) mRNA levels were lowest on day 1 of the experiment; however, throughout the entire experimental period, there were no statistically significant differences observed. After the initial

  18. Transcriptional analysis of human survivin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Li, F; Altieri, D C

    1999-01-01

    The preservation of tissue and organ homoeostasis depends on the regulated expression of genes controlling apoptosis (programmed cell death). In this study, we have investigated the basal transcriptional requirements of the survivin gene, an IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) prominently up-regulated in cancer. Analysis of the 5' flanking region of the human survivin gene revealed the presence of a TATA-less promoter containing a canonical CpG island of approximately 250 nt, three cell cycle dependent elements, one cell cycle homology region and numerous Sp1 sites. PCR-based analysis of human genomic DNA, digested with methylation-sensitive and -insensitive restriction enzymes, indicated that the CpG island was unmethylated in both normal and neoplastic tissues. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping of the human survivin gene identified two main transcription start sites at position -72 and within -57/-61 from the initiating ATG. Transfection of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells with truncated or nested survivin promoter-luciferase constructs revealed the presence of both enhancer and repressor sequences and identified a minimal promoter region within the proximal -230 nt of the human survivin gene. Unbiased mutagenesis analysis of the human survivin promoter revealed that targeting the Sp1 sequences at position -171 and -151 abolished basal transcriptional activity by approximately 63-82%. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay with DNA oligonucleotides confirmed formation of a DNA-protein complex between the survivin Sp1 sequences and HeLa cell extracts in a reaction abolished by mutagenesis of the survivin Sp1 sites. These findings identify the basal transcriptional requirements of survivin gene expression. PMID:10567210

  19. Screening of differentially expressed genes in pathological scar tissues using expression microarray.

    PubMed

    Huang, L P; Mao, Z; Zhang, L; Liu, X X; Huang, C; Jia, Z S

    2015-01-01

    Pathological scar tissues and normal skin tissues were differentiated by screening for differentially expressed genes in pathologic scar tissues via gene expression microarray. The differentially expressed gene data was analyzed by gene ontology and pathway analyses. There were 5001 up- or down-regulated genes in 2-fold differentially expressed genes, 956 up- or down-regulated genes in 5-fold differentially expressed genes, and 114 up- or down-regulated genes in 20-fold differentially expressed genes. Therefore, significant differences were observed in the gene expression in pathological scar tissues and normal foreskin tissues. The development of pathological scar tissues has been correlated to changes in multiple genes and pathways, which are believed to form a dynamic network connection. PMID:26400303

  20. Reduced expression of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34, an essential gene, enhances heterologous gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Tamer Z.; Zhang, Fengrui; Thiem, Suzanne M.

    2013-01-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34 is part of a transcriptional unit that includes ORF32, encoding a viral fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and ORF33. We identified ORF34 as a candidate for deletion to improve protein expression in the baculovirus expression system based on enhanced reporter gene expression in an RNAi screen of virus genes. However, ORF34 was shown to be an essential gene. To explore ORF34 function, deletion (KO34) and rescue bacmids were constructed and characterized. Infection did not spread from primary KO34 transfected cells and supernatants from KO34 transfected cells could not infect fresh Sf21 cells whereas the supernatant from the rescue bacmids transfection could recover the infection. In addition, budded viruses were not observed in KO34 transfected cells by electron microscopy, nor were viral proteins detected from the transfection supernatants by western blots. These demonstrate that ORF34 is an essential gene with a possible role in infectious virus production.

  1. High Fidelity Copy Number Analysis of Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues Using Affymetrix Cytoscan HD Chip

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan P.; Michalopoulos, Amantha; Ding, Ying; Tseng, George; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Detection of human genome copy number variation (CNV) is one of the most important analyses in diagnosing human malignancies. Genome CNV detection in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues remains challenging due to suboptimal DNA quality and failure to use appropriate baseline controls for such tissues. Here, we report a modified method in analyzing CNV in FFPE tissues using microarray with Affymetrix Cytoscan HD chips. Gel purification was applied to select DNA with good quality and data of fresh frozen and FFPE tissues from healthy individuals were included as baseline controls in our data analysis. Our analysis showed a 91% overlap between CNV detection by microarray with FFPE tissues and chromosomal abnormality detection by karyotyping with fresh tissues on 8 cases of lymphoma samples. The CNV overlap between matched frozen and FFPE tissues reached 93.8%. When the analyses were restricted to regions containing genes, 87.1% concordance between FFPE and fresh frozen tissues was found. The analysis was further validated by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization on these samples using probes specific for BRAF and CITED2. The results suggested that the modified method using Affymetrix Cytoscan HD chip gave rise to a significant improvement over most of the previous methods in terms of accuracy in detecting CNV in FFPE tissues. This FFPE microarray methodology may hold promise for broad application of CNV analysis on clinical samples. PMID:24699316

  2. The transcriptional regulation of regucalcin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Regucalcin, which is discovered as a calcium-binding protein in 1978, has been shown to play a multifunctional role in many tissues and cell types; regucalcin has been proposed to play a pivotal role in keeping cell homeostasis and function for cell response. Regucalcin and its gene are identified in over 15 species consisting of regucalcin family. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of regucalcin from vertebrate species is highly conserved in their coding region with throughout evolution. The regucalcin gene is localized on the chromosome X in rat and human. The organization of rat regucalcin gene consists of seven exons and six introns and several consensus regulatory elements exist upstream of the 5'-flanking region. AP-1, NF1-A1, RGPR-p117, β-catenin, and other factors have been found to be a transcription factor in the enhancement of regucalcin gene promoter activity. The transcription activity of regucalcin gene is enhanced through intracellular signaling factors that are mediated through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nuclear protein in vitro. Regucalcin mRNA and its protein are markedly expressed in the liver and kidney cortex of rats. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney cortex has been shown to stimulate by hormonal factors (including calcium, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, insulin, estrogen, and dexamethasone) in vivo. Regucalcin mRNA expression is enhanced in the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy of rats in vivo. The expression of regucalcin mRNA in the liver and kidney with pathophysiological state has been shown to suppress, suggesting an involvement of regucalcin in disease. Liver regucalcin expression is down-regulated in tumor cells, suggesting a suppressive role in the development of carcinogenesis. Liver regucalcin is markedly released into the serum of rats with chemically induced liver injury in vivo. Serum regucalcin has a potential sensitivity as a specific biochemical marker of chronic

  3. In silico analysis of gene expression profiles in the olfactory mucosae of aging senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Thomas V; Peng, Xuejun; Green, C Paul; Stromberg, Arnold J; Chen, Kuey-Chu; Mattson, Mark P; Getchell, Marilyn L

    2004-08-01

    We utilized high-density Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays to investigate gene expression in the olfactory mucosae of near age-matched aging senescence-accelerated mice (SAM). The senescence-prone (SAMP) strain has a significantly shorter lifespan than does the senescence-resistant (SAMR) strain. To analyze our data, we applied biostatistical methods that included a correlation analysis to evaluate sources of methodologic and biological variability; a two-sided t-test to identify a subpopulation of Present genes with a biologically relevant P-value <0.05; and a false discovery rate (FDR) analysis adjusted to a stringent 5% level that yielded 127 genes with a P-value of <0.001 that were differentially regulated in near age-matched SAMPs (SAMP-Os; 13.75 months) compared to SAMRs (SAMR-Os, 12.5 months). Volcano plots related the variability in the mean hybridization signals as determined by the two-sided t-test to fold changes in gene expression. The genes were categorized into the six functional groups used previously in gene profiling experiments to identify candidate genes that may be relevant for senescence at the genomic and cellular levels in the aging mouse brain (Lee et al. [2000] Nat Genet 25:294-297) and in the olfactory mucosa (Getchell et al. [2003] Ageing Res Rev 2:211-243), which serves several functions that include chemosensory detection, immune barrier function, xenobiotic metabolism, and neurogenesis. Because SAMR-Os and SAMP-Os have substantially different median lifespans, we related the rate constant alpha in the Gompertz equation on aging to intrinsic as opposed to environmental mechanisms of senescence based on our analysis of genes modulated during aging in the olfactory mucosa. PMID:15248299

  4. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    Plants sense changes in their orientation towards the vector of gravity and respond with directional growth. Several metabolites in the signal transduction cascade have been identified. However, very little is known about the interaction between these sensing and signal transduction events and even less is known about their role in the differential growth response. Gravity induced changes in transcript abundance have been identified in Arabidopsis whole seedlings and root apices (Moseyko et al. 2002; Kimbrough et al. 2004). Gravity induced transcript abundance changes can be observed within less than 1 min after stimulation (Salinas-Mondragon et al. 2005). Gene expression however requires not only transcription but also translation of the mRNA. Translation can only occur when mRNA is associated with ribosomes, even though not all mRNA associated with ribosomes is actively translated. To approximate translational capacity we quantified whole genome transcript abundances in corn stem pulvini during the first hour after gravity stimulation in total and poly-ribosomal fractions. As in Arabidopsis root apices, transcript abundances of several clusters of genes responded to gravity stimulation. The vast majority of these transcripts were also found to associate with polyribosomes in the same temporal and quantitative pattern. These genes are transcriptionally regulated by gravity stimulation, but do not exhibit translational regulation. However, a small group of genes showed increased transcriptional regulation after gravity stimulation, but no association with polysomes. These transcripts likely are translationally repressed. The mechanism of translational repression for these transcripts is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the genes essential for gravitropic responses should be expressed in most or all species, we compared the temporal gravity induced expression pattern of all orthologs identified between maize and Arabidopsis. A small group of genes showed high

  5. A gene expression signature for insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Nicky; Foletta, Victoria C; Segal, David H; Shields, Katherine A; Sanigorski, Andrew; Windmill, Kelly; Swinton, Courtney; Connor, Tim; Wanyonyi, Stephen; Dyer, Thomas D; Fahey, Richard P; Watt, Rose A; Curran, Joanne E; Molero, Juan-Carlos; Krippner, Guy; Collier, Greg R; James, David E; Blangero, John; Jowett, Jeremy B; Walder, Ken R

    2011-02-11

    Insulin resistance is a heterogeneous disorder caused by a range of genetic and environmental factors, and we hypothesize that its etiology varies considerably between individuals. This heterogeneity provides significant challenges to the development of effective therapeutic regimes for long-term management of type 2 diabetes. We describe a novel strategy, using large-scale gene expression profiling, to develop a gene expression signature (GES) that reflects the overall state of insulin resistance in cells and patients. The GES was developed from 3T3-L1 adipocytes that were made "insulin resistant" by treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and then reversed with aspirin and troglitazone ("resensitized"). The GES consisted of five genes whose expression levels best discriminated between the insulin-resistant and insulin-resensitized states. We then used this GES to screen a compound library for agents that affected the GES genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a way that most closely resembled the changes seen when insulin resistance was successfully reversed with aspirin and troglitazone. This screen identified both known and new insulin-sensitizing compounds including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, β-adrenergic antagonists, β-lactams, and sodium channel blockers. We tested the biological relevance of this GES in participants in the San Antonio Family Heart Study (n = 1,240) and showed that patients with the lowest GES scores were more insulin resistant (according to HOMA_IR and fasting plasma insulin levels; P < 0.001). These findings show that GES technology can be used for both the discovery of insulin-sensitizing compounds and the characterization of patients into subtypes of insulin resistance according to GES scores, opening the possibility of developing a personalized medicine approach to type 2 diabetes. PMID:21081660

  6. Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, Heleen M; Bünger, Meike; de Groot, Philip J; van der Meijde, Jolanda; Hooiveld, Guido JEJ; Müller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Fasting has dramatic effects on small intestinal transport function. However, little is known on expression of intestinal transport and phase I/II metabolism genes during fasting and the role the fatty acid-activated transcription factor PPARα may play herein. We therefore investigated the effects of fasting on expression of these genes using Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Results After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1) and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1). Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2), formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1), or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8). Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPARα-dependently upregulated upon fasting. Conclusion We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a) increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b) increased cholesterol secretion, c) increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d) reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance for e.g. pre

  7. Gene Expression Profiling of Ewing Sarcoma Tumors Reveals the Prognostic Importance of Tumor-Stromal Interactions: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Volchenboum, Samuel L.; Andrade, Jorge; Huang, Lei; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Krailo, Mark; Womer, Richard B.; Ranft, Andreas; Potratz, Jenny; Dirksen, Uta; Triche, Timothy J.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Relapse of Ewing sarcoma (ES) can occur months or years after initial remission and salvage therapy for relapsed disease is usually ineffective. Thus, there is great need to develop biomarkers that can predict which patients are at risk for relapse so that therapy and post-therapy evaluation can be adjusted accordingly. For the current study we performed whole genome expression profiling on two independent cohorts of clinically annotated ES tumors in an effort to identify and validate prognostic gene signatures. ES specimens were obtained from the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) and whole genome expression profiling performed using Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays. Lists of differentially expressed genes between survivors and non-survivors were used to identify prognostic gene signatures. An independent cohort of tumors from the Euro-Ewing cooperative group was similarly analyzed as a validation cohort. Unsupervised clustering of gene expression data failed to segregate tumors based on outcome. Supervised analysis of survivors vs. non-survivors revealed a small number of differentially expressed genes and several statistically significant gene signatures. Gene specific enrichment analysis (GSEA) demonstrated that integrin and chemokine genes were associated with survival in tumors where stromal contamination was present. Tumors that did not harbor stromal contamination showed no association of any genes or pathways with clinical outcome. Our results reflect the challenges of performing RNA-based assays on archived bone tumor specimens. In addition, they reveal a key role for tumor stroma in determining ES prognosis. Future biologic and clinical investigations should focus on elucidating the contribution of tumor:microenvironment interactions on ES progression and response to therapy. Key words: ES, gene expression profiling, prognostic signature PMID:26052443

  8. Variations in aggrecan localization and gene expression patterns characterize increasing stages of human intervertebral disk degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Helen E; Hoelscher, Gretchen L; Ingram, Jane A; Bethea, Synthia; Zinchenko, Natalia; Hanley, Edward N

    2011-10-01

    During disk degeneration, annulus dehydration and matrix fraying culminate in the formation of tears through which nucleus and annulus disk material may rupture, causing radicular pain. Annular tears are present in more than half of the patients in early adulthood and are almost always present in the elderly. Aggrecan, which provides the disk with a shock absorber function under loading, is a key disk extracellular matrix (ECM) component. The objective of the present study was to assess the immunolocalization of aggrecan in the annulus, and to assess molecular gene expression patterns in the annulus ECM utilizing microarray analysis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 45 specimens using an anti-human aggrecan antibody. Affymetrix microarray gene expression studies used the extracellular matrix ontology approach to evaluate an additional 6 grade I-II, 9 grade III, and 4 grade IV disks. Grade III/IV disks were compared to healthier grade I/II disks. Healthy and less degenerated disks showed a general uniform aggrecan immunolocalization; more degenerated disks contained regions with little or no identifiable aggrecan localization. In degenerated disks, molecular studies showed a significant downregulation of aggrecan, ADAMTS-like 3, and ADAMTS10. Collagen types III and VIII, fibronectin, decorin, connective tissue growth factor, TIMP-3, latent TGF-β binding protein 2 and TGF-β1 were significantly upregulated with fold changes ranging from 2.4 to 9.8. Findings here help us better understand changes in the immunohistochemical distribution of a key proteoglycan during disk aging. Such information may have application as we work towards biologic therapies to improve the aging/degenerating disk matrix. PMID:21689646

  9. Validation of a mouse xenograft model system for gene expression analysis of human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pre-clinical models that effectively recapitulate human disease are critical for expanding our knowledge of cancer biology and drug resistance mechanisms. For haematological malignancies, the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse is one of the most successful models to study paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, for this model to be effective for studying engraftment and therapy responses at the whole genome level, careful molecular characterisation is essential. Results Here, we sought to validate species-specific gene expression profiling in the high engraftment continuous ALL NOD/SCID xenograft. Using the human Affymetrix whole transcript platform we analysed transcriptional profiles from engrafted tissues without prior cell separation of mouse cells and found it to return highly reproducible profiles in xenografts from individual mice. The model was further tested with experimental mixtures of human and mouse cells, demonstrating that the presence of mouse cells does not significantly skew expression profiles when xenografts contain 90% or more human cells. In addition, we present a novel in silico and experimental masking approach to identify probes and transcript clusters susceptible to cross-species hybridisation. Conclusions We demonstrate species-specific transcriptional profiles can be obtained from xenografts when high levels of engraftment are achieved or with the application of transcript cluster masks. Importantly, this masking approach can be applied and adapted to other xenograft models where human tissue infiltration is lower. This model provides a powerful platform for identifying genes and pathways associated with ALL disease progression and response to therapy in vivo. PMID:20406497

  10. Gene expression profiling for genetic merit in dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression patterns have been shown to be a heritable trait in dairy cattle. Thus, the pattern of gene expression in many selected tissues may serve as a biomarker for genetic stature or physiological condition. Our laboratory has conducted a 5-year study on the use of gene expression pattern...

  11. Covariance Structure Models for Gene Expression Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Jun; Bentler, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    Covariance structure models are applied to gene expression data using a factor model, a path model, and their combination. The factor model is based on a few factors that capture most of the expression information. A common factor of a group of genes may represent a common protein factor for the transcript of the co-expressed genes, and hence, it…

  12. Analysis of Changes in Hepatic Gene Expression in a Murine Model of Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity (Autoprotection)

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Meeghan A; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P; Manautou, José E

    2013-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 hr later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 hr later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430_2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. PMID:24126418

  13. Gene Expression Omnibus: NCBI gene expression and hybridization array data repository.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Ron; Domrachev, Michael; Lash, Alex E

    2002-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) project was initiated in response to the growing demand for a public repository for high-throughput gene expression data. GEO provides a flexible and open design that facilitates submission, storage and retrieval of heterogeneous data sets from high-throughput gene expression and genomic hybridization experiments. GEO is not intended to replace in house gene expression databases that benefit from coherent data sets, and which are constructed to facilitate a particular analytic method, but rather complement these by acting as a tertiary, central data distribution hub. The three central data entities of GEO are platforms, samples and series, and were designed with gene expression and genomic hybridization experiments in mind. A platform is, essentially, a list of probes that define what set of molecules may be detected. A sample describes the set of molecules that are being probed and references a single platform used to generate its molecular abundance data. A series organizes samples into the meaningful data sets which make up an experiment. The GEO repository is publicly accessible through the World Wide Web at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo. PMID:11752295

  14. Gene Expression in the Star Mutation of Petunia x Hybrida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in structural gene expression are responsible for a wide range of responses from human cancer to patterned flowers. Gene silencing is one of the ways in which gene expression is controlled. We have developed a model system to study anthocyanin gene silencing using a mutation in Petunia ...

  15. Differential gene expression in cumulus oocyte complexes collected by ovum pick up from repeat breeder and normally fertile Holstein Friesian heifers.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Roberto; Cambuli, Caterina; Capoferri, Rossana; Giannino, Laura; Lukaj, Aleksander; Duchi, Roberto; Lazzari, Giovanna; Galli, Cesare; Feligini, Maria; Galli, Andrea; Bongioni, Graziella

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether perturbed gene expression during cumulus oocyte development causes repeat breeding in cattle. In this study, a repeat breeder was defined as a normal estrous cycling animal that did not become pregnant after three inseminations despite the absence of clinically detectable reproductive disorders. Transcripts of genes extracted from cumulus oocyte complexes (COC) that were collected from three repeat breeder and three normally fertile Holstein Friesian heifers were compared. Up to 40 COC were collected from each heifer by means of repeated sessions of ovum pick up in the absence of hormonal stimulation; immediately plunged into liquid nitrogen; and stored at -80°C until analysis. For each heifer, RNA was extracted from the pooled COC and hybridized on GeneChip(®) Bovine Gene Array (Affymetrix). Analysis of gene expression profiles of repeat breeder and control COC showed that 178 genes were differentially expressed (log2 fold change>1.5). Of these genes, 43 (24%) were up-regulated and 135 (76%) were down-regulated in repeat breeder relative to control heifers. This altered pattern of expression occurred in genes involved in several cellular biological processes and cellular components such as metabolism, angiogenesis, substrate/ion transport, regulation/signaling, cell adhesion and cytoskeleton. From these, 13 genes potentially involved in cumulus oocyte growth were subjected to validation by qRT-PCR and nine genes (annexin A1, ANXA1; lactoferrin, LTF; interferon stimulated exonuclease 20kDa, ISG20/HEM45; oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1, OLR1; fatty acid desaturase 2, FADS2; glutathione S-transferase A2 and A4, GSTA2 and GSTA4; glutathione peroxidase 1, GPX1; endothelin receptor type A, EDNRA) were confirmed to be differentially expressed. This study identified potential marker genes for fertility in dairy cattle. PMID:23911014

  16. Intestinal gene expression profiles of piglets benefit from maternal supplementation with a yeast mannan-rich fraction during gestation and lactation.

    PubMed

    Graugnard, D E; Samuel, R S; Xiao, R; Spangler, L F; Brennan, K M

    2015-04-01

    The objective was to study the effect of maternal supplementation with a yeast cell wall-based product containing a mannan-rich fraction (MRF) during gestation and lactation on piglet intestinal gene expression. First parity sows were fed experimental gestation and lactation diets with or without MRF (900 mg/kg). After farrowing, piglets were fostered within treatment, as necessary. Sow and litter production performance data were collected until weaning. On day 10 post farrowing, jejunum samples from piglets were collected for gene expression analysis using the Affymetrix Porcine GeneChip array. Most performance parameters did not differ between the treatments. However, protein (P<0.01), total solids less fat (P<0.03) and the concentration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in milk were greater (P<0.05) in the MRF-supplemented group. Gene expression results using hierarchical clustering revealed an overall dietary effect. Further analysis elucidated activation of pathways involved in tissue development, functioning and immunity, as well as greater cell proliferation and less migration of cells in the jejunum tissue. In conclusion, feeding the sow MRF during pregnancy and lactation was an effective nutritional strategy to bolster colostrum and milk IgG that are essential for development of piglet immune system and gut. In addition, the gene expression patterns affected by the passive immunity transfer showed indicators that could benefit animal performance long term. PMID:25482612

  17. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  18. Investigation of factors affecting RNA-seq gene expression calls

    PubMed Central

    Harati, Sahar; Phan, John H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-seq enables quantification of the human transcriptome. Estimation of gene expression is a fundamental issue in the analysis of RNA-seq data. However, there is an inherent ambiguity in distinguishing between genes with very low expression and experimental or transcriptional noise. We conducted an exploratory investigation of some factors that may affect gene expression calls. We observed that the distribution of reads that map to exonic, intronic, and intergenic regions are distinct. These distributions may provide useful insights into the behavior of gene expression noise. Moreover, we observed that these distributions are qualitatively similar between two sequence mapping algorithms. Finally, we examined the relationship between gene length and gene expression calls, and observed that they are correlated. This preliminary investigation is important for RNA-seq gene expression analysis because it may lead to more effective algorithms for distinguishing between true gene expression and experimental or transcriptional noise. PMID:25571173

  19. Administration of Lactobacillus evokes coordinated changes in the intestinal expression profile of genes regulating energy homeostasis and immune phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Nerstedt, Annika; Nilsson, Elisabeth C; Ohlson, Kajsa; Håkansson, Janet; Thomas Svensson, L; Löwenadler, Björn; Svensson, Ulla K; Mahlapuu, Margit

    2007-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are probiotics widely used in functional food products, with a variety of beneficial effects reported. Recently, intense research has been carried out to provide insight into the mechanism of the action of probiotic bacteria. We have used gene array technology to map the pattern of changes in the global gene expression profile of the host caused by Lactobacillus administration. Affymetrix microarrays were applied to comparatively characterize differences in gene transcription in the distal ileum of normal microflora (NMF) and germ-free (GF) mice evoked by oral administration of two Lactobacillus strains used in fermented dairy products today - Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei F19 (L. F19) or Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFB 1748. We show that feeding either of the two strains caused very similar effects on the transcriptional profile of the host. Both L. F19 and L. acidophilus NCFB 1748 evoked a complex response in the gut, reflected by differential regulation of a number of genes involved in essential physiological functions such as immune response, regulation of energy homeostasis and host defence. Notably, the changes in intestinal gene expression caused by Lactobacillus were different in the mice raised under GF v. NMF conditions, underlying the complex and dynamic nature of the host-commensal relationship. Differential expression of an array of genes described in this report evokes novel hypothesis of possible interactions between the probiotic bacteria and the host organism and warrants further studies to evaluate the functional significance of these transcriptional changes on the metabolic profile of the host. PMID:17433125

  20. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Counteracts Cortical Expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Benjamin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; von Nicolai, Constantin; Streichert, Thomas; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Schulte, Alexander; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin; Engel, Andreas K.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) is widely used as therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from advanced Parkinson’s disease. STN-HFS exerts a powerful modulatory effect on cortical motor control by orthodromic modulation of basal ganglia outflow and via antidromic activation of corticofugal fibers. However, STN-HFS-induced changes of the sensorimotor cortex are hitherto unexplored. To address this question at a genomic level, we performed mRNA expression analyses using Affymetrix microarray gene chips and real-time RT-PCR in sensorimotor cortex of parkinsonian and control rats following STN-HFS. Experimental parkinsonism was induced in Brown Norway rats by bilateral nigral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine and was assessed histologically, behaviorally, and electrophysiologically. We applied prolonged (23h) unilateral STN-HFS in awake and freely moving animals, with the non-stimulated hemisphere serving as an internal control for gene expression analyses. Gene enrichment analysis revealed strongest regulation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) related genes. STN-HFS led to a cortical downregulation of several MHC class II (RT1-Da, Db1, Ba, and Cd74) and MHC class I (RT1CE) encoding genes. The same set of genes showed increased expression levels in a comparison addressing the effect of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Hence, our data suggest the possible association of altered microglial activity and synaptic transmission by STN-HFS within the sensorimotor cortex of 6-hydroxydopamine treated rats. PMID:24621597

  1. Molecular mechanisms of curcumin action: gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shishodia, Shishir

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin derived from the tropical plant Curcuma longa has a long history of use as a dietary agent, food preservative, and in traditional Asian medicine. It has been used for centuries to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. The preventive and therapeutic properties of curcumin are associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Extensive research over several decades has attempted to identify the molecular mechanisms of curcumin action. Curcumin modulates numerous molecular targets by altering their gene expression, signaling pathways, or through direct interaction. Curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1), growth factors (e.g., VEGF, EGF, FGF), growth factor receptors (e.g., EGFR, HER-2, AR), enzymes (e.g., COX-2, LOX, MMP9, MAPK, mTOR, Akt), adhesion molecules (e.g., ELAM-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), apoptosis related proteins (e.g., Bcl-2, caspases, DR, Fas), and cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1). Curcumin modulates the activity of several transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1, STAT) and their signaling pathways. Based on its ability to affect multiple targets, curcumin has the potential for the prevention and treatment of various diseases including cancers, arthritis, allergies, atherosclerosis, aging, neurodegenerative disease, hepatic disorders, obesity, diabetes, psoriasis, and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of modulation of gene expression by curcumin. PMID:22996381

  2. Using PCR to Target Misconceptions about Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Leslie K.; Newman, Dina L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a PCR-based laboratory exercise that can be used with first- or second-year biology students to help overcome common misconceptions about gene expression. Biology students typically do not have a clear understanding of the difference between genes (DNA) and gene expression (mRNA/protein) and often believe that genes exist in an organism or cell only when they are expressed. This laboratory exercise allows students to carry out a PCR-based experiment designed to challenge their misunderstanding of the difference between genes and gene expression. Students first transform E. coli with an inducible GFP gene containing plasmid and observe induced and un-induced colonies. The following exercise creates cognitive dissonance when actual PCR results contradict their initial (incorrect) predictions of the presence of the GFP gene in transformed cells. Field testing of this laboratory exercise resulted in learning gains on both knowledge and application questions on concepts related to genes and gene expression. PMID:23858358

  3. Early changes in gene expression induced by blue light irradiation of A2E-laden retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    van der Burght, Barbro W.; Hansen, Morten; Olsen, Jørgen; Zhou, Jilin; Wu, Yalin; Nissen, Mogens H.; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Accumulation of bisretinoids as lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is implicated in the pathogenesis of some blinding diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To identify genes whose expression may change under conditions of bisretinoid accumulation, we investigated the differential gene expression in RPE cells that had accumulated the lipofuscin fluorophore A2E and were exposed to blue light (430 nm). Methods A2E-laden RPE cells were exposed to blue light (A2E/430 nm) at various time intervals. Cell death was quantified using Dead Red staining, and RNA levels for the entire genome was determined using DNA microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome 2.0 Plus). Array results for selected genes were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results Principal component analysis revealed that the A2E-laden RPE cells irradiated with blue light were clearly distinguishable from the control samples. We found differential regulation of genes belonging to the following functional groups: transcription factors, stress response, apoptosis and immune response. Among the last mentioned were downregulation of four genes that coded for proteins that have an inhibitory effect on the complement cascade: (complement factor H, complement factor H-related 1, complement factor I and vitronectin) and of two belonging to the classical pathway (complement component 1, s subcomponent and complement component 1, r subcomponent). Conclusion This study demonstrates that blue light irradiation of A2E-laden RPE cells can alter the transcription of genes belonging to different functional pathways including stress response, apoptosis and the immune response. We suggest that these molecules may be associated to the pathogenesis of AMD and can potentially serve as future therapeutic targets. PMID:23742627

  4. Reptile freeze tolerance: metabolism and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-02-01

    Terrestrially hibernating reptiles that live in seasonally cold climates need effective strategies of cold hardiness to survive the winter. Use of thermally buffered hibernacula is very important but when exposure to temperatures below 0 degrees C cannot be avoided, either freeze avoidance (supercooling) or freeze tolerance strategies can be employed, sometimes by the same species depending on environmental conditions. Several reptile species display ecologically relevant freeze tolerance, surviving for extended times with 50% or more of their total body water frozen. The use of colligative cryoprotectants by reptiles is poorly developed but metabolic and enzymatic adaptations providing anoxia tolerance and antioxidant defense are important aids to freezing survival. New studies using DNA array screening are examining the role of freeze-responsive gene expression. Three categories of freeze responsive genes have been identified from recent screenings of liver and heart from freeze-exposed (5h post-nucleation at -2.5 degrees C) hatchling painted turtles, Chrysemys picta marginata. These genes encode (a) proteins involved in iron binding, (b) enzymes of antioxidant defense, and (c) serine protease inhibitors. The same genes were up-regulated by anoxia exposure (4 h of N2 gas exposure at 5 degrees C) of the hatchlings which suggests that these defenses for freeze tolerance are aimed at counteracting the injurious effects of the ischemia imposed by plasma freezing. PMID:16321368

  5. Regulation of Airway Mucin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Philip; Loukoianov, Artem; Wachi, Shinichiro; Wu, Reen

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are important components that exert a variety of functions in cell-cell interaction, epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, and airways protection. In the conducting airways of the lungs, mucins are the major contributor to the viscoelastic property of mucous secretion, which is the major barrier to trapping inhaled microbial organism, particulates, and oxidative pollutants. The homeostasis of mucin production is an important feature in conducting airways for the maintenance of mucociliary function. Aberrant mucin secretion and accumulation in airway lumen are clinical hallmarks associated with various lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer. Among 20 known mucin genes identified, 11 of them have been verified at either the mRNA and/or protein level in airways. The regulation of mucin genes is complicated, as are the mediators and signaling pathways. This review summarizes the current view on the mediators, the signaling pathways, and the transcriptional units that are involved in the regulation of airway mucin gene expression. In addition, we also point out essential features of epigenetic mechanisms for the regulation of these genes. PMID:17961085

  6. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Meeghan A.; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430{sub 2} GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene

  7. Retrotransposons as regulators of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Lucas, Bronwyn A; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-02-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are both a boon and a bane to eukaryotic organisms, depending on where they integrate into the genome and how their sequences function once integrated. We focus on two types of TEs: long interspersed elements (LINEs) and short interspersed elements (SINEs). LINEs and SINEs are retrotransposons; that is, they transpose via an RNA intermediate. We discuss how LINEs and SINEs have expanded in eukaryotic genomes and contribute to genome evolution. An emerging body of evidence indicates that LINEs and SINEs function to regulate gene expression by affecting chromatin structure, gene transcription, pre-mRNA processing, or aspects of mRNA metabolism. We also describe how adenosine-to-inosine editing influences SINE function and how ongoing retrotransposition is countered by the body's defense mechanisms. PMID:26912865

  8. Regulation of interferon-gamma gene expression.

    PubMed

    Young, H A

    1996-08-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), also known as type II interferon, is an important immunoregulatory gene that has multiple effects on the development, maturation, and function of the immune system. IFN-gamma mRNA and protein are expressed predominantly by T cells and large granular lymphocytes. The IFN-gamma mRNA is induced/inhibited in these cell types by a wide variety of extracellular signals, thus implicating a number of diverse, yet convergent signal transduction pathways in its transcriptional control. In this review, I describe how DNA methylation and specific DNA binding proteins may regulate transcription of the IFN-gamma gene in response to extracellular signals. PMID:8877725

  9. The effect of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4ab,ac on early-weaned piglets: a gene expression study.

    PubMed

    Schroyen, M; Goddeeris, B M; Stinckens, A; Verhelst, R; Janssens, S; Cox, E; Georges, M; Niewold, T; Buys, N

    2013-03-15

    Diarrhoea in neonatal and early-weaned piglets due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-F4 (ETEC-F4) is an important problem in the pig farming industry. There is substantial evidence for a genetic basis for susceptibility to ETEC-F4 since not all pigs suffer from diarrhoea after an ETEC-F4 infection. A region on SSC13 has been found to be in close linkage to the susceptibility of piglets for ETEC-F4ab,ac. Potential candidate genes on SSC13 have been examined and although some polymorphisms were found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the phenotype, the causative mutation has not yet been found. In this study we are looking at the expression of porcine genes in relation to ETEC-F4ab,ac. With the aid of the Affymetrix GeneChip Porcine Genome Array we were able to find differentially expressed genes between ETEC-F4ab,ac receptor positive (Fab,acR(+)) piglets without diarrhoea and F4ab,acR(+) piglets with diarrhoea or F4ab,acR(-) animals. Since the susceptibility to ETEC-F4ab,ac was described as a Mendelian trait, it is not so surprisingly that only two differentially expressed genes, transferrin receptor (TFRC) and trefoil factor 1 (TFF1), came out of the analysis. Although both genes could pass for functional candidate genes only TFRC also mapped to the region on SSC13 associated with susceptibility for ETEC-F4, which makes TFRC a positional functional candidate gene. Validation by qRT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of TFRC and TFF1. In piglets without diarrhoea, the expression of both genes was higher in F4ab,acR(+) than in F4ab,acR(-) piglets. Similarly, TFRC and TFF1 expression in F4ab,acR(+) piglets without diarrhoea was also higher than in F4ab,acR(+) piglets with diarrhoea. Consequently, although both genes might not play a role as receptor for F4 fimbriae, they could be of great importance during an ETEC-F4 outbreak. An upregulation of TFRC can be a consequence of the piglets ability to raise an effective immune response. An elevation of TFF1, a

  10. Pathway network inference from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of high-throughput omics technologies enabled genome-wide measurements of the activity of cellular elements and provides the analytical resources for the progress of the Systems Biology discipline. Analysis and interpretation of gene expression data has evolved from the gene to the pathway and interaction level, i.e. from the detection of differentially expressed genes, to the establishment of gene interaction networks and the identification of enriched functional categories. Still, the understanding of biological systems requires a further level of analysis that addresses the characterization of the interaction between functional modules. Results We present a novel computational methodology to study the functional interconnections among the molecular elements of a biological system. The PANA approach uses high-throughput genomics measurements and a functional annotation scheme to extract an activity profile from each functional block -or pathway- followed by machine-learning methods to infer the relationships between these functional profiles. The result is a global, interconnected network of pathways that represents the functional cross-talk within the molecular system. We have applied this approach to describe the functional transcriptional connections during the yeast cell cycle and to identify pathways that change their connectivity in a disease condition using an Alzheimer example. Conclusions PANA is a useful tool to deepen in our understanding of the functional interdependences that operate within complex biological systems. We show the approach is algorithmically consistent and the inferred network is well supported by the available functional data. The method allows the dissection of the molecular basis of the functional connections and we describe the different regulatory mechanisms that explain the network's topology obtained for the yeast cell cycle data. PMID:25032889

  11. Clustering gene expression data using graph separators.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Bangaly; Pinet, Nicolas; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Sigayret, Alain; Berry, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has used graphs to modelize expression data from microarray experiments, in view of partitioning the genes into clusters. In this paper, we introduce the use of a decomposition by clique separators. Our aim is to improve the classical clustering methods in two ways: first we want to allow an overlap between clusters, as this seems biologically sound, and second we want to be guided by the structure of the graph to define the number of clusters. We test this approach with a well-known yeast database (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our results are good, as the expression profiles of the clusters we find are very coherent. Moreover, we are able to organize into another graph the clusters we find, and order them in a fashion which turns out to respect the chronological order defined by the the sporulation process. PMID:18391236

  12. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rennoll, Sherri A; Konsavage, Wesley M; Yochum, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24299953

  13. Differential gene expression in anatomical compartments of the human eye

    PubMed Central

    Diehn, Jennifer J; Diehn, Maximilian; Marmor, Michael F; Brown, Patrick O

    2005-01-01

    Background The human eye is composed of multiple compartments, diverse in form, function, and embryologic origin, that work in concert to provide us with our sense of sight. We set out to systematically characterize the global gene expression patterns that specify the distinctive characteristics of the various eye compartments. Results We used DNA microarrays representing approximately 30,000 human genes to analyze gene expression in the cornea, lens, iris, ciliary body, retina, and optic nerve. The distinctive patterns of expression in each compartment could be interpreted in relation to the physiology and cellular composition of each tissue. Notably, the sets of genes selectively expressed in the retina and in the lens were particularly large and diverse. Genes with roles in immune defense, particularly complement components, were expressed at especially high levels in the anterior segment tissues. We also found consistent differences between the gene expression patterns of the macula and peripheral retina, paralleling the differences in cell layer densities between these regions. Based on the hypothesis that genes responsible for diseases that affect a particular eye compartment are likely to be selectively expressed in that compartment, we compared our gene expression signatures with genetic mapping studies to identify candidate genes for diseases affecting the cornea, lens, and retina. Conclusion Through genome-scale gene expression profiling, we were able to discover distinct gene expression 'signatures' for each eye compartment and identified candidate disease genes that can serve as a reference database for investigating the physiology and pathophysiology of the eye. PMID:16168081

  14. Changes of myocardial gene expression and protein composition in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy after immunoadsorption with subsequent immunoglobulin substitution.

    PubMed

    Ameling, Sabine; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Hammer, Elke; Beug, Daniel; Steil, Leif; Reinke, Yvonne; Weitmann, Kerstin; Grube, Markus; Trimpert, Christiane; Klingel, Karin; Kandolf, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Nauck, Matthias; Dörr, Marcus; Empen, Klaus; Felix, Stephan B; Völker, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    Immunoadsorption with subsequent immunoglobulin substitution (IA/IgG) represents a therapeutic approach for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Here, we studied which molecular cardiac alterations are initiated after this treatment. Transcription profiling of endomyocardial biopsies with Affymetrix whole genome arrays was performed on 33 paired samples of DCM patients collected before and 6 months after IA/IgG. Therapy-related effects on myocardial protein levels were analysed by label-free proteome profiling for a subset of 23 DCM patients. Data were analysed regarding therapy-associated differences in gene expression and protein levels by comparing responders (defined by improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction ≥20 % relative and ≥5 % absolute) and non-responders. Responders to IA/IgG showed a decrease in serum N-terminal proBNP levels in comparison with baseline which was accompanied by a decreased expression of heart failure markers, such as angiotensin converting enzyme 2 or periostin. However, despite clinical improvement even in responders, IA/IgG did not trigger general inversion of DCM-associated molecular alterations in myocardial tissue. Transcriptome profiling revealed reduced gene expression for connective tissue growth factor, fibronectin, and collagen type I in responders. In contrast, in non-responders after IA/IgG, fibrosis-associated genes and proteins showed elevated levels, whereas values were reduced or maintained in responders. Thus, improvement of LV function after IA/IgG seems to be related to a reduced gene expression of heart failure markers and pro-fibrotic molecules as well as reduced fibrosis progression. PMID:27412778

  15. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    PubMed Central

    Gerecke, Donald R.; Chen, Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Yoke-Chen; Tong, Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal–epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors. PMID:18955075

  16. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gerecke, Donald R. Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C.; Tong Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2009-01-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors.

  17. A roadmap for zinc trafficking in the developing barley grain based on laser capture microdissection and gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tauris, Birgitte; Borg, Søren; Gregersen, Per L.; Holm, Preben B.

    2009-01-01

    Nutrients destined for the developing cereal grain encounter several restricting barriers on their path towards their final storage sites in the grain. In order to identify transporters and chelating agents that may be involved in transport and deposition of zinc in the barley grain, expression profiles have been generated of four different tissue types: the transfer cells, the aleurone layer, the endosperm, and the embryo. Cells from these tissues were isolated with the ‘laser capture microdissection’ technology and the extracted RNA was subjected to three rounds of T7-based amplification. The amplified RNA was subsequently hybridized to Affymetrix 22K Barley GeneChips. Due to the short average length of the amplified transcripts and the positioning of numerous probe sets at locations more than 400 base pairs (bp) from the poly(A)-tail, a normalization approach was used where the probe positions were taken into account. On the basis of the expression levels of a number of metal homeostasis genes, a working model is proposed for the translocation of zinc from the phloem to the storage sites in the developing grain. PMID:19297552

  18. Gut microbiota, host gene expression, and aging.

    PubMed

    Patrignani, Paola; Tacconelli, Stefania; Bruno, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    Novel concepts of disease susceptibility and development suggest an important role of gastrointestinal microbiota and microbial pathogens. They can contribute to physiological systems and disease processes, even outside of the gastrointestinal tract. There is increasing evidence that genetics of the host influence and interact with gut microbiota. Moreover, aging-associated oxidative stress may cause morphologic alterations of bacterial cells, thus influencing the aggressive potential and virulence markers of an anaerobic bacterium and finally the type of interaction with the host. At the same time, microbiota may influence host gene expression and it is becoming apparent that it may occur through the regulation of microRNAs. They are short single-stranded noncoding RNAs that regulate posttranscriptional gene expression by affecting mRNA stability and/or translational repression of their target mRNAs. The introduction of -omics approaches (such as metagenomics, metaproteomics, and metatranscriptomics) in microbiota research will certainly advance our knowledge of this area. This will lead to greatly deepen our understanding of the molecular targets in the homeostatic interaction between the gut microbiota and the host and, thereby, promises to reveal new ways to treat diseases and maintain health. PMID:25291121

  19. Regulation of gene expression by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E

    1993-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, is regulated in the carotid body, sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla by hypoxia. We found that a reduction in oxygen tension from 21% to 10% caused a substantial increase (200% at 1 hour and 500% at 6 hours exposure) in the concentration of TH mRNA in carotid body type I cells but not in either the sympathetic ganglia or adrenal gland. In addition, we found that hypercapnia, another natural stimulus of carotid body activity, failed to enhance TH mRNA in type I cells. Removal of the sensory and sympathetic innervation of the carotid body failed to prevent the induction of TH mRNA by hypoxia in type I cells. Our results show that TH gene expression is regulated by hypoxia in the carotid body but not in other peripheral catecholamine synthesizing tissue and that the regulatory mechanism is intrinsic to type I cells. PMID:7909954

  20. Gene expression profiles in human HepG2 cells treated with extracts of the Tamarindus indica fruit pulp.

    PubMed

    Razali, Nurhanani; Aziz, Azlina A; Junit, Sarni M

    2010-12-01

    Tamarindus indicaL. (T. indica) or locally known as asam jawa belongs to the family of Leguminosae. The fruit pulp had been reported to have antioxidant activities and possess hypolipidaemic effects. In this study, we attempted to investigate the gene expression patterns in human hepatoma HepG2 cell line in response to treatment with low concentration of the fruit pulp extracts. Microarray analysis using Affymetrix Human Genome 1.0 S.T arrays was used in the study. Microarray data were validated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR. Amongst the significantly up-regulated genes were those that code for the metallothioneins (MT1M, MT1F, MT1X) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTA1, GSTA2, GST02) that are involved in stress response. APOA4, APOA5, ABCG5 and MTTP genes were also significantly regulated that could be linked to hypolipidaemic activities of the T. indica fruit pulp. PMID:21189869