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Sample records for affymetrix genechip arrays

  1. Qualitative assessment of gene expression in affymetrix genechip arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix Genechip microarrays are used widely to determine the simultaneous expression of genes in a given biological paradigm. Probes on the Genechip array are atomic entities which by definition are randomly distributed across the array and in turn govern the gene expression. In the present study, we make several interesting observations. We show that there is considerable correlation between the probe intensities across the array which defy the independence assumption. While the mechanism behind such correlations is unclear, we show that scaling behavior and the profiles of perfect match (PM) as well as mismatch (MM) probes are similar and immune-to-background subtraction. We believe that the observed correlations are possibly an outcome of inherent non-stationarities or patchiness in the array devoid of biological significance. This is demonstrated by inspecting their scaling behavior and profiles of the PM and MM probe intensities obtained from publicly available Genechip arrays from three eukaryotic genomes, namely: Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), Homo sapiens (humans) and Mus musculus (house mouse) across distinct biological paradigms and across laboratories, with and without background subtraction. The fluctuation functions were estimated using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) with fourth-order polynomial detrending. The results presented in this study provide new insights into correlation signatures of PM and MM probe intensities and suggests the choice of DFA as a tool for qualitative assessment of Affymetrix Genechip microarrays prior to their analysis. A more detailed investigation is necessary in order to understand the source of these correlations.

  2. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  3. Gene Expression Analysis of Cultured Rat-Endothelial Cells after Nd:YAG Laser Irradiation by Affymetrix GeneChip Array

    PubMed Central

    MASUDA, YOSHIKO; YOKOSE, SATOSHI; SAKAGAMI, HIROSHI

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial cells and dental pulp cells enhance osteo-/odontogenic and angiogenic differentiation. In our previous study, rat pulp cells migrated to Nd:YAG laser-irradiated endothelial cells in an insert cell culture system. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible changes in the gene expression of cultured rat aortic endothelial cells after Nd:YAG laser irradiation using affymetrix GeneChip Array. Total RNA was extracted from the cells at 5 h after laser irradiation. Gene expressions were evaluated by DNA array chip. Up-regulated genes were related to cell migration and cell structure (membrane stretch, actin regulation and junctional complexes), neurotransmission and inflammation. Heat-shock 70 kDa protein (Hsp70) was related to the development of tooth germ. This study offers candidate genes for understanding the relationship between the laser-stimulated endothelial cells and dental pulp cells. PMID:28064220

  4. BEAT: Bioinformatics Exon Array Tool to store, analyze and visualize Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon Array data from disease experiments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is known from recent studies that more than 90% of human multi-exon genes are subject to Alternative Splicing (AS), a key molecular mechanism in which multiple transcripts may be generated from a single gene. It is widely recognized that a breakdown in AS mechanisms plays an important role in cellular differentiation and pathologies. Polymerase Chain Reactions, microarrays and sequencing technologies have been applied to the study of transcript diversity arising from alternative expression. Last generation Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays offer a more detailed view of the gene expression profile providing information on the AS patterns. The exon array technology, with more than five million data points, can detect approximately one million exons, and it allows performing analyses at both gene and exon level. In this paper we describe BEAT, an integrated user-friendly bioinformatics framework to store, analyze and visualize exon arrays datasets. It combines a data warehouse approach with some rigorous statistical methods for assessing the AS of genes involved in diseases. Meta statistics are proposed as a novel approach to explore the analysis results. BEAT is available at http://beat.ba.itb.cnr.it. Results BEAT is a web tool which allows uploading and analyzing exon array datasets using standard statistical methods and an easy-to-use graphical web front-end. BEAT has been tested on a dataset with 173 samples and tuned using new datasets of exon array experiments from 28 colorectal cancer and 26 renal cell cancer samples produced at the Medical Genetics Unit of IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza. To highlight all possible AS events, alternative names, accession Ids, Gene Ontology terms and biochemical pathways annotations are integrated with exon and gene level expression plots. The user can customize the results choosing custom thresholds for the statistical parameters and exploiting the available clinical data of the samples for a

  5. Comparative transcriptomic profiling of Vitis vinifera under high light using a custom-made array and the Affymetrix GeneChip.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luísa C; Vilela, Belmiro J; Mullineaux, Phil M; Amâncio, Sara

    2011-11-01

    Understanding abiotic stress responses is one of the most important issues in plant research nowadays. Abiotic stress, including excess light, can promote the onset of oxidative stress through the accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Oxidative stress also arises when in vitro propagated plants are exposed to high light upon transfer to ex vitro. To determine whether the underlying pathways activated at the transfer of in vitro grapevine to ex vitro conditions reflect the processes occurring upon light stress, we used Vitis vinifera Affymetrix GeneChip (VvGA) and a custom array of genes responsive to light stress (LSCA) detected by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). When gene-expression profiles were compared, 'protein metabolism and modification', 'signaling', and 'anti-oxidative' genes were more represented in LSCA, while, in VvGA, 'cell wall metabolism' and 'secondary metabolism' were the categories in which gene expression varied more significantly. The above functional categories confirm previous studies involving other types of abiotic stresses, enhancing the common attributes of abiotic stress defense pathways. The LSCA analysis of our experimental system detected strong response of heat shock genes, particularly the protein rescuing mechanism involving the cooperation of two ATP-dependent chaperone systems, Hsp100 and Hsp70, which showed an unusually late response during the recovery period, of extreme relevance to remove non-functional, potentially harmful polypeptides arising from misfolding, denaturation, or aggregation brought about by stress. The success of LSCA also proves the feasibility of a custom-made qRT-PCR approach, particularly for species for which no GeneChip is available and for researchers dealing with a specific and focused problem.

  6. High correspondence between Affymetrix exon and standard expression arrays.

    PubMed

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Hey, Yvonne; Pepper, Stuart D; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-02-01

    Exon arrays aim to provide comprehensive gene expression data at the level of individual exons, similar to that provided on a per-gene basis by existing expression arrays. This report describes the performance of Affymetrix GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST array by using replicated RNA samples from two human cell lines, MCF7 and MCF10A, hybridized both to Exon 1.0 ST and to HG-U133 Plus2 arrays. Cross-comparison between array types requires an appropriate mapping to be found between individual probe sets. Three possible mappings were considered, reflecting different strategies for dealing with probe sets that target different parts of the same transcript. Irrespective of the mapping used, Exon 1.0 ST and HG-U133 Plus2 arrays show a high degree of correspondence. More than 80% of HG-U133 Plus2 probe sets may be mapped to the Exon chip, and fold changes are found well preserved for over 96% of those probe sets detected present. Since HG-U133 Plus2 arrays have already been extensively validated, these results lend a significant degree of confidence to exon arrays.

  7. Identifying the impact of G-quadruplexes on Affymetrix 3' arrays using cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Memon, Farhat N; Owen, Anne M; Sanchez-Graillet, Olivia; Upton, Graham J G; Harrison, Andrew P

    2010-01-15

    A tetramer quadruplex structure is formed by four parallel strands of DNA/ RNA containing runs of guanine. These quadruplexes are able to form because guanine can Hoogsteen hydrogen bond to other guanines, and a tetrad of guanines can form a stable arrangement. Recently we have discovered that probes on Affymetrix GeneChips that contain runs of guanine do not measure gene expression reliably. We associate this finding with the likelihood that quadruplexes are forming on the surface of GeneChips. In order to cope with the rapidly expanding size of GeneChip array datasets in the public domain, we are exploring the use of cloud computing to replicate our experiments on 3' arrays to look at the effect of the location of G-spots (runs of guanines). Cloud computing is a recently introduced high-performance solution that takes advantage of the computational infrastructure of large organisations such as Amazon and Google. We expect that cloud computing will become widely adopted because it enables bioinformaticians to avoid capital expenditure on expensive computing resources and to only pay a cloud computing provider for what is used. Moreover, as well as financial efficiency, cloud computing is an ecologically-friendly technology, it enables efficient data-sharing and we expect it to be faster for development purposes. Here we propose the advantageous use of cloud computing to perform a large data-mining analysis of public domain 3' arrays.

  8. Discovery and mapping of single feature polymorphisms in wheat using affymetrix arrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single feature polymorphisms (SFPs) can be a rich source of markers for gene mapping and function studies. To explore the feasibility of using the Affymetrix GeneChip to discover and map SFPs in the large hexaploid wheat genome, six wheat varieties of diverse origins were analyzed for significant pr...

  9. Rawcopy: Improved copy number analysis with Affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhofer, Markus; Viklund, Björn; Isaksson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Microarray data is subject to noise and systematic variation that negatively affects the resolution of copy number analysis. We describe Rawcopy, an R package for processing of Affymetrix CytoScan HD, CytoScan 750k and SNP 6.0 microarray raw intensities (CEL files). Noise characteristics of a large number of reference samples are used to estimate log ratio and B-allele frequency for total and allele-specific copy number analysis. Rawcopy achieves better signal-to-noise ratio and higher proportion of validated alterations than commonly used free and proprietary alternatives. In addition, Rawcopy visualizes each microarray sample for assessment of technical quality, patient identity and genome-wide absolute copy number states. Software and instructions are available at http://rawcopy.org. PMID:27796336

  10. An annotation infrastructure for the analysis and interpretation of Affymetrix exon array data.

    PubMed

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Yates, Tim; Dibben, Siân; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays contain probesets intended to target every known and predicted exon in the entire genome, posing significant challenges for high-throughput genome-wide data analysis. X:MAP http://xmap.picr.man.ac.uk, an annotation database, and exonmap http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/2.0/bioc/html/exonmap.html, a BioConductor/R package, are designed to support fine-grained analysis of exon array data. The system supports the application of standard statistical techniques, prior to the use of genome scale annotation to provide gene-, transcript- and exon-level summaries and visualization tools.

  11. An annotation infrastructure for the analysis and interpretation of Affymetrix exon array data

    PubMed Central

    Okoniewski, Michał J; Yates, Tim; Dibben, Siân; Miller, Crispin J

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays contain probesets intended to target every known and predicted exon in the entire genome, posing significant challenges for high-throughput genome-wide data analysis. X:MAP , an annotation database, and exonmap , a BioConductor/R package, are designed to support fine-grained analysis of exon array data. The system supports the application of standard statistical techniques, prior to the use of genome scale annotation to provide gene-, transcript- and exon-level summaries and visualization tools. PMID:17498294

  12. Affymetrix Whole-Transcript Human Gene 1.0 ST array is highly concordant with standard 3' expression arrays.

    PubMed

    Pradervand, Sylvain; Paillusson, Alexandra; Thomas, Jérôme; Weber, Johann; Wirapati, Pratyaksha; Hagenbüchle, Otto; Harshman, Keith

    2008-05-01

    The recently released Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array has two major differences compared with standard 3' based arrays: (i) it interrogates the entire mRNA transcript, and (ii) it uses DNA targets. To assess the impact of these differences on array performance, we performed a series of comparative hybridizations between the Human Gene 1.0 ST and the Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 and the Illumina HumanRef-8 BeadChip arrays. Additionally, both RNA and DNA targets were hybridized on HG-U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. The results show that the overall reproducibility of the Gene 1.0 ST array is best. When looking only at the high intensity probes, the reproducibility of the Gene 1.0 ST array and the Illumina BeadChip array is equally good. Concordance of array results was assessed using different inter-platform mappings. Agreements are best between the two labeling protocols using HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array. The Gene 1.0 ST array is most concordant with the HG-U133 array hybridized with cDNA targets. This may reflect the impact of the target type. Overall, the high degree of correspondence provides strong evidence for the reliability of the Gene 1.0 ST array.

  13. Improvements to previous algorithms to predict gene structure and isoform concentrations using Affymetrix Exon arrays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Exon arrays provide a way to measure the expression of different isoforms of genes in an organism. Most of the procedures to deal with these arrays are focused on gene expression or on exon expression. Although the only biological analytes that can be properly assigned a concentration are transcripts, there are very few algorithms that focus on them. The reason is that previously developed summarization methods do not work well if applied to transcripts. In addition, gene structure prediction, i.e., the correspondence between probes and novel isoforms, is a field which is still unexplored. Results We have modified and adapted a previous algorithm to take advantage of the special characteristics of the Affymetrix exon arrays. The structure and concentration of transcripts -some of them possibly unknown- in microarray experiments were predicted using this algorithm. Simulations showed that the suggested modifications improved both specificity (SP) and sensitivity (ST) of the predictions. The algorithm was also applied to different real datasets showing its effectiveness and the concordance with PCR validated results. Conclusions The proposed algorithm shows a substantial improvement in the performance over the previous version. This improvement is mainly due to the exploitation of the redundancy of the Affymetrix exon arrays. An R-Package of SPACE with the updated algorithms have been developed and is freely available. PMID:21110835

  14. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform. PMID:21498550

  15. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software.

    PubMed

    Lockstone, Helen E

    2011-11-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform.

  16. X:Map: annotation and visualization of genome structure for Affymetrix exon array analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Tim; Okoniewski, Michał J.; Miller, Crispin J.

    2008-01-01

    Affymetrix exon arrays aim to target every known and predicted exon in the human, mouse or rat genomes, and have reporters that extend beyond protein coding regions to other areas of the transcribed genome. This combination of increased coverage and precision is important because a substantial proportion of protein coding genes are predicted to be alternatively spliced, and because many non-coding genes are known also to be of biological significance. In order to fully exploit these arrays, it is necessary to associate each reporter on the array with the features of the genome it is targeting, and to relate these to gene and genome structure. X:Map is a genome annotation database that provides this information. Data can be browsed using a novel Google-maps based interface, and analysed and further visualized through an associated BioConductor package. The database can be found at http://xmap.picr.man.ac.uk. PMID:17932061

  17. A sequence-based identification of the genes detected by probesets on the Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 array.

    PubMed

    Harbig, Jeremy; Sprinkle, Robert; Enkemann, Steven A

    2005-02-18

    One of the biggest problems facing microarray experiments is the difficulty of translating results into other microarray formats or comparing microarray results to other biochemical methods. We believe that this is largely the result of poor gene identification. We re-identified the probesets on the Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 GeneChip array. This identification was based on the sequence of the probes and the sequence of the human genome. Using the BLAST program, we matched probes with documented and postulated human transcripts. This resulted in the redefinition of approximately 37% of the probes on the U133 plus 2.0 array. This updated identification specifically points out where the identification is complicated by cross-hybridization from splice variants or closely related genes. More than 5000 probesets detect multiple transcripts and therefore the exact protein affected cannot be readily concluded from the performance of one probeset alone. This makes naming difficult and impacts any downstream analysis such as associating gene ontologies, mapping affected pathways or simply validating expression changes. We have now automated the sequence-based identification and can more appropriately annotate any array where the sequence on each spot is known.

  18. EzArray: A web-based highly automated Affymetrix expression array data management and analysis system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuerong; Zhu, Yuelin; Xu, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Background Though microarray experiments are very popular in life science research, managing and analyzing microarray data are still challenging tasks for many biologists. Most microarray programs require users to have sophisticated knowledge of mathematics, statistics and computer skills for usage. With accumulating microarray data deposited in public databases, easy-to-use programs to re-analyze previously published microarray data are in high demand. Results EzArray is a web-based Affymetrix expression array data management and analysis system for researchers who need to organize microarray data efficiently and get data analyzed instantly. EzArray organizes microarray data into projects that can be analyzed online with predefined or custom procedures. EzArray performs data preprocessing and detection of differentially expressed genes with statistical methods. All analysis procedures are optimized and highly automated so that even novice users with limited pre-knowledge of microarray data analysis can complete initial analysis quickly. Since all input files, analysis parameters, and executed scripts can be downloaded, EzArray provides maximum reproducibility for each analysis. In addition, EzArray integrates with Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and allows instantaneous re-analysis of published array data. Conclusion EzArray is a novel Affymetrix expression array data analysis and sharing system. EzArray provides easy-to-use tools for re-analyzing published microarray data and will help both novice and experienced users perform initial analysis of their microarray data from the location of data storage. We believe EzArray will be a useful system for facilities with microarray services and laboratories with multiple members involved in microarray data analysis. EzArray is freely available from . PMID:18218103

  19. SFP Genotyping from Affymetrix Arrays is Robust but Largely Detects Cis-acting Expression Regulators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent development of Affymetrix chips designed from assembled EST sequences has spawned considerable interest in identifying single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) from transcriptome data. SFPs are valuable genetic markers that potentially offer a physical link to the structural genes themselves....

  20. Evaluating the performance of Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 platform with 400 Japanese individuals

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Nao; Koike, Asako; Tajima, Atsushi; Ogasawara, Yuko; Ishibashi, Yoshimi; Uehara, Yasuka; Inoue, Ituro; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2008-01-01

    Background With improvements in genotyping technologies, genome-wide association studies with hundreds of thousands of SNPs allow the identification of candidate genetic loci for multifactorial diseases in different populations. However, genotyping errors caused by genotyping platforms or genotype calling algorithms may lead to inflation of false associations between markers and phenotypes. In addition, the number of SNPs available for genome-wide association studies in the Japanese population has been investigated using only 45 samples in the HapMap project, which could lead to an inaccurate estimation of the number of SNPs with low minor allele frequencies. We genotyped 400 Japanese samples in order to estimate the number of SNPs available for genome-wide association studies in the Japanese population and to examine the performance of the current SNP Array 6.0 platform and the genotype calling algorithm "Birdseed". Results About 20% of the 909,622 SNP markers on the array were revealed to be monomorphic in the Japanese population. Consequently, 661,599 SNPs were available for genome-wide association studies in the Japanese population, after excluding the poorly behaving SNPs. The Birdseed algorithm accurately determined the genotype calls of each sample with a high overall call rate of over 99.5% and a high concordance rate of over 99.8% using more than 48 samples after removing low-quality samples by adjusting QC criteria. Conclusion Our results confirmed that the SNP Array 6.0 platform reached the level reported by the manufacturer, and thus genome-wide association studies using the SNP Array 6.0 platform have considerable potential to identify candidate susceptibility or resistance genetic factors for multifactorial diseases in the Japanese population, as well as in other populations. PMID:18803882

  1. A Single-Array-Based Method for Detecting Copy Number Variants Using Affymetrix High Density SNP Arrays and its Application to Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Fu, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence has shown that structural variations, due to insertions, deletions, and inversions of DNA, may contribute considerably to the development of complex human diseases, such as breast cancer. High-throughput genotyping technologies, such as Affymetrix high density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, have produced large amounts of genetic data for genome-wide SNP genotype calling and copy number estimation. Meanwhile, there is a great need for accurate and efficient statistical methods to detect copy number variants. In this article, we introduce a hidden-Markov-model (HMM)-based method, referred to as the PICR-CNV, for copy number inference. The proposed method first estimates copy number abundance for each single SNP on a single array based on the raw fluorescence values, and then standardizes the estimated copy number abundance to achieve equal footing among multiple arrays. This method requires no between-array normalization, and thus, maintains data integrity and independence of samples among individual subjects. In addition to our efforts to apply new statistical technology to raw fluorescence values, the HMM has been applied to the standardized copy number abundance in order to reduce experimental noise. Through simulations, we show our refined method is able to infer copy number variants accurately. Application of the proposed method to a breast cancer dataset helps to identify genomic regions significantly associated with the disease. PMID:26279618

  2. CEL_INTERROGATOR: A FREE AND OPEN SOURCE PACKAGE FOR AFFYMETRIX CEL FILE PARSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CEL_Interrogator Package is a suite of programs designed to extract the average probe intensity and other information for each probe sequence from an Affymetrix GeneChip CEL file and unite them with their human-readable Affymetrix consensus sequence names. The resulting text file is suitable for di...

  3. Methods comparison for high-resolution transcriptional analysis of archival material on Affymetrix Plus 2.0 and Exon 1.0 microarrays.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kim; Hey, Yvonne; Dibben, Sian; Miller, Crispin; Freemont, Anthony; Radford, John; Pepper, Stuart

    2009-07-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is a new and evolving technique. This report compares transcript detection rates on Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 and Human Exon 1.0 ST GeneChips across several RNA extraction and target labeling protocols, using routinely collected archival FFPE samples. All RNA extraction protocols tested (Ambion-Optimum, Ambion-RecoverAll, and Qiagen-RNeasy FFPE) provided extracts suitable for microarray hybridization. Compared with Affymetrix One-Cycle labeled extracts, NuGEN system protocols utilizing oligo(dT) and random hexamer primers, and cDNA target preparations instead of cRNA, achieved percent present rates up to 55% on Plus 2.0 arrays. Based on two paired-sample analyses, at 90% specificity this equalled an average 30 percentage-point increase (from 50% to 80%) in FFPE transcript sensitivity relative to fresh frozen tissues, which we have assumed to have 100% sensitivity and specificity. The high content of Exon arrays, with multiple probe sets per exon, improved FFPE sensitivity to 92% at 96% specificity, corresponding to an absolute increase of ~600 genes over Plus 2.0 arrays. While larger series are needed to confirm high correspondence between fresh-frozen and FFPE expression patterns, these data suggest that both Plus 2.0 and Exon arrays are suitable platforms for FFPE microarray expression analyses.

  4. Evolving DNA motifs to predict GeneChip probe performance

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, WB; Harrison, AP

    2009-01-01

    Background Affymetrix High Density Oligonuclotide Arrays (HDONA) simultaneously measure expression of thousands of genes using millions of probes. We use correlations between measurements for the same gene across 6685 human tissue samples from NCBI's GEO database to indicated the quality of individual HG-U133A probes. Low correlation indicates a poor probe. Results Regular expressions can be automatically created from a Backus-Naur form (BNF) context-free grammar using strongly typed genetic programming. Conclusion The automatically produced motif is better at predicting poor DNA sequences than an existing human generated RE, suggesting runs of Cytosine and Guanine and mixtures should all be avoided. PMID:19298675

  5. A Robust Plant RNA Isolation Method for Affymetrix Genechip® Analysis and Quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarray analysis and quantitative real-time RT-PCR are the major high-throughput techniques that are used to study transcript profiles. One of the major limitations in these technologies is the isolation maximum yield of highly-pure RNA from plant tissues rich in complex polysaccharides, polyphen...

  6. A new diagnostic workflow for patients with mental retardation and/or multiple congenital abnormalities: test arrays first.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, Antoinet C J; Lew, Janet Y K; Bosch, Cathy A J; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H M; van Haeringen, Arie; den Hollander, Nicolette S; Kant, Sarina G; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Breuning, Martijn H; Bakker, Egbert; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L

    2009-11-01

    High-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping technology enables extensive genotyping as well as the detection of increasingly smaller chromosomal aberrations. In this study, we assess molecular karyotyping as first-round analysis of patients with mental retardation and/or multiple congenital abnormalities (MR/MCA). We used different commercially available SNP array platforms, the Affymetrix GeneChip 262K NspI, the Genechip 238K StyI, the Illumina HumanHap 300 and HumanCNV 370 BeadChip, to detect copy number variants (CNVs) in 318 patients with unexplained MR/MCA. We found abnormalities in 22.6% of the patients, including six CNVs that overlap known microdeletion/duplication syndromes, eight CNVs that overlap recently described syndromes, 63 potentially pathogenic CNVs (in 52 patients), four large segments of homozygosity and two mosaic trisomies for an entire chromosome. This study shows that high-density SNP array analysis reveals a much higher diagnostic yield as that of conventional karyotyping. SNP arrays have the potential to detect CNVs, mosaics, uniparental disomies and loss of heterozygosity in one experiment. We, therefore, propose a novel diagnostic approach to all MR/MCA patients by first analyzing every patient with an SNP array instead of conventional karyotyping.

  7. A New Resource for Cereal Genomics: 22K Barley GeneChip Comes of Age1

    PubMed Central

    Close, Timothy J.; Wanamaker, Steve I.; Caldo, Rico A.; Turner, Stacy M.; Ashlock, Daniel A.; Dickerson, Julie A.; Wing, Rod A.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.; Kleinhofs, Andris; Wise, Roger P.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, access to complete genomic sequences, coupled with rapidly accumulating data related to RNA and protein expression patterns, has made it possible to determine comprehensively how genes contribute to complex phenotypes. However, for major crop plants, publicly available, standard platforms for parallel expression analysis have been limited. We report the conception and design of the new publicly available, 22K Barley1 GeneChip probe array, a model for plants without a fully sequenced genome. Array content was derived from worldwide contribution of 350,000 high-quality ESTs from 84 cDNA libraries, in addition to 1,145 barley (Hordeum vulgare) gene sequences from the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database. Conserved sequences expressed in seedlings of wheat (Triticum aestivum), oat (Avena strigosa), rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and maize (Zea mays) were identified that will be valuable in the design of arrays across grasses. To enhance the usability of the data, BarleyBase, a MIAME-compliant, MySQL relational database, serves as a public repository for raw and normalized expression data from the Barley1 GeneChip probe array. Interconnecting links with PlantGDB and Gramene allow BarleyBase users to perform gene predictions using the 21,439 non-redundant Barley1 exemplar sequences or cross-species comparison at the genome level, respectively. We expect that this first generation array will accelerate hypothesis generation and gene discovery in disease defense pathways, responses to abiotic stresses, development, and evolutionary diversity in monocot plants. PMID:15020760

  8. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the μ-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in μ-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power

  9. Celsius: a community resource for Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Day, Allen; Carlson, Marc R J; Dong, Jun; O'Connor, Brian D; Nelson, Stanley F

    2007-01-01

    Celsius is a data warehousing system to aggregate Affymetrix CEL files and associated metadata. It provides mechanisms for importing, storing, querying, and exporting large volumes of primary and pre-processed microarray data. Celsius contains ten billion assay measurements and affiliated metadata. It is the largest publicly available source of Affymetrix microarray data, and through sheer volume it allows a sophisticated, broad view of transcription that has not previously been possible.

  10. GeneChip resequencing of the smallpox virus genome can identify novel strains: a biodefense application.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Tang, Kevin; Osborne, John; Sammons, Scott; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2007-02-01

    We developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips, based on the complete genome sequences of 24 strains of smallpox virus (variola virus), for rapid characterization of this human-pathogenic virus. Each GeneChip was designed to analyze a divergent segment of approximately 30,000 bases of the smallpox virus genome. This study includes the hybridization results of 14 smallpox virus strains. Of the 14 smallpox virus strains hybridized, only 7 had sequence information included in the design of the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips; similar information for the remaining strains was not tiled as a reference in these GeneChips. By use of variola virus-specific primers and long-range PCR, 22 overlapping amplicons were amplified to cover nearly the complete genome and hybridized with the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChip set. These GeneChips were successful in generating nucleotide sequences for all 14 of the smallpox virus strains hybridized. Analysis of the data indicated that the GeneChip resequencing by hybridization was fast and reproducible and that the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips could differentiate the 14 smallpox virus strains characterized. This study also suggests that high-density resequencing GeneChips have potential biodefense applications and may be used as an alternate tool for rapid identification of smallpox virus in the future.

  11. Noncoder: a web interface for exon array-based detection of long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gellert, Pascal; Ponomareva, Yuliya; Braun, Thomas; Uchida, Shizuka

    2013-01-01

    Due to recent technical developments, a high number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in mammals. Although it has been shown that lncRNAs are regulated differently among tissues and disease statuses, functions of these transcripts are still unknown in most cases. GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST Arrays (exon arrays) from Affymetrix, Inc. have been used widely to profile genome-wide expression changes and alternative splicing of protein-coding genes. Here, we demonstrate that re-annotation of exon array probes can be used to profile expressions of tens of thousands of lncRNAs. With this annotation, a detailed inspection of lncRNAs and their isoforms is possible. To allow for a general usage to the research community, we developed a user-friendly web interface called ‘noncoder’. By uploading CEL files from exon arrays and with a few mouse clicks and parameter settings, exon array data will be normalized and analysed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs. Noncoder provides the detailed annotation information of lncRNAs and is equipped with unique features to allow for an efficient search for interesting lncRNAs to be studied further. The web interface is available at http://noncoder.mpi-bn.mpg.de. PMID:23012263

  12. Multicenter Evaluation of Genechip for Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yu; Xia, Hui; Zhang, Zhiying; Li, Junchen; Dong, Yi; Li, Qiang; Ou, Xichao; Song, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yufeng; O'Brien, Richard; Kam, Kai Man; Chi, Junying; Huan, Shitong; Chin, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), especially multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), is still one of the most serious threats to TB control worldwide. Early diagnosis of MDR-TB is important for effectively blocking transmission and establishing an effective protocol for chemotherapy. Genechip is a rapid diagnostic method based on molecular biology that overcomes the poor biosafety, time consumption, and other drawbacks of traditional drug sensitivity testing (DST) that can detect MDR-TB. However, the Genechip approach has not been effectively evaluated, especially in limited-resource laboratories. In this study, we evaluated the performance of Genechip for MDR-TB in 1,814 patients in four prefectural or municipal laboratories and compared its performance with that of traditional DST. The results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of Genechip were 87.56% and 97.95% for rifampin resistance and 80.34% and 95.82% for isoniazid resistance, respectively. In addition, we found that the positive grade of the sputum smears influenced the judgment of results by Genechip. The test judged only 75% of the specimens of “scanty” positive grade. However, the positive grade of the specimens showed no influence on the accuracy of Genechip. Overall, the study suggests that, in limited-resource laboratories, Genechip showed high sensitivity and specificity for rifampin and isoniazid resistance, making it a more effective, rapid, safe, and cost-beneficial method worthy of broader use in limited-resource laboratories in China. PMID:23515537

  13. Molecular Targeting of Prostate Cancer during Androgen Ablation: Inhibition of CHES1/FOXN3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    wide gene expression profiling with Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays in order to identify the genes whose expression were...analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays. Microarray data analysis was performed using GeneSpring GX software. Differentially

  14. Reproducible and inexpensive probe preparation for oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Price, B D; Tetradis, S; Chakrabarti, S; Maulik, G; Makrigiorgos, G M

    2001-07-01

    We present a new protocol for the preparation of nucleic acids for microarray hybridization. DNA is fragmented quantitatively and reproducibly by using a hydroxyl radical-based reaction, which is initiated by hydrogen peroxide, iron(II)-EDTA and ascorbic acid. Following fragmentation, the nucleic acid fragments are densely biotinylated using a biotinylated psoralen analog plus UVA light and hybridized on microarrays. This non-enzymatic protocol circumvents several practical difficulties associated with DNA preparation for microarrays: the lack of reproducible fragmentation patterns associated with enzymatic methods; the large amount of labeled nucleic acids required by some array designs, which is often combined with a limited amount of starting material; and the high cost associated with currently used biotinylation methods. The method is applicable to any form of nucleic acid, but is particularly useful when applying double-stranded DNA on oligonucleotide arrays. Validation of this protocol is demonstrated by hybridizing PCR products with oligonucleotide-coated microspheres and PCR amplified cDNA with Affymetrix Cancer GeneChip microarrays.

  15. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  16. Smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips can also rapidly ascertain species status for some zoonotic non-variola orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Sammons, Scott A; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2008-04-01

    We recently developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips for the rapid sequencing of Variola virus strains in the WHO Repository of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this study, we attempted to hybridize these GeneChips with some known non-Variola orthopoxvirus isolates, including monkeypox, cowpox, and vaccinia viruses, for rapid detection.

  17. Mining Affymetrix microarray data for long non-coding RNAs: altered expression in the nucleus accumbens of heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Lipovich, Leonard; Blythe, Jason; Jia, Hui; Kapatos, Gregory; Bannon, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Although recent data suggest that some long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) exert widespread effects on gene expression and organelle formation, lncRNAs as a group constitute a sizable but poorly characterized fraction of the human transcriptome. We investigated whether some human lncRNA sequences were fortuitously represented on commonly used microarrays, then used this annotation to assess lncRNA expression in human brain. A computational and annotation pipeline was developed to identify lncRNA transcripts represented on Affymetrix U133 arrays. A previously published dataset derived from human nucleus accumbens was then examined for potential lncRNA expression. Twenty-three lncRNAs were determined to be represented on U133 arrays. Of these, dataset analysis revealed that five lncRNAs were consistently detected in samples of human nucleus accumbens. Strikingly, the abundance of these lncRNAs was up-regulated in human heroin abusers compared to matched drug-free control subjects, a finding confirmed by quantitative PCR. This study presents a paradigm for examining existing Affymetrix datasets for the detection and potential regulation of lncRNA expression, including changes associated with human disease. The finding that all detected lncRNAs were up-regulated in heroin abusers is consonant with the proposed role of lncRNAs as mediators of widespread changes in gene expression as occur in drug abuse.

  18. Marek's disease virus-induced immunosuppression: array analysis of chicken immune response gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Mohammad; Sarson, Aimie J; Huebner, Marianne; Sharif, Shayan; Kireev, Dmitry; Zhou, Huaijun

    2010-06-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens induced by a highly cell-associated oncogenic alpha-herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus (MDV). MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latency infection within CD4(+) T cells. Host-virus interaction, immune responses to infection, and transcriptional profiling of chicken gene expression in MD are poorly understood. In this study we conducted a global host gene expression analysis in the splenocytes of MDV-infected chickens using oligonucleotide-based Affymetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays. These arrays contain probes for more than 32,000 chicken transcripts and most of the known MDV genes and open reading frames. Two-week-old MD-susceptible chickens were inoculated with an oncogenic strain of MDV, and spleen samples were collected 5 and 15 days post-infection (dpi) for RNA isolation and microarray analysis. Array results displayed a significant differential pattern of immune response transcriptome between the two phases of MDV infection. The expression levels of more than 22 immune-response and related genes were downregulated, while the expression levels of at least 58 genes were increased at 5 dpi (cytolytic infection), compared to age-matched control birds. In comparison, out of 73 immune-response and related genes, 67 genes were downregulated, with only 6 genes having higher expression levels at 15 dpi (latency infection). Cytokines, chemokines, MHC molecules and related receptors, and adhesion molecules were among the many MDV-induced downregulated genes that are critical for an effective antiviral immune response. In addition, several apoptosis-associated genes were decreased in expression during latent infection, suggesting an MDV-induced blocking of initiation or progression of programmed cell death processes. These chicken arrays are valuable tools in understanding the molecular mechanisms behind viral pathogenesis and chicken gene expression patterns, and associated

  19. Statistical evaluation of transcriptomic data generated using the Affymetrix one-cycle, two-cycle and IVT-Express RNA labelling protocols with the Arabidopsis ATH1 microarray

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarrays are a powerful tool used for the determination of global RNA expression. There is an increasing requirement to focus on profiling gene expression in tissues where it is difficult to obtain large quantities of material, for example individual tissues within organs such as the root, or individual isolated cells. From such samples, it is difficult to produce the amount of RNA required for labelling and hybridisation in microarray experiments, thus a process of amplification is usually adopted. Despite the increasing use of two-cycle amplification for transcriptomic analyses on the Affymetrix ATH1 array, there has been no report investigating any potential bias in gene representation that may occur as a result. Results Here we compare transcriptomic data generated using Affymetrix one-cycle (standard labelling protocol), two-cycle (small-sample protocol) and IVT-Express protocols with the Affymetrix ATH1 array using Arabidopsis root samples. Results obtained with each protocol are broadly similar. However, we show that there are 35 probe sets (of a total of 22810) that are misrepresented in the two-cycle data sets. Of these, 33 probe sets were classed as mis-amplified when comparisons of two independent publicly available data sets were undertaken. Conclusions Given the unreliable nature of the highlighted probes, we caution against using data associated with the corresponding genes in analyses involving transcriptomic data generated with two-cycle amplification protocols. We have shown that the Affymetrix IVT-E labelling protocol produces data with less associated bias than the two-cycle protocol, and as such, would recommend this kit for new experiments that involve small samples. PMID:20230623

  20. MicroRNA expression analysis using the Affymetrix Platform.

    PubMed

    Dee, Suzanne; Getts, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays have been used extensively for messenger RNA expression monitoring. Recently, microarrays have been designed to interrogate expression levels of noncoding RNAs. Here, we describe methods for RNA labeling and the use of a miRNA array to identify and measure microRNA present in RNA samples.

  1. Acquisition of biologically relevant gene expression data by Affymetrix microarray analysis of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumours

    PubMed Central

    Linton, K M; Hey, Y; Saunders, E; Jeziorska, M; Denton, J; Wilson, C L; Swindell, R; Dibben, S; Miller, C J; Pepper, S D; Radford, J A; Freemont, A J

    2008-01-01

    Robust protocols for microarray gene expression profiling of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET) are needed to facilitate research when availability of fresh-frozen tissue is limited. Recent reports attest to the feasibility of this approach, but the clinical value of these data is poorly understood. We employed state-of-the-art RNA extraction and Affymetrix microarray technology to examine 34 archival FFPET primary extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Nineteen arrays met stringent QC criteria and were used to model prognostic signatures for metastatic recurrence. Arrays from two paired frozen and FFPET samples were compared: although FFPET sensitivity was low (∼50%), high specificity (95%) and positive predictive value (92%) suggest that transcript detection is reliable. Good agreement between arrays and real time (RT)–PCR was confirmed, especially for abundant transcripts, and RT–PCR validated the regulation pattern for 19 of 24 candidate genes (overall R2=0.4662). RT–PCR and immunohistochemistry on independent cases validated prognostic significance for several genes including RECQL4, FRRS1, CFH and MET – whose combined expression carried greater prognostic value than tumour grade – and cmet and TRKB proteins. These molecules warrant further evaluation in larger series. Reliable clinically relevant data can be obtained from archival FFPET, but protocol amendments are needed to improve the sensitivity and broad application of this approach. PMID:18382428

  2. Acquisition of biologically relevant gene expression data by Affymetrix microarray analysis of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumours.

    PubMed

    Linton, K M; Hey, Y; Saunders, E; Jeziorska, M; Denton, J; Wilson, C L; Swindell, R; Dibben, S; Miller, C J; Pepper, S D; Radford, J A; Freemont, A J

    2008-04-22

    Robust protocols for microarray gene expression profiling of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET) are needed to facilitate research when availability of fresh-frozen tissue is limited. Recent reports attest to the feasibility of this approach, but the clinical value of these data is poorly understood. We employed state-of-the-art RNA extraction and Affymetrix microarray technology to examine 34 archival FFPET primary extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Nineteen arrays met stringent QC criteria and were used to model prognostic signatures for metastatic recurrence. Arrays from two paired frozen and FFPET samples were compared: although FFPET sensitivity was low ( approximately 50%), high specificity (95%) and positive predictive value (92%) suggest that transcript detection is reliable. Good agreement between arrays and real time (RT)-PCR was confirmed, especially for abundant transcripts, and RT-PCR validated the regulation pattern for 19 of 24 candidate genes (overall R(2)=0.4662). RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry on independent cases validated prognostic significance for several genes including RECQL4, FRRS1, CFH and MET - whose combined expression carried greater prognostic value than tumour grade - and cmet and TRKB proteins. These molecules warrant further evaluation in larger series. Reliable clinically relevant data can be obtained from archival FFPET, but protocol amendments are needed to improve the sensitivity and broad application of this approach.

  3. Characterization of Capsicum annuum genetic diversity and population structure based on parallel polymorphism discovery with a 30K unigene Pepper GeneChip.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theresa A; Ashrafi, Hamid; Reyes-Chin-Wo, Sebastian; Yao, JiQiang; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP). Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens) detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and application of genome

  4. Understanding the physics of oligonucleotide microarrays: the Affymetrix spike-in data reanalysed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, Conrad J.

    2008-03-01

    The Affymetrix U95 and U133 Latin-Square spike-in datasets are reanalysed, together with a dataset from a version of the U95 spike-in experiment without a complex non-specific background. The approach uses a physico-chemical model which includes the effects of the specific and non-specific hybridization and probe folding at the microarray surface, target folding and hybridization in the bulk RNA target solution and duplex dissociation during the post-hybridization washing phase. The model predicts a three-parameter hyperbolic response function that fits well with fluorescence intensity data from all the three datasets. The importance of the various hybridization and washing effects in determining each of the three parameters is examined, and some guidance is given as to how a practical algorithm for determining specific target concentrations might be developed.

  5. MAAMD: a workflow to standardize meta-analyses and comparison of affymetrix microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mandatory deposit of raw microarray data files for public access, prior to study publication, provides significant opportunities to conduct new bioinformatics analyses within and across multiple datasets. Analysis of raw microarray data files (e.g. Affymetrix CEL files) can be time consuming, complex, and requires fundamental computational and bioinformatics skills. The development of analytical workflows to automate these tasks simplifies the processing of, improves the efficiency of, and serves to standardize multiple and sequential analyses. Once installed, workflows facilitate the tedious steps required to run rapid intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. Results We developed a workflow to facilitate and standardize Meta-Analysis of Affymetrix Microarray Data analysis (MAAMD) in Kepler. Two freely available stand-alone software tools, R and AltAnalyze were embedded in MAAMD. The inputs of MAAMD are user-editable csv files, which contain sample information and parameters describing the locations of input files and required tools. MAAMD was tested by analyzing 4 different GEO datasets from mice and drosophila. MAAMD automates data downloading, data organization, data quality control assesment, differential gene expression analysis, clustering analysis, pathway visualization, gene-set enrichment analysis, and cross-species orthologous-gene comparisons. MAAMD was utilized to identify gene orthologues responding to hypoxia or hyperoxia in both mice and drosophila. The entire set of analyses for 4 datasets (34 total microarrays) finished in ~ one hour. Conclusions MAAMD saves time, minimizes the required computer skills, and offers a standardized procedure for users to analyze microarray datasets and make new intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. PMID:24621103

  6. The Affymetrix DMET Plus Platform Reveals Unique Distribution of ADME-Related Variants in Ethnic Arabs

    PubMed Central

    Wakil, Salma M.; Nguyen, Cao; Muiya, Nzioka P.; Andres, Editha; Lykowska-Tarnowska, Agnieszka; Baz, Batoul; Meyer, Brian F.; Morahan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus Premier Pack has been designed to genotype 1936 gene variants thought to be essential for screening patients in personalized drug therapy. These variants include the cytochrome P450s (CYP450s), the key metabolizing enzymes, many other enzymes involved in phase I and phase II pharmacokinetic reactions, and signaling mediators associated with variability in clinical response to numerous drugs not only among individuals, but also between ethnic populations. Materials and Methods. We genotyped 600 Saudi individuals for 1936 variants on the DMET platform to evaluate their clinical potential in personalized medicine in ethnic Arabs. Results. Approximately 49% each of the 437 CYP450 variants, 56% of the 581 transporters, 56% of 419 transferases, 48% of the 104 dehydrogenases, and 58% of the remaining 390 variants were detected. Several variants, such as rs3740071, rs6193, rs258751, rs6199, rs11568421, and rs8187797, exhibited significantly either higher or lower minor allele frequencies (MAFs) than those in other ethnic groups. Discussion. The present study revealed some unique distribution trends for several variants in Arabs, which displayed partly inverse allelic prevalence compared to other ethnic populations. The results point therefore to the need to verify and ascertain the prevalence of a variant as a prerequisite for engaging it in clinical routine screening in personalized medicine in any given population. PMID:25802476

  7. Differential gene expression in anterior pituitary glands from anestrous and cycling postpartum beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oligionucleotide microarrays (GeneChip Bovine Genome Arrays, Affymetrix Inc., Santa Clara, CA) were used to evaluate gene expression profiles in anterior pituitary glands collected from 4 anestrous and 4 cycling postpartum primiparous beef cows to provide insight into genes associated with transitio...

  8. Analysis of the Metabolic Pathways Affected by Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) in Arabidopsis thaliana Based on GeneChip Microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zongqi; Lei, Peng; Feng, Xiaohai; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2016-08-17

    Plant growth is promoted by poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA). However, the molecular mechanism underlying such promotion is not yet well understood. Therefore, we used GeneChip microarrays to explore the effects of γ-PGA on gene transcription in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results revealed 299 genes significantly regulated by γ-PGA. These differently expressed genes participate mainly in metabolic and cellular processes and in stimuli responses. The metabolic pathways linked to these differently expressed genes were also investigated. A total of 64 of the 299 differently expressed genes were shown to be directly involved in 24 pathways such as brassinosteroid biosynthesis, α-linolenic acid metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and nitrogen metabolism, all of which were influenced by γ-PGA. The analysis demonstrated that γ-PGA promoted nitrogen assimilation and biosynthesis of brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, and lignins, providing a better explanation for why γ-PGA promotes growth and enhances stress tolerance in plants.

  9. GeneChip Expression Profiling Reveals the Alterations of Energy Metabolism Related Genes in Osteocytes under Large Gradient High Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis. PMID:25635858

  10. GeneChip expression profiling reveals the alterations of energy metabolism related genes in osteocytes under large gradient high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis.

  11. Mining gene-chip data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, Morten

    2005-03-01

    DNA microarray (``gene chip'') technology has enabled a rapid accumulation of gene-expression data for model organisms such as S. cerevisiae and C. elegans, as well as for H. sapiens, raising the issue of how best to extract information about the gene regulatory networks of these organisms from this data. While basic clustering algorithms have been successful at finding genes that are coregulated for a small, specific set of experimental conditions, these algorithms are less effective when applied to large, varied data sets. One of the major challenges in analyzing the data is the diversity in both size and signal strength of the various transcriptional modules, i.e. sets of coregulated genes along with the sets of conditions for which the genes are strongly coregulated. One method that has proven successful at identifying large and/or strong modules is the Iterative Signature Algorithm (ISA) [1]. A modified version of the ISA algorithm, the Progressive Iterative Signature Algorithm (PISA), is also able to identify smaller, weaker modules by sequentially eliminating transcriptional modules as they are identified. Applying these algorithms to a large set of yeast gene expression data illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. [1] Bergmann, S., Ihmels, J., and Barkai, N., Phys. Rev. E 67, 031902 (2002).

  12. Magnetic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Trumper, David L.; Kim, Won-jong; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  13. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  14. Kokkos Array

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards Daniel Sunderland, Harold Carter

    2012-09-12

    The Kokkos Array library implements shared-memory array data structures and parallel task dispatch interfaces for data-parallel computational kernels that are performance-portable to multicore-CPU and manycore-accelerator (e.g., GPGPU) devices.

  15. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2007-03-13

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  16. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2009-08-11

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  17. Clover Biotechnology Research at FAPRU

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Randy Dinkins (USDA-ARS-FAPRU) is conducting research to determine the utility of using the Medicago Affymetrix Genechip for use with red clover (Trifolium pretense). The Medicago Affymetrix Genechip contains approximately 51,000 probe sets that are derived from Medicago truncatula, 1,800 from Medi...

  18. Gene expression levels in small specimens from patients detected using oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Katrin; Firth, Martin J; Freitas, Joseph R; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Kees, Ursula R

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale gene expression profiling using microarray technology is often limited by the amount of tissue or cells available. A number of RNA amplification protocols have been published to overcome this problem. However, additional amplification steps can result in both a 3' bias and poor reproducibility for low abundance transcripts. We performed microarray experiments using HG-U133A GeneChip arrays to ascertain whether less than the recommended amount of RNA can be used, thus avoiding additional amplification steps. In a titration experiment, 2-10 microg of total RNA from a single cryopreserved patient specimen was used to prepare biotinylated cRNA, and the recommended standard amount of 15 microg of each preparation was used for hybridization. Statistical analysis using box plots, correlation coefficients, MvA plots, and concordance percentages revealed almost identical levels of gene expression, independent of the amount of RNA used for target preparation. Most importantly, there was no statistically significant difference when the concordance percentages for low abundance genes were compared, demonstrating that as little as 2 microg of total RNA is sufficient to perform GeneChip analysis.

  19. Construction of a versatile SNP array for pyramiding useful genes of rice.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Yusuke; Noda, Tomonori; Yamagata, Yoshiyuki; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn; Sunohara, Hidehiko; Uehara, Kanako; Furuta, Tomoyuki; Nagai, Keisuke; Jena, Kshirod Kumar; Yasui, Hideshi; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Doi, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection (MAS) has become an indispensable component of breeding. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are the most frequent polymorphism in the rice genome. However, SNP markers are not readily employed in MAS because of limitations in genotyping platforms. Here the authors report a Golden Gate SNP array that targets specific genes controlling yield-related traits and biotic stress resistance in rice. As a first step, the SNP genotypes were surveyed in 31 parental varieties using the Affymetrix Rice 44K SNP microarray. The haplotype information for 16 target genes was then converted to the Golden Gate platform with 143-plex markers. Haplotypes for the 14 useful allele are unique and can discriminate among all other varieties. The genotyping consistency between the Affymetrix microarray and the Golden Gate array was 92.8%, and the accuracy of the Golden Gate array was confirmed in 3 F2 segregating populations. The concept of the haplotype-based selection by using the constructed SNP array was proofed.

  20. Array2BIO: A Comprehensive Suite of Utilities for the Analysis of Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Chain, P G; Mabery, S; Rasley, A; Garcia, E; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-02-13

    We have developed an integrative and automated toolkit for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray data, named Array2BIO. It identifies groups of coexpressed genes using two complementary approaches--comparative analysis of signal versus control microarrays and clustering analysis of gene expression across different conditions. The identified genes are assigned to functional categories based on the Gene Ontology classification, and a detection of corresponding KEGG protein interaction pathways. Array2BIO reliably handles low-expressor genes and provides a set of statistical methods to quantify the odds of observations, including the Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni multiple testing corrections. Automated interface with the ECR Browser provides evolutionary conservation analysis of identified gene loci while the interconnection with Creme allows high-throughput analysis of human promoter regions and prediction of gene regulatory elements that underlie the observed expression patterns. Array2BIO is publicly available at http://array2bio.dcode.org.

  1. SNP Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Louhelainen, Jari

    2016-01-01

    The papers published in this Special Issue “SNP arrays” (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays) focus on several perspectives associated with arrays of this type. The range of papers vary from a case report to reviews, thereby targeting wider audiences working in this field. The research focus of SNP arrays is often human cancers but this Issue expands that focus to include areas such as rare conditions, animal breeding and bioinformatics tools. Given the limited scope, the spectrum of papers is nothing short of remarkable and even from a technical point of view these papers will contribute to the field at a general level. Three of the papers published in this Special Issue focus on the use of various SNP array approaches in the analysis of three different cancer types. Two of the papers concentrate on two very different rare conditions, applying the SNP arrays slightly differently. Finally, two other papers evaluate the use of the SNP arrays in the context of genetic analysis of livestock. The findings reported in these papers help to close gaps in the current literature and also to give guidelines for future applications of SNP arrays. PMID:27792140

  2. Enthalpy arrays

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Francisco E.; Kuhn, Peter; De Bruyker, Dirk; Bell, Alan G.; Wolkin, Michal V.; Peeters, Eric; Williamson, James R.; Anderson, Gregory B.; Schmitz, Gregory P.; Recht, Michael I.; Schweizer, Sandra; Scott, Lincoln G.; Ho, Jackson H.; Elrod, Scott A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Lerner, Richard A.; Bruce, Richard H.

    2004-01-01

    We report the fabrication of enthalpy arrays and their use to detect molecular interactions, including protein–ligand binding, enzymatic turnover, and mitochondrial respiration. Enthalpy arrays provide a universal assay methodology with no need for specific assay development such as fluorescent labeling or immobilization of reagents, which can adversely affect the interaction. Microscale technology enables the fabrication of 96-detector enthalpy arrays on large substrates. The reduction in scale results in large decreases in both the sample quantity and the measurement time compared with conventional microcalorimetry. We demonstrate the utility of the enthalpy arrays by showing measurements for two protein–ligand binding interactions (RNase A + cytidine 2′-monophosphate and streptavidin + biotin), phosphorylation of glucose by hexokinase, and respiration of mitochondria in the presence of 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupler. PMID:15210951

  3. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated.

  4. Array tomography: production of arrays.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the sectioning of embedded tissues and the mounting of the serial arrays. The procedures require some familiarity with the techniques used for ultramicrotome sectioning for electron microscopy.

  5. Infrared Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, I.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Infrared arrays are small electronic imaging devices subdivided into a grid or `array' of picture elements, or pixels, each of which is made of a material sensitive to photons (ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION) with wavelengths much longer than normal visible light. Typical dimensions of currently available devices are about 27-36 mm square, and formats now range from 2048×2048 pixels for the near-infra...

  6. Microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutley, Michael C.; Stevens, Richard F.; Daly, Daniel J.

    1992-04-01

    Microlenses have been with us for a long time as indeed the very word lens reminds us. Many early lenses,including those made by Hooke and Leeuwenhoek in the 17th century were small and resembled lentils. Many languages use the same word for both (French tilentillelt and German "Linse") and the connection is only obscure in English because we use the French word for the vegetable and the German for the optic. Many of the applications for arrays of inicrolenses are also well established. Lippmann's work on integral photography at the turn of the century required lens arrays and stimulated an interest that is very much alive today. At one stage, lens arrays played an important part in high speed photography and various schemes have been put forward to take advantage of the compact imaging properties of combinations of lens arrays. The fact that many of these ingenious schemes have not been developed to their full potential has to a large degree been due to the absence of lens arrays of a suitable quality and cost.

  7. Pacific Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, H.; Takeo, A.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Based on our recent results on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry (e.g., Suetsugu & Shiobara, 2014, Annual Review EPS), together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have now enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (both radial and azimuthal), with deployments of ~10-15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs) (namely "ocean-bottom broadband dispersion survey"; Takeo et al., 2013, JGR; Kawakatsu et al., 2013, AGU; Takeo, 2014, Ph.D. Thesis; Takeo et al., 2014, JpGU). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations might be sought.

  8. Analysis of copy number variations in Mexican Holstein cattle using axiom genome-wide Bos 1 array

    PubMed Central

    Salomon-Torres, Ricardo; Villa-Angulo, Rafael; Villa-Angulo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Recently, for copy number variation (CNV) analysis, bovine researchers have focused mainly on the use of genome-wide SNP genotyping arrays. One of the highest densities commercially available SNPchips for cattle is the Affymetrix axiom genome-wide Bos 1, which assays 648,315 informative SNPs across the whole bovine genome. Here, we describe the microarray data, quality controls and validation implemented in a study published in Genetics and Molecular Research Journal in 2015 [1]. The microarray raw data has been deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus under accession #GSE54813. PMID:26981375

  9. Global Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Palmer, Bruce J.

    2015-11-01

    Global Arrays (GA) is a distributed-memory programming model that allows for shared-memory-style programming combined with one-sided communication, to create a set of tools that combine high performance with ease-of-use. GA exposes a relatively straightforward programming abstraction, while supporting fully-distributed data structures, locality of reference, and high-performance communication. GA was originally formulated in the early 1990’s to provide a communication layer for the Northwest Chemistry (NWChem) suite of chemistry modeling codes that was being developed concurrently.

  10. Comparison of Nanostring nCounter® Data on FFPE Colon Cancer Samples and Affymetrix Microarray Data on Matched Frozen Tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Deane, Natasha G; Lewis, Keeli B; Li, Jiang; Zhu, Jing; Washington, M Kay; Beauchamp, R Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) stage II and III patients remains a challenge due to the difficulties of finding robust biomarkers suitable for testing clinical samples. The majority of published gene signatures of CRC have been generated on fresh frozen colorectal tissues. Because collection of frozen tissue is not practical for routine surgical pathology practice, a clinical test that improves prognostic capabilities beyond standard pathological staging of colon cancer will need to be designed for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. The NanoString nCounter® platform is a gene expression analysis tool developed for use with FFPE-derived samples. We designed a custom nCounter® codeset based on elements from multiple published fresh frozen tissue microarray-based prognostic gene signatures for colon cancer, and we used this platform to systematically compare gene expression data from FFPE with matched microarray array data from frozen tissues. Our results show moderate correlation of gene expression between two platforms and discovery of a small subset of genes as candidate biomarkers for colon cancer prognosis that are detectable and quantifiable in FFPE tissue sections.

  11. A Quantitative Tool for Producing DNA-Based Diagnostic Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Tom J. Whitaker

    2008-07-11

    The purpose of this project was to develop a precise, quantitative method to analyze oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) on an array to enable a systematic approach to quality control issues affecting DNA microarrays. Two types of ODN's were tested; ODN's formed by photolithography and ODN's printed onto microarrays. Initial work in Phase I, performed in conjunction with Affymetrix, Inc. who has a patent on a photolithographic in situ technique for creating DNA arrays, was very promising but did seem to indicate that the atomization process was not complete. Soon after Phase II work was under way, Affymetrix had further developed fluorescent methods and indicated they were no longer interested in our resonance ionization technique. This was communicated to the program manager and it was decided that the project would continue and be focused on printed ODNs. The method being tested is called SIRIS, Sputter-Initiated Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy. SIRIS has been shown to be a highly sensitive, selective, and quantitative tool for atomic species. This project was aimed at determining if an ODN could be labeled in such a way that SIRIS could be used to measure the label and thus provide quantitative measurements of the ODN on an array. One of the largest problems in this study has been developing a method that allows us to know the amount of an ODN on a surface independent of the SIRIS measurement. Even though we could accurately determine the amount of ODN deposited on a surface, the amount that actually attached to the surface is very difficult to measure (hence the need for a quantitative tool). A double-labeling procedure was developed in which 33P and Pt were both used to label ODNs. The radioactive 33P could be measured by a proportional counter that maps the counts in one dimension. This gave a good measurement of the amount of ODN remaining on a surface after immobilization and washing. A second label, Pt, was attached to guanine nucleotides in the ODN. Studies

  12. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  13. Diode Laser Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Dan; Scifres, Don R.

    2005-11-01

    Contributors; 1. Monolithic phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays D. Botez; 2. High power coherent, semiconductor laser master oscillator power amplifiers and amplifier arrays D. F. Welch and D. G. Mehuys; 3. Microoptical components applied to incoherent and coherent laser arrays J. R. Leger; 4. Modeling of diode laser arrays G. R. Hadley; 5. Dynamics of coherent semiconductor laser arrays H. G. Winfuland and R. K. Defreez; 6. High average power semiconductor laser arrays and laser array packaging with an emphasis for pumping solid state lasers R. Solarz; 7. High power diode laser arrays and their reliability D. R. Scifres and H. H. Kung; 8. Strained layer quantum well heterostructure laser arrays J. J. Coleman; 9. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser arrays C. J. Chang-Hasnain; 10. Individually addressed arrays of diode lasers D. Carlin.

  14. Genomic arrays in chronic lymphocytic leukemia routine clinical practice: are we ready to substitute conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques?

    PubMed

    Puiggros, Anna; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Salido, Marta; Ferrer, Ana; Abella, Eugènia; Gimeno, Eva; Nonell, Lara; Herranz, María José; Galván, Ana Belén; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Melero, Carme; Pairet, Silvia; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Serrano, Sergi; Florensa, Lourdes; Solé, Francesc; Espinet, Blanca

    2013-05-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a highly variable clinical course. Del(11q) and del(17p), routinely studied by conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CGC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have been related to progression and shorter overall survival. Recently, array-based karyotyping has gained acceptance as a high-resolution new tool for detecting genomic imbalances. The aim of the present study was to compare genomic arrays with CGC and FISH to ascertain whether the current techniques could be substituted in routine procedures. We analyzed 70 patients with CLL using the Cytogenetics Whole-Genome 2.7M Array and CytoScan HD Array (Affymetrix), CGC and FISH with the classical CLL panel. Whereas 31.4% and 68.6% of patients presented abnormalities when studied by CGC and FISH, respectively, these rates increased when arrays were also analyzed (78.6% and 80%). Although abnormality detection is higher when arrays are applied, one case with del(11q) and three with del(17p) were missed by genomic arrays due to their limited sensitivity. We consider that the complete substitution of CGC and FISH by genomic arrays in routine laboratories could negatively affect the management of some patients harboring 11q or 17p deletions. In conclusion, genomic arrays are valid to detect known and novel genomic imbalances in CLL, but should be maintained as a complementary tool to the current techniques.

  15. Design of a tobacco exon array with application to investigate the differential cadmium accumulation property in two tobacco varieties

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For decades the tobacco plant has served as a model organism in plant biology to answer fundamental biological questions in the areas of plant development, physiology, and genetics. Due to the lack of sufficient coverage of genomic sequences, however, none of the expressed sequence tag (EST)-based chips developed to date cover gene expression from the whole genome. The availability of Tobacco Genome Initiative (TGI) sequences provides a useful resource to build a whole genome exon array, even if the assembled sequences are highly fragmented. Here, the design of a Tobacco Exon Array is reported and an application to improve the understanding of genes regulated by cadmium (Cd) in tobacco is described. Results From the analysis and annotation of the 1,271,256 Nicotiana tabacum fasta and quality files from methyl filtered genomic survey sequences (GSS) obtained from the TGI and ~56,000 ESTs available in public databases, an exon array with 272,342 probesets was designed (four probes per exon) and tested on two selected tobacco varieties. Two tobacco varieties out of 45 accumulating low and high cadmium in leaf were identified based on the GGE biplot analysis, which is analysis of the genotype main effect (G) plus analysis of the genotype by environment interaction (GE) of eight field trials (four fields over two years) showing reproducibility across the trials. The selected varieties were grown under greenhouse conditions in two different soils and subjected to exon array analyses using root and leaf tissues to understand the genetic make-up of the Cd accumulation. Conclusions An Affymetrix Exon Array was developed to cover a large (~90%) proportion of the tobacco gene space. The Tobacco Exon Array will be available for research use through Affymetrix array catalogue. As a proof of the exon array usability, we have demonstrated that the Tobacco Exon Array is a valuable tool for studying Cd accumulation in tobacco leaves. Data from field and greenhouse

  16. The development and characterization of a 57K single nucleotide polymorphism array for rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Palti, Y; Gao, G; Liu, S; Kent, M P; Lien, S; Miller, M R; Rexroad, C E; Moen, T

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we describe the development and characterization of the first high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping array for rainbow trout. The SNP array is publically available from a commercial vendor (Affymetrix). The SNP genotyping quality was high, and validation rate was close to 90%. This is comparable to other farm animals and is much higher than previous smaller scale SNP validation studies in rainbow trout. High quality and integrity of the genotypes are evident from sample reproducibility and from nearly 100% agreement in genotyping results from other methods. The array is very useful for rainbow trout aquaculture populations with more than 40 900 polymorphic markers per population. For wild populations that were confounded by a smaller sample size, the number of polymorphic markers was between 10 577 and 24 330. Comparison between genotypes from individual populations suggests good potential for identifying candidate markers for populations' traceability. Linkage analysis and mapping of the SNPs to the reference genome assembly provide strong evidence for a wide distribution throughout the genome with good representation in all 29 chromosomes. A total of 68% of the genome scaffolds and contigs were anchored through linkage analysis using the SNP array genotypes, including ~20% of the genome assembly that has not been previously anchored to chromosomes.

  17. An Affymetrix Microarray Design for Microbial Genotyping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum APRT Okra 5 Clostridium botulinum A str. ATCC 19397 5 Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 40 Clostridium botulinum B str. Eklund 17B 5...Clostridium botulinum SNP B1 str. Okra plasmid pCLD 20 Clostridium botulinum B1 str. Okra plasmid pCLD 5 Clostridium botulinum Bf 5 Clostridium...botulinum HPT Eklund 17B 10 Clostridium botulinum HPT Loch Maree 20 Clostridium botulinum HPT Okra 5 Clostridium botulinum A3 str. Loch Maree 5

  18. High-quality genotyping data from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue on the drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters plus array.

    PubMed

    Vos, Hanneke I; van der Straaten, Tahar; Coenen, Marieke J H; Flucke, Uta; te Loo, D Maroeska W M; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus array covers 1936 markers in 231 genes involved in drug metabolism and transport. Blood- and saliva-derived DNA works well on the DMET array, but the utility of DNA from FFPE tissue has not been reported for this array. As the ability to use DNA from FFPE tissue on the array could open the potential for large retrospective sample collections, we examined the performance and reliability of FFPE-derived DNA on the DMET Plus array. Germline DNA isolated from archived normal FFPE tissue blocks stored for 3 to 19 years and matched blood or saliva from 16 patients with osteosarcoma were genotyped on the DMET Plus array. Concordance was assessed by calculating agreement and the κ-statistic. We observed high call rates for both the blood- or saliva-derived DNA samples (99.4%) and the FFPE-derived DNA samples (98.9%). Moreover, the concordance among the 16 blood- or saliva-derived DNA and FFPE DNA pairs was high (97.4%, κ = 0.915). This is the first study showing that DNA from normal FFPE tissue provides accurate and reliable genotypes on the DMET Plus array compared with blood- or saliva-derived DNA. This finding provides an opportunity for pharmacogenetic studies in diseases with high mortality rates and prevents a bias in studies where otherwise only alive patients can be included.

  19. Superconducting Bolometer Array Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Staguhn, Johannes; Wollack, Ed; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of far-infrared and submillimeter instruments require large arrays of detectors containing thousands of elements. These arrays will necessarily be multiplexed, and superconducting bolometer arrays are the most promising present prospect for these detectors. We discuss our current research into superconducting bolometer array technologies, which has recently resulted in the first multiplexed detections of submillimeter light and the first multiplexed astronomical observations. Prototype arrays containing 512 pixels are in production using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) architecture, which can be extended easily to 1000 pixel arrays. Planar arrays of close-packed bolometers are being developed for the GBT (Green Bank Telescope) and for future space missions. For certain applications, such as a slewed far-infrared sky survey, feedhorncoupling of a large sparsely-filled array of bolometers is desirable, and is being developed using photolithographic feedhorn arrays. Individual detectors have achieved a Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of -10(exp 17) W/square root of Hz at 300mK, but several orders of magnitude improvement are required and can be reached with existing technology. The testing of such ultralow-background detectors will prove difficult, as this requires optical loading of below IfW. Antenna-coupled bolometer designs have advantages for large format array designs at low powers due to their mode selectivity.

  20. Electronic Switch Arrays for Managing Microbattery Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Alahmad, Mahmoud; Sukumar, Vinesh; Zghoul, Fadi; Buck, Kevin; Hess, Herbert; Li, Harry; Cox, David

    2008-01-01

    Integrated circuits have been invented for managing the charging and discharging of such advanced miniature energy-storage devices as planar arrays of microscopic energy-storage elements [typically, microscopic electrochemical cells (microbatteries) or microcapacitors]. The architecture of these circuits enables implementation of the following energy-management options: dynamic configuration of the elements of an array into a series or parallel combination of banks (subarrarys), each array comprising a series of parallel combination of elements; direct addressing of individual banks for charging/or discharging; and, disconnection of defective elements and corresponding reconfiguration of the rest of the array to utilize the remaining functional elements to obtain the desited voltage and current performance. An integrated circuit according to the invention consists partly of a planar array of field-effect transistors that function as switches for routing electric power among the energy-storage elements, the power source, and the load. To connect the energy-storage elements to the power source for charging, a specific subset of switches is closed; to connect the energy-storage elements to the load for discharging, a different specific set of switches is closed. Also included in the integrated circuit is circuitry for monitoring and controlling charging and discharging. The control and monitoring circuitry, the switching transistors, and interconnecting metal lines are laid out on the integrated-circuit chip in a pattern that registers with the array of energy-storage elements. There is a design option to either (1) fabricate the energy-storage elements in the corresponding locations on, and as an integral part of, this integrated circuit; or (2) following a flip-chip approach, fabricate the array of energy-storage elements on a separate integrated-circuit chip and then align and bond the two chips together.

  1. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  2. Pacific Array (Transportable Broadband Ocean Floor Array)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Ekstrom, Goran; Evans, Rob; Forsyth, Don; Gaherty, Jim; Kennett, Brian; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Utada, Hisashi

    2016-04-01

    Based on recent developments on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry1, together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (azimuthal, and hopefully radial), with deployments of ~15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for a 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way or concurrently (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure beneath Pacific ocean, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations is essential: if three countries/institutions participate this endeavor together, Pacific Array may be accomplished within five-or-so years.

  3. Active aperture phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, R. P.

    1989-04-01

    Developments towards the realization of active aperture phased arrays are reviewed. The technology and cost aspects of the power amplifier and phase shifter subsystems are discussed. Consideration is given to research concerning T/R modules, MESFETs, side lobe control, beam steering, optical control techniques, and printed circuit antennas. Methods for configuring the array are examined, focusing on the tile and brick configurations. It is found that there is no technological impediment for introducing active aperture phased arrays.

  4. Gene expression profiling in the rhesus macaque: methodology, annotation and data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Nigel C; Kohama, Steven G; Urbanski, Henryk F

    2009-09-01

    Gene microarray analyses represent potentially effective means for high-throughput gene expression profiling in non-human primates. In the companion article, we emphasize effective experimental design based on the in vivo physiology of the rhesus macaque, whereas this article emphasizes considerations for gene annotation and data interpretation using gene microarray platforms from Affymetrix. Initial annotation of the rhesus genome array was based on Affymetrix human GeneChips. However, annotation revisions improve the precision with which rhesus transcripts are identified. Annotation of the rhesus GeneChip is under continuous revision with large percentages of probesets under multiple annotation systems having undergone multiple reassignments between March 2007 and November 2008. It is also important to consider that quantitation and comparison of gene expression levels across multiple chips requires appropriate normalization. External corroboration of microarray results using PCR-based methodology also requires validation of appropriate internal reference genes for normalization of expression values. Many tools are now freely available to aid investigators with microarray normalization and selection of internal reference genes to be used for independent corroboration of microarray results.

  5. A photovoltaic array simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachtsevanos, G. J.; Grimbas, E. J.

    A system simulating the output voltage-current characteristics of a photovoltaic array is described. The simulator may be used to test the performance of PV arrays and associated power conditioning equipment necessary for the autonomous or interconnected operation of photovoltaic energy sources. The simulator's main features include simplicity of construction, wide parametric variability and low cost. It is capable of reproducing the output characteristics of commercially available arrays at varying solar irradiation levels with sufficient accuracy. The design ensures the lowest possible power dissipation and minimal thermal drift. It is estimated that the cost of the simulator is an insignificant fraction of the actual array cost in the kilowatt power range.

  6. Interferometric array generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, A. S.; Khare, Alika

    2006-02-01

    We report the formation of square, rectangular as well as hexagonal arrays of small light spots in one single setup using Michelson and Mach-Zehnder interferometers in tandem. The geometry of arrays can be altered easily online, by changing the relative orientations of the mirrors. The arrays could be scanned over large longitudinal distances and could be compressed to give large spot density. The expression for the resultant intensity distribution for the arrays has been worked out and the computed pattern is compared with the experimental data.

  7. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  8. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  9. Solar array stepping to minimize array excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Mahabaleshwar K. P. (Inventor); Liu, Tung Y. (Inventor); Plescia, Carl T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical oscillations of a mechanism containing a stepper motor, such as a solar-array powered spacecraft, are reduced and minimized by the execution of step movements in pairs of steps, the period between steps being equal to one-half of the period of torsional oscillation of the mechanism. Each pair of steps is repeated at needed intervals to maintain desired continuous movement of the portion of elements to be moved, such as the solar array of a spacecraft. In order to account for uncertainty as well as slow change in the period of torsional oscillation, a command unit may be provided for varying the interval between steps in a pair.

  10. ISS Solar Array Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  11. Array for detecting microbes

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  12. Solar array deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calassa, Mark C.; Kackley, Russell

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a Solar Array Deployment Mechanism (SADM) used to deploy a rigid solar array panel on a commercial spacecraft. The application required a deployment mechanism design that was not only lightweight, but also could be produced and installed at the lowest possible cost. This paper covers design, test, and analysis of a mechanism that meets these requirements.

  13. Automated SNP genotype clustering algorithm to improve data completeness in high-throughput SNP genotyping datasets from custom arrays.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edward M; Littrell, Jack; Olivier, Michael

    2007-12-01

    High-throughput SNP genotyping platforms use automated genotype calling algorithms to assign genotypes. While these algorithms work efficiently for individual platforms, they are not compatible with other platforms, and have individual biases that result in missed genotype calls. Here we present data on the use of a second complementary SNP genotype clustering algorithm. The algorithm was originally designed for individual fluorescent SNP genotyping assays, and has been optimized to permit the clustering of large datasets generated from custom-designed Affymetrix SNP panels. In an analysis of data from a 3K array genotyped on 1,560 samples, the additional analysis increased the overall number of genotypes by over 45,000, significantly improving the completeness of the experimental data. This analysis suggests that the use of multiple genotype calling algorithms may be advisable in high-throughput SNP genotyping experiments. The software is written in Perl and is available from the corresponding author.

  14. High density pixel array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener-Avnear, Eliezer (Inventor); McFall, James Earl (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pixel array device is fabricated by a laser micro-milling method under strict process control conditions. The device has an array of pixels bonded together with an adhesive filling the grooves between adjacent pixels. The array is fabricated by moving a substrate relative to a laser beam of predetermined intensity at a controlled, constant velocity along a predetermined path defining a set of grooves between adjacent pixels so that a predetermined laser flux per unit area is applied to the material, and repeating the movement for a plurality of passes of the laser beam until the grooves are ablated to a desired depth. The substrate is of an ultrasonic transducer material in one example for fabrication of a 2D ultrasonic phase array transducer. A substrate of phosphor material is used to fabricate an X-ray focal plane array detector.

  15. Micromachined electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  16. Photovoltaic array loss mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Charles

    1986-10-01

    Loss mechanisms which come into play when solar cell modules are mounted in arrays are identified. Losses can occur either from a reduction in the array electrical performance or with nonoptimal extraction of power from the array. Electrical performance degradation is caused by electrical mismatch, transmission losses from cell surface soiling and steep angle of reflectance, and electrical losses from field wiring resistance and the voltage drop across blocking diodes. The second type of loss, concerned with the operating points of the array, can involve nonoptimal load impedance and limiting the operating envelope of the array to specific ranges of voltage and current. Each of the loss mechanisms are discussed and average energy losses expected from soiling, steep reflectance angles and circuit losses are calculated.

  17. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  18. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  19. Developing an Inflatable Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Patrick K.; Jankowski, Francis J.; Williams, Geoffery T.; Vendura, George J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs describing the development of an inflatable solar array as part of the Inflatable Torus Solar Array Technology (ITSAT) program are presented. Program phases, overall and subsystem designs, and array deployment are addressed.

  20. Dense array expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joseph N.; Chen, LiangMing

    1999-10-01

    Various researchers have realized the value of implementing loop fusion to evaluate dense (pointwise) array expressions. Recently, the method of template metaprogramming in C++ has been used to significantly speed-up the evaluation of array expressions, allowing C++ programs to achieve performance comparable to or better than FORTRAN for numerical analysis applications. Unfortunately, the template metaprogramming technique suffers from several limitations in applicability, portability, and potential performance. We present a framework for evaluating dense array expressions in object-oriented programming languages. We demonstrate how this technique supports both common subexpression elimination and threaded implementation and compare its performance to object-library and hand-generated code.

  1. Arrays vs. single telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. L.

    The question of the relative efficiencies of telescope arrays versus an equivalent mirror-area very large telescope is re-examined and summarized. Four separate investigations by Bowen, Johnson and Richards, Code, and Disney all came to the same conclusion: that an array of telescopes is superior, both scientifically and economically, to a single very large telescope. The costs of recently completed telescopes are compared. The costs of arrays of telescopes are shown to be significantly lower than that of a single, very large telescope, with the further advantage that because existing, proven, designs can be used, no engineering 'break-throughs' are needed.

  2. Virtual center arraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.; Lipes, R. G.; Miller, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Methods to increase the amount of data that can be received from outer planet missions are described with emphasis on antenna arraying systems designed to increase the total effective aperture of the receiving system. One such method is virtual center arraying (VCA). In VCA, a combined carrier reference is derived at a point that is, conceptually, the geometric center of the array. This point need not coincide with any of the actual antennas of the array. A noise analysis of the VCA system is given along with formulas for the phase jitter as a function of loop bandwidths and the amount of loop damping. If the ratio of the loop bandwidths of the center loop to the vertex loops is greater than 100, then the jitter is very nearly equal to that expected for ideal combined carrier referencing.

  3. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  4. Expandable LED array interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  5. Economical custom LSI arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, A.; Smith, A.; Ramondetta, P.; Noto, R.; Lombardi, T.

    1976-01-01

    Automatic design technique uses standard circuit cells for producing large-scale integrated arrays. Computerized fabrication process provides individual cells of high density and efficiency, quick turnaround time, low cost, and ease of corrections for changes and errors.

  6. Conformal array antenna subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-04-01

    An antenna subsystem to communicate between Ariane 4 and a data relay satellite was studied, concluding that the original ideas on ring antennas should be corrected due to the wide margin of coverage required in elevation for such antennas, which implies the need of splitting the coverage. Nevertheless, the study of cylindrical and conical conformal arrays was continued in view of their intrinsic interest. Needed coverages with specified gain can be obtained with a set of microstrip circular patch antennas. For the lower stage, a single patch is enough. For geostationary missions, one horizontal array is used, and for heliosynchronous missions two horizontal arrays and a vertical one. The numerical study carried out on omniazimuthal ring antennas shows that a tendency to omnidirectional pattern exists in spite of the directivity of the elementary radiators. A small pointing improvement of the meridian pattern can be obtained by means of conical arrays instead of the cylindrical ones.

  7. Multi Sensor Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the Multi Sensor Array. The topics include: 1) MSA Algorithm; 2) Types of Sensors for the MSA; 3) How to test the MSA; 4) Monte Carlo Simulation; and 5) Accelerated Life Tests.

  8. Glory Solar Array Deployment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Glory spacecraft uses Orbital Sciences Corporation Space Systems Group's LEOStar-1 bus design, with deployable, four-panel solar arrays. This conceptual animation reveals Glory's unique solar a...

  9. Random array grid collimator

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  10. Impact of copy number variations burden on coding genome in humans using integrated high resolution arrays.

    PubMed

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Lingaiah, Kusuma; Vishweswaraiah, Sangeetha; Murthy, Megha N; Suresh, Raviraj V; Manjegowda, Dinesh S; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-12-16

    Copy number variations (CNVs) alter the transcriptional and translational levels of genes by disrupting the coding structure and this burden of CNVs seems to be a significant contributor to phenotypic variations. Therefore it was necessary to assess the complexities of CNV burden on the coding genome. A total of 1715 individuals from 12 populations were used for CNV analysis in the present investigation. Analysis was performed using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6·0 chip and CytoScan High-Density arrays. CNVs were more frequently observed in the coding region than in the non-coding region. CNVs were observed vastly more frequently in the coding region than the non-coding region. CNVs were found to be enriched in the regions containing functional genes (83-96%) compared with the regions containing pseudogenes (4-17%). CNVs across the genome of an individual showed multiple hits across many genes, whose proteins interact physically and function under the same pathway. We identified varying numbers of proteins and degrees of interactions within protein complexes of single individual genomes. This study represents the first draft of a population-specific CNV genes map as well as a cross-populational map. The complex relationship of CNVs on genes and their physically interacting partners unravels many complexities involved in phenotype expression. This study identifies four mechanisms contributing to the complexities caused by the presence of multiple CNVs across many genes in the coding part of the genome.

  11. Sampled Longest Common Prefix Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirén, Jouni

    When augmented with the longest common prefix (LCP) array and some other structures, the suffix array can solve many string processing problems in optimal time and space. A compressed representation of the LCP array is also one of the main building blocks in many compressed suffix tree proposals. In this paper, we describe a new compressed LCP representation: the sampled LCP array. We show that when used with a compressed suffix array (CSA), the sampled LCP array often offers better time/space trade-offs than the existing alternatives. We also show how to construct the compressed representations of the LCP array directly from a CSA.

  12. Evaporating metal nanocrystal arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James C; Zhao, Chenwei; Kim, Jin Ho; Fernandes, Gustavo; Xu, J M; Valles, James M

    2017-03-10

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with a self-ordered triangular array of nanopores provide the means to fabricate multiple forms of nano materials, such as nanowires and nanoparticles. This study focuses on nanostructures that emerge in thin films of metals thermally evaporated onto the surface of AAO. Previous work showed that films of different evaporated metals assume dramatically different structures, e.g. an ordered triangular array of nearly monodisperse nanoparticles forms for lead (Pb) while a polycrystalline nanohoneycomb structure forms for silver (Ag). Here, we present investigations of the effects of substrate temperature and deposition angle that reveal the processes controlling the nano particle array formation. Our findings indicate that arrays form provided the grain nucleation density exceeds the pore density and the atomic mobility is high enough to promote grain coalescence. They introduce a method for producing films with anisotropic grain array structure. The results provide insight into the influence of substrate nano-morphology on thin film growth energetics and kinetics that can be harnessed for creating films with other novel nano-structures.

  13. Evaporating metal nanocrystal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Joy, James C.; Zhao, Chenwei; Kim, Jin Ho; Fernandes, Gustavo; Xu, J. M.; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2017-03-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with a self-ordered triangular array of nanopores provide the means to fabricate multiple forms of nano materials, such as nanowires and nanoparticles. This study focuses on nanostructures that emerge in thin films of metals thermally evaporated onto the surface of AAO. Previous work showed that films of different evaporated metals assume dramatically different structures, e.g. an ordered triangular array of nearly monodisperse nanoparticles forms for lead (Pb) while a polycrystalline nanohoneycomb structure forms for silver (Ag). Here, we present investigations of the effects of substrate temperature and deposition angle that reveal the processes controlling the nano particle array formation. Our findings indicate that arrays form provided the grain nucleation density exceeds the pore density and the atomic mobility is high enough to promote grain coalescence. They introduce a method for producing films with anisotropic grain array structure. The results provide insight into the influence of substrate nano-morphology on thin film growth energetics and kinetics that can be harnessed for creating films with other novel nano-structures.

  14. Folding of Nucleosome Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steven; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Andresen, Kurt; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2014-03-01

    Chromatin conformation and dynamics is central to gene functions including packaging, regulation, and repair. At the molecular level, the basic building block of chromatin is a nucleosome core particle (NCP) made of 147 base pairs (bp) of dsDNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. These NCPs are connected by short 10-90 bps of linker DNA as beads on a string. Key factors determining the packaging of NCP arrays to form chromatin include ionic condition, linker DNA length, and epigenetic modifications, especially of the histone tails. We have investigated how the conformations of model tetra-NCP arrays are modulated by these factors using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Here we present recent studies of the effects of ion (KCl and MgCl2), linker length, and histone modification (tail deletions) on NCP arrays. Our SAXS measurement makes it possible to learn about both the global compaction of NCP arrays and local inter-NCP spatial correlations within the same array.

  15. Striped tertiary storage arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drapeau, Ann L.

    1993-01-01

    Data stripping is a technique for increasing the throughput and reducing the response time of large access to a storage system. In striped magnetic or optical disk arrays, a single file is striped or interleaved across several disks; in a striped tape system, files are interleaved across tape cartridges. Because a striped file can be accessed by several disk drives or tape recorders in parallel, the sustained bandwidth to the file is greater than in non-striped systems, where access to the file are restricted to a single device. It is argued that applying striping to tertiary storage systems will provide needed performance and reliability benefits. The performance benefits of striping for applications using large tertiary storage systems is discussed. It will introduce commonly available tape drives and libraries, and discuss their performance limitations, especially focusing on the long latency of tape accesses. This section will also describe an event-driven tertiary storage array simulator that is being used to understand the best ways of configuring these storage arrays. The reliability problems of magnetic tape devices are discussed, and plans for modeling the overall reliability of striped tertiary storage arrays to identify the amount of error correction required are described. Finally, work being done by other members of the Sequoia group to address latency of accesses, optimizing tertiary storage arrays that perform mostly writes, and compression is discussed.

  16. Adaptive multibeam antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. I.

    1984-01-01

    An adaptive multibeam antenna array is considered which will enhance the advantages of a plain one. By providing simultaneous reception of signals from different directions and their sequential processing. The optimization of the array control for maximum interference suppression in the radiation pattern is emphasized. The optimum control is sought with respect to the signal-to-interference power ratio as a genaralized criterion. Sampled useful signals and transmission coefficients are found to be complex-conjugate quantities, assuming compatible formation of beams, so that synphasal equiamplitude addition of signals from all array element is attainable by unique settings of the weight factors. Calculations are simplified by letting the useful signal power in the 1-th beam be approximately equal to the k-th weight factor, before optimizing the weight vector for maximum signal-to-interference ratio. A narrowband interference described by power P and vector V of signal distribution over the array is considered as an example, to demonstrate the algorithm of synthesis. The algorithm, using the Butler matrix, was executed experimentally on a computer for a linear equidistant antenna array of 32 elements with compatible formation of beams.

  17. Solar array flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Emerging satellite designs require increasing amounts of electrical power to operate spacecraft instruments and to provide environments suitable for human habitation. In the past, electrical power was generated by covering rigid honeycomb panels with solar cells. This technology results in unacceptable weight and volume penalties when large amounts of power are required. To fill the need for large-area, lightweight solar arrays, a fabrication technique in which solar cells are attached to a copper printed circuit laminated to a plastic sheet was developed. The result is a flexible solar array with one-tenth the stowed volume and one-third the weight of comparably sized rigid arrays. An automated welding process developed to attack the cells to the printed circuit guarantees repeatable welds that are more tolerant of severe environments than conventional soldered connections. To demonstrate the flight readiness of this technology, the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) was developed and flown on the space shuttle Discovery in September 1984. The tests showed the modes and frequencies of the array to be very close to preflight predictions. Structural damping, however, was higher than anticipated. Electrical performance of the active solar panel was also tested. The flight performance and postflight data evaluation are described.

  18. Imaging antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many millimeter and far-infrared imaging systems are limited in sensitivity and speed because they depend on a single scanned element. Because of recent advances in planar detectors such as Schottky diodes, superconducting tunnel junctions, and microbolometers, an attractive approach to this problem is a planar antenna array with integrated detectors. A planar line antenna array and optical system for imaging has been developed. The significant advances are a 'reverse-microscope' optical configuration and a modified bow-tie antenna design. In the 'reverse-microscope' configuration, a lens is attached to the bottom of the substrate containing the antennas. Imaging is done through the substrate. This configuration eliminates the troublesome effects of substrate surface waves. The substrate lens has only a single refracting surface, making possible a virtually aplanatic system, with little spherical aberration or coma. The array is characterized by an optical transfer function that is easily measured. An array with 19 dB crosstalk levels between adjacent antennas has been tested and it was found that the array captured 50 percent of the available power. This imaging system was diffraction limited.

  19. Electrostatically clean solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Theodore Garry (Inventor); Krumweide, Duane Eric (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Provided are methods of manufacturing an electrostatically clean solar array panel and the products resulting from the practice of these methods. The preferred method uses an array of solar cells, each with a coverglass where the method includes machining apertures into a flat, electrically conductive sheet so that each aperture is aligned with and undersized with respect to its matched coverglass sheet and thereby fashion a front side shield with apertures (FSA). The undersized portion about each aperture of the bottom side of the FSA shield is bonded to the topside portions nearest the edges of each aperture's matched coverglass. Edge clips are attached to the front side aperture shield edges with the edge clips electrically and mechanically connecting the tops of the coverglasses to the solar panel substrate. The FSA shield, edge clips and substrate edges are bonded so as to produce a conductively grounded electrostatically clean solar array panel.

  20. Interagency Array Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayland, J. W.; Ruskin, A. M.; Bathker, D. A.; Rydgig, R. C.; Brown, D. W.; Madsen, B. D.; Clauss, R. C.; Levy, G. S.; Kerridge, S. J.; Klein, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The interagency array study that was convened in early 1982 to determine which of the world's large radio reception facilities might be feasibly and beneficially enlisted to help support the Voyager encounters at Uranus (1986) and Neptune (1989), and also to examine the future for such similar events and options as might appear is discussed. A similar but more specific study of the Parkes Radio Telescope at Uranus Encounter was just then being completed with a strong positive recommendation, and formed the foundation of the broader study. The approach, driving considerations, and outcome of the interagency array study are discussed. The recommendations of the study team concentrated upon the Voyager Encounters are: specifically to develop Parkes for the Uranus Encounter, while pursuing related Advanced Systems development work with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, and to seek support for the Neptune Encounter from Parkes, the Very Large Array near Socorro, Mexico, and the Japanese institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences 64 meter station.

  1. Array signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Haykin, S.; Justice, J.H.; Owsley, N.L.; Yen, J.L.; Kak, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    This is the first book to be devoted completely to array signal processing, a subject that has become increasingly important in recent years. The book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1, which is introductory, reviews some basic concepts in wave propagation. The remaining five chapters deal with the theory and applications of array signal processing in (a) exploration seismology, (b) passive sonar, (c) radar, (d) radio astronomy, and (e) tomographic imaging. The various chapters of the book are self-contained. The book is written by a team of five active researchers, who are specialists in the individual fields covered by the pertinent chapters.

  2. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  3. Solar array welding developement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  4. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  5. ALMA Extended Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameno, S.; Nakai, N.; Honma, M.

    2013-10-01

    We propose to append five 12-m antennas within 300-km from ALMA to realize high angular resolution of < 1 mas and sensitivity to detect Tb < 1000 K. This ALMA extended array offers a new parameter space of "Thermal universe with VLBI resolution". Proposed science case includes black-hole formation in sub-mm galaxies, mass accretion processes onto protostars, imaging stellar photospheres, distance measurements of stars, and so on. The array also functions as a part of sub-mm VLBI that targets black-hole imaging.

  6. Automated array assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. F.

    1976-01-01

    Manufacturing techniques are evaluated using expenses based on experience and studying basic cost factors for each step to evaluate expenses from a first-principles point of view. A formal cost accounting procedure is developed which is used throughout the study for cost comparisons. The first test of this procedure is a comparison of its predicted costs for array module manufacturing with costs from a study which is based on experience factors. A manufacturing cost estimate for array modules of $10/W is based on present-day manufacturing techniques, expenses, and materials costs.

  7. TANGO Array.. 2. Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    2004-01-01

    The angular and energy resolutions of the TANGO Array were obtained using extensive Monte Carlo simulations performed with a double purpose: (1) to determine the appropriate parameters for the array fitting to the desired range of sensitivity (the knee energy region), and (2) to construct a reliable shower database required for reference in the analysis of experimental data. The AIRES code, with the SIBYLL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (assuming protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 10 14 to 10 18 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detectors (water Cherenkov detectors), including the electronics, pickup noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cables. The trigger stage was considered in the simulations in order to estimate the trigger efficiency of the array and to verify the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper delineates the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and describes the simulated data. The results of these simulations suggest that we can expect an error in the energy of the primary cosmic-ray of ˜60% of the estimated value and that the error in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜4°. The present simulations also indicate that unambiguous assignments of the primary energy cannot be obtained because of the uncertainty in the nature of the primary cosmic ray.

  8. Frequency Diverse Array Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    the methods for electronic scanning of antenna systems. Techniques that have been studied in this connection include frequency variation, phase shift...an array antenna instantaneously into a desired direction where no mechanical mechanism is involved in the scanning process. Electronic scanning... methods including phase scanning, time delay scanning, and frequency scanning have been used in various radar applications; however new and cheaper

  9. A portable array biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Joel P.; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Taitt, Chris R.; Fertig, Stephanie; Sapsford, Kim E.; Ligler, Fran S.

    2004-12-01

    An array biosensor developed for performing simultaneous analysis of multiple samples for multiple analytes has been miniaturized and fully automated. The biochemical component of the multi-analyte biosensor consists of a patterned array of biological recognition elements ("capture" antibodies) immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide. A fluorescence assay is performed on the patterned surface, yielding an array of fluorescent spots, the locations of which are used to identify what analyte is present. Signal transduction is accomplished by means of a diode laser for fluorescence excitation, optical filters and a CCD camera for image capture. A laptop computer controls the miniaturized fluidics system and image capture. Data analysis software has been developed to locate each spot and quantify the fluorescent signal in each spot. The array biosensor is capable of detecting a variety of analytes including toxins, bacteria and viruses and shows minimal interference from complex physiological sample matrices such whole blood and blood components, fecal matter, saliva, nasal secretions, and urine. Some results from recent field trials are presented.

  10. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  11. Cellular Array Processing Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harry C.; Preston, Earl W.

    1981-11-01

    The Cellular Array Processing Simulation (CAPS) system is a high-level image language that runs on a multiprocessor configuration. CAPS is interpretively decoded on a conventional minicomputer with all image operation instructions executed on an array processor. The synergistic environment that exists between the minicomputer and the array processor gives CAPS its high-speed throughput, while maintaining a convenient conversational user language. CAPS was designed to be both modular and table driven so that it can be easily maintained and modified. CAPS uses the image convolution operator as one of its primitives and performs this cellular operation by decomposing it into parallel image steps that are scheduled to be executed on the array processor. Among its features is the ability to observe the imagery in real time as a user's algorithm is executed. This feature reduces the need for image storage space, since it is feasible to retain only original images and produce resultant images when needed. CAPS also contains a language processor that permits users to develop re-entrant image processing subroutines or algorithms.

  12. Automated array assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    A general technology assessment and manufacturing cost analysis was presented. A near-term (1982) factory design is described, and the results of an experimental production study for the large-scale production of flat-panel silicon and solar-cell arrays are detailed.

  13. The Askaryan Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Kara D.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra high energy cosmogenic neutrinos could be most efficiently detected in dense, radio frequency (RF) transparent media via the Askaryan effect. Building on the expertise gained by RICE, ANITA and IceCube's radio extension in the use of the Askaryan effect in cold Antarctic ice, we are currently developing an antenna array known as ARA (The Askaryan Radio Array) to be installed in boreholes extending 200 m below the surface of the ice near the geographic South Pole. The unprecedented scale of ARA, which will cover a fiducial area of ~ 100 square kilometers, was chosen to ensure the detection of the flux of neutrinos suggested by the observation of a drop in high energy cosmic ray flux consistent with the GZK cutoff by HiRes and the Pierre Auger Observatory. Funding to develop the instrumentation and install the first prototypes has been granted, and the first components of ARA were installed during the austral summer of 2010-2011. Within 3 years of commencing operation, the full ARA will exceed the sensitivity of any other instrument in the 0.1-10 EeV energy range by an order of magnitude. The primary goal of the ARA array is to establish the absolute cosmogenic neutrino flux through a modest number of events. This information would frame the performance requirements needed to expand the array in the future to measure a larger number of neutrinos with greater angular precision in order to study their spectrum and origins.

  14. Detail of array structural elements through axis of array, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of array structural elements through axis of array, looking north-northeast - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Columbia Falls Radar Site Receive Sector Two Antenna Array, At the end of Shadagee Ridge Road, Columbia Falls, Washington County, ME

  15. Characterization of a Wheat Breeders' Array suitable for high-throughput SNP genotyping of global accessions of hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Allen, Alexandra M; Winfield, Mark O; Burridge, Amanda J; Downie, Rowena C; Benbow, Harriet R; Barker, Gary L A; Wilkinson, Paul A; Coghill, Jane; Waterfall, Christy; Davassi, Alessandro; Scopes, Geoff; Pirani, Ali; Webster, Teresa; Brew, Fiona; Bloor, Claire; Griffiths, Simon; Bentley, Alison R; Alda, Mark; Jack, Peter; Phillips, Andrew L; Edwards, Keith J

    2017-03-01

    Targeted selection and inbreeding have resulted in a lack of genetic diversity in elite hexaploid bread wheat accessions. Reduced diversity can be a limiting factor in the breeding of high yielding varieties and crucially can mean reduced resilience in the face of changing climate and resource pressures. Recent technological advances have enabled the development of molecular markers for use in the assessment and utilization of genetic diversity in hexaploid wheat. Starting with a large collection of 819 571 previously characterized wheat markers, here we describe the identification of 35 143 single nucleotide polymorphism-based markers, which are highly suited to the genotyping of elite hexaploid wheat accessions. To assess their suitability, the markers have been validated using a commercial high-density Affymetrix Axiom(®) genotyping array (the Wheat Breeders' Array), in a high-throughput 384 microplate configuration, to characterize a diverse global collection of wheat accessions including landraces and elite lines derived from commercial breeding communities. We demonstrate that the Wheat Breeders' Array is also suitable for generating high-density genetic maps of previously uncharacterized populations and for characterizing novel genetic diversity produced by mutagenesis. To facilitate the use of the array by the wheat community, the markers, the associated sequence and the genotype information have been made available through the interactive web site 'CerealsDB'.

  16. Lightweight Parameterized Suffix Array Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomohiro, I.; Deguchi, Satoshi; Bannai, Hideo; Inenaga, Shunsuke; Takeda, Masayuki

    We present a first algorithm for direct construction of parameterized suffix arrays and parameterized longest common prefix arrays for non-binary strings. Experimental results show that our algorithm is much faster than naïve methods.

  17. Concurrent array-based queue

    SciTech Connect

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-01-06

    According to one embodiment, a method for implementing an array-based queue in memory of a memory system that includes a controller includes configuring, in the memory, metadata of the array-based queue. The configuring comprises defining, in metadata, an array start location in the memory for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, an array size for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, a queue top for the array-based queue and defining, in the metadata, a queue bottom for the array-based queue. The method also includes the controller serving a request for an operation on the queue, the request providing the location in the memory of the metadata of the queue.

  18. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  19. Conformal Antenna Array Design Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    PLANAR ARRAY PHASE C LbP=IowITH CORRECT CONFORMAL ARRAY PHASE C NbPt NOe OF PhS&. SH-IFT UITSPII- NoP*.GT*1O CONRCLT PHASES ARE USED C TAP19PATTLRN...of Antenna Arrays, Radio Science , Vol. 3, May 1968, pp. 401-522. M. T. Ma, "Theory and Application of Antenna Arrays", Wiley, New York, 1974, Chapter

  20. Waveguide-excited slot arrays for synthetic array radar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostrom, D. E.; Lewis, D. J.; Rupp, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    The basic design considerations for waveguide slottery arrays are reviewed, with emphasis on those design requirements that are most significant to both airborne and spaceborne synthetic array radar (SAR) systems. As an illustration of both design procedures and performance capability of slotted waveguide planar arrays, an L-band planar array was designed, fabricated, and tested. This array has an aperture approximately one meter wide by two meters high and was designed to be a typical submodule of a larger antenna. Measurements of radiation patterns, gain, and VSWR were recorded and are presented, together with the performance characteristics predicted on the basis of theoretical analysis.

  1. Dynamics of Nucleosome Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael

    2007-03-01

    DNA sites wrapped into chromatin are sterically occluded from proteins that must bind for processes such as RNA transcription and DNA repair. However, the role of chromatin compaction in biological function is poorly understood. To understand the biological functions of chromatin compaction, we constructed nucleosome arrays that are built with a tandem repeat of high affinity nucleosome positioning sequences, which contain probes for DNA accessibility and chromatin structure. I will describe our results that use restriction enzyme digestion and fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine the probability for DNA site exposure within compacted nucleosome arrays and the time scale for changes in chromatin compaction. I will then discuss how these results help explain how proteins gain access to DNA sites buried within chromatin.

  2. Holographic telescope arrays.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, A W; Sauer, F

    1988-07-15

    A typical job in optical computing is to illuminate an array of small nonlinear optical components, separated by wide gaps to avoid crosstalk. We do this by letting a wide uniform beam fall onto a densely packed array of minifying telescopes. Each telescope produces a narrow bundle of parallel rays which illuminates one of the nonlinear optical components. The holographic telescopes can do more than change the width of the bundles of parallel rays. Their image forming capability allows the transmission of many pixels per channel in parallel. The pair of lenslets of a single holographic telescope (Kepler or Galilean) is produced in rigid coupling. The monolithic production avoids adjusting the two lenslets later on.

  3. Large solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crabtree, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A spectrophotovoltaic converter, a thermophotovoltaic converter, a cassegrainian concentrator, a large silicon cell blanket, and a high flux approach are among the concepts being investigated as part of the multihundred kW solar array program for reducing the cost of photovoltaic energy in space. These concepts involve a range of technology risks, the highest risk being represented by the thermophotovoltaics and spectrophotovoltaics approaches which involve manipulation to of the incoming spectrum to enhance system efficiency. The planar array (solar blanket) has no technology risk and a moderate payback. The primary characteristics, components, and technology concerns of each of these concepts are summarized. An orbital power platform mission in the late 1980's is being used to allow a coherent technology advancement program in order to achieve a ten year life with maintenance at a capital recurring cost of $30/watt based on 1978 dollars.

  4. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  5. Microreactor Array Device

    PubMed Central

    Wiktor, Peter; Brunner, Al; Kahn, Peter; Qiu, Ji; Magee, Mitch; Bian, Xiaofang; Karthikeyan, Kailash; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    We report a device to fill an array of small chemical reaction chambers (microreactors) with reagent and then seal them using pressurized viscous liquid acting through a flexible membrane. The device enables multiple, independent chemical reactions involving free floating intermediate molecules without interference from neighboring reactions or external environments. The device is validated by protein expressed in situ directly from DNA in a microarray of ~10,000 spots with no diffusion during three hours incubation. Using the device to probe for an autoantibody cancer biomarker in blood serum sample gave five times higher signal to background ratio compared to standard protein microarray expressed on a flat microscope slide. Physical design principles to effectively fill the array of microreactors with reagent and experimental results of alternate methods for sealing the microreactors are presented. PMID:25736721

  6. Microreactor Array Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktor, Peter; Brunner, Al; Kahn, Peter; Qiu, Ji; Magee, Mitch; Bian, Xiaofang; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Labaer, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    We report a device to fill an array of small chemical reaction chambers (microreactors) with reagent and then seal them using pressurized viscous liquid acting through a flexible membrane. The device enables multiple, independent chemical reactions involving free floating intermediate molecules without interference from neighboring reactions or external environments. The device is validated by protein expressed in situ directly from DNA in a microarray of ~10,000 spots with no diffusion during three hours incubation. Using the device to probe for an autoantibody cancer biomarker in blood serum sample gave five times higher signal to background ratio compared to standard protein microarray expressed on a flat microscope slide. Physical design principles to effectively fill the array of microreactors with reagent and experimental results of alternate methods for sealing the microreactors are presented.

  7. Array Transposition in SSD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    One obstacle to running very large two- and three-dimensional codes on the Cray X-MP and Y-MP systems is to efficiently perform array transpositions using SSD storage. This article discusses how such transpositions can be performed by means of algorithms that feature exclusively unit stride, long vector transfers between main memory and SSD, and which only require a single pass through the data (provided sufficient main memory buffers are available).

  8. Microelectronic Stimulator Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-09

    number of researchers and is an active area of medical research. In a normal eye, in a basic concept 10, 20 Figures la and lb shows a ray trace of two...containing an embedded array of microwires . The glass has a curved surface that conforms to the inner radius of the retina 21. The microelectronic imaging...very small channels perpendicular to the plane of the wafer. The channels are filled with a good electrical conductor forming microwires with one

  9. Polymeric Microcapsule Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-24

    support, microencapsulation and entrapment within a membrane/film or gel. The ideal enzyme immobilization method would (1) Employ mild chemical...yields hollow polymeric microcapsules of uniform diameter and length. These microcapsules are arranged in a high density array in which the...individual capsules protrude from a surface like the bristles of a brush. We have developed procedures for filling these microcapsules with high

  10. Subsurface Deployable Antenna Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-25

    States Patent No. 6,710,746, issued March 23, 2004, to Anderson et al., discloses an antenna having a reconfigurable length, and a method of...an antenna linear extension and retraction apparatus and method of use for a submersible device. The apparatus includes a body having a cavity... microwave communications while at cruising speed and depth. [0027] It is a still further object of the present invention to provide an antenna array

  11. Solar collector array

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  12. The CHARA optical array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlister, Harold A.

    1992-11-01

    The Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy (CHARA) was established in the College of Arts and Sciences at Georgia State University in 1984 with the goals of designing, constructing, and then operating a facility for very high spatial resolution astronomy. The interest in such a facility grew out of the participants' decade of activity in speckle interferometry. Although speckle interferometry continues to provide important astrophysical measurements of a variety of objects, many pressing problems require resolution far beyond that which can be expected from single aperture telescopes. In early 1986, CHARA received a grant from the National Science Foundation which has permitted a detailed exploration of the feasibility of constructing a facility which will provide a hundred-fold increase in angular resolution over what is possible by speckle interferometry at the largest existing telescopes. The design concept for the CHARA Array was developed initially with the contractural collaboration of United Technologies Optical Systems, Inc., in West Palm Beach, Florida, an arrangement that expired in August 1987. In late November 1987, the Georgia Tech Research Institute joined with CHARA to continue and complete the design concept study. Very high-resolution imaging at optical wavelengths is clearly coming of age in astronomy. The CHARA Array and other related projects will be important and necessary milestones along the way toward the development of a major national facility for high-resolution imaging--a true optical counterpart to the Very Large Array. Ground-based arrays and their scientific output will lead to high resolution facilities in space and, ultimately, on the Moon.

  13. Large Aperture Acoustic Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    1730 GMT. Several propagation models, encompassing normal mode, parabolic equation, fast field and eigenray approaches, were compared using the array... eigenray ) was chosen as the prediction vehicle due to its robust simplicity in this application where the amplitude is controlled by two dominant paths...to the program as a slant range assuming a homogeneous medium with a sound speed of 1500 in/s. This is not normally the case, and for the Septeller

  14. Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, L.; Aristidi, E.; Vakili, F.; Domiciano, A.

    We present an interferometric beam recombination technique which allows achromatic and direct true imaging of targets at very high angular resolution. This technique intrinsically overcomes the main problems of Labeyrie's hypertelescope design, and can be used in a nulling configuration. It is thus particularly well suited for high contrast imaging in the context of exo-planet search and characterization especially for future space-borne arrays. We present the concept on a formal basis, and discuss its instrumental implementation.

  15. MEMS Colloid Thruster Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    design the electrodes are recessed relative to the nozzle to avoid voltage breakdown by surface flashover . Their work shows promise, since they have...plated onto the substrate upper surface . One goal of our simulations was to determine an electrode configuration that optimized performance. The...transmission line and electrode pattern. Thus, we can precisely define the emitter electrode separation in the array to avoid surface flashover , which occurs

  16. Hexagonal Mirror Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century, including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. A segmented array of mirrors was designed by the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center for solar the concentrator test stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for powering solar thermal propulsion engines. Each hexagon mirror has a spherical surface to approximate a parabolic concentrator when combined into the entire 18-foot diameter array. The aluminum mirrors were polished with a diamond turning machine, that creates a glass-like reflective finish on metal. The precision fabrication machinery at the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center at MSFC can polish specialized optical elements to a world class quality of smoothness. This image shows optics physicist, Vince Huegele, examining one of the 144-segment hexagonal mirrors of the 18-foot diameter array at the MSFC solar concentrator test stand.

  17. Hexagonal Mirror Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century, including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. A segmented array of mirrors was designed by the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center for the solar concentrator test stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for powering solar thermal propulsion engines. Each hexagon mirror has a spherical surface to approximate a parabolic concentrator when combined into the entire 18-foot diameter array. The aluminum mirrors were polished with a diamond turning machine that creates a glass-like reflective finish on metal. The precision fabrication machinery at the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center at MSFC can polish specialized optical elements to a world class quality of smoothness. This image shows optics physicist, Vince Huegele, examining one of the 144-segment hexagonal mirrors of the 18-foot diameter array at the MSFC solar concentrator test stand.

  18. Mir Cooperative Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skor, Mike; Hoffman, Dave J.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA), produced jointly by the United States and Russia, was deployed on the Mir Russian space station on May 25, 1996. The MCSA is a photovoltaic electrical power system that can generate up to 6 kW. The power from the MCSA is needed to extend Mir's lifetime and to support experiments conducted there by visiting U.S. astronauts. The MCSA was brought to Mir via the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-74 mission, launched November 12, 1995. This cooperative venture combined the best technology of both countries: the United States provided high-efficiency, lightweight photovoltaic panel modules, whereas Russia provided the array structure and deployment mechanism. Technology developed in the Space Station Freedom Program, and now being used in the International Space Station, was used to develop MCSA's photovoltaic panel. Performance data obtained from MCSA operation on Mir will help engineers better understand the performance of the photovoltaic panel modules in orbit. This information will be used to more accurately predict the performance of the International Space Station solar arrays. Managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center for NASA's International Space Station Program Office in Houston, Texas, the MCSA Project was completed on time and under budget despite a very aggressive schedule.

  19. Spaceborne Processor Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward T.; Schatzel, Donald V.; Whitaker, William D.; Sterling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A Spaceborne Processor Array in Multifunctional Structure (SPAMS) can lower the total mass of the electronic and structural overhead of spacecraft, resulting in reduced launch costs, while increasing the science return through dynamic onboard computing. SPAMS integrates the multifunctional structure (MFS) and the Gilgamesh Memory, Intelligence, and Network Device (MIND) multi-core in-memory computer architecture into a single-system super-architecture. This transforms every inch of a spacecraft into a sharable, interconnected, smart computing element to increase computing performance while simultaneously reducing mass. The MIND in-memory architecture provides a foundation for high-performance, low-power, and fault-tolerant computing. The MIND chip has an internal structure that includes memory, processing, and communication functionality. The Gilgamesh is a scalable system comprising multiple MIND chips interconnected to operate as a single, tightly coupled, parallel computer. The array of MIND components shares a global, virtual name space for program variables and tasks that are allocated at run time to the distributed physical memory and processing resources. Individual processor- memory nodes can be activated or powered down at run time to provide active power management and to configure around faults. A SPAMS system is comprised of a distributed Gilgamesh array built into MFS, interfaces into instrument and communication subsystems, a mass storage interface, and a radiation-hardened flight computer.

  20. TANGO ARRAY II: Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.

    The angular and energy resolution of the TANGO Array has been obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. The AIRES code, with the SYBILL hadronic collision package, was used to simulate Extended Air Showers produced by primary cosmic rays (protons and iron nuclei), with energies ranging from 1014 eV to 1018 eV. These data were fed into a realistic code which simulates the response of the detector stations (water ˇCerenkov detectors), including the electronics, pick up noise, and the signal attenuation in the connecting cabling. The trigger stage is taken into account in order to produce estimates of the trigger efficiency of the array and to check the accuracy of the reconstruction codes. This paper describes the simulations performed to obtain the expected behavior of the array, and presents the simulated data. These simulations indicate that the accuracy of the cosmic ray primary energy determination is expected to be ˜ 60 % and the precision in the measurement of the direction of arrival can be estimated as ˜ 4 degrees.

  1. Solar array construction

    DOEpatents

    Crouthamel, Marvin S.; Coyle, Peter J.

    1982-01-01

    An interconnect tab on each cell of a first set of circular solar cells connects that cell in series with an adjacent cell in the set. This set of cells is arranged in alternate columns and rows of an array and a second set of similar cells is arranged in the remaining alternate columns and rows of the array. Three interconnect tabs on each solar cell of the said second set are employed to connect the cells of the second set to one another, in series and to connect the cells of the second set to those of the first set in parallel. Some tabs (making parallel connections) connect the same surface regions of adjacent cells to one another and others (making series connections) connect a surface region of one cell to the opposite surface region of an adjacent cell; however, the tabs are so positioned that the array may be easily assembled by depositing the cells in a certain sequence and in proper orientation.

  2. Transmissive Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutyrev, A. S.; Moseley, H. S.; Fettig, R. K.; Kuhn, J. L.; Woodgate, B. E.; Kimble, R. A.; Orloff, J. H.

    1999-12-01

    We report further progress on the development of a two-dimensional array of microshutters, which can be used as a high efficiency, high contrast field selection device for a multi-object spectrometer for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). The device is a close packed array of shutters, with a typical size of 100 microns square and an area filling factor of up to 80%. Each shutter, made of single crystal silicon or silicon nitride with an appropriate optical coating, pivots on a torsion flexure along one edge. Each of the shutters is individually selectable. Although these devices can be used as reflection devices, their primary mode of operation is in transmission, which provides the minimum possible level of scattered light. An original double-shutter mechanism is employed for actuation. Small shutter arrays have been built using a Focus Ion Beam milling machine is a 3 x 3 double shutter actuation with a micro-manipulator under electron microscope observation has been demonstrated. An important aspect of this study has been to demonstrate the reliability of the structures over its expected lifetime. We analyzed stiffness, strength and fatigue issues of two good candidate materials, single crystal silicon and silicon nitride. Both appear to be suitable from the mechanical point of view. This project is supported by NASA grants.

  3. Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, F.; Aristidi, E.; Abe, L.; Lopez, B.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by reconfiguring images instead of pupils. Imaging is performed in a combined pupil-plane where the point-source intensity distribution (PSID by comparison to the more commonly quoted point-spread function, PSF) tends towards a pseudo Airy disc for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field limited to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance. We also discuss the application of IRAN to improve the performances of imaging and/or nulling interferometers like the full-fledged VLTI array or the DARWIN space-borne mission.

  4. The transcriptome of human oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kocabas, Arif Murat; Crosby, Javier; Ross, Pablo J.; Otu, Hasan H.; Beyhan, Zeki; Can, Handan; Tam, Wai-Leong; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Halgren, Robert G.; Lim, Bing; Fernandez, Emilio; Cibelli, Jose Bernardo

    2006-01-01

    The identification of genes and deduced pathways from the mature human oocyte can help us better understand oogenesis, folliculogenesis, fertilization, and embryonic development. Human metaphase II oocytes were used within minutes after removal from the ovary, and its transcriptome was compared with a reference sample consisting of a mixture of total RNA from 10 different normal human tissues not including the ovary. RNA amplification was performed by using a unique protocol. Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip arrays were used for hybridizations. Compared with reference samples, there were 5,331 transcripts significantly up-regulated and 7,074 transcripts significantly down-regulated in the oocyte. Of the oocyte up-regulated probe sets, 1,430 have unknown function. A core group of 66 transcripts was identified by intersecting significantly up-regulated genes of the human oocyte with those from the mouse oocyte and from human and mouse embryonic stem cells. GeneChip array results were validated using RT-PCR in a selected set of oocyte-specific genes. Within the up-regulated probe sets, the top overrepresented categories were related to RNA and protein metabolism, followed by DNA metabolism and chromatin modification. This report provides a comprehensive expression baseline of genes expressed in in vivo matured human oocytes. Further understanding of the biological role of these genes may expand our knowledge on meiotic cell cycle, fertilization, chromatin remodeling, lineage commitment, pluripotency, tissue regeneration, and morphogenesis. PMID:16968779

  5. Solid state neutron detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

    1999-08-17

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

  6. Cloning and characterization of the drought-resistance OsRCI2-5 gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Li, L; Li, N; Song, S F; Li, Y X; Xia, X J; Fu, X Q; Chen, G H; Deng, H F

    2014-05-23

    The genomic expression profile of the super-hybrid rice Liangyoupeijiu female parent Pei'ai 64S in different tissues at different developmental stages under low temperature, drought, and high temperature stresses were detected using an Affymetrix GeneChip Rice Genome Array to screen upregulated and downregulated genes. In this study, we screened the drought-resistant gene OsRCI2-5, after which a constitutive OsRCI2-5 construct was created and transferred into Nipponbare. After polyethylene glycol-6000 and drought treatment, we found that the OsRCI2-5 gene improved the drought resistance of Nipponbare. Gene expression profiling showed that the OsRCI2-5 gene was expressed in the rice leaves, stems, and flower organs. Subcellular localization revealed that the gene was located in the membranes, and hence, we can deduce that a membrane signal peptide was responsible for signal transduction.

  7. A genomic approach to myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Beatriz; Michelson, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We have developed an integrated genetic, genomic and computational approach to identify and characterize genes involved in myoblast fusion in Drosophila. We first used fluorescence activated cell sorting to purify mesodermal cells both from wild-type embryos and from twelve variant genotypes in which muscle development is perturbed in known ways. Then, we obtained gene expression profiles for the purified cells by hybridizing isolated mesodermal RNA to Affymetrix GeneChip arrays. These data were subsequently compounded into a statistical meta-analysis that predicts myoblast subtype-specific gene expression signatures that were later validated by in situ hybridization experiments. Finally, we analyzed the myogenic functions of a subset of these myoblast genes using a double-stranded RNA interference assay in living embryos expressing green fluorescent protein under control of a muscle-specific promoter. This experimental strategy led to the identification of several previously uncharacterized genes required for myoblast fusion in Drosophila. PMID:18979251

  8. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M.; Borradaile, Nica M.

    2016-01-01

    The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors “Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity” (Hughes-Large et al. 2014). Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA) values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR. PMID:26937468

  9. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Borradaile, Nica M

    2016-03-01

    The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors "Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity" (Hughes-Large et al. 2014). Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA) values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR.

  10. Comparative Transcriptional Profiling of Two Wheat Genotypes, with Contrasting Levels of Minerals in Grains, Shows Expression Differences during Grain Filling

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhir P.; Jeet, Raja; Kumar, Jitendra; Shukla, Vishnu; Srivastava, Rakesh; Mantri, Shrikant S.; Tuli, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Wheat is one of the most important cereal crops in the world. To identify the candidate genes for mineral accumulation, it is important to examine differential transcriptome between wheat genotypes, with contrasting levels of minerals in grains. A transcriptional comparison of developing grains was carried out between two wheat genotypes- Triticum aestivum Cv. WL711 (low grain mineral), and T. aestivum L. IITR26 (high grain mineral), using Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array. The study identified a total of 580 probe sets as differentially expressed (with log2 fold change of ≥2 at p≤0.01) between the two genotypes, during grain filling. Transcripts with significant differences in induction or repression between the two genotypes included genes related to metal homeostasis, metal tolerance, lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis, amino acid and protein transport, vacuolar-sorting receptor, aquaporins, and stress responses. Meta-analysis revealed spatial and temporal signatures of a majority of the differentially regulated transcripts. PMID:25364903

  11. Phased array ghost elimination

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  12. Compact Transducers and Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Soc. Am., 104, pp.64-71 44 25.Decarpigny, J.N., J.C. Debus, B. Tocquet & D. Boucher. 1985. "In-Air Analysis Of Piezoelectric Tonpilz Transducers In A... Transducers and Arrays Final Report May 2005 Contacts: Dr. Robert E. Newnham The Pennsylvania State University, 251 MRL, University Park, PA 16802 phone...814) 865-1612 fax: (814) 865-2326 email: ....c xx.....i.i.....ht.. .u a.p.u..c.e.du. Dr. Richard J. Meyer, Jr. Systems Engineering ( Transducers ), ARL

  13. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  14. Microplasma generating array

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, Jeffrey A.; Wu, Chen; Hoskinson, Alan R.; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2016-10-04

    A microplasma generator includes first and second conductive resonators disposed on a first surface of a dielectric substrate. The first and second conductive resonators are arranged in line with one another with a gap defined between a first end of each resonator. A ground plane is disposed on a second surface of the dielectric substrate and a second end of each of the first and second resonators is coupled to the ground plane. A power input connector is coupled to the first resonator at a first predetermined distance from the second end chosen as a function of the impedance of the first conductive resonator. A microplasma generating array includes a number of resonators in a dielectric material substrate with one end of each resonator coupled to ground. A micro-plasma is generated at the non-grounded end of each resonator. The substrate includes a ground electrode and the microplasmas are generated between the non-grounded end of the resonator and the ground electrode. The coupling of each resonator to ground may be made through controlled switches in order to turn each resonator off or on and therefore control where and when a microplasma will be created in the array.

  15. Biomolecule derived nanostructured arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen

    During the last decade, intensive research have been reported on biomimetic approaches towards achieving mono-dispersed nanoparticles, and building self-assembled system out of those (organizing nanoparticles). However the development of this research avenue is being hindered by the limited knowledge and very few practical, efficient, cost-effective approaches for implementation of the bio-derived arrays into engineering practice. The objective of this work is to biomimeticaly form nanocomposite materials using a simple, rapid, inexpensive, scalable approach, which is general enough and not limited to colloidal particle self-assembly. Throughout the studies, we have developed a universally applicable process, which is to fabricate macro-biomolecular arrays on solid substrates based on the convective self-assembly of colloidal particles. We have demonstrated that protein (ferritin) and virus (phage) arrays were directly deposited onto solid substrates such as glass, silicon wafer, and gold substrate in closed or near closed-packed order. The arrays were further incorporated into a more robust silica matrix, in such that strengthens the thermal stability and provides porous accessibility. After treatment in controlled pyrolysis, the organic protein shell was removed, left mono-dispersed iron-oxide nanoparticles intact on the substrate or in the silica matrix. Both iron-oxide nanoparticles arrays with or without silica matrix have been further characterized to possess superferromagnetic properties at low temperature (15 K), same as that in bulk material. Initial work on protein patterning, through combining either lithography based top-down or bottom-up techniques with our novel deposition approach, was presented as well. Thin film deposition of mesoporous materials using convective self-assembly is another main part in this work. Both silica and carbon mesoporous thin films were successfully formed using the convective self-assembly horizontal-coating approach. We

  16. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  17. Electrode array for neural stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Okandan, Murat; Stein, David J.; Yang, Pin; Cesarano, III, Joseph; Dellinger, Jennifer

    2011-08-16

    An electrode array for neural stimulation is disclosed which has particular applications for use in a retinal prosthesis. The electrode array can be formed as a hermetically-sealed two-part ceramic package which includes an electronic circuit such as a demultiplexer circuit encapsulated therein. A relatively large number (up to 1000 or more) of individually-addressable electrodes are provided on a curved surface of a ceramic base portion the electrode array, while a much smaller number of electrical connections are provided on a ceramic lid of the electrode array. The base and lid can be attached using a metal-to-metal seal formed by laser brazing. Electrical connections to the electrode array can be provided by a flexible ribbon cable which can also be used to secure the electrode array in place.

  18. Solid state image sensing arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadasiv, G.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of a photodiode transistor image sensor array in silicon, and tests on individual elements of the array are described along with design for a scanning system for an image sensor array. The spectral response of p-n junctions was used as a technique for studying the optical-absorption edge in silicon. Heterojunction structures of Sb2S3- Si were fabricated and a system for measuring C-V curves on MOS structures was built.

  19. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  20. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  1. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Yelton, William G.; Siegal, Michael P.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  2. Future directions for NICMOS arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Young, Erick T.; Mccarthy, D.; Rasche, Robert; Blessinger, Michael; Vural, Kadri; Kleinhans, William

    1989-01-01

    The Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) requires focal plane arrays of 256x256 pixels for both its cameras and its spectrometers. The new arrays, developed by the Rockwell Corporation for NICMOS, have 40 microns pixels of HgCdTe bump bonded to a switched MOSFET readout. Expected read noise and dark current for the arrays at 60 K are 30 e and 1 e/sec. respectively. The basis for these numbers is previous experience with 128x128 arrays.

  3. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An advanced, universally-mountable, integrated residential photovoltaic array concept was defined based upon an in-depth formulation and evaluation of three candidate approaches which were synthesized from existing or proposed residential array concepts. The impact of module circuitry and process sequence is considered and technology gaps and performance drivers associated with residential photovoltaic array concepts are identified. The actual learning experience gained from the comparison of the problem areas of the hexagonal shingle design with the rectangular module design led to what is considered an advanced array concept. Building the laboratory mockup provided actual experience and the opportunity to uncover additional technology gaps.

  4. Construction and evaluation of a high-density SNP array for the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Wang, Wei; Li, Busu; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widely used in genetics and genomics research. The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is an economically and ecologically important marine bivalve, and it possesses one of the highest levels of genomic DNA variation among animal species. Pacific oyster SNPs have been extensively investigated; however, the mechanisms by which these SNPs may be used in a high-throughput, transferable, and economical manner remain to be elucidated. Here, we constructed an oyster 190K SNP array using Affymetrix Axiom genotyping technology. We designed 190,420 SNPs on the chip; these SNPs were selected from 54 million SNPs identified through re-sequencing of 472 Pacific oysters collected in China, Japan, Korea, and Canada. Our genotyping results indicated that 133,984 (70.4%) SNPs were polymorphic and successfully converted on the chip. The SNPs were distributed evenly throughout the oyster genome, located in 3,595 scaffolds with a length of ~509.4 million; the average interval spacing was 4,210 bp. In addition, 111,158 SNPs were distributed in 21,050 coding genes, with an average of 5.3 SNPs per gene. In comparison with genotypes obtained through re-sequencing, ~69% of the converted SNPs had a concordance rate of >0.971; the mean concordance rate was 0.966. Evaluation based on genotypes of full-sib family individuals revealed that the average genotyping accuracy rate was 0.975. Carrying 133 K polymorphic SNPs, our oyster 190K SNP array is the first commercially available high-density SNP chip for mollusks, with the highest throughput. It represents a valuable tool for oyster genome-wide association studies, fine linkage mapping, and population genetics. PMID:28328985

  5. Etalon Array Reconstructive Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2017-01-01

    Compact spectrometers are crucial in areas where size and weight may need to be minimized. These types of spectrometers often contain no moving parts, which makes for an instrument that can be highly durable. With the recent proliferation in low-cost and high-resolution cameras, camera-based spectrometry methods have the potential to make portable spectrometers small, ubiquitous, and cheap. Here, we demonstrate a novel method for compact spectrometry that uses an array of etalons to perform spectral encoding, and uses a reconstruction algorithm to recover the incident spectrum. This spectrometer has the unique capability for both high resolution and a large working bandwidth without sacrificing sensitivity, and we anticipate that its simplicity makes it an excellent candidate whenever a compact, robust, and flexible spectrometry solution is needed.

  6. Etalon Array Reconstructive Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2017-01-01

    Compact spectrometers are crucial in areas where size and weight may need to be minimized. These types of spectrometers often contain no moving parts, which makes for an instrument that can be highly durable. With the recent proliferation in low-cost and high-resolution cameras, camera-based spectrometry methods have the potential to make portable spectrometers small, ubiquitous, and cheap. Here, we demonstrate a novel method for compact spectrometry that uses an array of etalons to perform spectral encoding, and uses a reconstruction algorithm to recover the incident spectrum. This spectrometer has the unique capability for both high resolution and a large working bandwidth without sacrificing sensitivity, and we anticipate that its simplicity makes it an excellent candidate whenever a compact, robust, and flexible spectrometry solution is needed. PMID:28074883

  7. Array biosensor: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Joel P.; Rowe-Taitt, Chris A.; Feldstein, Mark J.; Ligler, Frances S.

    1999-05-01

    A fluorescence-based immunosensor has been developed for simultaneous analyses of multiple samples for 1 to 6 different antigens. A patterned array of recognition antibodies immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide is used to 'capture' analyte present in samples. Bound analyte is then quantified by means of fluorescent detector molecules. Upon excitation of the fluorescent label by a small diode laser, a CCD camera detects the pattern of fluorescent antigen:antibody complexes on the sensor surface. Image analysis software correlates the position of fluorescent signals with the identity of the analyte. A new design for a fluidics distribution system is shown, as well as results from assays for physiologically relevant concentrations of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), F1 antigen from Yersinia pestis, and D- dimer, a marker of sepsis and thrombotic disorders.

  8. Diagnosable structured logic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  9. Networked Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Tighe

    2002-10-01

    A set of independent radiation sensors, coupled with real-time data telemetry, offers the opportunity to run correlation algorithms for the sensor array as well as to incorporate non-radiological data into the system. This may enhance the overall sensitivity of the sensors and provide an opportunity to project the location of a source within the array. In collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), we have conducted field experiments to test a prototype system. Combining the outputs of a set of distributed sensors permits the correlation that the independent sensor outputs. Combined with additional information such as traffic patterns and velocities, this can reduce random/false detections and enhance detection capability. The principle components of such a system include: (1) A set of radiation sensors. These may be of varying type and complexity, including gamma and/or neutron detectors, gross count and spectral-capable sensors, and low to high energy-resolution sensors. (2) A set of non-radiation sensors. These may include sensors such as vehicle presence and imaging sensors. (3) A communications architecture for near real-time telemetry. Depending upon existing infrastructure and bandwidth requirements, this may be a radio or hard-wire based system. (4) A central command console to pole the sensors, correlate their output, and display the data in a meaningful form to the system operator. Both sensitivity and selectivity are important considerations when evaluating the performance of a detection system. Depending on the application, the optimization of sensitivity as well as the rejection of ''nuisance'' radioactive sources may or may not be critical.

  10. TRMM Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Basic requirement of 978.59 watts per Panel output @ 58.9 volts B.O.L. was met on an average basis per agreement with NASA. Lower grade Cells were used on the shadowed Panel (Boom shadow) to maximize available power to the Spacecraft. The average output @ 58.9 volts was 991 watts. The outputs of the four t4) Panels ranged from 960 to 1,022 watts. The Panels successfully passed environmental testing at TRW to the contract specification and subsequent testing at NASA which involved output measurements at elevated temperatures. As this type of Array had never previously been built by TRW (aluminum Substrate with 4 cm x 4.4 cm GaAs Cells), the TRMM Program was a development effort combined with a Qual and Flight production effort. The most significant technical problem was Cell cracking during Qual thermal cycling. The cracking problem was determined to be generic within our Solar Array factory in the application of GaAs Cells to our designs. As a result, a TRW funded manufacturing process verification panel (known as the Manufacturing Verification Panel) was built to demonstrate our ability to properly apply GaAs Cells. The original Qual Panel comprised three (3) design variations with respect to Coverglass-to-Cell and Cell-to-Substrate adhesives. The intent was to qualify multiple designs in case one or more failed. When two of the three combinations failed due to excessive Cell breakage during thermal cycling, NASA was reluctant to allow Flight production based on the one remaining good Qual Panel Quadrant. This issue was pivotal for continuing the contract. Facts and recommendations are as follows: (1) The cause of the excessive cracking was never determined. and (2) The areas where the excessive cracking occurred utilized DC93-500 glassing adhesive which was NASA approved, and had been widely used by TRW on a multitude of projects.

  11. MIMAS 3.0 is a Multiomics Information Management and Annotation System

    PubMed Central

    Gattiker, Alexandre; Hermida, Leandro; Liechti, Robin; Xenarios, Ioannis; Collin, Olivier; Rougemont, Jacques; Primig, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA sequence integrity, mRNA concentrations and protein-DNA interactions have been subject to genome-wide analyses based on microarrays with ever increasing efficiency and reliability over the past fifteen years. However, very recently novel technologies for Ultra High-Throughput DNA Sequencing (UHTS) have been harnessed to study these phenomena with unprecedented precision. As a consequence, the extensive bioinformatics environment available for array data management, analysis, interpretation and publication must be extended to include these novel sequencing data types. Description MIMAS was originally conceived as a simple, convenient and local Microarray Information Management and Annotation System focused on GeneChips for expression profiling studies. MIMAS 3.0 enables users to manage data from high-density oligonucleotide SNP Chips, expression arrays (both 3'UTR and tiling) and promoter arrays, BeadArrays as well as UHTS data using MIAME-compliant standardized vocabulary. Importantly, researchers can export data in MAGE-TAB format and upload them to the EBI's ArrayExpress certified data repository using a one-step procedure. Conclusion We have vastly extended the capability of the system such that it processes the data output of six types of GeneChips (Affymetrix), two different BeadArrays for mRNA and miRNA (Illumina) and the Genome Analyzer (a popular Ultra-High Throughput DNA Sequencer, Illumina), without compromising on its flexibility and user-friendliness. MIMAS, appropriately renamed into Multiomics Information Management and Annotation System, is currently used by scientists working in approximately 50 academic laboratories and genomics platforms in Switzerland and France. MIMAS 3.0 is freely available via . PMID:19450266

  12. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    DOEpatents

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  13. Phase multiplying electronic scanning array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaton, A. F.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning array was designed with properties of low RF loss and phase control. The array consists of a series of special waveguides, hybrids made up of two variable reactance branch arms for input signals, an edge slot for the difference port, and a sum arm for the unradiated signal.

  14. High Voltage Space Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. C.; Hillard, G. B.; Vayner, B. V.; Galofaro, J. T.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent tests performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center and elsewhere have shown promise in the design and construction of high voltage (300-1000 V) solar arrays for space applications. Preliminary results and implications for solar array design will be discussed, with application to direct-drive electric propulsion and space solar power.

  15. Array tomography: semiautomated image alignment.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. Successful array tomography requires that the captured images be properly stacked and aligned, and the software to achieve these ends is freely available. This protocol describes the construction of volumetric image stacks from images of fluorescently labeled arrays for three-dimensional image visualization, analysis, and archiving.

  16. Automated Solar-Array Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffa, A.; Bycer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Large arrays are rapidly assembled from individual solar cells by automated production line developed for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Apparatus positions cells within array, attaches interconnection tabs, applies solder flux, and solders interconnections. Cells are placed in either straight or staggered configurations and may be connected either in series or in parallel. Are attached at rate of one every 5 seconds.

  17. Loudspeaker line array educational demonstration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Moser, Brad; Gee, Kent L

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a physical demonstration of an audio-range line array used to teach interference of multiple sources in a classroom or laboratory exercise setting. Software has been developed that permits real-time control and steering of the array. The graphical interface permits a user to vary the frequency, the angular response by phase shading, and reduce sidelobes through amplitude shading. An inexpensive, eight-element loudspeaker array has been constructed to test the control program. Directivity measurements of this array in an anechoic chamber and in a large classroom are presented. These measurements have good agreement with theoretical directivity predictions, thereby allowing its use as a quantitative learning tool for advanced students as well as a qualitative demonstration of arrays in other settings. Portions of this paper are directed toward educators who may wish to implement a similar demonstration for their advanced undergraduate or graduate level course in acoustics.

  18. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Three basic module design concepts were analyzed with respect to both production and installation costs. The results of this evaluation were used to synthesize a fourth design which incorporates the best features of these initial concepts to produce a module/array design approach which offers the promise of a substantial reduction in the installed cost of a residential array. A unique waterproofing and mounting scheme was used to reduce the cost of installing an integral array while still maintaining a high probability that the installed array will be watertight for the design lifetime of the system. This recommended concept will also permit the array to be mounted as a direct or stand-off installation with no changes to the module design.

  19. PEP solar array definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The conceptual design of a large, flexible, lightweight solar array is presented focusing on a solar array overview assessment, solar array blanket definition, structural-mechanical systems definition, and launch/reentry blanket protection features. The overview assessment includes a requirements and constraints review, the thermal environment assessment on the design selection, an evaluation of blanket integration sequence, a conceptual blanket/harness design, and a hot spot analysis considering the effects of shadowing and cell failures on overall array reliability. The solar array blanket definition includes the substrate design, hinge designs and blanket/harness flexibility assessment. The structural/mechanical systems definition includes an overall loads and deflection assessment, a frequency analysis of the deployed assembly, a components weights estimate, design of the blanket housing and tensioning mechanism. The launch/reentry blanket protection task includes assessment of solar cell/cover glass cushioning concepts during ascent and reentry flight condition.

  20. Optimization of isopolar microtubule arrays.

    PubMed

    Agayan, Rodney R; Tucker, Robert; Nitta, Takahiro; Ruhnow, Felix; Walter, Wilhelm J; Diez, Stefan; Hess, Henry

    2013-02-19

    Isopolar arrays of aligned cytoskeletal filaments are components in a number of designs of hybrid nanodevices incorporating biomolecular motors. For example, a combination of filament arrays and motor arrays can form an actuator or a molecular engine resembling an artificial muscle. Here, isopolar arrays of microtubules are fabricated by flow alignment, and their quality is characterized by their degree of alignment. We find, in agreement with our analytical models, that the degree of alignment is ultimately limited by thermal forces, while the kinetics of the alignment process are influenced by the flow strength, the microtubule stiffness, the gliding velocity, and the tip length. Strong flows remove microtubules from the surface and reduce the filament density, suggesting that there is an optimal flow strength for the fabrication of ordered arrays.

  1. A systolic array parallelizing compiler

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, P.S. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a completely new approach to the problem of systolic array parallelizing compiler. It describes the AL parallelizing compiler for the Warp systolic array, the first working systolic array parallelizing compiler which can generate efficient parallel code for complete LINPACK routines. This book begins by analyzing the architectural strength of the Warp systolic array. It proposes a model for mapping programs onto the machine and introduces the notion of data relations for optimizing the program mapping. Also presented are successful applications of the AL compiler in matrix computation and image processing. A complete listing of the source program and compiler-generated parallel code are given to clarify the overall picture of the compiler. The book concludes that systolic array parallelizing compiler can produce efficient parallel code, almost identical to what the user would have written by hand.

  2. Massively Parallel MRI Detector Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called “ultimate” SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. PMID:23453758

  3. Nanocoax Arrays for Sensing Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizal, Binod

    We have adapted a nanocoax array architecture for high sensitivity, all-electronic, chemical and biological sensing. Arrays of nanocoaxes with various dielectric annuli were developed using polymer replicas of Si nanopillars made via soft lithography. These arrays were implemented in the development of two different kinds of chemical detectors. First, arrays of nanocoaxes constructed with different porosity dielectric annuli were employed to make capacitive detectors for gaseous molecules and to investigate the role of dielectric porosity in the sensitivity of the device. Second, arrays of nanocoaxes with partially hollowed annuli were used to fabricate three-dimensional electrochemical biosensors within which we studied the role of nanoscale gap between electrodes on device sensitivity. In addition, we have employed a molecular imprint technique to develop a non-conducting molecularly imprinted polymer thin film of thickness comparable to size of biomolecules as an "artificial antibody" architecture for the detection of biomolecules.

  4. Nanomechanical Cantilever Array Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Hans; Hegner, Martin; Gerber, Christoph

    Microfabricated cantilever sensors have attracted much interest in recent years as devices for the fast and reliable detection of small concentrations of molecules in air and solution. In addition to application of such sensors for gas and chemical-vapor sensing, for example as an artificial nose, they have also been employed to measure physical properties of tiny amounts of materials in miniaturized versions of conventional standard techniques such as calorimetry, thermogravimetry, weighing, photothermal spectroscopy, as well as for monitoring chemical reactions such as catalysis on small surfaces. In the past few years, the cantilever-sensor concept has been extended to biochemical applications and as an analytical device for measurements of biomaterials. Because of the label-free detection principle of cantilever sensors, their small size and scalability, this kind of device is advantageous for diagnostic applications and disease monitoring, as well as for genomics or proteomics purposes. The use of microcantilever arrays enables detection of several analytes simultaneously and solves the inherent problem of thermal drift often present when using single microcantilever sensors, as some of the cantilevers can be used as sensor cantilevers for detection, and other cantilevers serve as passivated reference cantilevers that do not exhibit affinity to the molecules to be detected.

  5. Particle sensor array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Lieneweg, Udo (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particle sensor array which in a preferred embodiment comprises a static random access memory having a plurality of ion-sensitive memory cells, each such cell comprising at least one pull-down field effect transistor having a sensitive drain surface area (such as by bloating) and at least one pull-up field effect transistor having a source connected to an offset voltage. The sensitive drain surface area and the offset voltage are selected for memory cell upset by incident ions such as alpha-particles. The static random access memory of the present invention provides a means for selectively biasing the memory cells into the same state in which each of the sensitive drain surface areas is reverse biased and then selectively reducing the reversed bias on these sensitive drain surface areas for increasing the upset sensitivity of the cells to ions. The resulting selectively sensitive memory cells can be used in a number of applications. By way of example, the present invention can be used for measuring the linear energy transfer of ion particles, as well as a device for assessing the resistance of CMOS latches to Cosmic Ray induced single event upsets. The sensor of the present invention can also be used to determine the uniformity of an ion beam.

  6. Optical communications receiver array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint Clair, Jonathan M.; Chan, Eric Y.; Koshinz, Dennis G.; Wilcken, Stephen K.; Soreide, David C.; Joshi, Atul; Durmus, Hakan

    2010-04-01

    One of the major challenges to free space laser communications and ladar is the impact of turbulence on beam propagation, one example of which is signal fading. These impacts can be exacerbated on airborne platforms by turbulence in the vicinity of the laser system aperture and the platform wake. There are a number of strategies to mitigate this, including adaptive optics, active flow control, and various dimensions of diversity: wavelength, polarization, temporal, and spatial diversity. In this paper we will discuss spatial diversity implemented in the focal region of optical telescopes. We will briefly compare this with other methods, describe results of requirements analysis of array features and optical configurations for various atmospheric turbulence states, and suggest several attractive configurations. We will also report on the design and test of one configuration, implemented in a prototype, and tested for noise performance, optical transmission, modulation bandwidth, and BER performance with our dynamic turbulence simulator. Early evidence shows significant BER improvements of several orders of magnitude at high turbulence fluctuation frequencies using this technique.

  7. Microheater Array Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. Data from KC-135 and sounding rocket experiments indicate little effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble, surrounded by smaller satellite bubbles, moved over the surface, occasionally causing nucleation. Once formed, the primary bubble size remained constant for a given superheat, indicating evaporation at the bubble base is balanced with condensation on the bubble cap. The primary bubble's size increased with wall superheat. Most heaters under the primary bubble had low heat transfer rates, suggesting liquid dryout. Strong Marangoni convection developed in microgravity, forming a 'jet' into the bulk liquid that forced the bubble onto the heater. An experiment is being designed for the. Microgravity Science Glovebox. This experiment uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 and 7.0 mm in size. These heaters are individually controlled to operate at a constant temperature, measuring local heat fluxes as a function of time and space. Most boiling experiments operate at constant wall heat flux with larger heaters, allowing only time and space-averaged measurements. Each heater is about the bubble departure size in normal gravity, but significantly smaller than the bubble departure size in reduced gravity.

  8. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2010-08-31

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  9. Molecularly imprinted polymer sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ken D; Stephenson, Clifton J

    2010-12-01

    The sensor array format has proved an effective method of transforming sensors of modest selectivity into highly selective and discriminating sensors. The primary challenge in developing new sensor arrays is collecting together a sufficient number of recognition elements that possess different binding affinities for the analytes of interest. In this regard, the use of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as the recognition elements in sensor arrays has a number of unique advantages. MIPs can be rapidly and inexpensively prepared with different selectivities and tuned with different selectivity patterns via the choice of templates in the imprinting process. The array format also helps compensate for the low selectivities and high cross-reactivities of MIP sensors. These attractive qualities of MIP sensor arrays have been demonstrated in recent examples, which have established the viability and generality of the approach. In particular, the versatility of the imprinting process enables MIP sensor arrays to be tailored to specific analytes. MIP sensor arrays have also shown surprisingly broad utility, as even analytes that were not used as templates in the imprinting process can be effectively discriminated.

  10. Progress of the array laser detonation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhang, Rui; He, Ai-feng; Wang, Hao-yu

    2016-01-01

    This paper stated the main characteristics of the array laser technology, introduced high application and development at home and abroad, especially having a comparison of solid array laser technology with semiconductor array laser technology on fast initiation and fire energy, etc. by researchment of the array laser technology, this paper forsaw the prospect of the array laser. at last, this paper summaries plenty of advantages of the laser array technology on miniaturization, intellectualization, integration.

  11. Application specific serial arithmetic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, K.; Mathews, D.; Thompson, T.

    1990-01-01

    High performance systolic arrays of serial-parallel multiplier elements may be rapidly constructed for specific applications by applying hardware description language techniques to a library of full-custom CMOS building blocks. Single clock pre-charged circuits have been implemented for these arrays at clock rates in excess of 100 Mhz using economical 2-micron (minimum feature size) CMOS processes, which may be quickly configured for a variety of applications. A number of application-specific arrays are presented, including a 2-D convolver for image processing, an integer polynomial solver, and a finite-field polynomial solver.

  12. Interferometric optical vortex array generator

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, P

    2007-05-20

    Two new interferometric configurations for optical vortex array generation are presented.These interferometers are different from the conventional interferometers in that they are capable of producing a large number of isolated zeros of intensity, and all of them contain optical vortices. Simulation and theory for optical vortex array generation using three-plane-wave interference is presented. The vortex dipole array produced this way is noninteracting, as there are no attraction or repulsion forces between them, leading to annihilation or creation of vortex pairs.

  13. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  14. The Square Kilometer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, James M.

    2006-06-01

    The SKA is an observatory for m/cm wavelengths that will provide quantum leaps in studies of the early universe, the high-energy universe, and astrobiology. Key science areas include:(1) Galaxy Evolution and Large-Scale Structure, including Dark Energy;(2) Probing the Dark Ages through studies of highly redshifted hydrogen and carbon monoxide;(3) Cosmic magnetism;(4) Probing Gravity with Pulsars and Black Holes; and(5) The Cradle of Life, including real-time images of protoplanetary disks, inventory of organic molecules, and the search for signals from extraterrestrial intelligence.From a phase-space point of view, the SKA will expand enormously our ability to discover new and known phenomena, including transient sources with time scales from nano-seconds to years. Particular examples include coherent emissions from extrasolar planets and gamma-ray burst afterglows, detectable at levels 100 times smaller than currently. Specifications needed to meet the science requirements are technically quite challenging: a frequency range of approximately 0.1 to 25 GHz; wide field of view, tens of square degrees (frequency dependent); high dynamic range and image fidelity; flexibility in imaging on scales from sub-mas to degrees; and sampling the time-frequency domain as demanded by transient objects. Meeting these specifications requires collaboration of a world-wide group of engineers and scientists. For this and other reasons, the SKA will be realized internationally. Initially, several concepts have been explored for building inexpensive collecting area that provides broad frequency coverage. The Reference Design now specifies an SKA based on a large number of small-diameter dish antennas with "smart feeds." Complementary to the dishes is a phased aperture array that will provide very wide-field capability. I will discuss the Reference Design, along with a timeline for developing the technology, building the first 10% of the SKA, and finishing the full SKA, along with the

  15. Light propagation in nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahachou, A. I.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2007-03-01

    We study the propagation of TM- and TE-polarized light in two-dimensional arrays of silver nanorods of various diameters in a gelatin background. We calculate the transmittance, reflectance and absorption of arranged and disordered nanorod arrays and compare the exact numerical results with the predictions of the Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium theory. We show that interactions between nanorods, multipole contributions and formations of photonic gaps affect strongly the transmittance spectra that cannot be accounted for in terms of the conventional effective-medium theory. We also demonstrate and explain the degradation of the transmittance in arrays with randomly located rods as well as the weak influence of their fluctuating diameter. For TM modes we outline the importance of the skin effect, which causes the full reflection of the incoming light. We then illustrate the possibility of using periodic arrays of nanorods as high-quality polarizers.

  16. Downsampling Photodetector Array with Windowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patawaran, Ferze D.; Farr, William H.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Sahasrabudhe, Adit

    2012-01-01

    In a photon counting detector array, each pixel in the array produces an electrical pulse when an incident photon on that pixel is detected. Detection and demodulation of an optical communication signal that modulated the intensity of the optical signal requires counting the number of photon arrivals over a given interval. As the size of photon counting photodetector arrays increases, parallel processing of all the pixels exceeds the resources available in current application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and gate array (GA) technology; the desire for a high fill factor in avalanche photodiode (APD) detector arrays also precludes this. Through the use of downsampling and windowing portions of the detector array, the processing is distributed between the ASIC and GA. This allows demodulation of the optical communication signal incident on a large photon counting detector array, as well as providing architecture amenable to algorithmic changes. The detector array readout ASIC functions as a parallel-to-serial converter, serializing the photodetector array output for subsequent processing. Additional downsampling functionality for each pixel is added to this ASIC. Due to the large number of pixels in the array, the readout time of the entire photodetector is greater than the time between photon arrivals; therefore, a downsampling pre-processing step is done in order to increase the time allowed for the readout to occur. Each pixel drives a small counter that is incremented at every detected photon arrival or, equivalently, the charge in a storage capacitor is incremented. At the end of a user-configurable counting period (calculated independently from the ASIC), the counters are sampled and cleared. This downsampled photon count information is then sent one counter word at a time to the GA. For a large array, processing even the downsampled pixel counts exceeds the capabilities of the GA. Windowing of the array, whereby several subsets of pixels are designated

  17. A lightweight solar array study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josephs, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    A sample module was assembled to model a portion of a flexible extendable solar array, a type that promises to become the next generation of solar array design. The resulting study of this module is intended to provide technical support to the array designer for lightweight component selection, specifications, and tests. Selected from available lightweight components were 127-micron-thick wrap-around contacted solar cells, 34- micron-thick sputtered glass covers, and as a substrate a 13-micron-thick polyimide film clad with a copper printed circuit. Each component displayed weaknesses. The thin solar cells had excessive breakage losses. Sputtered glass cover adhesion was poor, and the covered cell was weaker than the cell uncovered. Thermal stresses caused some cell delamination from the model solar array substrate.

  18. Dynamically Reconfigurable Systolic Array Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasu, Aravind; Barnes, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A polymorphic systolic array framework has been developed that works in conjunction with an embedded microprocessor on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), which allows for dynamic and complimentary scaling of acceleration levels of two algorithms active concurrently on the FPGA. Use is made of systolic arrays and a hardware-software co-design to obtain an efficient multi-application acceleration system. The flexible and simple framework allows hosting of a broader range of algorithms, and is extendable to more complex applications in the area of aerospace embedded systems. FPGA chips can be responsive to realtime demands for changing applications needs, but only if the electronic fabric can respond fast enough. This systolic array framework allows for rapid partial and dynamic reconfiguration of the chip in response to the real-time needs of scalability, and adaptability of executables.

  19. Bolometric Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, E.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-11-01

    During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin films have been developed at INAOE, specifically boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible configurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit specifically designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  20. The Applicability of Incoherent Array Processing to IMS Seismic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Steven J.

    2014-03-01

    The seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) are highly diverse in size and configuration, with apertures ranging from under 1 km to over 60 km. Large and medium aperture arrays with large inter-site spacings complicate the detection and estimation of high-frequency phases lacking coherence between sensors. Pipeline detection algorithms often miss such phases, since they only consider frequencies low enough to allow coherent array processing, and phases that are detected are often attributed qualitatively incorrect backazimuth and slowness estimates. This can result in missed events, due to either a lack of contributing phases or by corruption of event hypotheses by spurious detections. It has been demonstrated previously that continuous spectral estimation can both detect and estimate phases on the largest aperture arrays, with arrivals identified as local maxima on beams of transformed spectrograms. The estimation procedure in effect measures group velocity rather than phase velocity, as is the case for classical f-k analysis, and the ability to estimate slowness vectors requires sufficiently large inter-sensor distances to resolve time-delays between pulses with a period of the order 4-5 s. Spectrogram beampacking works well on five IMS arrays with apertures over 20 km (NOA, AKASG, YKA, WRA, and KURK) without additional post-processing. Seven arrays with 10-20 km aperture (MJAR, ESDC, ILAR, KSRS, CMAR, ASAR, and EKA) can provide robust parameter estimates subject to a smoothing of the resulting slowness grids, most effectively achieved by convolving the measured slowness grids with the array response function for a 4 or 5 s period signal. Even for medium aperture arrays which can provide high-quality coherent slowness estimates, a complementary spectrogram beampacking procedure could act as a quality control by providing non-aliased estimates when the coherent slowness grids display

  1. Flexible solar-array mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    One of the key elements of the flexible rolled-up solar array system is a mechanism to deploy, retract, and store the flexible solar-cell arrays. The selection of components, the design of the mechanism assembly, and the tests that were performed are discussed. During 6 months in orbit, all mission objectives were satisfied, and inflight performance has shown good correlation with preflight analyses and tests.

  2. Conformal Impulse Receive Antenna Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    equations then becomes the integro - differential equation )26()()(’)’()’( 1 ’)’()’( 0 2 02 0 2...air-dielectric interface and backed by a perfectly conducting plane. We obtained an integro - differential equation for the surface current density on...multi-element array requires that we solve a certain integro - differential equation for the surface current density on the array. This equation

  3. Advanced photovoltaic solar array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurland, Richard M.; Stella, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Phase 2 of the Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array (APSA) program, started in mid-1987, is currently in progress to fabricate prototype wing hardware that will lead to wing integration and testing in 1989. The design configuration and key details are reviewed. A status of prototype hardware fabricated to date is provided. Results from key component-level tests are discussed. Revised estimates of array-level performance as a function of solar cell device technology for geosynchronous missions are given.

  4. Matrix computations on mesh arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the systematic derivation of mesh arrays for matrix computations, in particular realizing the algorithm-specific arrays and mapping algorithms onto class-specific arrays. A data-dependency graph-based transformational method is proposed in a design frame work consisting of two stages, namely algorithm regularization and derivation of arrays. The first stage derives the fully-parallel data-dependency graph (FPG) of an algorithm and transforms this graph into a three-dimensional one with unidirectional nearest-neighbor dependencies (a multi-mesh graph MMG). The second stage transforms the MMG into a two-dimensional G-graph, which is realized as an algorithm-specific array or mapped onto a class-specific array. This stage allows the incorporation of implementation restrictions and the evaluation of tradeoffs in properties of cells, as well as the derivation of arrays for fixed-size data and partitioned problems, while performing optimization of specific performance/cost measures. The proposed method is formalized by presenting a sufficient set of transformations and demonstrating the equivalence of graphs obtained from those transformations. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the MMG representation is always possible, due to the characteristics of the operators. The method has been applied to a collection of matrix algorithms, including matrix multiplication, convolution, matrix decompositions, transitive closure, the Faddeev algorithm, and BBA{sup {minus}1}. The examples show that, in addition to the features listed earlier, this method is easy to apply. Moreover, the method is compared with other techniques, concluding that it is advantageous because it meets evaluation criteria and produces more efficient arrays.

  5. Conformal microstrip arrays on cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazy, J.; Shtrikman, S.; Treves, D.

    1988-04-01

    Design and measured results for two X-band conformal microstrip arrays are presented. The two 4 x 4 arrays are built on the surface of a cylinder of small radius. They differ by the orientation of small radius. They differ by the orientation of the elements relative to the cylinder axis. The measured directivities and radiation patterns are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions.

  6. Dynamically Reconfigurable Systolic Array Accelorators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasu, Aravind (Inventor); Barnes, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A polymorphic systolic array framework that works in conjunction with an embedded microprocessor on an FPGA, that allows for dynamic and complimentary scaling of acceleration levels of two algorithms active concurrently on the FPGA. Use is made of systolic arrays and hardware-software co-design to obtain an efficient multi-application acceleration system. The flexible and simple framework allows hosting of a broader range of algorithms and extendable to more complex applications in the area of aerospace embedded systems.

  7. Sensor arrays for detecting microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A sensor array for detecting a microorganism comprising first and second sensors electrically connected to an electrical measuring apparatus, wherein the sensors comprise a region of nonconducting organic material and a region of conducting material compositionally that is different than the nonconducting organic material and an electrical path through the regions of nonconducting organic material and the conducting material. A system for identifying microorganisms using the sensor array, a computer and a pattern recognition algorithm, such as a neural net are also disclosed.

  8. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royal, G. C., III

    1981-01-01

    Sixteen conceptual designs of residential photovoltaic arrays are described. Each design concept was evaluated by an industry advisory panel using a comprehensive set of technical, economic and institutional criteria. Key electrical and mechanical concerns that effect further array subsystem development are also discussed. Three integrated array design concepts were selected by the advisory panel for further optimization and development. From these concepts a single one will be selected for detailed analysis and prototype fabrication. The three concepts selected are: (1) An array of frameless panels/modules sealed in a T shaped zipper locking neoprene gasket grid pressure fitted into an extruded aluminum channel grid fastened across the rafters. (2) An array of frameless modules pressure fitted in a series of zipper locking EPDM rubber extrusions adhesively bonded to the roof. Series string voltage is developed using a set of integral tongue connectors and positioning blocks. (3) An array of frameless modules sealed by a silicone adhesive in a prefabricated grid of rigid tape and sheet metal attached to the roof.

  9. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, G. C., III

    1981-04-01

    Sixteen conceptual designs of residential photovoltaic arrays are described. Each design concept was evaluated by an industry advisory panel using a comprehensive set of technical, economic and institutional criteria. Key electrical and mechanical concerns that effect further array subsystem development are also discussed. Three integrated array design concepts were selected by the advisory panel for further optimization and development. From these concepts a single one will be selected for detailed analysis and prototype fabrication. The three concepts selected are: (1) An array of frameless panels/modules sealed in a T shaped zipper locking neoprene gasket grid pressure fitted into an extruded aluminum channel grid fastened across the rafters. (2) An array of frameless modules pressure fitted in a series of zipper locking EPDM rubber extrusions adhesively bonded to the roof. Series string voltage is developed using a set of integral tongue connectors and positioning blocks. (3) An array of frameless modules sealed by a silicone adhesive in a prefabricated grid of rigid tape and sheet metal attached to the roof.

  10. Solar maximum: Solar array degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T.

    1985-01-01

    The 5-year in-orbit power degradation of the silicon solar array aboard the Solar Maximum Satellite was evaluated. This was the first spacecraft to use Teflon R FEP as a coverglass adhesive, thus avoiding the necessity of an ultraviolet filter. The peak power tracking mode of the power regulator unit was employed to ensure consistent maximum power comparisons. Telemetry was normalized to account for the effects of illumination intensity, charged particle irradiation dosage, and solar array temperature. Reference conditions of 1.0 solar constant at air mass zero and 301 K (28 C) were used as a basis for normalization. Beginning-of-life array power was 2230 watts. Currently, the array output is 1830 watts. This corresponds to a 16 percent loss in array performance over 5 years. Comparison of Solar Maximum Telemetry and predicted power levels indicate that array output is 2 percent less than predictions based on an annual 1.0 MeV equivalent election fluence of 2.34 x ten to the 13th power square centimeters space environment.

  11. Array imaging system for lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, Raoul; Mueller, Kevin; Malaurie, Pauline; Vogler, Uwe; Noell, Wilfried; Scharf, Toralf; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    We present an integrated array imaging system based on a stack of microlens arrays. The microlens arrays are manufactured by melting resist and reactive ion etching (RIE) technology on 8'' wafers (fused silica) and mounted by wafer-level packaging (WLP)1. The array imaging system is configured for 1X projection (magnification m = +1) of a mask pattern onto a planar wafer. The optical system is based on two symmetric telescopes, thus anti-symmetric wavefront aberrations like coma, distortion, lateral color are minimal. Spherical aberrations are reduced by using microlenses with aspherical lens profiles. In our system design approach, sub-images of individual imaging channels do not overlap to avoid interference. Image superposition is achieved by moving the array imaging system during the exposure time. A tandem Koehler integrator illumination system (MO Exposure Optics) is used for illumination. The angular spectrum of the illumination light underfills the pupils of the imaging channels to avoid crosstalk. We present and discuss results from simulation, mounting and testing of a first prototype of the investigated array imaging system for lithography.

  12. Scan-independent slot arrays with parasitic wire arrays in stratified medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Kwong T.; Munk, Benedikt A.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a parasitic wire array on the scan admittance of a slot array has been investigated. Structures considered can consist of an infinite slot array and an arbitrary number of parasitic infinte arrays of piecewise linear wires, all arrays being embedded in a stratified medium. These include, as particular cases, phased arrays of Clavin elements. Expressing the fields from the arrays as plane waves, a procedure similar to the periodic moment method for infinite periodic structures is set up to obtain the the scan admittance of the slot array. Scan admittances are presented for a slot array with monopole arrays in free space, and a slot array with a tilted dipole array in a stratified medium. Blind spots at which the incident energy is mainly reflected rather than transmitted were found. Results obtained indicate the possibility of using parasitic wire arrays for scan compensation of active slot arrays.

  13. Design of diffractive microlens array integration with focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sihai; Yi, Xinjian; Li, Yi; He, Miao; Chen, Sixiang; Kong, Lingbin

    2000-10-01

    The IR spectrum from 3 to 5micrometers has numerous applications in both military and civil industries. High performance at high operating temperature is often important in these applications. Conventional Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) without integration with concentrator such as microlens have poor sensitivity and low signal-to-noise ratio because of their lower fill factor. The binary optics microlens arrays reported in this paper are designed for integration with FPAs. Thus, the FPAs' fill factor, sensitivity, and signal- to-noise ratio can be improved while retaining a given image resolution and optical collection area. In the paper, we discussed the 256(Horizontal)x290(Vertical) microlens arrays designed for a center wavelength of 4micrometers , with 50micrometers (Horizontalx33micrometers (Vertical) quadrate pixel dimension and a speed (F number) of F/1.96. PtSi FPAs were fabricated on the front side of a 400-micrometers -thick Si substrate. The designed diffractive microlens arrays will be etched on the back side of the same wafer in a register fashion and it will be reported in other paper. Considering the diffraction efficiency, 8-phase-level approximation is enough. For the diffraction efficiency of 8-phase-level diffractive microlens reaches 95%. The process only need three mask-level, so we designed and fabricated three masks with the same dimension 4'x4'. Also, a set of fine verniers was designed and fabricated on each mask to allow accurate alignment during the fabrication process. Through a computer simulation, the microlens arrays are nearly diffraction limited, with the diffraction efficiency of 93%, a bit lower than the theoretical value of 95%. Introduction of microlens arrays has the ability to increase the FPAs' fill factor to 100%, while it is only about 21.6% without microlens. To our knowledge, this is the first trial of integration large area microlens arrays with FPAs at home.

  14. Genomewide scan for loss of heterozygosity and chromosomal amplification in breast carcinoma using single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays.

    PubMed

    Argos, Maria; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Jasmine, Farzana; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Su, Tao; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Ahsan, Habibul

    2008-04-15

    In an effort to identify novel genes implicated in breast carcinogenesis, a genomewide scan for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and copy number changes in paired-DNA samples extracted from normal and tumor tissue of frozen sections from women undergoing surgery for invasive breast cancer was conducted. The Affymetrix 10K SNP array was used to examine genomewide LOH of chromosomal regions. The number of LOH events, number of informative loci, percent heterozygosity, and percent fractional allelic loss (%FAL) were calculated. Although LOH events were detected in all samples, the proportion of LOH ranged from 0.1 to 57.2%. Elevated LOH events were detected in two samples, with a %FAL of 57.2 and 56.2. Chromosomal regions exceeding a threshold value for a P-value curve based on multiple-testing adjusted permutation methods were identified as significant regions of shared LOH across samples. Regions with significant LOH included 2p25.3; 2p21; 2p15 approximately p16.1, 2q23.3; and, 16q12.1. Chromosomal region 1q32.1 was identified as a region with significant copy number amplification. Regions of LOH and copy number changes identified from this analysis may provide insights into the underlying processes of and genes involved in breast carcinogenesis. The present study demonstrates a feasible methodological approach for the assessment of LOH and copy number changes.

  15. Global changes in expression of grapefruit peel tissue in response to the yeast biocontrol agent, Metschnikowia fructicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes taking place in citrus fruit tissue following the application of the yeast biocontrol agent, Metschnikowia fructicola, microarray analysis was performed on grapefruit surface wounds using an Affymetrix Citrus GeneChip. Using a cut off of p<0.0...

  16. Surveying expression level polymorphism and single-feature polymorphism in near-isogenic wheat lines differing for the Yr5 stripe rust resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA polymorphisms are valuable for several applications including genotyping, molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection. The Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip was used to survey expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) and single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) between two near-isogenic wheat genotypes (BC7...

  17. Surveying expression level polymorphism and single-feature polymorphism in near-isogenic wheat lines differing for the Yr5 stripe rust resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA polymorphisms are valuable for several applications including genotyping, molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection. The Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip was used to survey expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) and single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) between two near-isogenic wheat genotypes (BC...

  18. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiate between O3 and herbicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using published data based on Affymetrix ATH1 Gene-Chips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia to O3 and a few other major environmental stresses including oxidative stress . A set of 101 markers could be extracted which provided a compo...

  19. Characterizing the porcine transcriptional regulatory response to infection by Salmonella: identifying putative new NFkB direct targets through comparative bioinformatics.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have collected data on host response to infection from RNA prepared from mesenteric lymph node of swine infected with either Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) or S. Choleraesuis (SC) using the porcine Affymetrix GeneChip. We identified 848 (ST) and 1,853 (SC) genes with statistical evi...

  20. Computational Integration of Structural and Functional Genomics Data Across Species to Develop Information on Porcine Inflammatory Gene Regulatory Pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative integration of structural and functional genomic data across species holds great promise in finding genes controlling disease resistance. We are investigating the porcine gut immune response to infection through gene expression profiling. We have collected porcine Affymetrix GeneChip da...

  1. Biomimetic control for DEA arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin; Gisby, Todd; Xie, Sheng Q.; Calius, Emilio; Anderson, Iain

    2010-04-01

    Arrays of actuators are ubiquitous in nature for manipulation, pumping and propulsion. Often these arrays are coordinated in a multi-level fashion with distributed sensing and feedback manipulated by higher level controllers. In this paper we present a biologically inspired multi-level control strategy and apply it to control an array of Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA). A test array was designed consisting of three DEA arranged to tilt a set of rails on which a ball rolls. At the local level the DEA were controlled using capacitive self-sensing state machines that switched the actuator off and on when capacitive thresholds were exceeded, resulting in the steady rolling of the ball around the rails. By varying the voltage of the actuators in the on state, it was possible to control the speed of the ball to match a set point. A simple integral derivative controller was used to do this and an observer law was formulated to track the speed of the ball. The array demonstrated the ability to self start, roll the ball in either direction, and run at a range of speeds determined by the maximum applied voltage. The integral derivative controller successfully tracked a square wave set point. Whilst the test application could have been controlled with a classic centralised controller, the real benefit of the multi-level strategy becomes apparent when applied to larger arrays and biomimetic applications that are ideal for DEA. Three such applications are discussed; a robotic heart, a peristaltic pump and a ctenophore inspired propulsion array.

  2. Probe Array Correction With Strong Target Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    loads. We provide a probe array compensation theory based on the Lorentz reciprocity theorem giving the open circuit probe array voltages... circuit probe array voltages in terms of (1) the required surface integral involving the near fields scattered by the target and the near fields radiated...cancel the array currents during near field measurements, errors in the open circuit voltages can be large for array elements that are close to the

  3. Modeling of phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rais; Kundu, Tribikram; Placko, Dominique

    2005-04-01

    Phased array transducers are multi-element transducers, where different elements are activated with different time delays. The advantage of these transducers is that no mechanical movement of the transducer is needed to scan an object. Focusing and beam steering is obtained simply by adjusting the time delay. In this paper the DPSM (distributed point source method) is used to model the ultrasonic field generated by a phased array transducer and to study the interaction effect when two phased array transducers are placed in a homogeneous fluid. Earlier investigations modeled the acoustic field for conventional transducers where all transducer points are excited simultaneously. In this research, combining the concepts of delayed firing and the DPSM, the phased array transducers are modeled semi-analytically. In addition to the single transducer modeling the ultrasonic fields from two phased array transducers placed face to face in a fluid medium is also modeled to study the interaction effect. The importance of considering the interaction effect in multiple transducer modeling is discussed, pointing out that neighboring transducers not only act as ultrasonic wave generators but also as scatterers.

  4. Retrieval of Mir Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1999-01-01

    A Russian solar array panel removed in November 1997 from the non-articulating photovoltaic array on the Mir core module was returned to Earth on STS-89 in January 1998. The panel had been exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) for 10 years prior to retrieval. The retrieval provided a unique opportunity to study the effects of the LEO environment on a functional solar array. To take advantage of this opportunity, a team composed of members from RSC-Energia (Russia), the Boeing Company, and the following NASA Centers--Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center--was put together to analyze the array. After post-retrieval inspections at the Spacehab Facility at Kennedy in Florida, the array was shipped to Lewis in Cleveland for electrical performance tests, closeup photodocumentation, and removal of selected solar cells and blanket material. With approval from RSC-Energia, five cell pairs and their accompanying blanket and mesh material, and samples of painted handrail materials were selected for removal on the basis of their ability to provide degradation information. Sites were selected that provided different sizes and shapes of micrometeoroid impacts and different levels of surface contamination. These materials were then distributed among the team for round robin testing.

  5. Integrated Array/Metadata Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misev, Dimitar; Baumann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Data comes in various forms and types, and integration usually presents a problem that is often simply ignored and solved with ad-hoc solutions. Multidimensional arrays are an ubiquitous data type, that we find at the core of virtually all science and engineering domains, as sensor, model, image, statistics data. Naturally, arrays are richly described by and intertwined with additional metadata (alphanumeric relational data, XML, JSON, etc). Database systems, however, a fundamental building block of what we call "Big Data", lack adequate support for modelling and expressing these array data/metadata relationships. Array analytics is hence quite primitive or non-existent at all in modern relational DBMS. Recognizing this, we extended SQL with a new SQL/MDA part seamlessly integrating multidimensional array analytics into the standard database query language. We demonstrate the benefits of SQL/MDA with real-world examples executed in ASQLDB, an open-source mediator system based on HSQLDB and rasdaman, that already implements SQL/MDA.

  6. Contact Printing of Arrayed Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Luikart, Alicia M.; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    A novel contact printing method utilizing a sacrificial layer of polyacrylic acid (PAA) was developed to selectively modify the upper surfaces of arrayed microstructures. The method was characterized by printing polystyrene onto SU-8 microstructures to create an improved substrate for a cell-based microarray platform. Experiments measuring cell growth SU-8 arrays modified with polystyrene and fibronectin demonstrated improved growth of NIH 3T3 (93% vs. 38%), HeLa (97% vs. 77%), and HT1080 (76% vs. 20%) cells relative to that for the previously used coating method. In addition, use of the PAA sacrificial layer permitted the printing of functionalized polystyrene, carboxylate polystyrene nanospheres, and silica nanospheres onto the arrays in a facile manner. Finally, a high concentration of extracellular matrix materials (ECM), such as collagen (5 mg/mL) and gelatin (0.1%), was contact printed onto the array structures using as little as 5 μL of the ECM reagent and without the formation of a continuous film bridge across the microstructures. Murine embryonic stem cells cultured on arrays printed with this gelatin-hydrogel remained in an undifferentiated state indicating an adequate surface gelatin layer to maintain these cells over time. PMID:20425106

  7. Identification of a submicroscopic 3.2 Mb chromosomal 16q12.2-13 deletion in a child with short stature, mild developmental delay, and craniofacial anomalies, by high-density oligonucleotide array-a recognizable syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Fen; Li, Ling-Hui; Wang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chen, Tsai-Chuan; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui

    2010-09-01

    Interstitial deletion of 16q has emerged into a recognizable pattern of congenital malformation. We report on a 9-year-old boy with short stature, psychomotor retardation, high forehead, broad flat nasal bridge, hypertelorism, cup-shaped ears, short neck, and a normal karyotype. Using high-density oligonucleotide array chip (Affymetrix 6.0) to perform parental and proband samples concurrently on three chips and interpreted as a trio set, a de novo 3.2 Mb deletion from bands q12.2 to q13 on chromosome 16 (from 52.08 to 55.3 Mb) of paternal origin was identified. The deletion was confirmed by quantitative genomic PCR and the break points were defined by junction PCR. Our study demonstrated the power of high-density oligonucleotide array chip in identifying novel submicroscopic deletions that were not detectable using G-banding cytogenetic technology. Furthermore, our result narrowed down the critical region for craniofacial features in interstitial 16q11.2-q13 deletion syndrome. In patients who have high forehead, broad flat nasal bridge, hypertelorism, cup-shaped ears, short neck and short stature, high-density array should be included in initial work up.

  8. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  9. Distributed phased array architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Variations in amplifiers and phase shifters can cause degraded antenna performance, depending also on the environmental conditions and antenna array architecture. The implementation of distributed phased array hardware was studied with the aid of the DISTAR computer program as a simulation tool. This simulation provides guidance in hardware simulation. Both hard and soft failures of the amplifiers in the T/R modules are modeled. Hard failures are catastrophic: no power is transmitted to the antenna elements. Noncatastrophic or soft failures are modeled as a modified Gaussian distribution. The resulting amplitude characteristics then determine the array excitation coefficients. The phase characteristics take on a uniform distribution. Pattern characteristics such as antenna gain, half power beamwidth, mainbeam phase errors, sidelobe levels, and beam pointing errors were studied as functions of amplifier and phase shifter variations. General specifications for amplifier and phase shifter tolerances in various architecture configurations for C band and S band were determined.

  10. Optical phased-array ladar.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Juan; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Hatch, Robert; Payson, Harold

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate a ladar with 0.5 m class range resolution obtained by integrating a continuous-wave optical phased-array transmitter with a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode receiver array. In contrast with conventional ladar systems, an array of continuous-wave sources is used to effectively pulse illuminate a target by electro-optically steering far-field fringes. From the reference frame of a point in the far field, a steered fringe appears as a pulse. Range information is thus obtained by measuring the arrival time of a pulse return from a target to a receiver pixel. This ladar system offers a number of benefits, including broad spectral coverage, high efficiency, small size, power scalability, and versatility.

  11. An Integrated ISFET Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    A monolithically integrated ISFET sensor array and interface circuit are described. A new high-density, low-power source-drain follower was developed for the sensor array. ISFETs were formed by depositing Au/Ti extended-gate electrodes on standard MOSFETs, then thin silicon nitride layers using catalytic chemical vapor deposition and/or SU-8 protective layers were formed on the extended-gate electrodes. Applications for the array include: (1) pH detection by statistical distribution observing time and space fluctuations; (2) DNA detection using thiol-modified or silane-coupled oligonucleotides; (3) bio-image sensing by converting photons to electrons using Photosystem I of Thermosynechococcus elongatus, and sensing the converted electric charges by ISFETs. PMID:22291539

  12. Thin, Flexible IMM Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walmsley, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    NASA needs solar arrays that are thin, flexible, and highly efficient; package compactly for launch; and deploy into large, structurally stable high-power generators. Inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) solar cells can enable these arrays, but integration of this thin crystalline cell technology presents certain challenges. The Thin Hybrid Interconnected Solar Array (THINS) technology allows robust and reliable integration of IMM cells into a flexible blanket comprising standardized modules engineered for easy production. The modules support the IMM cell by using multifunctional materials for structural stability, shielding, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) stress relief, and integrated thermal and electrical functions. The design approach includes total encapsulation, which benefits high voltage as well as electrostatic performance.

  13. High voltage solar array experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennerud, K. L.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction between the components of a high voltage solar array and a simulated space plasma is studied to obtain data for the design of a high voltage solar array capable of 15kW at 2 to 16kV. Testing was conducted in a vacuum chamber 1.5-m long by 1.5-m diameter having a plasma source which simulated the plasma conditions existing in earth orbit between 400 nautical miles and synchronous altitude. Test samples included solar array segments pinholes in insulation covering high voltage electrodes, and plain dielectric samples. Quantitative data are presented in the areas of plasma power losses, plasma and high voltage induced damage, and dielectric properties. Limitations of the investigation are described.

  14. EHF multifunction phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1986-07-01

    The design of a low cost demonstration EHF multifunction-phased array antenna is described. Both, the radiating elements and the phase-shifter circuits are realized on microstrip substrate material in order to allow photolithographic batch fabrication. Self-encapsulated beam-lead PIN-diodes are employed as the electronic switch elements to avoid expensive hermetic encapsulation of the semiconductors or complete circuits. A space-feed using a horn-radiator to illuminate the array from the front-side is found to be the simplest and most inexpensive feed. The phased array antenna thus operates as a reflect-array, the antenna elements employed in a dual role for the collection of energy from the feed-horn and for the re-radiation of the phase-shifted waves (in transmit-mode). The antenna is divided into modules containing the radiator/phase-shifter plate plus drive- and BITE-circuitry at the back. Both drive- and BITE-components use gate-array integrated circuits especially designed for the purpose. Several bus-systems are used to supply bias and logical data flows to the modules. The beam-steering unit utilizes several signal processors and high-speed discrete adder circuits to combine the pointing, frequency and beam-shape information from the radar system computer with the stored phase-shift codes for the array elements. Since space, weight and power consumption are prime considerations only the most advanced technology is used in the design of both the microwave and the digital/drive circuitry.

  15. Versatile Flexible Graphene Multielectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kireev, Dmitry; Seyock, Silke; Ernst, Mathis; Maybeck, Vanessa; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a promising material possessing features relevant to bioelectronics applications. Graphene microelectrodes (GMEAs), which are fabricated in a dense array on a flexible polyimide substrate, were investigated in this work for their performance via electrical impedance spectroscopy. Biocompatibility and suitability of the GMEAs for extracellular recordings were tested by measuring electrical activities from acute heart tissue and cardiac muscle cells. The recordings show encouraging signal-to-noise ratios of 65 ± 15 for heart tissue recordings and 20 ± 10 for HL-1 cells. Considering the low noise and excellent robustness of the devices, the sensor arrays are suitable for diverse and biologically relevant applications. PMID:28025564

  16. Versatile Flexible Graphene Multielectrode Arrays.

    PubMed

    Kireev, Dmitry; Seyock, Silke; Ernst, Mathis; Maybeck, Vanessa; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-12-23

    Graphene is a promising material possessing features relevant to bioelectronics applications. Graphene microelectrodes (GMEAs), which are fabricated in a dense array on a flexible polyimide substrate, were investigated in this work for their performance via electrical impedance spectroscopy. Biocompatibility and suitability of the GMEAs for extracellular recordings were tested by measuring electrical activities from acute heart tissue and cardiac muscle cells. The recordings show encouraging signal-to-noise ratios of 65 ± 15 for heart tissue recordings and 20 ± 10 for HL-1 cells. Considering the low noise and excellent robustness of the devices, the sensor arrays are suitable for diverse and biologically relevant applications.

  17. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The design details of an optimized integrated residential photovoltaic module/array are presented. This selected design features a waterproofing and mounting scheme which was devised to simplify the installation procedures by the avoidance of complex gasketed or caulked joints, while still maintaining a high confidence that the watertight integrity of the integral roofing surface will be achieved for the design lifetime of the system. The production and installation costs for the selected module/array design are reported for a range of annual production rates as a function of the cost of solar cells.

  18. Hybrid Arrays for Chemical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Kirsten E.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Johnson, Kevin J.; Minor, Christian P.

    In recent years, multisensory approaches to environment monitoring for chemical detection as well as other forms of situational awareness have become increasingly popular. A hybrid sensor is a multimodal system that incorporates several sensing elements and thus produces data that are multivariate in nature and may be significantly increased in complexity compared to data provided by single-sensor systems. Though a hybrid sensor is itself an array, hybrid sensors are often organized into more complex sensing systems through an assortment of network topologies. Part of the reason for the shift to hybrid sensors is due to advancements in sensor technology and computational power available for processing larger amounts of data. There is also ample evidence to support the claim that a multivariate analytical approach is generally superior to univariate measurements because it provides additional redundant and complementary information (Hall, D. L.; Linas, J., Eds., Handbook of Multisensor Data Fusion, CRC, Boca Raton, FL, 2001). However, the benefits of a multisensory approach are not automatically achieved. Interpretation of data from hybrid arrays of sensors requires the analyst to develop an application-specific methodology to optimally fuse the disparate sources of data generated by the hybrid array into useful information characterizing the sample or environment being observed. Consequently, multivariate data analysis techniques such as those employed in the field of chemometrics have become more important in analyzing sensor array data. Depending on the nature of the acquired data, a number of chemometric algorithms may prove useful in the analysis and interpretation of data from hybrid sensor arrays. It is important to note, however, that the challenges posed by the analysis of hybrid sensor array data are not unique to the field of chemical sensing. Applications in electrical and process engineering, remote sensing, medicine, and of course, artificial

  19. Speckle imaging from an array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riker, Jim F.; Tyler, Glenn A.; Vaughn, Jeff L.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present two analytic theories developed recently to predict the performance of an imaging system composed of a phased array illuminator and a set of receiver subapertures. The receiver need not coincide with the transmitter. The two theories have been documented separately (ref. 1, 2), and the reader can find more details there - the theories present the analytic phased array irradiance on target in the presence of piston errors, and the resulting speckle pattern-induced imaging noise. The principal results presented here are the Signal to Noise Ratios (SNR) for both the radiometric portion of the problem and the speckle imaging portion of the problem.

  20. Mosaic of coded aperture arrays

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, Edward E.; Cannon, Thomas M.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a mosaic of coded aperture arrays which is capable of imaging off-axis sources with minimum detector size. Mosaics of the basic array pattern create a circular on periodic correlation of the object on a section of the picture plane. This section consists of elements of the central basic pattern as well as elements from neighboring patterns and is a cyclic version of the basic pattern. Since all object points contribute a complete cyclic version of the basic pattern, a section of the picture, which is the size of the basic aperture pattern, contains all the information necessary to image the object with no artifacts.

  1. Airborne electronically steerable phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of the second stage of a program for the design and development of a phased array capable of simultaneous and separate transmission and reception of radio frequency signals at S-band frequencies. The design goals of this stage were the development of three major areas of interest required for the final prototype model. These areas are the construction and testing of the low-weight, full-scale 128-element array of antenna elements, the development of the RF manifold feed system, and the construction and testing of a working module containing diplexer and transmit and receive circuits.

  2. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The Automated Array Assembly Task, Phase 2 of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project is a process development task. The contract provides for the fabrication of modules from large area tandem junction cells (TJC). During this quarter, effort was focused on the design of a large area, approximately 36 sq cm, TJC and process verification runs. The large area TJC design was optimized for minimum I squared R power losses. In the TJM activity, the cell-module interfaces were defined, module substrates were formed and heat treated and clad metal interconnect strips were fabricated.

  3. Bayesian Gaussian Mixture Models for High-Density Genotyping Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sabatti, Chiara; Lange, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Affymetrix's SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) genotyping chips have increased the scope and decreased the cost of gene-mapping studies. Because each SNP is queried by multiple DNA probes, the chips present interesting challenges in genotype calling. Traditional clustering methods distinguish the three genotypes of an SNP fairly well given a large enough sample of unrelated individuals or a training sample of known genotypes. This article describes our attempt to improve genotype calling by constructing Gaussian mixture models with empirically derived priors. The priors stabilize parameter estimation and borrow information collectively gathered on tens of thousands of SNPs. When data from related family members are available, our models capture the correlations in signals between relatives. With these advantages in mind, we apply the models to Affymetrix probe intensity data on 10,000 SNPs gathered on 63 genotyped individuals spread over eight pedigrees. We integrate the genotype-calling model with pedigree analysis and examine a sequence of symmetry hypotheses involving the correlated probe signals. The symmetry hypotheses raise novel mathematical issues of parameterization. Using the Bayesian information criterion, we select the best combination of symmetry assumptions. Compared to Affymetrix's software, our model leads to a reduction in no-calls with little sacrifice in overall calling accuracy. PMID:21572926

  4. Design and fabrication of microstrip antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A microstrip array project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of designing and fabricating simple, low cost, low sidelobe phased arrays with circular disk microstrip radiating elements. Design data were presented for microstrip elements and arrays including the effects of the protective covers, the mutual interaction between elements, and stripline feed network design. Low cost multilayer laminate fabrication techniques were also investigated. Utilizing this design data two C-band low sidelobe arrays were fabricated and tested: an eight-element linear and a sixty-four element planar array. These arrays incorporated stripline Butler matrix feed networks to produce a low sidelobe broadside beam.

  5. GRIFFIN's Fast-Timing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaizola, Bruno; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) is the new β-decay spectrometer facility at TRIUMF-ISAC. Consists of an array of 16 large-volume HPGe clover detectors with an unparalleled efficiency of 19% at 1.33 MeV. Its strongest advantage is the versatility of the ancillary detectors that can be coupled to the main array to tag on β particles, neutrons or precisely measure conversion electron spectra. An ancillary array of 8 LaBr3(Ce) detectors for γ-rays and a fast plastic scintillator for β-particles has been optimized for fast-timing experiments with GRIFFIN. The 51 mm x 51 mm cylindrical LaBr3(Ce) crystals are coupled to Hamamatsu R2083 photomultipliers. Timing resolutions as good as FWHM 200 ps and time-walks below +/- 30 ps have been obtained for individual crystals using analog electronics. There is also an ongoing project to develop an active BGO shield for the LaBr3(Ce) crystals. The LaBr3(Ce) array commissioning experiment to measure the 145,146Cs decay to 145,146Ba will test its capabilities over a wide range of lifetimes. Preliminary results on the lifetimes of some of the low-laying states will be presented.

  6. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on space shuttle flight STS-31D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  7. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures' dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on space shuttle flight STS-41D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  8. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, Richard W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on Space Shuttle flight STS-31D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  9. TANGO Array.. 1. The instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauleo, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Filevich, A.; Reguera, A.

    2004-01-01

    TANGO Array is an air shower experiment which has been constructed in Buenos Aires, Argentina. It was commissioned during the year 2000 becoming fully operational in September, 2000. The array consists of four water Cherenkov detectors enclosing a geometrical area of ˜30,000 m2 and its design has been optimized for the observation of Extended Air Showers produced by cosmic rays near the "knee" energy region ˜4×10 15 eV. Three of the detectors have been constructed using 12,000-l stainless-steel tanks, and the fourth has been mounted in a smaller, 400-l plastic container. The detectors are connected by cables to the data acquisition room, where a very simple system, which takes advantage of the features of a four-channel digital oscilloscope, was set for data collection. This data collection setup allows a fully automatic experiment control which does not require operator intervention. It includes monitoring, data logging, and daily calibration of all detectors. This paper describes the detectors and their associated electronics, and details are given on the data acquisition system, the triggering and calibration procedures, and the operation of the array. Examples of air shower traces, recorded by the array, are presented.

  10. Detector Arrays For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Paper describes status of program for developing integrated infrared detectors for astronomy. Program covers variety of detectors, including extrinsic silicon, extrinsic germanium, and indium antimonide devices with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Paper notes for arrays to reach background noise limit in cryogenic telescope, continued reductions in readout noise and dark current needed.

  11. Bubble Transport through Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kenneth; Savas, Omer

    2012-11-01

    In current energy research, artificial photosynthetic devices are being designed to split water and harvest hydrogen gas using energy from the sun. In one such design, hydrogen gas bubbles evolve on the catalytic surfaces of arrayed micropillars. If these bubbles are not promptly removed from the surface, they can adversely affect gas evolution rates, water flow rates, sunlight capture, and heat management of the system. Therefore, an efficient method of collecting the evolved gas bubbles is crucial. Preliminary flow visualization has been conducted of bubbles advecting through dense arrays of pillars. Bubbles moving through square and hexagonal arrays are tracked, and the results are qualitatively described. Initial attempts to correlate bubble motion with relevant lengthscales and forces are also presented. These observations suggest how bubble transport within such pillar arrays can be managed, as well as guide subsequent experiments that investigate bubble evolution and collection. This material is based upon work performed by the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, supported through the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award Number DE-SC0004993.

  12. The Murchison Widefield Array Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, S. M.; Crosse, B.; Emrich, D.; Pallot, D.; Wayth, R. B.; Clark, M. A.; Tremblay, S. E.; Arcus, W.; Barnes, D.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Bunton, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; deSouza, L.; Ewell-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Herne, D.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jacobs, D.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kincaid, B. B.; Koenig, R.; Kratzenberg, E.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Remillard, R. A.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Salah, J. E.; Sault, R. J.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Stevens, J.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-03-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array is a Square Kilometre Array Precursor. The telescope is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia. The MWA consists of 4 096 dipoles arranged into 128 dual polarisation aperture arrays forming a connected element interferometer that cross-correlates signals from all 256 inputs. A hybrid approach to the correlation task is employed, with some processing stages being performed by bespoke hardware, based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays, and others by Graphics Processing Units housed in general purpose rack mounted servers. The correlation capability required is approximately 8 tera floating point operations per second. The MWA has commenced operations and the correlator is generating 8.3 TB day-1 of correlation products, that are subsequently transferred 700 km from the MRO to Perth (WA) in real-time for storage and offline processing. In this paper, we outline the correlator design, signal path, and processing elements and present the data format for the internal and external interfaces.

  13. Low cost silicon solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, J. V.; Cleland, J. W.; Westbrook, R. D.; Davis, H. L.; Wood, R. F.; Lindmayer, J.; Wakefield, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The economic production of silicon solar cell arrays circumvents p-n junction degradation by nuclear doping, in which the Si-30 transmutes to P-31 after thermal neutron capture. Also considered are chemical purity specifications for improved silicon bulk states, surface induced states, and surface states.

  14. Miniaturization techniques benefit conformal arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, C. A.; Martin, D. J.; Moldovan, N.

    1984-03-01

    Crucial design tools for lightweight conformal arrays include low-loss, lightweight microstrip elements and substrates, the optimization of fabrication methods, and the design of the radome. It is noted that all these have demonstrated their effectiveness in the design of an S-band receive array. This new receive array comprises the radiation aperture, substrate, feed, and bonding skins. A circular microstrip patch is chosen as the lightweight radiation element owing to its small size and well-known performance characteristics. It is noted that honeycomb materials with bonding skins have proven to be excellent substrates for these elements. A honeycomb substrate material made up of a uniform lattice of circular cells extruded from a polycarbonate thermoplastic resin forms the element, which typically weighs less than 4 oz. per square foot. This honeycomb possesses good RF properties and affords very high resistance to rain and hail impact without sacrificing electrical performance. The design of the array grid is optimized by considering the effects of grating lobes, sidelobes, and the expected scanning performance.

  15. Directivity of linear microstrip arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. P.

    1987-08-01

    An analytical expression for the directivity is derived for uniformly excited linear arrays of rectangular printed antennas. Each antenna is assumed to radiate as two identical slots with a spacing which depends on the dielectric substrate. The directivity is plotted against distance between printed elements for two dielectric substrates, PTFE and alumina.

  16. Array Technology for Terahertz Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, Theodore; Siles, Jose; Jung, Cecile; Gill, John; Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, Imran; Cooper, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Heterodyne terahertz (0.3 - 3THz) imaging systems are currently limited to single or a low number of pixels. Drastic improvements in imaging sensitivity and speed can be achieved by replacing single pixel systems with an array of detectors. This paper presents an array topology that is being developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory based on the micromachining of silicon. This technique fabricates the array's package and waveguide components by plasma etching of silicon, resulting in devices with precision surpassing that of current metal machining techniques. Using silicon increases the versatility of the packaging, enabling a variety of orientations of circuitry within the device which increases circuit density and design options. The design of a two-pixel transceiver utilizing a stacked architecture is presented that achieves a pixel spacing of 10mm. By only allowing coupling from the top and bottom of the package the design can readily be arrayed in two dimensions with a spacing of 10mm x 18mm.

  17. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  18. Adaptive arrays for satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, I. J.; Ksienski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The suppression of interfering signals in a satellite communication system was studied. Adaptive arrays are used to suppress interference at the reception site. It is required that the interference be suppressed to very low levels and a modified adaptive circuit is used which accomplishes the desired objective. Techniques for the modification of the transmit patterns to minimize interference with neighboring communication links are explored.

  19. Solar Array Passive LDEF Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A Marshall researcher examines a sample from the Solar Array Passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). LDEF, which flew in space, measured the number, severity, and effects of micrometeroid hits on various materials. The data will lead to improved spacecraft design in the future.

  20. Advanced Rainbow Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick; Shields, Virgil

    2003-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays of the rainbow type, equipped with light-concentrator and spectral-beam-splitter optics, have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop lightweight, high-efficiency solar electric power sources. This investigation has contributed to a revival of the concept of the rainbow photovoltaic array, which originated in the 1950s but proved unrealistic at that time because the selection of solar photovoltaic cells was too limited. Advances in the art of photovoltaic cells since that time have rendered the concept more realistic, thereby prompting the present development effort. A rainbow photovoltaic array comprises side-by-side strings of series-connected photovoltaic cells. The cells in each string have the same bandgap, which differs from the bandgaps of the other strings. Hence, each string operates most efficiently in a unique wavelength band determined by its bandgap. To obtain maximum energy-conversion efficiency and to minimize the size and weight of the array for a given sunlight input aperture, the sunlight incident on the aperture is concentrated, then spectrally dispersed onto the photovoltaic array plane, whereon each string of cells is positioned to intercept the light in its wavelength band of most efficient operation. The number of cells in each string is chosen so that the output potentials of all the strings are the same; this makes it possible to connect the strings together in parallel to maximize the output current of the array. According to the original rainbow photovoltaic concept, the concentrated sunlight was to be split into multiple beams by use of an array of dichroic filters designed so that each beam would contain light in one of the desired wavelength bands. The concept has since been modified to provide for dispersion of the spectrum by use of adjacent prisms. A proposal for an advanced version calls for a unitary concentrator/ spectral-beam-splitter optic in the form of a parabolic curved Fresnel-like prism

  1. Quantifying the structural integrity of nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Thöle, Florian; Xue, Longjian; HEß, Claudia; Hillebrand, Reinald; Gorb, Stanislav N; Steinhart, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Arrays of aligned nanorods oriented perpendicular to a support, which are accessible by top-down lithography or by means of shape-defining hard templates, have received increasing interest as sensor components, components for nanophotonics and nanoelectronics, substrates for tissue engineering, surfaces having specific adhesive or antiadhesive properties and as surfaces with customized wettability. Agglomeration of the nanorods deteriorates the performance of components based on nanorod arrays. A comprehensive body of literature deals with mechanical failure mechanisms of nanorods and design criteria for mechanically stable nanorod arrays. However, the structural integrity of nanorod arrays is commonly evaluated only visually and qualitatively. We use real-space analysis of microscopic images to quantify the fraction of condensed nanorods in nanorod arrays. We suggest the number of array elements apparent in the micrographs divided by the number of array elements a defect-free array would contain in the same area, referred to as integrity fraction, as a measure of structural array integrity. Reproducible procedures to determine the imaged number of array elements are introduced. Thus, quantitative comparisons of different nanorod arrays, or of one nanorod array at different stages of its use, are possible. Structural integrities of identical nanorod arrays differing only in the length of the nanorods are exemplarily analysed.

  2. High resolution SNP array genomic profiling of peripheral T cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified, identifies a subgroup with chromosomal aberrations affecting the REL locus.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sylvia; Gesk, Stefan; Scholtysik, René; Kreuz, Markus; Bug, Stefanie; Vater, Inga; Döring, Claudia; Cogliatti, Sergio; Parrens, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Kwiecinska, Anna; Porwit, Anna; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Hoefler, Gerald; Küppers, Ralf; Siebert, Reiner; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about genomic aberrations in peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL NOS). We studied 47 PTCL NOS by 250k GeneChip single nucleotide polymorphism arrays and detected genomic imbalances in 22 of the cases. Recurrent gains and losses were identified, including gains of chromosome regions 1q32-43, 2p15-16, 7, 8q24, 11q14-25, 17q11-21 and 21q11-21 (> or = 5 cases each) as well as losses of chromosome regions 1p35-36, 5q33, 6p22, 6q16, 6q21-22, 8p21-23, 9p21, 10p11-12, 10q11-22, 10q25-26, 13q14, 15q24, 16q22, 16q24, 17p11, 17p13 and Xp22 (> or = 4 cases each). Genomic imbalances affected several regions containing members of nuclear factor-kappaB signalling and genes involved in cell cycle control. Gains of 2p15-16 were confirmed in each of three cases analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and were associated with breakpoints at the REL locus in two of these cases. Three additional cases with gains of the REL locus were detected by FISH among 18 further PTCL NOS. Five of 27 PTCL NOS investigated showed nuclear expression of the REL protein by immunohistochemistry, partly associated with genomic gains of the REL locus. Therefore, in a subgroup of PTCL NOS gains/rearrangements of REL and expression of REL protein may be of pathogenetic relevance.

  3. Arrays of Bolometric Detectors for Submillimeter Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Moseley, S. H.; Freund, M.; Allen, C.; Harper, A.; Loewenstein, R.; Dowell, C. D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large format two dimensional arrays of bolometric detectors are required for many millimeter and submillimeter applications. We describe the development and testing of such arrays and the plans for using them in both a ground-based and airborne instrument.

  4. Breadboard linear array scan imager program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The performance was evaluated of large scale integration photodiode arrays in a linear array scan imaging system breadboard for application to multispectral remote sensing of the earth's resources. Objectives, approach, implementation, and test results of the program are presented.

  5. Photovoltaic array: Power conditioner interface characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Hill, G. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The electrical output (power, current, and voltage) of flat plate solar arrays changes constantly, due primarily to changes in cell temperature and irradiance level. As a result, array loads such as dc-to-ac power conditioners must be capable of accommodating widely varying input levels while maintaining operation at or near the maximum power point of the array. The array operating characteristics and extreme output limits necessary for the systematic design of array load interfaces under a wide variety of climatic conditions are studied. A number of interface parameters are examined, including optimum operating voltage, voltage energy, maximum power and current limits, and maximum open circuit voltage. The effect of array degradation and I-V curve fill factor or the array power conditioner interface is also discussed. Results are presented as normalized ratios of power conditioner parameters to array parameters, making the results universally applicable to a wide variety of system sizes, sites, and operating modes.

  6. Miniaturized Retrodirective Arrays for a Nanosatellite Platform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    antenna array (RDA) is capable of autonomously steering its radiation pattern toward the source of an interrogating signal...null- steering array is a minimum. This information can then be used by a microcontroller to steer the beam of the full-duplex phase -shifting array in...International, pp.81-84, 23-28 May 2010. 8 used to properly phase each element in an adjacent phase -shifting array to steer a beam in the

  7. Defect Characterization Using Two-Dimensional Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    2D arrays are able to `view' a given defect from a range of angles leading to the possibility of obtaining richer characterization detail than possible with 1D arrays. In this paper a quantitative comparison of 2D arrays with different element layouts is performed. A technique for extracting the scattering matrix of a defect from the raw 2D array data is also presented. The method is tested on experimental data for characterization of various volumetric defects.

  8. Specification for the unified heliostat array

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-13

    The performance and design requirements for the Unified Heliostat Array are established. The Unified Heliostat Array is an array of heliostats on a common terraced structure. Requirements are given for designing and evaluating the individual heliostats. Representative site conditions to be encountered and survived by the array are described, including wind loading, precipitation, insolation, and earthquake, and soil properties are described. Heliostat design load calculations and preliminary design point calculations are presented. (LEW)

  9. A study of pipelining in computing arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagadish, H. V.; Mathews, R. G.; Newkirk, J. A.; Kailath, T.

    1986-01-01

    Scheduling considerations in computing arrays are examined. A simple sufficient condition is developed for determining whether a computing array can be pipelined. If the array cannot be pipelined in the form given, the condition also indicates the direction in which to proceed to make it pipelineable. The overall framework and methodology take a good part of the load off the logical architect of the array, and make the translation from the logical to the physical architecture a mechanical process.

  10. Method to fabricate hollow microneedle arrays

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Ingersoll, David; Schmidt, Carrie; Flemming, Jeb

    2006-11-07

    An inexpensive and rapid method for fabricating arrays of hollow microneedles uses a photoetchable glass. Furthermore, the glass hollow microneedle array can be used to form a negative mold for replicating microneedles in biocompatible polymers or metals. These microneedle arrays can be used to extract fluids from plants or animals. Glucose transport through these hollow microneedles arrays has been found to be orders of magnitude more rapid than natural diffusion.

  11. Proceedings: EPRI Second Phased Array Inspection Seminar

    SciTech Connect

    2001-11-01

    The Second EPRI Phased Array Inspection Seminar focused on industrial applications of phased array technology that have been achieved to date or are planned for the near future. Presentations were made by developers of inspection techniques, inspection services vendors, and utility personnel who have performed inspections using arrays.

  12. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bulkowski, John E.

    1986-01-01

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will.

  13. The technology of miniature acoustic element arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bom, N.; Lancee, C. T.; Ridder, J.; Ligtvoet, C.; Roelandt, J.

    1975-01-01

    Various aspects of miniature element array construction are discussed. Some initial results on optimization of lateral resolution with a special focusing technique in linear array design is presented, together with the constructional details. Furthermore the construction of a catheter tip array is treated in detail.

  14. Zero gravity testing of flexible solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, D. T.; Young, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Zero gravity testing in the KC-135 aircraft of flat fold flexible solar array test specimens sufficiently demonstrated the adequacy of the panel design. The aircraft flight crew provided invaluable assistance and significantly contributed to the design and development of the flexible solar array, and ultimately to the potential success of the solar electric propulsion solar array shuttle flight experiment program.

  15. Arrays of stacked metal coordination compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bulkowski, J.E.

    1986-10-21

    A process is disclosed for preparing novel arrays of metal coordination compounds characterized by arrangement of the metal ions, separated by a linking agent, in stacked order one above the other. The process permits great flexibility in the design of the array. For example, layers of different composition can be added to the array at will. 3 figs.

  16. Means of manufacturing annular arrays

    DOEpatents

    Day, R.A.

    1985-10-10

    A method is described for manufacturing an annular acoustic transducer array from a plate of transducer material, which enables production of precision aligned arrays at low cost. The circular plate is sawed along at least two lines that are radial to the axis of the plate. At steps along each radial cut, the plate is rotated first in one direction and then in an opposite direction by a predetermined angle such as slightly less than 90/sup 0/. The cuts result in the forming of several largely ring-shaped lands, each largely ring-shaped land being joined to the other rings of different radii by thin portions of the plate, and each ring being cut into segments. The bridges that join different rings hold the transducer together until it can be mounted on a lens.

  17. High voltage load resistor array

    DOEpatents

    Lehmann, Monty Ray

    2005-01-18

    A high voltage resistor comprising an array of a plurality of parallel electrically connected resistor elements each containing a resistive solution, attached at each end thereof to an end plate, and about the circumference of each of the end plates, a corona reduction ring. Each of the resistor elements comprises an insulating tube having an electrode inserted into each end thereof and held in position by one or more hose clamps about the outer periphery of the insulating tube. According to a preferred embodiment, the electrode is fabricated from stainless steel and has a mushroom shape at one end, that inserted into the tube, and a flat end for engagement with the end plates that provides connection of the resistor array and with a load.

  18. Adaptive ground implemented phase array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearing, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The simulation of an adaptive ground implemented phased array of five antenna elements is reported for a very high frequency system design that is tolerant to the radio frequency interference environment encountered by a tracking data relay satellite. Signals originating from satellites are received by the VHF ring array and both horizontal and vertical polarizations from each of the five elements are multiplexed and transmitted down to ground station. A panel on the transmitting end of the simulation chamber contains up to 10 S-band RFI sources along with the desired signal to simulate the dynamic relationship between user and TDRS. The 10 input channels are summed, and desired and interference signals are separated and corrected until the resultant sum signal-to-interference ratio is maximized. Testing performed with this simulation equipment demonstrates good correlation between predicted and actual results.

  19. Anderson attractors in active arrays

    PubMed Central

    Laptyeva, Tetyana V.; Tikhomirov, Andrey A.; Kanakov, Oleg I.; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V.

    2015-01-01

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays. PMID:26304462

  20. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An optimum integrated residential photovoltaic array/module is addressed. Nineteen existing or proposed systems intended for residential applications are described. Each of these systems is rated against a comprehensive set of evaluation criteria in an effort to formulate three module design concepts for further study and analysis. This evaluation led to a number of observations which are enumerated and should be considered in future module and array designs. Three module concepts are presented as baseline design approaches to be further analyzed and optimized. These options include: (1) a rectangular, direct mounted, shingle type module; (2) an integrally mounted module with nonconductive exposed elements; and (3) an aluminum framed, stand off module. Preliminary design drawings are presented for each of these module configurations.

  1. Subwavelength micropillar array terahertz lasers.

    PubMed

    Krall, Michael; Brandstetter, Martin; Deutsch, Christoph; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2014-01-13

    We report on micropillar-based terahertz lasers with active pillars that are much smaller than the emission wavelength. These micropillar array lasers correspond to scaled-down band-edge photonic crystal lasers forming an active photonic metamaterial. In contrast to photonic crystal lasers which use significantly larger pillar structures, lasing emission is not observed close to high-symmetry points in the photonic band diagram, but in the effective medium regime. We measure stimulated emission at 4 THz for micropillar array lasers with pillar diameters of 5 µm. Our results not only demonstrate the integration of active subwavelength optics in a terahertz laser, but are also an important step towards the realization of nanowire-based terahertz lasers.

  2. Automated Camera Array Fine Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clouse, Daniel; Padgett, Curtis; Ansar, Adnan; Cheng, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Using aerial imagery, the JPL FineCalibration (JPL FineCal) software automatically tunes a set of existing CAHVOR camera models for an array of cameras. The software finds matching features in the overlap region between images from adjacent cameras, and uses these features to refine the camera models. It is not necessary to take special imagery of a known target and no surveying is required. JPL FineCal was developed for use with an aerial, persistent surveillance platform.

  3. Array-based photoacoustic spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, S. Thomas; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chen, Yu

    2005-03-22

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. A photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array including a body having at least three recesses or affinity masses connected thereto is used in conjunction with a photoacoustic spectroscopy system. At least one acoustic detector is positioned near the recesses or affinity masses for detection of acoustic waves emitted from species of interest within the recesses or affinity masses.

  4. Frequency Diverse Array Receiver Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-29

    fielded systems. The FDA architecture intrinsically covers multiple diversity domains therefore, naturally lends it self to a multi-mission, multi-mode...dependent characteristics of the FDA and the periodic nature of the beam paterns. 7 Chapter 3 Linear Array Receiver Architectures We aim to design, clarify...flexibility in steering the beam. 3.1.1 FDA Time Dependency Spatial Pattern Due to the time dependency and periodic nature of the FDA spatial patterns a

  5. Cabling design for phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, I. D.; Turkiewicz, L.

    1972-01-01

    The ribbon-cabling system used for the AEGIS phased array which provides minimum cable bulk, complete EMI shielding, rugged mechanical design, repeatable electrical characteristics, and ease of assembly and maintenance is described. The ribbon cables are 0.040-inch thick, and in widths up to 2 1/2 inches. Their terminations are molded connectors that can be grouped in a three-tier arrangement, with cable branching accomplished by a matrix-welding technique.

  6. Optical MEMS-based arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.

    2003-07-01

    Industrial Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) developers are rapidly bringing to demonstration inertial radio frequency, and optical MEMS devices and components. The Army has a requirement for compact, highly reliable, and inexpensive laser beam steering components for missile seekers and unmanned aerial vehicles remote sensing components to provide a fast scanning capability for pointing, acquisition, tracking, and data communication. The coupling of this requirement with recent developments in the micro-optics area, has led scientists and engineers at the Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) to consider optical MEMS-based phased arrays, which have potential applications in the commercial industry as well as in the military, as a replacement for gimbals. Laser beam steering in commercial applications such as free space communicataion, scanning display, bar-code reading, and gimbaled seekers; require relatively large monolithic micro-mirrors to accomplish the required optical resolution. The Army will benefit from phased arrays composed of relatively small micro-mirrors that can be actuated through large deflection angles with substantially reduced volume times. The AMCOM Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has initiated a research project to develop MEMS-based phased arrays for use in a small volume, inexpensive Laser Detection and Ranging (LADAR) seeker that is particularly attractive because of its ability to provide large field-of-regard and autonomous target acquisition for reconnaissance mission applications. The primary objective of the collaborative project with the Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is to develop a rugged, MEMS-based phased arrays for incorporation into the 2-D scanner of a LADAR seeker. Design challenges and approach to achieving performance requirements will be discussed.

  7. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Phased Array Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, J. N.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-10-01

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  8. Array Imaging of Noisy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    The ultimate limit on ultrasonic defect detectability is the coherent noise due to material backscatter. A model of such noise in ultrasonic array images is developed based on the single scattering assumption. The implications of the model are discussed and supported with some experimental examples. In the case of a copper specimen, it is shown that an improvement in signal to coherent noise ratio of over 30 dB can be obtained by optimization of imaging parameters.

  9. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging.

    PubMed

    Potter, J N; Croxford, A J; Wilcox, P D

    2014-10-03

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  10. PEP solar array definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The power extension package (PEP) is a solar array system that will be used on the space transportation system to augment the power of the Orbiter vehicle and to extend the time the vehicle may stay in orbit. The baseline configuration of the PEP is reviewed. The programmatic aspects of the design covering the development plan, the manufacturing facility plan and the estimated costs and risks are presented.

  11. Gaussian Schell-model arrays.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhangrong; Zhao, Daomu; Korotkova, Olga; Mao, Yonghua

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a novel class of planar, quasi-homogeneous Schell-model source for producing far fields with optical lattice average intensity patterns and derive the corresponding beam conditions. The array dimension, lobes intensity profile, and periodicity of the optical lattice can be flexibly tuned by changing the correlation parameters of the source field. It is also found that, with an appropriate choice of the source parameters, the radiant intensity may possess flat-topped intensity patterns.

  12. Phased Array Theory and Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    drive the ferrite magnetization to saturation as in a latching phase shifter, or to various points on the magnetization curve with flux drive...can vary from 1 kW to as much as 150 kW peak and average power levels to 400 W. Latching phase shifters have switching times un the order of one...Circuits , and Toroid Ferrite Phase Shifted SO. ode \\rrav Network 26. Dual Slat . 27. PA\\ E PAWS Array (Courtesy of Raytheon Company) 28. Patriot

  13. Thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports design and characterization testing of thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays. The micromirrors were fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs polysilicon surface micromachining process. The power averaging characteristic of thermal actuation is exploited in a novel line addressing scheme which reduces wiring for an n2 array to 2n wires. Mirror deflections were measured with a microscope laser interferometer system equipped with a vacuum chamber. Data presented includes device uniformity, frequency response, and deflection versus drive power for varied ambient pressure. Initial test results confirm that thermally actuated piston micromirrors offer several advantages over more common electrostatic designs. Thermally actuated micromirrors offer greater deflections at drive voltages compatible with CMOS circuitry. Measured thermal piston micromirror deflection versus drive voltage is nonlinear, but does not exhibit the 'snap through instability' characteristic of electrostatic devices. Operation of thermally actuated devices in rarefied ambient significantly decreases power dissipation. For a given deflection range, the power reduction facilitated by vacuum operation makes large arrays feasible. Frequency response of thermally actuated devices is limited by the ability of the device to dissipate heat, but operation at 1 kHz rates is feasible.

  14. Twist Propagation in Dinucleosome Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Dobrovolskaia, Irina V.; Kenward, Martin; Arya, Gaurav

    2010-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of the distribution and propagation of twist from one DNA linker to another for a two-nucleosome array subjected to externally applied twist. A mesoscopic model of the array that incorporates nucleosome geometry along with the bending and twisting mechanics of the linkers is employed and external twist is applied in stepwise increments to mimic quasistatic twisting of chromatin fibers. Simulation results reveal that the magnitude and sign of the imposed and induced twist on contiguous linkers depend strongly on their relative orientation. Remarkably, the relative direction of the induced and applied twist can become inverted for a subset of linker orientations—a phenomenon we refer to as “twist inversion”. We characterize the twist inversion, as a function of relative linker orientation, in a phase diagram and explain its key features using a simple model based on the geometry of the nucleosome/linker complex. In addition to twist inversion, our simulations reveal “nucleosome flipping”, whereby nucleosomes may undergo sudden flipping in response to applied twist, causing a rapid bending of the linker and a significant change in the overall twist and writhe of the array. Our findings shed light on the underlying mechanisms by which torsional stresses impact chromatin organization. PMID:21081084

  15. LOFAR, the low frequency array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, R. C.

    2012-09-01

    LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a next-generation radio telescope designed by ASTRON, with antenna stations concentrated in the north of the Netherlands and currently spread into Germany, France, Sweden and the United Kingdom; plans for more LOFAR stations exist in several other countries. Utilizing a novel, phased-array design, LOFAR is optimized for the largely unexplored low frequency range between 30 and 240 MHz. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid re-pointing of the telescopes as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. Processing (e.g. cross-correlation) takes place in the LOFAR BlueGene/P supercomputer, and associated post-processing facilities. With its dense core (inner few km) array and long (more than 1000 km) interferometric baselines, LOFAR reaches unparalleled sensitivity and resolution in the low frequency radio regime. The International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) is now issuing its first call for observing projects that will be peer reviewed and selected for observing starting in December. Part of the allocations will be made on the basis of a fully Open Skies policy; there are also reserved fractions assigned by national consortia in return for contributions from their country to the ILT. In this invited talk, the gradually expanding complement of operationally verified observing modes and capabilities are reviewed, and some of the exciting first astronomical results are presented.

  16. A novel method to design sparse linear arrays for ultrasonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Chen, Bin; Shi, Ke-Ren

    2006-12-22

    In ultrasonic phased array testing, a sparse array can increase the resolution by enlarging the aperture without adding system complexity. Designing a sparse array involves choosing the best or a better configuration from a large number of candidate arrays. We firstly designed sparse arrays by using a genetic algorithm, but found that the arrays have poor performance and poor consistency. So, a method based on the Minimum Redundancy Linear Array was then adopted. Some elements are determined by the minimum-redundancy array firstly in order to ensure spatial resolution and then a genetic algorithm is used to optimize the remaining elements. Sparse arrays designed by this method have much better performance and consistency compared to the arrays designed only by a genetic algorithm. Both simulation and experiment confirm the effectiveness.

  17. Measured aperture-array noise temperature of the Mark II phased array feed for ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Shaw, R. D.; Hayman, D. B.; Macleod, A.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.; Cantrall, C.; Brothers, M. L.; Hotan, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  18. Strain responsive concave and convex microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Dinesh; Yang, Shu; Lin, Pei-Chun

    2007-12-01

    We report the fabrication of single-component, strain responsive microlens arrays with real-time tunability. The concave lens array is fabricated by patterning hard oxide layer on a bidirectionally prestretched soft elastomer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) followed by confined buckling upon release of the prestrain. The convex microlens array is replica molded from the concave lenses in PDMS. Due to difference in lens formation mechanisms, the two types of lenses show different tunable range of focal length in response to the applied strain: large focal length change is observed from the concave microlens array, whereas that from the convex microlens array is much smaller.

  19. Ultrasonic stair case array for NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, K.; Tittmann, B. R.; Kropf, M.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we present the results on the design of a unique two-dimensional phased array with low channel applications for imaging defects on a metal surface. First, basic transducer calculations will be shown. Followed by the results of important phased array variables, such as focusing, and angle beam sweeping ability, The final design will be given. Next the computer simulation results will be discussed. These results will indicate the performance of the actual array. The second half of the paper will be devoted to a discussion on the phased array testing results with a demonstration phased array.

  20. Stressed detector arrays for airborne astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Geis, N.; Poglitsch, A.; Rumitz, M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of stressed Ge:Ga detector arrays for far-infrared astronomy from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) is discussed. Researchers successfully constructed and used a three channel detector array on five flights from the KAO, and have conducted laboratory tests of a two-dimensional, 25 elements (5x5) detector array. Each element of the three element array performs as well as the researchers' best single channel detector, as do the tested elements of the 25 channel system. Some of the exciting new science possible with far-infrared detector arrays is also discussed.

  1. Characterization of microrod arrays by image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrand, Reinald; Grimm, Silko; Giesa, Reiner; Schmidt, Hans-Werner; Mathwig, Klaus; Gösele, Ulrich; Steinhart, Martin

    2009-04-01

    The uniformity of the properties of array elements was evaluated by statistical analysis of microscopic images of array structures, assuming that the brightness of the array elements correlates quantitatively or qualitatively with a microscopically probed quantity. Derivatives and autocorrelation functions of cumulative frequency distributions of the object brightnesses were used to quantify variations in object properties throughout arrays. Thus, different specimens, the same specimen at different stages of its fabrication or use, and different imaging conditions can be compared systematically. As an example, we analyzed scanning electron micrographs of microrod arrays and calculated the percentage of broken microrods.

  2. Multifrequency Arrays: Design and Cost Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-08

    ANTENNAS One antenna examined was a planar phased array of slots in stripline. The elements have to be staggered...KEY WORDS rConrbiu* on «v.«. »Id» II n»e»»»ty md ld»nllly by block numb»f) Phased array Multifrequency array Cost analysis Stripline slots ... antenna techniques and a method of cost analysis for array antennas . A concept is given which has potential to reduce overall array costs for large

  3. Status of wake and array loss research

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.L.

    1991-09-01

    In recent years, many projects have evaluated wind turbine wake effects and resultant array losses in both Europe and the United States. This paper examines the status of current knowledge about wake effects and array losses and suggests future research. Single-turbine wake characteristics have been studied extensively and are generally described well by existing theoretical models. Field measurements of wake effects in wind turbine arrays are largely limited to small arrays, with 2 to 4 rows of turbines. Few data have been published on wake effects within large arrays. Measurements of wake deficits downwind of large arrays that deficits are substantially larger and extend farther downwind than expected. Although array design models have been developed, these models have been tested and verified using only limited data from a few rows of wind turbines in complex terrain, whereas some of the largest arrays have more than 40 rows of wind turbines. Planned cooperative efforts with the wind industry will obtain existing data relevant to analyzing energy deficits within large arrays and identifying data sets for potential use in array model verification efforts. Future research being considered include a cooperative research experiment to obtain more definitive data on wake deficits and turbulence within and downwind of large arrays. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Coupling Between Waveguide-Fed Slot Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam

    2011-01-01

    Coupling between two waveguide-fed planar slot arrays has been investigated using full-wave analysis. The analysis employs the method-of-moments solution to the pertinent coupled integral equations for the aperture electric field of all slots. In order to compute coupling between two arrays, the input port of the first array is excited with a TE(sub 10) mode wave while the second one is match-terminated. After solving the moment method matrix equations, the aperture fields of all slots are obtained and thereby the TE(sub 10) mode wave received at the input port of the second array is determined. Coupling between two arrays is the ratio of the wave amplitude arriving in the second array port to the incident wave amplitude at the first array port. The coupling mechanism has been studied as a function of spacing between arrays in different directions, e.g. the electric field plane, the magnetic field plane, and the diagonal plane. Computed coupling values are presented for different array geometries. This work is novel since it provides a good understanding of coupling between waveguide-fed slot arrays as a function of spacing and orientation for different aperture distributions and array architectures. This serves as a useful tool for antenna design engineers and system engineers.

  5. International ultraviolet explorer solar array power degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, J. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristic electrical performance of each International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) solar array panel is evaluated as a function of several prevailing variables (namely, solar illumination, array temperature and solar cell radiation damage). Based on degradation in the current-voltage characteristics of the array due to solar cell damage accumulated over time by space charged particle radiations, the available IUE solar array power is determined for life goals up to 10 years. Best and worst case calculations are normalized to actual IUE flight data (available solar array power versus observatory position) to accurately predict the future IUE solar array output. It is shown that the IUE solar array can continue to produce more power than is required at most observatory positions for at least 5 more years.

  6. Initial Results from the BRAHMS Multiplicity Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, H.

    2000-10-01

    The BRAHMS Multiplicity Array is one of three systems used to characterize the centrality of RHIC collisions at the BRAHMS experiment. Together, these systems, which also include the Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC) and Beam-Beam Counter arrays, provide a global characterization of particle multiplicities, with the Multiplicity Array (-2.2<η<2.2) and Beam-Beam Arrays (3.2 <= |η|<= 4.3 ) sensitive to charged-particle multiplicity distributions over a large range of pseudorapidity η, and the ZDC measuring neutron distributions along the beam axis. The Multiplicity Array consists of an inner barrel of 24 modestly segmented Si Strip detectors and an outer barrel of 38 plastic scintillator tiles in a collinear arrangement about the beam axis. This talk will discuss some of the physics to be explored with the Multiplicity Array and present initial results obtained with the array during the first RHIC running period.

  7. An ANSERLIN array for mobile satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colomb, F. Y.; Kunkee, D. B.; Mayes, P. E.; Smith, D. W.; Jamnejad, V.

    1990-01-01

    Design, analysis, construction, and test of linear arrays of ANSERLIN (annular sector, radiating line) elements are reported and discussed. Due to feeding simplicity and easy construction as well as good CP performance, a planar array composed of a number of such linear arrays each producing a shaped beam tilted in elevation, is a good candidate as a vehicle-mounted mechanically steered antenna for mobile satellite applications. A single level construction technique was developed that makes this type of array very cost competitive with other low-profile arrays. An asymmetric 19.5 inch long four-element array was fabricated and tested with reasonable performance. A smaller five-element symmetric array (16 inch long) was also designed and tested capable of operating in either sense of circular polarization. Efforts were made to successfully reduce this effect.

  8. Integrating Scientific Array Processing into Standard SQL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misev, Dimitar; Bachhuber, Johannes; Baumann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We live in a time that is dominated by data. Data storage is cheap and more applications than ever accrue vast amounts of data. Storing the emerging multidimensional data sets efficiently, however, and allowing them to be queried by their inherent structure, is a challenge many databases have to face today. Despite the fact that multidimensional array data is almost always linked to additional, non-array information, array databases have mostly developed separately from relational systems, resulting in a disparity between the two database categories. The current SQL standard and SQL DBMS supports arrays - and in an extension also multidimensional arrays - but does so in a very rudimentary and inefficient way. This poster demonstrates the practicality of an SQL extension for array processing, implemented in a proof-of-concept multi-faceted system that manages a federation of array and relational database systems, providing transparent, efficient and scalable access to the heterogeneous data in them.

  9. The indirect binary n-cube array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    The array is built from a large number (hundreds or thousands) of microprocessors or microcomputers linked through a switching network into an indirect binary n-cube array. Control is two level, the array operating synchronously, or in lock step, at the higher level, and with the broadcast commands being locally interpreted into rewritable microinstruction streams in the microprocessors and in the switch control units. The key to the design is the switching array. By properly programming it, the array can be made into a wide variety of virtual arrays which are well adapted to a wide range of applications. It is believed that the flexibility of the switching array can be used to obtain fault avoidance, which appears necessary in any highly parallel design.

  10. New fabrication and applications of carbohydrate arrays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gangliang; Chen, Xin; Xiao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate arrays are used as high-throughput screening platforms to study the carbohydrate-mediated recognition events for glycobiology. The polysaccharide arrays are easy to fabricate by non-covalently or covalently immobilizing polysaccharides onto array surfaces because polysaccharides have hydrophobic interactions. Oligosaccharides must be derived and covalently or non-covalently immobilized onto array surfaces to fabricate oligosaccharide arrays because they have hydrophilic interactions. At the moment, carbohydrate arrays are mainly used to study the carbohydrate-protein interactions and carbohydrate-binding lectins or antibodies, which are possible to be applied to clinics and diagnoses. This review mainly summed up the new fabrication strategies of carbohydrate arrays and their applications in recent four years.

  11. Delamination Detection Using Guided Wave Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; Leckey, Cara

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting multiple delaminations in composite laminates using non-contact phased arrays. The phased arrays are implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). The array imaging algorithm is performed in the frequency domain where both the guided wave dispersion effect and direction dependent wave properties are considered. By using the non-contact SLDV array with a frequency domain imaging algorithm, an intensity image of the composite plate can be generated for delamination detection. For the proof of concept, a laboratory test is performed using a non-contact phased array to detect two delaminations (created through quasi-static impact test) at different locations in a composite plate. Using the non-contact phased array and frequency domain imaging, the two impact-induced delaminations are successfully detected. This study shows that the non-contact phased array method is a potentially effective method for rapid delamination inspection in large composite structures.

  12. Dynamics and function of compact nucleosome arrays.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Michael G; Oh, Eugene; Tims, Hannah S; Widom, Jonathan

    2009-09-01

    The packaging of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin sterically occludes polymerases, recombinases and repair enzymes. How chromatin structure changes to allow their actions is unknown. We constructed defined fluorescently labeled trinucleosome arrays, allowing analysis of chromatin conformational dynamics via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The arrays undergo reversible Mg2+-dependent folding similar to that of longer arrays studied previously. We define two intermediate conformational states in the reversible folding of the nucleosome arrays and characterize the microscopic rate constants. Nucleosome arrays are highly dynamic even when compact, undergoing conformational fluctuations on timescales in the second to microsecond range. Compact states of the arrays allow binding to DNA within the central nucleosome via site exposure. Protein binding can also drive decompaction of the arrays. Thus, our results reveal multiple modes by which spontaneous chromatin fiber dynamics allow for the invasion and action of DNA-processing protein complexes.

  13. Imaging phased telescope array study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The problems encountered in obtaining a wide field-of-view with large, space-based direct imaging phased telescope arrays were considered. After defining some of the critical systems issues, previous relevant work in the literature was reviewed and summarized. An extensive list was made of potential error sources and the error sources were categorized in the form of an error budget tree including optical design errors, optical fabrication errors, assembly and alignment errors, and environmental errors. After choosing a top level image quality requirment as a goal, a preliminary tops-down error budget allocation was performed; then, based upon engineering experience, detailed analysis, or data from the literature, a bottoms-up error budget reallocation was performed in an attempt to achieve an equitable distribution of difficulty in satisfying the various allocations. This exercise provided a realistic allocation for residual off-axis optical design errors in the presence of state-of-the-art optical fabrication and alignment errors. Three different computational techniques were developed for computing the image degradation of phased telescope arrays due to aberrations of the individual telescopes. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses were then performed for a variety of subaperture configurations and telescope design parameters in an attempt to determine how the off-axis performance of a phased telescope array varies as the telescopes are scaled up in size. The Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) multipurpose telescope testbed (MMTT) configuration was analyzed in detail with regard to image degradation due to field curvature and distortion of the individual telescopes as they are scaled up in size.

  14. rasdaman Array Database: current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merticariu, George; Toader, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    rasdaman (Raster Data Manager) is a Free Open Source Array Database Management System which provides functionality for storing and processing massive amounts of raster data in the form of multidimensional arrays. The user can access, process and delete the data using SQL. The key features of rasdaman are: flexibility (datasets of any dimensionality can be processed with the help of SQL queries), scalability (rasdaman's distributed architecture enables it to seamlessly run on cloud infrastructures while offering an increase in performance with the increase of computation resources), performance (real-time access, processing, mixing and filtering of arrays of any dimensionality) and reliability (legacy communication protocol replaced with a new one based on cutting edge technology - Google Protocol Buffers and ZeroMQ). Among the data with which the system works, we can count 1D time series, 2D remote sensing imagery, 3D image time series, 3D geophysical data, and 4D atmospheric and climate data. Most of these representations cannot be stored only in the form of raw arrays, as the location information of the contents is also important for having a correct geoposition on Earth. This is defined by ISO 19123 as coverage data. rasdaman provides coverage data support through the Petascope service. Extensions were added on top of rasdaman in order to provide support for the Geoscience community. The following OGC standards are currently supported: Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The Web Map Service is an extension which provides zoom and pan navigation over images provided by a map server. Starting with version 9.1, rasdaman supports WMS version 1.3. The Web Coverage Service provides capabilities for downloading multi-dimensional coverage data. Support is also provided for several extensions of this service: Subsetting Extension, Scaling Extension, and, starting with version 9.1, Transaction Extension, which

  15. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  16. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  17. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  18. Double interconnection fuel cell array

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1993-01-01

    A fuel cell array (10) is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells (12) which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes (14) and outer electrodes (18 and 18'), with solid electrolyte (16 and 16') between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections (20 and 20') contacting the inner electrode (14), each cell (12) having only three metallic felt electrical connectors (22) which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other.

  19. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the overall program is to establish technological readiness and provide verification for the elements of a manufacturing sequence which would ultimately be suitable for the large-scale production of silicon solar-array modules at a selling price of less than $500/kW. A program and process plan for accomplishing this objective was developed and put into operation. Three junction-formation processes are shown; since cost analysis shows that they do not differ greatly in cost, each should be considered for technical merits and possible future cost reduction. The progress made in the various process steps of the plan is described, and conclusions are presented.

  20. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  1. The collinear coaxial array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammer, D. J.; Williams, D.

    1981-03-01

    A design of a coaxial vertical antenna proposed in the ARRL antenna handbook is analyzed. A numerical analysis was carried out using the moment method. A variety of antenna configurations in the 160 MHz design frequency are analyzed and current distribution, gain, polar diagrams and impedances are calculated. The analysis is carried out for simple configurations and extended to a case with 16 repeated center sections. The effects of using lossy cable in the construction is also investigated. A defect in the original ARRL design is rectified. An array of an overall length 5.33 wavelengths is shown to have a gain of 10.69 dB.

  2. Station characteristics of the Singapore Infrasound Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perttu, Anna; Taisne, Benoit; Caudron, Corentin; Garces, Milton; Avila Encillo, Jeffrey; Ildefonso, Sorvigenaleon

    2016-04-01

    Singapore, located in Southeast Asia, presents an ideal location for an additional regional infrasound array, with diverse persistent natural and anthropogenic regional infrasound sources, including ~750 active or potentially active volcanoes within 4,000 kilometers. Previous studies have focused on theoretical and calculated regional signal detection capability improvement with the addition of a Singapore array. The Earth Observatory of Singapore installed a five element infrasound array in northcentral Singapore in late 2014, and this station began consistent real-time data transmission mid-2015. The Singapore array uses MB2005s microbarometers and Nanometrics Taurus digitizers. Automated array processing is carried out with the INFrasonic EneRgy Nth Octave (INFERNO) energy estimation suite, and PMCC (Progressive MultiChannel Correlation). The addition of the Singapore infrasound array to the existing International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound stations in the region has increased regional infrasound detection capability, which is illustrated with the preliminary work on three observed meteor events of various sizes in late 2015. A meteor observed in Bangkok, Thailand in early September, 2015 was picked up by the CTBTO, however, another meteor observed in Bangkok in November was only recorded on the Singapore array. Additionally, another meteor observed over Sumatra was only recorded by one IMS station and the Singapore array. This study uses array processing and Power Spectral Density results for both the Singapore and publicly available regional IMS stations to examine station characteristics and detection capability of the Singapore array in the context of the regional IMS network.

  3. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-11-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a “worship”. Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning.

  4. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a “worship”. Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning. PMID:26582365

  5. Optimal array of sand fences

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Izael A.; Araújo, Ascânio D.; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2017-01-01

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth’s climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost. PMID:28338053

  6. Module/array interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Several aspects of module design are evaluated, including glass superstrate and metal substrate module configurations, the potential for hail damage, light absorption in glass superstrates, the economics of glass selection, and electrical design. Also, three alternate glass superstrate module configurations are evaluated by means of finite element computer analyses. Two panel sizes, 1.2 by 2.4 m (4 by 8 ft) and 2.4 by 4.8 m are used to support three module sizes, 0.6 by 1.2 m, 1.2 by 1.2 m, and 1.2 by 2.4 m, for design loadings of + or - 1.7 kPa, + or - 2.4 kPa, and + or - 3.6 kPa. Designs and cost estimates are presented for twenty panel types and nine array configurations at each of the three design loadings. Structural cost sensitivities of combined array configurations and panel cases are presented.

  7. Optimal array of sand fences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Izael A.; Araújo, Ascânio D.; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2017-03-01

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth’s climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  8. The Ooty Wide Field Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanya, C. R.; Manoharan, P. K.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2017-03-01

    We describe here an ongoing upgrade to the legacy Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). The ORT is a cylindrical parabolic cylinder 530 m × 30 m in size operating at a frequency of 326.5 (or z˜3.35 for the HI 21-cm line). The telescope has been constructed on a North-South hill slope whose gradient is equal to the latitude of the hill, making it effectively equatorially mounted. The feed consists of an array of 1056 dipoles. The key feature of this upgrade is the digitization and cross-correlation of the signals of every set of 4-dipoles. This converts the ORT into a 264 element interferometer with a field-of-view of 2∘×27.4∘cos( δ). This upgraded instrument is called the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA). This paper briefly describes the salient features of the upgrade, as well as its main science drivers. There are three main science drivers viz. (1) observations of the large scale distribution of HI in the post-reionization era, (2) studies of the propagation of plasma irregularities through the inner heliosphere and (3) blind surveys for transient sources. More details on the upgrade, as well as on the expected science uses can be found in other papers in this special issue.

  9. Optimal array of sand fences.

    PubMed

    Lima, Izael A; Araújo, Ascânio D; Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2017-03-24

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth's climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  10. Self-organizing learning array.

    PubMed

    Starzyk, Janusz A; Zhu, Zhen; Liu, Tsun-Ho

    2005-03-01

    A new machine learning concept--self-organizing learning array (SOLAR)--is presented. It is a sparsely connected, information theory-based learning machine, with a multilayer structure. It has reconfigurable processing units (neurons) and an evolvable system structure, which makes it an adaptive classification system for a variety of machine learning problems. Its multilayer structure can handle complex problems. Based on the entropy estimation, information theory-based learning is performed locally at each neuron. Neural parameters and connections that correspond to minimum entropy are adaptively set for each neuron. By choosing connections for each neuron, the system sets up its wiring and completes its self-organization. SOLAR classifies input data based on the weighted statistical information from all the neurons. The system classification ability has been simulated and experiments were conducted using test-bench data. Results show a very good performance compared to other classification methods. An important advantage of this structure is its scalability to a large system and ease of hardware implementation on regular arrays of cells.

  11. Birefringence compensated arrayed waveguide grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Xia, Xiang; Lang, Tingting; He, Jian-Jun

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we review our work on birefringence compensated arrayed waveguide grating. We elaborate on a birefringence compensation technique based on angled star couplers in arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) and discuss several demonstrations both in low-index-contrast and high-index-contrast material systems. A 16-channel AWG with 100GHz channel spacing for DWDM application is designed and fabricated in silica-based low-index-contrast waveguide. The experimental results confirm that the polarization-dependent wavelength shift (PDλ) can be tuned by varying the incident/diffraction angle at the star couplers and a birefringence-free property can be achieved without additional fabrication process as compared to conventional AWG. A further validation of this technique is demonstrated in high-index-contrast silicon-on-insulator waveguide, in combination with different diffraction orders for TE and TM polarizations. A birefringence compensated silicon nanowire AWG for CWDM optical interconnects is designed and fabricated. The theoretical and experimental results show that the PDλ can be reduced from 380-420nm to 0.5-3.5 nm, below 25% of the 3 dB bandwidth of the channel response in the wavelength range of 1500 to 1600nm.

  12. IRAN: interferometric remapped array nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristidi, Eric; Vakili, Farrokh; Abe, Lyu; Belu, Adrian; Lopez, Bruno; Lanteri, Henri; Schutz, A.; Menut, Jean-Luc

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by observing in a combined pupil plane instead of an image plane. The point-source intensity distribution (PSID) of this interferometric "image" tends towards a psuedo Airy disc (similar to that of a giant monolithic telescope) for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field comparable to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions, circumstellar nebulosities or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance.

  13. Stretchable Micro-Electrode Array

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, M; Hamilton, J; Polla, D; Rose, K; Wilson, T; Krulevitch, P

    2002-03-08

    This paper focuses on the design consideration, fabrication processes and preliminary testing of the stretchable micro-electrode array. We are developing an implantable, stretchable micro-electrode array using polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The device will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces and electroplated electrodes. The metal features are embedded within a thin ({approx}50 micron) substrate fabricated using poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible elastomeric material that has very low water permeability. The conformable nature of PDMS is critical for ensuring uniform contact with the curved surface of the retina. To fabricate the device, we developed unique processes for metalizing PDMS to produce robust traces capable of maintaining conductivity when stretched (5%, SD 1.5), and for selectively passivating the conductive elements. An in situ measurement of residual strain in the PDMS during curing reveals a tensile strain of 10%, explaining the stretchable nature of the thin metalized devices.

  14. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOEpatents

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  15. Space and power efficient hybrid counters array

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina

    2010-03-30

    A hybrid counter array device for counting events. The hybrid counter array includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each counter device for receiving signals representing occurrences of events from an event source and providing a first count value corresponding to a lower order bits of the hybrid counter array. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits of the hybrid counter array. A control device monitors each of the N counter devices of the first counter portion and initiates updating a value of a corresponding second count value stored at the corresponding addressable memory location in the second counter portion. Thus, a combination of the first and second count values provide an instantaneous measure of number of events received.

  16. Space and power efficient hybrid counters array

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina

    2009-05-12

    A hybrid counter array device for counting events. The hybrid counter array includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each counter device for receiving signals representing occurrences of events from an event source and providing a first count value corresponding to a lower order bits of the hybrid counter array. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits of the hybrid counter array. A control device monitors each of the N counter devices of the first counter portion and initiates updating a value of a corresponding second count value stored at the corresponding addressable memory location in the second counter portion. Thus, a combination of the first and second count values provide an instantaneous measure of number of events received.

  17. The revised solar array synthesis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The Revised Solar Array Synthesis Computer Program is described. It is a general-purpose program which computes solar array output characteristics while accounting for the effects of temperature, incidence angle, charged-particle irradiation, and other degradation effects on various solar array configurations in either circular or elliptical orbits. Array configurations may consist of up to 75 solar cell panels arranged in any series-parallel combination not exceeding three series-connected panels in a parallel string and no more than 25 parallel strings in an array. Up to 100 separate solar array current-voltage characteristics, corresponding to 100 equal-time increments during the sunlight illuminated portion of an orbit or any 100 user-specified combinations of incidence angle and temperature, can be computed and printed out during one complete computer execution. Individual panel incidence angles may be computed and printed out at the user's option.

  18. Photovoltaic array space power plus diagnostics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidice, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) experiment is to measure the effects of the interaction of the low- to mid-altitude space environment on the performance of a diverse set of small solar-cell arrays (planar and concentrator, representative of present and future military technologies) under differing conditions of velocity-vector orientation and simulated (by biasing) high-voltage operation. Solar arrays to be tested include Si and GaAs planar arrays and several types of GaAs concentrator arrays. Diagnostics (a Langmuir probe and a pressure gauge) and a transient pulse monitor (to measure radiated and conducted EMI during arcing) will be used to determine the impact of the environment on array operation to help verify various interactions models. Results from a successful PASP Plus flight will furnish answers to important interactions questions and provide inputs for design and test standards for photovoltaic space-power subsystems.

  19. Sky reconstruction for the Tianlai cylinder array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiao; Zuo, Shi-Fan; Ansari, Reza; Chen, Xuelei; Li, Yi-Chao; Wu, Feng-Quan; Campagne, Jean-Eric; Magneville, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    We apply our sky map reconstruction method for transit type interferometers to the Tianlai cylinder array. The method is based on spherical harmonic decomposition, and can be applied to a cylindrical array as well as dish arrays and we can compute the instrument response, synthesized beam, transfer function and noise power spectrum. We consider cylinder arrays with feed spacing larger than half a wavelength and, as expected, we find that the arrays with regular spacing have grating lobes which produce spurious images in the reconstructed maps. We show that this problem can be overcome using arrays with a different feed spacing on each cylinder. We present the reconstructed maps, and study the performance in terms of noise power spectrum, transfer function and beams for both regular and irregular feed spacing configurations.

  20. Interferometric Plasmonic Lensing with Nanohole Arrays.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G; El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Hess, Wayne P

    2014-12-18

    Nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) of nanohole arrays in gold films is used to map propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from lithographically patterned structures. Strong near-field photoemission patterns are observed in the PEEM images, recorded following low angle of incidence irradiation of nanohole arrays with sub-15 fs laser pulses centered at 780 nm. The recorded photoemission patterns are attributed to constructive and destructive interference between PSPs launched from the individual nanoholes which comprise the array. By exploiting the wave nature of PSPs, we demonstrate how varying the array geometry (hole diameter, pitch, and number of rows/columns) ultimately yields intense localized photoemission. Through a combination of PEEM experiments and finite-difference time-domain simulations, we identify the optimal array geometry for efficient light coupling and interferometric plasmonic lensing. We show a preliminary application of inteferometric plasmonic lensing by enhancing the photoemission from the vertex of a gold triangle using a nanohole array.

  1. Interferometric Plasmonic Lensing with Nanohole Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-18

    Nonlinear photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) of nanohole arrays in gold films maps propagating surface plasmons (PSPs) launched from lithographically patterned structures. Strong near field photoemission patterns are observed in the PEEM images, recorded following low angle of incidence irradiation of nanohole arrays with sub-15 fs laser pulses centered at 780 nm. The recorded photoemission patterns are attributed to constructive and destructive interferences between PSPs launched from the individual nanoholes which comprise the array. By exploiting the wave nature of PSPs, we demonstrate how varying the array geometry (hole diameter, pitch, and number of rows/columns) ultimately yields intense localized photoemission. Through a combination of PEEM and finite-difference time-domain simulations, we identify the optimal array geometry for efficient light coupling and interferometric plasmonic lensing. We show a preliminary application of inteferometric plasmonic lensing by enhancing the photoemission from the vertex of a gold triangle using nanohole array.

  2. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing a plurality of a nucleic acid array, comprising, in order, the steps of amplifying in situ nucleic acid molecules of a first randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array comprising a heterogeneous pool of nucleic acid molecules affixed to a support, transferring at least a subset of the nucleic acid molecules produced by such amplifying to a second support, and affixing the subset so transferred to the second support to form a second randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array, wherein the nucleic acid molecules of the second array occupy positions that correspond to those of the nucleic acid molecules from which they were amplified on the first array, so that the first array serves as a template to produce a plurality, is disclosed.

  3. Halbach arrays in precision motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Trumper, D.L.; Williams, M.E.

    1995-02-01

    The Halbach array was developed for use as an optical element in particle accelerators. Following up on a suggestion from Klaus Halbach, the authors have investigated the utility of such arrays as the permanent magnet structure for synchronous machines in cartesian, polar, and cylindrical geometries. Their work has focused on the design of a novel Halbach array linear motor for use in a magnetic suspension stage for photolithography. This paper presents the details of the motor design and its force and power characteristics.

  4. Big Data Challenges for Large Radio Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Wagstaff, Kiri; Thompson, David; D'Addario, Larry; Navarro, Robert; Mattmann, Chris; Majid, Walid; Lazio, Joseph; Preston, Robert; Rebbapragada, Umaa

    2012-01-01

    Future large radio astronomy arrays, particularly the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to generate data at rates far higher than can be analyzed or stored affordably with current practices. This is, by definition, a "big data" problem, and requires an end-to-end solution if future radio arrays are to reach their full scientific potential. Similar data processing, transport, storage, and management challenges face next-generation facilities in many other fields.

  5. Nonvolatile Array Of Synapses For Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1993-01-01

    Elements of array programmed with help of ultraviolet light. A 32 x 32 very-large-scale integrated-circuit array of electronic synapses serves as building-block chip for analog neural-network computer. Synaptic weights stored in nonvolatile manner. Makes information content of array invulnerable to loss of power, and, by eliminating need for circuitry to refresh volatile synaptic memory, makes architecture simpler and more compact.

  6. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  7. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  8. Infrared array detectors. [for astronomical observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Arrays of detectors sensitive to infrared radiation will enable astronomical observations to be made with shorter observing times than with discrete detectors and with good relative spatial accuracy. Systems using such arrays are being developed for astronomy in several regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. An example of an infrared system is given here consisting of a 32x32 element bismuth doped silicon charge injection device array that has been used in an astronomical camera.

  9. Microfabricated wire arrays for Z-pinch.

    SciTech Connect

    Spahn, Olga Blum; Rowen, Adam M.; Cich, Michael Joseph; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Arrington, Christian L.; Nash, Thomas J.; Klem, John Frederick; Romero, Dustin Heinz

    2008-10-01

    Microfabrication methods have been applied to the fabrication of wire arrays suitable for use in Z. Self-curling GaAs/AlGaAs supports were fabricated as an initial route to make small wire arrays (4mm diameter). A strain relief structure that could be integrated with the wire was designed to allow displacements of the anode/cathode connections in Z. Electroplated gold wire arrays with integrated anode/cathode bus connections were found to be sufficiently robust to allow direct handling. Platinum and copper plating processes were also investigated. A process to fabricate wire arrays on any substrate with wire thickness up to 35 microns was developed. Methods to handle and mount these arrays were developed. Fabrication of wire arrays of 20mm diameter was demonstrated, and the path to 40mm array fabrication is clear. With some final investment to show array mounting into Z hardware, the entire process to produce a microfabricated wire array will have been demonstrated.

  10. Recent advances in antiguided diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Jansen, M.; Roth, T. J.; Zmudzinski, C.; Tu, C.; Yun, J.

    1992-06-01

    The paper discusses features of advanced antiguided diode laser arrays optimized for single-spatial-mode operation to high output power. Twenty-element antiguided arrays have been fabricated to operate reproducibly to CW power levels of 0.5 W with 48-50 percent efficiency. These devices were also shown to exhibit thousands of hours of reliable operation. The paper gives special attention to modeling and optimization of multiclad antiguided arrays and presents experimental results on multiclad antiguided arrays fabricated by either of the two techniques, the conventional self-aligned stripe and the complementary self-aligned stripe.

  11. Tapered LSO arrays for small animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongfeng; St. James, Sara; Wu, Yibao; Du, Huini; Qi, Jinyi; Farrell, Richard; Dokhale, Purushottam A.; Shah, Kanai S.; Vaigneur, Keith; Cherry, Simon R.

    2011-01-01

    By using detectors with good depth encoding accuracy (~2 mm), an animal PET scanner can be built with a small ring diameter and thick crystals to simultaneously obtain high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. However, there will be large wedge-shaped gaps between detector modules in such a scanner if traditional cuboid crystal arrays are used in a polygonal arrangement. The gaps can be minimized by using tapered scintillator arrays enabling the sensitivity of the scanner to be further improved. In this work, tapered lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) arrays with different crystal dimensions and different combinations of inter-crystal reflector and crystal surface treatments were manufactured and their performance was evaluated. Arrays were read out from both ends by position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). In the optimal configuration, arrays consisting of 0.5 mm LSO elements could be clearly resolved and a depth of interaction resolution of 2.6 mm was obtained for a 20 mm thick array. For this tapered array, the intrinsic spatial is degraded from 0.67 to 0.75 mm compared to a standard cuboidal array with similar dimensions, while the increase in efficiency is 41%. Tapered scintillator arrays offer the prospect of improvements in sensitivity and sampling for small-bore scanners, without large increases in manufacturing complexity.

  12. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. As a result, these graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays are illustrated with a few examples.

  13. Enhanced reflection from inverse tapered nanocone arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Xiang-Tian; Dai, Qing; Butt, Haider Deng, Sunan; Yetisen, Ali K.; Cruz Vasconcellos, Fernando da; Kangwanwatana, Chuan; Montelongo, Yunuen; Qasim, Malik M.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.

    2014-08-04

    We computationally and experimentally demonstrate enhanced reflection effects displayed by silicon-based inverted nanocone arrays. A 3D finite element model is used to characterize the optical properties of the nanocone arrays with respect to the change in polarization and incident angles. The nanocone arrays are fabricated by e-beam lithography in hexagonal and triangular geometries with a lattice constant of 300 nm. The fabricated devices show a two-fold increase in reflection compared with bare silicon surface, as well as a strong diffraction within the visible and near-infrared spectra. The nanocone arrays may find a variety of applications from optical devices to energy conservation technologies.

  14. Array algebra estimation in signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauhala, U. A.

    A general theory of linear estimators called array algebra estimation is interpreted in some terms of multidimensional digital signal processing, mathematical statistics, and numerical analysis. The theory has emerged during the past decade from the new field of a unified vector, matrix and tensor algebra called array algebra. The broad concepts of array algebra and its estimation theory cover several modern computerized sciences and technologies converting their established notations and terminology into one common language. Some concepts of digital signal processing are adopted into this language after a review of the principles of array algebra estimation and its predecessors in mathematical surveying sciences.

  15. Aluminum Nanowire Arrays via Directed Assembly.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Nathan T; Merlo, Juan M; Rose, Aaron H; Calm, Yitzi M; Kempa, Krzysztof; Burns, Michael J; Naughton, Michael J

    2015-11-11

    Freestanding and vertically-oriented metal nanowire arrays have potential utility in a number of applications, but presently lack a route to fabrication. Template-based techniques, such as electrodeposition into lithographically defined nanopore arrays, have produced well-ordered nanowire arrays with a maximum pitch of about 2 μm; such nanowires, however, tend to cluster due to local attractive forces. Here, we modify this template fabrication method to produce well-ordered, vertically-oriented, freestanding Al nanowire arrays, etched from an underlying Al substrate, with highly tunable pitch. In addition, optical measurements demonstrated that the nanowires support the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons.

  16. Parallel scheduling of recursively defined arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, T. J.; Gokhale, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    A new method of automatic generation of concurrent programs which constructs arrays defined by sets of recursive equations is described. It is assumed that the time of computation of an array element is a linear combination of its indices, and integer programming is used to seek a succession of hyperplanes along which array elements can be computed concurrently. The method can be used to schedule equations involving variable length dependency vectors and mutually recursive arrays. Portions of the work reported here have been implemented in the PS automatic program generation system.

  17. Silver nanorod arrays for photocathode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilayurganapathy, Subramanian; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Varga, Tamas; Coffey, Greg; Schwenzer, Birgit; Pandey, Archana; Kayani, Asghar; Hess, Wayne P.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-10-01

    We explore the use of plasmonic Ag nanorod arrays featuring enhanced photoemission as high-brightness photocathode material. Silver nanorod arrays are synthesized by the direct current electrodeposition method and their dimensionality, uniformity, crystallinity, and oxide/impurity content are characterized. The yielded arrays exhibit greatly enhanced two-photon photoemission under 400 nm femtosecond pulsed laser excitation. Plasmonic field enhancement in the array produces photoemission hot spots that are mapped using photoemission electron microscopy. The relative photoemission enhancement of nanorod hot spots relative to that of a flat Ag thin film is found to range between 102 and 3 × 103.

  18. Airborne Electronically Steerable Phased Array (AESPA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The basic concept and design of a flatplate-fed transmission array are described and system performance requirements are summarized. Particular emphasis is given to the design of the aperture, the radiating element, the phase shifter, the flatplate feed, and the mechanical support structure. Fabrication and testing techniques are considered. Of the three major parameters of interest in demonstrating the performance capabilities of the transmissive array, beamwidth was shown to be the least sensitive to system amplitude and phase errors. Beam pointing angle was also shown to be relatively insensitive to errors. Close agreement between measured and calculated values was found for array gain. The greatest difference was found for array sidelone level.

  19. Serial multiplier arrays for parallel computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, Kel

    1990-01-01

    Arrays of systolic serial-parallel multiplier elements are proposed as an alternative to conventional SIMD mesh serial adder arrays for applications that are multiplication intensive and require few stored operands. The design and operation of a number of multiplier and array configurations featuring locality of connection, modularity, and regularity of structure are discussed. A design methodology combining top-down and bottom-up techniques is described to facilitate development of custom high-performance CMOS multiplier element arrays as well as rapid synthesis of simulation models and semicustom prototype CMOS components. Finally, a differential version of NORA dynamic circuits requiring a single-phase uncomplemented clock signal introduced for this application.

  20. The Very Large Ecological Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, M. P.; Dawson, T. E.; Thompson, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Regional climatic change and variability is expected to alter the boundary conditions to which ecosystems and landscapes are subject. Unambiguously identifying how these changes alter the biophysics of ecosystems or the phenology or behavior of individual organisms, however, remains challenging due to the complexity and heterogeneity of real landscapes. One of the aims of the Very Large Ecological Array (VeLEA) - a landscape-scale distributed wireless environmental monitoring system under deployment at the University of California, Blue Oak Ranch Reserve (Mount Hamilton Range, Santa Clara County, California) - is to allow a sufficiently fine-resolution understanding of spatial and temporal variability in the landscape that such changes can be reliably quantified. The VeLEA is structured around two wireless mesh radio networks, with solar-powered nodes spaced by up to 2 miles. This allows widely distributed arrays of instrumentation to be deployed over hundreds to thousands of hectares. The first network supports ten weather stations (recording barometric pressure, temperature, humidity, wind, rainfall, total solar radiation and leaf wetness), along with sixty nodes measuring humidity and air temperature at 1m above ground. Future deployments will extend the network to include soil moisture, soil temperature, piezometric head and streamflow across the site. The second network supports an array of 10 networked cameras providing real-time viewing and time-lapse recording of animal behavior, vegetation phenology and aquatic variability. An important goal of the VeLEA project is to optimize the deployment of wireless nodes with respect to spatial and temporal variation at the site. Preliminary data obtained from the initial deployments are being used to characterize spatial and temporal variability across the site and to investigate mechanistic and statistical methods for interpolating and up-scaling that data. Observing and characterizing such spatio

  1. Rigorous investigation of the array-tilt aberration for hexagonal, optical phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Milo W; Wyman, Jason E; Tyler, Glenn A

    2014-04-10

    An investigation of the array-tilt aberration for hexagonal, optical phased arrays is presented. The investigation begins with theoretical derivations of the far-zone radiated field, the array factor, and the far-field radiated power for the seven-element hexagonal array with array tilt present. Physical insights gained from this analysis are discussed. An analytical treatment of correlation-based array-tilt estimators is also undertaken. Two novel array-tilt estimation techniques are developed from the analysis. The new techniques are shown to be significantly more efficient computationally than the traditional estimation approach. Simulation and experimental results are presented to validate the new array-tilt estimation methods.

  2. On analytic design of loudspeaker arrays with uniform radiation characteristics

    PubMed

    Aarts; Janssen

    2000-01-01

    Some notes on analytical derived loudspeaker arrays with uniform radiation characteristics are presented. The array coefficients are derived via analytical means and compared with so-called maximal flat sequences known from telecommunications and information theory. It appears that the newly derived array, i.e., the quadratic phase array, has a higher efficiency than the Bessel array and a flatter response than the Barker array. The method discussed admits generalization to the design of arrays with desired nonuniform radiating characteristics.

  3. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  4. UAVSAR Active Electronically Scanned Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory, A.; Chamberlain, Neil F.; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Brown, Kyle M.; Fisher, Charles D.; Figueroa, Harry S.; Hamilton, Gary A.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Vorperian, Vatche; Grando, Maurio B.

    2011-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a pod-based, L-band (1.26 GHz), repeatpass, interferometric, synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Repeat-pass interferometric radar measurements from an airborne platform require an antenna that can be steered to maintain the same angle with respect to the flight track over a wide range of aircraft yaw angles. In order to be able to collect repeat-pass InSAR data over a wide range of wind conditions, UAVSAR employs an active electronically scanned array (AESA). During data collection, the UAVSAR flight software continuously reads the aircraft attitude state measured by the Embedded GPS/INS system (EGI) and electronically steers the beam so that it remains perpendicular to the flight track throughout the data collection

  5. Multilayer Ferritin Array for Bionanobattery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R., Jr. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A thin-film electrode for a bio-nanobattery is produced by consecutively depositing arrays of a ferritin protein on a substrate, employing a spin self-assembly procedure. By this procedure, a first ferritin layer is first formed on the substrate, followed by building a second, oppositely-charged ferritin layer on the top of the first ferritin layer to form a bilayer structure. Oppositely-charged ferritin layers are subsequently deposited on top of each other until a desired number of bilayer structures is produced. An ordered, uniform, stable and robust, thin-film electrode material of enhanced packing density is presented, which provides optimal charge density for the bio-nanobattery.

  6. Arrays of ultrasmall metal rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Deepak K.; Krotkov, Robert V.; Xiang, Hongqi; Xu, Ting; Russell, Thomas P.; Tuominen, Mark T.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method to fabricate ultra-high-density hexagonal arrays of ferromagnetic nanorings having 13 nm outer diameter, 5 nm inner diameter and 5 nm thickness. Cobalt magnetic nanorings were fabricated using a self-assembled diblock copolymer template with an angular evaporation of metal followed by an ion-beam etching. Magnetic measurements and theoretical calculations suggest that, at low fields, only the single domain and vortex states are important for rings of this size. The measured magnetization as a function of applied field shows a hysteresis that is consistent. These ultrasmall ferromagnetic rings have potential use in magnetic memory devices due to the simplicity of the preparation coupled with the ultra-high-density and geometry-controlled switching. This fabrication technique can be extended to other materials for applications in optics, sensing and nanoscale research.

  7. Wind farm array wake losses

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.; McCarthy, E.F.

    1997-12-31

    A wind turbine wake study was conducted in the summer of 1987 at an Altamont Pass wind electric generating facility. The wind speed deficits, turbulence, and power deficits from an array consisting of several rows of wind turbines is discussed. A total of nine different test configurations were evaluated for a downwind spacing ranging from 7 rotor diameters (RD) to 34 RD and a cross wind spacing of 1.3 RD and 2.7 RD. Wake power deficits of 15% were measured at 16 RD and power losses of a few percent were even measurable at 27 RD for the closer cross wind spacing. For several rows of turbines separated by 7-9 RD the wake zones overlapped and formed compound wakes with higher velocity deficits. The wind speed and direction turbulence in the wake was much higher than the ambient turbulence. The results from this study are compared to the findings from other similar field measurements.

  8. Gigapixel imaging with microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Antony; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2016-03-01

    A crucial part of the drug discovery process involves imaging the response of thousands of cell cultures to candidate drugs. Quantitative parameters from these "high content screens", such as protein expression and cell morphology, are extracted from fluorescence and brightfield micrographs. Due to the sheer number of cells that need to imaged for adequate statistics, the imaging time itself is a major bottleneck. Automated microscopes image small fields-of-view (FOVs) serially, which are then stitched together to form gigapixel-scale mosaics. We have developed a microscopy architecture that reduces mechanical overhead of traditional large field-of-view by parallelizing the image capture process. Instead of a single objective lens imaging FOVs one by one, we employ a microlens array for continuous photon capture, resulting in a 3-fold throughput increase. In this contribution, we present the design and imaging results of this microscopy architecture in three different contrast modes: multichannel fluorescence, hyperspectral fluorescence and brightfield.

  9. Conformable eddy current array delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summan, Rahul; Pierce, Gareth; Macleod, Charles; Mineo, Carmelo; Riise, Jonathan; Morozov, Maxim; Dobie, Gordon; Bolton, Gary; Raude, Angélique; Dalpé, Colombe; Braumann, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The external surface of stainless steel containers used for the interim storage of nuclear material may be subject to Atmospherically Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (AISCC). The inspection of such containers poses a significant challenge due to the large quantities involved; therefore, automating the inspection process is of considerable interest. This paper reports upon a proof-of-concept project concerning the automated NDT of a set of test containers containing artificially generated AISCCs. An Eddy current array probe with a conformable padded surface from Eddyfi was used as the NDT sensor and end effector on a KUKA KR5 arc HW robot. A kinematically valid cylindrical raster scan path was designed using the KUKA|PRC path planning software. Custom software was then written to interface measurement acquisition from the Eddyfi hardware with the motion control of the robot. Preliminary results and analysis are presented from scanning two canisters.

  10. Global Arrays Parallel Programming Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Nieplocha, Jaroslaw; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tipparaju, Vinod; Harrison, Robert J.; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The two predominant classes of programming models for parallel computing are distributed memory and shared memory. Both shared memory and distributed memory models have advantages and shortcomings. Shared memory model is much easier to use but it ignores data locality/placement. Given the hierarchical nature of the memory subsystems in modern computers this characteristic can have a negative impact on performance and scalability. Careful code restructuring to increase data reuse and replacing fine grain load/stores with block access to shared data can address the problem and yield performance for shared memory that is competitive with message-passing. However, this performance comes at the cost of compromising the ease of use that the shared memory model advertises. Distributed memory models, such as message-passing or one-sided communication, offer performance and scalability but they are difficult to program. The Global Arrays toolkit attempts to offer the best features of both models. It implements a shared-memory programming model in which data locality is managed by the programmer. This management is achieved by calls to functions that transfer data between a global address space (a distributed array) and local storage. In this respect, the GA model has similarities to the distributed shared-memory models that provide an explicit acquire/release protocol. However, the GA model acknowledges that remote data is slower to access than local data and allows data locality to be specified by the programmer and hence managed. GA is related to the global address space languages such as UPC, Titanium, and, to a lesser extent, Co-Array Fortran. In addition, by providing a set of data-parallel operations, GA is also related to data-parallel languages such as HPF, ZPL, and Data Parallel C. However, the Global Array programming model is implemented as a library that works with most languages used for technical computing and does not rely on compiler technology for achieving

  11. The Low Frequency Space Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, Brian; Weiler, K. W.; Johnston, K. J.; Simon, R. S.; Spencer, J. H.; Hammarstrom, L. M.; Wilhelm, P. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Fainberg, J.

    1987-01-01

    The Low Frequency Space Array (LFSA) is a conceptual mission to survey the entire sky and to image individual sources at frequencies between 1.5 and 26 MHz, a frequency range over which the earth's ionosphere transmits poorly or not at all. With high resolution, high sensitivity observations, a new window will be opened in the electromagnetic spectrum for astronomical investigation. Also, extending observations down to such low frequencies will bring astronomy to the fundamental limit below which the galaxy becomes optically thick due to free-free absorption. A number of major scientific goals can be pursued with such a mission, including mapping galactic emission and absorption, studies of individual source spectra in a frequency range where a number of important processes may play a role, high resolution imaging of extended sources, localization of the impulsive emission from Jupiter, and a search for coherent emission processes.

  12. Remotely Monitored Sealing Array Software

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-12

    The Remotely Monitored Sealing Array (RMSA) utilizes the Secure Sensor Platform (SSP) framework to establish the fundamental operating capabilities for communication, security, power management, and cryptography. In addition to the SSP framework the RMSA software has unique capabilities to support monitoring a fiber optic seal. Fiber monitoring includes open and closed as well as parametric monitoring to detect tampering attacks. The fiber monitoring techniques, using the SSP power management processes, allow the seals to last for years while maintaining the security requirements of the monitoring application. The seal is enclosed in a tamper resistant housing with software to support active tamper monitoring. New features include LED notification of fiber closure, the ability to retrieve the entire fiber optic history via translator command, separate memory storage for fiber optic events, and a more robust method for tracking and resending failed messages.

  13. Camp Blanding Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee,Richard; Christian, Hugh; Bailey, Jeffrey; Hall, John; Uman, Martin; Jordan, Doug; Krehbiel, Paul; Rison, William; Edens, Harald

    2011-01-01

    A seven station, short base-line Lightning Mapping Array was installed at the Camp Blanding International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) during April 2011. This network will support science investigations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) and lightning initiation using rocket triggered lightning at the ICLRT. The network operations and data processing will be carried out through a close collaboration between several organizations, including the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, University of Florida, and New Mexico Tech. The deployment was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The network does not have real-time data dissemination. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

  14. A Portable Diode Array Spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, David

    2016-05-01

    A cheap portable visible light spectrometer is presented. The spectrometer uses readily sourced items and could be constructed by anyone with a knowledge of electronics. The spectrometer covers the wavelength range 450-725 nm with a resolution better than 5 nm. The spectrometer uses a diffraction grating to separate wavelengths, which are detected using a 128-element diode array, the output of which is analyzed using a microprocessor. The spectrum is displayed on a small liquid crystal display screen and can be saved to a micro SD card for later analysis. Battery life (2 × AAA) is estimated to be 200 hours. The overall dimensions of the unit are 120 × 65 × 60 mm, and it weighs about 200 g.

  15. Infrared-Bolometer Arrays with Reflective Backshorts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Abrahams, John; Allen, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated circuits that incorporate square arrays of superconducting-transition- edge bolometers with optically reflective backshorts are being developed for use in image sensors in the spectral range from far infrared to millimeter wavelengths. To maximize the optical efficiency (and, thus, sensitivity) of such a sensor at a specific wavelength, resonant optical structures are created by placing the backshorts at a quarter wavelength behind the bolometer plane. The bolometer and backshort arrays are fabricated separately, then integrated to form a single unit denoted a backshort-under-grid (BUG) bolometer array. In a subsequent fabrication step, the BUG bolometer array is connected, by use of single-sided indium bump bonding, to a readout device that comprises mostly a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer circuit. The resulting sensor unit comprising the BUG bolometer array and the readout device is operated at a temperature below 1 K. The concept of increasing optical efficiency by use of backshorts at a quarter wavelength behind the bolometers is not new. Instead, the novelty of the present development lies mainly in several features of the design of the BUG bolometer array and the fabrication sequence used to implement the design. Prior to joining with the backshort array, the bolometer array comprises, more specifically, a square grid of free-standing molybdenum/gold superconducting-transition-edge bolometer elements on a 1.4- m-thick top layer of silicon that is part of a silicon support frame made from a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The backshort array is fabricated separately as a frame structure that includes support beams and contains a correspond - ing grid of optically reflective patches on a single-crystal silicon substrate. The process used to fabricate the bolometer array includes standard patterning and etching steps that result in the formation of deep notches in the silicon support frame. These notches are designed to

  16. Simultaneous use of multiple seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipčević, J.; Kennett, B. L. N.; Tkalčić, H.

    2017-01-01

    Seismic arrays provide an important means of enhancing seismic signals and determining the directional properties of the wavefield by beam-forming. When multiple arrays are to be used together, the viewpoint needs to be modified from looking outwards from each array to focusing on a specific target area and so constraining the portions of the waveforms to be analysed. Beam-forming for each array is supplemented by the relative time constraints for propagation from the target to each array to provide tight spatial control. Simultaneous multiple array analysis provides a powerful tool for source characterisation, and for structural analysis of scatterers as virtual sources. The multiple array concept allows us to illuminate a specific point in the Earth from many different directions and thus map detailed patterns of heterogeneity in the Earth. Furthermore, illumination of the structure from multiple directions using data from the same event minimizes source effects to provide clearer images of heterogeneity. The analysis is based on a similar concept to the back-projection technique, where a part of the seismic wavetrain is mapped to a specific point in space by ray-tracing. In contrast to classic back-projection where the incoming energy is mapped onto a horizontal plane with limited vertical resolution, the multi-array method controls depth response by combining relative time constraints between the arrays and conventional beam-forming. We illustrate this approach with application to two earthquakes at moderate depth. The results show that the use of simultaneous multiple arrays can provide improvement both in signal quality and resolution, with the additional benefit of being able to accurately locate the source of the incoming energy and map large areas with only a limited number of such arrays.

  17. JPL Large Advanced Antenna Station Array Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In accordance with study requirements, two antennas are described: a 30 meter standard antenna and a 34 meter modified antenna, along with a candidate array configuration for each. Modified antenna trade analyses are summarized, risks analyzed, costs presented, and a final antenna array configuration recommendation made.

  18. Array Processor Has Power and Flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, G. H.; Lundstrom, S. F.; Shafer, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed processor architecture would have flexibility of a multi-processor and computational power of a lockstep array. Using an efficient interconnection network, it accomodates a large number of individual processors and memory modules. Array architecture would be suitable for very large scientific simulation problems and other applications.

  19. A synthesis array for lunar submillimeter astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a system concept for a synthesis array for lunar submillimeter astronomy (SALSA). It includes a brief discussion of the science objectives and the advantages of a placing such an array on the moon, the system concept, and a top-level discussion of the various subsystems, including the technology drivers associated with each.

  20. Si:As BIB detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bharat, R.; Petroff, M. D.; Speer, J. J.; Stapelbroek, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights of the results obtained on arsenic-doped silicon blocked impurity band (BIB) detectors and arrays since the invention of the BIB concept a few years ago are presented. After a brief introduction and a description of the BIB concept, data will be given on single detector performance. Then different arrays that were fabricated will be described and test data presented.

  1. Scattering by a Truncated Periodic Array.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    those near the truncated edges of the array. This edge effect is clearly noticeable from the computed data and leads one to conclude that the simple...findings of this work are summarized as follows: (1) The edge effect is clearly observable and should not be ignored; (2) The array scat- ters strongly in

  2. MMIC Phased Array Demonstrations with ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A. (Compiler); Martzaklis, Konstantinos (Compiler); Zakrajsek, Robert J. (Compiler); Andro, Monty (Compiler); Turtle, John P.

    1996-01-01

    Over a one year period from May 1994 to May 1995, a number of demonstrations were conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in which voice, data, and/or video links were established via NASA's advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) between the ACTS link evaluation terminal (LET) in Cleveland, OH, and aeronautical and mobile or fixed Earth terminals having monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array antenna systems. This paper describes four of these. In one, a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice (and in one case video as well) links between the ACTS and an Army vehicle. The fourth demonstrated a high data rate downlink from ACTS to a fixed terminal. Array antenna systems used in these demonstrations were developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and Air Force experimental arrays using gallium arsenide MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The single 30 GHz transmit array was developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments. The three 20 GHz receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force array development contracts with Boeing and Lockheed Martin. The paper describes the four proof-of-concept arrays and the array control system. The system configured for each of the demonstrations is described, and results are discussed.

  3. An experimental X band phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. P. R.; Limaye, K. U.; Ramalingam, R. P.; Gangadharan, T. S.; Bhandopadhyay, G.; Deshpande, P. A.

    1983-10-01

    The details of an X band experimental 11 x 11 element Phased Array Antenna of phased lens configuration with a monopulse space feed developed at LRDE are presented. The studies carried and the results obtained on collimation, beam steering, pattern variation with scan, array operation in two-dimensional search, dedicated track and track while scan (TWS) are also given.

  4. Array Of Rockets For Multicrewmember Evacuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    Emergency egress system undergoing development for aircraft and aerospace vehicles uses fixed array of tractor rockets to eject crewmembers. Crewmembers hook up to tractor rockets and fire them unaided. Positioned as unit in ready-to-use orientation during flight operations. On ground, swung out of way. Rocket array also mounts under exit hatch, serving as egress ramp.

  5. The SKA New Instrumentation: Aperture Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ardenne, A.; Faulkner, A. J.; de Vaate, J. G. bij

    The radio frequency window of the Square Kilometre Array is planned to cover the wavelength regime from cm up to a few meters. For this range to be optimally covered, different antenna concepts are considered enabling many science cases. At the lowest frequency range, up to a few GHz, it is expected that multi-beam techniques will be used, increasing the effective field-of-view to a level that allows very efficient detailed and sensitive exploration of the complete sky. Although sparse narrow band phased arrays are as old as radio astronomy, multi-octave sparse and dense arrays now being considered for the SKA, requiring new low noise design, signal processing and calibration techniques. These new array techniques have already been successfully introduced as phased array feeds upgrading existing reflecting telescopes and for new telescopes to enhance the aperture efficiency as well as greatly increasing their field-of-view (van Ardenne et al., Proc IEEE 97(8):2009) by [1]. Aperture arrays use phased arrays without any additional reflectors; the phased array elements are small enough to see most of the sky intrinsically offering a large field of view.

  6. Evaluation of space station solar array technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The research concerning lightweight solar array assemblies since 1970 is reported. A bibliography of abstracts of documents used for reference during this period is included along with an evaluation of available solar array technology. A list of recommended technology programs is presented.

  7. Operation of NIST Josephson Array Voltage Standards

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Clark A.; Burroughs, Charles; Chieh, Kao

    1990-01-01

    This paper begins with a brief discussion of the physical principles and history of Josephson effect voltage standards. The main body of the paper deals with the practical details of the array design, cryoprobe construction, bias source requirements, adjustment of the system for optimum performance, calibration algorithms, and an assessment of error sources for the NIST-developed Josephson array standard. PMID:28179776

  8. Advanced dynamic pyroelectric focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglaub, Ricardo A. G.; Celinska, Jolanta B.; McWilliams, Christopher R.; Paz de Araujo, Carlos A.; Forbes, Timothy; Pankin, Jayson D.

    2010-04-01

    The pyroelectric effect has been characterized for single-pixel elements consisting of strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) ferroelectric material as the sensing elements. These pixels have been integrated into second-generation focal plane arrays. The constituent second-generation pixels include thermal insulating layers and an infrared absorber layer. The MEMS-less arrays are operated in active mode, a technique that eliminates radiation choppers found in other passive pyroelectric IR imagers. This paper addresses the results of precursor 2x2 to 14x14 second-generation arrays of SBT elements, the active detection mechanism, and the unique read-out, interrogation signal, and the synchronization electronics. The second-generation 14x14 pixels array was implemented to demonstrate the performance of an active pyroelectric array as a precursor to larger size arrays using different pixel dimensions. The active mode detection eliminates the use of a chopper, enables the dynamic partition of the array into pixel domains in which pixel sensitivity in the domains can be adjusted independently. This unique feature in IR detection can be applied to the simultaneous tracking of diverse contrast objects. In addition, by controlling the thickness of the absorber material the arrays can be optimized for maximum response at specified wavelengths by means of quarter-wavelength interferometry.

  9. Dual band QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Choi, Kwong Kit (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) that provides two-color image sensing. Two different quantum wells are configured to absorb two different wavelengths. The QWIPs are arrayed in a focal plane array (FPA). The two-color QWIPs are selected for readout by selective electrical contact with the two different QWIPs or by the use of two different wavelength sensitive gratings.

  10. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Brandon; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry.

  11. Law of substitution for mixed arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Koudelka, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear safety justification of a mixed array of dissimilar fissile units of metal units and dilute solution units, according to Clayton, has been a persistent and nagging problem. Dissimilar uranium metal or dissimilar uranium solution units in a mixed array can also create a modeling nightmare for the nuclear criticality safety engineer. Now, a calculational method known as the Law of Substitution has been developed to ensure that the k/sub eff/ of an array of uranium metal and uranium solution units will satisfy any k/sub eff/ limit set by the nuclear safety engineer. The nuclear criticality safety engineer can utilize the Law of Substitution to safely mix or substitute different uranium metal units, different uranium solution units, and more importantly, uranium metal and dilute UO/sub 2/ solution units in an array. The Law of Substitution is as follows: (1) calculate the k/sub eff/ of each unit type in its own infinite planar array. (2) Determine the edge-to-edge spacing of the infinite planar array of each type of unit to satisfy a desired k/sub eff/. (3) Select the largest edge-to-edge spacing from among the similar units in their infinite planar arrays and use that spacing for the finite or infinite planar array of mixed units.

  12. Spectral stability of Taylor's vortex array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Tobak, M.

    1986-01-01

    In a global sense it is shown that the two-dimensional Taylor vortex array, an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, is absolutely and monotonically stable with respect to infinitesimal disturbances of all discrete frequencies as long as the viscosity is positive. It is suggested that the Taylor vortex array may also be stable with respect to finite amplitude disturbances.

  13. Glasses for Solar-Cell Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Report presents data on glass for encapsulation of solar-cell arrays, with special emphasis on materials and processes for automated high-volume production of low-cost arrays. Commercial suppliers of glass are listed. Factors that affect the cost of glass are examined: type (sheet, float, or plate), formulation, and energy consumed in manufacturing.

  14. A SQUID series array dc current sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, J.; Drung, D.

    2008-09-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors are used to sense changes in various physical quantities, which can be transformed into changes in the magnetic flux threading the SQUID loop. We have developed a novel SQUID array dc current sensor. The device is based on a series array of identical dc SQUIDs. An input signal current to be measured is coupled tightly but non-uniformly to the SQUID array elements. The input signal coupling to the individual array elements is chosen such that a single-valued, non-periodic overall voltage response is obtained. Flux offsets in the individual SQUIDs which would compromise the sensor voltage response are avoided or can be compensated. We present simulations and experimental results on the SQUID Array for Dc (SQUAD) current sensor current sensor performance. A dc current resolution of <1 nA in a measurement bandwidth of 0-25 Hz is achieved for an input inductance of LIn<3 nH.

  15. Residential photovoltaic module and array requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nearhoof, S. L.; Oster, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in residential applications were identified. Building codes and referenced standards were reviewed for their applicability to residential photovoltaic array installations. Four installation types were identified - integral (replaces roofing), direct (mounted on top of roofing), stand-off (mounted away from roofing), and rack (for flat or low slope roofs, or ground mounted). Installation costs were developed for these mounting types as a function of panel/module size. Studies were performed to identify optimum module shapes and sizes and operating voltage cost drivers. It is concluded that there are no perceived major obstacles to the use of photovoltaic modules in residential arrays. However, there is no applicable building code category for residential photovoltaic modules and arrays and additional work with standards writing organizations is needed to develop residential module and array requirements.

  16. The Atacama Compact Array: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, S.; Wilson, T. L.

    2010-01-01

    When completed, ALMA will comprise a 12-meter diameter antennas array (12-m Array) of a minimum of fifty antennas, and the ACA (Atacama Compact Array), composed of four 12-meter diameter antennas and twelve 7-meter diameter antennas. Out of the fifty antennas of the 12-m Array, one-half are provided by the North American partners of ALMA, the other half by the European partners. The sixteen antennas that will comprise the ACA are provided by the East Asian Partners of ALMA. In the last issue of the ALMA Science Newsletter, we outlined the testing of the prototype ALMA 12-meter diameter antennas and the procurement process for these antennas. In that article, only a short account was given of the antennas for the Atacama Compact Array (ACA). In the following we give an overview of the ACA, starting with an introduction to imaging using interferometers.

  17. Thermopile Detector Arrays for Space Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M. C.; Kenyon, M.; Krueger, T. R.; McCann, T. A.; Chacon, R.; Jones, E. W.; Dickie, M. R.; Schofield, J. T.; McCleese, D. J.; Gaalema, S.

    2004-01-01

    Thermopile detectors are widely used in uncooled applications where small numbers of detectors are required, particularly in low-cost commercial applications or applications requiring accurate radiometry. Arrays of thermopile detectors, however, have not been developed to the extent of uncooled bolometer and pyroelectric/ferroelectric arrays. Efforts at JPL seek to remedy this deficiency by developing high performance thin-film thermopile detectors in both linear and two-dimensional formats. The linear thermopile arrays are produced by bulk micromachining and wire bonded to separate CMOS readout electronic chips. Such arrays are currently being fabricated for the Mars Climate Sounder instrument, scheduled for launch in 2005. Progress is also described towards realizing a two-dimensional thermopile array built over CMOS readout circuitry in the substrate.

  18. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  19. Analyzing Array Manipulating Programs by Program Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, J. Robert M.; Gange, Graeme; Navas, Jorge A.; Schachte, Peter; Sondergaard, Harald; Stuckey, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    We explore a transformational approach to the problem of verifying simple array-manipulating programs. Traditionally, verification of such programs requires intricate analysis machinery to reason with universally quantified statements about symbolic array segments, such as "every data item stored in the segment A[i] to A[j] is equal to the corresponding item stored in the segment B[i] to B[j]." We define a simple abstract machine which allows for set-valued variables and we show how to translate programs with array operations to array-free code for this machine. For the purpose of program analysis, the translated program remains faithful to the semantics of array manipulation. Based on our implementation in LLVM, we evaluate the approach with respect to its ability to extract useful invariants and the cost in terms of code size.

  20. Phase array calibration orthogonal phase sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorace, Ronald E. (Inventor); Reinhardt, Victor S. (Inventor); Chan, Clinton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and systems for calibrating an array antenna are described. The array antenna has a plurality of antenna elements each having a signal with a phase and an amplitude forming an array antenna signal. For calibration, the phase of each element signal is sequentially switched one at a time through four orthogonal phase states. At each orthogonal phase state, the power of the array antenna signal is measured. A phase and an amplitude error for each of the element signals is determined based on the power of the array antenna signal at each of the four orthogonal phase states. The phase and amplitude of each of the element signals is then adjusted by the corresponding phase and amplitude errors.

  1. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Radko, Ilya P; Evlyukhin, Andrey B; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2008-03-17

    Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive index increases inside the array by a factor of approximately 1.08 (for the wavelength 800 nm) with respect to the SPP index at a flat surface. Observations of SPP focusing and deflection by circularly shaped areas as well as SPP waveguiding inside rectangular arrays are consistent with the SPP index increase deduced from the SPP refraction by triangular arrays. The SPP refractive index is found to decrease slightly for longer wavelengths within the wavelength range of 700-860 nm. Modeling based on the Green's tensor formalism is in a good agreement with the experimental results, opening the possibility to design nanoparticle arrays for specific applications requiring in-plane SPP manipulation.

  2. Active floating micro electrode arrays (AFMA).

    PubMed

    Kim, T; Troyk, P R; Bak, M

    2006-01-01

    Neuroscientists have widely used metal microelectrodes inserted into the cortex to record neural signals from, and provide electrical stimulation to, neural tissue for many years. Recently, the demand for implanting electrode arrays within the cortex, for both stimulation and recording, has rapidly increased. We are developing Active-floating-micro-electrode-arrays (AFMA) that are intended for use as a multielectrode cortical interface while minimizing the number of wires leading from the array to extra-dural circuitry or connectors. When combined with a wireless module, these new microelectrode arrays should allow for simulation and recording within free-roaming animals. This paper mainly discusses the design, fabrication, and packing of the first generation AFMA. Our long-term vision is a wireless-transmission electrode system, for stimulation and recording in free-roaming animals, which uses a family of modular active implantable electrode arrays.

  3. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  4. Evolutionary Technique for Designing Optimized Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villazón, J.; Ibañez, A.

    2011-06-01

    Many ultrasonic inspection applications in the industry could benefit from the use of phased array distributions specifically designed for them. Some common design requirements are: to adapt the shape of the array to that of the part to be inspected, to use large apertures for increasing lateral resolution, to find a layout of elements that avoids artifacts produced by lateral and/or grating lobes, to maintain the total number of independent elements (and the number of control channels) as low as possible to reduce complexity and cost of the inspection system. Recent advances in transducer technology have made possible to design and build arrays whit non-regular layout of elements. In this paper we propose to use Evolutionary Algorithms to find layouts of ultrasonic arrays (whether 1D or 2D array) that approach a set of specified beampattern characteristics using a low number of elements.

  5. Acoustic positioning using multiple microphone arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Milios, Evangelos

    2005-05-01

    Passive acoustic techniques are presented to solve the localization problem of a sound source in three-dimensional space using off-the-shelf hardware. Multiple microphone arrays are employed, which operate independently, in estimating the direction of arrival of sound, or, equivalently, a direction vector from the array's geometric center towards the source. Direction vectors and array centers are communicated to a central processor, where the source is localized by finding the intersection of the direction lines defined by the direction vectors and the associated array centers. The performance of the method in the air is demonstrated experimentally and compared with a state-of-the-art method that requires centralized digitization of the signals from the microphones of all the arrays.

  6. SMEX-Lite Modular Solar Array Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, John W.; Day, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Small Explorer (SMEX) missions have typically had three years between mission definition and launch. This short schedule has posed significant challenges with respect to solar array design and procurement. Typically, the solar panel geometry is frozen prior to going out with a procurement. However, with the SMEX schedule, it has been virtually impossible to freeze the geometry in time to avoid scheduling problems with integrating the solar panels to the spacecraft. A modular solar array architecture was developed to alleviate this problem. This approach involves procuring sufficient modules for multiple missions and assembling the modules onto a solar array framework that is unique to each mission. The modular approach removes the solar array from the critical path of the SMEX integration and testing schedule. It also reduces the cost per unit area of the solar arrays and facilitates the inclusion of experiments involving new solar cell or panel technologies in the SMEX missions.

  7. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: Performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, D.; Allison, J. R.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bignall, H. E.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hegarty, S.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B. T.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; Popping, A.; Raja, W.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Voronkov, M. A.; Whiting, M.; Amy, S. W.; Axtens, P.; Ball, L.; Bateman, T. J.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Brown, A. J.; Bunton, J. D.; Cheng, W.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Feain, I.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Guzman, J. C.; Hampson, G. A.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Joseph, J.; Koribalski, B. S.; Leach, M.; Lensson, E. S.; MacLeod, A.; Mackay, S.; Marquarding, M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Mirtschin, P.; Mitchell, D.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R.; Pearce, S.; Qiao, R. Y.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Shields, M.; Shimwell, T. W.; Storey, M.; Troup, E.; Turner, B.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Wark, R. M.; Westmeier, T.; Wilson, C.; Wilson, T.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array, the prototype for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. Boolardy Engineering Test Array is the first aperture synthesis radio telescope to use phased array feed technology, giving it the ability to electronically form up to nine dual-polarisation beams. We report the methods developed for forming and measuring the beams, and the adaptations that have been made to the traditional calibration and imaging procedures in order to allow BETA to function as a multi-beam aperture synthesis telescope. We describe the commissioning of the instrument and present details of Boolardy Engineering Test Array's performance: sensitivity, beam characteristics, polarimetric properties, and image quality. We summarise the astronomical science that it has produced and draw lessons from operating Boolardy Engineering Test Array that will be relevant to the commissioning and operation of the final Australian Square Kilometre Array Path telescope.

  8. Array-on-Array Strategy For Activity-Based Enzyme Profiling.

    PubMed

    Sieow, Brendan Fu-Long; Uttamchandani, Mahesh

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel array on array strategy intended to enhance the throughput of enzymatic activity screening using microarrays. This strategy consists of spotting a first array with large droplets of enzymes with varying concentrations and subsequently spotting a second array with small droplets of fluorogenic substrate on top of the enzyme array. By varying the array on array spotting patterns of different classes of enzyme (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, kinases) and their corresponding fluorogenic substrates, we have the unprecedented ability for testing enzymes and mixed samples in a multiplexed fashion within a single microarray slide. This new approach enables rapid enzyme characterization building upon a one enzyme on one slide droplet-based screening concept previously established.

  9. Vertical Acoustic Arrays in the Deep Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, F.

    2002-12-01

    The R/P FLIP has made possible the deployments of vertical arrays to study sound propagation and ambient noise in the deep ocean in ways never before possible from existing research vessels. Long vertical arrays can be deployed without the flow noise contamination from platform motion, long a bane for making such studies. The vertical stability of FLIP combined with the deep mooring capability developed by Earl D. Bronson made it possible to deploy multi-element arrays beginning with a versatile 20 element array with variable spacing developed by Bill Whitney in Fred Spiess's group. The 20 element array consisted of bungee mounted hydrophones in metal cages at either uniform spacing or variable spacing to meet directivity or other requirements. It was assembled on station in the vertical and deployed to the desired depths for the elements. Gerald Morris at MPL conducted ambient noise studies using variable spacing of the elements to below the critical depth as well as in the water column above. Vic Anderson used it for his DIMUS processing system for detecting low level signals masked by ambient noise. As a 500 meter array, I used it for a series of CONTRACK (Continuous Tracking of signals at long range) experiments to resolve multipaths so they wouldn't interfere with one another. The VEKA vertical array developed by Rick Swenson of NORDA was deployed in very deep (below 3300 m) water by Dan Ramsdale of NORDA using the winch and double lay armored cable on FLIP, the same cable system for the MPL 20 element array. In my group Bruce Williams designed a rapidly deployable array to study vertical anisotropy of ambient noise as a function of range from near shore shipping via downslope conversion in a series of 48 hours FLIP stations 350, 1000 and 1500 miles from the Pacific coast. A short 120 element array, 1000 meters long, was built by John Hildebrands's group for a test of matched field processing and the SLICE experiment in acoustic tomography research of Peter

  10. Design theory of microphone arrays for teleconferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macomber, Dwight Frank

    2001-07-01

    Room reverberation and interfering acoustical noise lower the quality of speech transmission in teleconferencing. Conventional solutions for speech capture that suppress pickup of reverberation and interference typically constrain the motion of the speaker, encumber the speaker physically, or make it difficult for many different speakers to easily participate. These impediments result from cables, radio and headset microphones, or so-called house microphones located at fixed positions. Microphone arrays and matched-filter processing have been proposed as solutions to this sound capture problem. In part because the behavior of arrays in reverberant acoustic spaces has not been well quantified, there have been no guidelines for designing effective teleconference arrays. The principal goal of this work is the development of general design rules for speech acquisition arrays. Expressions for the array performance measures of signal-to-reverberation ratio and signal-to-interference ratio are derived using statistical acoustics, then verified by computer simulation using the image method of geometric room acoustics. The analysis is facilitated by assuming the reverberant sound field to be diffuse. The assumption is valid above approximately 250 Hz. All work assumes omnidirectional sources and sensors mounted on walls with low absorption. Array sensors should be placed close to, and roughly equidistant to the source, yet as far from each other as possible. The aperture of a full-band array should extend into three dimensions. Wall and ceiling mounting of sensors is recommended. Relations specify the number of sensors required for various room volumes, room absorptions, and source-to-sensor distances. A planar ceiling array expands the range of motion for speakers by widening the focal region above 300 Hz. Off-line audition of a 32-sensor array in a 60-cubicmeter room with a reverberation time of .63 second indicates that subjectively good array performance may be obtained

  11. Quantitative ultrasonic phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    When imaging with ultrasonic phased arrays, what do we actually image? What quantitative information is contained in the image? Ad-hoc delay-and-sum methods such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and the total focusing method (TFM) fail to answer these questions. We have shown that a new quantitative approach allows the formation of flaw images by explicitly inverting the Thompson-Gray measurement model. To examine the above questions, we have set up a software simulation test bed that considers a 2-D scalar scattering problem of a cylindrical inclusion with the method of separation of variables. It is shown that in SAFT types of imaging the only part of the flaw properly imaged is the front surface specular response of the flaw. Other responses (back surface reflections, creeping waves, etc.) are improperly imaged and form artifacts in the image. In the case of TFM-like imaging the quantity being properly imaged is an angular integration of the front surface reflectivity. The other, improperly imaged responses are also averaged, leading to a reduction in some of the artifacts present. Our results have strong implications for flaw sizing and flaw characterization with delay-and-sum images.

  12. Handheld ultrasound array imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Juin-Jet; Quistgaard, Jens

    1999-06-01

    A handheld ultrasound imaging device, one that weighs less than five pounds, has been developed for diagnosing trauma in the combat battlefield as well as a variety of commercial mobile diagnostic applications. This handheld device consists of four component ASICs, each is designed using the state of the art microelectronics technologies. These ASICs are integrated with a convex array transducer to allow high quality imaging of soft tissues and blood flow in real time. The device is designed to be battery driven or ac powered with built-in image storage and cineloop playback capability. Design methodologies of a handheld device are fundamentally different to those of a cart-based system. As system architecture, signal and image processing algorithm as well as image control circuit and software in this device is deigned suitably for large-scale integration, the image performance of this device is designed to be adequate to the intent applications. To elongate the battery life, low power design rules and power management circuits are incorporated in the design of each component ASIC. The performance of the prototype device is currently being evaluated for various applications such as a primary image screening tool, fetal imaging in Obstetrics, foreign object detection and wound assessment for emergency care, etc.

  13. Redundant arrays of IDE drives

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Sanders et al.

    2002-01-02

    The authors report tests of redundant arrays of IDE disk drives for use in offline high energy physics data analysis. Parts costs of total systems using commodity EIDE disks are now at the $4000 per Terabyte level. Disk storage prices have now decreased to the point where they equal the cost per Terabyte of Storage Technology tape silos. The disks, however, offer far better granularity; even small institutions can afford to deploy systems. The tests include reports on software RAID-5 systems running under Linux 2.4 using Promise Ultra 100{trademark} disk controllers. RAID-5 protects data in case of a single disk failure by providing parity bits. Tape backup is not required. Journaling file systems are used to allow rapid recovery from crashes. The data analysis strategy is to encapsulate data and CPU processing power. Analysis for a particular part of a data set takes place on the PC where the data resides. The network is only used to put results together. They explore three methods of moving data between sites; internet transfers, not pluggable IDE disks in FireWire cases, and DVD-R disks.

  14. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  15. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  16. Large phased-array radars

    SciTech Connect

    Brookner, D.E.

    1988-12-15

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  17. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    DOE PAGES

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; ...

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-rangingmore » lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.« less

  18. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-ranging lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.

  19. Endometrial receptivity array: Clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Human implantation is a complex process requiring synchrony between a healthy embryo and a functionally competent or receptive endometrium. Diagnosis of endometrial receptivity (ER) has posed a challenge and so far most available tests have been subjective and lack accuracy and a predictive value. Microarray technology has allowed identification of the transcriptomic signature of the window of receptivity window of implantation (WOI). This technology has led to the development of a molecular diagnostic tool, the ER array (ERA) for diagnosis of ER. Use of this test in patients with recurrent implantation failure (RIF) has shown that the WOI is displaced in a quarter of these patients and use of a personalized embryo transfer (pET) on the day designated by ERA improves reproductive performance. Our results in the Indian population revealed an endometrial factor in 27.5% RIF patients, which was significantly greater than the non-RIF group 15% (P = 0.04). After pET, the overall ongoing pregnancy rate was 42.4% and implantation rate was 33%, which was at par with our in-vitro fertilization results over 1-year. We also performed ERA in patients with persistently thin endometrium, and it was reassuring to find that the endometrium in 75% of these patients was receptive despite being 6 mm or less. A pregnancy rate of 66.7% was achieved in this group. Though larger studies are required to validate these results ERA has become a useful tool in our diagnostic armamentarium for ER. PMID:26538853

  20. Automated Array Assembly, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The solar cell module process development activities in the areas of surface preparation are presented. The process step development was carried out on texture etching including the evolution of a conceptual process model for the texturing process; plasma etching; and diffusion studies that focused on doped polymer diffusion sources. Cell processing was carried out to test process steps and a simplified diode solar cell process was developed. Cell processing was also run to fabricate square cells to populate sample minimodules. Module fabrication featured the demonstration of a porcelainized steel glass structure that should exceed the 20 year life goal of the low cost silicon array program. High efficiency cell development was carried out in the development of the tandem junction cell and a modification of the TJC called the front surface field cell. Cell efficiencies in excess of 16 percent at AM1 have been attained with only modest fill factors. The transistor-like model was proposed that fits the cell performance and provides a guideline for future improvements in cell performance.

  1. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Teresa B; Strickhouser, Rachel B; Hatab, Nahla A; Charlton, Jennifer J; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2015-05-21

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2 μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200-400 nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-ranging lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.

  2. Geochemical Arrays at Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, K.; Wilson, R. M.; Chanton, J.; Lapham, L.; Farr, N.; Camilli, R.; Martens, C. S.; Pontbriand, C.

    2011-12-01

    A suite of geochemical monitoring arrays has been developed for the Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory in the northern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate the oceanographic and tectonic forcing factors on the formation and stability of gas hydrates. These arrays are designed to collect sustained, time-series data of chemical concentrations, gradients and fluxes from the subsurface to the seafloor and into the near bottom water column. A Pore Fluid Array provides time-series measurements of methane, sulfate and salinity in subsurface pore waters to evaluate microbial activity, hydrate formation and/or hydrate dissociation. A Chimney Sampler Array collects in situ chemical and physical readings at the benthic boundary. The array is designed around a vertical cylinder with a known volume and washout rate for measuring chemical gradients and flux at the seafloor. The Benthic Boundary Layer Array extends into the water column with a package of sensors in a node close to the seafloor and a similar node 20 m above the seafloor to evaluate upward, downward and transversely advecting fluids. The three arrays can be used in concert to evaluate a release of methane by the dissociation of gas hydrates: the Pore Fluid Array identifies the breakdown of gas hydrates in the subsurface, the Chimney Array determines the rate of flux at the seafloor and the Benthic Boundary Layer Array evaluates the fate of the release in the water column. Combining the data from the geochemical arrays with output from the geophysical arrays provides key information to evaluate the specific and relative importance of tectonic and oceanographic triggers for hydrate dissociation. New probes and deployment platforms have been developed for the installation and maintenance of the arrays and new systems are in place and under development for the recovery of the data. Generally, the complete array or its components have to be recovered to download the data. However, this summer 2011, a new optic modem system was

  3. Advanced photovoltaic solar array - Design and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurland, Richard; Stella, Paul

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of an ultralightweight flexible blanket, flatpack, foldout solar array design that can provide 3- to 4-fold improvement on specific power performance of current rigid panel arrays and a factor of two improvement over a first-generation flexible blanket array developed as a forerunner to the Space Station Freedom array. To date a prototype wing has been built with a projected specific power performance of about 138 W/kg at beginning-of-life (BOL) and 93 W/kg end-of-life (EOL) at 12 kW (BOL) for a 10-year geosynchronous (GEO) mission. The prototype wing hardware has been subjected to a series of system-level tests to demonstrate design feasibility. The design of the array is summarized. The major trade studies that led to the selection of the baseline design are discussed. Key system-level and component-level testing are described. Array-level performance projections are presented as a function of existing and advanced solar array component technology for various mission applications.

  4. Array tomography: immunostaining and antibody elution.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are prepared for imaging by tagging with primary antibodies against specific cellular targets, followed by labeling with fluorescent secondary antibodies. Alternatively, fluorescent proteins that have been introduced into the tissue before dissection can be used.

  5. Array tomography: rodent brain fixation and embedding.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the fixation and processing required to prepare tissues for immunofluorescence array tomography.

  6. Stretched Lens Array Squarerigger (SLASR) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A.J.; Howell, Joe; Lollar, Louis; Carrington, Connie; Hoppe, David; Piszczor, Michael; Suszuki, Nantel; Eskenazi, Michael; Aiken, Dan; Fulton, Michael; Brandhorst, Henry; Schuller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Since April 2005, our team has been underway on a competitively awarded program sponsored by NASA s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop, refine, and mature the unique solar array technology known as Stretched Lens Array SquareRigger (SLASR). SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, including the following: Areal Power Density = 300 W/m2 (2005) - 400 W/m2 (2008 Target) Specific Power = 300 W/kg (2005) - 500 W/kg (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Stowed Power = 80 kW/cu m (2005) - 120 kW/m3 (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Scalable Array Capacity = 100 s of W s to 100 s of kW s Super-Insulated Small Cell Circuit = High-Voltage (300-600 V) Operation at Low Mass Penalty Super-Shielded Small Cell Circuit = Excellent Radiation Hardness at Low Mass Penalty 85% Cell Area Savings = 75% Lower Array Cost per Watt than One-Sun Array Modular, Scalable, & Mass-Producible at MW s per Year Using Existing Processes and Capacities

  7. Mass properties survey of solar array technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, Robert

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the technologies, electrical performance, and mass characteristics of many of the presently available and the more advanced developmental space solar array technologies is presented. Qualitative trends and quantitative mass estimates as total array output power is increased from 1 kW to 5 kW at End of Life (EOL) from a single wing are shown. The array technologies are part of a database supporting an ongoing solar power subsystem model development for top level subsystem and technology analyses. The model is used to estimate the overall electrical and thermal performance of the complete subsystem, and then calculate the mass and volume of the array, batteries, power management, and thermal control elements as an initial sizing. The array types considered here include planar rigid panel designs, flexible and rigid fold-out planar arrays, and two concentrator designs, one with one critical axis and the other with two critical axes. Solar cell technologies of Si, GaAs, and InP were included in the analyses. Comparisons were made at the array level; hinges, booms, harnesses, support structures, power transfer, and launch retention mountings were included. It is important to note that the results presented are approximations, and in some cases revised or modified performance and mass estimates of specific designs.

  8. Inductively coupled wireless RF coil arrays.

    PubMed

    Bulumulla, S B; Fiveland, E; Park, K J; Foo, T K; Hardy, C J

    2015-04-01

    As the number of coils increases in multi-channel MRI receiver-coil arrays, RF cables and connectors become increasingly bulky and heavy, degrading patient comfort and slowing workflow. Inductive coupling of signals provides an attractive "wireless" approach, with the potential to reduce coil weight and cost while simplifying patient setup. In this work, multi-channel inductively coupled anterior arrays were developed and characterized for 1.5T imaging. These comprised MR receiver coils inductively (or "wirelessly") linked to secondary or "sniffer" coils whose outputs were transmitted via preamps to the MR system cabinet. The induced currents in the imaging coils were blocked by passive diode circuits during RF transmit. The imaging arrays were totally passive, obviating the need to deliver power to the coils, and providing lightweight, untethered signal reception with easily positioned coils. Single-shot fast spin echo images were acquired from 5 volunteers using a 7-element inductively coupled coil array and a conventionally cabled 7-element coil array of identical geometry, with the inductively-coupled array showing a relative signal-to-noise ratio of 0.86 +/- 0.07. The concept was extended to a larger 9-element coil array to demonstrate the effect of coil element size on signal transfer and RF-transmit blocking.

  9. DNA methylation-associated colonic mucosal immune and defense responses in treatment-naïve pediatric ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Harris, R Alan; Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Mir, Sabina A V; Frank, Eibe; Szigeti, Reka; Kaplan, Jess L; Bronsky, Jiri; Opekun, Antone; Ferry, George D; Winter, Harland; Kellermayer, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are emerging globally, indicating that environmental factors may be important in their pathogenesis. Colonic mucosal epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, can occur in response to the environment and have been implicated in IBD pathology. However, mucosal DNA methylation has not been examined in treatment-naïve patients. We studied DNA methylation in untreated, left sided colonic biopsy specimens using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. We analyzed 22 control (C) patients, 15 untreated Crohn's disease (CD) patients, and 9 untreated ulcerative colitis (UC) patients from two cohorts. Samples obtained at the time of clinical remission from two of the treatment-naïve UC patients were also included into the analysis. UC-specific gene expression was interrogated in a subset of adjacent samples (5 C and 5 UC) using the Affymetrix GeneChip PrimeView Human Gene Expression Arrays. Only treatment-naïve UC separated from control. One-hundred-and-twenty genes with significant expression change in UC (> 2-fold, P<0.05) were associated with differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Epigenetically associated gene expression changes (including gene expression changes in the IFITM1, ITGB2, S100A9, SLPI, SAA1, and STAT3 genes) were linked to colonic mucosal immune and defense responses. These findings underscore the relationship between epigenetic changes and inflammation in pediatric treatment-naïve UC and may have potential etiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic relevance for IBD.

  10. Tannerella forsythia infection-induced calvarial bone and soft tissue transcriptional profiles.

    PubMed

    Bakthavatchalu, V; Meka, A; Sathishkumar, S; Lopez, M C; Bhattacharyya, I; Boyce, B F; Mans, J J; Lamont, R J; Baker, H V; Ebersole, J L; Kesavalu, L

    2010-10-01

    Tannerella forsythia is associated with subgingival biofilms in adult periodontitis, although the molecular mechanisms contributing to chronic inflammation and loss of periodontal bone remain unclear. We examined changes in the host transcriptional profiles during a T. forsythia infection using a murine calvarial model of inflammation and bone resorption. Tannerella forsythia was injected into the subcutaneous soft tissue over calvariae of BALB/c mice for 3 days, after which the soft tissues and calvarial bones were excised. RNA was isolated and Murine GeneChip (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) array analysis of transcript profiles showed that 3226 genes were differentially expressed in the infected soft tissues (P < 0.05) and 2586 genes were differentially transcribed in calvarial bones after infection. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcription levels of selected genes corresponded well with the microarray results. Biological pathways significantly impacted by T. forsythia infection in calvarial bone and soft tissue included leukocyte transendothelial migration, cell adhesion molecules (immune system), extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, adherens junction, and antigen processing and presentation. Histologic examination revealed intense inflammation and increased osteoclasts in calvariae compared with controls. In conclusion, localized T. forsythia infection differentially induces transcription of a broad array of host genes, and the profiles differ between inflamed soft tissues and calvarial bone.

  11. Regions of acquired uniparental disomy at diagnosis of follicular lymphoma are associated with both overall survival and risk of transformation.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Derville; O'Riain, Ciarán; Gupta, Manu; Waters, Rachel; Yang, Youwen; Wrench, David; Gribben, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Rimsza, Lisa M; Holte, Harald; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Johnson, Nathalie A; Campo, Elias; Chan, Wing C; Gascoyne, Randy D; Young, Bryan D; Staudt, Louis M; Lister, T Andrew; Fitzgibbon, Jude

    2009-03-05

    Acquired homozygosity in the form of segmental acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) has been described in follicular lymphoma (FL) and is usually due to mitotic recombination. SNP array analysis was performed with the use of the Affymetrix 10K 2.0 Gene-chip array on DNA from 185 diagnostic FL patients to assess the prognostic relevance of aUPD. Genetic abnormalities were detected in 118 (65%) of 182 patients. Number of abnormalities was predictive of outcome; more than 3 abnormalities was associated with inferior overall survival (OS; P < .03). Sites of recurrent aUPD were detected on 6p (n = 25), 16p (n = 22), 12q (n = 17), 1p36 (n = 14), 10q (n = 8), and 6q (n = 8). On multivariate analysis aUPD on 1p36 correlated with shorter OS (P = .05). aUPD on 16p was predictive of transformation (P = .03) and correlated with poorer progression-free survival (P = .02). aUPD is frequent at diagnosis of FL and affects probability of disease transformation and clinical outcome.

  12. Generation of a non-small cell lung cancer transcriptome microarray

    PubMed Central

    Tanney, Austin; Oliver, Gavin R; Farztdinov, Vadim; Kennedy, Richard D; Mulligan, Jude M; Fulton, Ciaran E; Farragher, Susan M; Field, John K; Johnston, Patrick G; Harkin, D Paul; Proutski, Vitali; Mulligan, Karl A

    2008-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. At present no reliable biomarkers are available to guide the management of this condition. Microarray technology may allow appropriate biomarkers to be identified but present platforms are lacking disease focus and are thus likely to miss potentially vital information contained in patient tissue samples. Methods A combination of large-scale in-house sequencing, gene expression profiling and public sequence and gene expression data mining were used to characterise the transcriptome of NSCLC and the data used to generate a disease-focused microarray – the Lung Cancer DSA research tool. Results Built on the Affymetrix GeneChip platform, the Lung Cancer DSA research tool allows for interrogation of ~60,000 transcripts relevant to Lung Cancer, tens of thousands of which are unavailable on leading commercial microarrays. Conclusion We have developed the first high-density disease specific transcriptome microarray. We present the array design process and the results of experiments carried out to demonstrate the array's utility. This approach serves as a template for the development of other disease transcriptome microarrays, including non-neoplastic diseases. PMID:18513400

  13. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  14. LSA Low-cost Solar Array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The activities of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project during the period October through December, 1977 are reported. The LSSA Project is assigned responsibility for advancing silicon solar array technology while encouraging industry to reduce the price of arrays to a level at which photovoltaic electric power systems will be competitive with more conventional power sources early in the next decade. Set forth are the goals and plans with which the Project intends to accomplish this and the progress that was made during the quarter.

  15. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  16. The next generation very large array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Mark; Carilli, Chris; Beasley, Tony

    2016-07-01

    The North American astronomical community is considering a future large area radio array optimized to perform imaging of thermal emission down to milliarcsecond scales. This `Next Generation Very Large Array' would entail ten times the effective collecting area of the Jansky Very Large Array, operate from 1GHz to 115GHz, with ten times longer baselines (300km) providing milliarcsecond resolution, and include a dense core on kilometer scales for high surface brightness imaging. The preliminary design, capabilities, and some of the priority science goals of the instrument are summarized.

  17. Photoresponse in arrays of thermoelectric nanowire junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, T. E.; Scott, R.; Johnson, S.; Brower, T.; Belk, J. H.; Hunt, J. H.

    2013-07-01

    We report the first demonstration of optical detection by thermoelectric nanowire junctions. We employed devices composed of bismuth nanowire arrays which are capped with a transparent indium tin oxide electrode. The incident surface features very low optical reflectivity and enhanced light trapping. The unique attributes of the thermoelectric arrays are the combination of strong temporal and optical wavelength dependences of the photocurrent. Under infrared illumination, the signal can be completely described by thermoelectric effects considering cooling rates given by heat diffusion through the array. In addition, under visible illumination, we observe a photovoltaic response.

  18. Resonance spectra of diabolo optical antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hong; Guo, Junpeng; Simpkins, Blake; Caldwell, Joshua D.

    2015-10-15

    A complete set of diabolo optical antenna arrays with different waist widths and periods was fabricated on a sapphire substrate by using a standard e-beam lithography and lift-off process. Fabricated diabolo optical antenna arrays were characterized by measuring the transmittance and reflectance with a microscope-coupled FTIR spectrometer. It was found experimentally that reducing the waist width significantly shifts the resonance to longer wavelength and narrowing the waist of the antennas is more effective than increasing the period of the array for tuning the resonance wavelength. Also it is found that the magnetic field enhancement near the antenna waist is correlated to the shift of the resonance wavelength.

  19. GENERALIZED SIDELOBE CANCELLER FOR MAGNETOENCEPHALOGRAPHY ARRAYS.

    PubMed

    Mosher, John C; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Hui, Hua Brian; Burgess, Richard C; Leahy, Richard M

    2009-08-07

    In the last decade, large arrays of sensors for magnetoencephalography (MEG) (and electroencephalography (EEG)) have become more commonplace, allowing new opportunities for the application of beamforming techniques to the joint problems of signal estimation and noise reduction. We introduce a new approach to noise cancellation, the generalized sidelobe canceller (GSC), itself an alternative to the linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) algorithm. The GSC framework naturally fits within the other noise reduction techniques that employ real or virtual reference arrays. Using expository human subject data with strong environmental and biological artifacts, we demonstrate a straightforward sequence of steps for practical noise filtering, applicable to any large array sensor design.

  20. Wideband Microstrip Antenna-Feeding Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1990-01-01

    Special impedance-matching probes help reduce feed complexity. Lightweight array of microstrip antenna elements designed to transmit and illuminate reflector antenna with circularly polarized radiation at 1,545 to 1,550 MHz and to receive circularly polarized radiation at 1,646 to 1,660 MHz. Microstrip array is cluster of 7 subarrays containing total of 28 microstrip patches. Produces cicularly polarized beam with suitable edge taper to illuminate reflector antenna. Teardrop-shaped feed probe provides gradual change of field from coaxial transmission line into microstrip substrate. Intended to be part of larger overlapping-cluster array generating multiple contiguous beams.

  1. Landsat 7 Solar Array Testing Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfrich, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    This paper covers the extensive Landsat 7 solar array flight qualification testing effort. Details of the mechanical design of the solar array and its retention/release system are presented. A testing chronology is provided beginning with the onset of problems encountered at the subsystem level and carrying through the third and final powered-spacecraft ground deployment test. Design fixes and other changes are explained in the same order as they became necessary to flight-qualify the array. Some interesting lessons learned are included along with key references.

  2. Arrays: The heart and soul of SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Michael W.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.

    1994-01-01

    This pape describes the status of NASA's Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) program. SIRTF will be a cryogenically cooled observatory for infrared astronomy from space and is planned for launch early in the next decade. It will be the first cryogenic space observatory to make extensive use of the powerful infrared detector array technology discussed at this conference. We summarize a newly developed SIRTF mission concept and show how the availability of detector arrays has shaped the scientific rationale for SIRTF, and how the arrays themselves have become part of the definition of the SIRTF mission.

  3. Arrays: The Heart and Soul of SIRTIF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Michael W.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the status of NASA's Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) program. SIRTF will be a cryogenically cooled observatory for infrared astronomy from space and is planned for launch early in the next decade. It will be the first cryogenic observatory to make extensive use of the powerful infrared detector array technology discussed at this conference. We summarize a newly developed SIRTF mission concept and show how the availability of detector arrays has shaped the scientific rationale for SIRTF, and how the arrays themselves have become part of the definition of the SIRTF mission.

  4. Large Format Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Adams, J. A.; Bandler, S. b.; Busch, S. E.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Kelley, R. L.; Porst, J. P.; Porter, F. S.; Ray, C.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    We have produced a variety of superconducting transition edge sensor array designs for microcalorimetric detection of x-rays. Designs include kilopixel scale arrays of relatively small sensors (approximately 75 micron pitch) atop a thick metal heat sinking layer as well as arrays of membrane-isolated devices on 250 micron and up to 600 micron pitch. We discuss fabrication and performance of microstripline wiring at the small scales achieved to date. We also address fabrication issues with reduction of absorber contact area in small devices.

  5. Magnetic properties of arrays of electrodeposited nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, C. A.; Hwang, M.; Shima, M.; Smith, Henry I.; Farhoud, M.; Savas, T. A.; Schwarzacher, W.; Parrochon, J.; Escoffier, W.; Bertram, H. Neal; Humphrey, F. B.; Redjdal, M.

    2002-08-01

    The fabrication and magnetic properties of arrays of short nanowires are reviewed. The arrays consist of electrodeposited ferromagnetic cylinders with aspect ratios of up to 3 and diameters of 57-180 nm. Their hysteresis loops are characterized and their remanent states are related to the predictions of a three-dimensional micromagnetic model, which shows a transition from a single-domain 'flower' state to a lower-remanence 'vortex' state with increasing diameter. The shapes of the array hysteresis loops are governed by interactions between the particles. The switching fields of small Ni cylinders can be described using a dynamic micromagnetic model.

  6. GADL: A gate array description language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippens, P. E. R.; Slenter, A. G. J.

    1987-01-01

    A way to map digital networks onto gate array images is described. A language to describe gate array images, design rules for the wiring, and arbitrary specified macros from image dependent libraries is defined. A data base is generated by compiling the description of a gate array family in terms of the above items. Place and route software is automatically conditioned to implement arbitrary specifications of a digital system in terms of a netlist. The performance of the system is demonstrated for various practical situations.

  7. Cerro La Negra EAS Cherenkov array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, P.; Garipov, G. K.; Khrenov, B. A.; Martínez, O.; Moreno, E.; Salazar, H.; Silaev, A. A.; Villaseñor, L.; Zepeda, A.

    2001-05-01

    The design of the air Cherenkov detector array for the Cerro La Negra site (elevation 4300 m asl) is presented. The most important features of the array are: autonomous operation of the detectors, low power electronics, laser communication lines and power supplied by solar panels and batteries. The joint operation of the array with water Cherenkov extensive air shower (EAS) particle detectors will allow to obtain information on EAS core positions, primary energies, arrival directions of the primary particles, and temporal profiles of the EAS pulses in air Cherenkov and particle detectors. The study of the EAS development above the shower maximum is among the main goals of this experiment. .

  8. Resonance spectra of diabolo optical antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong; Simpkins, Blake; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-10-01

    A complete set of diabolo optical antenna arrays with different waist widths and periods was fabricated on a sapphire substrate by using a standard e-beam lithography and lift-off process. Fabricated diabolo optical antenna arrays were characterized by measuring the transmittance and reflectance with a microscope-coupled FTIR spectrometer. It was found experimentally that reducing the waist width significantly shifts the resonance to longer wavelength and narrowing the waist of the antennas is more effective than increasing the period of the array for tuning the resonance wavelength. Also it is found that the magnetic field enhancement near the antenna waist is correlated to the shift of the resonance wavelength.

  9. Thermoelectric Nanowire Arrays Response to Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Tito; Scott, Reum; Johnson, Scott; Brower, Tina; Nikolaeva, Albina; Konopko, Leonid

    Bismuth nanowire arrays configured on devices where they are capped with a transparent indium tin oxide electrode generate electric power when exposed to light. The arrays feature poor optical reflectivity and, possibly, light trapping. We show experimental results that indicate that the arrays respond to illumination owing to the thermoelectric conversion of heat absorbed at the surface. The unique features of the energy pathway are manifested through a strong temporal and photon wavelength dependence of the photoresponse. Energy conversion in thermoelectrics with light trapping surfaces is a path to fast infrared light detection and across-the-spectrum solar energy harvesting.

  10. Avalanche Photodiode Arrays for Optical Communications Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Vilnrotter, V.

    2001-01-01

    An avalanche photodiode (APD) array for ground-based optical communications receivers is investigated for the reception of optical signals through the turbulent atmosphere. Kolmogorov phase screen simulations are used to generate realistic spatial distributions of the received optical field. It is shown that use of an APD array for pulse-position modulation detection can improve performance by up to 4 dB over single APD detection in the presence of turbulence, but that photon-counting detector arrays yield even greater gains.

  11. Microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis device and method

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Peter C.; Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2000-01-01

    A capillary array electrophoresis (CAE) micro-plate with an array of separation channels connected to an array of sample reservoirs on the plate. The sample reservoirs are organized into one or more sample injectors. One or more waste reservoirs are provided to collect wastes from reservoirs in each of the sample injectors. Additionally, a cathode reservoir is also multiplexed with one or more separation channels. To complete the electrical path, an anode reservoir which is common to some or all separation channels is also provided on the micro-plate. Moreover, the channel layout keeps the distance from the anode to each of the cathodes approximately constant.

  12. Microfabricated capillary array electrophoresis device and method

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Peter C.; Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2004-06-15

    A capillary array electrophoresis (CAE) micro-plate with an array of separation channels connected to an array of sample reservoirs on the plate. The sample reservoirs are organized into one or more sample injectors. One or more waste reservoirs are provided to collect wastes from reservoirs in each of the sample injectors. Additionally, a cathode reservoir is also multiplexed with one or more separation channels. To complete the electrical path, an anode reservoir which is common to some or all separation channels is also provided on the micro-plate. Moreover, the channel layout keeps the distance from the anode to each of the cathodes approximately constant.

  13. Processor arrays with asynchronous TDM optical buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Zheng, S. Q.

    1997-04-01

    We propose a pipelined asynchronous time division multiplexing optical bus. Such a bus can use one of the two hardwared priority schemes, the linear priority scheme and the round-robin priority scheme. Our simulation results show that the performances of our proposed buses are significantly better than the performances of known pipelined synchronous time division multiplexing optical buses. We also propose a class of processor arrays connected by pipelined asynchronous time division multiplexing optical buses. We claim that our proposed processor array not only have better performance, but also have better scalabilities than the existing processor arrays connected by pipelined synchronous time division multiplexing optical buses.

  14. Low-cost Solar Array (LSA) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The activities of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project are described for the period April through June 1978. The Project is assigned responsibility for advancing solar array technology while encouraging industry to reduce the price of arrays to a level at which photovoltaic electric power systems will be competitive with more conventional power sources early in the next decade. Set forth are the goals and plans with which the Project intends to accomplish this and the progress that was made during the quarter.

  15. Computer generated holograms for carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Butt, Haider; Butler, Tim; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2013-05-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are highly diffractive structures in the optical regime. Their metallic character and large scattering cross-section allow their usage as diffractive elements in Fraunhofer holograms. This work elaborates some important features of the far field diffraction patterns produced from periodic arrays of nanotubes. A theoretical approach for the interaction of arrays of nanotubes with light is presented and a computer generated hologram is calculated by means of periodical patterns. Based on the results, fabrication of carbon nanotube arrays (in holographic patterns) was performed. Experimentally measured diffraction patterns were in good agreement with the calculations.

  16. Computer generated holograms for carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Butt, Haider; Butler, Tim; Wilkinson, Timothy D; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2013-05-21

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are highly diffractive structures in the optical regime. Their metallic character and large scattering cross-section allow their usage as diffractive elements in Fraunhofer holograms. This work elaborates some important features of the far field diffraction patterns produced from periodic arrays of nanotubes. A theoretical approach for the interaction of arrays of nanotubes with light is presented and a computer generated hologram is calculated by means of periodical patterns. Based on the results, fabrication of carbon nanotube arrays (in holographic patterns) was performed. Experimentally measured diffraction patterns were in good agreement with the calculations.

  17. Assignment of job modules onto array processors

    SciTech Connect

    Fukunaga, K.; Yamada, S.; Kasai, T.

    1987-07-01

    This paper deals with the optimum assignment of job modules onto array processors. In array processors it is important to assign job modules onto processors such that the modules that communicate with each other are assigned to adjacent processors, because communication overhead increases as communications occur between processors that are remotely connected. The authors propose an efficient algorithm to solve this assignment problem for a specific array of processors. The algorithm reduces the quadratic problem to a solvable linear problem that produces a good, but not necessarily optimal solution. This is followed by a phase of iterations in which the solution is improved by small perturbation of the assignment.

  18. Remote environmental sensor array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Geoffrey G.

    This thesis examines the creation of an environmental monitoring system for inhospitable environments. It has been named The Remote Environmental Sensor Array System or RESA System for short. This thesis covers the development of RESA from its inception, to the design and modeling of the hardware and software required to make it functional. Finally, the actual manufacture, and laboratory testing of the finished RESA product is discussed and documented. The RESA System is designed as a cost-effective way to bring sensors and video systems to the underwater environment. It contains as water quality probe with sensors such as dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, specific conductivity, oxidation-reduction potential and chlorophyll a. In addition, an omni-directional hydrophone is included to detect underwater acoustic signals. It has a colour, high-definition and a low-light, black and white camera system, which it turn are coupled to a laser scaling system. Both high-intensity discharge and halogen lighting system are included to illuminate the video images. The video and laser scaling systems are manoeuvred using pan and tilt units controlled from an underwater computer box. Finally, a sediment profile imager is included to enable profile images of sediment layers to be acquired. A control and manipulation system to control the instruments and move the data across networks is integrated into the underwater system while a power distribution node provides the correct voltages to power the instruments. Laboratory testing was completed to ensure that the different instruments associated with the RESA performed as designed. This included physical testing of the motorized instruments, calibration of the instruments, benchmark performance testing and system failure exercises.

  19. Modeling Charge Collection in Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Pickel, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    A detector array charge collection model has been developed for use as an engineering tool to aid in the design of optical sensor missions for operation in the space radiation environment. This model is an enhancement of the prototype array charge collection model that was developed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) program. The primary enhancements were accounting for drift-assisted diffusion by Monte Carlo modeling techniques and implementing the modeling approaches in a windows-based code. The modeling is concerned with integrated charge collection within discrete pixels in the focal plane array (FPA), with high fidelity spatial resolution. It is applicable to all detector geometries including monolithc charge coupled devices (CCDs), Active Pixel Sensors (APS) and hybrid FPA geometries based on a detector array bump-bonded to a readout integrated circuit (ROIC).

  20. Bionic ommatidia based on microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liu; Sihai, Chen; Shan, Dong; Xinjian, Yi

    2009-06-01

    A simple method is reported to manufacture a planar compound eye using a microlens array. The compound eye, inspired by insects, consists of a microlens array and a waveguide coupled with it. A microlens array with lenses of 50 μm in diameter is fabricated by melting AZ1500 photoresist and then transferring it onto SU-8. With the self-focus method applied, a waveguide array is formed, and each is exactly coupled to a lens. The formation of the waveguide is simulated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) arithmetic, resembling the ommatidia produced in our experiment. The ommatidia is also testified to astrict beam, just as the natural compound eyes do.

  1. A monolithic bolometer array suitable for FIRST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; LeDuc, H. G.; Lange, A. E.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    The development of arrays of infrared bolometers that are suitable for use in the Far Infrared and Submillimeter Telescope (FIRST) mission is reported. The array architecture is based on the silicon nitride micromesh bolometer currently baselined for use in the case of the Planck mission. This architecture allows each pixel to be efficiently coupled to one or both polarizations and to one or more spatial models of radiation. Micromesh structures are currently being developed, coupled with transistor-edge sensors and read out by a SQUID amplifier. If these devices are successful, then the relatively large cooling power available at 300 mK may enable a SQUID-based multiplexer to be integrated on the same wafer as the array, creating a monolithic, fully multiplexed, 2D array with relatively few connections to the sub-Kelvin stage.

  2. Receptor arrays optimized for natural odor statistics

    PubMed Central

    Zwicker, David; Murugan, Arvind; Brenner, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Natural odors typically consist of many molecules at different concentrations. It is unclear how the numerous odorant molecules and their possible mixtures are discriminated by relatively few olfactory receptors. Using an information theoretic model, we show that a receptor array is optimal for this task if it achieves two possibly conflicting goals: (i) Each receptor should respond to half of all odors and (ii) the response of different receptors should be uncorrelated when averaged over odors presented with natural statistics. We use these design principles to predict statistics of the affinities between receptors and odorant molecules for a broad class of odor statistics. We also show that optimal receptor arrays can be tuned to either resolve concentrations well or distinguish mixtures reliably. Finally, we use our results to predict properties of experimentally measured receptor arrays. Our work can thus be used to better understand natural olfaction, and it also suggests ways to improve artificial sensor arrays. PMID:27102871

  3. Some Recent Results from the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brummelaar, T. A.; Huber, D.; von Braun, K.; Boyajian, T.; Richardson, N. D.; Schaefer, G.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; Mourard, D.; McAlister, H. A.; Turner, N. H.; Sturmann, L.; Sturmann, J.; Monnier, J. D.; Ireland, M.

    2014-09-01

    The CHARA Array is a six 1-m telescope optical and near infrared interferometer located at the Mount Wilson Observatory in southern California and operated by the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy of Georgia State University. The CHARA Array has been in regular scientific operation since 2005 and now has over 55 publications in the refereed literature, including two in Science and one in Nature. The Array now supports seven beam combiners ranging from 0.5 microns up to 2.3 microns and combing from 2 to 4 beams at a time. An upgrade to a full 6-beam combiner is now underway, and fringes with all six telescopes were achieved soon after the meeting. We present some of the more recent results from the CHARA Array.

  4. SMEX-Lite Modular Solar Array Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, John

    2002-01-01

    For the most part, Goddard solar arrays have been custom designs that are unique to each mission. The solar panel design has been frozen prior to issuing an RFP for their procurement. There has typically been 6-9 months between RFP release and contract award, followed by an additional 24 months for performance of the contract. For Small Explorer (SMEX) missions, with three years between mission definition and launch, this has been a significant problem. The SMEX solar panels have been sufficiently small that the contract performance period has been reduced to 12-15 months. The bulk of this time is used up in the final design definition and fabrication of flight solar cell assemblies. Even so, it has been virtually impossible to have the spacecraft design at a level of maturity sufficient to freeze the solar panel geometry and release the RFP in time to avoid schedule problems with integrating the solar panels to the spacecraft. With that in mind, the SMEX-Lite project team developed a modular architecture for the assembly of solar arrays to greatly reduce the cost and schedule associated with the development of a mission- specific solar array. In the modular architecture, solar cells are fabricated onto small substrate panels. This modular panel (approximately 8.5" x 17" in this case) becomes the building block for constructing solar arrays for multiple missions with varying power requirements and geometrical arrangements. The mechanical framework that holds these modules together as a solar array is the only mission-unique design, changing in size and shape as required for each mission. There are several advantages to this approach. First, the typical solar array development cycle requires a mission unique design, procurement, and qualification including a custom qualification panel. With the modular architecture, a single qualification of the SMEX-Lite modules and the associated mechanical framework in a typical configuration provided a qualification by

  5. Variable-focus cylindrical liquid lens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wu-xiang; Liang, Dong; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Chao; Zang, Shang-fei; Wang, Qiong-hua

    2013-06-01

    A variable-focus cylindrical liquid lens array based on two transparent liquids of different refractive index is demonstrated. An elastic membrane divides a transparent reservoir into two chambers. The two chambers are filled with liquid 1 and liquid 2, respectively, which are of different refractive index. The micro-clapboards help liquid 1, liquid 2 and the elastic membrane form a cylindrical lens array. Driving these two liquids to flow can change the shape of the elastic membrane as well as the focal length. In this design, the gravity effect of liquid can be overcome. A demo lens array of positive optical power is developed and tested. Moreover, a potential application of the proposed lens array for autostereoscopic 3D displays is emphasized.

  6. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, B.L.; Skidmore, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost. 19 figs.

  7. Low-cost laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.; Skidmore, Jay A.

    1999-01-01

    A substrate is used to fabricate a low-cost laser diode array. A substrate is machined from an electrically insulative material that is thermally conductive, or two substrates can be bonded together in which the top substrate is electrically as well as thermally conductive. The substrate thickness is slightly longer than the cavity length, and the width of the groove is wide enough to contain a bar and spring (which secures the laser bar firmly along one face of the groove). The spring also provides electrical continuity from the backside of the bar to the adjacent metalization layer on the laser bar substrate. Arrays containing one or more bars can be formed by creating many grooves at various spacings. Along the groove, many bars can be adjoined at the edges to provide parallel electrical conduction. This architecture allows precise and predictable registration of an array of laser bars to a self-aligned microlens array at low cost.

  8. Stretched Lens Array Photovoltaic Concentrator Technology Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Solar arrays have been and continue to be the mainstay in providing power to nearly all commercial and government spacecraft. Light from the Sun is directly converted into electrical energy using solar cells. One way to reduce the cost of future space power systems is by minimizing the size and number of expensive solar cells by focusing the sunlight onto smaller cells using concentrator optics. The stretched lens array (SLA) is a unique concept that uses arched Fresnel lens concentrators to focus sunlight onto a line of high-efficiency solar cells located directly beneath. The SLA concept is based on the Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET) design that was used on NASA's New Millennium Deep Space 1 mission. The highly successful asteroid/comet rendezvous mission (1998 to 2001) demonstrated the performance and long-term durability of the SCARLET/SLA solar array design and set the foundation for further improvements to optimize its performance.

  9. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. As a result, these graphical methods formore » evaluating covering arrays are illustrated with a few examples.« less

  10. Quantum Phase Transition in Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, K.; Girvin, S. M.

    1997-03-01

    One-dimensional Josephson junction arrays of SQUIDS exhibit a novel superconductor-insulator phase transition. The critical regime can be accessed by tuning the effective Josephson coupling energy using a weak magnetic field applied to the SQUIDS. The role of instantons induced by quantum fluctuations will be discussed. One novel feature of these systems which can be explained in terms of quantum phase slips is that in some regimes, the array resistance decreases with increasing length of the array. We calculate the finite temperature crossover function for the array resistance and compare our theoretical results with the recent experiments by D. Haviland and P. Delsing at Chalmers. This work is supported by DOE grant #DE-FG02-90ER45427 and by NSF DMR-9502555.

  11. Spacecraft Multiple Array Communication System Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Desilva, Kanishka; Sham, Catherine C.

    2010-01-01

    The Communication Systems Simulation Laboratory (CSSL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center is tasked to perform spacecraft and ground network communication system simulations, design validation, and performance verification. The CSSL has developed simulation tools that model spacecraft communication systems and the space and ground environment in which the tools operate. In this paper, a spacecraft communication system with multiple arrays is simulated. Multiple array combined technique is used to increase the radio frequency coverage and data rate performance. The technique is to achieve phase coherence among the phased arrays to combine the signals at the targeting receiver constructively. There are many technical challenges in spacecraft integration with a high transmit power communication system. The array combining technique can improve the communication system data rate and coverage performances without increasing the system transmit power requirements. Example simulation results indicate significant performance improvement can be achieved with phase coherence implementation.

  12. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng F.; Tu, Yi

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  13. Two-Dimensional Informative Array Testing

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Christopher S.; Tebbs, Joshua M.; Bilder, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Array-based group testing algorithms for case identification are widely used in infectious disease testing, drug discovery, and genetics. In this paper, we generalize previous statistical work in array testing to account for heterogeneity among individuals being tested. We first derive closed-form expressions for the expected number of tests (efficiency) and misclassification probabilities (sensitivity, specificity, predictive values) for two-dimensional array testing in a heterogeneous population. We then propose two “informative” array construction techniques which exploit population heterogeneity in ways that can substantially improve testing efficiency when compared to classical approaches which regard the population as homogeneous. Furthermore, a useful byproduct of our methodology is that misclassification probabilities can be estimated on a per-individual basis. We illustrate our new procedures using chlamydia and gonorrhea testing data collected in Nebraska as part of the Infertility Prevention Project. PMID:22212007

  14. Substrate-supported lipid nanotube arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A. I.; Poluektov, O. G.; Chemistry; North Carolina State

    2003-07-16

    This Communication describes the self-assembly of phospholipids into lipid nanotubes inside nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide substrate. Orientations of the lipid molecules in such lipid nanoscale structures were verified by high-resolution spin labeling EPR at 95 GHz. The static order parameter of lipids in such nanotube arrays was determined from low-temperature EPR spectra and was found to be exceptionally high, S{sub static} {approx} 0.9. We propose that substrate-supported lipid nanotube arrays have potential for building robust biochips and biosensors in which rigid nanoporous substrates protect the bilayer surface from contamination. The total bilayer surface in the lipid nanotube arrays is much greater than that in the planar substrate-supported membranes. The lipid nanotube arrays seem to be suitable for developing patterned lipid deposition and could be potentially used for patterning of membrane-associated molecules.

  15. Intense terahertz antenna array with interdigital electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Shi, Wei; Xu, Ming; Chen, Yong

    2008-12-01

    In this work a powerful terahertz antenna array with interdigital electrodes is fabricated, and the performance of one antenna unit is compared with a conventional resonant dipole antenna. The antenna unit has a better capacity of generating THz wave compared with a conventional resonant dipole antenna at the same bias electrical field and the same laser energy. However only 23 % of THz wave transmitted through the ceramic substrate of antenna array, if there is a hole drilled through ceramic substrate to release the THz wave, the THz amplitude of entire interdigital antenna array with 8 antenna units can be more than 10 times larger than that of resonant dipole antenna. To get this result, the pump beam is focused into a linear beam by a cylindrical lens to trigger the antenna array, and the linear THz wave is focused by a polyethylene lens before it reaches ZnTe crystal.

  16. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  17. Calibration of a photomultiplier array spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Steven A.; Wright, C. Wayne; Piazza, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the calibration of a photomultiplier array spectrometer is presented. Through this approach, incident light radiance derivation is made by recognizing and tracing gain characteristics for each photomultiplier tube.

  18. Segmented-mirror phased-array lasers

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; Laporta, P.; Magni, V.; Svelto, O.

    1987-11-30

    A scheme for phase-locked laser arrays in both one- and two-dimensional configurations is discussed. The scheme can be applied to any laser and its validity has been proved for the case of a pulsed neodimium laser.

  19. A phased array tracking antenna for vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Mano, Kazukiko; Tanaka, Kenji; Matsunaga, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Makio

    1990-01-01

    An antenna system including antenna elements and a satellite tracking method is considered a key technology in implementing land mobile satellite communications. In the early stage of land mobile satellite communications, a mechanical tracking antenna system is considered the best candidate for vehicles, however, a phased array antenna will replace it in the near future, because it has many attractive advantages such as a low and compact profile, high speed tracking, and potential low cost. Communications Research Laboratory is now developing a new phased array antenna system for land vehicles based on research experiences of the airborne phased array antenna, which was developed and evaluated in satellite communication experiments using the ETS-V satellite. The basic characteristics of the phased array antenna for land vehicles are described.

  20. ARRAYS FOR BIOMONITORING ENVIRONMENTAL AND REPRODUCTIVE TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA arrays are receiving increasing interest as a tool for monitoring the developmental and reproductive impact of xenobiotics and other hazardous materials on human and wildlife populations. The primary tenet of toxicogenomics is that effects of environmental exposure on cellul...