Science.gov

Sample records for affymetrix genechip human

  1. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  2. Affymetrix GeneChip microarray preprocessing for multivariate analyses.

    PubMed

    McCall, Matthew N; Almudevar, Anthony

    2012-09-01

    Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays are the most widely used high-throughput technology to measure gene expression, and a wide variety of preprocessing methods have been developed to transform probe intensities reported by a microarray scanner into gene expression estimates. There have been numerous comparisons of these preprocessing methods, focusing on the most common analyses-detection of differential expression and gene or sample clustering. Recently, more complex multivariate analyses, such as gene co-expression, differential co-expression, gene set analysis and network modeling, are becoming more common; however, the same preprocessing methods are typically applied. In this article, we examine the effect of preprocessing methods on some of these multivariate analyses and provide guidance to the user as to which methods are most appropriate.

  3. Using probe secondary structure information to enhance Affymetrix GeneChip background estimates

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Fodor, Anthony A.; Gibas, Cynthia J.

    2007-01-01

    High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are a primary research tool for assessing global gene expression. Background noise on microarrays comprises a significant portion of the measured raw data. A number of statistical techniques have been developed to correct for this background noise. Here, we demonstrate that probe minimum folding energy and structure can be used to enhance a previously existing model for background noise correction. We estimate that probe secondary structure accounts for up to 3% of all variation on Affymetrix microarrays. PMID:17387043

  4. Gene expression in the rat brain during sleep deprivation and recovery sleep: an Affymetrix GeneChip study.

    PubMed

    Terao, A; Wisor, J P; Peyron, C; Apte-Deshpande, A; Wurts, S W; Edgar, D M; Kilduff, T S

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that macromolecular synthesis in the brain is modulated in association with the occurrence of sleep and wakefulness. Similarly, the spectral composition of electroencephalographic activity that occurs during sleep is dependent on the duration of prior wakefulness. Since this homeostatic relationship between wake and sleep is highly conserved across mammalian species, genes that are truly involved in the electroencephalographic response to sleep deprivation might be expected to be conserved across mammalian species. Therefore, in the rat cerebral cortex, we have studied the effects of sleep deprivation on the expression of immediate early gene and heat shock protein mRNAs previously shown to be upregulated in the mouse brain in sleep deprivation and in recovery sleep after sleep deprivation. We find that the molecular response to sleep deprivation and recovery sleep in the brain is highly conserved between these two mammalian species, at least in terms of expression of immediate early gene and heat shock protein family members. Using Affymetrix Neurobiology U34 GeneChips , we also screened the rat cerebral cortex, basal forebrain, and hypothalamus for other genes whose expression may be modulated by sleep deprivation or recovery sleep. We find that the response of the basal forebrain to sleep deprivation is more similar to that of the cerebral cortex than to the hypothalamus. Together, these results suggest that sleep-dependent changes in gene expression in the cerebral cortex are similar across rodent species and therefore may underlie sleep history-dependent changes in sleep electroencephalographic activity.

  5. Global Expression Patterns of Three Festuca Species Exposed to Different Doses of Glyphosate Using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, Ozge; Budak, Hikmet

    2009-01-01

    Glyphosate has been shown to act as an inhibitor of an aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway, while other pathways that may be affected by glyphosate are not known. Cross species hybridizations can provide a tool for elucidating biological pathways conserved among organisms. Comparative genome analyses have indicated a high level of colinearity among grass species and Festuca, on which we focus here, and showed rearrangements common to the Pooideae family. Based on sequence conservation among grass species, we selected the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array as a tool for the analysis of expression profiles of three Festuca (fescue) species with distinctly different tolerances to varying levels of glyphosate. Differences in transcript expression were recorded upon foliar glyphosate application at 1.58 mM and 6.32 mM, representing 5% and 20%, respectively, of the recommended rate. Differences highlighted categories of general metabolic processes, such as photosynthesis, protein synthesis, stress responses, and a larger number of transcripts responded to 20% glyphosate application. Differential expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the shikimic acid pathway could not be identified by cross hybridization. Microarray data were confirmed by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analyses. This is the first report to analyze the potential of cross species hybridization in Fescue species and the data and analyses will help extend our knowledge on the cellular processes affected by glyphosate.

  6. Development and application of a 6.5 million feature Affymetrix Genechip® for massively parallel discovery of single position polymorphisms in lettuce (Lactuca spp.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-resolution genetic maps are needed in many crops to help characterize the genetic diversity that determines agriculturally important traits. Hybridization to microarrays to detect single feature polymorphisms is a powerful technique for marker discovery and genotyping because of its highly parallel nature. However, microarrays designed for gene expression analysis rarely provide sufficient gene coverage for optimal detection of nucleotide polymorphisms, which limits utility in species with low rates of polymorphism such as lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Results We developed a 6.5 million feature Affymetrix GeneChip® for efficient polymorphism discovery and genotyping, as well as for analysis of gene expression in lettuce. Probes on the microarray were designed from 26,809 unigenes from cultivated lettuce and an additional 8,819 unigenes from four related species (L. serriola, L. saligna, L. virosa and L. perennis). Where possible, probes were tiled with a 2 bp stagger, alternating on each DNA strand; providing an average of 187 probes covering approximately 600 bp for each of over 35,000 unigenes; resulting in up to 13 fold redundancy in coverage per nucleotide. We developed protocols for hybridization of genomic DNA to the GeneChip® and refined custom algorithms that utilized coverage from multiple, high quality probes to detect single position polymorphisms in 2 bp sliding windows across each unigene. This allowed us to detect greater than 18,000 polymorphisms between the parental lines of our core mapping population, as well as numerous polymorphisms between cultivated lettuce and wild species in the lettuce genepool. Using marker data from our diversity panel comprised of 52 accessions from the five species listed above, we were able to separate accessions by species using both phylogenetic and principal component analyses. Additionally, we estimated the diversity between different types of cultivated lettuce and distinguished morphological types

  7. GCOD - GeneChip Oncology Database

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays have become a nearly ubiquitous tool for the study of human disease, and nowhere is this more true than in cancer. With hundreds of studies and thousands of expression profiles representing the majority of human cancers completed and in public databases, the challenge has been effectively accessing and using this wealth of data. Description To address this issue we have collected published human cancer gene expression datasets generated on the Affymetrix GeneChip platform, and carefully annotated those studies with a focus on providing accurate sample annotation. To facilitate comparison between datasets, we implemented a consistent data normalization and transformation protocol and then applied stringent quality control procedures to flag low-quality assays. Conclusion The resulting resource, the GeneChip Oncology Database, is available through a publicly accessible website that provides several query options and analytical tools through an intuitive interface. PMID:21291543

  8. inSilicoDb: an R/Bioconductor package for accessing human Affymetrix expert-curated datasets from GEO.

    PubMed

    Taminau, Jonatan; Steenhoff, David; Coletta, Alain; Meganck, Stijn; Lazar, Cosmin; de Schaetzen, Virginie; Duque, Robin; Molter, Colin; Bersini, Hugues; Nowé, Ann; Weiss Solís, David Y

    2011-11-15

    Microarray technology has become an integral part of biomedical research and increasing amounts of datasets become available through public repositories. However, re-use of these datasets is severely hindered by unstructured, missing or incorrect biological samples information; as well as the wide variety of preprocessing methods in use. The inSilicoDb R/Bioconductor package is a command-line front-end to the InSilico DB, a web-based database currently containing 86 104 expert-curated human Affymetrix expression profiles compiled from 1937 GEO repository series. The use of this package builds on the Bioconductor project's focus on reproducibility by enabling a clear workflow in which not only analysis, but also the retrieval of verified data is supported.

  9. Detection of TMPRSS2-ERG translocations in human prostate cancer by expression profiling using GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays.

    PubMed

    Jhavar, Sameer; Reid, Alison; Clark, Jeremy; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Christmas, Timothy; Thompson, Alan; Woodhouse, Christopher; Ogden, Christopher; Fisher, Cyril; Corbishley, Cathy; De-Bono, Johann; Eeles, Rosalind; Brewer, Daniel; Cooper, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Translocation of TMPRSS2 to the ERG gene, found in a high proportion of human prostate cancer, results in overexpression of the 3'-ERG sequences joined to the 5'-TMPRSS2 promoter. The studies presented here were designed to test the ability of expression analysis on GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays to detect 5'-TMPRSS2-ERG-3' hybrid transcripts encoded by this translocation. Monitoring the relative expression of each ERG exon revealed altered transcription of the ERG gene in 15 of a series of 27 prostate cancer samples. In all cases, exons 4 to 11 exhibited enhanced expression compared with exons 2 and 3. This pattern of expression indicated that the most abundant hybrid transcripts involve fusions to ERG exon 4, and RT-PCR analyses confirmed the joining of TMPRSS2 exon 1 to ERG exon 4 in all 15 cases. The exon expression patterns also indicated that TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcripts commonly contain deletion of ERG exon 8. Analysis of gene-level data from the arrays allowed the identification of genes whose expression levels significantly correlated with the presence of the translocation. These studies demonstrate that expression analyses using exon arrays represent a valuable approach for detecting ETS gene translocation in prostate cancer, in parallel with analyses of gene expression profiles.

  10. GeneChip resequencing of the smallpox virus genome can identify novel strains: a biodefense application.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Tang, Kevin; Osborne, John; Sammons, Scott; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2007-02-01

    We developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips, based on the complete genome sequences of 24 strains of smallpox virus (variola virus), for rapid characterization of this human-pathogenic virus. Each GeneChip was designed to analyze a divergent segment of approximately 30,000 bases of the smallpox virus genome. This study includes the hybridization results of 14 smallpox virus strains. Of the 14 smallpox virus strains hybridized, only 7 had sequence information included in the design of the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips; similar information for the remaining strains was not tiled as a reference in these GeneChips. By use of variola virus-specific primers and long-range PCR, 22 overlapping amplicons were amplified to cover nearly the complete genome and hybridized with the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChip set. These GeneChips were successful in generating nucleotide sequences for all 14 of the smallpox virus strains hybridized. Analysis of the data indicated that the GeneChip resequencing by hybridization was fast and reproducible and that the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips could differentiate the 14 smallpox virus strains characterized. This study also suggests that high-density resequencing GeneChips have potential biodefense applications and may be used as an alternate tool for rapid identification of smallpox virus in the future.

  11. IGG: A tool to integrate GeneChips for genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Li, M-X; Jiang, L; Ho, S-L; Song, Y-Q; Sham, P-C

    2007-11-15

    To facilitate genetic studies using high-throughput genotyping technologies, we have developed an open source tool to integrate genotype data across the Affymetrix and Illumina platforms. It can efficiently integrate a large amount of data from various GeneChips, add genotypes of the HapMap Project into a specific project, flexibly trim and export the integrated data with different formats of popular genetic analysis tools, and highly control the quality of genotype data. Furthermore, this tool has sufficiently simplified its usage through its user-friendly graphic interface and is independent of third-party databases. IGG has successfully been applied to a genome-wide linkage scan in a Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease pedigree by integrating three types of GeneChips and HapMap project genotypes. PMID:17872914

  12. IGG: A tool to integrate GeneChips for genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Li, M-X; Jiang, L; Ho, S-L; Song, Y-Q; Sham, P-C

    2007-11-15

    To facilitate genetic studies using high-throughput genotyping technologies, we have developed an open source tool to integrate genotype data across the Affymetrix and Illumina platforms. It can efficiently integrate a large amount of data from various GeneChips, add genotypes of the HapMap Project into a specific project, flexibly trim and export the integrated data with different formats of popular genetic analysis tools, and highly control the quality of genotype data. Furthermore, this tool has sufficiently simplified its usage through its user-friendly graphic interface and is independent of third-party databases. IGG has successfully been applied to a genome-wide linkage scan in a Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease pedigree by integrating three types of GeneChips and HapMap project genotypes.

  13. Methods comparison for high-resolution transcriptional analysis of archival material on Affymetrix Plus 2.0 and Exon 1.0 microarrays.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kim; Hey, Yvonne; Dibben, Sian; Miller, Crispin; Freemont, Anthony; Radford, John; Pepper, Stuart

    2009-07-01

    Microarray gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is a new and evolving technique. This report compares transcript detection rates on Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 and Human Exon 1.0 ST GeneChips across several RNA extraction and target labeling protocols, using routinely collected archival FFPE samples. All RNA extraction protocols tested (Ambion-Optimum, Ambion-RecoverAll, and Qiagen-RNeasy FFPE) provided extracts suitable for microarray hybridization. Compared with Affymetrix One-Cycle labeled extracts, NuGEN system protocols utilizing oligo(dT) and random hexamer primers, and cDNA target preparations instead of cRNA, achieved percent present rates up to 55% on Plus 2.0 arrays. Based on two paired-sample analyses, at 90% specificity this equalled an average 30 percentage-point increase (from 50% to 80%) in FFPE transcript sensitivity relative to fresh frozen tissues, which we have assumed to have 100% sensitivity and specificity. The high content of Exon arrays, with multiple probe sets per exon, improved FFPE sensitivity to 92% at 96% specificity, corresponding to an absolute increase of ~600 genes over Plus 2.0 arrays. While larger series are needed to confirm high correspondence between fresh-frozen and FFPE expression patterns, these data suggest that both Plus 2.0 and Exon arrays are suitable platforms for FFPE microarray expression analyses.

  14. Identification of biomarkers regulated by rexinoids (LGD1069, LG100268 and Ro25-7386) in human breast cells using Affymetrix microarray.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye-Sook; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2015-07-01

    Retinoids possess anti-proliferative properties, which suggests that they possess chemopreventive and therapeutic potential against cancer. In the current study, genes modulated by rexinoids (retinoid X receptor (RXR)-pan agonists, LGD1069 and LG100268; and the RXRα agonist, Ro25-7386) were identified using an Affymetrix microarray in normal and malignant breast cells. It was observed that LGD1069, LG100268 and Ro25-7386 suppressed the growth of breast cells. Secondly, several rexinoid-regulated genes were identified, which are involved in cell death, cell growth/maintenance, signal transduction and response to stimulus. These genes may be associated with the growth-suppressive activity of rexinoids. Therefore, the identified genes may serve as biomarkers and novel molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Identifying the impact of G-quadruplexes on Affymetrix 3' arrays using cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Memon, Farhat N; Owen, Anne M; Sanchez-Graillet, Olivia; Upton, Graham J G; Harrison, Andrew P

    2010-01-15

    A tetramer quadruplex structure is formed by four parallel strands of DNA/ RNA containing runs of guanine. These quadruplexes are able to form because guanine can Hoogsteen hydrogen bond to other guanines, and a tetrad of guanines can form a stable arrangement. Recently we have discovered that probes on Affymetrix GeneChips that contain runs of guanine do not measure gene expression reliably. We associate this finding with the likelihood that quadruplexes are forming on the surface of GeneChips. In order to cope with the rapidly expanding size of GeneChip array datasets in the public domain, we are exploring the use of cloud computing to replicate our experiments on 3' arrays to look at the effect of the location of G-spots (runs of guanines). Cloud computing is a recently introduced high-performance solution that takes advantage of the computational infrastructure of large organisations such as Amazon and Google. We expect that cloud computing will become widely adopted because it enables bioinformaticians to avoid capital expenditure on expensive computing resources and to only pay a cloud computing provider for what is used. Moreover, as well as financial efficiency, cloud computing is an ecologically-friendly technology, it enables efficient data-sharing and we expect it to be faster for development purposes. Here we propose the advantageous use of cloud computing to perform a large data-mining analysis of public domain 3' arrays.

  16. GeneChip profiling of transcriptional responses to soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, colonization of soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Puthoff, David P; Ehrenfried, Mindy L; Vinyard, Bryan T; Tucker, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is currently the most devastating pathogen of soybean. SCN penetrates the root and migrates toward the central vascular bundle where it establishes a complex multinucleated feeding structure that provides plant-derived nutrients to support the development and growth of the nematode. To identify host genes that play significant roles in SCN development in susceptible roots, RNA from SCN-inoculated and non-inoculated root pieces were hybridized to the Affymetrix soybean genome GeneChips. RNA was collected at 8, 12, and 16 d post-inoculation from root pieces that displayed multiple swollen female SCN and similar root pieces from non-inoculated roots. Branch roots and root tips were trimmed from the root pieces to minimize the amount of RNA contributed by these organs. Of the 35 593 transcripts represented on the GeneChip, approximately 26,500 were expressed in the SCN-colonized root pieces. ANOVA followed by False Discovery Rate analysis indicated that the expression levels of 4616 transcripts changed significantly (Q-value < or =0.05) in response to SCN. In this set of 4616 transcripts, 1404 transcripts increased >2-fold and 739 decreased >2-fold. Of the transcripts to which a function could be assigned, a large proportion was associated with cell wall structure. Other functional categories that included a large number of up-regulated transcripts were defence, metabolism, and histones, and a smaller group of transcripts associated with signal transduction and transcription. PMID:17977850

  17. MADS+: discovery of differential splicing events from Affymetrix exon junction array data

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Warzecha, Claude C.; Carstens, Russ P.; Xing, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: The Affymetrix Human Exon Junction Array is a newly designed high-density exon-sensitive microarray for global analysis of alternative splicing. Contrary to the Affymetrix exon 1.0 array, which only contains four probes per exon and no probes for exon–exon junctions, this new junction array averages eight probes per probeset targeting all exons and exon–exon junctions observed in the human mRNA/EST transcripts, representing a significant increase in the probe density for alternative splicing events. Here, we present MADS+, a computational pipeline to detect differential splicing events from the Affymetrix exon junction array data. For each alternative splicing event, MADS+ evaluates the signals of probes targeting competing transcript isoforms to identify exons or splice sites with different levels of transcript inclusion between two sample groups. MADS+ is used routinely in our analysis of Affymetrix exon junction arrays and has a high accuracy in detecting differential splicing events. For example, in a study of the novel epithelial-specific splicing regulator ESRP1, MADS+ detects hundreds of exons whose inclusion levels are dependent on ESRP1, with a RT-PCR validation rate of 88.5% (153 validated out of 173 tested). Availability: MADS+ scripts, documentations and annotation files are available at http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/Labs/Xing/MADSplus/. Contact: yi-xing@uiowa.edu PMID:19933160

  18. Multicenter Evaluation of Genechip for Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yu; Xia, Hui; Zhang, Zhiying; Li, Junchen; Dong, Yi; Li, Qiang; Ou, Xichao; Song, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yufeng; O'Brien, Richard; Kam, Kai Man; Chi, Junying; Huan, Shitong; Chin, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), especially multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), is still one of the most serious threats to TB control worldwide. Early diagnosis of MDR-TB is important for effectively blocking transmission and establishing an effective protocol for chemotherapy. Genechip is a rapid diagnostic method based on molecular biology that overcomes the poor biosafety, time consumption, and other drawbacks of traditional drug sensitivity testing (DST) that can detect MDR-TB. However, the Genechip approach has not been effectively evaluated, especially in limited-resource laboratories. In this study, we evaluated the performance of Genechip for MDR-TB in 1,814 patients in four prefectural or municipal laboratories and compared its performance with that of traditional DST. The results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of Genechip were 87.56% and 97.95% for rifampin resistance and 80.34% and 95.82% for isoniazid resistance, respectively. In addition, we found that the positive grade of the sputum smears influenced the judgment of results by Genechip. The test judged only 75% of the specimens of “scanty” positive grade. However, the positive grade of the specimens showed no influence on the accuracy of Genechip. Overall, the study suggests that, in limited-resource laboratories, Genechip showed high sensitivity and specificity for rifampin and isoniazid resistance, making it a more effective, rapid, safe, and cost-beneficial method worthy of broader use in limited-resource laboratories in China. PMID:23515537

  19. DMET-Analyzer: automatic analysis of Affymetrix DMET Data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical Bioinformatics is currently growing and is based on the integration of clinical and omics data aiming at the development of personalized medicine. Thus the introduction of novel technologies able to investigate the relationship among clinical states and biological machineries may help the development of this field. For instance the Affymetrix DMET platform (drug metabolism enzymes and transporters) is able to study the relationship among the variation of the genome of patients and drug metabolism, detecting SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) on genes related to drug metabolism. This may allow for instance to find genetic variants in patients which present different drug responses, in pharmacogenomics and clinical studies. Despite this, there is currently a lack in the development of open-source algorithms and tools for the analysis of DMET data. Existing software tools for DMET data generally allow only the preprocessing of binary data (e.g. the DMET-Console provided by Affymetrix) and simple data analysis operations, but do not allow to test the association of the presence of SNPs with the response to drugs. Results We developed DMET-Analyzer a tool for the automatic association analysis among the variation of the patient genomes and the clinical conditions of patients, i.e. the different response to drugs. The proposed system allows: (i) to automatize the workflow of analysis of DMET-SNP data avoiding the use of multiple tools; (ii) the automatic annotation of DMET-SNP data and the search in existing databases of SNPs (e.g. dbSNP), (iii) the association of SNP with pathway through the search in PharmaGKB, a major knowledge base for pharmacogenomic studies. DMET-Analyzer has a simple graphical user interface that allows users (doctors/biologists) to upload and analyse DMET files produced by Affymetrix DMET-Console in an interactive way. The effectiveness and easy use of DMET Analyzer is demonstrated through different case studies regarding

  20. Rawcopy: Improved copy number analysis with Affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhofer, Markus; Viklund, Björn; Isaksson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Microarray data is subject to noise and systematic variation that negatively affects the resolution of copy number analysis. We describe Rawcopy, an R package for processing of Affymetrix CytoScan HD, CytoScan 750k and SNP 6.0 microarray raw intensities (CEL files). Noise characteristics of a large number of reference samples are used to estimate log ratio and B-allele frequency for total and allele-specific copy number analysis. Rawcopy achieves better signal-to-noise ratio and higher proportion of validated alterations than commonly used free and proprietary alternatives. In addition, Rawcopy visualizes each microarray sample for assessment of technical quality, patient identity and genome-wide absolute copy number states. Software and instructions are available at http://rawcopy.org. PMID:27796336

  1. Gene Expression and Genetic Variation in Human Atria

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Honghuang; Dolmatova, Elena V.; Morley, Michael P.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; McManus, David D.; Magnani, Jared W.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Hakonarson, Hakon; del Monte, Federica; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The human left and right atria have different susceptibilities to develop atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the molecular events related to structural and functional changes that enhance AF susceptibility are still poorly understood. Objective To characterize gene expression and genetic variation in human atria. Methods We studied the gene expression profiles and genetic variations in 53 left atrial and 52 right atrial tissue samples collected from the Myocardial Applied Genomics Network (MAGNet) repository. The tissues were collected from heart failure patients undergoing transplantation and from unused organ donor hearts with normal ventricular function. Gene expression was profiled using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133A Array. Genetic variation was profiled using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results We found that 109 genes were differentially expressed between left and right atrial tissues. A total of 187 and 259 significant cis-associations between transcript levels and genetic variants were identified in left and right atrial tissues, respectively. We also found that a SNP at a known AF locus, rs3740293, was associated with the expression of MYOZ1 in both left and right atrial tissues. Conclusion We found a distinct transcriptional profile between the right and left atrium, and extensive cis-associations between atrial transcripts and common genetic variants. Our results implicate MYOZ1 as the causative gene at the chromosome 10q22 locus for AF. PMID:24177373

  2. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the μ-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in μ-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power

  3. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the μ-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in μ-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power

  4. Smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips can also rapidly ascertain species status for some zoonotic non-variola orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Sammons, Scott A; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2008-04-01

    We recently developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips for the rapid sequencing of Variola virus strains in the WHO Repository of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this study, we attempted to hybridize these GeneChips with some known non-Variola orthopoxvirus isolates, including monkeypox, cowpox, and vaccinia viruses, for rapid detection.

  5. Uses of Staphylococcus aureus GeneChips in Genotyping and Genetic Composition Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dunman, P. M.; Mounts, W.; McAleese, F.; Immermann, F.; Macapagal, D.; Marsilio, E.; McDougal, L.; Tenover, F. C.; Bradford, P. A.; Petersen, P. J.; Projan, S. J.; Murphy, E.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the relatedness of strains within a bacterial species is essential for monitoring reservoirs of antimicrobial resistance and for epidemiological studies. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), ribotyping, and multilocus sequence typing are commonly used for this purpose. However, these techniques are either nonquantitative or provide only a limited estimation of strain relatedness. Moreover, they cannot extensively define the genes that constitute an organism. In the present study, 21 oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ORSA) isolates, representing eight major ORSA lineages, and each of the seven strains for which the complete genomic sequence is publicly available were genotyped using a novel GeneChip-based approach. Strains were also subjected to PFGE and ribotyping analysis. GeneChip results provided a higher level of discrimination among isolates than either ribotyping or PFGE, although strain clustering was similar among the three techniques. In addition, GeneChip signal intensity cutoff values were empirically determined to provide extensive data on the genetic composition of each isolate analyzed. Using this technology it was shown that strains could be examined for each element represented on the GeneChip, including virulence factors, antimicrobial resistance determinants, and agr type. These results were validated by PCR, growth on selective media, and detailed in silico analysis of each of the sequenced genomes. Collectively, this work demonstrates that GeneChips provide extensive genotyping information for S. aureus strains and may play a major role in epidemiological studies in the future where correlating genes with particular disease phenotypes is critical. PMID:15365023

  6. ExonMiner: Web service for analysis of GeneChip Exon array data

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Ryo; Nagasaki, Masao; Saito, Ayumu; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    Background Some splicing isoform-specific transcriptional regulations are related to disease. Therefore, detection of disease specific splice variations is the first step for finding disease specific transcriptional regulations. Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST Array can measure exon-level expression profiles that are suitable to find differentially expressed exons in genome-wide scale. However, exon array produces massive datasets that are more than we can handle and analyze on personal computer. Results We have developed ExonMiner that is the first all-in-one web service for analysis of exon array data to detect transcripts that have significantly different splicing patterns in two cells, e.g. normal and cancer cells. ExonMiner can perform the following analyses: (1) data normalization, (2) statistical analysis based on two-way ANOVA, (3) finding transcripts with significantly different splice patterns, (4) efficient visualization based on heatmaps and barplots, and (5) meta-analysis to detect exon level biomarkers. We implemented ExonMiner on a supercomputer system in order to perform genome-wide analysis for more than 300,000 transcripts in exon array data, which has the potential to reveal the aberrant splice variations in cancer cells as exon level biomarkers. Conclusion ExonMiner is well suited for analysis of exon array data and does not require any installation of software except for internet browsers. What all users need to do is to access the ExonMiner URL . Users can analyze full dataset of exon array data within hours by high-level statistical analysis with sound theoretical basis that finds aberrant splice variants as biomarkers. PMID:19036125

  7. Screening and identification of microRNA involved in unstable angina using gene-chip analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si; Sun, Ya-Nan; Zhou, Yun-Tao; Zhang, Chun-Lai; Lu, Feng; Liu, Jia; Shang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that microRNA (miRNA) may play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, which has led to a greater understanding of the complex pathophysiological processes underlying unstable angina (UA). The present study aimed to investigate changes in the miRNA expression profiles of patients with UA using gene-chip analysis, in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of UA. Total RNA was extracted and purified from plasma samples collected from patients with UA and healthy controls. The samples underwent microarray analysis using an Exiqon miRCURY LNA™ microRNA Array. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified by volcano plot filtering, and were validated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). In addition, functional annotation of the differentially expressed miRNAs involved gene ontology analyses. Among the 212 miRNAs differentially expressed between the two groups, 82 were upregulated and 130 were downregulated. Notably, the results of the RT-qPCR were consistent with the gene-chip results. The miRNAs identified in the present study may be potential novel biomarkers for the prevention and early diagnosis of UA. Furthermore, the results of the present study suggested that UA occurs as a result of complex and dynamic processes regulated by numerous factors, including multiple miRNAs. PMID:27703515

  8. Cross-platform expression profiling demonstrates that SV40 small tumor antigen activates Notch, Hedgehog, and Wnt signaling in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ali-Seyed, Mohamed; Laycock, Noelani; Karanam, Suresh; Xiao, Wenming; Blair, Eric T; Moreno, Carlos S

    2006-01-01

    Background We previously analyzed human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines for the effects that simian virus 40 (SV40) small tumor antigen (ST) has on gene expression using Affymetrix U133 GeneChips. To cross-validate and extend our initial findings, we sought to compare the expression profiles of these cell lines using an alternative microarray platform. METHODS: We have analyzed matched cell lines with and without expression of SV40 ST using an Applied Biosystems (AB) microarray platform that uses single 60-mer oligonucleotides and single-color quantitative chemiluminescence for detection. RESULTS: While we were able to previously identify only 456 genes affected by ST with the Affymetrix platform, we identified 1927 individual genes with the AB platform. Additional technical replicates increased the number of identified genes to 3478 genes and confirmed the changes in 278 (61%) of our original set of 456 genes. Among the 3200 genes newly identified as affected by SV40 ST, we confirmed 20 by QRTPCR including several components of the Wnt, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways, consistent with SV40 ST activation of these developmental pathways. While inhibitors of Notch activation had no effect on cell survival, cyclopamine had a potent killing effect on cells expressing SV40 ST. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that SV40 ST expression alters cell survival pathways to sensitize cells to the killing effect of Hedgehog pathway inhibitors. PMID:16522205

  9. Analysis of discordant Affymetrix probesets casts serious doubt on idea of microarray data reutilization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Affymetrix microarray technology allows one to investigate expression of thousands of genes simultaneously upon a variety of conditions. In a popular U133A microarray platform, the expression of 37% of genes is measured by more than one probeset. The discordant expression observed for two different probesets that match the same gene is a widespread phenomenon which is usually underestimated, ignored or disregarded. Results Here we evaluate the prevalence of discordant expression in data collected using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarray platform. In U133A, about 30% of genes annotated by two different probesets demonstrate a substantial correlation between independently measured expression values. To our surprise, sorting the probesets according to the nature of the discrepancy in their expression levels allowed the classification of the respective genes according to their fundamental functional properties, including observed enrichment by tissue-specific transcripts and alternatively spliced variants. On another hand, an absence of discrepancies in probesets that simultaneously match several different genes allowed us to pinpoint non-expressed pseudogenes and gene groups with highly correlated expression patterns. Nevertheless, in many cases, the nature of discordant expression of two probesets that match the same transcript remains unexplained. It is possible that these probesets report differently regulated sets of transcripts, or, in best case scenario, two different sets of transcripts that represent the same gene. Conclusion The majority of absolute gene expression values collected using Affymetrix microarrays may not be suitable for typical interpretative downstream analysis. PMID:25563078

  10. AffyTrees: facilitating comparative analysis of Affymetrix plant microarray chips.

    PubMed

    Frickey, Tancred; Benedito, Vagner Augusto; Udvardi, Michael; Weiller, Georg

    2008-02-01

    Microarrays measure the expression of large numbers of genes simultaneously and can be used to delve into interaction networks involving many genes at a time. However, it is often difficult to decide to what extent knowledge about the expression of genes gleaned in one model organism can be transferred to other species. This can be examined either by measuring the expression of genes of interest under comparable experimental conditions in other species, or by gathering the necessary data from comparable microarray experiments. However, it is essential to know which genes to compare between the organisms. To facilitate comparison of expression data across different species, we have implemented a Web-based software tool that provides information about sequence orthologs across a range of Affymetrix microarray chips. AffyTrees provides a quick and easy way of assigning which probe sets on different Affymetrix chips measure the expression of orthologous genes. Even in cases where gene or genome duplications have complicated the assignment, groups of comparable probe sets can be identified. The phylogenetic trees provide a resource that can be used to improve sequence annotation and detect biases in the sequence complement of Affymetrix chips. Being able to identify sequence orthologs and recognize biases in the sequence complement of chips is necessary for reliable cross-species microarray comparison. As the amount of work required to generate a single phylogeny in a nonautomated manner is considerable, AffyTrees can greatly reduce the workload for scientists interested in large-scale cross-species comparisons.

  11. Improvements to previous algorithms to predict gene structure and isoform concentrations using Affymetrix Exon arrays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Exon arrays provide a way to measure the expression of different isoforms of genes in an organism. Most of the procedures to deal with these arrays are focused on gene expression or on exon expression. Although the only biological analytes that can be properly assigned a concentration are transcripts, there are very few algorithms that focus on them. The reason is that previously developed summarization methods do not work well if applied to transcripts. In addition, gene structure prediction, i.e., the correspondence between probes and novel isoforms, is a field which is still unexplored. Results We have modified and adapted a previous algorithm to take advantage of the special characteristics of the Affymetrix exon arrays. The structure and concentration of transcripts -some of them possibly unknown- in microarray experiments were predicted using this algorithm. Simulations showed that the suggested modifications improved both specificity (SP) and sensitivity (ST) of the predictions. The algorithm was also applied to different real datasets showing its effectiveness and the concordance with PCR validated results. Conclusions The proposed algorithm shows a substantial improvement in the performance over the previous version. This improvement is mainly due to the exploitation of the redundancy of the Affymetrix exon arrays. An R-Package of SPACE with the updated algorithms have been developed and is freely available. PMID:21110835

  12. Study on the antiendotoxin action of Pulsatillae Decoction using an Affymetrix rat genome array.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiyi; Chen, Xi; Lin, Hong; Hu, Yuanliang; Mu, Xiang

    2009-01-01

    A high-throughput and efficient Affymetrix rat genome array was used to investigate the pharmacological mechanism of the traditional Chinese medicine, Pulsatillae Decoction (PD), used for the treatment of diseases induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Rat intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (RIMECs) were challenged with 1mug/ml LPS for 3h, and then treated with PD at a concentration of 1mg/ml for 24h. Total RNA from each treatment group was extracted from cultured RIMECs for detection by the Affymetrix Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array. The results showed that 36 genes were upregulated and 33 genes were downregulated in the LPS group vs. the blank control group; 566 genes were upregulated and 12 genes were downregulated in the PD-treated group vs. the LPS group; and 93 genes were upregulated and 29 genes were downregulated in the PD-treated group vs. the blank control group. The analysis of these data suggested that PD specifically and effectively reduce damage induced by LPS, and improved physiological and biochemical responses to counteract the effects of LPS.

  13. ACNE: a summarization method to estimate allele-specific copy numbers for Affymetrix SNP arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Estevez, Maria; Bengtsson, Henrik; Rubio, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Current algorithms for estimating DNA copy numbers (CNs) borrow concepts from gene expression analysis methods. However, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays have special characteristics that, if taken into account, can improve the overall performance. For example, cross hybridization between alleles occurs in SNP probe pairs. In addition, most of the current CN methods are focused on total CNs, while it has been shown that allele-specific CNs are of paramount importance for some studies. Therefore, we have developed a summarization method that estimates high-quality allele-specific CNs. Results: The proposed method estimates the allele-specific DNA CNs for all Affymetrix SNP arrays dealing directly with the cross hybridization between probes within SNP probesets. This algorithm outperforms (or at least it performs as well as) other state-of-the-art algorithms for computing DNA CNs. It better discerns an aberration from a normal state and it also gives more precise allele-specific CNs. Availability: The method is available in the open-source R package ACNE, which also includes an add on to the aroma.affymetrix framework (http://www.aroma-project.org/). Contact: arubio@ceit.es Supplementaruy information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20529889

  14. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression patterns in purified, uncultured human liver cells and activated hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Andrew H.; Coll, Mar; Verhulst, Stefaan; Mannaerts, Inge; Øie, Cristina I.; Smedsrød, Bård; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Luttun, Aernout; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Collas, Philippe; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver fibrogenesis – scarring of the liver that can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer – is characterized by hepatocyte impairment, capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. To date, the molecular determinants of a healthy human liver cell phenotype remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we assess the transcriptome and the genome-wide promoter methylome specific for purified, non-cultured human hepatocytes, LSECs and HSCs, and investigate the nature of epigenetic changes accompanying transcriptional changes associated with activation of HSCs. Material and methods Gene expression profile and promoter methylome of purified, uncultured human liver cells and culture-activated HSCs were respectively determined using Affymetrix HG-U219 genechips and by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation coupled to promoter array hybridization. Histone modification patterns were assessed at the single-gene level by chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR. Results We unveil a DNA-methylation-based epigenetic relationship between hepatocytes, LSECs and HSCs despite their distinct ontogeny. We show that liver cell type-specific DNA methylation targets early developmental and differentiation-associated functions. Integrative analysis of promoter methylome and transcriptome reveals partial concordance between DNA methylation and transcriptional changes associated with human HSC activation. Further, we identify concordant histone methylation and acetylation changes in the promoter and putative novel enhancer elements of genes involved in liver fibrosis. Conclusions Our study provides the first epigenetic blueprint of three distinct freshly isolated, human hepatic cell types and of epigenetic changes elicited upon HSC activation. PMID:26353929

  15. Evaluation of the Affymetrix CytoScan® Dx Assay for Developmental Delay

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Bryn D.; Scharf, Rebecca J.; Spear, Emily A.; Edelmann, Lisa J.; Stroustrup, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The goal of molecular cytogenetic testing for children presenting with developmental delay is to identify or exclude genetic abnormalities that are associated with cognitive, behavioral, and/or motor symptoms. Until 2010, chromosome analysis was the standard first-line genetic screening test for evaluation of patients with developmental delay when a specific syndrome was not suspected. In 2010, The American College of Medical Genetics and several other groups recommended chromosomal microarray (CMA) as the first-line test in children with developmental delays, multiple congenital anomalies, and/or autism. This test is able to detect regions of genomic imbalances at a much finer resolution than G-banded karyotyping. Until recently, no CMA testing had been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This review will focus on the use of the Affymetrix CytoScan® Dx Assay, the first CMA to receive FDA approval for the genetic evaluation of individuals with developmental delay. PMID:25350348

  16. Gene expression profiling of dengue infected human primary cells identifies secreted mediators in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Aniuska; Warke, Rajas V.; Martin, Katherine; Xhaja, Kris; de Bosch, Norma; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2009-01-01

    We used gene expression profiling of human primary cells infected in vitro with dengue virus (DENV) as a tool to identify secreted mediators induced in response to the acute infection. Affymetrix Genechip analysis of human primary monocytes, B cells and dendritic cells infected with DENV in vitro revealed a strong induction of monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP-2/CCL8), interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/TNFSF10). The expression of these genes was confirmed in dendritic cells infected with DENV in vitro at mRNA and protein levels. A prospectively enrolled cohort of DENV-infected Venezuelan patients was used to measure the levels of these proteins in serum during three different periods of the disease. Results showed significant increase of MCP-2, IP-10 and TRAIL levels in DENV-infected patients during the febrile period, when compared to healthy donors and patients with other febrile illnesses. MCP-2 and IP-10 levels were still elevated during the post-febrile period while TRAIL levels dropped close to normal after defervescense. Patients with primary infections had higher TRAIL levels than patients with secondary infections during the febrile period of the disease. Increased levels of IP-10, TRAIL and MCP-2 in acute DENV infections suggest a role for these mediators in the immune response to the infection. PMID:19551822

  17. MAAMD: a workflow to standardize meta-analyses and comparison of affymetrix microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mandatory deposit of raw microarray data files for public access, prior to study publication, provides significant opportunities to conduct new bioinformatics analyses within and across multiple datasets. Analysis of raw microarray data files (e.g. Affymetrix CEL files) can be time consuming, complex, and requires fundamental computational and bioinformatics skills. The development of analytical workflows to automate these tasks simplifies the processing of, improves the efficiency of, and serves to standardize multiple and sequential analyses. Once installed, workflows facilitate the tedious steps required to run rapid intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. Results We developed a workflow to facilitate and standardize Meta-Analysis of Affymetrix Microarray Data analysis (MAAMD) in Kepler. Two freely available stand-alone software tools, R and AltAnalyze were embedded in MAAMD. The inputs of MAAMD are user-editable csv files, which contain sample information and parameters describing the locations of input files and required tools. MAAMD was tested by analyzing 4 different GEO datasets from mice and drosophila. MAAMD automates data downloading, data organization, data quality control assesment, differential gene expression analysis, clustering analysis, pathway visualization, gene-set enrichment analysis, and cross-species orthologous-gene comparisons. MAAMD was utilized to identify gene orthologues responding to hypoxia or hyperoxia in both mice and drosophila. The entire set of analyses for 4 datasets (34 total microarrays) finished in ~ one hour. Conclusions MAAMD saves time, minimizes the required computer skills, and offers a standardized procedure for users to analyze microarray datasets and make new intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. PMID:24621103

  18. Mapping MRI/MRS Parameters with Genetic Over-expression Profiles In Human Prostate Cancer: Demonstrating the Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lenkinski, Robert E.; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Liu, Fangbing; Frangioni, John V.; Perner, Sven; Rubin, Mark A.; Genega, Elizabeth; Rofsky, Neil M.; Gaston, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy can probe a variety of physiological (e.g. blood vessel permeability) and metabolic characteristics of prostate cancer. However, little is known about the changes in gene expression that underlie the spectral and imaging features observed in prostate cancer. Tumor induced changes in vascular permeability and angiogenesis are thought to contribute to patterns of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI images of prostate cancer even though the genetic basis of tumor vasculogenesis is complex and the specific mechanisms underlying these DCEMRI features have not yet been determined. In order to identify the changes in gene expression that correspond to MRS and DCEMRI patterns in human prostate cancers, we have utilized tissue print micropeel techniques to generate “whole mount” molecular maps of radical prostatectomy specimens that correspond to pre-surgical MRI/MRS studies. These molecular maps include RNA expression profiles from both Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qrt-PCR) analysis, as well as immunohistochemical studies. Using these methods on patients with prostate cancer, we found robust over-expression of choline kinase a in the majority of primary tumors. We also observed overexpression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), a newly identified angiogenic factor, in a subset of DCEMRI positive prostate cancers. These studies set the stage for establishing MRI/MRS parameters as validated biomarkers for human prostate cancer. PMID:18752015

  19. High-Throughput Quantitative Analysis of the Human Intestinal Microbiota with a Phylogenetic Microarray▿

    PubMed Central

    Paliy, Oleg; Kenche, Harshavardhan; Abernathy, Frank; Michail, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Gut microbiota carry out key functions in health and participate in the pathogenesis of a growing number of diseases. The aim of this study was to develop a custom microarray that is able to identify hundreds of intestinal bacterial species. We used the Entrez nucleotide database to compile a data set of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences isolated from human intestinal and fecal samples. Identified sequences were clustered into separate phylospecies groups. Representative sequences from each phylospecies were used to develop a microbiota microarray based on the Affymetrix GeneChip platform. The designed microbiota array contains probes to 775 different bacterial phylospecies. In our validation experiments, the array correctly identified genomic DNA from all 15 bacterial species used. Microbiota array has a detection sensitivity of at least 1 pg of genomic DNA and can detect bacteria present at a 0.00025% level of overall sample. Using the developed microarray, fecal samples from two healthy children and two healthy adults were analyzed for bacterial presence. Between 227 and 232 species were detected in fecal samples from children, whereas 191 to 208 species were found in adult stools. The majority of identified phylospecies belonged to the classes Clostridia and Bacteroidetes. The microarray revealed putative differences between the gut microbiota of healthy children and adults: fecal samples from adults had more Clostridia and less Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria than those from children. A number of other putative differences were found at the genus level. PMID:19363078

  20. The Affymetrix DMET Plus Platform Reveals Unique Distribution of ADME-Related Variants in Ethnic Arabs

    PubMed Central

    Wakil, Salma M.; Nguyen, Cao; Muiya, Nzioka P.; Andres, Editha; Lykowska-Tarnowska, Agnieszka; Baz, Batoul; Meyer, Brian F.; Morahan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus Premier Pack has been designed to genotype 1936 gene variants thought to be essential for screening patients in personalized drug therapy. These variants include the cytochrome P450s (CYP450s), the key metabolizing enzymes, many other enzymes involved in phase I and phase II pharmacokinetic reactions, and signaling mediators associated with variability in clinical response to numerous drugs not only among individuals, but also between ethnic populations. Materials and Methods. We genotyped 600 Saudi individuals for 1936 variants on the DMET platform to evaluate their clinical potential in personalized medicine in ethnic Arabs. Results. Approximately 49% each of the 437 CYP450 variants, 56% of the 581 transporters, 56% of 419 transferases, 48% of the 104 dehydrogenases, and 58% of the remaining 390 variants were detected. Several variants, such as rs3740071, rs6193, rs258751, rs6199, rs11568421, and rs8187797, exhibited significantly either higher or lower minor allele frequencies (MAFs) than those in other ethnic groups. Discussion. The present study revealed some unique distribution trends for several variants in Arabs, which displayed partly inverse allelic prevalence compared to other ethnic populations. The results point therefore to the need to verify and ascertain the prevalence of a variant as a prerequisite for engaging it in clinical routine screening in personalized medicine in any given population. PMID:25802476

  1. affyPara-a Bioconductor Package for Parallelized Preprocessing Algorithms of Affymetrix Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Markus; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2009-07-22

    Microarray data repositories as well as large clinical applications of gene expression allow to analyse several hundreds of microarrays at one time. The preprocessing of large amounts of microarrays is still a challenge. The algorithms are limited by the available computer hardware. For example, building classification or prognostic rules from large microarray sets will be very time consuming. Here, preprocessing has to be a part of the cross-validation and resampling strategy which is necessary to estimate the rule's prediction quality honestly.This paper proposes the new Bioconductor package affyPara for parallelized preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data. Partition of data can be applied on arrays and parallelization of algorithms is a straightforward consequence. The partition of data and distribution to several nodes solves the main memory problems and accelerates preprocessing by up to the factor 20 for 200 or more arrays.affyPara is a free and open source package, under GPL license, available form the Bioconductor project at www.bioconductor.org. A user guide and examples are provided with the package.

  2. ChIP-on-chip analysis methods for Affymetrix tiling arrays.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Sean J

    2015-01-01

    Although the ChIP-sequencing has gained significant attraction recently, ChIP analysis using microarrays is still an attractive option due to the low cost, ease of analysis, and access to legacy and public data sets. The analysis of ChIP-Chip data entails a multistep approach that requires several different applications to progress from the initial stages of raw data analysis to the identification and characterization of ChIP binding sites. There are multiple approaches to data analysis and there are several applications available for each stage of the analysis pipeline. Each application must be evaluated for its suitability for the particular experiment as well as the investigator's background with computational tools. This chapter is a review of the commonly available applications for Affymetrix ChIP-Chip data analysis, as well as the general workflow of a ChIP-Chip analysis approach. The purpose of the chapter is to allow the researcher to better select the appropriate applications and provide them with the direction necessary to proceed with a ChIP-Chip analysis.

  3. Differential effects of Tat proteins derived from HIV-1 subtypes B and recombinant CRF02_AG on human brain microvascular endothelial cells: implications for blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Shawna M; Bhargavan, Biju; Yu, Fang; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2014-06-01

    HIV-1 genetic differences influence viral replication and progression to AIDS. HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF)02_AG is the predominant viral subtype infecting humans in West and Central Africa, but its effects on HIV neuropathogenesis are not known. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Tat proteins from HIV-1 subtype B (Tat.B) and HIV-1 CRF02_AG (Tat.AG) on primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), the major component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0.ST arrays, we showed that Tat.AG had minimal effects while Tat.B induced transcriptional upregulation of 90 genes in HBMEC, including proinflammatory chemokines, complement components C3, C7, and complement factor B, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-3, MMP-10, and MMP-12. These results were confirmed by real-time PCR. Compared with Tat.AG, Tat.B significantly increased MMP-3, MMP-10, and MMP-12 activities in HBMEC, and the MMPs tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 blocked Tat-induced increase in MMPs activity. Western blot analyses also showed that Tat increased the expression of C3 and its cleaved fragment C3b in HBMEC. These data suggest that genetic differences between HIV-1 subtypes B and CRF02_AG influence the effects of Tat proteins from these two clades on HBMEC, including molecular and cellular functions, and canonical pathways, which would affect BBB dysfunction and viral neuropathogenesis.

  4. Who are the Okinawans? Ancestry, genome diversity, and implications for the genetic study of human longevity from a geographically isolated population.

    PubMed

    Bendjilali, Nasrine; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; He, Qimei; Willcox, D Craig; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Donlon, Timothy A; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Suzuki, Makoto; Willcox, Bradley J

    2014-12-01

    Isolated populations have advantages for genetic studies of longevity from decreased haplotype diversity and long-range linkage disequilibrium. This permits smaller sample sizes without loss of power, among other utilities. Little is known about the genome of the Okinawans, a potential population isolate, recognized for longevity. Therefore, we assessed genetic diversity, structure, and admixture in Okinawans, and compared this with Caucasians, Chinese, Japanese, and Africans from HapMap II, genotyped on the same Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K array. Principal component analysis, haplotype coverage, and linkage disequilibrium decay revealed a distinct Okinawan genome-more homogeneity, less haplotype diversity, and longer range linkage disequilibrium. Population structure and admixture analyses utilizing 52 global reference populations from the Human Genome Diversity Cell Line Panel demonstrated that Okinawans clustered almost exclusively with East Asians. Sibling relative risk (λs) analysis revealed that siblings of Okinawan centenarians have 3.11 times (females) and 3.77 times (males) more likelihood of centenarianism. These findings suggest that Okinawans are genetically distinct and share several characteristics of a population isolate, which are prone to develop extreme phenotypes (eg, longevity) from genetic drift, natural selection, and population bottlenecks. These data support further exploration of genetic influence on longevity in the Okinawans. PMID:24444611

  5. Solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation induces histone 3 methylation changes in the gene promoters of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 in primary human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gesumaria, Lisa; Matsui, Mary S; Kluz, Thomas; Costa, Max

    2015-05-01

    Molecular signalling pathways delineating the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are currently well-defined; however, the effects of UVR on epigenetic mechanisms of MMP induction are not as well understood. In this study, we examined solar-simulated UVR (ssUVR)-induced gene expression changes and alterations to histone methylation in the promoters of MMP1 and MMP3 in primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDF). Gene expression changes, including the increased expression of MMP1 and MMP3, were observed using Affymetrix GeneChip arrays and confirmed by qRT-PCR. Using ChIP-PCR, we showed for the first time that in HDF irradiated with 12 J/cm(2) ssUVR, the H3K4me3 transcriptional activating mark increased and the H3K9me2 transcriptional silencing mark decreased in abundance in promoters, correlating with the observed elevation of MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA levels following ssUVR exposure. Changes in mRNA levels due to a single exposure were transient and decreased 5 days after exposure. PMID:25707437

  6. Solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation induces histone 3 methylation changes in the gene promoters of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 in primary human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gesumaria, Lisa; Matsui, Mary S; Kluz, Thomas; Costa, Max

    2015-05-01

    Molecular signalling pathways delineating the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are currently well-defined; however, the effects of UVR on epigenetic mechanisms of MMP induction are not as well understood. In this study, we examined solar-simulated UVR (ssUVR)-induced gene expression changes and alterations to histone methylation in the promoters of MMP1 and MMP3 in primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDF). Gene expression changes, including the increased expression of MMP1 and MMP3, were observed using Affymetrix GeneChip arrays and confirmed by qRT-PCR. Using ChIP-PCR, we showed for the first time that in HDF irradiated with 12 J/cm(2) ssUVR, the H3K4me3 transcriptional activating mark increased and the H3K9me2 transcriptional silencing mark decreased in abundance in promoters, correlating with the observed elevation of MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA levels following ssUVR exposure. Changes in mRNA levels due to a single exposure were transient and decreased 5 days after exposure.

  7. Influence of sex on gene expression in human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tomo; Richards, Stephen M.; Liu, Shaohui; Jensen, Roderick V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Sex-associated differences have been identified in the anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the human cornea. We hypothesize that many of these differences are due to fundamental variations in gene expression. Our objective in this study was to determine whether such differences exist in human corneal epithelial cells both in vivo and in vitro. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells were isolated from the corneoscleral rims of male and female donors. Cells were processed either directly for RNA extraction, or first cultured in phenol red-free keratinocyte serum-free media. The RNA samples were examined for differentially expressed mRNAs by using of CodeLink Bioarrays and Affymetrix GeneChips. Data were analyzed with GeneSifter.Net software. Results Our results demonstrate that sex significantly influences the expression of over 600 genes in human corneal epithelial cells in vivo. These genes are involved in a broad spectrum of biologic processes, molecular functions and cellular components, such as metabolic processes, DNA replication, cell migration, RNA binding, oxidoreductase activity and nucleoli. We also identified significant, sex-related effects on gene expression in human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. However, with few exceptions (e.g., X- and Y-linked genes), these sex-related differences in gene expression in vitro were typically different than those in vivo. Conclusions Our findings support our hypothesis that sex-related differences exist in the gene expression of human corneal epithelial cells. Variations in gene expression may contribute to sex-related differences in the prevalence of certain corneal diseases. PMID:20011627

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of the Human Corneal Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Frausto, Ricardo F.; Wang, Cynthia; Aldave, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To comprehensively characterize human corneal endothelial cell (HCEnC) gene expression and age-dependent differential gene expression and to identify expressed genes mapped to chromosomal loci associated with the corneal endothelial dystrophies posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD)1, Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD)4, and X-linked endothelial dystrophy (XECD). Methods. Total RNA was isolated from ex vivo corneal endothelium obtained from six pediatric and five adult donor corneas. Complementary DNA was hybridized to the Affymetrix GeneChip 1.1ST array. Data analysis was performed using Partek Genomics Suite software, and differentially expressed genes were validated by digital molecular barcoding technology. Results. Transcripts corresponding to 12,596 genes were identified in HCEnC. Nine genes displayed the most significant differential expression between pediatric and adult HCEnC: CAPN6, HIST1H3A, HIST1H4E, and HSPA2 were expressed at higher levels in pediatric HCEnC, while ITGBL1, NALCN, PREX2, TAC1, and TMOD1 were expressed at higher levels in adult HCEnC. Analysis of the PPCD1, FECD4 and XECD loci demonstrated transcription of 53/95 protein-coding genes in the PPCD1 locus, 27/40 in the FECD4 locus, and 35/68 in the XECD locus. Conclusions. An analysis of the HCEnC transcriptome reveals the expression of almost 13,000 genes, with less than 1% mapped to chromosomal loci associated with PPCD1, FECD4, and XECD. At least nine genes demonstrated significant differential expression between pediatric and adult HCEnC, defining specific functional properties distinct to each age group. These data will serve as a resource for vision scientists investigating HCEnC gene expression and can be used to focus the search for the genetic basis of the corneal endothelial dystrophies for which the genetic basis remains unknown. PMID:25377225

  9. Evaluation of developmental toxicity using undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eui-Man; Choi, Yeo-ul; Kang, Hong-Seok; Yang, Hyun; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Yang, Jun-young; Choi, Ki Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2015-02-01

    An embryonic stem cell test (EST) has been developed to evaluate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals with an in vitro system. In the present study, novel methods to screen toxic chemicals during the developmental process were evaluated using undifferentiated human embryonic stem (hES) cells. By using surface marker antigens (SSEA-4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81), we confirmed undifferentiated conditions of the used hES cells by immunocytochemistry. We assessed the developmental toxicity of embryotoxic chemicals, 5-fluorouracil, indomethacin and non-embryotoxic penicillin G in different concentrations for up to 7 days. While expressions of the surface markers were not significantly affected, the embryotoxic chemicals influenced their response to pluripotent ES cell markers, such as OCT-4, NANOG, endothelin receptor type B (EDNRB), secreted frizzled related protein 2 (SFRP2), teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 (TDGF1), and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Most of the pluripotent ES cell markers were down-regulated in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with embryotoxic chemicals. After treatment with 5-fluorouracil, indomethacin and penicillin G, we observed a remarkable convergence in the degree of up-regulation of development, cell cycle and apoptosis-related genes by gene expression profiles using an Affymetrix GeneChips. Taken together, these results suggest that embryotoxic chemicals have cytotoxic effects, and modulate the expression of ES cell markers as well as development-, cell cycle- and apoptosis-related genes that have pivotal roles in undifferentiated hES cells. Therefore, we suggest that hES cells may be useful for testing the toxic effects of chemicals that could impact the embryonic developmental stage.

  10. A new method for class prediction based on signed-rank algorithms applied to Affymetrix® microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rème, Thierry; Hose, Dirk; De Vos, John; Vassal, Aurélien; Poulain, Pierre-Olivier; Pantesco, Véronique; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background The huge amount of data generated by DNA chips is a powerful basis to classify various pathologies. However, constant evolution of microarray technology makes it difficult to mix data from different chip types for class prediction of limited sample populations. Affymetrix® technology provides both a quantitative fluorescence signal and a decision (detection call: absent or present) based on signed-rank algorithms applied to several hybridization repeats of each gene, with a per-chip normalization. We developed a new prediction method for class belonging based on the detection call only from recent Affymetrix chip type. Biological data were obtained by hybridization on U133A, U133B and U133Plus 2.0 microarrays of purified normal B cells and cells from three independent groups of multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Results After a call-based data reduction step to filter out non class-discriminative probe sets, the gene list obtained was reduced to a predictor with correction for multiple testing by iterative deletion of probe sets that sequentially improve inter-class comparisons and their significance. The error rate of the method was determined using leave-one-out and 5-fold cross-validation. It was successfully applied to (i) determine a sex predictor with the normal donor group classifying gender with no error in all patient groups except for male MM samples with a Y chromosome deletion, (ii) predict the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains expressed by the malignant myeloma clones of the validation group and (iii) predict sex, light and heavy chain nature for every new patient. Finally, this method was shown powerful when compared to the popular classification method Prediction Analysis of Microarray (PAM). Conclusion This normalization-free method is routinely used for quality control and correction of collection errors in patient reports to clinicians. It can be easily extended to multiple class prediction suitable with clinical groups, and looks

  11. EFFECTS OF STORAGE, RNA EXTRACTION, GENECHIP TYPE, AND DONOR SEX ON GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF HUMAN WHOLE BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Gene expression profiling of whole blood may be useful for monitoring toxicological exposure and for diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases. Several methods are available that can be used to transport, store, and extract RNA from whole blood, but it is not clear...

  12. IL-17A mediates a selective gene expression profile in asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stéphane; Hirst, Stuart J; Lee, Tak H; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2014-06-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma by orchestrating and perpetuating airway inflammation and remodeling responses. In this study, we evaluated the IL-17RA signal transduction and gene expression profile in ASM cells from subjects with mild asthma and healthy individuals. Human primary ASM cells were treated with IL-17A and probed by the Affymetrix GeneChip array, and gene targets were validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Genomic analysis underlined the proinflammatory nature of IL-17A, as multiple NF-κB regulatory factors and chemokines were induced in ASM cells. Transcriptional regulators consisting of primary response genes were overrepresented and displayed dynamic expression profiles. IL-17A poorly enhanced IL-1β or IL-22 gene responses in ASM cells from both subjects with mild asthma and healthy donors. Interestingly, protein modifications to the NF-κB regulatory network were not observed after IL-17A stimulation, although oscillations in IκBε expression were detected. ASM cells from subjects with mild asthma up-regulated more genes with greater overall variability in response to IL-17A than from healthy donors. Finally, in response to IL-17A, ASM cells displayed rapid activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/ribosomal S6 kinase signaling pathway and increased nuclear levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Taken together, our results suggest that IL-17A mediated modest gene expression response, which, in cooperation with the NF-κB signaling network, may regulate the gene expression profile in ASM cells.

  13. Analysis of the Metabolic Pathways Affected by Poly(γ-glutamic Acid) in Arabidopsis thaliana Based on GeneChip Microarray.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zongqi; Lei, Peng; Feng, Xiaohai; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2016-08-17

    Plant growth is promoted by poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA). However, the molecular mechanism underlying such promotion is not yet well understood. Therefore, we used GeneChip microarrays to explore the effects of γ-PGA on gene transcription in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results revealed 299 genes significantly regulated by γ-PGA. These differently expressed genes participate mainly in metabolic and cellular processes and in stimuli responses. The metabolic pathways linked to these differently expressed genes were also investigated. A total of 64 of the 299 differently expressed genes were shown to be directly involved in 24 pathways such as brassinosteroid biosynthesis, α-linolenic acid metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and nitrogen metabolism, all of which were influenced by γ-PGA. The analysis demonstrated that γ-PGA promoted nitrogen assimilation and biosynthesis of brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, and lignins, providing a better explanation for why γ-PGA promotes growth and enhances stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27465513

  14. IT'S IN THE CHIPS: DEVELOPMENT OF A MICROARRAY GENECHIP APPROACH TO DETE T AND TYPE WATERBORNE VIRUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human caliciviruses, specifically members of the genus Norovirus, have been documented as a culprit for drinking water-related outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in the United States. In addition, these viruses are believed to be one of the major causes of waterborne disease. D...

  15. Early Transcriptomic Response to LDL and oxLDL in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damián-Zamacona, Salvador; Toledo-Ibelles, Paola; Ibarra-Abundis, Mabel Z.; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Macedo-Alcibia, Karla Paola; Delgado–Coello, Blanca; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although nowadays it is well known that the human transcriptome can importantly vary according to external or environmental condition, the reflection of this concept when studying oxidative stress and its direct relationship with gene expression profiling during the process of atherogenesis has not been thoroughly achieved. Objective The ability to analyze genome-wide gene expression through transcriptomics has shown that the genome responds dynamically to diverse stimuli. Here, we describe the transcriptome of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC) stimulated by native and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (nLDL and oxLDL respectively), with the aim of assessing the early molecular changes that induce a response in this cell type resulting in a transcriptomic transformation. This expression has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaques in vivo and in vitro, particularly in the light of the oxidative modification hypothesis of atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Total RNA was isolated with TRIzol reagent (Life Technologies) and quality estimated using an Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer. The transcriptome of hVSMC under different experimental conditions (1,5 and 24 hours for nLDL and oxLDL) was obtained using the GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST (Affymetrix) designed to measure gene expression of 28,869 well-annotated genes. A fixed fold-change cut-off corresponding to ± 2 was used to identify genes exhibiting the most significant variation and statistical significance (P< 0.05), and 8 genes validated by qPCR using Taqman probes. Conclusions 10 molecular processes were significantly affected in hVSMC: Apoptosis and cell cycle, extracellular matrix remodeling, DNA repair, cholesterol efflux, cGMP biosynthesis, endocytic mechanisms, calcium homeostasis, redox balance, membrane trafficking and finally, the immune response to inflammation. The evidence we present supporting the hypothesis for the involvement of oxidative modification of several processes and

  16. Effects of Metformin on Tissue Oxidative and Dicarbonyl Stress in Transgenic Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Expressing Human C-Reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Malínská, Hana; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Škop, Vojtěch; Šilhavý, Jan; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Strnad, Hynek; Kazdová, Ludmila; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative and dicarbonyl stress play important roles in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the first-line drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because it effectively suppresses gluconeogenesis in the liver. However, its "pleiotropic" effects remain controversial. In the current study, we tested the effects of metformin on inflammation, oxidative and dicarbonyl stress in an animal model of inflammation and metabolic syndrome, using spontaneously hypertensive rats that transgenically express human C-reactive protein (SHR-CRP). We treated 8-month-old male transgenic SHR-CRP rats with metformin (5 mg/kg/day) mixed as part of a standard diet for 4 weeks. A corresponding untreated control group of male transgenic SHR-CRP rats were fed a standard diet without metformin. In a similar fashion, we studied a group of nontransgenic SHR treated with metformin and an untreated group of nontransgenic SHR controls. In each group, we studied 6 animals. Parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism and oxidative and dicarbonyl stress were measured using standard methods. Gene expression profiles were determined using Affymetrix GeneChip Arrays. Statistical significance was evaluated by two-way ANOVA. In the SHR-CRP transgenic strain, we found that metformin treatment decreased circulating levels of inflammatory response marker IL-6, TNFα and MCP-1 while levels of human CRP remained unchanged. Metformin significantly reduced oxidative stress (levels of conjugated dienes and TBARS) and dicarbonyl stress (levels of methylglyoxal) in left ventricles, but not in kidneys. No significant effects of metformin on oxidative and dicarbonyl stress were observed in SHR controls. In addition, metformin treatment reduced adipose tissue lipolysis associated with human CRP. Possible molecular mechanisms of metformin action-studied by gene expression profiling in the liver-revealed deregulated genes from inflammatory and insulin signaling, AMP

  17. Effects of Metformin on Tissue Oxidative and Dicarbonyl Stress in Transgenic Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Expressing Human C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Malínská, Hana; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Škop, Vojtěch; Šilhavý, Jan; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Strnad, Hynek; Kazdová, Ludmila; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative and dicarbonyl stress play important roles in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the first-line drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because it effectively suppresses gluconeogenesis in the liver. However, its “pleiotropic” effects remain controversial. In the current study, we tested the effects of metformin on inflammation, oxidative and dicarbonyl stress in an animal model of inflammation and metabolic syndrome, using spontaneously hypertensive rats that transgenically express human C-reactive protein (SHR-CRP). We treated 8-month-old male transgenic SHR-CRP rats with metformin (5 mg/kg/day) mixed as part of a standard diet for 4 weeks. A corresponding untreated control group of male transgenic SHR-CRP rats were fed a standard diet without metformin. In a similar fashion, we studied a group of nontransgenic SHR treated with metformin and an untreated group of nontransgenic SHR controls. In each group, we studied 6 animals. Parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism and oxidative and dicarbonyl stress were measured using standard methods. Gene expression profiles were determined using Affymetrix GeneChip Arrays. Statistical significance was evaluated by two-way ANOVA. In the SHR-CRP transgenic strain, we found that metformin treatment decreased circulating levels of inflammatory response marker IL-6, TNFα and MCP-1 while levels of human CRP remained unchanged. Metformin significantly reduced oxidative stress (levels of conjugated dienes and TBARS) and dicarbonyl stress (levels of methylglyoxal) in left ventricles, but not in kidneys. No significant effects of metformin on oxidative and dicarbonyl stress were observed in SHR controls. In addition, metformin treatment reduced adipose tissue lipolysis associated with human CRP. Possible molecular mechanisms of metformin action–studied by gene expression profiling in the liver–revealed deregulated genes from inflammatory and insulin signaling, AMP

  18. GeneChip expression profiling reveals the alterations of energy metabolism related genes in osteocytes under large gradient high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis. PMID:25635858

  19. GeneChip Expression Profiling Reveals the Alterations of Energy Metabolism Related Genes in Osteocytes under Large Gradient High Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Yin, Chun; Ma, Jian-Hua; Li, Di-Jie; Zhao, Fan; Sun, Yu-Long; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has recently been applied in life science research. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. Osteocyte, as the most important mechanosensor in bone, takes a pivotal position in mediating the mechano-induced bone remodeling. In this study, the effects of LG-HMF on gene expression profiling of osteocyte-like cell line MLO-Y4 were investigated by Affymetrix DNA microarray. LG-HMF affected osteocyte gene expression profiling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and data mining were further analyzed by using bioinfomatic tools, such as DAVID, iReport. 12 energy metabolism related genes (PFKL, AK4, ALDOC, COX7A1, STC1, ADM, CA9, CA12, P4HA1, APLN, GPR35 and GPR84) were further confirmed by real-time PCR. An integrated gene interaction network of 12 DEGs was constructed. Bio-data mining showed that genes involved in glucose metabolic process and apoptosis changed notablly. Our results demostrated that LG-HMF affected the expression of energy metabolism related genes in osteocyte. The identification of sensitive genes to special environments may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis. PMID:25635858

  20. Characterization of Capsicum annuum genetic diversity and population structure based on parallel polymorphism discovery with a 30K unigene Pepper GeneChip.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theresa A; Ashrafi, Hamid; Reyes-Chin-Wo, Sebastian; Yao, JiQiang; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP). Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens) detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and application of genome

  1. Characterization of Capsicum annuum Genetic Diversity and Population Structure Based on Parallel Polymorphism Discovery with a 30K Unigene Pepper GeneChip

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Theresa A.; Ashrafi, Hamid; Reyes-Chin-Wo, Sebastian; Yao, JiQiang; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W.; Van Deynze, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP). Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens) detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and application of genome

  2. Characterization of Capsicum annuum genetic diversity and population structure based on parallel polymorphism discovery with a 30K unigene Pepper GeneChip.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theresa A; Ashrafi, Hamid; Reyes-Chin-Wo, Sebastian; Yao, JiQiang; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP). Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens) detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and application of genome

  3. Osteogenic, stem cell and molecular characterisation of the human induced membrane from extremity bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Ode, G.; Hoelscher, G.; Ingram, J.; Bethea, S.; Bosse, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The biomembrane (induced membrane) formed around polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) spacers has value in clinical applications for bone defect reconstruction. Few studies have evaluated its cellular, molecular or stem cell features. Our objective was to characterise induced membrane morphology, molecular features and osteogenic stem cell characteristics. Methods Following Institutional Review Board approval, biomembrane specimens were obtained from 12 patient surgeries for management of segmental bony defects (mean patient age 40.7 years, standard deviation 14.4). Biomembranes from nine tibias and three femurs were processed for morphologic, molecular or stem cell analyses. Gene expression was determined using the Affymetrix GeneChip Operating Software (GCOS). Molecular analyses compared biomembrane gene expression patterns with a mineralising osteoblast culture, and gene expression in specimens with longer spacer duration (> 12 weeks) with specimens with shorter durations. Statistical analyses used the unpaired student t-test (two tailed; p < 0.05 was considered significant). Results Average PMMA spacer in vivo time was 11.9 weeks (six to 18). Trabecular bone was present in 33.3% of the biomembrane specimens; bone presence did not correlate with spacer duration. Biomembrane morphology showed high vascularity and collagen content and positive staining for the key bone forming regulators, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Positive differentiation of cultured biomembrane cells for osteogenesis was found in cells from patients with PMMA present for six to 17 weeks. Stem cell differentiation showed greater variability in pluripotency for osteogenic potential (70.0%) compared with chondrogenic or adipogenic potentials (100% and 90.0%, respectively). Significant upregulation of BMP2 and 6, numerous collagens, and bone gla protein was present in biomembrane compared with the cultured cell line. Biomembranes with

  4. Gene expression profiling of Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammation in human whole blood: The role of complement and CD14-mediated innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lau, Corinna; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-09-01

    Non-sterile pathogen-induced sepsis and sterile inflammation like in trauma or ischemia-reperfusion injury may both coincide with the life threatening systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multi-organ failure. Consequently, there is an urgent need for specific biomarkers in order to distinguish sepsis from sterile conditions. The overall aim of this study was to uncover putative sepsis biomarkers and biomarker pathways, as well as to test the efficacy of combined inhibition of innate immunity key players complement and Toll-like receptor co-receptor CD14 as a possible therapeutic regimen for sepsis. We performed whole blood gene expression analyses using microarray in order to profile Gram-negative bacteria-induced inflammatory responses in an ex vivo human whole blood model. The experiments were performed in the presence or absence of inhibitors of complement proteins (C3 and CD88 (C5a receptor 1)) and CD14, alone or in combination. In addition, we used blood from a C5-deficient donor. Anti-coagulated whole blood was challenged with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli for 2 h, total RNA was isolated and microarray analyses were performed on the Affymetrix GeneChip Gene 1.0 ST Array platform. The initial experiments were performed in duplicates using blood from two healthy donors. C5-deficiency is very rare, and only one donor could be recruited. In order to increase statistical power, a technical replicate of the C5-deficient samples was run. Subsequently, log2-transformed intensities were processed by robust multichip analysis and filtered using a threshold of four. In total, 73 microarray chips were run and analyzed. The normalized and filtered raw data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and are accessible with GEO Series accession number GSE55537. Linear models for microarray data were applied to estimate fold changes between data sets and the respective multiple testing adjusted p-values (FDR q-values). The interpretation of the

  5. The direct effect of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), dominant-negative FAK, FAK-CD and FAK siRNA on gene expression and human MCF-7 breast cancer cell tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in survival signaling. FAK has been shown to be overexpressed in breast cancer tumors at early stages of tumorigenesis. Methods To study the direct effect of FAK on breast tumorigenesis, we developed Tet-ON (tetracycline-inducible) system of MCF-7 breast cancer cells stably transfected with FAK or dominant-negative, C-terminal domain of FAK (FAK-CD), and also FAKsiRNA with silenced FAK MCF-7 stable cell line. Increased expression of FAK in isogenic Tet-inducible MCF-7 cells caused increased cell growth, adhesion and soft agar colony formation in vitro, while expression of dominant-negative FAK inhibitor caused inhibition of these cellular processes. To study the role of induced FAK and FAK-CD in vivo, we inoculated these Tet-inducible cells in nude mice to generate tumors in the presence or absence of doxycycline in the drinking water. FAKsiRNA-MCF-7 cells were also injected into nude mice to generate xenograft tumors. Results Induction of FAK resulted in significant increased tumorigenesis, while induced FAK-CD resulted in decreased tumorigenesis. Taq Man Low Density Array assay demonstrated specific induction of FAKmRNA in MCF-7-Tet-ON-FAK cells. DMP1, encoding cyclin D binding myb-like protein 1 was one of the genes specifically affected by Tet-inducible FAK or FAK-CD in breast xenograft tumors. In addition, silencing of FAK in MCF-7 cells with FAK siRNA caused increased cell rounding, decreased cell viability in vitro and inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Importantly, Affymetrix microarray gene profiling analysis using Human Genome U133A GeneChips revealed >4300 genes, known to be involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, and adhesion that were significantly down- or up-regulated (p < 0.05) by FAKsiRNA. Conclusion Thus, these data for the first time demonstrate the direct effect of FAK expression and function on MCF-7 breast cancer tumorigenesis in vivo and reveal

  6. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  7. Nanobarcode gene expression monitoring system for potential miniaturized space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Weiming; Eastman, P. Scott; Cooke, Patrick A.; Park, Jennifer S.; Chu, Julia S. F.; Gray, Joe W.; Li, Song; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    Manned mission to space has been threatened by various cosmos risks including radiation, mirogravity, vacuum, confinement, etc., which may cause genetic variations of astronauts and eventually lead to damages of their health. Thus, the development of small biomedical devices, which can monitor astronaut gene expression changes, is useful for future long-term space missions. Using magnetic microbeads packed with nanocrystal quantum dots at controlled ratios, we were able to generate highly multiplexed nanobarcodes, which can encode a flexible panel of genes. Also, by using a reporter quantum dot, this nanobarcode platform can monitor and quantify gene expression level with improved speed and sensitivity. As a comparison, we studied TGF-β1 induced transcription changes in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with both the nanobarcode microbead system and the Affymetrix GeneChip ® HTA system, which is currently considered as the industrial standard. Though using only 1/20 of the sample RNA, the nanobarcode system showed sensitivity equivalent to Affymetrix GeneChip ® system. The coefficient of variation, dynamic range, and accuracy of the nanobarcodes measurement is equivalent to that of the GeneChip ® HTA system. Therefore, this newly invented nanobarcode microbead platform is thought to be sensitive, flexible, cost-effective and accurate in a level equivalent to the conventional methods. As an extension of the use of this new platform, spacecrafts may carry this miniaturized system as a diagnostic tool for the astronauts.

  8. Microarray analysis of gene expression in mouse (strain 129) embryonic stem cells after typical synthetic musk exposure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiachen; Li, Ming; Jiao, Zhihao; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Yixing; Shao, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic musks are widely used in personal-care products and can readily accumulate in the adipose tissue, breast milk, and blood of humans. In this study, the Affymetrix Mouse Genome GeneChip was used to identify alterations in gene expression of embryonic stem cells from the 129 strain of the laboratory mouse after treatment with the synthetic musk tonalide (AHTN). Among the 45,037 transcripts in the microarray, 2,879 genes were differentially expressed. According to the microarray analysis, the potential influence of AHTN on the development to embryo should be of concern, and the toxicological effects of it and related musk compounds should be studied further.

  9. Changes in transcriptional output of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lara A; Tighe, S W; Kenefick, R W; Dragon, J; Westcott, N W; Leclair, R J

    2011-12-01

    Various types of exercise alter the population of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and change their transcriptional output. This work examines changes in PBMC populations and transcription in response to resistance exercise training (RET), and identify key transcriptional changes in PBMCs that may play a role in altering peripheral tissues in response to RET. Ten resistance-trained men (20-24 years), performed an acute bout of RET for ~30 min following a 12 h fast. Venous blood was sampled at rest, immediately following exercise, and at 2 h post-exercise and analyzed for total and differential leukocytes and global gene expression using Affymetrix Genechips. Results showed elevated leukocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, and lactate values immediately post-exercise (P < 0.05) over baseline. At 2 h post-exercise, leukocytes, and granulocytes remained elevated (P < 0.05), whereas lymphocytes were lower than (P < 0.05) baseline values. Initial microarray results showed the greatest transcriptional changes in pathways related to immune response, inflammation, and cellular communication. The change in PBMC population (2 h time point) correlated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of CD160, and XCL1, markers of lymphocyte populations. At the 2 h recovery time point upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9, orosomucoid 1, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 2, and arginase 1 suggest an induction in muscle damage and repair during this time frame. These results demonstrate that an acute bout of RET disrupts cellular homeostasis, induces a transient redistribution of certain leukocytes, and results in transcriptional changes in PBMCs translating into systemic changes in response to RET. PMID:21437602

  10. Changes in transcriptional output of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lara A; Tighe, S W; Kenefick, R W; Dragon, J; Westcott, N W; Leclair, R J

    2011-12-01

    Various types of exercise alter the population of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and change their transcriptional output. This work examines changes in PBMC populations and transcription in response to resistance exercise training (RET), and identify key transcriptional changes in PBMCs that may play a role in altering peripheral tissues in response to RET. Ten resistance-trained men (20-24 years), performed an acute bout of RET for ~30 min following a 12 h fast. Venous blood was sampled at rest, immediately following exercise, and at 2 h post-exercise and analyzed for total and differential leukocytes and global gene expression using Affymetrix Genechips. Results showed elevated leukocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, and lactate values immediately post-exercise (P < 0.05) over baseline. At 2 h post-exercise, leukocytes, and granulocytes remained elevated (P < 0.05), whereas lymphocytes were lower than (P < 0.05) baseline values. Initial microarray results showed the greatest transcriptional changes in pathways related to immune response, inflammation, and cellular communication. The change in PBMC population (2 h time point) correlated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of CD160, and XCL1, markers of lymphocyte populations. At the 2 h recovery time point upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9, orosomucoid 1, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 2, and arginase 1 suggest an induction in muscle damage and repair during this time frame. These results demonstrate that an acute bout of RET disrupts cellular homeostasis, induces a transient redistribution of certain leukocytes, and results in transcriptional changes in PBMCs translating into systemic changes in response to RET.

  11. Lr34-mediated leaf rust resistance in wheat: transcript profiling reveals a high energetic demand supported by transient recruitment of multiple metabolic pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wheat gene Lr34 confers partial resistance to all races of Puccinia triticina, the causal agent of wheat leaf rust. However, the biological basis for the exceptional durability of Lr34 is unclear. We used the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array to compare transcriptional changes of wheat in a...

  12. Characterizing the porcine transcriptional regulatory response to infection by Salmonella: identifying putative new NFkB direct targets through comparative bioinformatics.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have collected data on host response to infection from RNA prepared from mesenteric lymph node of swine infected with either Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST) or S. Choleraesuis (SC) using the porcine Affymetrix GeneChip. We identified 848 (ST) and 1,853 (SC) genes with statistical evi...

  13. Surveying expression level polymorphism and single-feature polymorphism in near-isogenic wheat lines differing for the Yr5 stripe rust resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA polymorphisms are valuable for several applications including genotyping, molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection. The Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip was used to survey expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) and single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) between two near-isogenic wheat genotypes (BC...

  14. Surveying expression level polymorphism and single-feature polymorphism in near-isogenic wheat lines differing for the Yr5 stripe rust resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA polymorphisms are valuable for several applications including genotyping, molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection. The Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip was used to survey expression level polymorphisms (ELPs) and single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) between two near-isogenic wheat genotypes (BC7...

  15. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiate between O3 and herbicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using published data based on Affymetrix ATH1 Gene-Chips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia to O3 and a few other major environmental stresses including oxidative stress . A set of 101 markers could be extracted which provided a compo...

  16. Global changes in expression of grapefruit peel tissue in response to the yeast biocontrol agent, Metschnikowia fructicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes taking place in citrus fruit tissue following the application of the yeast biocontrol agent, Metschnikowia fructicola, microarray analysis was performed on grapefruit surface wounds using an Affymetrix Citrus GeneChip. Using a cut off of p<0.0...

  17. A new diagnostic workflow for patients with mental retardation and/or multiple congenital abnormalities: test arrays first.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, Antoinet C J; Lew, Janet Y K; Bosch, Cathy A J; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H M; van Haeringen, Arie; den Hollander, Nicolette S; Kant, Sarina G; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Breuning, Martijn H; Bakker, Egbert; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L

    2009-11-01

    High-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping technology enables extensive genotyping as well as the detection of increasingly smaller chromosomal aberrations. In this study, we assess molecular karyotyping as first-round analysis of patients with mental retardation and/or multiple congenital abnormalities (MR/MCA). We used different commercially available SNP array platforms, the Affymetrix GeneChip 262K NspI, the Genechip 238K StyI, the Illumina HumanHap 300 and HumanCNV 370 BeadChip, to detect copy number variants (CNVs) in 318 patients with unexplained MR/MCA. We found abnormalities in 22.6% of the patients, including six CNVs that overlap known microdeletion/duplication syndromes, eight CNVs that overlap recently described syndromes, 63 potentially pathogenic CNVs (in 52 patients), four large segments of homozygosity and two mosaic trisomies for an entire chromosome. This study shows that high-density SNP array analysis reveals a much higher diagnostic yield as that of conventional karyotyping. SNP arrays have the potential to detect CNVs, mosaics, uniparental disomies and loss of heterozygosity in one experiment. We, therefore, propose a novel diagnostic approach to all MR/MCA patients by first analyzing every patient with an SNP array instead of conventional karyotyping.

  18. Genomic response to Wnt signalling is highly context-dependent - Evidence from DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation screens of Wnt/TCF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Railo, Antti; Pajunen, Antti; Itaeranta, Petri; Naillat, Florence; Vuoristo, Jussi; Kilpelaeinen, Pekka; Vainio, Seppo

    2009-10-01

    Wnt proteins are important regulators of embryonic development, and dysregulated Wnt signalling is involved in the oncogenesis of several human cancers. Our knowledge of the downstream target genes is limited, however. We used a chromatin immunoprecipitation-based assay to isolate and characterize the actual gene segments through which Wnt-activatable transcription factors, TCFs, regulate transcription and an Affymetrix microarray analysis to study the global transcriptional response to the Wnt3a ligand. The anti-{beta}-catenin immunoprecipitation of DNA-protein complexes from mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts expressing a fusion protein of {beta}-catenin and TCF7 resulted in the identification of 92 genes as putative TCF targets. GeneChip assays of gene expression performed on NIH3T3 cells and the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 revealed 355 genes in NIH3T3 and 129 genes in the PC12 cells with marked changes in expression after Wnt3a stimulus. Only 2 Wnt-regulated genes were shared by both cell lines. Surprisingly, Disabled-2 was the only gene identified by the chromatin immunoprecipitation approach that displayed a marked change in expression in the GeneChip assay. Taken together, our approaches give an insight into the complex context-dependent nature of Wnt pathway transcriptional responses and identify Disabled-2 as a potential new direct target for Wnt signalling.

  19. Genome-wide analysis in human colorectal cancer cells reveals ischemia-mediated expression of motility genes via DNA hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Karolina; Skowronki, Karolina; Andrews, Joseph; Rodenhiser, David I; Coomber, Brenda L

    2014-01-01

    DNA hypomethylation is an important epigenetic modification found to occur in many different cancer types, leading to the upregulation of previously silenced genes and loss of genomic stability. We previously demonstrated that hypoxia and hypoglycaemia (ischemia), two common micro-environmental changes in solid tumours, decrease DNA methylation through the downregulation of DNMTs in human colorectal cancer cells. Here, we utilized a genome-wide cross-platform approach to identify genes hypomethylated and upregulated by ischemia. Following exposure to hypoxia or hypoglycaemia, methylated DNA from human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116) was immunoprecipitated and analysed with an Affymetrix promoter array. Additionally, RNA was isolated and analysed in parallel with an Affymetrix expression array. Ingenuity pathway analysis software revealed that a significant proportion of the genes hypomethylated and upregulated were involved in cellular movement, including PLAUR and CYR61. A Matrigel invasion assay revealed that indeed HCT116 cells grown in hypoxic or hypoglycaemic conditions have increased mobility capabilities. Confirmation of upregulated expression of cellular movement genes was performed with qPCR. The correlation between ischemia and metastasis is well established in cancer progression, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for this common observation have not been clearly identified. Our novel data suggests that hypoxia and hypoglycaemia may be driving changes in DNA methylation through downregulation of DNMTs. This is the first report to our knowledge that provides an explanation for the increased metastatic potential seen in ischemic cells; i.e. that ischemia could be driving DNA hypomethylation and increasing expression of cellular movement genes.

  20. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis of human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to airborne particulate matter collected from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Shamy, Magdy; Kluz, Thomas; Muñoz, Alexandra B.; Zhong, Mianhua; Laulicht, Freda; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have established a positive correlation between human mortality and increased concentration of airborne particulate matters (PM). However, the mechanisms underlying PM related human diseases, as well as the molecules and pathways mediating the cellular response to PM, are not fully understood. This study aims to investigate the global gene expression changes in human cells exposed to PM10 and to identify genes and pathways that may contribute to PM related adverse health effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to PM10 collected from Saudi Arabia for 1 or 4 days, and whole transcript expression was profiled using the GeneChip human gene 1.0 ST array. A total of 140 and 230 genes were identified that significantly changed more than 1.5 fold after PM10 exposure for 1 or 4 days, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that different exposure durations triggered distinct pathways. Genes involved in NRF2-mediated response to oxidative stress were up-regulated after 1 day exposure. In contrast, cells exposed for 4 days exhibited significant changes in genes related to cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways. These observed changes in cellular oxidative stress and lipid synthesis might contribute to PM related respiratory and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23085030

  1. A genome-wide linkage analysis of alcoholism on microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism data, using alcohol dependence phenotypes and electroencephalogram measures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Cawley, Simon; Liu, Guoying; Cao, Manqiu; Gorrell, Harley; Kennedy, Giulia C

    2005-01-01

    The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is a large-scale family study designed to identify genes that affect the risk for alcoholism and alcohol-related phenotypes. We performed genome-wide linkage analyses on the COGA data made available to participants in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 14 (GAW 14). The dataset comprised 1,350 participants from 143 families. The samples were analyzed on three technologies: microsatellites spaced at 10 cM, Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10 K Array (HMA10K) and Illumina SNP-based Linkage III Panel. We used ALDX1 and ALDX2, the COGA definitions of alcohol dependence, as well as electrophysiological measures TTTH1 and ECB21 to detect alcoholism susceptibility loci. Many chromosomal regions were found to be significant for each of the phenotypes at a p-value of 0.05. The most significant region for ALDX1 is on chromosome 7, with a maximum LOD score of 2.25 for Affymetrix SNPs, 1.97 for Illumina SNPs, and 1.72 for microsatellites. The same regions on chromosome 7 (96-106 cM) and 10 (149-176 cM) were found to be significant for both ALDX1 and ALDX2. A region on chromosome 7 (112-153 cM) and a region on chromosome 6 (169-185 cM) were identified as the most significant regions for TTTH1 and ECB21, respectively. We also performed linkage analysis on denser maps of markers by combining the SNPs datasets from Affymetrix and Illumina. Adding the microsatellite data to the combined SNP dataset improved the results only marginally. The results indicated that SNPs outperform microsatellites with the densest marker sets performing the best.

  2. Gene expression profiling of di-n-butyl phthalate in normal human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, Maureen R; Whipkey, Diana L; Tennant, Lora B; Weston, Ainsley

    2007-01-01

    Studies show that female workers in the personal-care industry have an increased risk of developing cancer believed to be the result of increased exposure to toxic and/or carcinogenic chemicals found in cosmetics, hair dyes, and nail polish. One chemical found in multiple personal-care products, di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), is a known endocrine disruptor and has been found in increased levels in women of childbearing age. The goal of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of phthalate toxicity in normal human cells to provide information concerning interindividual variation and gene-environment interactions. Normal human mammary epithelial cell strains were obtained from discarded tissues following reduction mammoplasty [Cooperative Human Tissue Network (sponsors: NCI/NDRI)]. Gene transcription in each cell strain was analyzed using high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (U133A, Affymetrix) and changes in the expression of selected genes were verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (ABI). DNA microarrays were hybridized with total RNA that was collected after DBP treatment for 5 hr and 10 hr. RNA was harvested from the vehicle control (acetone) at 10 hr. Data Mining Tool software (Affymetrix) was used to separate genes in clusters based on their expression patterns over time. Only 57 genes were found to be altered in all four cell strains following exposure to DBP. These included genes involved in fertility (inhibin, placental growth factor), immune response (tumor necrosis factor induced protein), and antioxidant status (glutathione peroxidase). Data from this study will help clarify the role of DBP in reproductive toxicity, and yield biomarkers of exposure for future epidemiology studies. PMID:17725530

  3. Gene expression profiling of di-n-butyl phthalate in normal human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, Maureen R; Whipkey, Diana L; Tennant, Lora B; Weston, Ainsley

    2007-01-01

    Studies show that female workers in the personal-care industry have an increased risk of developing cancer believed to be the result of increased exposure to toxic and/or carcinogenic chemicals found in cosmetics, hair dyes, and nail polish. One chemical found in multiple personal-care products, di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), is a known endocrine disruptor and has been found in increased levels in women of childbearing age. The goal of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of phthalate toxicity in normal human cells to provide information concerning interindividual variation and gene-environment interactions. Normal human mammary epithelial cell strains were obtained from discarded tissues following reduction mammoplasty [Cooperative Human Tissue Network (sponsors: NCI/NDRI)]. Gene transcription in each cell strain was analyzed using high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (U133A, Affymetrix) and changes in the expression of selected genes were verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (ABI). DNA microarrays were hybridized with total RNA that was collected after DBP treatment for 5 hr and 10 hr. RNA was harvested from the vehicle control (acetone) at 10 hr. Data Mining Tool software (Affymetrix) was used to separate genes in clusters based on their expression patterns over time. Only 57 genes were found to be altered in all four cell strains following exposure to DBP. These included genes involved in fertility (inhibin, placental growth factor), immune response (tumor necrosis factor induced protein), and antioxidant status (glutathione peroxidase). Data from this study will help clarify the role of DBP in reproductive toxicity, and yield biomarkers of exposure for future epidemiology studies.

  4. Effects of weak, low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (BEMER type) on gene expression of human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Walther, Markus; Mayer, Florian; Kafka, Wolf; Schütze, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    In vitro effects of electromagnetic fields appear to be related to the type of electromagnetic field applied. Previously, we showed that human osteoblasts display effects of BEMER type electromagnetic field (BTEMF) on gene regulation. Here, we analyze effects of BTEMF on gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes. Primary mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and the chondrocyte cell line C28I2 were stimulated 5 times at 12-h intervals for 8 min each with BTEMF. RNA from treated and control cells was analyzed for gene expression using the affymetrix chip HG-U133A. A limited number of regulated gene products from both cell types mainly affect cell metabolism and cell matrix structure. There was no increased expression of cancer-related genes. RT-PCR analysis of selected transcripts partly confirmed array data. Results indicate that BTEMF in human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes provide the first indications to understanding therapeutic effects achieved with BTEMF stimulation.

  5. The prevalence of chromosomal aberrations associated with myelodysplastic syndromes in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinyong; Chu, Yuxin; Song, Qibin; Yao, Yi; Yang, Weihong; Huang, Shiang

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence and distribution of diverse chromosomal aberrations associated with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in China. Bone marrow samples were collected from multiple cities in China. Metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were initially used to test chromosomal lesions. Affymetrix CytoScan 750 K genechip platform performed a genome-wide detection of chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal gain was identified in 76 patients; the most prevalent was trisomy 8(17.9 %). New chromosomal gain was detected on chromosome 9, 19p, and X. Chromosomal loss was detected in 101 patients. The most frequent was loss 5q (21.0 %). Some loss and gain were not identified by MC or FISH but identified by genechip. UPD was solely identified by genechip in 51 patients; the most prevalent were UPD 7q (4.94 %) and UPD 17p (4.32 %). Furthermore, complex chromosomal aberrations were detected in 56 patients. In conclusion, Affymetrix CytoScan 750 K genechip was more precise than MC and FISH in detection of cryptic chromosomal aberrations relevant to MDS. Analysis of the prevalence and distribution of diverse chromosomal aberrations in China may improve strategies for MDS diagnosis and therapies. PMID:27225263

  6. Calcium pantothenate modulates gene expression in proliferating human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, Tonio; Heise, Ruth; Skazik, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Joussen, Sylvia; Erdmann, Kati; Schröder, Henning; Merk, Hans F; Baron, Jens Malte

    2009-11-01

    Topical application of pantothenate is widely used in clinical practice for wound healing. Previous studies identified a positive effect of pantothenate on migration and proliferation of cultured fibroblasts. However, these studies were mainly descriptive with no molecular data supporting a possible model of its action. In this study, we first established conditions for an in vitro model of pantothenate wound healing and then analysed the molecular effects of pantothenate. To test the functional effect of pantothenate on dermal fibroblasts, cells were cultured and in vitro proliferation tests were performed using a standardized scratch test procedure. For all three donors analysed, a strong stimulatory effect of pantothenate at a concentration of 20 microg/ml on the proliferation of cultivated dermal fibroblasts was observed. To study the molecular mechanisms resulting in the proliferative effect of pantothenate, gene expression was analysed in dermal fibroblasts cultivated with 20 microg/ml of pantothenate compared with untreated cells using the GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A number of significantly regulated genes were identified including genes coding for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, Id1, HMOX-1, HspB7, CYP1B1 and MARCH-II. Regulation of these genes was subsequently verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Induction of HMOX-1 expression by pantothenol and pantothenic acid in dermal cells was confirmed on the protein level using immunoblots. Functional studies revealed the enhanced suppression of free radical formation in skin fibroblasts cultured with panthenol. In conclusion, these studies provided new insight in the molecular mechanisms linked to the stimulatory effect of pantothenate and panthenol on the proliferation of dermal fibroblasts. PMID:19397697

  7. Fine-scaled human genetic structure revealed by SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Zhang, Yuhua; Guthery, Stephen L; Thara, Rangaswamy; Mowry, Bryan J; Bulayeva, Kazima; Weiss, Robert B; Jorde, Lynn B

    2009-05-01

    We report an analysis of more than 240,000 loci genotyped using the Affymetrix SNP microarray in 554 individuals from 27 worldwide populations in Africa, Asia, and Europe. To provide a more extensive and complete sampling of human genetic variation, we have included caste and tribal samples from two states in South India, Daghestanis from eastern Europe, and the Iban from Malaysia. Consistent with observations made by Charles Darwin, our results highlight shared variation among human populations and demonstrate that much genetic variation is geographically continuous. At the same time, principal components analyses reveal discernible genetic differentiation among almost all identified populations in our sample, and in most cases, individuals can be clearly assigned to defined populations on the basis of SNP genotypes. All individuals are accurately classified into continental groups using a model-based clustering algorithm, but between closely related populations, genetic and self-classifications conflict for some individuals. The 250K data permitted high-level resolution of genetic variation among Indian caste and tribal populations and between highland and lowland Daghestani populations. In particular, upper-caste individuals from Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh form one defined group, lower-caste individuals from these two states form another, and the tribal Irula samples form a third. Our results emphasize the correlation of genetic and geographic distances and highlight other elements, including social factors that have contributed to population structure. PMID:19411602

  8. Adaptation of Group A Streptococcus to Human Amniotic Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Green, Nicole M.; Guo, Nina; Bongiovanni, Ann M.; Witkin, Steven S.; Musser, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Background For more than 100 years, group A Streptococcus has been identified as a cause of severe and, in many cases, fatal infections of the female urogenital tract. Due to advances in hospital hygiene and the advent of antibiotics, this type of infection has been virtually eradicated. However, within the last three decades there has been an increase in severe intra- and post-partum infections attributed to GAS. Methodology We hypothesized that GAS alters its transcriptome to survive in human amniotic fluid (AF) and cause disease. To identify genes that were up or down regulated in response to growth in AF, GAS was grown in human AF or standard laboratory media (THY) and samples for expression microarray analysis were collected during mid-logarithmic, late-logarithmic, and stationary growth phases. Microarray analysis was performed using a custom Affymetrix chip and normalized hybridization values derived from three biological replicates were collected at each growth point. Ratios of AF/THY above a 2-fold change and P-value <0.05 were considered significant. Principal Findings The majority of changes in the GAS transcriptome involved down regulation of multiple adhesins and virulence factors and activation of the stress response. We observed significant changes in genes involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and in the nucleotide de novo synthesis pathway. Conclusions/Significance Our work provides new insight into how pathogenic bacteria respond to their environment to establish infection and cause disease. PMID:20352104

  9. Fine-scaled human genetic structure revealed by SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Zhang, Yuhua; Guthery, Stephen L; Thara, Rangaswamy; Mowry, Bryan J; Bulayeva, Kazima; Weiss, Robert B; Jorde, Lynn B

    2009-05-01

    We report an analysis of more than 240,000 loci genotyped using the Affymetrix SNP microarray in 554 individuals from 27 worldwide populations in Africa, Asia, and Europe. To provide a more extensive and complete sampling of human genetic variation, we have included caste and tribal samples from two states in South India, Daghestanis from eastern Europe, and the Iban from Malaysia. Consistent with observations made by Charles Darwin, our results highlight shared variation among human populations and demonstrate that much genetic variation is geographically continuous. At the same time, principal components analyses reveal discernible genetic differentiation among almost all identified populations in our sample, and in most cases, individuals can be clearly assigned to defined populations on the basis of SNP genotypes. All individuals are accurately classified into continental groups using a model-based clustering algorithm, but between closely related populations, genetic and self-classifications conflict for some individuals. The 250K data permitted high-level resolution of genetic variation among Indian caste and tribal populations and between highland and lowland Daghestani populations. In particular, upper-caste individuals from Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh form one defined group, lower-caste individuals from these two states form another, and the tribal Irula samples form a third. Our results emphasize the correlation of genetic and geographic distances and highlight other elements, including social factors that have contributed to population structure.

  10. Clinical relevance of Neutral Endopeptidase (NEP/CD10) in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez, Elsa F; Yancovitz, Molly; Pavlick, Anna; Berman, Russell; Shapiro, Richard; Bogunovic, Dusan; O'Neill, David; Yu, Yi-Lo; Spira, Joanna; Christos, Paul J; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Mazumdar, Madhu; Nanus, David M; Liebes, Leonard; Bhardwaj, Nina; Polsky, David; Osman, Iman

    2007-01-01

    Background Overexpression of Neutral Endopeptidase (NEP) has been reported in metastatic carcinomas, implicating NEP in tumor progression and suggesting a role for NEP inhibitors in its treatment. We investigated the role of NEP expression in the clinical progression of cutaneous melanoma. Methods We screened 7 melanoma cell lines for NEP protein expression. NEP-specific siRNA was transfected into the lines to examine the role of gene transcription in NEP expression. Immunohistochemistry was done for 93 specimens and correlated with clinicopathologic parameters. Thirty-seven metastatic melanoma specimens were examined for NEP transcript expression using Affymetrix GeneChips. In a subset of 25 specimens for which both transcript and protein expression was available, expression ratios were used to identify genes that co-express with NEP in GeneChip analysis. Results NEP was overexpressed in 4/7 human melanoma cell lines, and siRNA knock-down of NEP transcripts led to downregulation of its protein expression. NEP protein overexpression was significantly more common in metastatic versus primary tumors (P = 0.002). Twelve of 37 (32%) metastatic tumors had increased NEP transcript expression, and an association was observed between NEP transcript upregulation and protein overexpression (P < 0.0001). Thirty-eight genes were found to significantly co-express with NEP (p < 0.005). Thirty-three genes positively correlated with NEP, including genes involved in the MAP kinase pathway, antigen processing and presentation, apoptosis, and WNT signaling pathway, and 5 genes negatively correlated with NEP, including genes of focal adhesion and the notch signaling pathways. Conclusion NEP overexpression, which seems to be largely driven by increased transcription, is rare in primary melanoma and occurs late in melanoma progression. Functional studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms of NEP regulation in melanoma. PMID:17207277

  11. Diagnostic microRNA markers to screen for sporadic human colon cancer in stool: I. Proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid E; Ahmed, Nancy C; Vos, Paul W; Bonnerup, Chris; Atkins, James N; Casey, Michelle; Nuovo, Gerard J; Naziri, Wade; Wiley, John E; Mota, Helvecio; Allison, Ron R

    2013-01-01

    To present proof-of-principle application for employing micro(mi)RNAs as diagnostic markers for colon cancer, we carried out global microarray expression studies on stool samples obtained from fifteen individuals (three controls, and three each with TNM stage 0-1, stage 2, stage 3, and stage 4 colon cancer), using Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA 3.0 Array, to select for a panel of miRNA genes for subsequent focused semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis studies. Microarray results showed 202 preferentially expressed miRNA genes that were either increased (141 miRNAs), or reduced (61 miRNAs) in expression. We then conducted a stem-loop reverse transcriptase (RT)-TaqMan® minor groove binding (MGB) probes, followed by a modified qPCR expression study on 20 selected miRNAs. Twelve of the miRNAs exhibited increased and 8 decreased expression in stool from 60 individuals (20 controls, 20 with tumor-lymph node-metastatic (TNM) stage 0-1, 10 with stage 2, five with stage 3, and 5 with stage 4 colon cancer) to quantitatively monitor miRNA changes at various TNM stages of colon cancer progression. We also used laser-capture microdissection (LCM) of colon mucosal epithelial tissue samples (three control samples, and three samples from each of the four stages of colon cancer, for a total of 15 samples) to find concordance or lack thereof with stool findings. The reference housekeeping pseudogene-free ribosomal gene (18S rRNA), which shows little variation in expression, was employed as a normalization standard for relative PCR quantification. Results of the PCR analyses confirmed that twelve miRNAs (miR-7, miR-17, miR-20a, miR-21, miR-92a, miR-96, miR-106a, miR-134, miR-183, miR-196a, miR-199a-3p and miR214) had an increased expression in the stool of patients with colon cancer, and that later TNM carcinoma stages exhibited a more pronounced expression than did adenomas. On the other hand, eight miRNAs (miR-9, miR-29b, miR-127-5p, miR-138, miR-143, miR-146a, mi

  12. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis of human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to airborne particulate matter collected from Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hong; Shamy, Magdy; Kluz, Thomas; Muñoz, Alexandra B.; Zhong, Mianhua; Laulicht, Freda; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Costa, Max

    2012-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have established a positive correlation between human mortality and increased concentration of airborne particulate matters (PM). However, the mechanisms underlying PM related human diseases, as well as the molecules and pathways mediating the cellular response to PM, are not fully understood. This study aims to investigate the global gene expression changes in human cells exposed to PM{sub 10} and to identify genes and pathways that may contribute to PM related adverse health effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to PM{sub 10} collected from Saudi Arabia for 1 or 4 days, and whole transcript expression was profiled using the GeneChip human gene 1.0 ST array. A total of 140 and 230 genes were identified that significantly changed more than 1.5 fold after PM{sub 10} exposure for 1 or 4 days, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that different exposure durations triggered distinct pathways. Genes involved in NRF2-mediated response to oxidative stress were up-regulated after 1 day exposure. In contrast, cells exposed for 4 days exhibited significant changes in genes related to cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways. These observed changes in cellular oxidative stress and lipid synthesis might contribute to PM related respiratory and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► PM exposure modulated gene expression and associated pathways in BEAS-2B cells. ► One-day exposure to PM induced genes involved in responding to oxidative stress. ► 4-day exposure to PM changed genes associated to cholesterol and lipid synthesis.

  13. Identification of human metapneumovirus-induced gene networks in airway epithelial cells by microarray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.; Sinha, M. |; Liu, T.; Hong, C.; Luxon, B.A. |; Garofalo, R.P. ||; Casola, A. ||

    2008-04-25

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. Little is known about the response to hMPV infection of airway epithelial cells, which play a pivotal role in initiating and shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional profiles of airway epithelial cells infected with hMPV using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. Of the 47,400 transcripts and variants represented on the Affimetrix GeneChip Human Genome HG-U133 plus 2 array, 1601 genes were significantly altered following hMPV infection. Altered genes were then assigned to functional categories and mapped to signaling pathways. Many up-regulated genes are involved in the initiation of pro-inflammatory and antiviral immune responses, including chemokines, cytokines, type I interferon and interferon-inducible proteins. Other important functional classes up-regulated by hMPV infection include cellular signaling, gene transcription and apoptosis. Notably, genes associated with antioxidant and membrane transport activity, several metabolic pathways and cell proliferation were down-regulated in response to hMPV infection. Real-time PCR and Western blot assays were used to confirm the expression of genes related to several of these functional groups. The overall result of this study provides novel information on host gene expression upon infection with hMPV and also serves as a foundation for future investigations of genes and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of this important viral infection. Furthermore, it can facilitate a comparative analysis of other paramyxoviral infections to determine the transcriptional changes that are conserved versus the one that are specific to individual pathogens.

  14. Microarray analysis of microRNA expression in mouse fetus at 13.5 and 14.5 days post-coitum in ear and back skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Torres, Leda; Juárez, Ulises; García, Laura; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Frias, Sara

    2016-09-01

    There is no information regarding the role of microRNAs in the development of the external ear in mammals. The purpose of this study was to determine the stage-specific expression of microRNA during external ear development in mice under normal conditions. GeneChip miRNA 3.0 arrays by Affymetrix were used to obtain miRNA expression profiles from mice fetal pinnae and back skin tissues at 13.5 days-post-coitum (dpc) and 14.5 dpc. Biological triplicates for each tissue were analyzed; one litter represents one biological replica, each litter had 16 fetuses on average. The results were analyzed with Affymetrix's Transcriptome Analysis Console software to identify differentially expressed miRNAs. The inquiry showed significant differential expression of 25 miRNAs at 13.5 dpc and 31 at 14.5 dpc, some of these miRNAs were predicted to target genes implicated in external ear development. One example is mmu-miR-10a whose low expression in pinnae is known to impact ear development by modulating Hoxa1 mRNA levels Garzon et al. (2006), Gavalas et al. (1998) [1], [2]. Other findings like the upregulation of mmu-miR-200c and mmu-miR-205 in the pinnae tissues of healthy mice are in agreement with what has been reported in human patients with microtia, in which down regulation of both miRNAs has been found Li et al. (2013) [3]. This study uncovered a spatiotemporal pattern of miRNA expression in the external ear, which results from continuous transcriptional changes during normal development of body structures. All microarray data are available at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at NCBI under accession number GSE64945. PMID:27408816

  15. Preliminary array analysis reveals novel genes regulated by ovarian steroids in the monkey raphe region.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Arubala P; Bethea, Cynthia L

    2005-06-01

    We hypothesize that ovarian hormones may improve serotonin neuron survival. We sought the effect of estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) on novel gene expression in the macaque dorsal raphe region with Affymetrix array analysis. Nine spayed rhesus macaques were treated with either placebo, E or E+P via Silastic implant for 1 month prior to euthanasia (n=3 per treatment). RNA was extracted from a small block of midbrain containing the dorsal raphe and examined on an Agilent Bioanalyzer. The RNA from each monkey was labeled and hybridized to an Affymetrix HG_U95AV Human GeneChip Array. After filtering and sorting, 25 named genes remained that were regulated by E, and 24 named genes remained that were regulated by supplemental P. These genes further sorted into functional categories that would promote neuronal plasticity, transmitter synthesis, and trafficking, as well as reduce apoptosis. The relative abundance of four pivotal genes was examined in all nine animals with quantitative RT-PCR and normalized by glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). E+/-P caused a significant threefold reduction in JNK-1 (a pro-apoptosis gene, p<0.007); and a significant sixfold decrease in kynurenine mono-oxygenase (produces neurotoxic quinolones, p<0.05). GABA-A receptor (alpha3 subunit; benzodiazepine site) and E2F1 (interferes with cytokine signaling) were unaffected by E, but increased sevenfold (p<0.02) and fourfold (p<0.009), respectively, upon treatment with P. In summary, subsets of genes related to tissue remodeling or apoptosis were up- or down-regulated by E and P in a tissue block containing the dorsal raphe. These changes could promote cellular resilience in the region where serotonin neurons originate.

  16. Microarray analysis of microRNA expression in mouse fetus at 13.5 and 14.5 days post-coitum in ear and back skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Torres, Leda; Juárez, Ulises; García, Laura; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Frias, Sara

    2016-09-01

    There is no information regarding the role of microRNAs in the development of the external ear in mammals. The purpose of this study was to determine the stage-specific expression of microRNA during external ear development in mice under normal conditions. GeneChip miRNA 3.0 arrays by Affymetrix were used to obtain miRNA expression profiles from mice fetal pinnae and back skin tissues at 13.5 days-post-coitum (dpc) and 14.5 dpc. Biological triplicates for each tissue were analyzed; one litter represents one biological replica, each litter had 16 fetuses on average. The results were analyzed with Affymetrix's Transcriptome Analysis Console software to identify differentially expressed miRNAs. The inquiry showed significant differential expression of 25 miRNAs at 13.5 dpc and 31 at 14.5 dpc, some of these miRNAs were predicted to target genes implicated in external ear development. One example is mmu-miR-10a whose low expression in pinnae is known to impact ear development by modulating Hoxa1 mRNA levels Garzon et al. (2006), Gavalas et al. (1998) [1], [2]. Other findings like the upregulation of mmu-miR-200c and mmu-miR-205 in the pinnae tissues of healthy mice are in agreement with what has been reported in human patients with microtia, in which down regulation of both miRNAs has been found Li et al. (2013) [3]. This study uncovered a spatiotemporal pattern of miRNA expression in the external ear, which results from continuous transcriptional changes during normal development of body structures. All microarray data are available at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at NCBI under accession number GSE64945.

  17. Bioinformatic and statistical analysis of the optic nerve head in a primate model of ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kompass, Kenneth S; Agapova, Olga A; Li, Wenjun; Kaufman, Paul L; Rasmussen, Carol A; Hernandez, M Rosario

    2008-01-01

    Background The nonhuman primate model of glaucomatous optic neuropathy most faithfully reproduces the human disease. We used high-density oligonucleotide arrays to investigate whole genome transcriptional changes occurring at the optic nerve head during primate experimental glaucoma. Results Laser scarification of the trabecular meshwork of cynomolgus macaques produced elevated intraocular pressure that was monitored over time and led to varying degrees of damage in different samples. The macaques were examined clinically before enucleation and the myelinated optic nerves were processed post-mortem to determine the degree of neuronal loss. Global gene expression was examined in dissected optic nerve heads with Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays. We validated a subset of differentially expressed genes using qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immuno-enriched astrocytes from healthy and glaucomatous human donors. These genes have previously defined roles in axonal outgrowth, immune response, cell motility, neuroprotection, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Conclusion Our findings show that glaucoma is associated with increased expression of genes that mediate axonal outgrowth, immune response, cell motility, neuroprotection, and ECM remodeling. These studies also reveal that, as glaucoma progresses, retinal ganglion cell axons may make a regenerative attempt to restore lost nerve cell contact. PMID:18822132

  18. Genome-wide association study suggested copy number variation may be associated with body mass index in the Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Bao-Yong; Yang, Tie-Lin; Zhao, Lan-Juan; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Guo, Yan; Chen, Yuan; Pan, Feng; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Dong, Shan-Shan; Xu, Xiang-Hong; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem characterized with high body mass index (BMI). Copy number variations (CNVs) have been identified to be associated with complex human diseases. The effect of CNVs on obesity is unknown. In this study, we explored the association of CNVs with BMI in 597 Chinese Han subjects using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set. We found that one CNV at 10q11.22 (from 46.36 Mb to 46.56 Mb) was associated with BMI (the raw P=0.011). The CNV contributed 1.6% of BMI variation, and it covered one important obesity gene—pancreatic polypeptide receptor 1(PPYR1). It was reported that PPYR1 was a key regulator of energy homeostasis. Our findings suggested that CNV might be potentially important for the BMI variation. In addition, our study suggested that CNV might be used as a genetic marker to locate genes associated with BMI in Chinese population. PMID:19229253

  19. Vibration mechanosignals superimposed to resistive exercise result in baseline skeletal muscle transcriptome profiles following chronic disuse in bed rest.

    PubMed

    Salanova, Michele; Gambara, Guido; Moriggi, Manuela; Vasso, Michele; Ungethuem, Ute; Belavý, Daniel L; Felsenberg, Dieter; Cerretelli, Paolo; Gelfi, Cecilia; Blottner, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Disuse-induced muscle atrophy is a major concern in aging, in neuromuscular diseases, post-traumatic injury and in microgravity life sciences affecting health and fitness also of crew members in spaceflight. By using a laboratory analogue to body unloading we perform for the first time global gene expression profiling joined to specific proteomic analysis to map molecular adaptations in disused (60 days of bed rest) human soleus muscle (CTR) and in response to a resistive exercise (RE) countermeasure protocol without and with superimposed vibration mechanosignals (RVE). Adopting Affymetrix GeneChip technology we identified 235 differently transcribed genes in the CTR group (end- vs. pre-bed rest). RE comprised 206 differentially expressed genes, whereas only 51 changed gene transcripts were found in RVE. Most gene transcription and proteomic changes were linked to various key metabolic pathways (glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, lipid metabolism) and to functional contractile structures. Gene expression profiling in bed rest identified a novel set of genes explicitly responsive to vibration mechanosignals in human soleus. This new finding highlights the efficacy of RVE protocol in reducing key signs of disuse maladaptation and atrophy, and to maintain a close-to-normal skeletal muscle quality outcome following chronic disuse in bed rest. PMID:26596638

  20. Vibration mechanosignals superimposed to resistive exercise result in baseline skeletal muscle transcriptome profiles following chronic disuse in bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Salanova, Michele; Gambara, Guido; Moriggi, Manuela; Vasso, Michele; Ungethuem, Ute; Belavý, Daniel L.; Felsenberg, Dieter; Cerretelli, Paolo; Gelfi, Cecilia; Blottner, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Disuse-induced muscle atrophy is a major concern in aging, in neuromuscular diseases, post-traumatic injury and in microgravity life sciences affecting health and fitness also of crew members in spaceflight. By using a laboratory analogue to body unloading we perform for the first time global gene expression profiling joined to specific proteomic analysis to map molecular adaptations in disused (60 days of bed rest) human soleus muscle (CTR) and in response to a resistive exercise (RE) countermeasure protocol without and with superimposed vibration mechanosignals (RVE). Adopting Affymetrix GeneChip technology we identified 235 differently transcribed genes in the CTR group (end- vs. pre-bed rest). RE comprised 206 differentially expressed genes, whereas only 51 changed gene transcripts were found in RVE. Most gene transcription and proteomic changes were linked to various key metabolic pathways (glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, lipid metabolism) and to functional contractile structures. Gene expression profiling in bed rest identified a novel set of genes explicitly responsive to vibration mechanosignals in human soleus. This new finding highlights the efficacy of RVE protocol in reducing key signs of disuse maladaptation and atrophy, and to maintain a close-to-normal skeletal muscle quality outcome following chronic disuse in bed rest. PMID:26596638

  1. DGEM--a microarray gene expression database for primary human disease tissues.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yuni; Campen, Andrew; Rigsby, Dan; Guo, Ying; Feng, Xingdong; Su, Eric W; Palakal, Mathew; Li, Shuyu

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression patterns can reflect gene regulations in human tissues under normal or pathologic conditions. Gene expression profiling data from studies of primary human disease samples are particularly valuable since these studies often span many years in order to collect patient clinical information and achieve a large sample size. Disease-to-Gene Expression Mapper (DGEM) provides a beneficial community resource to access and analyze these data; it currently includes Affymetrix oligonucleotide array datasets for more than 40 human diseases and 1400 samples. The data are normalized to the same scale and stored in a relational database. A statistical-analysis pipeline was implemented to identify genes abnormally expressed in disease tissues or genes whose expressions are associated with clinical parameters such as cancer patient survival. Data-mining results can be queried through a web-based interface at http://dgem.dhcp.iupui.edu/. The query tool enables dynamic generation of graphs and tables that are further linked to major gene and pathway resources that connect the data to relevant biology, including Entrez Gene and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). In summary, DGEM provides scientists and physicians a valuable tool to study disease mechanisms, to discover potential disease biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis, and to identify novel gene targets for drug discovery. The source code is freely available for non-profit use, on request to the authors. PMID:17570735

  2. Patient-derived xenografts recapitulate molecular features of human uveal melanomas.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Cécile; Gentien, David; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Némati, Fariba; Nicolas, André; Tesson, Bruno; Desjardins, Laurence; Mariani, Pascale; Rapinat, Audrey; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Couturier, Jérôme; Hupé, Philippe; de Koning, Leanne; Dubois, Thierry; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Stern, Marc-Henri; Barillot, Emmanuel; Harbour, J William; Saule, Simon; Decaudin, Didier

    2013-06-01

    We have previously developed a new method for the development and maintenance of uveal melanoma (UM) xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Here, we compare the genetic profiles of the primary tumors to their corresponding xenografts that have been passaged over time. The study included sixteen primary UMs and corresponding xenografts at very early (P1), early (P4), and late (P9) in vivo passages. The tumors were analyzed for mutation status of GNAQ, GNA11, GNAS, GNA15, BAP1, and BRAF, chromosomal copy number alterations using Affymetrix GeneChip(®) Genome-Wide Human SNP6.0 arrays, gene expression profiles using GeneChip(®) Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays, BAP1 mRNA and protein expression, and MAPK pathway status using Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA). The UM xenografts accurately recapitulated the genetic features of primary human UMs and they exhibited genetic stability over the course of their in vivo maintenance. Our technique for establishing and maintaining primary UMs as xenograft tumors in immunodeficient mice exhibit a high degree of genetic conservation between the primary tumors and the xenograft tumors over multiple passages in vivo. These models therefore constitute valuable preclinical tool for drug screening in UM.

  3. High-risk human papillomaviruses may have an important role in non-oral habits-associated oral squamous cell carcinomas in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Julia Yu-Fong; Lin, Ming-Chieh; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the etiologic role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral carcinogenesis, DNA samples were purified from 103 oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and 30 normal oral mucosal (NOM) specimens. A nested polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, and gene-chip HPV typing were used to identify multiple HPV types in our samples. We found that the positive rates of all HPV types and of high-risk HPV types were significantly higher in OSCC samples (49.5% and 41.7%, respectively) than in NOM samples (6/30 [20%; P < .01] and 5/30 [17%; P < .05], respectively) and significantly higher in non-oral habits (OH)-associated OSCC samples (31/51 [61%] and 28/51 [55%], respectively) than in OH-associated OSCC samples (20/52 [38%; P < .05] and 15/52 [29%; P < .001], respectively). High-risk HPV types and all HPV types had odds ratios of 3.97 (P = .0097) and 3.92 (P = .006), respectively. Our results suggest that HPVs, particularly high-risk HPVs, might be associated with the development of OSCCs, especially the non-OH-associated OSCCs.

  4. Human See, Human Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  5. Starr: Simple Tiling ARRay analysis of Affymetrix ChIP-chip data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with DNA microarrays (ChIP-chip) is an assay used for investigating DNA-protein-binding or post-translational chromatin/histone modifications. As with all high-throughput technologies, it requires thorough bioinformatic processing of the data for which there is no standard yet. The primary goal is to reliably identify and localize genomic regions that bind a specific protein. Further investigation compares binding profiles of functionally related proteins, or binding profiles of the same proteins in different genetic backgrounds or experimental conditions. Ultimately, the goal is to gain a mechanistic understanding of the effects of DNA binding events on gene expression. Results We present a free, open-source R/Bioconductor package Starr that facilitates comparative analysis of ChIP-chip data across experiments and across different microarray platforms. The package provides functions for data import, quality assessment, data visualization and exploration. Starr includes high-level analysis tools such as the alignment of ChIP signals along annotated features, correlation analysis of ChIP signals with complementary genomic data, peak-finding and comparative display of multiple clusters of binding profiles. It uses standard Bioconductor classes for maximum compatibility with other software. Moreover, Starr automatically updates microarray probe annotation files by a highly efficient remapping of microarray probe sequences to an arbitrary genome. Conclusion Starr is an R package that covers the complete ChIP-chip workflow from data processing to binding pattern detection. It focuses on the high-level data analysis, e.g., it provides methods for the integration and combined statistical analysis of binding profiles and complementary functional genomics data. Starr enables systematic assessment of binding behaviour for groups of genes that are alingned along arbitrary genomic features. PMID:20398407

  6. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision.

  7. TRAIL Pathway is Associated with Inhibition of Colon Cancer by Protopanaxadiol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Li, Zejuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Chunfeng; Calway, Tyler; He, Tong-Chuan; Du, Wei; Chen, Jianjun; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2016-01-01

    Among important components of American ginseng, protopanaxadiol (PPD) showed more active anticancer potential than other triterpenoid saponins. In this study, we determined the in vivo effects of PPD in a mouse cancer model first. Then, using human colorectal cancer cell lines, we observed significant cancer cell growth inhibition by promoting G1 cell cycle redistribution and apoptosis. Subsequently, we characterized the downstream genes targeted by PPD in HCT-116 cancer cells. Using Affymetrix high density GeneChips, we obtained the gene expression profile of the cells. Microarray data indicated that the expression levels of 76 genes were changed over two-fold after PPD, of which 52 were upregulated while the remaining 24 were downregulated. Ingenuity pathway analysis of top functions affected was carried out. Data suggested that by regulating the interactions between p53 and DR4/DR5, the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) pathway played a key role in the action of PPD, a promising colon cancer inhibitory compound. PMID:25704023

  8. Microarray analysis of responsible genes in increased growth rate in the subline of HL60 (HL60RG) cells.

    PubMed

    Luan, Yang; Kogi, Mieko; Rajaguru, Palanisamy; Ren, Jin; Yamaguchi, Teruhide; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Takayoshi

    2012-03-01

    HL60RG, a subline of human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells, has a increased growth rate than their parental cells. To gain information of the mechanisms involved in the increased growth rate of HL60RG, we performed a multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), standard cytogenetics analysis (G-banding) and genome scan using 10K SNP mapping array on both cell types. Characteristic genomic alterations in HL60RG cells were identified including uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 1, and hemizygous deletion in 10p and 11p. However, no such defects were observed in HL60 cells. Changes in gene expression in HL60RG cells were determined using expression arrays (Affymetrix GeneChip, HU133A). Candidate genes associated with the rapid growth of HL60RG cells were identified. Two tumor necrosis factor receptors, TNFRSF1B (type II tumor necrosis factor-α receptor) and TNFRSF8 (also known as a tumor marker CD30), which are adjacently located on chromosome 1 showed opposing changes in gene expression in HL60RG cells-over-expression of TNFRSF8 and repression of TNFRSF1B. Differences in the DNA methylation status in the transcriptional regulatory regions of both genes between HL60 and HL60RG was detected by a methylation-specific PCR assay. In conclusion, alterations in chromosome and gene expression in HL60RG may be associated with increased growth rate.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in patients with atrophic age-related macular degeneration in oldest old Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhou, T Q; Guan, H J; Hu, J Y

    2015-12-21

    The aim of this study was to identify disease-associated loci in oldest old Han Chinese with atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This genome-wide association study (GWAS) only included oldest old (≥95 years old) subjects in Rugao County, China. Thirty atrophic AMD patients and 47 age-matched non-AMD controls were enrolled. The study subjects underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were scanned by Genome-Wide Human Mapping SNP 6.0 Arrays and GeneChip Scanner 3000 7G. The results were read and analyzed by the Affymetrix Genotyping Console software. We filtered out the SNPs with a no-call rate ≥10%, MAF P < 0.05, and HWE P < 0.001. The remaining 561,277 SNPs were included in the association analysis. We found that the following 2 SNPs had the highest association with atrophic AMD: rs7624556 (located on 3q24) and rs13119914 (located on 4q34.3). In conclusion, we identified two atrophic AMD-associated SNPs (rs7624556 and rs13119914) in an oldest old Han Chinese population. This finding may lead to new strategies for screening of atrophic AMD for Han Chinese.

  10. Genomic Alterations Are Enhanced in Placentas from Pregnancies with Fetal Growth Restriction and Preeclampsia: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Biron-Shental, Tal; Sharony, Reuven; Shtorch-Asor, Atalia; Keiser, Meirav; Sadeh-Mestechkin, Dana; Laish, Ido; Amiel, Aliza

    2016-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) secondary to placental insufficiency and preeclampsia (PE) are associated with substantially increased childhood and adult morbidity and mortality. The long-term outcomes are related to placental aberrations and intrauterine programming. Advances in microarray technology allow high-resolution, genome-wide evaluation for DNA copy number variations - deletions and duplications. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the usefulness of microarray testing in FGR placentas. Using Affymetrix GeneChip for chromosomal microarray (CMA), we analyzed 10 placentas from pregnancies with FGR attributed to placental insufficiency; 5 with FGR below the 5th percentile and 5 from the 5th to <10th percentiles. All fetuses had normal anomaly scans and karyotypes. We also analyzed 5 third-trimester placentas from pregnancies complicated by PE with severe features and 5 from PE without severe features, all with appropriately grown fetuses. The results were compared to 10 placentas from uncomplicated pregnancies with healthy neonates. CMA analysis identified more genomic alterations in FGR (p < 0.05) and in PE (p < 0.05) placentas than in healthy controls. There was a correlation to the severity of FGR and PE. The genomic alterations were below the resolution of normal karyotyping. The altered genes are related to adult human height, stress reactions and to cellular migration, differentiation and adhesion. Though very preliminary, our data support evaluating FGR and PE placentas using CMA. Larger data sets are needed for further evaluation of the findings and their clinical implications. PMID:27022328

  11. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision. PMID:26176695

  12. Differential gene expression in mouse liver associated with the hepatoprotective effect of clofibrate

    SciTech Connect

    Moffit, Jeffrey S.; Koza-Taylor, Petra H.; Holland, Ricky D.; Thibodeau, Michael S.; Beger, Richard D.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, Jose E. . E-mail: jose.manautou@uconn.edu

    2007-07-15

    Pretreatment of mice with the peroxisome proliferator clofibrate (CFB) protects against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Previous studies have shown that activation of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is required for this effect. The present study utilizes gene expression profile analysis to identify potential pathways contributing to PPAR{alpha}-mediated hepatoprotection. Gene expression profiles were compared between wild type and PPAR{alpha}-null mice pretreated with vehicle or CFB (500 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 10 days) and then challenged with APAP (400 mg/kg, p.o.). Total hepatic RNA was isolated 4 h after APAP treatment and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MGU74 v2.0 GeneChips. Gene expression analysis was performed utilizing GeneSpring (registered) software. Our analysis identified 53 genes of interest including vanin-1, cell cycle regulators, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, an acetaminophen binding protein. Vanin-1 could be important for CFB-mediated hepatoprotection because this protein is involved in the synthesis of cysteamine and cystamine. These are potent antioxidants capable of ameliorating APAP toxicity in rodents and humans. HPLC-ESI/MS/MS analysis of liver extracts indicates that enhanced vanin-1 gene expression results in elevated cystamine levels, which could be mechanistically associated with CFB-mediated hepatoprotection.

  13. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex antigens in invading glioma cells: stealth invasion of the brain.

    PubMed

    Zagzag, David; Salnikow, Konstantin; Chiriboga, Luis; Yee, Herman; Lan, Li; Ali, M Aktar; Garcia, Roberto; Demaria, Sandra; Newcomb, Elizabeth W

    2005-03-01

    Invasion into surrounding brain tissue is a fundamental feature of gliomas and the major reason for treatment failure. The process of brain invasion in gliomas is not well understood. Differences in gene expression and/or gene products between invading and noninvading glioma cells may identify potential targets for new therapies. To look for genes associated with glioma invasion, we first employed Affymetrix microarray Genechip technology to identify genes differentially expressed in migrating glioma cells in vitro and in invading glioma cells in vivo using laser capture microdissection. We observed upregulation of a variety of genes, previously reported to be linked to glioma cell migration and invasion. Remarkably, major histocompatiblity complex (MHC) class I and II genes were significantly downregulated in migrating cells in vitro and in invading cells in vivo. Decreased MHC expression was confirmed in migrating glioma cells in vitro using RT-PCR and in invading glioma cells in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of human and murine glioblastomas for beta2 microglobulin, a marker of MHC class I protein expression. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe the downregulation of MHC class I and II antigens in migrating and invading glioma cells, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. These results suggest that the very process of tumor invasion is associated with decreased expression of MHC antigens allowing glioma cells to invade the surrounding brain in a 'stealth'-like manner.

  14. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision. PMID:26176695

  15. USH1G with unique retinal findings caused by a novel truncating mutation identified by genome-wide linkage analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taibah, Khalid; Bin-Khamis, Ghada; Kennedy, Shelley; Hemidan, Amal; Al-Qahtani, Faisal; Tabbara, Khalid; Mubarak, Bashayer Al; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Meyer, Brian F.; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder divided into three distinct clinical subtypes based on the severity of the hearing loss, manifestation of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of retinitis pigmentosa and visual symptoms. To date, mutations in seven different genes have been reported to cause USH type 1 (USH1), the most severe form. Patients diagnosed with USH1 are known to be ideal candidates to benefit from cochlear implantation. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10K arrays were performed in three cochlear implanted Saudi siblings born from a consanguineous marriage, clinically diagnosed with USH1 by comprehensive clinical, audiological, and ophthalmological examinations. From the linkage results, the USH1G gene was screened for mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons. Results We report the identification of a novel p.S243X truncating mutation in USH1G that segregated with the disease phenotype and was not present in 300 ethnically matched normal controls. We also report on the novel retinal findings and the outcome of cochlear implantation in the affected individuals. Conclusions In addition to reporting a novel truncating mutation, this report expands the retinal phenotype in USH1G and presents the first report of successful cochlear implants in this disease. PMID:22876113

  16. TRAIL pathway is associated with inhibition of colon cancer by protopanaxadiol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Li, Zejuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Calway, Tyler; He, Tong-Chuan; Du, Wei; Chen, Jianjun; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Among important components of American ginseng, protopanaxadiol (PPD) showed more active anticancer potential than other triterpenoid saponins. In this study, we determined the in vivo effects of PPD in a mouse cancer model first. Then, using human colorectal cancer cell lines, we observed significant cancer cell growth inhibition by promoting G1 cell cycle redistribution and apoptosis. Subsequently, we characterized the downstream genes targeted by PPD in HCT-116 cancer cells. Using Affymetrix high density GeneChips, we obtained the gene expression profile of the cells. Microarray data indicated that the expression levels of 76 genes were changed over two-fold after PPD, of which 52 were upregulated while the remaining 24 were downregulated. Ingenuity pathway analysis of top functions affected was carried out. Data suggested that by regulating the interactions between p53 and DR4/DR5, the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) pathway played a key role in the action of PPD, a promising colon cancer inhibitory compound. PMID:25704023

  17. Identification of Diabetic Retinopathy Genes through a Genome-Wide Association Study among Mexican-Americans from Starr County, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Hallman, D. Michael; Gonzalez, Victor H.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Cox, Nancy J.; Bell, Graeme I.; Hanis, Craig L.

    2010-01-01

    To identify genetic loci for severe diabetic retinopathy, 286 Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes from Starr County, Texas, completed physical examinations including fundus photography for diabetic retinopathy grading. Individuals with moderate-to-severe non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy were defined as cases. Direct genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set, and SNPs passing quality control criteria were used to impute markers available in HapMap Phase III Mexican population (MXL) in Los Angeles, California. Two directly genotyped markers were associated with severe diabetic retinopathy at a P-value less than .0001: SNP rs2300782 (P = 6.04 × 10−5) mapped to an intron region of CAMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) on chromosome 5, and SNP rs10519765 (P = 6.21 × 10−5) on chromosomal 15q13 in the FMN1 (formin 1) gene. Using well-imputed markers based on the HapMap III Mexican population, we identified an additional 32 SNPs located in 11 chromosomal regions with nominal association with severe diabetic retinopathy at P-value less than .0001. None of these markers were located in traditional candidate genes for diabetic retinopathy or diabetes itself. However, these signals implicate genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and cell adhesion for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:20871662

  18. Differential gene expression in pulmonary artery endothelial cells exposed to sickle cell plasma.

    PubMed

    Klings, Elizabeth S; Safaya, Surinder; Adewoye, Adeboye H; Odhiambo, Adam; Frampton, Garrett; Lenburg, Marc; Gerry, Norman; Sebastiani, Paola; Steinberg, Martin H; Farber, Harrison W

    2005-05-11

    Clinical variability in sickle cell disease (SCD) suggests a role for extra-erythrocytic factors in the pathogenesis of vasoocclusion. We hypothesized that endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction, one possible modifier of disease variability, results from induction of phenotypic changes by circulating factors. Accordingly, we analyzed gene expression in cultured human pulmonary artery ECs (HPAEC) exposed to plasma from 1) sickle acute chest syndrome (ACS) patients, 2) SCD patients at steady state, 3) normal volunteers, and 4) serum-free media, using whole genome microarrays (U133A-B GeneChip, Affymetrix). Data were analyzed by Bayesian analysis of differential gene expression (BADGE). Differential expression was defined by the probability of >1.5 fold change in signal intensity greater than 0.999 and a predicted score of 70-100, measured by cross-validation. Compared with normal plasma, plasma from SCD patients (steady state) resulted in differential expression of 50 genes in HPAEC. Of these genes, molecules involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and lipid transport, the cellular stress response, and extracellular matrix proteins were most prominent. Another 58 genes were differentially expressed in HPAEC exposed to plasma from ACS patients. The pattern of altered gene expression suggests that plasma from SCD patients induces an EC phenotype which is anti-apoptotic and favors cholesterol biosynthesis. An altered EC phenotype elicited by SCD plasma may contribute to the pathogenesis of sickle vasoocclusion.

  19. VSNL1 Co-Expression Networks in Aging Include Calcium Signaling, Synaptic Plasticity, and Alzheimer's Disease Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Wei; Chang, Lun-Ching; Tseng, George C; Kirkwood, Caitlin M; Sibille, Etienne L; Sweet, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The visinin-like 1 (VSNL1) gene encodes visinin-like protein 1, a peripheral biomarker for Alzheimer disease (AD). Little is known, however, about normal VSNL1 expression in brain and the biologic networks in which it participates. Frontal cortex gray matter obtained from 209 subjects without neurodegenerative or psychiatric illness, ranging in age from 16 to 91, was processed on Affymetrix GeneChip 1.1 ST and Human SNP Array 6.0. VSNL1 expression was unaffected by age and sex, and not significantly associated with SNPs in cis or trans. VSNL1 was significantly co-expressed with genes in pathways for calcium signaling, AD, long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and trafficking of AMPA receptors. The association with AD was driven, in part, by correlation with amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression. These findings provide an unbiased link between VSNL1 and molecular mechanisms of AD, including pathways implicated in synaptic pathology in AD. Whether APP may drive increased VSNL1 expression, VSNL1 drives increased APP expression, or both are downstream of common pathogenic regulators will need to be evaluated in model systems. PMID:25806004

  20. Semaphorin and plexin gene expression is altered in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia patients with and without auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Sáez, Ana Rosa; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo; Sebastiá-Ortega, Noelia; González-Martínez, Rocio; Costa, Juan; Haro, Josep María; Callado, Luis F; Meana, J Javier; Nacher, Juán; Sanjuán, Julio; Moltó, María Dolores

    2015-10-30

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are clinical hallmarks of schizophrenia, however little is known about molecular genetics of these symptoms. In this study, gene expression profiling of postmortem brain samples from prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients without AH (SNA), patients with AH (SA) and control subjects were compared. Genome-wide expression analysis was conducted using samples of three individuals of each group and the Affymetrix GeneChip Human-Gene 1.0 ST-Array. This analysis identified the Axon Guidance pathway as one of the most differentially expressed network among SNA, SA and CNT. To confirm the transcriptome results, mRNA level quantification of seventeen genes involved in this pathway was performed in a larger sample. PLXNB1, SEMA3A, SEMA4D and SEM6C were upregulated in SNA or SA patients compared to controls. PLXNA1 and SEMA3D showed down-regulation in their expression in the patient's samples, but differences remained statistically significant between the SNA patients and controls. Differences between SNA and SA were found in PLXNB1 expression which is decreased in SA patients. This study strengthens the contribution of brain plasticity in pathophysiology of schizophrenia and shows that non-hallucinatory patients present more alterations in frontal regions than patients with hallucinations concerning neural plasticity.

  1. Gene Expression Analysis of HCT116 Colon Tumor-derived Cells Treated with the Polyamine Analog PG-11047

    PubMed Central

    IGNATENKO, NATALIA A.; YERUSHALMI, HAGIT F.; PANDEY, RITU; KACHEL, KAREN L.; STRINGER, DAVID E.; MARTON, LAURENCE J.; GERNER, EUGENE W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The conformationally restricted polyamine analog PG-11047 has significant growth inhibitory activity against prostate and lung cancer cell lines and is currently under evaluation in several clinical trials, both alone and in combination with other drugs, for the treatment of relapsed or refractory cancer. The objective of this study was to identify the molecular signature of genes responsive to PG-11047 treatment and the biochemical effects of this drug in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Materials and Methods Gene expression analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip human genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Changes in protein expression were evaluated using 2D polyacrylamide gels followed by LCMS/MS. Results Treatment of cells with PG-11047 at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 μM caused inhibition of cell growth. The activity of PG-11047 was found to correlate with its transcriptional effects on cell cycle control, focal adhesion, adherent and gap junction genes, MAPK-, Wnt- and, TGF-β signaling pathways, transport and DNA/RNA transcription factor genes. PG-11047 caused depletion of polyamine pools. Proteomics analysis showed that PG-11047 restricts the modification of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), resulting in suppression of general protein synthesis in PG-11047-treated cells. Conclusion These data show that PG-11047 has a broad spectrum of anticancer activity in colon cancer cells. PMID:19487545

  2. Reference genes identified in SH-SY5Y cells using custom-made gene arrays with validation by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hoerndli, Frédéric J; Toigo, Marco; Schild, Andreas; Götz, Jürgen; Day, Philip J

    2004-12-01

    Transcriptomic methods are widely used as an initial approach to gain a mechanistic insight into physiological and pathological processes. Because differences in gene regulation to be assessed by RNA screening methods (e.g., SAGE, Affymetrix GeneChips) can be very subtle, these techniques require stable reference genes for accurate normalization. It is widely known that housekeeping genes, which are routinely used for normalization, can vary significantly depending on the tissue, and experimental test. In this study, we aimed at identifying stable reference genes for a fibrillar Abeta(42) peptide-treated, human tau-expressing SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line derived to model aspects of Alzheimer's disease in tissue culture. We selected genes exhibiting potential normalization characteristics from public databases to create a custom-made microarray allowing the identification of reference genes for low, intermediate, and abundant mRNAs. A subset of these candidates was subjected to quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and was analyzed with geNorm software. By doing so, we were able to identify GAPD, M-RIP, and POLR2F as stable and usable reference genes irrespective of differentiation status and Abeta(42) treatment. PMID:15519568

  3. Identification of Diabetic Retinopathy Genes through a Genome-Wide Association Study among Mexican-Americans from Starr County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Hallman, D Michael; Gonzalez, Victor H; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Cox, Nancy J; Bell, Graeme I; Hanis, Craig L

    2010-01-01

    To identify genetic loci for severe diabetic retinopathy, 286 Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes from Starr County, Texas, completed physical examinations including fundus photography for diabetic retinopathy grading. Individuals with moderate-to-severe non-proliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy were defined as cases. Direct genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set, and SNPs passing quality control criteria were used to impute markers available in HapMap Phase III Mexican population (MXL) in Los Angeles, California. Two directly genotyped markers were associated with severe diabetic retinopathy at a P-value less than .0001: SNP rs2300782 (P = 6.04 × 10(-5)) mapped to an intron region of CAMK4 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV) on chromosome 5, and SNP rs10519765 (P = 6.21 × 10(-5)) on chromosomal 15q13 in the FMN1 (formin 1) gene. Using well-imputed markers based on the HapMap III Mexican population, we identified an additional 32 SNPs located in 11 chromosomal regions with nominal association with severe diabetic retinopathy at P-value less than .0001. None of these markers were located in traditional candidate genes for diabetic retinopathy or diabetes itself. However, these signals implicate genes involved in inflammation, oxidative stress and cell adhesion for the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:20871662

  4. Dexpanthenol modulates gene expression in skin wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heise, R; Skazik, C; Marquardt, Y; Czaja, K; Sebastian, K; Kurschat, P; Gan, L; Denecke, B; Ekanayake-Bohlig, S; Wilhelm, K-P; Merk, H F; Baron, J M

    2012-01-01

    Topical application of dexpanthenol is widely used in clinical practice for the improvement of wound healing. Previous in vitro experiments identified a stimulatory effect of pantothenate on migration, proliferation and gene regulation in cultured human dermal fibroblasts. To correlate these in vitro findings with the more complex in vivo situation of wound healing, a clinical trial was performed in which the dexpanthenol-induced gene expression profile in punch biopsies of previously injured and dexpanthenol-treated skin in comparison to placebo-treated skin was analyzed at the molecular level by Affymetrix® GeneChip analysis. Upregulation of IL-6, IL-1β, CYP1B1, CXCL1, CCL18 and KAP 4-2 gene expression and downregulation of psorasin mRNA and protein expression were identified in samples treated topically with dexpanthenol. This in vivo study might provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the effect of dexpanthenol in wound healing and shows strong correlations to previous in vitro data using cultured dermal fibroblasts. PMID:22759998

  5. Clinical Effect of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Patients With Cervical Cancer Undergoing Primary Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chao, Angel; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 1,010 patients with cervical cancer after radiotherapy between 1993 and 2000 were eligible for this study. The HPV genotypes were determined by a genechip, which detects 38 types of HPV. The patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were analyzed using the Cox regression hazard model and classification and regression tree decision tree method. Results: A total of 25 genotypes of HPV were detected in 992 specimens (98.2%). The leading 8 types were HPV16, 58, 18, 33, 52, 39, 31, and 45. These types belong to two high-risk HPV species: alpha-7 (HPV18, 39, 45) and alpha-9 (HPV16, 31, 33, 52, 58). Three HPV-based risk groups, which were independent of established prognostic factors, such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, age, pathologic features, squamous cell carcinoma antigen, and lymph node metastasis, were associated with the survival outcomes. The high-risk group consisted of the patients without HPV infection or the ones infected with the alpha-7 species only. Patients co-infected with the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species belonged to the medium-risk group, and the others were included in the low-risk group. Conclusion: The results of the present study have confirmed the prognostic value of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy. The different effect of the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species on the radiation response deserves additional exploration.

  6. Inflammatory response of esophageal epithelium in combined-type esophagitis in rats: a transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Kuroda, Masaaki; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Akagiri, Satomi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshida, Norimasa; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that esophageal mucosal inflammatory response is involved in the pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The aim of the present study was to identify specific gene expression profiles of the esophageal mucosa in a rat model of combined-type chronic reflux esophagitis. Esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis was carried out in male Wistar rats by anastomosing the jejunum to the gastroesophageal junction under diethyl-ether inhalation anesthesia. Esophageal epithelial cells were obtained from esophagi of rats by laser capture microdissection. Preparation of cRNA and target hybridization were performed according to the Affymetrix GeneChip eukaryotic small sample target labeling assay protocol. The gene expression profile was evaluated by the rat toxicology U34 GeneChip. Array data analysis was carried out using Affymetrix GeneChip operating software, ingenuity pathway analysis software, and Gene Springs software. A comparison between esophagitis and sham-operated rats 2 weeks after the operation revealed that 368 probes (36%) were significantly affected, i.e. 185 probes were up-regulated, and 183 probes were down-regulated, both at levels of at least 1.5-fold in the esophagitis rats. Ingenuity signal analysis of 207 affected probes revealed the interleukin-6 signaling pathway as the most significantly affected caronical pathway. In addition, the expression of many genes associated with cytokine and transcription factor was enhanced in the esophagitis rats. This transcriptome approach provided insight into genes and putative genetic pathways thought to be affected by stimulation with gastroduodenal refluxates.

  7. Effect of rosemary polyphenols on human colon cancer cells: transcriptomic profiling and functional enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Alberto; García-Cañas, Virginia; Rocamora-Reverte, Lourdes; Gómez-Martínez, Angeles; Ferragut, José Antonio; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the effect of rosemary extracts rich on polyphenols obtained using pressurized fluids was investigated on the gene expression of human SW480 and HT29 colon cancer cells. The application of transcriptomic profiling and functional enrichment analysis was done via two computational approaches, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. These two approaches were used for functional enrichment analysis as a previous step for a reliable interpretation of the data obtained from microarray analysis. Reverse transcription quantitative-PCR was used to confirm relative changes in mRNA levels of selected genes from microarrays. The selection of genes was based on their expression change, adjusted p value, and known biological function. According to genome-wide transcriptomics analysis, rosemary polyphenols altered the expression of ~4 % of the genes covered by the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0ST chip in both colon cancer cells. However, only ~18 % of the differentially expressed genes were common to both cell lines, indicating markedly different expression profiles in response to the treatment. Differences in induction of G2/M arrest observed by rosemary polyphenols in the two colon adenocarcinoma cell lines suggest that the extract may be differentially effective against tumors with specific mutational pattern. From our results, it is also concluded that rosemary polyphenols induced a low degree of apoptosis indicating that other multiple signaling pathways may contribute to colon cancer cell death.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of PPARγ target genes reveals the involvement of lysyl oxidase in human placental cytotrophoblast invasion.

    PubMed

    Segond, Nadine; Degrelle, Séverine A; Berndt, Sarah; Clouqueur, Elodie; Rouault, Christine; Saubamea, Bruno; Dessen, Philippe; Fong, Keith S K; Csiszar, Katalin; Badet, Josette; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Fournier, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Human placental development is characterized by invasion of extravillous cytotrophoblasts (EVCTs) into the uterine wall during the first trimester of pregnancy. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) plays a major role in placental development, and activation of PPARγ by its agonists results in inhibition of EVCT invasion in vitro. To identify PPARγ target genes, microarray analysis was performed using GeneChip technology on EVCT primary cultures obtained from first-trimester human placentas. Gene expression was compared in EVCTs treated with the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone versus control. A total of 139 differentially regulated genes were identified, and changes in the expression of the following 8 genes were confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction: a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain12 (ADAM12), connexin 43 (CX43), deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX-1), lysyl oxidase (LOX), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and PPARγ. Among the upregulated genes, lysyl oxidase (LOX) was further analyzed. In the LOX family, only LOX, LOXL1 and LOXL2 mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in rosiglitazone-treated EVCTs. RNA and protein expression of the subfamily members LOX, LOXL1 and LOXL2 were analyzed by absolute RT-qPCR and western blotting, and localized by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence-confocal microscopy. LOX protein was immunodetected in the EVCT cytoplasm, while LOXL1 was found in the nucleus and nucleolus. No signal was detected for LOXL2 protein. Specific inhibition of LOX activity by β-aminopropionitrile in cell invasion assays led to an increase in EVCT invasiveness. These results suggest that LOX, LOXL1 and LOXL2 are downstream PPARγ targets and that LOX activity is a negative regulator of trophoblastic cell invasion.

  9. Calprotectin is released from human skeletal muscle tissue during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Andersen, Kasper; Fischer, Christian; Nielsen, Anders Rinnov; Nielsen, Søren; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Aastrøm, Maj-brit; Borup, Rehannah; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has been identified as a secretory organ. We hypothesized that IL-6, a cytokine secreted from skeletal muscle during exercise, could induce production of other secreted factors in skeletal muscle. IL-6 was infused for 3 h into healthy young males (n = 7) and muscle biopsies obtained at time points 0, 3 and 6 h in these individuals and in resting controls. Affymetrix microarray analysis of gene expression changes in skeletal muscle biopsies identified a small set of genes changed by IL-6 infusion. RT-PCR validation confirmed that S100A8 and S100A9 mRNA were up-regulated 3-fold in skeletal muscle following IL-6 infusion compared to controls. Furthermore, S100A8 and S100A9 mRNA levels were up-regulated 5-fold in human skeletal muscle following cycle ergometer exercise for 3 h at ∼60% of in young healthy males (n = 8). S100A8 and S100A9 form calprotectin, which is known as an acute phase reactant. Plasma calprotectin increased 5-fold following acute cycle ergometer exercise in humans, but not following IL-6 infusion. To identify the source of calprotectin, healthy males (n = 7) performed two-legged dynamic knee extensor exercise for 3 h with a work load of ∼50% of peak power output and arterial–femoral venous differences were obtained. Arterial plasma concentrations for calprotectin increased 2-fold compared to rest and there was a net release of calprotectin from the working muscle. In conclusion, IL-6 infusion and muscle contractions induce expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in skeletal muscle. However, IL-6 alone is not a sufficient stimulus to facilitate release of calprotectin from skeletal muscle. PMID:18511485

  10. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a wholly new…

  11. Quality control parameters on a large dataset of regionally dissected human control brains for whole genome expression studies

    PubMed Central

    Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Walker, Robert; Smith, Colin; Imran, Sabaena; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John

    2011-01-01

    We are building an open-access database of regional human brain expression designed to allow the genome-wide assessment of genetic variability on expression. Array and RNA sequencing technologies make assessment of genome-wide expression possible. Human brain tissue is a challenging source for this work because it can only be obtained several and variable hours post-mortem and after varying agonal states. These variables alter RNA integrity in a complex manner. In this report, we assess the effect of post-mortem delay, agonal state and age on gene expression, and the utility of pH and RNA integrity number as predictors of gene expression as measured on 1266 Affymetrix Exon Arrays. We assessed the accuracy of the array data using QuantiGene, as an independent non-PCR-based method. These quality control parameters will allow database users to assess data accuracy. We report that within the parameters of this study post-mortem delay, agonal state and age have little impact on array quality, array data are robust to variable RNA integrity, and brain pH has only a small effect on array performance. QuantiGene gave very similar expression profiles as array data. This study is the first step in our initiative to make human, regional brain expression freely available. PMID:21848658

  12. Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of climate change Video not supported Human Health Climate change threatens human health and well-being ... Copy link to clipboard Key Message: Wide-ranging Health Impacts Climate change threatens human health and well- ...

  13. AMDA 2.13: A major update for automated cross-platform microarray data analysis.

    PubMed

    Kapetis, Dimos; Clarelli, Ferdinando; Vitulli, Federico; de Rosbo, Nicole Kerlero; Beretta, Ottavio; Foti, Maria; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Zolezzi, Francesca

    2012-07-01

    Microarray platforms require analytical pipelines with modules for data pre-processing including data normalization, statistical analysis for identification of differentially expressed genes, cluster analysis, and functional annotation. We previously developed the Automated Microarray Data Analysis (AMDA, version 2.3.5) pipeline to process Affymetrix 3' IVT GeneChips. The availability of newer technologies that demand open-source tools for microarray data analysis has impelled us to develop an updated multi-platform version, AMDA 2.13. It includes additional quality control metrics, annotation-driven (annotation grade of Affymetrix NetAffx) and signal-driven (Inter-Quartile Range) gene filtering, and approaches to experimental design. To enhance understanding of biological data, differentially expressed genes have been mapped into KEGG pathways. Finally, a more stable and user-friendly interface was designed to integrate the requirements for different platforms. AMDA 2.13 allows the analysis of Affymetrix (cartridges and plates) and whole transcript probe design (Gene 1.0/1.1 ST and Exon 1.0 ST GeneChips), Illumina Bead Arrays, and one-channel Agilent 4×44 arrays. Relative to early versions, it supports various experimental designs and delivers more insightful biological understanding and up-to-date annotations.

  14. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Elferink, M.G.L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E.M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W.G.; Heisterkamp, S.H.; Groothuis, G.M.M.

    2011-05-15

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be directly extrapolated to humans due to species differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate precision-cut human liver slices as in vitro method for the prediction of human specific toxicity by toxicogenomics. The liver slices contain all cell types of the liver in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process. Previously we showed that toxicogenomic analysis of rat liver slices is highly predictive for rat in vivo toxicity. In this study we investigated the levels of gene expression during incubation up to 24 h with Affymetrix microarray technology. The analysis was focused on a broad spectrum of genes related to stress and toxicity, and on genes encoding for phase-I, -II and -III metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Observed changes in gene expression were associated with cytoskeleton remodeling, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion, but for the ADME-Tox related genes only minor changes were observed. PCA analysis showed that changes in gene expression were not associated with age, sex or source of the human livers. Slices treated with acetaminophen showed patterns of gene expression related to its toxicity. These results indicate that precision-cut human liver slices are relatively stable during 24 h of incubation and represent a valuable model for human in vitro hepatotoxicity testing despite the human inter-individual variability.

  15. Transcriptional profiling and biological pathway analysis of human equivalence PCB exposure in vitro: Indicator of Disease and disorder development in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Somiranjan; Mitra, Partha S.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Trnovec, Tomas; Murinova, Lubica; Sovcikova, Eva; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Zang, Shizhu; Hoffman, Eric P.; Dutta, Sisir K.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Our earlier gene-expression studies with a Slovak PCBs-exposed population have revealed possible disease and disorder development in accordance with epidemiological studies. The present investigation aimed to develop an in vitro model system that can provide an indication of disrupted biological pathways associated with developing future diseases, well in advance of the clinical manifestations that may take years to appear in the actual human exposure scenario. Methods We used human PBMC (Primary Blood Mononuclear Cells) and exposed them to a mixture of human equivalence levels of PCBs (PCB-118,138,153,170,180) as found in the PCBs-exposed Slovak population. The microarray studies of global gene expression were conducted on the Affymetrix platform using Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array along with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to associate the affected genes with their mechanistic pathways. High-throughput qRT-PCR Taqman Low Density Array (TLDA) was done to further validate the selected 6 differentially expressed genes of our interest, viz., ARNT, CYP2D6, LEPR, LRP12, RRAD, TP53, with a small population validation sample (n=71). Results Overall, we revealed a discreet gene expression profile in the experimental model that resembled the diseases and disorders observed in PCBs-exposed population studies. The disease pathways included Endocrine System disorders, Genetic disorders, Metabolic diseases, Developmental disorders, and Cancers, strongly consistent with the evidence from epidemiological studies. Interpretation These gene finger prints could lead to the identification of populations and subgroups at high risk for disease, and can pose as early disease biomarkers well ahead of time, before the actual disease becomes visible. PMID:25725301

  16. Systematic analysis of a novel human renal glomerulus-enriched gene expression dataset.

    PubMed

    Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Eichinger, Felix; Sen, Kontheari; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Edenhofer, Ilka; Mattinzoli, Deborah; Kretzler, Matthias; Rastaldi, Maria P; Cohen, Clemens D

    2010-01-01

    Glomerular diseases account for the majority of cases with chronic renal failure. Several genes have been identified with key relevance for glomerular function. Quite a few of these genes show a specific or preferential mRNA expression in the renal glomerulus. To identify additional candidate genes involved in glomerular function in humans we generated a human renal glomerulus-enriched gene expression dataset (REGGED) by comparing gene expression profiles from human glomeruli and tubulointerstitium obtained from six transplant living donors using Affymetrix HG-U133A arrays. This analysis resulted in 677 genes with prominent overrepresentation in the glomerulus. Genes with 'a priori' known prominent glomerular expression served for validation and were all found in the novel dataset (e.g. CDKN1, DAG1, DDN, EHD3, MYH9, NES, NPHS1, NPHS2, PDPN, PLA2R1, PLCE1, PODXL, PTPRO, SYNPO, TCF21, TJP1, WT1). The mRNA expression of several novel glomerulus-enriched genes in REGGED was validated by qRT-PCR. Gene ontology and pathway analysis identified biological processes previously not reported to be of relevance in glomeruli of healthy human adult kidneys including among others axon guidance. This finding was further validated by assessing the expression of the axon guidance molecules neuritin (NRN1) and roundabout receptor ROBO1 and -2. In diabetic nephropathy, a prevalent glomerulopathy, differential regulation of glomerular ROBO2 mRNA was found.In summary, novel transcripts with predominant expression in the human glomerulus could be identified using a comparative strategy on microdissected nephrons. A systematic analysis of this glomerulus-specific gene expression dataset allows the detection of target molecules and biological processes involved in glomerular biology and renal disease. PMID:20634963

  17. Analysis of human breast milk cells: gene expression profiles during pregnancy, lactation, involution, and mastitic infection.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julie A; Lefèvre, Christophe; Watt, Ashalyn; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2016-05-01

    The molecular processes underlying human milk production and the effects of mastitic infection are largely unknown because of limitations in obtaining tissue samples. Determination of gene expression in normal lactating women would be a significant step toward understanding why some women display poor lactation outcomes. Here, we demonstrate the utility of RNA obtained directly from human milk cells to detect mammary epithelial cell (MEC)-specific gene expression. Milk cell RNA was collected from five time points (24 h prepartum during the colostrum period, midlactation, two involutions, and during a bout of mastitis) in addition to an involution series comprising three time points. Gene expression profiles were determined by use of human Affymetrix arrays. Milk cells collected during milk production showed that the most highly expressed genes were involved in milk synthesis (e.g., CEL, OLAH, FOLR1, BTN1A1, and ARG2), while milk cells collected during involution showed a significant downregulation of milk synthesis genes and activation of involution associated genes (e.g., STAT3, NF-kB, IRF5, and IRF7). Milk cells collected during mastitic infection revealed regulation of a unique set of genes specific to this disease state, while maintaining regulation of milk synthesis genes. Use of conventional epithelial cell markers was used to determine the population of MECs within each sample. This paper is the first to describe the milk cell transcriptome across the human lactation cycle and during mastitic infection, providing valuable insight into gene expression of the human mammary gland. PMID:26909879

  18. Global analysis of the human gastric epithelial transcriptome altered by Helicobacter pylori eradication in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, M B; Sabo, E; Meitner, P A; Kim, S S; Cho, Y; Kim, H K; Tavares, R; Moss, S F

    2006-01-01

    Objective The transcriptional profile of gastric epithelial cell lines cocultured with Helicobacter pylori and the global gene expression of whole gastric mucosa has been described previously. We aimed to overcome limitations of previous studies by determining the effects of H pylori eradication on the transcriptome of purified human gastric epithelium using each patient as their own control. Design Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to extract mRNA from paraffin‐embedded antral epithelium from 10 patients with peptic ulcer disease, before and after H pylori eradication. mRNA was reverse transcribed and applied on to Affymetrix cDNA microarray chips customised for formalin‐fixed tissue. Differentially expressed genes were identified and a subset validated by real‐time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results A total of 13 817 transcripts decreased and 9680 increased after H pylori eradication. Applying cut‐off criteria (p<0.02, fold‐change threshold 2.5) reduced the sample to 98 differentially expressed genes. Genes detected included those previously implicated in H pylori pathophysiology such as interleukin 8, chemokine ligand 3, β defensin and somatostatin, as well as novel genes such as GDDR (TFIZ1), chemokine receptors 7 and 8, and gastrokine. Conclusions LCM of archival specimens has enabled the identification of gastric epithelial genes whose expression is considerably altered after H pylori eradication. This study has confirmed the presence of genes previously implicated in the pathogenesis of H pylori, as well as highlighted novel candidates for further investigation. PMID:16641130

  19. Identification of Prognostic Molecular Features in the Reactive Stroma of Human Breast and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Provero, Paolo; Fusco, Carlo; Delorenzi, Mauro; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Stamenkovic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Primary tumor growth induces host tissue responses that are believed to support and promote tumor progression. Identification of the molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and elucidation of its crosstalk with tumor cells may therefore be crucial for improving our understanding of the processes implicated in cancer progression, identifying potential therapeutic targets, and uncovering stromal gene expression signatures that may predict clinical outcome. A key issue to resolve, therefore, is whether the stromal response to tumor growth is largely a generic phenomenon, irrespective of the tumor type or whether the response reflects tumor-specific properties. To address similarity or distinction of stromal gene expression changes during cancer progression, oligonucleotide-based Affymetrix microarray technology was used to compare the transcriptomes of laser-microdissected stromal cells derived from invasive human breast and prostate carcinoma. Invasive breast and prostate cancer-associated stroma was observed to display distinct transcriptomes, with a limited number of shared genes. Interestingly, both breast and prostate tumor-specific dysregulated stromal genes were observed to cluster breast and prostate cancer patients, respectively, into two distinct groups with statistically different clinical outcomes. By contrast, a gene signature that was common to the reactive stroma of both tumor types did not have survival predictive value. Univariate Cox analysis identified genes whose expression level was most strongly associated with patient survival. Taken together, these observations suggest that the tumor microenvironment displays distinct features according to the tumor type that provides survival-predictive value. PMID:21611158

  20. Global patterns of large copy number variations in the human genome reveal complexity in chromosome organization.

    PubMed

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Suresh, Raviraj V; Vishweswaraiah, Sangeetha; Lingaiah, Kusuma; Murthy, Megha; Manjegowda, Dinesh S; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2015-01-01

    Global patterns of copy number variations (CNVs) in chromosomes are required to understand the dynamics of genome organization and complexity. For this study, analysis was performed using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip and CytoScan High-Density arrays. We identified a total of 44 109 CNVs from 1715 genomes with a mean of 25 CNVs in an individual, which established the first drafts of population-specific CNV maps providing a rationale for prioritizing chromosomal regions. About 19 905 ancient CNVs were identified across all chromosomes and populations at varying frequencies. CNV count, and sometimes CNV size, contributed to the bulk CNV size of the chromosome. Population specific lengthening and shortening of chromosomal length was observed. Sex bias for CNV presence was largely dependent on ethnicity. Lower CNV inheritance rate was observed for India, compared to YRI and CEU. A total of 33 candidate CNV hotspots from 5382 copy number (CN) variable region (CNVR) clusters were identified. Population specific CNV distribution patterns in p and q arms disturbed the assumption that CNV counts in the p arm are less common compared to long arms, and the CNV occurrence and distribution in chromosomes is length independent. This study unraveled the force of independent evolutionary dynamics on genome organization and complexity across chromosomes and populations. PMID:26390810

  1. A homozygous deletion in GRID2 causes a human phenotype with cerebellar ataxia and atrophy.

    PubMed

    Utine, G Eda; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Salanci, Bilge; Çetinkaya, Arda; Kiper, P Özlem; Alanay, Yasemin; Aktas, Dilek; Boduroğlu, Koray; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet

    2013-07-01

    GRID2 is a member of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family of excitatory neurotransmitter receptors. GRID2 encodes the glutamate receptor subunit delta-2, selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The phenotype associated with loss of GRID2 function was described only in mice until now, characterized by different degrees of cerebellar ataxia and usually relatively mild abnormalities of the cerebellum. This work describes for the first time the human phenotype associated with homozygous partial deletion of GRID2 in 3 children in one large consanguineous Turkish family. Homozygous deletion of exons 3 and 4 of GRID2 (94 153 589-94 298 037 bp) in the proband and similarly affected cousins, and heterozygous deletions in parental DNA were shown using Affymetrix® 6.0 single-nucleotide polymorphism array, confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The phenotype includes nystagmus, hypotonia with marked developmental delay in gross motor skills in early infancy followed by a static encephalopathy course with development of cerebellar ataxia, oculomotor apraxia, and pyramidal tract involvement.

  2. Microarray analysis of cultured human brain aggregates following cortisol exposure: implications for cellular functions relevant to mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Salaria, S; Chana, G; Caldara, F; Feltrin, E; Altieri, M; Faggioni, F; Domenici, E; Merlo-Pich, E; Everall, I P

    2006-09-01

    Increased cortisol levels in humans are often observed in patients suffering from mood disorders. In this study human fetal brain aggregates were exposed to cortisol at 500 nM for 3 weeks, as an in-vitro model of chronic cortisol exposure. Microarray analysis on extracted mRNA using the Affymetrix U133A platform was then performed. Our results demonstrated a significant effect of cortisol on 1648 transcripts; 736 up-regulated and 912 down-regulated genes. The most differentially regulated biological categories were: RNA processing, protein metabolism, and cell growth. Within these categories we observed a down-regulation of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) (-1.5-fold) and aquaporin4 (AQP4) (-1.7-fold), alongside an up-regulation of fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) (+1.7-fold) and vesicle associated membrane protein2 (VAMP2) (+1.7-fold). FGF2, FGF9, AQP4 and VAMP2 changes were confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemistry. Alterations in FGF transcripts are in keeping with recent literature demonstrating such effects in patients with mood disorders. PMID:16844382

  3. Gene expression profiles in human HepG2 cells treated with extracts of the Tamarindus indica fruit pulp.

    PubMed

    Razali, Nurhanani; Aziz, Azlina A; Junit, Sarni M

    2010-12-01

    Tamarindus indicaL. (T. indica) or locally known as asam jawa belongs to the family of Leguminosae. The fruit pulp had been reported to have antioxidant activities and possess hypolipidaemic effects. In this study, we attempted to investigate the gene expression patterns in human hepatoma HepG2 cell line in response to treatment with low concentration of the fruit pulp extracts. Microarray analysis using Affymetrix Human Genome 1.0 S.T arrays was used in the study. Microarray data were validated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR. Amongst the significantly up-regulated genes were those that code for the metallothioneins (MT1M, MT1F, MT1X) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTA1, GSTA2, GST02) that are involved in stress response. APOA4, APOA5, ABCG5 and MTTP genes were also significantly regulated that could be linked to hypolipidaemic activities of the T. indica fruit pulp.

  4. Unravelling the Complexity of Human Olfactory Receptor Repertoire by Copy Number Analysis across Population Using High Resolution Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Veerappa, Avinash M.; Vishweswaraiah, Sangeetha; Lingaiah, Kusuma; Murthy, Megha; Manjegowda, Dinesh S.; Nayaka, Radhika; Ramachandra, Nallur B.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (OR), responsible for detection of odor molecules, belong to the largest family of genes and are highly polymorphic in nature having distinct polymorphisms associated with specific regions around the globe. Since there are no reports on the presence of copy number variations in OR repertoire of Indian population, the present investigation in 43 Indians along with 270 HapMap and 31 Tibetan samples was undertaken to study genome variability and evolution. Analysis was performed using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip, Affymterix CytoScan® High-Density array, HD-CNV, and MAFFT program. We observed a total of 1527 OR genes in 503 CNV events from 81.3% of the study group, which includes 67.6% duplications and 32.4% deletions encompassing more of genes than pseudogenes. We report human genotypic variation in functional OR repertoire size across populations and it was found that the combinatorial effect of both “orthologous obtained from closely related species” and “paralogous derived sequences” provide the complexity to the continuously occurring OR CNVs. PMID:23843967

  5. Stabilin-1 is expressed in human breast cancer and supports tumor growth in mammary adenocarcinoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, Vladimir; Yin, Shuiping; Song, Bin; Avdic, Aida; Schledzewski, Kai; Ovsiy, Ilja; Gratchev, Alexei; Verdiell, Maria Llopis; Sticht, Carsten; Schmuttermaier, Christina; Schönhaber, Hiltrud; Weiss, Christel; Fields, Alan P.; Simon-Keller, Katja; Pfister, Frederick; Berlit, Sebastian; Marx, Alexander; Arnold, Bernd; Goerdt, Sergij; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Stabilin-1 is a multifunctional scavenger receptor expressed on alternatively-activated macrophages. Stabilin-1 mediates phagocytosis of “unwanted-self” components, intracellular sorting, and endocytic clearance of extracellular ligands including SPARC that modulates breast cancer growth. The expression of stabilin-1 was found on tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in mouse and human cancers including melanoma, lymphoma, glioblastoma, and pancreatic insulinoma. Despite its tumor-promoting role in mouse models of melanoma and lymphoma the expression and functional role of stabilin-1 in breast cancer was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that stabilin-1 is expressed on TAM in human breast cancer, and its expression is most pronounced on stage I disease. Using stabilin-1 knockout (ko) mice we show that stabilin-1 facilitates growth of mouse TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma. Endocytosis assay on stabilin-1 ko TAM demonstrated impaired clearance of stabilin-1 ligands including SPARC that was capable of inducing cell death in TS/A cells. Affymetrix microarray analysis on purified TAM and reporter assays in stabilin-1 expressing cell lines demonstrated no influence of stabilin-1 expression on intracellular signalling. Our results suggest stabilin-1 mediated silent clearance of extracellular tumor growth-inhibiting factors (e.g. SPARC) as a mechanism of stabilin-1 induced tumor growth. Silent clearance function of stabilin-1 makes it an attractive candidate for delivery of immunomodulatory anti-cancer therapeutic drugs to TAM. PMID:27105498

  6. Human Alveolar Macrophage Gene Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains H37Ra and H37Rv

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Richard F.; Walrath, Jessica; Lee, Hung; Jacobson, Bruce A.; Horton, Heidi; Bowman, Michael R.; Nocka, Karl; Sypek, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    H37Rv and H37Ra have been widely used as models of virulent and avirulent strains, respectively, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Since the sequencing of H37Rv, microarrays have been used to investigate gene expression of M. tuberculosis strains under various conditions, and to compare gene expression of specific isolates of the organism. Because differences in the virulence of these organisms could also be manifest via their differential induction of host genes, we used Affymetrix Human Genome Arrays U133A and U133B to evaluate human alveolar macrophage (AM) responses to infection with H37Rv and H37Ra. H37Rv altered expression of far more genes than did H37Ra. Moreover, the genes induced by H37Rv to a greater extent than by H37Ra were predominantly associated with the development of effective immunity. H37Rv markedly increased expression of IL-23 p19, whereas neither organism significantly induced IL-12 p35 expression. Quantitative PCR confirmed that H37Rv induced significantly more AM p19 expression than did H37Ra. After low-level infection of both AM and peripheral blood monocytes (MN) with H37Rv, neither cell type produced IL-12 (by ELISA). In contrast, AM displayed significant IL-23 production in response to H37Rv, whereas MN did not. Our findings thus suggest an important role for IL-23 in human host responses to pulmonary infection with M. tuberculosis, and are consistent with epidemiologic and genetic studies that imply that H37Rv may not have unusual capacity to cause human disease. PMID:18787177

  7. Transcript-Specific Expression Profiles Derived from Sequence-Based Analysis of Standard Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Anton G.; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Peter J.; Zimmer, Ralf; Cohen, Clemens D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Alternative mRNA processing mechanisms lead to multiple transcripts (i.e. splice isoforms) of a given gene which may have distinct biological functions. Microarrays like Affymetrix GeneChips measure mRNA expression of genes using sets of nucleotide probes. Until recently probe sets were not designed for transcript specificity. Nevertheless, the re-analysis of established microarray data using newly defined transcript-specific probe sets may provide information about expression levels of specific transcripts. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study alignment of probe sequences of the Affymetrix microarray HG-U133A with Ensembl transcript sequences was performed to define transcript-specific probe sets. Out of a total of 247,965 perfect match probes, 95,008 were designated “transcript-specific”, i.e. showing complete sequence alignment, no cross-hybridization, and transcript-, not only gene-specificity. These probes were grouped into 7,941 transcript-specific probe sets and 15,619 gene-specific probe sets, respectively. The former were used to differentiate 445 alternative transcripts of 215 genes. For selected transcripts, predicted by this analysis to be differentially expressed in the human kidney, confirmatory real-time RT-PCR experiments were performed. First, the expression of two specific transcripts of the genes PPM1A (PP2CA_HUMAN and P35813) and PLG (PLMN_HUMAN and Q5TEH5) in human kidneys was determined by the transcript-specific array analysis and confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Secondly, disease-specific differential expression of single transcripts of PLG and ABCA1 (ABCA1_HUMAN and Q5VYS0_HUMAN) was computed from the available array data sets and confirmed by transcript-specific real-time RT-PCR. Conclusions Transcript-specific analysis of microarray experiments can be employed to study gene-regulation on the transcript level using conventional microarray data. In this study, predictions based on sufficient probe set size and

  8. Human Trafficking

    MedlinePlus

    ... TRAFFICKING (English) Listen < Back to Search FACT SHEET: HUMAN TRAFFICKING (English) Published: August 2, 2012 Topics: Public Awareness , ... organizations that protect and serve trafficking victims. National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1.888.373.7888 Last ...

  9. Metabolic gene profile in early human fetal heart development.

    PubMed

    Iruretagoyena, J I; Davis, W; Bird, C; Olsen, J; Radue, R; Teo Broman, A; Kendziorski, C; Splinter BonDurant, S; Golos, T; Bird, I; Shah, D

    2014-07-01

    The primitive cardiac tube starts beating 6-8 weeks post fertilization in the developing embryo. In order to describe normal cardiac development during late first and early second trimester in human fetuses this study used microarray and pathways analysis and created a corresponding 'normal' database. Fourteen fetal hearts from human fetuses between 10 and 18 weeks of gestational age (GA) were prospectively collected at the time of elective termination of pregnancy. RNA from recovered tissues was used for transcriptome analysis with Affymetrix 1.0 ST microarray chip. From the amassed data we investigated differences in cardiac development within the 10-18 GA period dividing the sample by GA in three groups: 10-12 (H1), 13-15 (H2) and 16-18 (H3) weeks. A fold change of 2 or above adjusted for a false discovery rate of 5% was used as initial cutoff to determine differential gene expression for individual genes. Test for enrichment to identify functional groups was carried out using the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Array analysis correctly identified the cardiac specific genes, and transcripts reported to be differentially expressed were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Single transcript and Ontology analysis showed first trimester heart expression of myosin-related genes to be up-regulated >5-fold compared with second trimester heart. In contrast the second trimester hearts showed further gestation-related increases in many genes involved in energy production and cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, fetal heart development during the first trimester was dominated by heart-specific genes coding for myocardial development and differentiation. During the second trimester, transcripts related to energy generation and cardiomyocyte communication for contractile coordination/proliferation were more dominant. Transcripts related to fatty acid metabolism can be seen as early as 10 weeks and clearly increase as the heart matures. Retinol

  10. Effects of weak, low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (BEMER type) on gene expression of human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Walther, Markus; Mayer, Florian; Kafka, Wolf; Schütze, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    In vitro effects of electromagnetic fields appear to be related to the type of electromagnetic field applied. Previously, we showed that human osteoblasts display effects of BEMER type electromagnetic field (BTEMF) on gene regulation. Here, we analyze effects of BTEMF on gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes. Primary mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and the chondrocyte cell line C28I2 were stimulated 5 times at 12-h intervals for 8 min each with BTEMF. RNA from treated and control cells was analyzed for gene expression using the affymetrix chip HG-U133A. A limited number of regulated gene products from both cell types mainly affect cell metabolism and cell matrix structure. There was no increased expression of cancer-related genes. RT-PCR analysis of selected transcripts partly confirmed array data. Results indicate that BTEMF in human mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes provide the first indications to understanding therapeutic effects achieved with BTEMF stimulation. PMID:17886005

  11. Data analysis considerations for detecting copy number changes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sharoni

    2012-11-01

    The Whole Genome Sampling Analysis (WGSA) assay in combination with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping Arrays is used for copy number analysis of high-quality DNA samples (i.e., samples that have been collected from blood, fresh or frozen tissue, or cell lines). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, however, represent the most prevalent form of archived clinical samples, but they provide additional challenges for molecular assays. FFPE processing usually results in the degradation of FFPE DNA and in the contamination and chemical modification of these DNA samples. In this article, we describe the steps needed to obtain reliable copy number predictions from degraded and contaminated FFPE samples.

  12. Gene expression and pathway analysis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells treated with cadmium.

    PubMed

    Cartularo, Laura; Laulicht, Freda; Sun, Hong; Kluz, Thomas; Freedman, Jonathan H; Costa, Max

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal naturally occurring in the Earth's crust. A common route of human exposure is via diet and cadmium accumulates in the liver. The effects of Cd exposure on gene expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells were examined in this study. HepG2 cells were acutely-treated with 0.1, 0.5, or 1.0 μM Cd for 24h; or chronically-treated with 0.01, 0.05, or 0.1 μM Cd for three weeks and gene expression analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Acute and chronic exposures significantly altered the expression of 333 and 181 genes, respectively. The genes most upregulated by acute exposure included several metallothioneins. Downregulated genes included the monooxygenase CYP3A7, involved in drug and lipid metabolism. In contrast, CYP3A7 was upregulated by chronic Cd exposure, as was DNAJB9, an anti-apoptotic J protein. Genes downregulated following chronic exposure included the transcriptional regulator early growth response protein 1. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that the top networks altered by acute exposure were lipid metabolism, small molecule biosynthesis, cell morphology, organization, and development; while top networks altered by chronic exposure were organ morphology, cell cycle, cell signaling, and renal and urological diseases/cancer. Many of the dysregulated genes play important roles in cellular growth, proliferation, and apoptosis, and may be involved in carcinogenesis. In addition to gene expression changes, HepG2 cells treated with cadmium for 24h indicated a reduction in global levels of histone methylation and acetylation that persisted 72 h post-treatment.

  13. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  14. Toxicogenomics directory of chemically exposed human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Marianna; Stöber, Regina M; Edlund, Karolina; Rempel, Eugen; Godoy, Patricio; Reif, Raymond; Widera, Agata; Madjar, Katrin; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Marchan, Rosemarie; Sachinidis, Agapios; Spitkovsky, Dimitry; Hescheler, Jürgen; Carmo, Helena; Arbo, Marcelo D; van de Water, Bob; Wink, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Rogiers, Vera; Escher, Sylvia; Hardy, Barry; Mitic, Dragana; Myatt, Glenn; Waldmann, Tanja; Mardinoglu, Adil; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Nüssler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas S; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfons; Schaap, Mirjam M; Luijten, Mirjam; van Steeg, Harry; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Stierum, Rob H; Leist, Marcel; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-12-01

    A long-term goal of numerous research projects is to identify biomarkers for in vitro systems predicting toxicity in vivo. Often, transcriptomics data are used to identify candidates for further evaluation. However, a systematic directory summarizing key features of chemically influenced genes in human hepatocytes is not yet available. To bridge this gap, we used the Open TG-GATES database with Affymetrix files of cultivated human hepatocytes incubated with chemicals, further sets of gene array data with hepatocytes from human donors generated in this study, and publicly available genome-wide datasets of human liver tissue from patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer (HCC). After a curation procedure, expression data of 143 chemicals were included into a comprehensive biostatistical analysis. The results are summarized in the publicly available toxicotranscriptomics directory ( http://wiki.toxbank.net/toxicogenomics-map/ ) which provides information for all genes whether they are up- or downregulated by chemicals and, if yes, by which compounds. The directory also informs about the following key features of chemically influenced genes: (1) Stereotypical stress response. When chemicals induce strong expression alterations, this usually includes a complex but highly reproducible pattern named 'stereotypical response.' On the other hand, more specific expression responses exist that are induced only by individual compounds or small numbers of compounds. The directory differentiates if the gene is part of the stereotypical stress response or if it represents a more specific reaction. (2) Liver disease-associated genes. Approximately 20 % of the genes influenced by chemicals are up- or downregulated, also in liver disease. Liver disease genes deregulated in cirrhosis, HCC, and NASH that overlap with genes of the aforementioned stereotypical chemical stress response include CYP3A7, normally expressed in fetal liver; the

  15. Clinical Study of Styping Detection of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection with Microarray from Paraffinembedded Specimens of Cervical Cancer and Precursor Lesions.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai; Wang, Xubo; Geng, Jianxiang; Zhao, Xue

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in Jiangsu, China was investigated. A total of 93 cases with cervical cancer and 176 CINII-III tissue samples were obtained from women undergoing biopsy or surgery. The 1047 exfoliated cervical cell samples were collected with cervical brush in physical examination women. HPV DNA and typing were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene-chip. The results showed that HPV DNA was detected in 82 cases with cervical cancer (88.17%), HPV 16 being detected in 65 (69.89%) cases, HPV 18 in 12 (12.90%) cases, HPV 33 in 10 (10.75%) cases, HPV 31 in 4 (4.30%) cases, and HPV 45 in 3 (3.23%) cases. HPV DNA was detected in 154 cases with CINII-III (87.50%), HPV 16 being detected in 92 (52.27%) cases, HPV 18 in 50 (28.41%) cases, HPV 33 in 25 (14.21%) cases, HPV 58 in 25 (14.21%) cases, and HPV 31 in 20 (11.36%) cases. About 20.43% cervical cancer and 38.64% CINII-III specimens exhibited multiple infections (p < 0.01). The total positive rate, single infection and mixed infection rate of the CINII-III and SCC group all had a significant difference (p < 0.05) when compared with the normal cells group. The total positive rate, single infection rate and mixed infection rate of CINII-III group did not show significant difference (p > 0.05) when compared with SCC group. CINII-III and SCC had all intimate relation with HPV infection. The high prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 33, 31 and 58 in Jiangsu (China) deserves more attention, as it has important implications for the successful use of HPV vaccine and choice of diagnostic methods. PMID:26716195

  16. Drinking-Water Arsenic Exposure Modulates Gene Expression in Human Lymphocytes from a U.S. Population

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Angeline S.; Jewell, David A.; Mason, Rebecca A.; Whitfield, Michael L.; Moore, Jason H.; Karagas, Margaret R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Arsenic exposure impairs development and can lead to cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. The mechanism underlying these effects remains unknown. Primarily because of geologic sources of contamination, drinking-water arsenic levels are above the current recommended maximum contaminant level of 10 μg/L in the northeastern, western, and north central regions of the United States. Objectives We investigated the effects of arsenic exposure, defined by internal biomarkers at levels relevant to the United States and similarly exposed populations, on gene expression. Methods We conducted separate Affymetrix microarray-based genomewide analyses of expression patterns. Peripheral blood lymphocyte samples from 21 controls interviewed (1999–2002) as part of a case–control study in New Hampshire were selected based on high- versus low-level arsenic exposure levels. Results The biologic functions of the transcripts that showed statistically significant abundance differences between high- and low-arsenic exposure groups included an overrepresentation of genes involved in defense response, immune function, cell growth, apoptosis, regulation of cell cycle, T-cell receptor signaling pathway, and diabetes. Notably, the high-arsenic exposure group exhibited higher levels of several killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors that inhibit natural killer cell activity. Conclusions These findings define biologic changes that occur with chronic arsenic exposure in humans and provide leads and potential targets for understanding and monitoring the pathogenesis of arsenic-induced diseases. PMID:18414638

  17. Global Gene Expression Profiling and Alternative Splicing Events during the Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Cartilage Endplate-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jin; Fan, Xin; Shangguan, Lei; Liu, Huan; Zhou, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a very prevalent disease and degenerative disc diseases (DDDs) usually account for the LBP. However, the pathogenesis of DDDs is complicated and difficult to elucidate. Alternative splicing is a sophisticated regulatory process which greatly increases cellular complexity and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic organisms. In addition, the cartilage endplate-derived stem cells have been discovered and identified by our research group. In this paper, we continue to investigate gene expression profiling and alternative splicing events during chondrogenic differentiation of cartilage endplate-derived stem cells. We adopted Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 (HTA 2.0) to compare the transcriptional and splicing changes between the control and differentiated samples. RT-PCR and quantitative PCR are used to validate the microarray results. The GO and KEGG pathway analysis was also performed. After bioinformatics analysis of the data, we detected 1953 differentially expressed genes. In terms of alternative splicing, the Splicing Index algorithm was used to select alternatively spliced genes. We detected 4411 alternatively spliced genes. GO and KEGG pathway analysis also revealed several functionally involved biological processes and signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the alternative splicing mechanisms in chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells on a genome-wide scale. PMID:26649308

  18. Inter-laboratory comparison of human renal proximal tubule (HK-2) transcriptome alterations due to Cyclosporine A exposure and medium exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Paul; Aydin, Sonia; Bennett, Jason; McBride, Rachael; Weiland, Christina; Tuite, Niamh; Gruber, Leonhard N; Perco, Paul; Gaora, Peadar O; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Ahr, Hans-Juergen; Kooten, Cees Van; Daha, Mohamed R; Prieto, Pilar; Ryan, Michael P; Pfaller, Walter; McMorrow, Tara

    2009-04-01

    There is an acknowledged need to promote and further develop in vitro techniques in order to achieve the goal of improved risk assessment of chemicals and pharmaceuticals to humans. The EU 6th framework project "PREDICTOMICS" was established in order to contribute to the further development of in vitro toxicology, with a particular focus on emerging techniques including toxicogenomics. DNA microarray technology is being used more frequently in the in vitro field, however, only very few studies have assessed the reproducibility of this technique with respect to in vitro toxicology. To this end we conducted an interlaboratory comparison to test the reproducibility of transcriptomic changes induced by the immunosuppressive agent, Cyclosporine A (CsA) on the human renal proximal tubular cell line, HK-2 cell. Four European laboratories took part in this study. Under standardised conditions, each laboratory treated HK-2 cells with 5microM CsA for 12 and 48h. RNA was isolated and hybridised to Affymetrix HGU-133 plus two arrays at three different sites. Analysis of the transcription profiles demonstrated that one laboratory clustered away from the other laboratories, potentially due to an inclusion of a trypsinisation step by this laboratory. Once the genes responsible for this separate clustering were removed all laboratories showed similar expression profiles. There was a major impact of time since feed, due to medium exhaustion in the 48h arrays compared to the 12h arrays, regardless of CsA treatment. Biological processes including general vesicle transport, amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport and amino acid biosynthesis were over-represented due to time since feed, while cell cycle, DNA replication, mitosis and DNA metabolism were under-represented. CsA responsive genes were involved in cell cycle, the p53 pathway and Wnt signaling. Additionally there was an overlap of differentially expressed genes due to CsA and medium exhaustion which is most likely due to

  19. Genome-wide prediction of cis-acting RNA elements regulating tissue-specific pre-mRNA alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Kejun; Radovich, Milan; Wang, Yue; Wang, Guohua; Feng, Weixing; Sanford, Jeremy R; Liu, Yunlong

    2009-01-01

    Background Human genes undergo various patterns of pre-mRNA splicing across different tissues. Such variation is primarily regulated by trans-acting factors that bind on exonic and intronic cis-acting RNA elements (CAEs). Here we report a computational method to mechanistically identify cis-acting RNA elements that contribute to the tissue-specific alternative splicing pattern. This method is an extension of our previous model, SplicingModeler, which predicts the significant CAEs that contribute to the splicing differences between two tissues. In this study, we introduce tissue-specific functional levels estimation step, which allows evaluating regulatory functions of predicted CAEs that are involved in more than two tissues. Results Using a publicly available Affymetrix Genechip® Human Exon Array dataset, our method identifies 652 cis-acting RNA elements (CAEs) across 11 human tissues. About one third of predicted CAEs can be mapped to the known RBP (RNA binding protein) binding sites or match with other predicted exonic splicing regulator databases. Interestingly, the vast majority of predicted CAEs are in intronic regulatory regions. A noticeable exception is that many exonic elements are found to regulate the alternative splicing between cerebellum and testes. Most identified elements are found to contribute to the alternative splicing between two tissues, while some are important in multiple tissues. This suggests that genome-wide alternative splicing patterns are regulated by a combination of tissue-specific cis-acting elements and "general elements" whose functional activities are important but differ across multiple tissues. Conclusion In this study, we present a model-based computational approach to identify potential cis-acting RNA elements by considering the exon splicing variation as the combinatorial effects of multiple cis-acting regulators. This methodology provides a novel evaluation on the functional levels of cis-acting RNA elements by estimating

  20. In silico Analysis of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) Gene: Identification of a Distant Homolog of Melanoma Antigen Family Gene (MAGE)

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ruhul; Jesmin; Jamil, Hasan; Hossain, M. Anwar

    2009-01-01

    Melanoma antigen family (MAGE) genes are widely expressed in various tumor types but silent in normal cells except germ-line cells lacking human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression. Over 25 MAGE genes have been identified in different tissues, mostly located in Xq28 of human chromosome and some of them in chromosome 3 and 15, containing either single or multiple-exons. This in silico study predicted the genes on hTERT location and identified a distant relative of MAGE gene located on chromosome 5. The study identified a single exon coding ~850 residues polypeptide sharing ~30% homology with Macfa-MAGE E1 and hMAGE-E1. dbEST search of the predicted transcript matches 5′ and 3′ flanking ESTs. The predicted protein showed sequence homology within the MAGE homology domain 2 (MHD2). UCSC genome annotation of CpG Island around the coding region reveals that this gene could be silent by methylation. Affymetrix all-exon track indicates the gene could be expressed in different tissues particularly in cancer cells as they widely undergo a genome wide demethylation process. PMID:20011463

  1. Expression and localization of P1 promoter-driven hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF4α) isoforms in human and rats

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuying; Tanaka, Toshiya; Iwanari, Hiroko; Hotta, Hiromitsu; Yamashita, Hisahiko; Kumakura, Junko; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Uchiyama, Yasutoshi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Hamakubo, Takao; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Naito, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF4α; NR2A1) is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily involved in various processes that could influence endoderm development, glucose and lipid metabolism. A loss-of-function mutation in human HNF4α causes one form of diabetes mellitus called maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 1 (MODY1) which is characterized in part by a diminished insulin secretory response to glucose. The expression of HNF4α in a variety of tissues has been examined predominantly at the mRNA level, and there is little information regarding the cellular localization of the endogenous HNF4α protein, due, in part, to the limited availability of human HNF4α-specific antibodies. Results Monoclonal antibodies have been produced using baculovirus particles displaying gp64-HNF4α fusion proteins as the immunizing agent. The mouse anti-human HNF4α monoclonal antibody (K9218) generated against human HNF4α1/α2/α3 amino acids 3–49 was shown to recognize not only the transfected and expressed P1 promoter-driven HNF4α proteins, but also endogenous proteins. Western blot analysis with whole cell extracts from Hep G2, Huh7 and Caco-2 showed the expression of HNF4α protein, but HEK293 showed no expression of HNF4α protein. Nuclear-specific localization of the HNF4α protein was observed in the hepatocytes of liver cells, proximal tubular epithelial cells of kidney, and mucosal epithelial cells of small intestine and colon, but no HNF4α protein was detected in the stomach, pancreas, glomerulus, and distal and collecting tubular epithelial cells of kidney. The same tissue distribution of HNF4α protein was observed in humans and rats. Electron microscopic immunohistochemistry showed a chromatin-like localization of HNF4α in the liver and kidney. As in the immunohistochemical investigation using K9218, HNF4α mRNA was found to be localized primarily to liver, kidney, small intestine and colon by RT-PCR and GeneChip analysis

  2. Teaching humanism.

    PubMed

    Stern, David T; Cohen, Jordan J; Bruder, Ann; Packer, Barbara; Sole, Allison

    2008-01-01

    As the "passion that animates authentic professionalism," humanism must be infused into medical education and clinical care as a central feature of medicine's professionalism movement. In this article, we discuss a current definition of humanism in medicine. We will also provide detailed descriptions of educational programs intended to promote humanism at a number of medical schools in the United States (and beyond) and identify the key factors that make these programs effective. Common elements of programs that effectively teach humanism include: (1) opportunities for students to gain perspective in the lives of patients; (2) structured time for reflection on those experiences; and (3) focused mentoring to ensure that these events convert to positive, formative learning experiences. By describing educational experiences that both promote and sustain humanism in doctors, we hope to stimulate the thinking of other medical educators and to disseminate the impact of these innovative educational programs to help the profession meet its obligation to provide the public with humanistic physicians.

  3. PTPRD is homozygously deleted and epigenetically downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Acun, Tolga; Demir, Kubilay; Oztas, Emin; Arango, Diego; Yakicier, M Cengiz

    2015-04-01

    PTPRD (protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type, D) is a tumor suppressor gene, frequently inactivated through deletions or epigenetic mechanisms in several cancers with importance for global health. In this study, we provide new and functionally integrated evidence on genetic and epigenetic alterations of PTPRD gene in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Importantly, HCC is the sixth most common malignancy and the third most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. We used a high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray assay (Affymetrix, 10K2.0 Assay) covering the whole genome to screen an extensive panel of HCC cell lines (N=14 in total) to detect DNA copy number changes. PTPRD expression was determined in human HCCs by Q-RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Promoter hypermethylation was assessed by combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA). DNA methyl transferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC) and/or histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostain A (TSA) were used to restore the expression. We identified homozygous deletions in Mahlavu and SNU475 cells, in the 5'UTR and coding regions, respectively. PTPRD mRNA expression was downregulated in 78.5% of cell lines and 82.6% of primary HCCs. PTPRD protein expression was also found to be lost or reduced in HCC tumor tissues. We found promoter hypermethylation in 22.2% of the paired HCC samples and restored PTPRD expression by 5-AzaC and/or TSA treatments. In conclusion, PTPRD is homozygously deleted and epigenetically downregulated in HCCs. We hypothesize PTPRD as a tumor suppressor candidate and potential cancer biomarker in human HCCs. This hypothesis is consistent with compelling evidences in other organ systems, as discussed in this article. Further functional assays in larger samples may ascertain the contribution of PTPRD to hepatocarcinogenesis in greater detail, not to forget its broader importance for diagnostic medicine and the emerging field of personalized medicine in

  4. Dengue Virus Induces Novel Changes in Gene Expression of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warke, Rajas V.; Xhaja, Kris; Martin, Katherine J.; Fournier, Marcia F.; Shaw, Sunil K.; Brizuela, Nathaly; de Bosch, Norma; Lapointe, David; Ennis, Francis A.; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cells are permissive to dengue virus (DV) infection in vitro, although their importance as targets of DV infection in vivo remains a subject of debate. To analyze the virus-host interaction, we studied the effect of DV infection on gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by using differential display reverse transcription-PCR (DD-RTPCR), quantitative RT-PCR, and Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays. DD identified eight differentially expressed cDNAs, including inhibitor of apoptosis-1, 2′-5′ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), a 2′-5′ OAS-like (OASL) gene, galectin-9, myxovirus protein A (MxA), regulator of G-protein signaling, endothelial and smooth muscle cell-derived neuropilin-like protein, and phospholipid scramblase 1. Microarray analysis of 22,000 human genes confirmed these findings and identified an additional 269 genes that were induced and 126 that were repressed more than fourfold after DV infection. Broad functional responses that were activated included the stress, defense, immune, cell adhesion, wounding, inflammatory, and antiviral pathways. These changes in gene expression were seen after infection of HUVECs with either laboratory-adapted virus or with virus isolated directly from plasma of DV-infected patients. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, OASL, and MxA and h-IAP1 genes were induced within the first 8 to 12 h after infection, suggesting a direct effect of DV infection. These global analyses of DV effects on cellular gene expression identify potentially novel mechanisms involved in dengue disease manifestations such as hemostatic disturbance. PMID:14557666

  5. Human Issues in Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the report of the National Academy of Sciences' Committee in Human Rights which seeks to ease the plight of individual scientists, engineers, and medical personnel suffering severe repression. Case studies of instances of negligence of human rights are provided. (CP)

  6. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  7. Human rights

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J Enoch

    1977-01-01

    What are human rights? In this article Enoch Powell, MP (a former Conservative Minister of Health), approaches this question through a critical discussion of Article 25 (I) of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Professor R S Downie in his accompanying commentary analyses Mr Powell's statements and takes up in particular Mr Powell's argument that claiming rights for one person entails compulsion on another person. In Professor Downie's view there is nothing in Article 25 (I) that cannot embody acceptable moral rights, the commonly accepted interpretation of that Article of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights which many people think is wholly acceptable. PMID:604483

  8. Changes in gene expression profiles in response to selenium supplementation among individuals with arsenic-induced pre-malignant skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Kibriya, Muhammad G; Jasmine, Farzana; Argos, Maria; Verret, Wendy J; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Ahmed, Alauddin; Parvez, Faruque; Ahsan, Habibul

    2007-03-01

    The molecular basis and downstream targets of oral selenium supplementation in individuals with elevated risk of cancer due to chronic exposure from environmental carcinogens has been largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated genome-wide differential gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals with pre-malignant arsenic (As)-induced skin lesions before and after 6 months daily oral supplementation of 200 microg L-selenomethionine. The Affymetrix GeneChip Human 133A 2.0 array, containing probes for 22,277 gene transcripts, was used to assess gene expression. Three different normalization methods, RMA (robust multi-chip analysis), GC-RMA and PLIER (Probe logarithmic intensity error), were applied to explore differentially expressed genes. We identified a list of 28 biologically meaningful, significantly differentially expressed genes. Genes up-regulated by selenium supplementation included TNF, IL1B, IL8, SOD2, CXCL2 and several other immunological and oxidative stress-related genes. When mapped to a biological association network, many of the differentially expressed genes were found to regulate functional classes such as fibroblast growth factor, collagenase, matrix metalloproteinase and stromelysin-1, and thus, considered to affect cellular processes like apoptosis, proliferation and others. Many of the significantly up-regulated genes following selenium-supplementation were previously found by us to be down-regulated in a different set of individuals with As-induced skin lesions compared to those without. In conclusion, findings from this study may elucidate the biological effect of selenium supplementation in humans. Additionally, this study suggests that long-term selenium supplementation may revert some of the gene expression changes presumably induced by chronic As exposure in individuals with pre-malignant skin lesions.

  9. Genome-wide association study of 14,000 cases of seven common diseases and 3,000 shared controls

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genome-wide association (GWA) studies represent a powerful approach to the identification of genes involved in common human diseases. We describe a joint GWA study (using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500K Mapping Array Set) undertaken in the British population, which has examined ~2,000 individuals for each of 7 major diseases and a shared set of ~3,000 controls. Case-control comparisons identified 24 independent association signals at P<5×10-7: 1 in bipolar disorder, 1 in coronary artery disease, 9 in Crohn’s disease, 3 in rheumatoid arthritis, 7 in type 1 diabetes and 3 in type 2 diabetes. On the basis of prior findings and replication studies thus-far completed, almost all of these signals reflect genuine susceptibility effects. We observed association at many previously identified loci, and found compelling evidence that some loci confer risk for more than one of the diseases studied. Across all diseases, we identified a large number of further signals (including 58 loci with single-point P values between 10-5 and 5×10-7) likely to yield additional susceptibility loci. The importance of appropriately large samples was confirmed by the modest effect sizes observed at most loci identified. This study thus represents a thorough validation of the GWA approach. It has also demonstrated that careful use of a shared control group represents a safe and effective approach to GWA analyses of multiple disease phenotypes; has generated a genome-wide genotype database for future studies of common diseases in the British population; and shown that, provided individuals with non-European ancestry are excluded, the extent of population stratification in the British population is generally modest. Our findings offer new avenues for exploring the pathophysiology of these important disorders. We anticipate that our data, results and software, which will be widely available to other investigators, will provide a powerful resource for human genetics

  10. EMT transcription factors snail and slug directly contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a molecular process through which an epithelial cell undergoes transdifferentiation into a mesenchymal phenotype. The role of EMT in embryogenesis is well-characterized and increasing evidence suggests that elements of the transition may be important in other processes, including metastasis and drug resistance in various different cancers. Methods Agilent 4 × 44 K whole human genome arrays and selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry were used to investigate mRNA and protein expression in A2780 cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines. Invasion and migration were assessed using Boyden chamber assays. Gene knockdown of snail and slug was done using targeted siRNA. Clinical relevance of the EMT pathway was assessed in a cohort of primary ovarian tumours using data from Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 plus 2.0 arrays. Results Morphological and phenotypic hallmarks of EMT were identified in the chemoresistant cells. Subsequent gene expression profiling revealed upregulation of EMT-related transcription factors including snail, slug, twist2 and zeb2. Proteomic analysis demonstrated up regulation of Snail and Slug as well as the mesenchymal marker Vimentin, and down regulation of E-cadherin, an epithelial marker. By reducing expression of snail and slug, the mesenchymal phenotype was largely reversed and cells were resensitized to cisplatin. Finally, gene expression data from primary tumours mirrored the finding that an EMT-like pathway is activated in resistant tumours relative to sensitive tumours, suggesting that the involvement of this transition may not be limited to in vitro drug effects. Conclusions This work strongly suggests that genes associated with EMT may play a significant role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, therefore potentially leading to the development of predictive biomarkers of drug response or novel therapeutic strategies for overcoming drug resistance. PMID

  11. NeuroTransDB: highly curated and structured transcriptomic metadata for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bagewadi, Shweta; Adhikari, Subash; Dhrangadhariya, Anjani; Irin, Afroza Khanam; Ebeling, Christian; Namasivayam, Aishwarya Alex; Page, Matthew; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Senger, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are chronic debilitating conditions, characterized by progressive loss of neurons that represent a significant health care burden as the global elderly population continues to grow. Over the past decade, high-throughput technologies such as the Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays have provided new perspectives into the pathomechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. Public transcriptomic data repositories, namely Gene Expression Omnibus and curated ArrayExpress, enable researchers to conduct integrative meta-analysis; increasing the power to detect differentially regulated genes in disease and explore patterns of gene dysregulation across biologically related studies. The reliability of retrospective, large-scale integrative analyses depends on an appropriate combination of related datasets, in turn requiring detailed meta-annotations capturing the experimental setup. In most cases, we observe huge variation in compliance to defined standards for submitted metadata in public databases. Much of the information to complete, or refine meta-annotations are distributed in the associated publications. For example, tissue preparation or comorbidity information is frequently described in an article's supplementary tables. Several value-added databases have employed additional manual efforts to overcome this limitation. However, none of these databases explicate annotations that distinguish human and animal models in neurodegeneration context. Therefore, adopting a more specific disease focus, in combination with dedicated disease ontologies, will better empower the selection of comparable studies with refined annotations to address the research question at hand. In this article, we describe the detailed development of NeuroTransDB, a manually curated database containing metadata annotations for neurodegenerative studies. The database contains more than 20 dimensions of metadata annotations within 31 mouse, 5 rat and 45 human studies, defined in

  12. Identification of diagnostic markers in colorectal cancer via integrative epigenomics and genomics data.

    PubMed

    Kok-Sin, Teow; Mokhtar, Norfilza Mohd; Ali Hassan, Nur Zarina; Sagap, Ismail; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Harun, Roslan; Jamal, Rahman

    2015-07-01

    Apart from genetic mutations, epigenetic alteration is a common phenomenon that contributes to neoplastic transformation in colorectal cancer. Transcriptional silencing of tumor-suppressor genes without changes in the DNA sequence is explained by the existence of promoter hypermethylation. To test this hypothesis, we integrated the epigenome and transcriptome data from a similar set of colorectal tissue samples. Methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina InfiniumHumanMethylation27 BeadChip on 55 paired cancer and adjacent normal epithelial cells. Fifteen of the 55 paired tissues were used for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Validation was carried out on 150 colorectal tissues using the methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) technique. PCA and supervised hierarchical clustering in the two microarray datasets showed good separation between cancer and normal samples. Significant genes from the two analyses were obtained based on a ≥2-fold change and a false discovery rate (FDR) p-value of <0.05. We identified 1,081 differentially hypermethylated CpG sites and 36 hypomethylated CpG sites. We also found 709 upregulated and 699 downregulated genes from the gene expression profiling. A comparison of the two datasets revealed 32 overlapping genes with 27 being hypermethylated with downregulated expression and 4 hypermethylated with upregulated expression. One gene was found to be hypomethylated and downregulated. The most enriched molecular pathway identified was cell adhesion molecules that involved 4 overlapped genes, JAM2, NCAM1, ITGA8 and CNTN1. In the present study, we successfully identified a group of genes that showed methylation and gene expression changes in well-defined colorectal cancer tissues with high purity. The integrated analysis gives additional insight regarding the regulation of colorectal cancer-associated genes and their underlying mechanisms that

  13. NeuroTransDB: highly curated and structured transcriptomic metadata for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bagewadi, Shweta; Adhikari, Subash; Dhrangadhariya, Anjani; Irin, Afroza Khanam; Ebeling, Christian; Namasivayam, Aishwarya Alex; Page, Matthew; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Senger, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are chronic debilitating conditions, characterized by progressive loss of neurons that represent a significant health care burden as the global elderly population continues to grow. Over the past decade, high-throughput technologies such as the Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays have provided new perspectives into the pathomechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. Public transcriptomic data repositories, namely Gene Expression Omnibus and curated ArrayExpress, enable researchers to conduct integrative meta-analysis; increasing the power to detect differentially regulated genes in disease and explore patterns of gene dysregulation across biologically related studies. The reliability of retrospective, large-scale integrative analyses depends on an appropriate combination of related datasets, in turn requiring detailed meta-annotations capturing the experimental setup. In most cases, we observe huge variation in compliance to defined standards for submitted metadata in public databases. Much of the information to complete, or refine meta-annotations are distributed in the associated publications. For example, tissue preparation or comorbidity information is frequently described in an article's supplementary tables. Several value-added databases have employed additional manual efforts to overcome this limitation. However, none of these databases explicate annotations that distinguish human and animal models in neurodegeneration context. Therefore, adopting a more specific disease focus, in combination with dedicated disease ontologies, will better empower the selection of comparable studies with refined annotations to address the research question at hand. In this article, we describe the detailed development of NeuroTransDB, a manually curated database containing metadata annotations for neurodegenerative studies. The database contains more than 20 dimensions of metadata annotations within 31 mouse, 5 rat and 45 human studies, defined in

  14. Genome-wide association study of 14,000 cases of seven common diseases and 3,000 shared controls.

    PubMed

    2007-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that genome-wide association (GWA) studies represent a powerful approach to the identification of genes involved in common human diseases. We describe a joint GWA study (using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500K Mapping Array Set) undertaken in the British population, which has examined approximately 2,000 individuals for each of 7 major diseases and a shared set of approximately 3,000 controls. Case-control comparisons identified 24 independent association signals at P < 5 x 10(-7): 1 in bipolar disorder, 1 in coronary artery disease, 9 in Crohn's disease, 3 in rheumatoid arthritis, 7 in type 1 diabetes and 3 in type 2 diabetes. On the basis of prior findings and replication studies thus-far completed, almost all of these signals reflect genuine susceptibility effects. We observed association at many previously identified loci, and found compelling evidence that some loci confer risk for more than one of the diseases studied. Across all diseases, we identified a large number of further signals (including 58 loci with single-point P values between 10(-5) and 5 x 10(-7)) likely to yield additional susceptibility loci. The importance of appropriately large samples was confirmed by the modest effect sizes observed at most loci identified. This study thus represents a thorough validation of the GWA approach. It has also demonstrated that careful use of a shared control group represents a safe and effective approach to GWA analyses of multiple disease phenotypes; has generated a genome-wide genotype database for future studies of common diseases in the British population; and shown that, provided individuals with non-European ancestry are excluded, the extent of population stratification in the British population is generally modest. Our findings offer new avenues for exploring the pathophysiology of these important disorders. We anticipate that our data, results and software, which will be widely available to other investigators, will provide a

  15. Identification of diagnostic markers in colorectal cancer via integrative epigenomics and genomics data

    PubMed Central

    KOK-SIN, TEOW; MOKHTAR, NORFILZA MOHD; HASSAN, NUR ZARINA ALI; SAGAP, ISMAIL; ROSE, ISA MOHAMED; HARUN, ROSLAN; JAMAL, RAHMAN

    2015-01-01

    Apart from genetic mutations, epigenetic alteration is a common phenomenon that contributes to neoplastic transformation in colorectal cancer. Transcriptional silencing of tumor-suppressor genes without changes in the DNA sequence is explained by the existence of promoter hypermethylation. To test this hypothesis, we integrated the epigenome and transcriptome data from a similar set of colorectal tissue samples. Methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina InfiniumHumanMethylation27 BeadChip on 55 paired cancer and adjacent normal epithelial cells. Fifteen of the 55 paired tissues were used for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Validation was carried out on 150 colorectal tissues using the methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) technique. PCA and supervised hierarchical clustering in the two microarray datasets showed good separation between cancer and normal samples. Significant genes from the two analyses were obtained based on a ≥2-fold change and a false discovery rate (FDR) P-value of <0.05. We identified 1,081 differentially hypermethylated CpG sites and 36 hypomethylated CpG sites. We also found 709 upregulated and 699 downregulated genes from the gene expression profiling. A comparison of the two datasets revealed 32 overlapping genes with 27 being hypermethylated with downregulated expression and 4 hypermethylated with upregulated expression. One gene was found to be hypomethylated and downregulated. The most enriched molecular pathway identified was cell adhesion molecules that involved 4 overlapped genes, JAM2, NCAM1, ITGA8 and CNTN1. In the present study, we successfully identified a group of genes that showed methylation and gene expression changes in well-defined colorectal cancer tissues with high purity. The integrated analysis gives additional insight regarding the regulation of colorectal cancer-associated genes and their underlying mechanisms that

  16. Over-expression of the miRNA cluster at chromosome 14q32 in the alcoholic brain correlates with suppression of predicted target mRNA required for oligodendrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Manzardo, A M; Gunewardena, S; Butler, M G

    2013-09-10

    We examined miRNA expression from RNA isolated from the frontal cortex (Broadman area 9) of 9 alcoholics (6 males, 3 females, mean age 48 years) and 9 matched controls using both the Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA 2.0 and Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays to further characterize genetic influences in alcoholism and the effects of alcohol consumption on predicted target mRNA expression. A total of 12 human miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in alcohol dependent subjects (fold change≥1.5, false discovery rate (FDR)≤0.3; p<0.05) compared with controls including a cluster of 4 miRNAs (e.g., miR-377, miR-379) from the maternally expressed 14q32 chromosome region. The status of the up-regulated miRNAs was supported using the high-throughput method of exon microarrays showing decreased predicted mRNA gene target expression as anticipated from the same RNA aliquot. Predicted mRNA targets were involved in cellular adhesion (e.g., THBS2), tissue differentiation (e.g., CHN2), neuronal migration (e.g., NDE1), myelination (e.g., UGT8, CNP) and oligodendrocyte proliferation (e.g., ENPP2, SEMA4D1). Our data support an association of alcoholism with up-regulation of a cluster of miRNAs located in the genomic imprinted domain on chromosome 14q32 with their predicted gene targets involved with oligodendrocyte growth, differentiation and signaling. PMID:23747354

  17. Comparison of L1000 and Affymetrix Microarray for In Vitro Concentration-Response Gene Expression Profiling (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in high-throughput screening technologies and in vitro systems have opened doors for cost-efficient evaluation of chemical effects on a diversity of biological endpoints. However, toxicogenomics platforms remain too costly to evaluate large libraries of chemicals in conc...

  18. Quality control in microarray assessment of gene expression in human airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Tina; O'Connor, Timothy P; Hackett, Neil R; Wang, Wei; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Attiyeh, Marc A; Dang, David T; Teater, Matthew; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for defining gene expression profiles of airway epithelium that lend insight into the pathogenesis of human airway disorders. The focus of this study was to establish rigorous quality control parameters to ensure that microarray assessment of the airway epithelium is not confounded by experimental artifact. Samples (total n = 223) of trachea, large and small airway epithelium were collected by fiberoptic bronchoscopy of 144 individuals and hybridized to Affymetrix microarrays. The pre- and post-chip quality control (QC) criteria established, included: (1) RNA quality, assessed by RNA Integrity Number (RIN) ≥ 7.0; (2) cRNA transcript integrity, assessed by signal intensity ratio of GAPDH 3' to 5' probe sets ≤ 3.0; and (3) the multi-chip normalization scaling factor ≤ 10.0. Results Of the 223 samples, all three criteria were assessed in 191; of these 184 (96.3%) passed all three criteria. For the remaining 32 samples, the RIN was not available, and only the other two criteria were used; of these 29 (90.6%) passed these two criteria. Correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons of expression levels for 100 maintenance genes in which at least one array failed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.90 ± 0.04) were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) than correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons between arrays that passed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.97 ± 0.01). Inter-array variability was significantly decreased (p < 0.0001) among samples passing the QC criteria compared with samples failing the QC criteria. Conclusion Based on the aberrant maintenance gene data generated from samples failing the established QC criteria, we propose that the QC criteria outlined in this study can accurately distinguish high quality from low quality data, and can be used to delete poor quality microarray samples before proceeding to higher-order biological analyses and interpretation. PMID:19852842

  19. Discrimination of Vanadium from Zinc Using Gene Profiling in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuowei; Stonehuerner, Jackie; Devlin, Robert B.; Huang, Yuh-Chin T.

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that gene expression profiling may discriminate vanadium from zinc in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). RNA from HBECs exposed to vehicle, V (50 μM), or Zn (50 μM) for 4 hr (n = 4 paired experiments) was hybridized to Affymetrix Hu133A chips. Using one-class t-test with p < 0.01, we identified 140 and 76 genes with treatment:control ratios ≥ 2.0 or ≤ 0.5 for V and Zn, respectively. We then categorized these genes into functional pathways and compared the number of genes in each pathway between V and Zn using Fisher’s exact test. Three pathways regulating gene transcription, inflammatory response, and cell proliferation distinguished V from Zn. When genes in these three pathways were matched with the 163 genes flagged by the same statistical filtration for V:Zn ratios, 12 genes were identified. The hierarchical clustering analysis showed that these 12 genes discriminated V from Zn and consisted of two clusters. Cluster 1 genes (ZBTB1, PML, ZNF44, SIX1, BCL6, ZNF450) were down-regulated by V and involved in gene transcription, whereas cluster 2 genes (IL8, IL1A, PTGS2, DTR, TNFAIP3, CXCL3) were up-regulated and linked to inflammatory response and cell proliferation. Also, metallothionein 1 genes (MT1F, MT1G, MT1K) were up-regulated by Zn only. Thus, using microarray analysis, we identified a small set of genes that may be used as biomarkers for discriminating V from Zn. The novel genes and pathways identified by the microarray may help us understand the pathogenesis of health effects caused by environmental V and Zn exposure. PMID:16330358

  20. Identification of Cancer Related Genes Using a Comprehensive Map of Human Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lukk, Margus; Xue, Vincent; Parkinson, Helen; Rung, Johan; Brazma, Alvis

    2016-01-01

    Rapid accumulation and availability of gene expression datasets in public repositories have enabled large-scale meta-analyses of combined data. The richness of cross-experiment data has provided new biological insights, including identification of new cancer genes. In this study, we compiled a human gene expression dataset from ∼40,000 publicly available Affymetrix HG-U133Plus2 arrays. After strict quality control and data normalisation the data was quantified in an expression matrix of ∼20,000 genes and ∼28,000 samples. To enable different ways of sample grouping, existing annotations where subjected to systematic ontology assisted categorisation and manual curation. Groups like normal tissues, neoplasmic tissues, cell lines, homoeotic cells and incompletely differentiated cells were created. Unsupervised analysis of the data confirmed global structure of expression consistent with earlier analysis but with more details revealed due to increased resolution. A suitable mixed-effects linear model was used to further investigate gene expression in solid tissue tumours, and to compare these with the respective healthy solid tissues. The analysis identified 1,285 genes with systematic expression change in cancer. The list is significantly enriched with known cancer genes from large, public, peer-reviewed databases, whereas the remaining ones are proposed as new cancer gene candidates. The compiled dataset is publicly available in the ArrayExpress Archive. It contains the most diverse collection of biological samples, making it the largest systematically annotated gene expression dataset of its kind in the public domain. PMID:27322383

  1. A massive human co-expression-network and its medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaping; Hurst, Jonathan; Almeida-De-Macedo, Marcia; Chen, Xi; Li, Ling; Ransom, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Network-based analysis is indispensable in analyzing high throughput biological data. Based on the assumption that the variation of gene interactions under given biological conditions could be better interpreted in the context of a large-scale and wide variety of developmental, tissue, and disease, we leverage the large quantity of publicly-available transcriptomic data > 40,000 HG U133A Affymetrix microarray chips stored in ArrayExpress (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/) using MetaOmGraph (http://metnet.vrac.iastate.edu/MetNet_MetaOmGraph.htm). From this data, 18,637 chips encompassing over 500 experiments containing high quality data (18637Hu-dataset) were used to create a globally stable gene co-expression network (18637Hu-co-expression-network). Regulons, groups of highly and consistently co-expressed genes, were obtained by partitioning the 18637Hu-co-expression-network using an MCL clustering algorithm. The regulon were demonstrated to be statistically significant using a gene ontology (GO) term overrepresentation test combined with evaluation of the effects of gene permutations. The regulons include approximately 12% of human genes, interconnected by 31,471 correlations. All network data and metadata is publically available (http://metnet.vrac.iastate.edu/MetNet_MetaOmGraph.htm). Text mining of these metadata, GO term overrepresentation analysis, and statistical analysis of transcriptomic experiments across multiple environmental, tissue, and disease conditions, has revealed novel fingerprints distinguishing central nervous system (CNS)-related conditions. This study demonstrates the value of mega-scale network-based analysis for biologists to further refine transcriptomic data derived from a particular condition, to study the global relationships between genes and diseases, and to develop hypotheses that can inform future research. PMID:22589089

  2. Unbalanced placental expression of imprinted genes in human intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    McMinn, J; Wei, M; Schupf, N; Cusmai, J; Johnson, E B; Smith, A C; Weksberg, R; Thaker, H M; Tycko, B

    2006-01-01

    Imprinted genes control fetal and placental growth in mice and in rare human syndromes, but the role of these genes in sporadic intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is less well-studied. We measured the ratio of mRNA from a maternally expressed imprinted gene, PHLDA2, to that from a paternally expressed imprinted gene, MEST, by Northern blotting in 38 IUGR-associated placentae and 75 non-IUGR placentae and found an increase in the PHLDA2/MEST mRNA ratio in IUGR (p=0.0001). Altered expression of PHLDA2 and MEST was not accompanied by changes in DNA methylation within their imprinting centers, and immunohistochemistry showed PHLDA2 protein appropriately restricted to villous and intermediate cytotrophoblast in the IUGR placentae. We next did a genome-wide survey of mRNA expression in 14 IUGR placentae with maternal vascular under-perfusion compared to 15 non-IUGR placentae using Affymetrix U133A microarrays. In this series six imprinted genes were differentially expressed by ANOVA with a Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate of 0.05, with increased expression of PHLDA2 and decreased expression of MEST, MEG3, GATM, GNAS and PLAGL1 in IUGR placentae. At lower significance, we found IGF2 mRNA decreased and CDKN1C mRNA increased in the IUGR cases. We confirmed the significant reduction in MEG3 non-translated RNA in IUGR placentae by Northern blotting. In addition to imprinted genes, the microarray data highlighted non-imprinted genes acting in endocrine signaling (LEP, CRH, HPGD, INHBA), tissue growth (IGF1), immune modulation (INDO, PSG-family genes), oxidative metabolism (GLRX), vascular function (AGTR1, DSCR1) and metabolite transport (SLC-family solute carriers) as differentially expressed in IUGR vs. non-IUGR placentae. PMID:16125225

  3. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression.

  4. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression. PMID:24789080

  5. [Human monkeypox].

    PubMed

    Chastel, C

    2009-03-01

    Unlike other recent viral emergences, which were in majority caused by RNA viruses, the monkeypox results from infection by a DNA virus, an orthopoxvirus closely related to both vaccine and smallpox viruses and whose two genomic variants are known. Unexpectedly isolated from captive Asiatic monkeys and first considered as an laboratory curiosity, this virus was recognised in 1970 as an human pathogen in tropical Africa. Here it was responsible for sporadic cases following intrusions (for hunting) into tropical rain forests or rare outbreak with human-to-human transmission as observed in 1996 in Democratic Republic of Congo. As monkeypox in humans is not distinguishable from smallpox (a disease globally eradicated in 1977) it was only subjected to vigilant epidemiological surveillance and not considered as a potential threat outside Africa. This point of view radically changed in 2003 when monkeypox was introduced in the USA by African wild rodents and spread to 11 different states of this country. Responsible for 82 infections in American children and adults, this outbreak led to realize the sanitary hazards resulting from international trade of exotic animals and scientific investigations increasing extensively our knowledge of this zoonosis. PMID:18394820

  6. Humanizing Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the history and the mathematics used by Newton and Leibniz in their invention of calculus. The exploration of this topic is intended to show students that mathematics is a human invention. Suggestions are made to help teachers incorporate the mathematics and the history into their own lessons. (Contains 3…

  7. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  8. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  9. Stable RNA markers for identification of blood and saliva stains revealed from whole genome expression analysis of time-wise degraded samples.

    PubMed

    Zubakov, Dmitry; Hanekamp, Eline; Kokshoorn, Mieke; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Kayser, Manfred

    2008-03-01

    Human body fluids such as blood and saliva represent the most common source of biological material found at a crime scene. Reliable tissue identification in forensic science can reveal significant insights into crime scene reconstruction and can thus contribute toward solving crimes. Limitations of existing presumptive tests for body fluid identification in forensics, which are usually based on chemoluminescence or protein analysis, are expected to be overcome by RNA-based methods, provided that stable RNA markers with tissue-specific expression patterns are available. To generate sets of stable RNA markers for reliable identification of blood and saliva stains we (1) performed whole-genome gene expression analyses on a series of time-wise degraded blood and saliva stain samples using the Affymetrix U133 plus2 GeneChip, (2) consulted expression databases to obtain additional information on tissue specificity, and (3) confirmed expression patterns of the most promising candidate genes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction including additional forensically relevant tissues such as semen and vaginal secretion. Overall, we identified nine stable mRNA markers for blood and five stable mRNA markers for saliva detection showing tissue-specific expression signals in stains aged up to 180 days of age, expectedly older. Although, all of the markers were able to differentiate blood/saliva from semen samples, none of them could differentiate vaginal secretion because of the complex nature of vaginal secretion and the biological similarity of buccal and vaginal mucosa. We propose the use of these 14 stable mRNA markers for identification of blood and saliva stains in future forensic practice. PMID:17579879

  10. Genomic association analysis suggests chromosome 12 locus influencing antihypertensive response to thiazide diuretic.

    PubMed

    Turner, Stephen T; Bailey, Kent R; Fridley, Brooke L; Chapman, Arlene B; Schwartz, Gary L; Chai, High Seng; Sicotte, Hugues; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Rodin, Andréi S; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2008-08-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify novel genes influencing diastolic blood pressure (BP) response to hydrochlorothiazide, a commonly prescribed thiazide diuretic preferred for the treatment of high BP. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100K Arrays were used to measure single nucleotide polymorphisms across the 22 autosomes in 194 non-Hispanic black subjects and 195 non-Hispanic white subjects with essential hypertension selected from opposite tertiles of the race- and sex-specific distributions of age-adjusted diastolic BP response to hydrochlorothiazide (25 mg daily, PO, for 4 weeks). The black sample consisted of 97 "good" responders (diastolic BP response [mean+/-SD]=-18.3+/-4.2 mm Hg; age=47.1+/-6.1 years; 51.5% women) and 97 "poor" responders (diastolic BP response=-0.18+/-4.3; age=47.4+/-6.5 years; 51.5% women). Haplotype trend regression identified a region of chromosome 12q15 in which haplotypes constructed from 3 successive single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs317689, rs315135, and rs7297610) in proximity to lysozyme (LYZ), YEATS domain containing 4 (YEATS4), and fibroblast growth receptor substrate 2 (FRS2) were significantly associated with diastolic BP response (nominal P=2.39 x 10(-7); Bonferroni corrected P=0.024; simulated experiment-wise P=0.040). Genotyping of 35 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms selected to "tag" linkage disequilibrium blocks in these genes provided corroboration that variation in LYZ and YEATS4 was associated with diastolic BP response in a statistically independent data set of 291 black subjects and in the sample of 294 white subjects. These results support the use of genome-wide association analyses to identify novel genes influencing antihypertensive drug responses. PMID:18591461

  11. A genomewide admixture mapping panel for Hispanic/Latino populations.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianyun; Bigham, Abigail W; Mei, Rui; Gutierrez, Gerardo; Weiss, Ken M; Brutsaert, Tom D; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola; Moore, Lorna G; Vargas, Enrique; McKeigue, Paul M; Shriver, Mark D; Parra, Esteban J

    2007-06-01

    Admixture mapping (AM) is a promising method for the identification of genetic risk factors for complex traits and diseases showing prevalence differences among populations. Efficient application of this method requires the use of a genomewide panel of ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) to infer the population of origin of chromosomal regions in admixed individuals. Genomewide AM panels with markers showing high frequency differences between West African and European populations are already available for disease-gene discovery in African Americans. However, no such a map is yet available for Hispanic/Latino populations, which are the result of two-way admixture between Native American and European populations or of three-way admixture of Native American, European, and West African populations. Here, we report a genomewide AM panel with 2,120 AIMs showing high frequency differences between Native American and European populations. The average intermarker genetic distance is ~1.7 cM. The panel was identified by genotyping, with the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K array, a population sample with European ancestry, a Mesoamerican sample comprising Maya and Nahua from Mexico, and a South American sample comprising Aymara/Quechua from Bolivia and Quechua from Peru. The main criteria for marker selection were both high information content for Native American/European ancestry (measured as the standardized variance of the allele frequencies, also known as "f value") and small frequency differences between the Mesoamerican and South American samples. This genomewide AM panel will make it possible to apply AM approaches in many admixed populations throughout the Americas. PMID:17503334

  12. Identification of molecular pathways affected by pterostilbene, a natural dimethylether analog of resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhiqiang; Agarwal, Ameeta K; Xu, Tao; Feng, Qin; Baerson, Scott R; Duke, Stephen O; Rimando, Agnes M

    2008-01-01

    Background Pterostilbene, a naturally occurring phenolic compound produced by agronomically important plant genera such as Vitis and Vacciunium, is a phytoalexin exhibiting potent antifungal activity. Additionally, recent studies have demonstrated several important pharmacological properties associated with pterostilbene. Despite this, a systematic study of the effects of pterostilbene on eukaryotic cells at the molecular level has not been previously reported. Thus, the aim of the present study was to identify the cellular pathways affected by pterostilbene by performing transcript profiling studies, employing the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Methods S. cerevisiae strain S288C was exposed to pterostilbene at the IC50 concentration (70 μM) for one generation (3 h). Transcript profiling experiments were performed on three biological replicate samples using the Affymetrix GeneChip Yeast Genome S98 Array. The data were analyzed using the statistical methods available in the GeneSifter microarray data analysis system. To validate the results, eleven differentially expressed genes were further examined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and S. cerevisiae mutant strains with deletions in these genes were analyzed for altered sensitivity to pterostilbene. Results Transcript profiling studies revealed that pterostilbene exposure significantly down-regulated the expression of genes involved in methionine metabolism, while the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial functions, drug detoxification, and transcription factor activity were significantly up-regulated. Additional analyses revealed that a large number of genes involved in lipid metabolism were also affected by pterostilbene treatment. Conclusion Using transcript profiling, we have identified the cellular pathways targeted by pterostilbene, an analog of resveratrol. The observed response in lipid metabolism genes is consistent with its known hypolipidemic properties, and the induction of mitochondrial

  13. The Regulation of Cytokine Networks in Hippocampal CA1 Differentiates Extinction from Those Required for the Maintenance of Contextual Fear Memory after Recall

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Birger; Doidge, Amie N.; Barnes, Philip; Hall, Jeremy; Wilkinson, Lawrence S.; Thomas, Kerrie L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the distinctiveness of gene regulatory networks in CA1 associated with the extinction of contextual fear memory (CFM) after recall using Affymetrix GeneChip Rat Genome 230 2.0 Arrays. These data were compared to previously published retrieval and reconsolidation-attributed, and consolidation datasets. A stringent dual normalization and pareto-scaled orthogonal partial least-square discriminant multivariate analysis together with a jack-knifing-based cross-validation approach was used on all datasets to reduce false positives. Consolidation, retrieval and extinction were correlated with distinct patterns of gene expression 2 hours later. Extinction-related gene expression was most distinct from the profile accompanying consolidation. A highly specific feature was the discrete regulation of neuroimmunological gene expression associated with retrieval and extinction. Immunity–associated genes of the tyrosine kinase receptor TGFβ and PDGF, and TNF families’ characterized extinction. Cytokines and proinflammatory interleukins of the IL-1 and IL-6 families were enriched with the no-extinction retrieval condition. We used comparative genomics to predict transcription factor binding sites in proximal promoter regions of the retrieval-regulated genes. Retrieval that does not lead to extinction was associated with NF-κB-mediated gene expression. We confirmed differential NF-κBp65 expression, and activity in all of a representative sample of our candidate genes in the no-extinction condition. The differential regulation of cytokine networks after the acquisition and retrieval of CFM identifies the important contribution that neuroimmune signalling plays in normal hippocampal function. Further, targeting cytokine signalling upon retrieval offers a therapeutic strategy to promote extinction mechanisms in human disorders characterised by dysregulation of associative memory. PMID:27224427

  14. Effect of Acute Stressor and Serotonin Transporter Genotype on Amygdala First Wave Transcriptome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hohoff, Christa; Gorji, Ali; Kaiser, Sylvia; Willscher, Edith; Korsching, Eberhard; Ambrée, Oliver; Arolt, Volker; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Sachser, Norbert; Deckert, Jürgen; Lewejohann, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The most prominent brain region evaluating the significance of external stimuli immediately after their onset is the amygdala. Stimuli evaluated as being stressful actuate a number of physiological processes as an immediate stress response. Variation in the serotonin transporter gene has been associated with increased anxiety- and depression-like behavior, altered stress reactivity and adaptation, and pathophysiology of stress-related disorders. In this study the instant reactions to an acute stressor were measured in a serotonin transporter knockout mouse model. Mice lacking the serotonin transporter were verified to be more anxious than their wild-type conspecifics. Genome-wide gene expression changes in the amygdala were measured after the mice were subjected to control condition or to an acute stressor of one minute exposure to water. The dissection of amygdalae and stabilization of RNA was conducted within nine minutes after the onset of the stressor. This extremely short protocol allowed for analysis of first wave primary response genes, typically induced within five to ten minutes of stimulation, and was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. RNA profiling revealed a largely new set of differentially expressed primary response genes between the conditions acute stress and control that differed distinctly between wild-type and knockout mice. Consequently, functional categorization and pathway analysis indicated genes related to neuroplasticity and adaptation in wild-types whereas knockouts were characterized by impaired plasticity and genes more related to chronic stress and pathophysiology. Our study therefore disclosed different coping styles dependent on serotonin transporter genotype even directly after the onset of stress and accentuates the role of the serotonergic system in processing stressors and threat in the amygdala. Moreover, several of the first wave primary response genes that we found might provide promising targets for

  15. Early changes in gene expression induced by blue light irradiation of A2E-laden retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    van der Burght, Barbro W.; Hansen, Morten; Olsen, Jørgen; Zhou, Jilin; Wu, Yalin; Nissen, Mogens H.; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Accumulation of bisretinoids as lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is implicated in the pathogenesis of some blinding diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To identify genes whose expression may change under conditions of bisretinoid accumulation, we investigated the differential gene expression in RPE cells that had accumulated the lipofuscin fluorophore A2E and were exposed to blue light (430 nm). Methods A2E-laden RPE cells were exposed to blue light (A2E/430 nm) at various time intervals. Cell death was quantified using Dead Red staining, and RNA levels for the entire genome was determined using DNA microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome 2.0 Plus). Array results for selected genes were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results Principal component analysis revealed that the A2E-laden RPE cells irradiated with blue light were clearly distinguishable from the control samples. We found differential regulation of genes belonging to the following functional groups: transcription factors, stress response, apoptosis and immune response. Among the last mentioned were downregulation of four genes that coded for proteins that have an inhibitory effect on the complement cascade: (complement factor H, complement factor H-related 1, complement factor I and vitronectin) and of two belonging to the classical pathway (complement component 1, s subcomponent and complement component 1, r subcomponent). Conclusion This study demonstrates that blue light irradiation of A2E-laden RPE cells can alter the transcription of genes belonging to different functional pathways including stress response, apoptosis and the immune response. We suggest that these molecules may be associated to the pathogenesis of AMD and can potentially serve as future therapeutic targets. PMID:23742627

  16. A Genomewide Admixture Mapping Panel for Hispanic/Latino Populations

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xianyun ; Bigham, Abigail W. ; Mei, Rui ; Gutierrez, Gerardo ; Weiss, Ken M. ; Brutsaert, Tom D. ; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola ; Moore, Lorna G. ; Vargas, Enrique ; McKeigue, Paul M. ; Shriver, Mark D. ; Parra, Esteban J. 

    2007-01-01

    Admixture mapping (AM) is a promising method for the identification of genetic risk factors for complex traits and diseases showing prevalence differences among populations. Efficient application of this method requires the use of a genomewide panel of ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) to infer the population of origin of chromosomal regions in admixed individuals. Genomewide AM panels with markers showing high frequency differences between West African and European populations are already available for disease-gene discovery in African Americans. However, no such a map is yet available for Hispanic/Latino populations, which are the result of two-way admixture between Native American and European populations or of three-way admixture of Native American, European, and West African populations. Here, we report a genomewide AM panel with 2,120 AIMs showing high frequency differences between Native American and European populations. The average intermarker genetic distance is ∼1.7 cM. The panel was identified by genotyping, with the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K array, a population sample with European ancestry, a Mesoamerican sample comprising Maya and Nahua from Mexico, and a South American sample comprising Aymara/Quechua from Bolivia and Quechua from Peru. The main criteria for marker selection were both high information content for Native American/European ancestry (measured as the standardized variance of the allele frequencies, also known as “f value”) and small frequency differences between the Mesoamerican and South American samples. This genomewide AM panel will make it possible to apply AM approaches in many admixed populations throughout the Americas. PMID:17503334

  17. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Cell-Free Fetal RNA from Amniotic Fluid and RNA from Amniocytes in Uncomplicated Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Y. W.; Shim, S. H.; Sung, S. R.; Park, J. E.; Cha, D. H.; Ahn, E. H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to compare tissue-specific expression profiles and biological pathways of RNA from amniocytes and amniotic fluid supernatant (AFS) from second-trimester pregnancies by using transcriptome analysis. Additionally, we wanted to explore whether cell-free RNA from AFS exhibits a unique gene expression signature that more adequately reflects the fetal developmental process than amniocyte RNA. Methods Amniotic fluid samples were prospectively collected in the second trimester of pregnancy from euploid fetuses. Total RNA was extracted from amniocytes and AFS and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip Human Arrays. Significantly differentially expressed transcripts between amniocytes and AFS were obtained by using Welch’s t-test. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was used to visualize overall expression characteristics and differences in transcripts between AFS and amniocytes. The biological functions of selected genes were analyzed using various online Gene Ontology databases. Results A total of 3,072 and 15,633 transcripts were detected in the second-trimester AFS and amniocytes, respectively. Hierarchical clustering revealed differential transcript expression between AFS and amniocytes. We found 353 genes that were specifically enriched in the AFS only, and tissue expression analysis showed enrichment of brain-specific genes in the AFS. Biological pathway analysis revealed that AFS-specific transcripts were mainly involved in embryonic development, cardiovascular development, and cellular morphology pathways. Conclusion This study demonstrated differential tissue-specific gene expression profiles and biological pathways between AFS and amniocytes. The results suggested that AFS is the preferred RNA source to investigate potential biomarkers of fetal neurodevelopment. PMID:26181329

  18. Effect of Diet Supplementation on the Expression of Bovine Genes Associated with Fatty Acid Synthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sandeep J.; Robbins, Kelly R.; Pavan, Enrique; Pratt, Scott L.; Duckett, Susan K.; Rekaya, Romdhane

    2010-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are of important nutritional and health benefit to human. Food products of animal origin are their major dietary source and their concentration increases with high concentrate diets fed to animals. To examine the effects of diet supplementation on the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism, 28 Angus steers were fed either pasture only, pasture with soybean hulls and corn oil, pasture with corn grain, or high concentrate diet. At slaughter, samples of subcutaneous adipose tissue were collected, from which RNA was extracted. Relative abundance of gene expression was measured using Affymetrix GeneChip Bovine Genome array. An ANOVA model nested within gene was used to analyze the background adjusted, normalized average difference of probe-level intensities. To control experiment wise error, a false discovery rate of 0.01 was imposed on all contrasts. Expression of several genes involved in the synthesis of enzymes related to fatty acid metabolism and lipogenesis such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), fatty acid synthetase (FASN), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty-acyl elongase (LCE) along with several trancription factors and co-activators involved in lipogenesis were found to be differentially expressed. Confirmatory RT-qPCR was done to validate the microarray results, which showed satisfactory correspondence between the two platforms. Results show that changes in diet by increasing dietary energy intake by supplementing high concentrate diet have effects on the transcription of genes encoding enzymes involved in fat metabolism which in turn has effects on fatty acid content in the carcass tissue as well as carcass quality. Corn supplementation either as oil or grain appeared to significantly alter the expression of genes directly associated with fatty acid synthesis. PMID:20448844

  19. Linkage to chromosome 2q32.2-q33.3 in familial serrated neoplasia (Jass syndrome).

    PubMed

    Roberts, Aedan; Nancarrow, Derek; Clendenning, Mark; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jenkins, Mark A; Duggan, David; Taverna, Darin; McKeone, Diane; Walters, Rhiannon; Walsh, Michael D; Young, Bruce W; Jass, Jeremy R; Rosty, Christophe; Gattas, Michael; Pelzer, Elise; Hopper, John L; Goldblatt, Jack; George, Jill; Suthers, Graeme K; Phillips, Kerry; Parry, Susan; Woodall, Sonja; Arnold, Julie; Tucker, Kathy; Muir, Amanda; Drini, Musa; Macrae, Finlay; Newcomb, Polly; Potter, John D; Pavluk, Erika; Lindblom, Annika; Young, Joanne P

    2011-06-01

    Causative genetic variants have to date been identified for only a small proportion of familial colorectal cancer (CRC). While conditions such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Lynch syndrome have well defined genetic causes, the search for variants underlying the remainder of familial CRC is plagued by genetic heterogeneity. The recent identification of families with a heritable predisposition to malignancies arising through the serrated pathway (familial serrated neoplasia or Jass syndrome) provides an opportunity to study a subset of familial CRC in which heterogeneity may be greatly reduced. A genome-wide linkage screen was performed on a large family displaying a dominantly-inherited predisposition to serrated neoplasia genotyped using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10 K SNP Array. Parametric and nonparametric analyses were performed and resulting regions of interest, as well as previously reported CRC susceptibility loci at 3q22, 7q31 and 9q22, were followed up by finemapping in 10 serrated neoplasia families. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed regions of interest at 2p25.2-p25.1, 2q24.3-q37.1 and 8p21.2-q12.1. Finemapping linkage and haplotype analyses identified 2q32.2-q33.3 as the region most likely to harbour linkage, with heterogeneity logarithm of the odds (HLOD) 2.09 and nonparametric linkage (NPL) score 2.36 (P = 0.004). Five primary candidate genes (CFLAR, CASP10, CASP8, FZD7 and BMPR2) were sequenced and no segregating variants identified. There was no evidence of linkage to previously reported loci on chromosomes 3, 7 and 9.

  20. A genome wide association study of mathematical ability reveals an association at chromosome 3q29, a locus associated with autism and learning difficulties: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Murphy, Laura; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Warrier, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical ability is heritable, but few studies have directly investigated its molecular genetic basis. Here we aimed to identify specific genetic contributions to variation in mathematical ability. We carried out a genome wide association scan using pooled DNA in two groups of U.K. samples, based on end of secondary/high school national academic exam achievement: high (n = 419) versus low (n = 183) mathematical ability while controlling for their verbal ability. Significant differences in allele frequencies between these groups were searched for in 906,600 SNPs using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. After meeting a threshold of p<1.5×10(-5), 12 SNPs from the pooled association analysis were individually genotyped in 542 of the participants and analyzed to validate the initial associations (lowest p-value 1.14 ×10(-6)). In this analysis, one of the SNPs (rs789859) showed significant association after Bonferroni correction, and four (rs10873824, rs4144887, rs12130910 rs2809115) were nominally significant (lowest p-value 3.278 × 10(-4)). Three of the SNPs of interest are located within, or near to, known genes (FAM43A, SFT2D1, C14orf64). The SNP that showed the strongest association, rs789859, is located in a region on chromosome 3q29 that has been previously linked to learning difficulties and autism. rs789859 lies 1.3 kbp downstream of LSG1, and 700 bp upstream of FAM43A, mapping within the potential promoter/regulatory region of the latter. To our knowledge, this is only the second study to investigate the association of genetic variants with mathematical ability, and it highlights a number of interesting markers for future study.

  1. Stable RNA markers for identification of blood and saliva stains revealed from whole genome expression analysis of time-wise degraded samples.

    PubMed

    Zubakov, Dmitry; Hanekamp, Eline; Kokshoorn, Mieke; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Kayser, Manfred

    2008-03-01

    Human body fluids such as blood and saliva represent the most common source of biological material found at a crime scene. Reliable tissue identification in forensic science can reveal significant insights into crime scene reconstruction and can thus contribute toward solving crimes. Limitations of existing presumptive tests for body fluid identification in forensics, which are usually based on chemoluminescence or protein analysis, are expected to be overcome by RNA-based methods, provided that stable RNA markers with tissue-specific expression patterns are available. To generate sets of stable RNA markers for reliable identification of blood and saliva stains we (1) performed whole-genome gene expression analyses on a series of time-wise degraded blood and saliva stain samples using the Affymetrix U133 plus2 GeneChip, (2) consulted expression databases to obtain additional information on tissue specificity, and (3) confirmed expression patterns of the most promising candidate genes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction including additional forensically relevant tissues such as semen and vaginal secretion. Overall, we identified nine stable mRNA markers for blood and five stable mRNA markers for saliva detection showing tissue-specific expression signals in stains aged up to 180 days of age, expectedly older. Although, all of the markers were able to differentiate blood/saliva from semen samples, none of them could differentiate vaginal secretion because of the complex nature of vaginal secretion and the biological similarity of buccal and vaginal mucosa. We propose the use of these 14 stable mRNA markers for identification of blood and saliva stains in future forensic practice.

  2. Gene expression profiling in the lung tissue of cynomolgus monkeys in response to repeated exposure to welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jeong-Doo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Choong Yong; Song, Chang-Woo; Yoon, Seokjoo; Han, Jin Soo; Yu, Il Je

    2010-03-01

    Many in the welding industry suffer from bronchitis, lung function changes, metal fume fever, and diseases related to respiratory damage. These phenomena are associated with welding fumes; however, the mechanism behind these findings remains to be elucidated. In this study, the lungs of cynomolgus monkeys were exposed to MMA-SS welding fumes for 229 days and allowed to recover for 153 days. After the exposure and recovery period, gene expression profiles were investigated using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human U133 plus 2.0. In total, it was confirmed that 1,116 genes were up-or downregulated (over 2-fold changes, P\\0.01) for the T1 (31.4 ± 2.8 mg/m3) and T2 (62.5 ± 2.7 mg/m3) dose groups. Differentially expressed genes in the exposure and recovery groups were analyzed, based on hierarchical clustering, and were imported into Ingenuity Pathways Analysis to analyze the biological and toxicological functions. Functional analysis identified genes involved in immunological disease in both groups. Additionally, differentially expressed genes in common between monkeys and rats following welding fume exposure were compared using microarray data, and the gene expression of selected genes was verified by real-time PCR. Genes such as CHI3L1, RARRES1, and CTSB were up-regulated and genes such as CYP26B1, ID4, and NRGN were down-regulated in both monkeys and rats following welding fume exposure. This is the first comprehensive gene expression profiling conducted for welding fume exposure in monkeys, and these expressed genes are expected to be useful in helping to understand transcriptional changes in monkey lungs after welding fume exposure.

  3. Pathway Analysis using Gene-expression Profiles of HPV-positive and HPV-negative Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients in a Hispanic Population: Methodological Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Erick; González, Lorena; Pérez-Mitchell, Carlos; Ortiz, Ana P.; Ramírez-Sola, Maricarmen; Acosta, Jaime; Bernabe-Dones, Raúl D.; González-Aquino, Carlos; Montes-Rodríguez, Ingrid; Cadilla, Carmen L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The incidence of oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer in Puerto Rican men is higher than it is in the men of any other ethnic/racial group in the United States of America (US). The information regarding the effect of the human papilloma virus (HPV) in the gene-expression profile among patients with this cancer is limited in Hispanic community. We aim to describe the methodology for future studies to identify the molecular networks for determining overrepresented signaling and metabolic canonical pathways, based on the differential gene-expression profiles of HPV+ and HPV− samples from patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in Puerto Rico. Methods We analyzed the RNA expression of 5 tissue samples from subjects diagnosed with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, 2 HPV+ and 3 HPV−, using Affymetrix GeneChips. The relative difference between the average gene expressions of the HPV+ and HPV− samples was assessed, based on the fold change (log2-scale). Results Our analysis revealed 10 up regulated molecules (Mup1, LRP1, P14KA, ALYREF, and BHMT) and 5 down regulated ones (PSME4, KEAP1, ELK3, FAM186B, and PRELID1), at a cutoff of 1.5-fold change. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed the following biological functions to be affected in the HPV+ samples: cancer, hematological disease, and RNA post-transcriptional modification. QRT-PCR analysis confirmed only the differential regulation of ALYREF, KEAP1, and FAM186B genes. Conclusion The relevant methodological procedures described are sufficient to detect the most significant biological functions and pathways according to the HPV status in patients with oropharyngeal cancer in Puerto Rico. PMID:26932277

  4. Human Rights in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  5. An ADAM9 mutation in canine cone-rod dystrophy 3 establishes homology with human cone-rod dystrophy 9

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Orly; Mezey, Jason G.; Boyko, Adam R.; Gao, Chuan; Wang, Wei; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Anguish, Lynne J.; Jordan, Julie Ann; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To identify the causative mutation in a canine cone-rod dystrophy (crd3) that segregates as an adult onset disorder in the Glen of Imaal Terrier breed of dog. Methods Glen of Imaal Terriers were ascertained for crd3 phenotype by clinical ophthalmoscopic examination, and in selected cases by electroretinography. Blood samples from affected cases and non-affected controls were collected and used, after DNA extraction, to undertake a genome-wide association study using Affymetrix Version 2 Canine single nucleotide polymorphism chips and 250K Sty Assay protocol. Positional candidate gene analysis was undertaken for genes identified within the peak-association signal region. Retinal morphology of selected crd3-affected dogs was evaluated by light and electron microscopy. Results A peak association signal exceeding genome-wide significance was identified on canine chromosome 16. Evaluation of genes in this region suggested A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease domain, family member 9 (ADAM9), identified concurrently elsewhere as the cause of human cone-rod dystrophy 9 (CORD9), as a strong positional candidate for canine crd3. Sequence analysis identified a large genomic deletion (over 20 kb) that removed exons 15 and 16 from the ADAM9 transcript, introduced a premature stop, and would remove critical domains from the encoded protein. Light and electron microscopy established that, as in ADAM9 knockout mice, the primary lesion in crd3 appears to be a failure of the apical microvilli of the retinal pigment epithelium to appropriately invest photoreceptor outer segments. By electroretinography, retinal function appears normal in very young crd3-affected dogs, but by 15 months of age, cone dysfunction is present. Subsequently, both rod and cone function degenerate. Conclusions Identification of this ADAM9 deletion in crd3-affected dogs establishes this canine disease as orthologous to CORD9 in humans, and offers opportunities for further characterization of the disease

  6. A 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficient human skin fibroblast transcriptome reveals underlying mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zandberg, L; van Dyk, H C; van der Westhuizen, F H; van Dijk, A A

    2016-09-01

    Isolated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) deficiency is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease of leucine catabolism with a highly variable phenotype. Apart from extensive mutation analyses of the MCCC1 and MCCC2 genes encoding 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.4), molecular data on MCC deficiency gene expression studies in human tissues is lacking. For IEMs, unbiased '-omics' approaches are starting to reveal the secondary cellular responses to defects in biochemical pathways. Here we present the first whole genome expression profile of immortalized cultured skin fibroblast cells of two clinically affected MCC deficient patients and two healthy individuals generated using Affymetrix(®)HuExST1.0 arrays. There were 16191 significantly differentially expressed transcript IDs of which 3591 were well annotated and present in the predefined knowledge database of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software used for downstream functional analyses. The most noticeable feature of this MCCA deficient skin fibroblast transcriptome was the typical genetic hallmark of mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased antioxidant response and disruption of energy homeostasis, which was confirmed by mitochondrial functional analyses. The MCC deficient transcriptome seems to predict oxidative stress that could alter the complex secondary cellular response that involve genes of the glycolysis, the TCA cycle, OXPHOS, gluconeogenesis, β-oxidation and the branched-chain fatty acid metabolism. An important emerging insight from this human MCCA transcriptome in combination with previous reports is that chronic exposure to the primary and secondary metabolites of MCC deficiency and the resulting oxidative stress might impact adversely on the quality of life and energy levels, irrespective of whether MCC deficient individuals are clinically affected or asymptomatic.

  7. Genomewide comparison of the inducible transcriptomes of nuclear receptors CAR, PXR and PPARα in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Benjamin A; Thomas, Maria; Winter, Stefan; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Burk, Oliver; Schwab, Matthias; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2016-09-01

    The ligand-activated nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) and the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) are two master transcriptional regulators of many important drug metabolizing enzymes and transporter genes (DMET) in response to xenobiotics including many drugs. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα, NR1C1), the target of lipid lowering fibrate drugs, primarily regulates fatty acid catabolism and energy-homeostasis. Recent research has shown that there are substantial overlaps in the regulated genes of these receptors. For example, both CAR and PXR also modulate the transcription of key enzymes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism and PPARα also functions as a direct transcriptional regulator of important DMET genes including cytochrome P450s CYP3A4 and CYP2C8. Despite their important and widespread influence on liver metabolism, comparative data are scarce, particularly at a global level and in humans. The major objective of this study was to directly compare the genome-wide transcriptional changes elucidated by the activation of these three nuclear receptors in primary human hepatocytes. Cultures from six individual donors were treated with the prototypical ligands for CAR (CITCO), PXR (rifampicin) and PPARα (WY14,643) or DMSO as vehicle control. Genomewide mRNA profiles determined with Affymetrix microarrays were analyzed for differentially expressed genes and metabolic functions. The results confirmed known prototype target genes and revealed strongly overlapping sets of coregulated but also distinctly regulated and novel responsive genes and pathways. The results further specify the role of PPARα as a regulator of drug metabolism and the role of the xenosensors PXR and CAR in lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie.

  8. A 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficient human skin fibroblast transcriptome reveals underlying mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zandberg, L; van Dyk, H C; van der Westhuizen, F H; van Dijk, A A

    2016-09-01

    Isolated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) deficiency is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease of leucine catabolism with a highly variable phenotype. Apart from extensive mutation analyses of the MCCC1 and MCCC2 genes encoding 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.4), molecular data on MCC deficiency gene expression studies in human tissues is lacking. For IEMs, unbiased '-omics' approaches are starting to reveal the secondary cellular responses to defects in biochemical pathways. Here we present the first whole genome expression profile of immortalized cultured skin fibroblast cells of two clinically affected MCC deficient patients and two healthy individuals generated using Affymetrix(®)HuExST1.0 arrays. There were 16191 significantly differentially expressed transcript IDs of which 3591 were well annotated and present in the predefined knowledge database of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software used for downstream functional analyses. The most noticeable feature of this MCCA deficient skin fibroblast transcriptome was the typical genetic hallmark of mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased antioxidant response and disruption of energy homeostasis, which was confirmed by mitochondrial functional analyses. The MCC deficient transcriptome seems to predict oxidative stress that could alter the complex secondary cellular response that involve genes of the glycolysis, the TCA cycle, OXPHOS, gluconeogenesis, β-oxidation and the branched-chain fatty acid metabolism. An important emerging insight from this human MCCA transcriptome in combination with previous reports is that chronic exposure to the primary and secondary metabolites of MCC deficiency and the resulting oxidative stress might impact adversely on the quality of life and energy levels, irrespective of whether MCC deficient individuals are clinically affected or asymptomatic. PMID:27417235

  9. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  10. Human evolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, B

    1996-12-01

    The common ancestor of modern humans and the great apes is estimated to have lived between 5 and 8 Myrs ago, but the earliest evidence in the human, or hominid, fossil record is Ardipithecus ramidus, from a 4.5 Myr Ethiopian site. This genus was succeeded by Australopithecus, within which four species are presently recognised. All combine a relatively primitive postcranial skeleton, a dentition with expanded chewing teeth and a small brain. The most primitive species in our own genus, Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis, are little advanced over the australopithecines and with hindsight their inclusion in Homo may not be appropriate. The first species to share a substantial number of features with later Homo is Homo ergaster, or 'early African Homo erectus', which appears in the fossil record around 2.0 Myr. Outside Africa, fossil hominids appear as Homo erectus-like hominids, in mainland Asia and in Indonesia close to 2 Myr ago; the earliest good evidence of 'archaic Homo' in Europe is dated at between 600-700 Kyr before the present. Anatomically modern human, or Homo sapiens, fossils are seen first in the fossil record in Africa around 150 Kyr ago. Taken together with molecular evidence on the extent of DNA variation, this suggests that the transition from 'archaic' to 'modern' Homo may have taken place in Africa. PMID:8976151

  11. Human evolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, B

    1996-12-01

    The common ancestor of modern humans and the great apes is estimated to have lived between 5 and 8 Myrs ago, but the earliest evidence in the human, or hominid, fossil record is Ardipithecus ramidus, from a 4.5 Myr Ethiopian site. This genus was succeeded by Australopithecus, within which four species are presently recognised. All combine a relatively primitive postcranial skeleton, a dentition with expanded chewing teeth and a small brain. The most primitive species in our own genus, Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis, are little advanced over the australopithecines and with hindsight their inclusion in Homo may not be appropriate. The first species to share a substantial number of features with later Homo is Homo ergaster, or 'early African Homo erectus', which appears in the fossil record around 2.0 Myr. Outside Africa, fossil hominids appear as Homo erectus-like hominids, in mainland Asia and in Indonesia close to 2 Myr ago; the earliest good evidence of 'archaic Homo' in Europe is dated at between 600-700 Kyr before the present. Anatomically modern human, or Homo sapiens, fossils are seen first in the fossil record in Africa around 150 Kyr ago. Taken together with molecular evidence on the extent of DNA variation, this suggests that the transition from 'archaic' to 'modern' Homo may have taken place in Africa.

  12. Comparison of biological effects of modulated electro-hyperthermia and conventional heat treatment in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Andocs, G; Rehman, M U; Zhao, Q-L; Tabuchi, Y; Kanamori, M; Kondo, T

    2016-01-01

    Loco-regional hyperthermia treatment has long history in oncology. Modulated electro-hyperthermia (mEHT, trade name: oncothermia) is an emerging curative treatment method in this field due to its highly selective actions. The impedance-matched, capacitive-coupled modulated radiofrequency (RF) current is selectively focused in the malignant cell membrane of the cancer cells. Our objective is studying the cell-death process and comparing the cellular effects of conventional water-bath hyperthermia treatment to mEHT. The U937 human histiocytic lymphoma cell line was used for the experiments. In the case of conventional hyperthermia treatment, cells were immersed in a thermoregulated water bath, whereas in the case of mEHT, the cells were treated using a special RF generator (LabEHY, Oncotherm) and an applicator. The heating dynamics, the maximum temperature reached (42 °C) and the treatment duration (30 min) were exactly the same in both cases. Cell samples were analysed using different flow cytometric methods as well as microarray gene expression assay and western blot analysis was also used to reveal the molecular basis of the induced effects. Definite difference was observed in the biological response to different heat treatments. At 42 °C, only mEHT induced significant apoptotic cell death. The GeneChip analysis revealed a whole cluster of genes, which are highly up-regulated in case of only RF heating, but not in conventional heating. The Fas, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and ERK signalling pathway was the dominant factor to induce apoptotic cell death in mEHT, whereas the cell-protective mechanisms dominated in case of conventional heating. This study has clearly shown that conventional hyperthermia and RF mEHT can result in different biological responses at the same temperature. The reason for the difference is the distinct, non-homogenous energy distribution on the cell membrane, which activates cell death-related signalling pathways in m

  13. Comparison of biological effects of modulated electro-hyperthermia and conventional heat treatment in human lymphoma U937 cells

    PubMed Central

    Andocs, G; Rehman, M U; Zhao, Q-L; Tabuchi, Y; Kanamori, M; Kondo, T

    2016-01-01

    Loco-regional hyperthermia treatment has long history in oncology. Modulated electro-hyperthermia (mEHT, trade name: oncothermia) is an emerging curative treatment method in this field due to its highly selective actions. The impedance-matched, capacitive-coupled modulated radiofrequency (RF) current is selectively focused in the malignant cell membrane of the cancer cells. Our objective is studying the cell-death process and comparing the cellular effects of conventional water-bath hyperthermia treatment to mEHT. The U937 human histiocytic lymphoma cell line was used for the experiments. In the case of conventional hyperthermia treatment, cells were immersed in a thermoregulated water bath, whereas in the case of mEHT, the cells were treated using a special RF generator (LabEHY, Oncotherm) and an applicator. The heating dynamics, the maximum temperature reached (42 °C) and the treatment duration (30 min) were exactly the same in both cases. Cell samples were analysed using different flow cytometric methods as well as microarray gene expression assay and western blot analysis was also used to reveal the molecular basis of the induced effects. Definite difference was observed in the biological response to different heat treatments. At 42 °C, only mEHT induced significant apoptotic cell death. The GeneChip analysis revealed a whole cluster of genes, which are highly up-regulated in case of only RF heating, but not in conventional heating. The Fas, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and ERK signalling pathway was the dominant factor to induce apoptotic cell death in mEHT, whereas the cell-protective mechanisms dominated in case of conventional heating. This study has clearly shown that conventional hyperthermia and RF mEHT can result in different biological responses at the same temperature. The reason for the difference is the distinct, non-homogenous energy distribution on the cell membrane, which activates cell death-related signalling pathways in m

  14. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  15. Human Heredity: Genetic Mechanisms in Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are some of the uncertainties in human genetic mechanisms that are often presented as dogma in Biology textbooks. Presented is a brief historical background and illustrations involving chromosome abnormality in humans and linkage studies in humans. (CW)

  16. Human Astroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pintó, Rosa M.; Guix, Susana

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human astroviruses (HAtVs) are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses that were discovered in 1975. Astroviruses infecting other species, particularly mammalian and avian, were identified and classified into the genera Mamastrovirus and Avastrovirus. Through next-generation sequencing, many new astroviruses infecting different species, including humans, have been described, and the Astroviridae family shows a high diversity and zoonotic potential. Three divergent groups of HAstVs are recognized: the classic (MAstV 1), HAstV-MLB (MAstV 6), and HAstV-VA/HMO (MAstV 8 and MAstV 9) groups. Classic HAstVs contain 8 serotypes and account for 2 to 9% of all acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Infections are usually self-limiting but can also spread systemically and cause severe infections in immunocompromised patients. The other groups have also been identified in children with gastroenteritis, but extraintestinal pathologies have been suggested for them as well. Classic HAstVs may be grown in cells, allowing the study of their cell cycle, which is similar to that of caliciviruses. The continuous emergence of new astroviruses with a potential zoonotic transmission highlights the need to gain insights on their biology in order to prevent future health threats. This review focuses on the basic virology, pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, diagnostic assays, and prevention strategies for HAstVs. PMID:25278582

  17. Human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, Daniel G; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Secor, W Evan; King, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis—or bilharzia—is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring. At present, preventive public health measures in endemic regions consist of treatment once every 1 or 2 years with the isoquinolinone drug, praziquantel, to suppress morbidity. In some locations, elimination of transmission is now the goal; however, more sensitive diagnostics are needed in both the field and clinics, and integrated environmental and health-care management will be needed to ensure elimination. PMID:24698483

  18. Benchmarking the CATMA Microarray. A Novel Tool forArabidopsis Transcriptome Analysis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Allemeersch, Joke; Durinck, Steffen; Vanderhaeghen, Rudy; Alard, Philippe; Maes, Ruth; Seeuws, Kurt; Bogaert, Tom; Coddens, Kathleen; Deschouwer, Kirsten; Van Hummelen, Paul; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Moreau, Yves; Kwekkeboom, Jeroen; Wijfjes, André H.M.; May, Sean; Beynon, Jim; Hilson, Pierre; Kuiper, Martin T.R.

    2005-01-01

    Transcript profiling is crucial to study biological systems, and various platforms have been implemented to survey mRNAs at the genome scale. We have assessed the performance of the CATMA microarray designed for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transcriptome analysis and compared it with the Agilent and Affymetrix commercial platforms. The CATMA array consists of gene-specific sequence tags of 150 to 500 bp, the Agilent (Arabidopsis 2) array of 60mer oligonucleotides, and the Affymetrix gene chip (ATH1) of 25mer oligonucleotide sets. We have matched each probe repertoire with the Arabidopsis genome annotation (The Institute for Genomic Research release 5.0) and determined the correspondence between them. Array performance was analyzed by hybridization with labeled targets derived from eight RNA samples made of shoot total RNA spiked with a calibrated series of 14 control transcripts. CATMA arrays showed the largest dynamic range extending over three to four logs. Agilent and Affymetrix arrays displayed a narrower range, presumably because signal saturation occurred for transcripts at concentrations beyond 1,000 copies per cell. Sensitivity was comparable for all three platforms. For Affymetrix GeneChip data, the RMA software package outperformed Microarray Suite 5.0 for all investigated criteria, confirming that the information provided by the mismatch oligonucleotides has no added value. In addition, taking advantage of replicates in our dataset, we conducted a robust statistical analysis of the platform propensity to yield false positive and false negative differentially expressed genes, and all gave satisfactory results. The results establish the CATMA array as a mature alternative to the Affymetrix and Agilent platforms. PMID:15710687

  19. SEGEL: A Web Server for Visualization of Smoking Effects on Human Lung Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Hu, Brian; Alnajm, Sammy S; Lu, Yin; Huang, Yangxin; Allen-Gipson, Diane; Cheng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major cause of death worldwide resulting in over six million deaths per year. Cigarette smoke contains complex mixtures of chemicals that are harmful to nearly all organs of the human body, especially the lungs. Cigarette smoking is considered the major risk factor for many lung diseases, particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) and lung cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of smoking-induced lung injury associated with these lung diseases still remain largely unknown. Expression microarray techniques have been widely applied to detect the effects of smoking on gene expression in different human cells in the lungs. These projects have provided a lot of useful information for researchers to understand the potential molecular mechanism(s) of smoke-induced pathogenesis. However, a user-friendly web server that would allow scientists to fast query these data sets and compare the smoking effects on gene expression across different cells had not yet been established. For that reason, we have integrated eight public expression microarray data sets from trachea epithelial cells, large airway epithelial cells, small airway epithelial cells, and alveolar macrophage into an online web server called SEGEL (Smoking Effects on Gene Expression of Lung). Users can query gene expression patterns across these cells from smokers and nonsmokers by gene symbols, and find the effects of smoking on the gene expression of lungs from this web server. Sex difference in response to smoking is also shown. The relationship between the gene expression and cigarette smoking consumption were calculated and are shown in the server. The current version of SEGEL web server contains 42,400 annotated gene probe sets represented on the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 platform. SEGEL will be an invaluable resource for researchers interested in the effects of smoking on gene expression in the lungs. The server also provides useful information

  20. Complex signatures of selection for the melanogenic loci TYR, TYRP1 and DCT in humans

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The observed correlation between ultraviolet light incidence and skin color, together with the geographical apportionment of skin reflectance among human populations, suggests an adaptive value for the pigmentation of the human skin. We have used Affymetrix U133a v2.0 gene expression microarrays to investigate the expression profiles of a total of 9 melanocyte cell lines (5 from lightly pigmented donors and 4 from darkly pigmented donors) plus their respective unirradiated controls. In order to reveal signatures of selection in loci with a bearing on skin pigmentation in humans, we have resequenced between 4 to 5 kb of the proximal regulatory regions of three of the most differently expressed genes, in the expectation that variation at regulatory regions might account for intraespecific morphological diversity, as suggested elsewhere. Results Contrary to our expectations, expression profiles did not cluster the cells into unirradiated versus irradiated melanocytes, or into lightly pigmented versus darkly pigmented melanocytes. Instead, expression profiles correlated with the presence of Bovine Pituitary Extract (known to contain α-MSH) in the media. This allowed us to differentiate between melanocytes that are synthesizing melanin and those that are not. TYR, TYRP1 and DCT were among the five most differently expressed genes between these two groups. Population genetic analyses of sequence haplotypes of the proximal regulatory flanking-regions included Tajima's D, HEW and DHEW neutrality tests analysis. These were complemented with EHH tests (among others) in which the significance was obtained by a novel approach using extensive simulations under the coalescent model with recombination. We observe strong evidence for positive selection for TYRP1 alleles in Africans and for DCT and TYRP1 in Asians. However, the overall picture reflects a complex pattern of selection, which might include overdominance for DCT in Europeans. Conclusion Diversity patterns

  1. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  2. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  3. A genome wide analysis of alternative splicing events during the osteogenic differentiation of human cartilage endplate-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jin; Wang, Honggang; Fan, Xin; Shangguan, Lei; Liu, Huan

    2016-08-01

    Low back pain is a prevalent disease, which leads to suffering and disabilities in a vast number of individuals. Degenerative disc diseases are usually the underlying causes of low back pain. However, the pathogenesis of degenerative disc diseases is highly complex and difficult to determine. Current therapies for degenerative disc diseases are various. In particular, cell-based therapies have proven to be effective and promising. Our research group has previously isolated and identified the cartilage endplate‑derived stem cells. In addition, alternative splicing is a sophisticated regulatory mechanism, which greatly increases cellular complexity and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic organisms. The present study continued to investigate alternative splicing events in osteogenic differentiation of cartilage endplate‑derived stem cells. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to detect splicing changes between the control and differentiated samples. Additionally, molecular function and pathway analysis were also performed. Following rigorous bioinformatics analysis of the data, 3,802 alternatively spliced genes were identified, and 10 of these were selected for validation by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis also revealed numerous enriched GO terms and signaling pathways. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate alternative splicing mechanisms in osteogenic differentiation of stem cells on a genome‑wide scale. The illumination of molecular mechanisms of stem cell osteogenic differentiation may assist the development novel bioengineered methods to treat degenerative disc diseases.

  4. A genome wide analysis of alternative splicing events during the osteogenic differentiation of human cartilage endplate-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jin; Wang, Honggang; Fan, Xin; Shangguan, Lei; Liu, Huan

    2016-08-01

    Low back pain is a prevalent disease, which leads to suffering and disabilities in a vast number of individuals. Degenerative disc diseases are usually the underlying causes of low back pain. However, the pathogenesis of degenerative disc diseases is highly complex and difficult to determine. Current therapies for degenerative disc diseases are various. In particular, cell-based therapies have proven to be effective and promising. Our research group has previously isolated and identified the cartilage endplate‑derived stem cells. In addition, alternative splicing is a sophisticated regulatory mechanism, which greatly increases cellular complexity and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic organisms. The present study continued to investigate alternative splicing events in osteogenic differentiation of cartilage endplate‑derived stem cells. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to detect splicing changes between the control and differentiated samples. Additionally, molecular function and pathway analysis were also performed. Following rigorous bioinformatics analysis of the data, 3,802 alternatively spliced genes were identified, and 10 of these were selected for validation by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis also revealed numerous enriched GO terms and signaling pathways. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate alternative splicing mechanisms in osteogenic differentiation of stem cells on a genome‑wide scale. The illumination of molecular mechanisms of stem cell osteogenic differentiation may assist the development novel bioengineered methods to treat degenerative disc diseases. PMID:27278552

  5. Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lamson, Daryl M.; St. George, Kirsten; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs), first discovered in the 1950s, are responsible for more than one-half of cold-like illnesses and cost billions of dollars annually in medical visits and missed days of work. Advances in molecular methods have enhanced our understanding of the genomic structure of HRV and have led to the characterization of three genetically distinct HRV groups, designated groups A, B, and C, within the genus Enterovirus and the family Picornaviridae. HRVs are traditionally associated with upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, and sinusitis. In recent years, the increasing implementation of PCR assays for respiratory virus detection in clinical laboratories has facilitated the recognition of HRV as a lower respiratory tract pathogen, particularly in patients with asthma, infants, elderly patients, and immunocompromised hosts. Cultured isolates of HRV remain important for studies of viral characteristics and disease pathogenesis. Indeed, whether the clinical manifestations of HRV are related directly to viral pathogenicity or secondary to the host immune response is the subject of ongoing research. There are currently no approved antiviral therapies for HRVs, and treatment remains primarily supportive. This review provides a comprehensive, up-to-date assessment of the basic virology, pathogenesis, clinical epidemiology, and laboratory features of and treatment and prevention strategies for HRVs. PMID:23297263

  6. Human oestrus

    PubMed Central

    Gangestad, Steven W; Thornhill, Randy

    2008-01-01

    For several decades, scholars of human sexuality have almost uniformly assumed that women evolutionarily lost oestrus—a phase of female sexuality occurring near ovulation and distinct from other phases of the ovarian cycle in terms of female sexual motivations and attractivity. In fact, we argue, this long-standing assumption is wrong. We review evidence that women's fertile-phase sexuality differs in a variety of ways from their sexuality during infertile phases of their cycles. In particular, when fertile in their cycles, women are particularly sexually attracted to a variety of features that likely are (or, ancestrally, were) indicators of genetic quality. As women's fertile-phase sexuality shares with other vertebrate females' fertile-phase sexuality a variety of functional and physiological features, we propose that the term oestrus appropriately applies to this phase in women. We discuss the function of women's non-fertile or extended sexuality and, based on empirical findings, suggest ways that fertile-phase sexuality in women has been shaped to partly function in the context of extra-pair mating. Men are particularly attracted to some features of fertile-phase women, but probably based on by-products of physiological changes males have been selected to detect, not because women signal their cycle-based fertility status. PMID:18252670

  7. Human Factors in Human-Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Sandor, Aniko; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Any large organization whose mission is to design and develop systems for humans, and train humans needs a well-developed integration and process plan to deal with the challenges that arise from managing multiple subsystems. Human capabilities, skills, and needs must be considered early in the design and development process, and must be continuously considered throughout the development lifecycle. This integration of human needs within system design is typically formalized through a Human-Systems Integration (HSI) program. By having an HSI program, an institution or organization can reduce lifecycle costs and increase the efficiency, usability, and quality of its products because human needs have been considered from the beginning.

  8. Optimised laser microdissection of the human ocular surface epithelial regions for microarray studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The most important challenge of performing insitu transcriptional profiling of the human ocular surface epithelial regions is obtaining samples in sufficient amounts, without contamination from adjacent tissue, as the region of interest is microscopic and closely apposed to other tissues regions. We have effectively collected ocular surface (OS) epithelial tissue samples from the Limbal Epithelial Crypt (LEC), limbus, cornea and conjunctiva of post-mortem cadaver eyes with laser microdissection (LMD) technique for gene expression studies with spotted oligonucleotide microarrays and Gene 1.0 ST arrays. Methods Human donor eyes (4 pairs for spotted oligonucleotide microarrays, 3 pairs for Gene 1.0 ST arrays) consented for research were included in this study with due ethical approval of the Nottingham Research Ethics Committee. Eye retrieval was performed within 36 hours of post-mortem period. The dissected corneoscleral buttons were immersed in OCT media and frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at −80°C till further use. Microscopic tissue sections of interest were taken on PALM slides and stained with Toluidine Blue for laser microdissection with PALM microbeam systems. Optimisation of the laser microdissection technique was crucial for efficient and cost effective sample collection. Results The starting concentration of RNA as stipulated by the protocol of microarray platforms was taken as the cut-off concentration of RNA samples in our studies. The area of LMD tissue processed for spotted oligonucleotide microarray study ranged from 86,253 μm2 in LEC to 392,887 μm2 in LEC stroma. The RNA concentration of the LMD samples ranged from 22 to 92 pg/μl. The recommended starting concentration of the RNA samples used for Gene 1.0 ST arrays was 6 ng/5 μl. To achieve the desired RNA concentration the area of ocular surface epithelial tissue sample processed for the Gene 1.0 ST array experiments was approximately 100,0000 μm2 to 130,0000 μm2. RNA

  9. Microarray Analysis of Human Liver Cells irradiated by 80MeV/u Carbon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Tian, Xiaoling; Kong, Fuquan; Li, Qiang; Jin, Xiaodong; Dai, Zhongying; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Mingjian; Zhao, Kui

    Objective Biological effect of heavy ion beam has the important significance for cancer therapy and space exploring owing its high LET and RBE, low OER, especially forming Bragg spike at the end of the tracks of charged particles. More serious damage for cells are induced by heavy ions and difficult repair than other irradiation such as X-ray and ν-ray . To explore the molecular mechanism of biological effect caused by heavy ionizing radiation (HIR) and to construct the gene expression profile database of HIR-induced human liver cells L02 by microarray analysis. Methods In this study, L02 cells were irradiated by 80MeV/u carbon ions at 5 Gy delivered by HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou) at room temperature. Total RNAs of cells incubated 6 hours and 24hours after irradiation were extracted with Trizol. Unirradiated cells were used as a control. RNAs were transcripted into cDNA by reverse transcription and labelled with cy5-dCTP and cy3-dCTP respectively. A human genome oligonucleotide set consisting of 5 amino acid-modified 70-mer probes and representing 21,329 well-characterized Homo sapiens genes was selected for microarray analysis and printed on amino-silaned glass slides. Arrays were fabricated using an OmniGrid microarrayer. Only genes whose alteration tendency was consistent in both microarrays were selected as differentially expressed genes. The Affymetrix's short oligonucleotide (25-mer) HG U133A 2.0 array analyses were performed per the manufacturer's instructions. Results Of the 21,329 genes tested, 37 genes showed changes in expression level with ratio higher than 2.0 and lower than 0.5 at 6hrs after irradiation. There were 19 genes showing up-regulation in radiated L02 cells, whereas 18 genes showing down-regulation; At 24hrs after irradiation, 269 genes showed changes in expression level with ratio higher than 2.0 and lower than 0.5. There were 67 genes showing up-regulation in radiated L02 cells, whereas 202 genes showing down

  10. Humane Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Eileen S.; Westerlund, Stuart R.

    This booklet traces the historical development of human education as it has been instilled into the young people of America from colonial times to the present and provides a future prognosis of humaneness in the schools. Humane education promotes humane behavior and is an important part of the humane movement in the United States, although until…

  11. Human Research Risk Management

    NASA Video Gallery

    Crew health and performance is critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The Human Research Program (HRP) investigates and mitigates the highest risks to human health and per...

  12. Human-machine interactions

    DOEpatents

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  13. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  14. Differential global and extra-cellular matrix focused gene expression patterns between normal and glaucomatous human lamina cribrosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Wordinger, Robert J.; Clark, Abbot F.; O'Brien, Colm J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Marked extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling occurs in the human optic nerve head in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). The glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) negative lamina cribrosa cell may play an important role in this remodeling process. We report the first study of global and ECM-focused gene transcription differentials between GFAP-negative lamina cribrosa (LC) cells from normal and POAG human donors. Methods GFAP-negative LC cell lines were generated from the optic nerve tissue of four normal (n=4) and four POAG (n=4) human donors. Using Affymetrix U133A arrays the transcriptional profile between the normal and diseased groups were compared. Bioinformatic analysis was performed using robust multichip average (RMA Express) and EASE/David. Real time TaqMan PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses were performed to validate the microarray data. Results 183 genes were upregulated by greater than 1.5 fold and 220 were down regulated by greater than 1.5 fold in the POAG LC cells versus normal controls. Upregulated genes in POAG LC cells included, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1), secreted acid protein cysteine rich (SPARC), periostin (POSTN), thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), cartilage linking protein-1 (CRTL-1), and collagen type I (COL1A1), collagen type V (COL5A1), and collagen type XI (COL11A1). Downregulated ECM genes in POAG included fibulin 1 (FBLN1), decorin (DCN), and collagen type XVIII (COL18A1). All TaqMan PCR validation assays were significant (*p<0.05) and consistent with the array data. Immunohistochemistry of one target (periostin) confirmed its differential expression at the protein level in POAG optic nerve head tissue compared with non-glaucomatous controls. Functional annotation and over-representation analysis identified ECM genes as a statistically over-represented class of genes in POAG LC cells compared with normal LC cells. Conclusions This study reports for the first time that POAG LC cells in-vitro demonstrate upregulated ECM

  15. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  16. Special Section: Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  17. Human Research Program Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of HRP is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Human Research Program was designed to meet the needs of human space exploration, and understand and reduce the risk to crew health and performance in exploration missions.

  18. The Humanities: Interconnections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on a wide range of interdisciplinary themes and ideas for humanities instruction, the 17 articles in this journal issue discuss the following topics: (1) literature, humanities, and the adult learner; (2) the role of the humanities in educating for a democracy; (3) humanities in the marketplace; (4) literature versus "great books" in high…

  19. Microarray analysis of ox-LDL (oxidized low-density lipoprotein)-regulated genes in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Minta, Joe; Jungwon Yun, James; St Bernard, Rosanne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that circulating LDL (low-density lipoproteins) play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and the oxidized form (ox-LDL) is highly atherogenic. Deposits of ox-LDL have been found in atherosclerotic plaques, and ox-LDL has been shown to promote monocyte recruitment, foam cell formation and the transition of quiescent and contractile vascular SMCs (smooth muscle cells) to the migratory and proliferative phenotype. SMC phenotype transition and hyperplasia are the pivotal events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. To comprehend the complex molecular mechanisms involved in ox-LDL-mediated SMC phenotype transition, we have compared the differential gene expression profiles of cultured quiescent human coronary artery SMCs with cells induced with ox-LDL for 3 and 21 h using Affymetrix HG-133UA cDNA microarray chips. Assignment of the regulated genes into functional groups indicated that several genes involved in metabolism, membrane transport, cell-cell interactions, signal transduction, transcription, translation, cell migration, proliferation and apoptosis were differentially expressed. Our data suggests that the interaction of ox-LDL with its cognate receptors on SMCs modulates the induction of several growth factors and cytokines, which activate a variety of intracellular signalling mechanisms (including PI3K, MAPK, Jak/STAT, sphingosine, Rho kinase pathways) that contribute to SMC transition from the quiescent and contractile phenotype to the proliferative and migratory phenotype. Our study has also identified several genes (including CDC27, cyclin A1, cyclin G2, glypican 1, MINOR, p15 and apolipoprotein) not previously implicated in ox-LDL-induced SMC phenotype transition and substantially extends the list of potential candidate genes involved in atherogenesis.

  20. ISS Payload Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  1. Economics of human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  2. Economics of human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans. PMID:20645472

  3. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  4. Virtual Human Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, RD

    2001-06-12

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive human modeling environment, the Virtual Human, which will be used initially to model the human respiratory system for purposes of predicting pulmonary disease or injury using lung sounds. The details of the computational environment, including the development of a Virtual Human Thorax, a database for storing models, model parameters, and experimental data, and a Virtual Human web interface are outlined. Preliminary progress in developing this environment will be presented. A separate paper at the conference describes the modeling of sound generation using computational fluid dynamics and the modeling of sound propagation in the human respiratory system.

  5. Distinct gene subsets in pterygia formation and recurrence: dissecting complex biological phenomenon using genome wide expression data

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Louis; Chew, Jaime; Yang, Henry; Ang, Leonard PK; Tan, Donald TH; Beuerman, Roger W

    2009-01-01

    Background Pterygium is a common ocular surface disease characterized by fibrovascular invasion of the cornea and is sight-threatening due to astigmatism, tear film disturbance, or occlusion of the visual axis. However, the mechanisms for formation and post-surgical recurrence of pterygium are not understood, and a valid animal model does not exist. Here, we investigated the possible mechanisms of pterygium pathogenesis and recurrence. Methods First we performed a genome wide expression analysis (human Affymetrix Genechip, >22000 genes) with principal component analysis and clustering techniques, and validated expression of key molecules with PCR. The controls for this study were the un-involved conjunctival tissue of the same eye obtained during the surgical resection of the lesions. Interesting molecules were further investigated with immunohistochemistry, Western blots, and comparison with tear proteins from pterygium patients. Results Principal component analysis in pterygium indicated a signature of matrix-related structural proteins, including fibronectin-1 (both splice-forms), collagen-1A2, keratin-12 and small proline rich protein-1. Immunofluorescence showed strong expression of keratin-6A in all layers, especially the superficial layers, of pterygium epithelium, but absent in the control, with up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of the cell adhesion molecule CD24 in the pterygium epithelium. Western blot shows increased protein expression of beta-microseminoprotein, a protein up-regulated in human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Gene products of 22 up-regulated genes in pterygium have also been found by us in human tears using nano-electrospray-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry after pterygium surgery. Recurrent disease was associated with up-regulation of sialophorin, a negative regulator of cell adhesion, and never in mitosis a-5, known to be involved in cell motility. Conclusion Aberrant wound healing is therefore a key process in this

  6. Mining human antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become drugs of choice for the management of an increasing number of human diseases. Human antibody repertoires provide a rich source for human mAbs. Here we review the characteristics of natural and non-natural human antibody repertoires and their mining with non-combinatorial and combinatorial strategies. In particular, we discuss the selection of human mAbs from naïve, immune, transgenic and synthetic human antibody repertoires using methods based on hybridoma technology, clonal expansion of peripheral B cells, single-cell PCR, phage display, yeast display and mammalian cell display. Our reliance on different strategies is shifting as we gain experience and refine methods to the efficient generation of human mAbs with superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:20505349

  7. Pathfinder: Humans in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on the Pathfinder program. Information is given on human exploration of the solar system, technical requirements interfaces, program objectives, space suits, human performance, man-machine systems, space habitats, life support systems, and artificial gravity

  8. Human bites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  9. Telling the Human Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  10. Human assisted robotic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Files, B. T.; Canady, J.; Warnell, G.; Stump, E.; Nothwang, W. D.; Marathe, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    In support of achieving better performance on autonomous mapping and exploration tasks by incorporating human input, we seek here to first characterize humans' ability to recognize locations from limited visual information. Such a characterization is critical to the design of a human-in-the-loop system faced with deciding whether and when human input is useful. In this work, we develop a novel and practical place-recognition task that presents humans with video clips captured by a navigating ground robot. Using this task, we find experimentally that human performance does not seem to depend on factors such as clip length or familiarity with the scene and also that there is significant variability across subjects. Moreover, we find that humans significantly outperform a state-of-the-art computational solution to this problem, suggesting the utility of incorporating human input in autonomous mapping and exploration techniques.

  11. Isolation of Microarray-Grade Total RNA, MicroRNA, and DNA from a Single PAXgene Blood RNA Tube

    PubMed Central

    Kruhøffer, Mogens; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Voss, Thorsten; Lindberg, Raija L.P.; Wyrich, Ralf; Thykjaer, Thomas; Orntoft, Torben F.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for isolation of microRNA and genomic DNA in addition to total RNA from whole blood stabilized in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes. The procedure is based on automatic extraction on a BioRobot MDx and includes isolation of DNA from a fraction of the stabilized blood and recovery of small RNA species that are otherwise lost. The procedure presented here is suitable for large-scale experiments and is amenable to further automation. Procured total RNA and DNA was tested using Affymetrix Expression and single-nucleotide polymorphism GeneChips, respectively, and isolated microRNA was tested using spotted locked nucleic acid-based microarrays. We conclude that the yield and quality of total RNA, microRNA, and DNA from a single PAXgene blood RNA tube is sufficient for downstream microarray analysis. PMID:17690207

  12. The number of genes changing expression after chronic exposure to code division multiple access or frequency DMA radiofrequency radiation does not exceed the false-positive rate.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Timothy D; Moros, Eduardo G; Brownstein, Bernard H; Roti Roti, Joseph L

    2006-09-01

    Experiments with cultured C3H 10T 1/2 cells were performed to determine if exposure to cell phone radiofrequency (RF) radiations induce changes in gene expression. Following a 24 h exposure of 5 W/kg specific adsorption rate, RNA was extracted from the exposed and sham control cells for microarray analysis on Affymetrix U74Av2 Genechips. Cells exposed to 0.68 Gy of X-rays with a 4-h recovery were used as positive controls. The number of gene expression changes induced by RF radiation was not greater than the number of false positives expected based on a sham versus sham comparison. In contrast, the X-irradiated samples showed higher numbers of probe sets changing expression level than in the sham versus sham comparison.

  13. A genomic approach to myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Beatriz; Michelson, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We have developed an integrated genetic, genomic and computational approach to identify and characterize genes involved in myoblast fusion in Drosophila. We first used fluorescence activated cell sorting to purify mesodermal cells both from wild-type embryos and from twelve variant genotypes in which muscle development is perturbed in known ways. Then, we obtained gene expression profiles for the purified cells by hybridizing isolated mesodermal RNA to Affymetrix GeneChip arrays. These data were subsequently compounded into a statistical meta-analysis that predicts myoblast subtype-specific gene expression signatures that were later validated by in situ hybridization experiments. Finally, we analyzed the myogenic functions of a subset of these myoblast genes using a double-stranded RNA interference assay in living embryos expressing green fluorescent protein under control of a muscle-specific promoter. This experimental strategy led to the identification of several previously uncharacterized genes required for myoblast fusion in Drosophila. PMID:18979251

  14. Sample processing considerations for detecting copy number changes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sharoni

    2012-11-01

    The Whole Genome Sampling Analysis (WGSA) assay in combination with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping Arrays is used for copy number analysis of high-quality DNA samples (i.e., samples that have been collected from blood, fresh or frozen tissue, or cell lines). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, however, represent the most prevalent form of archived clinical samples, but they provide additional challenges for molecular assays. FFPE processing usually results in the degradation of FFPE DNA and in the contamination and chemical modification of these DNA samples. Because of these issues, FFPE DNA is not suitable for all molecular assays designed for high-quality DNA samples. Strategies recommended for processing FFPE DNA samples through WGSA and to the Mapping arrays are described here. PMID:23118355

  15. Data analysis considerations for detecting copy number changes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sharoni

    2012-11-01

    The Whole Genome Sampling Analysis (WGSA) assay in combination with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping Arrays is used for copy number analysis of high-quality DNA samples (i.e., samples that have been collected from blood, fresh or frozen tissue, or cell lines). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, however, represent the most prevalent form of archived clinical samples, but they provide additional challenges for molecular assays. FFPE processing usually results in the degradation of FFPE DNA and in the contamination and chemical modification of these DNA samples. In this article, we describe the steps needed to obtain reliable copy number predictions from degraded and contaminated FFPE samples. PMID:23118356

  16. Sample processing considerations for detecting copy number changes in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Sharoni

    2012-11-01

    The Whole Genome Sampling Analysis (WGSA) assay in combination with Affymetrix GeneChip Mapping Arrays is used for copy number analysis of high-quality DNA samples (i.e., samples that have been collected from blood, fresh or frozen tissue, or cell lines). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, however, represent the most prevalent form of archived clinical samples, but they provide additional challenges for molecular assays. FFPE processing usually results in the degradation of FFPE DNA and in the contamination and chemical modification of these DNA samples. Because of these issues, FFPE DNA is not suitable for all molecular assays designed for high-quality DNA samples. Strategies recommended for processing FFPE DNA samples through WGSA and to the Mapping arrays are described here.

  17. Cloning and characterization of the drought-resistance OsRCI2-5 gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Li, L; Li, N; Song, S F; Li, Y X; Xia, X J; Fu, X Q; Chen, G H; Deng, H F

    2014-01-01

    The genomic expression profile of the super-hybrid rice Liangyoupeijiu female parent Pei'ai 64S in different tissues at different developmental stages under low temperature, drought, and high temperature stresses were detected using an Affymetrix GeneChip Rice Genome Array to screen upregulated and downregulated genes. In this study, we screened the drought-resistant gene OsRCI2-5, after which a constitutive OsRCI2-5 construct was created and transferred into Nipponbare. After polyethylene glycol-6000 and drought treatment, we found that the OsRCI2-5 gene improved the drought resistance of Nipponbare. Gene expression profiling showed that the OsRCI2-5 gene was expressed in the rice leaves, stems, and flower organs. Subcellular localization revealed that the gene was located in the membranes, and hence, we can deduce that a membrane signal peptide was responsible for signal transduction. PMID:24938613

  18. Effects of Integrating and Non-Integrating Reprogramming Methods on Copy Number Variation and Genomic Stability of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiangjin; Yu, Qian; Huang, Yuling; Song, Bing; Chen, Yaoyong; Gao, Xingcheng; He, Wenyin; Sun, Xiaofang; Fan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are derived from differentiated somatic cells using defined factors and provide a renewable source of autologous cells for cell therapy. Many reprogramming methods have been employed to generate human iPSCs, including the use of integrating vectors and non-integrating vectors. Maintenance of the genomic integrity of iPSCs is highly desirable if the cells are to be used in clinical applications. Here, using the Affymetrix Cytoscan HD array, we investigated the genomic aberration profiles of 19 human cell lines: 5 embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines, 6 iPSC lines derived using integrating vectors ("integrating iPSC lines"), 6 iPSC lines derived using non-integrating vectors ("non-integrating iPSC lines"), and the 2 parental cell lines from which the iPSCs were derived. The genome-wide copy number variation (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and mosaicism patterns of integrating and non-integrating iPSC lines were investigated. The maximum sizes of CNVs in the genomes of the integrating iPSC lines were 20 times higher than those of the non-integrating iPSC lines. Moreover, the total number of CNVs was much higher in integrating iPSC lines than in other cell lines. The average numbers of novel CNVs with a low degree of overlap with the DGV and of likely pathogenic CNVs with a high degree of overlap with the ISCA (International Symposium on Computer Architecture) database were highest in integrating iPSC lines. Different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) calls revealed that, using the parental cell genotype as a reference, integrating iPSC lines displayed more single nucleotide variations and mosaicism than did non-integrating iPSC lines. This study describes the genome stability of human iPSCs generated using either a DNA-integrating or non-integrating reprogramming method, of the corresponding somatic cells, and of hESCs. Our results highlight the importance of using a high-resolution method to monitor genomic aberrations

  19. Curcumin alters gene expression-associated DNA damage, cell cycle, cell survival and cell migration and invasion in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-Tsang; Wang, Wei-Shu; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Su-Tso; Tang, Nou-Ying; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality and new cases are on the increase worldwide. However, the treatment of lung cancer remains unsatisfactory. Curcumin has been shown to induce cell death in many human cancer cells, including human lung cancer cells. However, the effects of curcumin on genetic mechanisms associated with these actions remain unclear. Curcumin (2 µM) was added to NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells and the cells were incubated for 24 h. Total RNA was extracted from isolated cells for cDNA synthesis, labeling, microarray hybridization and flour‑labeled cDNA hybridized on chip. Localized concentrations of fluorescent molecules were detected and quantified using Expression Console software (Affymetrix) with default RMA parameters. GeneGo software was used for the key genes involved and their possible interaction pathways. The results showed that ~170 genes were significantly upregulated and 577 genes were significantly downregulated in curcumin‑treated cells. Specifically, the up‑ and downregulated genes included CCNE2, associated with DNA damage; ID3, associated with cell survival and 146 genes with a >2- to 3-fold change including the TP53INP1 gene, associated with DNA damage; CDC6, CDCA5, TAKMIP2, CDK14, CDK5, CDCA76, CDC25A, CDC5L and SKP2, associated with cell cycle; the CARD6, ID1 and ID2 genes, associated with cell survival and the BRMS1L, associated with cell migration and invasion. Additionally, 59 downregulated genes exhibited a >4-fold change, including the DDIT3 gene, associated with DNA damage; while 97 genes had a >3- to 4-fold change including the DDIT4 gene, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle and 321 genes with a >2- to 3-fold including the GADD45A and CGREF1 genes, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle, the TNFRSF10B, GAS5, TSSC1 and TNFRSF11B gene, associated with cell survival and the ARHAP29 and CADM2 genes, associated with cell migration

  20. Effects of Integrating and Non-Integrating Reprogramming Methods on Copy Number Variation and Genomic Stability of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiangjin; Yu, Qian; Huang, Yuling; Song, Bing; Chen, Yaoyong; Gao, Xingcheng; He, Wenyin; Sun, Xiaofang; Fan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are derived from differentiated somatic cells using defined factors and provide a renewable source of autologous cells for cell therapy. Many reprogramming methods have been employed to generate human iPSCs, including the use of integrating vectors and non-integrating vectors. Maintenance of the genomic integrity of iPSCs is highly desirable if the cells are to be used in clinical applications. Here, using the Affymetrix Cytoscan HD array, we investigated the genomic aberration profiles of 19 human cell lines: 5 embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines, 6 iPSC lines derived using integrating vectors ("integrating iPSC lines"), 6 iPSC lines derived using non-integrating vectors ("non-integrating iPSC lines"), and the 2 parental cell lines from which the iPSCs were derived. The genome-wide copy number variation (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and mosaicism patterns of integrating and non-integrating iPSC lines were investigated. The maximum sizes of CNVs in the genomes of the integrating iPSC lines were 20 times higher than those of the non-integrating iPSC lines. Moreover, the total number of CNVs was much higher in integrating iPSC lines than in other cell lines. The average numbers of novel CNVs with a low degree of overlap with the DGV and of likely pathogenic CNVs with a high degree of overlap with the ISCA (International Symposium on Computer Architecture) database were highest in integrating iPSC lines. Different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) calls revealed that, using the parental cell genotype as a reference, integrating iPSC lines displayed more single nucleotide variations and mosaicism than did non-integrating iPSC lines. This study describes the genome stability of human iPSCs generated using either a DNA-integrating or non-integrating reprogramming method, of the corresponding somatic cells, and of hESCs. Our results highlight the importance of using a high-resolution method to monitor genomic

  1. Human productivity program definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The optimization of human productivity on the space station within the existing resources and operational constraints is the aim of the Human Productivity Program. The conceptual objectives of the program are as follows: (1) to identify long lead technology; (2) to identify responsibility for work elements; (3) to coordinate the development of crew facilities and activities; and (4) to lay the foundation for a cost effective approach to improving human productivity. Human productivity work elements are also described and examples are presented.

  2. Some Criteria for Humanizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Charlotte S.

    Patterns for humanizing the information sciences include recognizing essential "humanness," taking a holistic approach to the subject field, and being aware of the epistemological nature of how people communicate and relate to others and themselves. The complete inclusion of the human factor in information theory researches can only amplify the…

  3. A Human Rights Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Presents a human rights glossary that includes definitions of basic terms, treaties, charters, and groups/organizations that have been featured in previous articles in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education"; the human rights terms have been compiled as part of the celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). (CMK)

  4. Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mensel, R. Frank

    The contradictions of campus management are examined in this speech and applied to the problems of human resource development. The author suggests that human resource development cannot be considered fully without taking into account the state of the institution and institutional development. Since human resources represents 75 percent or more of…

  5. Demystifying the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonham, George

    1980-01-01

    The new Rockefeller Foundation's Commission on the Humanities' report is discussed. Some of the commission's recommendations include: improved quality of elementary and secondary schools, strengthening of humanities research, reaffirmation within education of the values of the humanities, and closer collaboration of educational and cultural…

  6. Visible Human Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mobile Gallery Site Navigation Home The Visible Human Project ® Overview The Visible Human Project ® is an outgrowth of the NLM's 1986 Long- ... The long-term goal of the Visible Human Project ® is to produce a system of knowledge structures ...

  7. Whose Human Rights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendel, Margherita

    During the last 50 years, principles, institutions, and policies of human rights have been developed worldwide. This book brings together European and international conventions on human rights, the rights of women, and the users and uses of education, and places them in their wider context. It examines issues in how human rights work, the ways in…

  8. Human nature and enhancement.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allen

    2009-03-01

    Appeals to the idea of human nature are frequent in the voluminous literature on the ethics of enhancing human beings through biotechnology. Two chief concerns about the impact of enhancements on human nature have been voiced. The first is that enhancement may alter or destroy human nature. The second is that if enhancement alters or destroys human nature, this will undercut our ability to ascertain the good because, for us, the good is determined by our nature. The first concern assumes that altering or destroying human nature is in itself a bad thing. The second concern assumes that human nature provides a standard without which we cannot make coherent, defensible judgments about what is good. I will argue (1) that there is nothing wrong, per se, with altering or destroying human nature, because, on a plausible understanding of what human nature is, it contains bad as well as good characteristics and there is no reason to believe that eliminating some of the bad would so imperil the good as to make the elimination of the bad impermissible, and (2) that altering or destroying human nature need not result in the loss of our ability to make judgments about the good, because we possess a conception of the good by which we can and do evaluate human nature. I will argue that appeals to human nature tend to obscure rather than illuminate the debate over the ethics of enhancement and can be eliminated in favor of more cogent considerations.

  9. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  10. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences. PMID:23908778

  11. Financing Human Capital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juffras, Jason; Sawhill, Isabel V.

    This paper examines the government's role in financing human capital investments. It first examines why private investments in education, training, and other forms of human capital are likely to fall short of socially desirable levels. It then reviews past trends in public support for human resource investments. Finally, it discusses current…

  12. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  13. Human-technology Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Katharine M.

    Human-technology integration is the replacement of human parts and extension of human capabilities with engineered devices and substrates. Its result is hybrid biological-artificial systems. We discuss here four categories of products furthering human-technology integration: wearable computers, pervasive computing environments, engineered tissues and organs, and prosthetics, and introduce examples of currently realized systems in each category. We then note that realization of a completely artificial sytem via the path of human-technology integration presents the prospect of empirical confirmation of an aware artificially embodied system.

  14. Biological Races in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  15. Mapping human genetic ancestry.

    PubMed

    Ebersberger, Ingo; Galgoczy, Petra; Taudien, Stefan; Taenzer, Simone; Platzer, Matthias; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2007-10-01

    The human genome is a mosaic with respect to its evolutionary history. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of 23,210 DNA sequence alignments from human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and rhesus, we present a map of human genetic ancestry. For about 23% of our genome, we share no immediate genetic ancestry with our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. This encompasses genes and exons to the same extent as intergenic regions. We conclude that about 1/3 of our genes started to evolve as human-specific lineages before the differentiation of human, chimps, and gorillas took place. This explains recurrent findings of very old human-specific morphological traits in the fossils record, which predate the recent emergence of the human species about 5-6 MYA. Furthermore, the sorting of such ancestral phenotypic polymorphisms in subsequent speciation events provides a parsimonious explanation why evolutionary derived characteristics are shared among species that are not each other's closest relatives.

  16. Human rights and bioethics.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y M; Brusa, M

    2008-05-01

    In the first part of this article we survey the concept of human rights from a philosophical perspective and especially in relation to the "right to healthcare". It is argued that regardless of meta-ethical debates on the nature of rights, the ethos and language of moral deliberation associated with human rights is indispensable to any ethics that places the victim and the sufferer in its centre. In the second part we discuss the rise of the "right to privacy", particularly in the USA, as an attempt to make the element of personal free will dominate over the element of basic human interest within the structure of rights and when different rights seem to conflict. We conclude by discussing the relationship of human rights with moral values beyond the realm of rights, mainly human dignity, free will, human rationality and response to basic human needs.

  17. Office for Human Research Protections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office for Human Research Protections The Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) provides leadership in the protection of the rights, welfare, and wellbeing of human subjects involved in ...

  18. NeuroTransDB: highly curated and structured transcriptomic metadata for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bagewadi, Shweta; Adhikari, Subash; Dhrangadhariya, Anjani; Irin, Afroza Khanam; Ebeling, Christian; Namasivayam, Aishwarya Alex; Page, Matthew; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are chronic debilitating conditions, characterized by progressive loss of neurons that represent a significant health care burden as the global elderly population continues to grow. Over the past decade, high-throughput technologies such as the Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays have provided new perspectives into the pathomechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. Public transcriptomic data repositories, namely Gene Expression Omnibus and curated ArrayExpress, enable researchers to conduct integrative meta-analysis; increasing the power to detect differentially regulated genes in disease and explore patterns of gene dysregulation across biologically related studies. The reliability of retrospective, large-scale integrative analyses depends on an appropriate combination of related datasets, in turn requiring detailed meta-annotations capturing the experimental setup. In most cases, we observe huge variation in compliance to defined standards for submitted metadata in public databases. Much of the information to complete, or refine meta-annotations are distributed in the associated publications. For example, tissue preparation or comorbidity information is frequently described in an article’s supplementary tables. Several value-added databases have employed additional manual efforts to overcome this limitation. However, none of these databases explicate annotations that distinguish human and animal models in neurodegeneration context. Therefore, adopting a more specific disease focus, in combination with dedicated disease ontologies, will better empower the selection of comparable studies with refined annotations to address the research question at hand. In this article, we describe the detailed development of NeuroTransDB, a manually curated database containing metadata annotations for neurodegenerative studies. The database contains more than 20 dimensions of metadata annotations within 31 mouse, 5 rat and 45 human studies, defined in

  19. Epidermal differentiation complex (locus 1q21) gene expression in head and neck cancer and normal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tyszkiewicz, Tomasz; Jarzab, Michal; Szymczyk, Cezary; Kowal, Monika; Krajewska, Jolanta; Jaworska, Magdalena; Fraczek, Marcin; Krajewska, Anna; Hadas, Ewa; Swierniak, Michal; Markowski, Jaroslaw; Lange, Dariusz; Poltorak, Stanislaw; Wiench, Malgorzata; Krecicki, Tomasz; Jarzab, Jerzy; Maciejewski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) comprises a number of genes associated with human skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and hyperkeratosis. These genes have also been linked to numerous cancers, among them skin, gastric, colorectal, lung, ovarian and renal carcinomas. The involvement of EDC components encoding S100 proteins, small proline-rich proteins (SPRRs) and other genes in the tumorigenesis of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) has been previously suggested. The aim of the study was to systematically analyze the expression of EDC components on the transcript level in HNSCC. Tissue specimens from 93 patients with HNC of oral cavity and 87 samples from adjacent or distant grossly normal oral mucosawere analyzed. 48 samples (24 tumor and 24 corresponding surrounding tissue) were hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip Human 1.0 ST Arrays. For validation by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) the total RNA from all180 samples collected in the study was analyzed with Real-Time PCR system and fluorescent amplicon specific-probes. Additional set of samples from 14 patients with laryngeal carcinoma previously obtained by HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarray was also included in the analyses. The expression of analyzed EDC genes was heterogeneous. Two transcripts (S100A1 and S100A4) were significantly down-regulated in oral cancer when compared to normal mucosa (0.69 and 0.36-fold change, respectively), showing an opposite pattern of expression to the remaining S100 genes. Significant up-regulation in tumors was found for S100A11, S100A7, LCE3D, S100A3 and S100A2 genes. The increased expression of S100A7 was subsequently validated by QPCR, confirming significant differences. The remaining EDC genes, including all encoding SPRR molecules, did not show any differences between oral cancer and normal mucosa. The observed differences were also assessed in the independent set of laryngeal cancer samples, confirming the role of S100A3 and LCE3D transcripts in

  20. Transcriptional responses in thyroid tissues from rats treated with a tumorigenic and a non-tumorigenic triazole conazole fungicide

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, Susan D. Nesnow, Stephen

    2008-03-15

    Conazoles are azole-containing fungicides that are used in agriculture and medicine. Conazoles can induce follicular cell adenomas of the thyroid in rats after chronic bioassay. The goal of this study was to identify pathways and networks of genes that were associated with thyroid tumorigenesis through transcriptional analyses. To this end, we compared transcriptional profiles from tissues of rats treated with a tumorigenic and a non-tumorigenic conazole. Triadimefon, a rat thyroid tumorigen, and myclobutanil, which was not tumorigenic in rats after a 2-year bioassay, were administered in the feed to male Wistar/Han rats for 30 or 90 days similar to the treatment conditions previously used in their chronic bioassays. Thyroid gene expression was determined using high density Affymetrix GeneChips (Rat 230{sub 2}). Gene expression was analyzed by the Gene Set Expression Analyses method which clearly separated the tumorigenic treatments (tumorigenic response group (TRG)) from the non-tumorigenic treatments (non-tumorigenic response group (NRG)). Core genes from these gene sets were mapped to canonical, metabolic, and GeneGo processes and these processes compared across group and treatment time. Extensive analyses were performed on the 30-day gene sets as they represented the major perturbations. Gene sets in the 30-day TRG group had over representation of fatty acid metabolism, oxidation, and degradation processes (including PPAR{gamma} and CYP involvement), and of cell proliferation responses. Core genes from these gene sets were combined into networks and found to possess signaling interactions. In addition, the core genes in each gene set were compared with genes known to be associated with human thyroid cancer. Among the genes that appeared in both rat and human data sets were: Acaca, Asns, Cebpg, Crem, Ddit3, Gja1, Grn, Jun, Junb, and Vegf. These genes were major contributors in the previously developed network from triadimefon-treated rat thyroids. It is

  1. Construction and Validation of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 DNA Microarray: Transcriptome Flexibility at Diverse Growth Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Christopher T.; Sram, Jakub; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Ivanov, Pavel S.; Mackenzie, Christopher; Choudhary, Madhusudan; Land, Miriam L; Larimer, Frank W; Kaplan, Samuel; Gomelsky, Mark

    2004-07-01

    A high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarray, a genechip, representing the 4.6-Mb genome of the facultative phototrophic proteobacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1, was custom-designed and manufactured by Affymetrix, Santa Clara, Calif. The genechip contains probe sets for 4,292 open reading frames (ORFs), 47 rRNA and tRNA genes, and 394 intergenic regions. The probe set sequences were derived from the genome annotation generated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory after extensive revision, which was based primarily upon codon usage characteristic of this GC-rich bacterium. As a result of the revision, numerous missing ORFs were uncovered, nonexistent ORFs were deleted, and misidentified start codons were corrected. To evaluate R. sphaeroides transcriptome flexibility, expression profiles for three diverse growth modes-aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration in the dark, and anaerobic photosynthesis-were generated. Expression levels of one-fifth to one-third of the R. sphaeroides ORFs were significantly different in cells under any two growth modes. Pathways involved in energy generation and redox balance maintenance under three growth modes were reconstructed. Expression patterns of genes involved in these pathways mirrored known functional changes, suggesting that massive changes in gene expression are the major means used by R. sphaeroides in adaptation to diverse conditions. Differential expression was observed for genes encoding putative new participants in these pathways (additional photosystem genes, duplicate NADH dehydrogenase, ATP synthases), whose functionality has yet to be investigated. The DNA microarray data correlated well with data derived from quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, as well as with data from the literature, thus validating the R. sphaeroides genechip as a powerful and reliable tool for studying unprecedented metabolic versatility of this bacterium.

  2. Human research subjects as human research workers.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Holly Fernandez

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research involving human subjects has traditionally been treated as a unique endeavor, presenting special risks and demanding special protections. But in several ways, the regulatory scheme governing human subjects research is counter-intuitively less protective than the labor and employment laws applicable to many workers. This Article relies on analogical and legal reasoning to demonstrate that this should not be the case; in a number of ways, human research subjects ought to be fundamentally recast as human research workers. Like other workers protected under worklaw, biomedical research subjects often have interests that diverge from those in positions of control but little bargaining power for change. Bearing these important similarities in mind, the question becomes whether there is any good reason to treat subjects and protected workers differently as a matter of law. With regard to unrestricted payment, eligibility for a minimum wage, compensation for injury, and rights to engage in concerted activity, the answer is no and human subjects regulations ought to be revised accordingly. PMID:25051653

  3. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  4. Changes in gene expression in human renal proximal tubule cells exposed to low concentrations of S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, a metabolite of trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Edward A. . E-mail: e.lock@ljmu.ac.uk; Barth, Jeremy L.; Argraves, Scott W.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2006-10-15

    Epidemiology studies suggest that there may be a weak association between high level exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) and renal tubule cell carcinoma. Laboratory animal studies have shown an increased incidence of renal tubule carcinoma in male rats but not mice. TCE can undergo metabolism via glutathione (GSH) conjugation to form metabolites that are known to be nephrotoxic. The GSH conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione (DCVG), is processed further to the cysteine conjugate, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), which is the penultimate nephrotoxic species. We have cultured human renal tubule cells (HRPTC) in serum-free medium under a variety of different culture conditions and observed growth, respiratory control and glucose transport over a 20 day period in medium containing low glucose. Cell death was time- and concentration-dependent, with the EC{sub 5} for DCVG being about 3 {mu}M and for DCVC about 7.5 {mu}M over 10 days. Exposure of HRPTC to sub-cytotoxic doses of DCVC (0.1 {mu}M and 1 {mu}M for 10 days) led to a small number of changes in gene expression, as determined by transcript profiling with Affymetrix human genome chips. Using the criterion of a mean 2-fold change over control for the four samples examined, 3 genes at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC increased, namely, adenosine kinase, zinc finger protein X-linked and an enzyme with lyase activity. At 1 {mu}M DCVC, two genes showed a >2-fold decrease, N-acetyltransferase 8 and complement factor H. At a lower stringency (1.5-fold change), a total of 63 probe sets were altered at 0.1 {mu}M DCVC and 45 at 1 {mu}M DCVC. Genes associated with stress, apoptosis, cell proliferation and repair and DCVC metabolism were altered, as were a small number of genes that did not appear to be associated with the known mode of action of DCVC. Some of these genes may serve as molecular markers of TCE exposure and effects in the human kidney.

  5. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept.

  6. [The embryo, the human and the humanized].

    PubMed

    Roa, A

    1992-03-01

    Since the moment of fecundation the human embryo is endowed with the properties of unity and uniqueness and its existence is therefore inviolable. Disputing arguments against this thesis are analyzed. Recent views of some biologists negate the human character to the embryo since the essence of a human being would be its cultural nature and ability to communicate. However, the embryo contains all the genetic information that will allow him to develop the ability to communicate. Any attempt to separate the 3 moments of time, past present and future is a definitive violation of ethics. A basic foundation of ethics is that present and future are implicit in the past and vice-versa. Finally, the idea that the unwanted child is not a cultural being should be discarded.

  7. Human organ markets and inherent human dignity.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Calum

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human organs should be bought and sold on a regulated market as any other material property belongingto an individual. This would have the advantage of both addressing the grave shortage of organs available for transplantation and respecting the freedom of individuals to choose to do whatever they want with their body parts. The old arguments against such a market in human organs are, therefore, being brought back into question. The article examines the different arguments both in favour and against the sale of human organs. It concludes that the body and any of its elements is a full expression of the whole person. As such, they cannot have a price if the individual is to retain his or her full inherent dignity and if society is to retain and protect this very important concept. PMID:24979876

  8. Human Performance in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  9. Chimeras and human dignity.

    PubMed

    de Melo-Martín, Inmaculada

    2008-12-01

    Discussions about whether new biomedical technologies threaten or violate human dignity are now common. Indeed, appeals to human dignity have played a central role in national and international debates about whether to allow particular kinds of biomedical investigations. The focus of this paper is on chimera research. I argue here that both those who claim that particular types of human-nonhuman chimera research threaten human dignity and those who argue that such threat does not exist fail to make their case. I first introduce some of the arguments that have been offered supporting the claim that the creation of certain sorts of chimeras threatens or violates human dignity. I next present opponents' assessments of such arguments. Finally I critically analyze both the critics' and the supporters' claims about whether chimera research threatens human dignity.

  10. [Humanization and nursing work].

    PubMed

    Collet, Neusa; Rozendo, Célia Alves

    2003-01-01

    In this work we have as our objective to reflect on the theme of the 63rd. Annual Nursing Week "Humanization and Work: reason and meaning in Nursing". We discuss the relationship between humanization/work in nursing, differentiating the aspects related to the humanization of nursing work to those of the humanized work in nursing. The challenges of the process of humanization of assistance and of work relationships imply on the overcoming of the relevance given to the technical scientific competence, routine patterns which are crystallized, conventional models of management, corporativism of the different professional categories in favor of interdependence and the complementarity in health actions; construction of an utopia of the humanization as collective process which can be reached and implemented.

  11. Human reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, E.M.; Fragola, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a treatment of human reliability analysis incorporating an introduction to probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear power generating stations. They treat the subject according to the framework established for general systems theory. Draws upon reliability analysis, psychology, human factors engineering, and statistics, integrating elements of these fields within a systems framework. Provides a history of human reliability analysis, and includes examples of the application of the systems approach.

  12. Robotics for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  13. Human cloning 2001.

    PubMed

    Healy, David L; Weston, Gareth; Pera, Martin F; Rombauts, Luk; Trounson, Alan O

    2002-05-01

    This review summaries human cloning from a clinical perspective. Natural human clones, that is, monozygotic twins, are increasing in the general community. Iatrogenic human clones have been produced for decades in infertile couples given fertility treatment such as ovulation induction. A clear distinction must be made between therapeutic cloning using embryonic stem cells and reproductive cloning attempts. Unlike the early clinical years of in vitro fertilization, with cloning there is no animal model that is safe and dependable. Until there is such a model, 'Dolly'-style human cloning is medically unacceptable.

  14. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  15. The comparison of different pre- and post-analysis filters for determination of exon-level alternative splicing events using Affymetrix arrays.

    PubMed

    Whistler, Toni; Chiang, Cheng-Feng; Lin, Jin-Mann; Lonergan, William; Reeves, William C

    2010-04-01

    Understanding the biologic significance of alternative splicing has been impeded by the difficulty in systematically identifying and validating transcript isoforms. Current exon array workflows suggest several different filtration steps to reduce the number of tests and increase the detection of alternative splicing events. In this study, we examine the effects of the suggested pre-analysis filtration by detection above background P value or signal intensity. This is followed post-analytically by restriction of exon expression to a fivefold change between groups, limiting the analysis to known alternative splicing events, or using the intersection of the results from different algorithms. Combinations of the filters are also examined. We find that none of the filtering methods reduces the number of technical false-positive calls identified by visual inspection. These include edge effects, nonresponsive probe sets, and inclusion of intronic and untranslated region probe sets into transcript annotations. Modules for filtering the exon microarray data on the basis of annotation features are needed. We propose new approaches to data filtration that would reduce the number of technical false-positives and therefore, impact the time spent performing visual inspection of the exon arrays.

  16. Comparison of Nanostring nCounter® Data on FFPE Colon Cancer Samples and Affymetrix Microarray Data on Matched Frozen Tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Deane, Natasha G; Lewis, Keeli B; Li, Jiang; Zhu, Jing; Washington, M Kay; Beauchamp, R Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) stage II and III patients remains a challenge due to the difficulties of finding robust biomarkers suitable for testing clinical samples. The majority of published gene signatures of CRC have been generated on fresh frozen colorectal tissues. Because collection of frozen tissue is not practical for routine surgical pathology practice, a clinical test that improves prognostic capabilities beyond standard pathological staging of colon cancer will need to be designed for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. The NanoString nCounter® platform is a gene expression analysis tool developed for use with FFPE-derived samples. We designed a custom nCounter® codeset based on elements from multiple published fresh frozen tissue microarray-based prognostic gene signatures for colon cancer, and we used this platform to systematically compare gene expression data from FFPE with matched microarray array data from frozen tissues. Our results show moderate correlation of gene expression between two platforms and discovery of a small subset of genes as candidate biomarkers for colon cancer prognosis that are detectable and quantifiable in FFPE tissue sections. PMID:27176004

  17. Human phosphodiesterase 4D7 (PDE4D7) expression is increased in TMPRSS2-ERG-positive primary prostate cancer and independently adds to a reduced risk of post-surgical disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, R; Henderson, D J P; Dulla, K; van Strijp, D; Waanders, L F; Tevz, G; Lehman, M L; Merkle, D; van Leenders, G J L H; Baillie, G S; Jenster, G; Houslay, M D; Hoffmann, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is an acute need to uncover biomarkers that reflect the molecular pathologies, underpinning prostate cancer progression and poor patient outcome. We have previously demonstrated that in prostate cancer cell lines PDE4D7 is downregulated in advanced cases of the disease. To investigate further the prognostic power of PDE4D7 expression during prostate cancer progression and assess how downregulation of this PDE isoform may affect disease outcome, we have examined PDE4D7 expression in physiologically relevant primary human samples. Methods: About 1405 patient samples across 8 publically available qPCR, Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST arrays and RNA sequencing data sets were screened for PDE4D7 expression. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene rearrangement status of patient samples was determined by transformation of the exon array and RNA seq expression data to robust z-scores followed by the application of a threshold >3 to define a positive TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion event in a tumour sample. Results: We demonstrate that PDE4D7 expression positively correlates with primary tumour development. We also show a positive association with the highly prostate cancer-specific gene rearrangement between TMPRSS2 and the ETS transcription factor family member ERG. In addition, we find that in primary TMPRSS2-ERG-positive tumours PDE4D7 expression is significantly positively correlated with low-grade disease and a reduced likelihood of progression after primary treatment. Conversely, PDE4D7 transcript levels become significantly decreased in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Conclusions: We further characterise and add physiological relevance to PDE4D7 as a novel marker that is associated with the development and progression of prostate tumours. We propose that the assessment of PDE4D7 levels may provide a novel, independent predictor of post-surgical disease progression. PMID:26575822

  18. Gene expression profiling reveals novel regulation by bisphenol-A in estrogen receptor-{alpha}-positive human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, David W.; Feng, Yuxin; Yang, Jun; Puga, Alvaro; Lee, Adrian V.; Khan, Sohaib A. . E-mail: sohaib.khan@uc.edu

    2006-01-15

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) shows proliferative actions in uterus and mammary glands and may influence the development of male and female reproductive tracts in utero or during early postnatal life. Because of its ability to function as an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist, BPA has the potential to disrupt normal endocrine signaling through regulation of ER target genes. Some genes are regulated by both estradiol (E2) and BPA, but those exclusive to either agent have not been described. Using a yeast strain incorporating a vitellogenin A2 ERE-LacZ reporter gene into the genome, we found that BPA induced expression of the reporter in colonies transformed with the ER{alpha} expression plasmid, illustrating BPA-mediated regulation within a chromatin context. Additionally, a reporter gene transiently transfected into the endometrial cancer (Ishikawa) cell line also showed BPA activity, although at 100-fold less potency than E2. To compare global gene expression in response to BPA and E2, we used a variant of the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line stably expressing HA-tagged ER{alpha}. Cultures were treated for 3 h with an ethanol vehicle, E2 (10{sup -8} M), or BPA (10{sup -6} M), followed by isolation of RNA and microarray analysis with the human U95A probe array (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA). More than 300 genes were changed 2-fold or more by either or both agents, with roughly half being up-regulated and half down-regulated. A number of growth- and development-related genes, such as HOXC1 and C6, Wnt5A, Frizzled, TGF{beta}-2, and STAT inhibitor 2, were found to be affected exclusively by BPA. We used quantitative real-time PCR to verify regulation of the HOXC6 gene, which showed decreased expression of approximately 2.5-fold by BPA. These results reveal novel effects by BPA and E2, raising interesting possibilities regarding the role of endocrine disruptors in sexual development.

  19. HER-2 overexpression differentially alters transforming growth factor-β responses in luminal versus mesenchymal human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Cindy A; Cajulis, Elaina E; Green, Jennifer L; Olsen, Taylor M; Chung, Young Ah; Damore, Michael A; Dering, Judy; Calzone, Frank J; Slamon, Dennis J

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Amplification of the HER-2 receptor tyrosine kinase has been implicated in the pathogenesis and aggressive behavior of approximately 25% of invasive human breast cancers. Clinical and experimental evidence suggest that aberrant HER-2 signaling contributes to tumor initiation and disease progression. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is the dominant factor opposing growth stimulatory factors and early oncogene activation in many tissues, including the mammary gland. Thus, to better understand the mechanisms by which HER-2 overexpression promotes the early stages of breast cancer, we directly assayed the cellular and molecular effects of TGF-β1 on breast cancer cells in the presence or absence of overexpressed HER-2. Methods Cell proliferation assays were used to determine the effect of TGF-β on the growth of breast cancer cells with normal or high level expression of HER-2. Affymetrix microarrays combined with Northern and western blot analysis were used to monitor the transcriptional responses to exogenous TGF-β1 in luminal and mesenchymal-like breast cancer cells. The activity of the core TGF-β signaling pathway was assessed using TGF-β1 binding assays, phospho-specific Smad antibodies, immunofluorescent staining of Smad and Smad DNA binding assays. Results We demonstrate that cells engineered to over-express HER-2 are resistant to the anti-proliferative effect of TGF-β1. HER-2 overexpression profoundly diminishes the transcriptional responses induced by TGF-β in the luminal MCF-7 breast cancer cell line and prevents target gene induction by a novel mechanism that does not involve the abrogation of Smad nuclear accumulation, DNA binding or changes in c-myc repression. Conversely, HER-2 overexpression in the context of the mesenchymal MDA-MB-231 breast cell line potentiated the TGF-β induced pro-invasive and pro-metastatic gene signature. Conclusion HER-2 overexpression promotes the growth and malignancy of mammary epithelial cells, in

  20. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  1. Interactions of human cytomegalovirus with human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vonka, V; Benyesh-Melnick, M

    1966-01-01

    Vonka, Vladimir (Baylor University College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.), and Matilda Benyesh-Melnick. Interactions of human cytomegalovirus with human fibroblasts. J. Bacteriol. 91:213-220. 1966.-Virus attachment of human cytomegalovirus to human embryo lung fibroblasts was found to be temperature-independent, from 4 to 37 C. Prolonged incubation at 4 C, however, resulted in inactivation of a high proportion of attached virus. Virus penetration seemed to be temperature-dependent, occurring at 37 C but not at 4 C. Detailed studies of the growth curve of the virus were made. Cell-associated virus preceded the appearance of virus in the fluid phase by 2 to 5 days. Complement-fixing antigen could be detected, but only when the cytopathic effect was advanced, and it was demonstrable only in the cell-associated fraction. Under methyl cellulose, decreasing the bicarbonate concentration in the overlay from 0.225 to 0.15% resulted in marked increase in plating efficiency with all strains tested. However, varying the concentration of bicarbonate from 0.3 to 0.15% in fluid medium did not influence the growth of virus.

  2. Human Pythiosis, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Sandra de Moraes Gimenes; Araújo, João Pessoa; Candeias, João Manuel Grisi; Fabiano de Franco, Marcello; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Mendoza, Leonel; Pires de Camargo, Rosangela; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2005-01-01

    Pythiosis, caused by Pythium insidiosum, occurs in humans and animals and is acquired from aquatic environments that harbor the emerging pathogen. Diagnosis is difficult because clinical and histopathologic features are not pathognomonic. We report the first human case of pythiosis from Brazil, diagnosed by using culture and rDNA sequencing. PMID:15890126

  3. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  4. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to protect public health and safeguard the environment. Risk assessment is an integral part of this mission in that it identifies and characterizes environmentally related human health problems. The Human Health Re...

  5. HSI in Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggerman, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document examines the scope of Human Systems Integration (HSI) at NASA, and the implementation of HSI in the human space flight programs. Two areas of interest are the Responsibilities and the lessons learned from the International Space Station and the strategy and approach for the Crew Exploration Vehicle.

  6. Being Human in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dorothy J.; Fahey, Brian W.

    The structure of humanness as the unique and essential being of the individual, constantly emerging through experience and the actualization of human potential within the sports environment, is the central theme of this book. Sport is defined broadly to include all forms of physical activity experiences. Each chapter represents an inquiry unique…

  7. Quantifying Human Performance Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askren, William B.; Regulinski, Thaddeus L.

    Human performance reliability for tasks in the time-space continuous domain is defined and a general mathematical model presented. The human performance measurement terms time-to-error and time-to-error-correction are defined. The model and measurement terms are tested using laboratory vigilance and manual control tasks. Error and error-correction…

  8. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  9. Human Mind Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  10. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  11. Toward a Humane Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foshay, Arthur W.

    In this paper, an integrated view is presented of the direction that education must take if it is to become the creative, effective, joyful enterprise that many educators long for. Educational institutions are not humane because they fail to deal with the human condition in all its variety and meaning. They continue to affirm the intellectual part…

  12. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  13. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  14. Hooking Kids with Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anstead, Neil L.

    1993-01-01

    Humanitas is part of Collaboratives for Humanities and Arts Teaching (CHART), a nationwide network funded primarily by the Rockefeller Foundation. In 11 large school districts and numerous rural districts, high school teachers, academics, artists, and business and community leaders are cooperating to promote teaching of the arts and humanities.…

  15. Human Dignity Through History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlie, Arthur L.

    A major educational need, as assessed by a committee of teachers, students, and community members, is to recognize acceptance of human dignity as the ultimate value in decision making. This concept provides a basis for the elementary and secondary social studies program. Although the concept of human dignity was promoted with the signing of the…

  16. Humanities in Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruprecht, Robert

    1997-01-01

    States that engineers contribute tremendously to the changing face of the earth, and the ever more urgent call for languages, management, and law competencies for engineers is an expression of the need for a grounding in humanities. Discusses the role of humanities in engineering education in the context of world economics and the role of…

  17. The Humanities' Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey Galt

    2009-01-01

    Why should society support the humanities when so many people are suffering from the effects of the economic crisis? What claim do the humanities, or scholarship generally, have on increasingly limited resources? Shouldn't such pursuits be considered luxuries at a time when people should be focusing on essentials? The alleviation of human…

  18. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  19. Human Simulated Diving Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David S.; Speck, Dexter F.

    1979-01-01

    This report details several simulated divinq experiments on the human. These are suitable for undergraduate or graduate laboratories in human or environmental physiology. The experiment demonstrates that a diving reflex is precipitated by both facial cooling and apnea. (Author/RE)

  20. Methods in human cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 4, discusses the various techniques used in the study human cytogenetics. The methods are discussed in historical order, from direct methods to tissue culture techniques, prenatal studies, meiotic studies, sex chromatin techniques, banding techniques, prophase banding and replication studies. Nomenclature of human chromosomes and quantitative methods are also mentioned. 60 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  2. Quantification of human responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  3. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  4. Environment and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    As a conference report, the booklet is primarily devoted to abstracts of papers presented at a Conference on Environment and Humanities held in Tallahassee, Florida, April 25-27, 1976. Dr. Huston Smith of Syracuse University, the main speaker, addressed the issue of "Humanities and Environmental Awareness." Other topics discussed included: (1)…

  5. Ecology and Human Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1970

    "Ecology and Human Values" is an interdisciplinary course designed for senior year high school students in social studies and/or science. Its main thrust is the investigation of human values as they relate to the environment, although rooted in the natural sciences as a means of understanding the complexities inherent in the environment. Use is…

  6. Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Mount, Frances

    2004-01-01

    The first human space flight, in the early 1960s, was aimed primarily at determining whether humans could indeed survive and function in micro-gravity. Would eating and sleeping be possible? What mental and physical tasks could be performed? Subsequent programs increased the complexity of the tasks the crew performed. Table 1 summarizes the history of U.S. space flight, showing the projects, their dates, crew sizes, and mission durations. With over forty years of experience with human space flight, the emphasis now is on how to design space vehicles, habitats, and missions to produce the greatest returns to human knowledge. What are the roles of the humans in space flight in low earth orbit, on the moon, and in exploring Mars?

  7. Mars Human Exploration Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Geoff

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the objectives and other considerations of Human exploration of Mars. The objectives of human exploration of Mars are: (1) to learn how Mars is similar to, and different from, Earth; (2) to explore possible life, past and present; (3) to discover what Mars is like now from the perspective of Geoscience and geologic history; and (4) how did Mars form and how did its formation differ from Earth. Considerations of human Martian exploration involve: (1) having a capable base laboratory; (2) having long range transportation; (3) having operational autonomy of the crew, and the requirement of the crew to possess a range of new cognitive processes along with easy communications with terrestrial colleagues; and finally (4) creating the human habitat along with human factors which involve more than just survivability.

  8. Helminths in human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fried, Bernard; Reddy, Aditya; Mayer, David

    2011-06-28

    This review examines the salient literature on selected helminths involved in carcinogenicity in humans and updates information in an earlier review on cancer and helminths by Mayer and Fried (2007, Advances in Parasitology 65, 239-296). The earlier review was concerned with various helminths, i.e., trematodes, cestodes, and nematodes, that are definitely implicated as being carcinogenic. This review examines only those helminths, all of which turn out to be trematodes, that are definitely implicated as being carcinogenic. These trematodes are the blood flukes Schistosoma haematobium, associated with inducing human carcinoma of the urinary bladder and the liver flukes Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis, associated with inducing cancer of the bile duct (cholangiocarcinoma) and cancer of the liver (hepatocarcinoma) in humans. The review examines mainly the epidemiology and pathology of these helminthic infections in humans and considers what we know about the mechanisms associated with the carcinogenicity of these three trematodes in humans.

  9. Beliefs about Human Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a web-based survey about futures issues. Among many questions, respondents were asked whether they believe humans will become extinct. Forty-five percent of the almost 600 respondents believe that humans will become extinct. Many of those holding this believe felt that humans could become extinct within 500-1000 years. Others estimated extinction 5000 or more years into the future. A logistic regression model was estimated to explore the bases for this belief. It was found that people who describe themselves a secular are more likely to hold this belief than people who describe themselves as being Protestant. Older respondents and those who believe that humans have little control over their future also hold this belief. In addition, people who are more apt to think about the future and are better able to imagine potential futures tend to also believe that humans will become extinct.

  10. Association of genetic variants with myocardial infarction in Japanese individuals with or without metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KAWAMIYA, TOSHIKI; KATO, KIMIHIKO; HORIBE, HIDEKI; YOKOI, KIYOSHI; OGURI, MITSUTOSHI; YOSHIDA, TETSURO; FUJIMAKI, TETSUO; WATANABE, SACHIRO; SATOH, KEI; AOYAGI, YUKITOSHI; NOZAWA, YOSHINORI; MUROHARA, TOYOAKI; YAMADA, YOSHIJI

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly complex, with both genetic and environmental factors being thought to play an important role. Although MetS has been recognized as a risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI), the genetic risk for MI in individuals with or without MetS has remained uncharacterized. We examined a possible association of genetic variants with MI in individuals with or without MetS separately. The study population comprised 4,424 individuals, including 1,918 individuals with MetS (903 subjects with MI and 1,015 controls) and 2,506 individuals without MetS (499 subjects with MI and 2,007 controls). The 150 polymorphisms examined in the present study were selected by genome-wide association studies of MI and ischemic stroke with the use of Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set. Initial screening by the Chi-square test revealed that the C→T polymorphism (rs1794429) of LRPAP1, the A→G polymorphism (rs12373237) of LAMA3 and the A→G polymorphism (rs3782257) of NCOR2 were significantly (false discovery rate of <0.05) associated with MI for individuals with MetS, and that the C→G polymorphism (rs13051704) of TFF1 was significantly related to MI for individuals without MetS. Subsequent multivariable logistic analysis with adjustment for covariates revealed that rs1794429 of LRPAP1 (recessive model; P=0.0218; odds ratio=0.71) and rs3782257 of NCOR2 (dominant model; P=0.0057; odds ratio=1.94) were significantly associated with MI among individuals with MetS, and that rs13051704 of TFF1 (additive model; P=0.0100; odds ratio=0.55) was significantly associated with MI among individuals without MetS. The genetic variants that confer susceptibility to MI differ between individuals with or without MetS. Stratification of subjects according to the presence or absence of MetS may thus be important for personalized prevention of MI based on genetic information. PMID:22993627

  11. Genetic risk for myocardial infarction in Japanese individuals with or without chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Tetsuo; Kato, Kimihiko; Yokoi, Kiyoshi; Yoshida, Tetsuro; Oguri, Mitsutoshi; Watanabe, Sachiro; Metoki, Norifumi; Yoshida, Hidemi; Satoh, Kei; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2010-05-01

    Although chronic kidney disease (CKD) is recognized as an important risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI), genetic factors underlying predisposition to MI in individuals with or without CKD remain largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to identify genetic variants that confer susceptibility to MI in individuals with or without CKD in order to allow prediction of genetic risk for such individuals separately. The study population comprised a total of 4344 individuals, including 1247 individuals with CKD (506 subjects with MI and 741 controls) and 3097 individuals without CKD (833 subjects with MI and 2264 controls). The 150 polymorphisms examined in this study were selected by genome-wide association studies of ischemic stroke and MI with the use of the GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set (Affymetrix) and determined by a method that combines the polymerase chain reaction and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes with suspension array technology. In individuals with CKD, no polymorphism was significantly related to MI. In individuals without CKD, an initial screen by the Chi-square test revealed that the Cyright curved arrow T polymorphism of CLEC16A (rs9925481) and the Aright curved arrow G polymorphism of LAMA3 (rs12373237) were significantly (false discovery rate for allele frequencies of <0.05) associated with MI. Subsequent multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for covariates revealed that the Cright curved arrow T polymorphism of CLEC16A (dominant model; P=0.0003; odds ratio, 0.66) and the Aright curved arrow G polymorphism of LAMA3 (recessive model; P=0.0087; odds ratio, 0.75) were significantly (P<0.05) associated with MI. A stepwise forward selection procedure also revealed that these polymorphisms were significant and independent determinants of MI. CLEC16A and LAMA3 may be susceptibility loci for MI in Japanese individuals without CKD. Determination of genotypes for CLEC16A and LAMA3 may prove informative for

  12. Association of genetic variants with myocardial infarction in Japanese individuals with or without metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawamiya, Toshiki; Kato, Kimihiko; Horibe, Hideki; Yokoi, Kiyoshi; Oguri, Mitsutoshi; Yoshida, Tetsuro; Fujimaki, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Sachiro; Satoh, Kei; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Murohara, Toyoaki; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2010-11-01

    The etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly complex, with both genetic and environmental factors being thought to play an important role. Although MetS has been recognized as a risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI), the genetic risk for MI in individuals with or without MetS has remained uncharacterized. We examined a possible association of genetic variants with MI in individuals with or without MetS separately. The study population comprised 4,424 individuals, including 1,918 individuals with MetS (903 subjects with MI and 1,015 controls) and 2,506 individuals without MetS (499 subjects with MI and 2,007 controls). The 150 polymorphisms examined in the present study were selected by genome-wide association studies of MI and ischemic stroke with the use of Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set. Initial screening by the Chi-square test revealed that the C→T polymorphism (rs1794429) of LRPAP1, the A→G polymorphism (rs12373237) of LAMA3 and the A→G polymorphism (rs3782257) of NCOR2 were significantly (false discovery rate of <0.05) associated with MI for individuals with MetS, and that the C→G polymorphism (rs13051704) of TFF1 was significantly related to MI for individuals without MetS. Subsequent multivariable logistic analysis with adjustment for covariates revealed that rs1794429 of LRPAP1 (recessive model; P=0.0218; odds ratio=0.71) and rs3782257 of NCOR2 (dominant model; P=0.0057; odds ratio=1.94) were significantly associated with MI among individuals with MetS, and that rs13051704 of TFF1 (additive model; P=0.0100; odds ratio=0.55) was significantly associated with MI among individuals without MetS. The genetic variants that confer susceptibility to MI differ between individuals with or without MetS. Stratification of subjects according to the presence or absence of MetS may thus be important for personalized prevention of MI based on genetic information. PMID:22993627

  13. Overexpression of miR-9 in mast cells is associated with invasive behavior and spontaneous metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While microRNA (miRNA) expression is known to be altered in a variety of human malignancies contributing to cancer development and progression, the potential role of miRNA dysregulation in malignant mast cell disease has not been previously explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential contribution of miRNA dysregulation to the biology of canine mast cell tumors (MCTs), a well-established spontaneous model of malignant mast cell disease. Methods We evaluated the miRNA expression profiles from biologically low-grade and biologically high-grade primary canine MCTs using real-time PCR-based TaqMan Low Density miRNA Arrays and performed real-time PCR to evaluate miR-9 expression in primary canine MCTs, malignant mast cell lines, and normal bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Mouse mast cell lines and BMMCs were transduced with empty or pre-miR-9 expressing lentiviral constructs and cell proliferation, caspase 3/7 activity, and invasion were assessed. Transcriptional profiling of cells overexpressing miR-9 was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Gene 2.0 ST arrays and real-time PCR was performed to validate changes in mRNA expression. Results Our data demonstrate that unique miRNA expression profiles correlate with the biological behavior of primary canine MCTs and that miR-9 expression is increased in biologically high grade canine MCTs and malignant cell lines compared to biologically low grade tumors and normal canine BMMCs. In transformed mouse malignant mast cell lines expressing either wild-type (C57) or activating (P815) KIT mutations and mouse BMMCs, miR-9 overexpression significantly enhanced invasion but had no effect on cell proliferation or apoptosis. Transcriptional profiling of normal mouse BMMCs and P815 cells possessing enforced miR-9 expression demonstrated dysregulation of several genes, including upregulation of CMA1, a protease involved in activation of matrix metalloproteases and extracellular matrix

  14. Influence of Smoking on Colonic Gene Expression Profile in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Csillag, Claudio; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Olsen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Background The development and course of Crohn's disease (CD) is related to both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been found to exacerbate the course of CD by increasing the risk of developing fistulas and strictures as well as the need for surgery, possibly because of an interaction between smoking or nicotine on macrophage function and the intestinal microvasculature. Several genes are involved in the pathogenesis of CD, and in this study the gene expression differences of the descending colonic mucosa were investigated in CD (smokers or never smokers) and controls (smokers or never smokers). Aim To identify any difference in gene expression of the descending colonic mucosa between smoking and never-smoking CD patients (and controls) by determining genetic expression profiles from microarray analysis. Methods Fifty-seven specimens were obtained by routine colonoscopy from the included material: CD smokers (n = 28) or never-smokers (n = 14) as compared to fifteen healthy controls (8 smokers and 7 never-smokers). RNA was isolated and gene expression assessed with Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0. Data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), Wilcoxon rank sum test and multiple linear regressions. Real-time (RT) PCR was subsequently applied to verify microarray results. Results The PCA analysis showed no intrinsic clustering of smokers versus never-smokers. However, when Wilcoxon rank sum test corrected with Q values were performed, six known genes were significantly expressed differently in the inflamed CD smokers as compared to the inflamed CD never-smokers: ring finger protein 138 (RNF138), metalothionein 2A (MT2A) and six transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate 3 (STEAP3), SA hypertension-associated homolog, PGM2L1 and KCNJ2. The subsequent RT-PCR-analyses verified, however, that only RNF138, MT2A and STEAP3 were significantly up-regulated in CD smokers in specimens with inflammatory activity of the

  15. Association of genetic variants with myocardial infarction in Japanese individuals with or without metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawamiya, Toshiki; Kato, Kimihiko; Horibe, Hideki; Yokoi, Kiyoshi; Oguri, Mitsutoshi; Yoshida, Tetsuro; Fujimaki, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Sachiro; Satoh, Kei; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Murohara, Toyoaki; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2010-11-01

    The etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly complex, with both genetic and environmental factors being thought to play an important role. Although MetS has been recognized as a risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI), the genetic risk for MI in individuals with or without MetS has remained uncharacterized. We examined a possible association of genetic variants with MI in individuals with or without MetS separately. The study population comprised 4,424 individuals, including 1,918 individuals with MetS (903 subjects with MI and 1,015 controls) and 2,506 individuals without MetS (499 subjects with MI and 2,007 controls). The 150 polymorphisms examined in the present study were selected by genome-wide association studies of MI and ischemic stroke with the use of Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set. Initial screening by the Chi-square test revealed that the C→T polymorphism (rs1794429) of LRPAP1, the A→G polymorphism (rs12373237) of LAMA3 and the A→G polymorphism (rs3782257) of NCOR2 were significantly (false discovery rate of <0.05) associated with MI for individuals with MetS, and that the C→G polymorphism (rs13051704) of TFF1 was significantly related to MI for individuals without MetS. Subsequent multivariable logistic analysis with adjustment for covariates revealed that rs1794429 of LRPAP1 (recessive model; P=0.0218; odds ratio=0.71) and rs3782257 of NCOR2 (dominant model; P=0.0057; odds ratio=1.94) were significantly associated with MI among individuals with MetS, and that rs13051704 of TFF1 (additive model; P=0.0100; odds ratio=0.55) was significantly associated with MI among individuals without MetS. The genetic variants that confer susceptibility to MI differ between individuals with or without MetS. Stratification of subjects according to the presence or absence of MetS may thus be important for personalized prevention of MI based on genetic information.

  16. Wnt5a participates in hepatic stellate cell activation observed by gene expression profile and functional assays

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wu-Jun; Hu, Li-Juan; Jian, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Li-Jing; Jiang, Ming; Li, Wei; He, Yi

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify differentially expressed genes in quiescent and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and explore their functions. METHODS: HSCs were isolated from the normal Sprague Dawley rats by in suit perfusion of collagenase and pronase and density Nycodenz gradient centrifugation. Total RNA and mRNA of quiescent HSCs, and culture-activated HSCs were extracted, quantified and reversely transcripted into cDNA. The global gene expression profile was analyzed by microarray with Affymetrix rat genechip. Differentially expressed genes were annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) and analyzed with Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Microarray data were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The function of Wnt5a on human HSCs line LX-2 was assessed with lentivirus-mediated Wnt5a RNAi. The expression of Wnt5a in fibrotic liver of a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced fibrosis rat model was also analyzed with Western blotting. RESULTS: Of the 28 700 genes represented on this chip, 2566 genes displayed at least a 2-fold increase or decrease in expression at a P < 0.01 level with a false discovery rate. Of these, 1396 genes were upregulated, while 1170 genes were downregulated in culture-activated HSCs. These differentially expressed transcripts were grouped into 545 GO based on biological process GO terms. The most enriched GO terms included response to wounding, wound healing, regulation of cell growth, vasculature development and actin cytoskeleton organization. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that Wnt5a signaling pathway participated in the activation of HSCs. Wnt5a was significantly increased in culture-activated HSCs as compared with quiescent HSCs. qRT-PCR validated the microarray data. Lentivirus-mediated suppression of Wnt5a expression in activated LX-2 resulted in significantly impaired proliferation, downregulated expressions of

  17. Potential candidate genomic biomarkers of drug induced vascular injury in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Dalmas, Deidre A.; Scicchitano, Marshall S.; Mullins, David; Hughes-Earle, Angela; Tatsuoka, Kay; Magid-Slav, Michal; Frazier, Kendall S.; Thomas, Heath C.

    2011-12-15

    Drug-induced vascular injury is frequently observed in rats but the relevance and translation to humans present a hurdle for drug development. Numerous structurally diverse pharmacologic agents have been shown to induce mesenteric arterial medial necrosis in rats, but no consistent biomarkers have been identified. To address this need, a novel strategy was developed in rats to identify genes associated with the development of drug-induced mesenteric arterial medial necrosis. Separate groups (n = 6/group) of male rats were given 28 different toxicants (30 different treatments) for 1 or 4 days with each toxicant given at 3 different doses (low, mid and high) plus corresponding vehicle (912 total rats). Mesentery was collected, frozen and endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells were microdissected from each artery. RNA was isolated, amplified and Affymetrix GeneChip Registered-Sign analysis was performed on selectively enriched samples and a novel panel of genes representing those which showed a dose responsive pattern for all treatments in which mesenteric arterial medial necrosis was histologically observed, was developed and verified in individual endothelial cell- and vascular smooth muscle cell-enriched samples. Data were confirmed in samples containing mesentery using quantitative real-time RT-PCR (TaqMan Trade-Mark-Sign ) gene expression profiling. In addition, the performance of the panel was also confirmed using similarly collected samples obtained from a timecourse study in rats given a well established vascular toxicant (Fenoldopam). Although further validation is still required, a novel gene panel has been developed that represents a strategic opportunity that can potentially be used to help predict the occurrence of drug-induced mesenteric arterial medial necrosis in rats at an early stage in drug development. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A gene panel was developed to help predict rat drug-induced mesenteric MAN. Black

  18. Mid-Gestational Gene Expression Profile in Placenta and Link to Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Uusküla, Liis; Männik, Jaana; Rull, Kristiina; Minajeva, Ave; Kõks, Sulev; Vaas, Pille; Teesalu, Pille; Reimand, Jüri; Laan, Maris

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance of placenta in mediating rapid physiological changes in pregnancy, data on temporal dynamics of placental gene expression are limited. We completed the first transcriptome profiling of human placental gene expression dynamics (GeneChips, Affymetrix®; ∼47,000 transcripts) from early to mid-gestation (n = 10; gestational weeks 5–18) and report 154 genes with significant transcriptional changes (ANOVA, FDR P<0.1). TaqMan RT-qPCR analysis (n = 43; gestational weeks 5–41) confirmed a significant (ANOVA and t-test, FDR P<0.05) mid-gestational peak of placental gene expression for BMP5, CCNG2, CDH11, FST, GATM, GPR183, ITGBL1, PLAGL1, SLC16A10 and STC1, followed by sharp decrease in mRNA levels at term (t-test, FDR P<0.05). We hypothesized that normal course of late pregnancy may be affected when genes characteristic to mid-gestation placenta remain highly expressed until term, and analyzed their expression in term placentas from normal and complicated pregnancies [preeclampsia (PE), n = 12; gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), n = 12; small- and large-for-gestational-age newborns (SGA, LGA), n = 12+12]. STC1 (stanniocalcin 1) exhibited increased mRNA levels in all studied complications, with the most significant effect in PE- and SGA-groups (t-test, FDR P<0.05). In post-partum maternal plasma, the highest STC1 hormone levels (ELISA, n = 129) were found in women who had developed PE and delivered a SGA newborn (median 731 vs 418 pg/ml in controls; ANCOVA, P = 0.00048). Significantly higher expression (t-test, FDR P<0.05) of CCNG2 and LYPD6 accompanied with enhanced immunostaining of the protein was detected in placental sections of PE and GDM cases (n = 15). Our study demonstrates the importance of temporal dynamics of placental transcriptional regulation across three trimesters of gestation. Interestingly, many genes with high expression in mid-gestation placenta have also been implicated in adult complex

  19. Identity-by-descent approaches identify regions of importance for genetic susceptibility to hereditary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ko, Josephine My; Zhang, Peng; Law, Simon; Fan, Yanhui; Song, You-Qiang; Zhao, Xue Ke; Wong, Elibe H W; Tang, Sa; Song, Xin; Lung, Maria Li; Wang, Li Dong

    2014-08-01

    Worldwide, the highest prevalence of esophageal cancer (EC) occurs in Northern China. High-density SNP arrays allow identification of identity-by-descent (IBD) segments in genomic DNAs representative of shared common ancestral regions. We utilized IBD approaches to map susceptibility loci associated with low-penetrance SNPs in high-risk Henan hereditary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. Affymetrix GeneChip Human mapping SNP array IBD analysis was performed in 32 Henan family history-positive (FH+) ESCC patients, 18 Henan healthy unrelated individuals, and 45 Chinese individuals from a CHB HapMap dataset using PLink (scoring IBD segments individually) and Beagle (scoring of shared IBD segments among case/case vs. control/control pairs) software. Both analyses identified longer IBD segment lengths associated with FH+ ESCC compared to controls. However, there was no strong evidence for a genetic founder effect. Pairing IBD analysis with BEAGLE identified 8 critical IBD segments residing at 2q32.1-q32.2, 3p22.3-p22.2, 4q21.1-q21.21, 7p22.2, 8q23.2-q23.3, 10q23.33-q24.1, 14q24.3 and 16q11.2-q12.1, which were more significantly shared among case/case compared to control/control. The shared IBD segments in FH+ ESCC samples with no overlap with control/CHB Hapmap may encompass potential cancer susceptibility loci. Selected targeted genes, PLCE1, GPT2, SIAH1 and CYP2C-18, residing within the IBD segments at 10q23.33-q24.1 and 16q11.2-q12.1, had statistically significant differential expression in primary ESCC tissues and are likely involved in ESCC carcinogenesis. The importance of these IBD segments to the etiology and development of ESCC in high-risk areas requires further study with expanded sample sizes. This is the first report employing the pairing IBD approach for elucidation of the genetic basis of hereditary ESCC in Henan by applying high throughput SNP array analysis.

  20. Microarray profiling of gene expression patterns in glomerular cells of astaxanthin-treated diabetic mice: a nutrigenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Kuroda, Masaaki; Akagiri, Satomi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshida, Norimasa; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Jiro; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-10-01

    We have demonstrated that astaxanthin reduces glomerular oxidative stress as well as inhibits the increase in urinary albumin in diabetic db/db mice. The aim of the present study was to determine the gene expression patterns in the glomerular cells of the diabetic mouse kidney, and to investigate the effects of astaxanthin on the expression of these genes using a high-density DNA microarray. The diet administered to the astaxanthin-supplementation group was prepared by mixing a control powder with astaxanthin at a concentration of 0.02%. Glomerular cells were obtained from the kidneys of mice by laser capture microdissection. Preparation of cRNA and target hybridization were performed according to the Affymetrix GeneChip eukaryotic small sample target labeling assay protocol. The gene expression profile was evaluated by the mouse expression set 430A GeneChip. Array data analysis was carried out using Affymetrix GeneChip operating and Ingenuity Pathway analysis software. Comparison between diabetic db/db and non-diabetic db/m mice revealed that 779 probes (3.1%) were significantly affected, i.e. 550 probes were up-regulated, and 229 probes were down-regulated, both at levels of >/=1.5-fold in the diabetic mice. Ingenuity signal analysis of 550 up-regulated probes revealed the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway as the most significantly affected caronical pathway. The affected genes were associated with complexes I, III, and IV located on the mitochondrial inner membrane, and the expression levels of these genes were decreased in mice treated with astaxanthin as compared to the levels in the control mice. In addition, the expression of many genes associated with oxidative stress, collagen synthesis, and transforming growth factor-beta signaling was enhanced in the diabetic mice, and this enhancement was slightly inhibited in the astaxanthin-treated mice. In conclusion, this genome-wide nutrigenomics approach provided insight into genes and putative

  1. Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony

    2014-01-01

    The Mars probe, launched by India a few months ago, is on its way to Mars. At this juncture, it is appropriate to talk about the opportunities presented to us for the Human Exploration of Mars. I am planning to highlight some of the challenges to take humans to Mars, descend, land, stay, ascend and return home safely. The logistics of carrying the necessary accessories to stay at Mars will be delivered in multiple stages using robotic missions. The primary ingredients for human survival is air, water, food and shelter and the necessity to recycle the primary ingredients will be articulated. Humans have to travel beyond the van Allen radiation belt under microgravity condition during this inter-planetary travel for about 6 months minimum one way. The deconditioning of human system under microgravity conditions and protection of humans from Galactic cosmic radiation during the travel should be taken into consideration. The multi-disciplinary effort to keep the humans safe and functional during this journey will be addressed.

  2. Archaea on human skin.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alexander J; Auerbach, Anna K; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  3. Human Plasma Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protein, which exists in bovine plasma as a precursor of a serine protease. In this study, protein C was isolated to homogeneity from human plasma by barium citrate adsorption and elution, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, dextran sulfate agarose chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Human protein C (Mr = 62,000) contains 23% carbohydrate and is composed of a light chain (Mr = 21,000) and a heavy chain (Mr = 41,000) held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain has an amino-terminal sequence of Ala-Asn-Ser-Phe-Leu- and the heavy chain has an aminoterminal sequence of Asp-Pro-Glu-Asp-Gln. The residues that are identical to bovine protein C are underlined. Incubation of human protein C with human α-thrombin at an enzyme to substrate weight ratio of 1:50 resulted in the formation of activated protein C, an enzyme with serine amidase activity. In the activation reaction, the apparent molecular weight of the heavy chain decreased from 41,000 to 40,000 as determined by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No apparent change in the molecular weight of the light chain was observed in the activation process. The heavy chain of human activated protein C also contains the active-site serine residue as evidenced by its ability to react with radiolabeled diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Human activated protein C markedly prolongs the kaolin-cephalin clotting time of human plasma, but not that of bovine plasma. The amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of human activated protein C were completely obviated by prior incubation of the enzyme with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. These results indicate that human protein C, like its bovine counterpart, exists in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease by limited proteolysis with attendant anticoagulant activity. Images PMID:468991

  4. Global gene expression analysis in time series following N-acetyl L-cysteine induced epithelial differentiation of human normal and cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Anna C; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Edlundh-Rose, Esther; Greco, Giulia; Serafino, Annalucia; Krasnowska, Eva K; Lundeberg, Thomas; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Romano, Maria-Concetta; Parasassi, Tiziana; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2005-01-01

    Background Cancer prevention trials using different types of antioxidant supplements have been carried out at several occasions and one of the investigated compounds has been the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Studies at the cellular level have previously demonstrated that a single supplementation of NAC induces a ten-fold more rapid differentiation in normal primary human keratinocytes as well as a reversion of a colon carcinoma cell line from neoplastic proliferation to apical-basolateral differentiation [1]. The investigated cells showed an early change in the organization of the cytoskeleton, several newly established adherens junctions with E-cadherin/β-catenin complexes and increased focal adhesions, all features characterizing the differentiation process. Methods In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the proliferation arrest and accelerated differentiation induced by NAC treatment of NHEK and Caco-2 cells in vitro, we performed global gene expression analysis of NAC treated cells in a time series (1, 12 and 24 hours post NAC treatment) using the Affymetrix GeneChip™ Human Genome U95Av2 chip, which contains approximately 12,000 previously characterized sequences. The treated samples were compared to the corresponding untreated culture at the same time point. Results Microarray data analysis revealed an increasing number of differentially expressed transcripts over time upon NAC treatment. The early response (1 hour) was transient, while a constitutive trend was commonly found among genes differentially regulated at later time points (12 and 24 hours). Connections to the induction of differentiation and inhibition of growth were identified for a majority of up- and down-regulated genes. All of the observed transcriptional changes, except for seven genes, were unique to either cell line. Only one gene, ID-1, was mutually regulated at 1 hour post treatment and might represent a common mediator of early NAC action. The detection

  5. Human exposure to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  6. Aluminium in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans.

  7. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  8. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  9. Human Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwani, Akhilesh; Sengar, Chitransh; Talwaniper, Jyotsna; Sharma, Shaan

    2012-08-01

    The paper basically deals with the study of HCI (Human computer interaction) or BCI(Brain-Computer-Interfaces) Technology that can be used for capturing brain signals and translating them into commands that allow humans to control (just by thinking) devices such as computers, robots, rehabilitation technology and virtual reality environments. The HCI is based as a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. BCIs are often aimed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions.The paper also deals with many advantages of BCI Technology along with some of its applications and some major drawbacks.

  10. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-06-01

    The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

  11. ESA Human Exploration Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, Scott

    The long term goal of the Aurora Exploration Programme is Human exploration of Mars. In preparation for this, exploration of the Moon is a necessary step to provide demonstration of capabilities, mandatory for long duration human spaceflight. With the European Columbus module attached to the ISS, Europe has access to a world class laboratory in space for microgravity research, technology demonstration and preparation for future human exploration missions. The ongoing phase of the exploration programme has been focused on defining the overall European strategy and exploration architecture within the global exploration environment. System studies as well as focused technology developments are in progress (e.g. development of regenerative life support).

  12. [Human dying has changed].

    PubMed

    Llano Escobar, A

    1990-01-01

    In the modern era, the act of dying, at least in the West, presents a series of new characteristics resulting from scientific and technological progress and social changes. More and more frequently, humans die in the strange surroundings of medical establishments without the support of their loved ones and without the opportunity of taking part in decisions related to their own deaths. In the light of the serious personal and social problems caused by this transformation of human death, bioethics emerges as an attempt to uncover options that are more humane.

  13. The Concept of Being Human.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    This analysis of the relationship between humanism and humanitarianism outlines educational goals that should lead to a more humane world. Section 1, an outline of human life examines six substructures--human life, individuality, amenity, contact, actualization, and problems. A definition and examples of humanism in section 2 are elaborated into a…

  14. High-Density Microarray of Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kenneth H.; Wilson, Wendy J.; Radosevich, Jennifer L.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Viswanathan, Vijay S.; Kuczmarski, Thomas A.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2002-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, originally conceived as a way to provide a universal phylogeny for life forms, has proven useful in many areas of biological research. Some of the most promising applications of this approach are presently limited by the rate at which sequences can be analyzed. As a step toward overcoming this limitation, we have investigated the use of photolithography chip technology to perform sequence analyses on amplified small-subunit rRNA genes. The GeneChip (Affymetrix Corporation) contained 31,179 20-mer oligonucleotides that were complementary to a subalignment of sequences in the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) (B. L. Maidak et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 29:173-174, 2001). The chip and standard Affymetrix software were able to correctly match small-subunit ribosomal DNA amplicons with the corresponding sequences in the RDP database for 15 of 17 bacterial species grown in pure culture. When bacteria collected from an air sample were tested, the method compared favorably with cloning and sequencing amplicons in determining the presence of phylogenetic groups. However, the method could not resolve the individual sequences comprising a complex mixed sample. Given these results and the potential for future enhancement of this technology, it may become widely useful. PMID:11976131

  15. Pesticides and Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Rodenticides Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose ...

  16. Approaches to Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard W., Ed.; Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This anthology of essays approaches human communication from the points of view of: anthropology, art biology, economics, encounter groups, semantics, general system theory, history, information theory, international behavior, journalism, linguistics, mass media, neurophysiology, nonverbal behavior, organizational behavior, philosophy, political…

  17. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Print Email Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  18. Viruses and human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  19. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  20. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  1. Humanism vs. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Madeline

    1977-01-01

    Author argues that humanism and behaviorism are not necessarily exclusive of one another, and that principles of behaviorism, when thoughtfully applied, can lead to the achievement of humanistic goals. (RW)

  2. Bridging Humanism and Behaviorism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Lily

    1980-01-01

    Humanistic behaviorism may provide the necessary bridge between behaviorism and humanism. Perhaps the most humanistic approach to teaching is to learn how certain changes will help students and how these changes can be accomplished. (Author/MLF)

  3. Teaching about Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database concerning the teaching of human geography. Includes documents dealing with Africa, Asia, the United States, Canada, Antarctica, and geographic concepts. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  4. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  5. Human Resource Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  6. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You Human Papillomavirus Vaccine HPV Information in Other Languages Women ...

  7. Human Biomass Consumption

    NASA Video Gallery

    Humans are using an increasing amount of Earth’s annual production of plants. Research shows that, from 1995 to 2005, consumption rose from 20 to 25 percent of the planet's annual production. Wha...

  8. Human Systems Integration Introduction

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lecture provides an overview of Human Systems Integration (HSI), its implementation cost and return on investment, HSI domains, how HSI fits into the NASA organization structure, HSI roles and...

  9. The Human Hazard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickell, Crispin

    1995-01-01

    Examines the plight of environmental refugees and the adequacy of political responses to the situation. Discusses the consequences of accelerated environmental change, particularly the impact of global warming on human migration. (LZ)

  10. Elitism in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomfield, Morton W.

    1974-01-01

    A justification and explication of the existence of elites in the academic world, but especially in the humanities where they perform a practical and necessary function for the enrichment of the mankind, is presented. (JH)

  11. Pushing Human Frontiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    With human colonization of Mars, I think you will see a higher standard of civilization, just as America set a higher standard of civilization which then promulgated back into Europe. I think that if you want to maximize human potential, you need a higher standard of civilization, and that becomes an example that benefits everyone. Without an open frontier, closed world ideologies, such as the Malthus Theory, tend to come to the forefront. It is that there are limited resources; therefore, we are all in deadly competition with each other for the limited pot. The result is tyrannical and potentially genocidal regimes, and we've already seen this in the twentieth century. There s no truth in the Malthus Theory, because human beings are the creators of their resources. With every mouth comes a pair of hands and a brain. But if it seems to be true, you have a vector in this direction, and it is extremely unfortunate. It is only in a universe of infinite resources that all humans can be brothers and sisters. The fundamental question which affects humanity s sense of itself is whether the world is changeable or fixed. Are we the makers of our world or just its inhabitants? Some people have a view that they re living at the end of history within a world that s already defined, and there is no fundamental purpose to human life because there is nothing humans can do that matters. On the other hand, if humans understand their own role as the creators of their world, that s a much more healthy point of view. It raises the dignity of humans. Indeed, if we do establish a new branch of human civilization on Mars that grows in time and potency to the point where it cannot really settle Mars, but transforms Mars, and brings life to Mars, we will prove to everyone and for all time the precious and positive nature of the human species and every member of it.

  12. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  13. Habitability and Human Factors Contributions to Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumaya, Jennifer Boyer

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch in support of human space flight in two main areas: Applied support to major space programs, and Space research. The field of Human Factors applies knowledge of human characteristics for the design of safer, more effective, and more efficient systems. This work is in several areas of the human space program: (1) Human-System Integration (HSI), (2) Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, (3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA), (4) Lunar Surface Systems, (5) International Space Station (ISS), and (6) Human Research Program (HRP). After detailing the work done in these areas, the facilities that are available for human factors work are shown.

  14. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes.

  15. Humans in space.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Averner, M

    2001-02-22

    Many successful space missions over the past 40 years have highlighted the advantages and necessity of humans in the exploration of space. But as space travel becomes ever more feasible in the twenty-first century, the health and safety of future space explorers will be paramount. In particular, understanding the risks posed by exposure to radiation and extended weightlessness will be crucial if humans are to travel far from Earth.

  16. Evolution and human sexuality.

    PubMed

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory.

  17. Quality and human society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, W.

    1991-02-01

    Quality of products and services is seen as a necessity in our modern world. Quality also has important cross-links to safety in our society. It is however suggested, that human beings are living in their industrial environment under the stress of a fractured personality with anxieties and frustrations. Some cultural comparisons with other industrial nations are given. Quality control tailored to human nature is recommended.

  18. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  19. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes several case studies of human space exploration, considered by the NASA's Office of Exploration in 1988. Special attention is given to the mission scenarios, the critical technology required in these expeditions, and the extraterrestrial power requirements of significant system elements. The cases examined include a manned expedition to Phobos, the inner Martian moon; a human expedition to Mars; the Lunar Observatory; and a lunar outpost to early Mars evolution.

  20. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  1. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  2. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  3. Glycobiology of human milk.

    PubMed

    Newburg, D S

    2013-07-01

    Glycans are characteristic components of milk, and each species has unique patterns of specific carbohydrates. Human milk is unusually rich in glycans, with the major components being lactose and oligosaccharides, representing approximately 6.8 and 1% of the milk, respectively. Other sources of glycans in human milk include monosaccharides, mucins, glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins, glycopeptides, and glycolipids. In human milk, the presence and patterns of these glycans vary depending upon the stage of lactation and the maternal genes and their genetic polymorphisms that control glycosyl transferases. The synthesis of milk glycans utilizes a significant portion of the metabolic energy that the mother expends when producing her milk, but other than lactose, these glycans contribute little to the nutritional needs of the infant. The data herein support several functions. 1) Many human milk glycans inhibit pathogens from binding to the intestinal mucosa. 2) Human milk glycans attenuate inflammation. 3) Glycans also directly stimulate the growth of beneficial (mutualist) bacteria of the microbiota (formerly considered commensal microflora of the intestine); these mutualists and their fermentation products can, in turn, (a) inhibit pathogens, (b) modulate signaling and inflammation, and (c) the fermentation products can be absorbed and utilized as a source of dietary calories. These functions can help direct and support intestinal postnatal growth, development, and ontogeny of colonization. The many functions of the milk glycans may synergistically protect infants from disease. Hence, human milk glycans and their homologs may serve as novel prophylactic or therapeutic agents for a diverse range of deleterious conditions.

  4. Genomics of human longevity.

    PubMed

    Slagboom, P E; Beekman, M; Passtoors, W M; Deelen, J; Vaarhorst, A A M; Boer, J M; van den Akker, E B; van Heemst, D; de Craen, A J M; Maier, A B; Rozing, M; Mooijaart, S P; Heijmans, B T; Westendorp, R G J

    2011-01-12

    In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial metabolic and cellular features of long-lived families resemble those in animals for whom the lifespan is extended by applying genetic manipulation and, especially, dietary restriction. Candidate gene studies in humans support the notion that human orthologues from longevity genes identified in lower species do contribute to longevity but that the influence of the genetic variants involved is small. Here we discuss how an integration of novel study designs, labour-intensive biobanking, deep phenotyping and genomic research may provide insights into the mechanisms that drive human longevity and healthy ageing, beyond the associations usually provided by molecular and genetic epidemiology. Although prospective studies of humans from the cradle to the grave have never been performed, it is feasible to extract life histories from different cohorts jointly covering the molecular changes that occur with age from early development all the way up to the age at death. By the integration of research in different study cohorts, and with research in animal models, biological research into human longevity is thus making considerable progress.

  5. The human telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Moyzis, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    An ultimate goal of human genetics is the generation of a complete physical and ''functional'' map of the human genome. Twenty-five percent of human DNA, however, consists of repetitive DNA sequences. These repetitive DNA sequences are thought to arise by many mechanisms, from direct sequence amplification by the unequal recombination of homologous DNA regions to the reverse flow of genetic information. A general outline of the chromosomal organization of these repetitive sequences will be discussed. Our working hypothesis is that certain classes of human repetitive DNA sequences ''encode'' the information necessary for defining long-range genomic structure. Evidence will be presented that the first goal of this research, the identification and cloning of the human telomere, has been achieved. A human repetitive DNA library was constructed from randomly sheared, reassociated, and oligo(G/center dot/C)-tailed DNA, a method that minimizes the potential loss of sequences devoid of a given restriction enzyme site. Sequences too large to clone efficiently in cosmid or /lambda/ vectors, such as centromeric repeats, or telomeric sequences with an end incompatible for cloning, should be present in this library. In order to isolate highly conserved repetitive DNA sequences, this library was screened with radiolabeled hamster Cot50 repetitive DNA. Two clones, containing tandem arrays of the sequence (TTAGGG), were isolated by this method. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Human bites - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Bites - human - self-care ... Human bites can occur in 2 ways: If someone bites you If your hand comes into contact ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than animal bites. ...

  7. Human behavior and human performance: Psychomotor demands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of several experiments are presented in abstract form. These studies are critical for the interpretation and acceptance of flight based science to be conducted by the Behavior and Performance project. Some representative titles are as follow: External audio for IBM/PC compatible computers; A comparative assessment of psychomotor performance (target prediction by humans and macaques); Response path (a dependent measure for computer maze solving and other tasks); Behavioral asymmetries of psychomotor performance in Rhesus monkey (a dissociation between hand preference and skill); Testing primates with joystick based automated apparatus; and Environmental enrichment and performance assessment for ground or flight based research with primates;

  8. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    Manned space flight can be viewed as an interaction of three general elements: the human crewmember, spacecraft systems, and the environment. While the human crewmember is a crucial element in the system, certain physiological, psychological, environ- mental and spacecraft systems factors can compromise human performance in space. These factors include atmospheric pressure, physiology, uncertainties associated with space radiation, the potential for exposure to toxic materials in the closed environment, and spacecraft habitability. Health protection in space, for current and future missions, relies on a philosophy of risk reduction, which in the space program is achieved in four ways-through health maintenance, health care, design criteria, an selection and training. Emphasis is place upon prevention, through selection criteria and careful screening. Spacecraft health care systems must be absolutely reliable, and they will be automated and computerized to the maximum extent possible, but still designed with the human crewmember's capabilities in mind. The autonomy and technological sophistication of future missions will require a greater emphasis on high-level interaction between the human operator and automated systems, with effective allocation of tasks between humans and machines. Performance in space will include complex tasks during extravehicular activity (EVA) and on planetary surfaces, and knowledge of crewmembers' capability and limitations during such operations will be critical to mission success. Psychological support will become increasingly important on space missions, as crews spend long periods in remote and potentially hazardous environments. The success of future missions will depend on both individual psychological health and group cohesion and productivity, particularly as crew profiles become more heterogeneous. Thus, further human factors are needed in the area of small-group dynamics and performance.

  9. Human Milk Fortification.

    PubMed

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born <32 weeks' gestation prior to discharge home. Recent recommended dietary intakes (RDI) have been revised. Up to 4.2 g of protein and 135 kcal/kg per day is recommended for infants born very preterm. Additional supplements are needed to current commercial fortifiers to achieve these RDI and reduce the incidence of ex-uterine growth failure. A human milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population. PMID:26111568

  10. Human Milk Fortification.

    PubMed

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born <32 weeks' gestation prior to discharge home. Recent recommended dietary intakes (RDI) have been revised. Up to 4.2 g of protein and 135 kcal/kg per day is recommended for infants born very preterm. Additional supplements are needed to current commercial fortifiers to achieve these RDI and reduce the incidence of ex-uterine growth failure. A human milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population.

  11. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  12. Differences in gene expression and cytokine production by crystalline vs. amorphous silica in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to respirable crystalline silica particles, as opposed to amorphous silica, is associated with lung inflammation, pulmonary fibrosis (silicosis), and potentially with lung cancer. We used Affymetrix/GeneSifter microarray analysis to determine whether gene expression profiles differed in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS 2B) exposed to cristobalite vs. amorphous silica particles at non-toxic and equal surface areas (75 and 150 × 106μm2/cm2). Bio-Plex analysis was also used to determine profiles of secreted cytokines and chemokines in response to both particles. Finally, primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) were used to comparatively assess silica particle-induced alterations in gene expression. Results Microarray analysis at 24 hours in BEAS 2B revealed 333 and 631 significant alterations in gene expression induced by cristobalite at low (75) and high (150 × 106μm2/cm2) amounts, respectively (p < 0.05/cut off ≥ 2.0-fold change). Exposure to amorphous silica micro-particles at high amounts (150 × 106μm2/cm2) induced 108 significant gene changes. Bio-Plex analysis of 27 human cytokines and chemokines revealed 9 secreted mediators (p < 0.05) induced by crystalline silica, but none were induced by amorphous silica. QRT-PCR revealed that cristobalite selectively up-regulated stress-related genes and cytokines (FOS, ATF3, IL6 and IL8) early and over time (2, 4, 8, and 24 h). Patterns of gene expression in NHBE cells were similar overall to BEAS 2B cells. At 75 × 106μm2/cm2, there were 339 significant alterations in gene expression induced by cristobalite and 42 by amorphous silica. Comparison of genes in response to cristobalite (75 × 106μm2/cm2) revealed 60 common, significant gene alterations in NHBE and BEAS 2B cells. Conclusions Cristobalite silica, as compared to synthetic amorphous silica particles at equal surface area concentrations, had comparable effects on the viability of human bronchial epithelial cells

  13. The Medicago truncatula gene expression atlas web server

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Legumes (Leguminosae or Fabaceae) play a major role in agriculture. Transcriptomics studies in the model legume species, Medicago truncatula, are instrumental in helping to formulate hypotheses about the role of legume genes. With the rapid growth of publically available Affymetrix GeneChip Medicago Genome Array GeneChip data from a great range of tissues, cell types, growth conditions, and stress treatments, the legume research community desires an effective bioinformatics system to aid efforts to interpret the Medicago genome through functional genomics. We developed the Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA) web server for this purpose. Description The Medicago truncatula Gene Expression Atlas (MtGEA) web server is a centralized platform for analyzing the Medicago transcriptome. Currently, the web server hosts gene expression data from 156 Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago genome arrays in 64 different experiments, covering a broad range of developmental and environmental conditions. The server enables flexible, multifaceted analyses of transcript data and provides a range of additional information about genes, including different types of annotation and links to the genome sequence, which help users formulate hypotheses about gene function. Transcript data can be accessed using Affymetrix probe identification number, DNA sequence, gene name, functional description in natural language, GO and KEGG annotation terms, and InterPro domain number. Transcripts can also be discovered through co-expression or differential expression analysis. Flexible tools to select a subset of experiments and to visualize and compare expression profiles of multiple genes have been implemented. Data can be downloaded, in part or full, in a tabular form compatible with common analytical and visualization software. The web server will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate new gene expression data and genome annotation, and is accessible at: http

  14. Why Geo-Humanities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graells, Robert Casals i.; Sibilla, Anna; Bohle, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic global change is a composite process. It consists of societal processes (in the 'noosphere') and natural processes (in the 'bio-geosphere'). The 'noosphere' is the ensemble of social, cultural or political insights ('shared subjective mental concepts') of people. Understanding the composite of societal and natural processes ('human geo-biosphere intersections'), which shapes the features of anthropogenic global change, would benefit from a description that draws equally on natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. To that end it is suggested to develop a concept of 'geo-humanities': This essay presents some aspects of its scope, discussing "knowledge that is to manage", "intentions that are to shape", "choices that are to justify" and "complexity that is to handle". Managing knowledge: That people understand anthropogenic global change requires their insights into how 'human geosphere intersections' function. Insights are formed ('processed') in the noosphere by means of interactions between people. Understanding how 'human geosphere intersections' functions combines scientific, engineering and economic studies with studies of the dynamics of the noosphere. Shaping intentions: During the last century anthropogenic global change developed as the collateral outcome of humankind's accumulated actions. It is caused by the number of people, the patterns of their consumption of resources, and the alterations of their environments. Nowadays, anthropogenic global chance is either an intentional negligence or a conscious act. Justifying choices: Humanity has alternatives how to alter Earth at planetary scale consciously. For example, there is a choice to alter the geo-biosphere or to adjust the noosphere. Whatever the choice, it will depend on people's world-views, cultures and preferences. Thus beyond issues whether science and technology are 'sound' overarching societal issues are to tackle, such as: (i) how to appropriate and distribute natural

  15. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different…

  16. [Human ehrlichiosis. Review].

    PubMed

    Arraga-Alvarado, C

    1994-12-01

    Human ehrlichiosis is a newly recognized tick-borne disease. Since 1935 Ehrlichia canis has been known as a cause of illness in dogs and other canine species, and for a few years it was related with human disease. In 1990, Ehrlichia chaffeensis was isolated from a man suspected of having ehrlichiosis. Partial sequencing of the rRNAS from the human isolate and E. canis, indicated that they are 98.7% related. More recently (May 1994) an "human granulocytic ehrlichiosis" have been reported in USA. PCR amplification and sequence of 16S rDNA, showed that the human isolate was virtually identical to those reported for E. phagocytophila y E. equi, organisms that cause ehrlichiosis in rumiant and in horses. Most patients shows fever, headache, malaise, nausea or vomiting, anorexia and in a minority of cases rash is present. Some of them have complications such as pulmonary infiltrates, gastrointestinal problems, renal dysfunction or failure, hepatoesplenomegaly, neurologic abnormalities, DIC and some times death. Leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver enzyme values have been common findings. Tetracycline and cloramphenicol have been using in adults and children as especific theraphy.

  17. Healthy human gut phageome.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M; Young, Mark J

    2016-09-13

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20-50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health. PMID:27573828

  18. The Human Serum Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  19. The Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1989-01-01

    Early in 1986, Charles DeLisi, then head of the Office of Health and Environmental Research at the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to organize a workshop charged with inquiring whether the state of technology and potential payoffs in biological knowledge and medical practice were such as to justify an organized program to map and sequence the human genome. The DOE's interest arose from its mission to assess the effects of radiation and other products of energy generation on human health in general and genetic material in particular. The workshop concluded that the technology was ripe, the benefits would be great, and a national program should be promptly initiated. Later committees, reporting to DOE, to the NIH, to the Office of Technology Assessment of the US Congress, and to the National Academy of Science have reviewed these issues more deliberately and come to the same conclusion. As a consequence, there has been established in the United States, a Human Genome Program, with funding largely from the NIH and the DOE, as indicated in Table 1. Moreover, the Program has attracted international interest, and Great Britain, France, Italy, and the Soviet Union, among other countries, have been reported to be starting human genome initiatives. Coordination of these programs, clearly in the interests of each, remains to be worked out, although an international Human Genome Organization (HUGO) is considering such coordination. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Human HOX gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Quinonez, Shane C; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The Hox genes are an evolutionarily conserved family of genes, which encode a class of important transcription factors that function in numerous developmental processes. Following their initial discovery, a substantial amount of information has been gained regarding the roles Hox genes play in various physiologic and pathologic processes. These processes range from a central role in anterior-posterior patterning of the developing embryo to roles in oncogenesis that are yet to be fully elucidated. In vertebrates there are a total of 39 Hox genes divided into 4 separate clusters. Of these, mutations in 10 Hox genes have been found to cause human disorders with significant variation in their inheritance patterns, penetrance, expressivity and mechanism of pathogenesis. This review aims to describe the various phenotypes caused by germline mutation in these 10 Hox genes that cause a human phenotype, with specific emphasis paid to the genotypic and phenotypic differences between allelic disorders. As clinical whole exome and genome sequencing is increasingly utilized in the future, we predict that additional Hox gene mutations will likely be identified to cause distinct human phenotypes. As the known human phenotypes closely resemble gene-specific murine models, we also review the homozygous loss-of-function mouse phenotypes for the 29 Hox genes without a known human disease. This review will aid clinicians in identifying and caring for patients affected with a known Hox gene disorder and help recognize the potential for novel mutations in patients with phenotypes informed by mouse knockout studies.

  1. Human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, D K; Dominguez, G; Pellett, P E

    1997-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 6 variant B (HHV-6B) are two closely related yet distinct viruses. These visuses belong to the Roseolovirus genus of the betaherpesvirus subfamily; they are most closely related to human herpesvirus 7 and then to human cytomegalovirus. Over 95% of people older than 2 years of age are seropositive for either or both HHV-6 variants, and current serologic methods are incapable of discriminating infection with one variant from infection with the other. HHV-6A has not been etiologically linked to any human disease, but such an association will probably be found soon. HHV-6B is the etiologic agent of the common childhood illness exanthem subitum (roseola infantum or sixth disease) and related febrile illnesses. These viruses are frequently active and associated with illness in immunocompromised patients and may play a role in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies. HHV-6 is a commensal inhabitant of brains; various neurologic manifestations, including convulsions and encephalitis, can occur during primary HHV-6 infection or in immunocompromised patients. HHV-6 and distribution in the central nervous system are altered in patients with multiple sclerosis; the significance of this is under investigation. PMID:9227865

  2. Human hybrid hybridoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.

    1987-11-15

    Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.

  3. Human occupancy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    1994-10-01

    In the area of security and surveillance technologies, the problem of the arrival in Canada of illegal and undesirable ship and truck cargo loads is steadily increasing. As the volumes of cargo arrivals increase so do the Immigration and Customs problems related to the determination of the validity of those cargo contents. Of special concern to Immigration Control Authorities around the world is the emerging and increasing trend of illegal smuggling of human beings hidden inside of shipping containers. Beginning in 1992, Immigration Control Authorities in Canada observed an escalation of alien people smuggling through the use of cargo shipping containers arriving in the Port of Montreal. This paper will present to the audience the recently completed Immigration Canada Human Occupancy Detection project by explaining the design, development and testing of human occupancy detectors. The devices are designed to electronically detect the presence of persons hiding inside of shipping containers, without the requirement of opening the container doors. The human occupancy detection concepts are based upon the presence of carbon dioxide or other human waste characteristics commonly found inside of shipping containers.

  4. Humanized Mice for Studying Human Leukocyte Integrins In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Kumar, Priti; Ye, Chunting; Shankar, Premlata

    2015-01-01

    Humanized mice have recently emerged as powerful translational animal models for studying human hematopoiesis, immune interactions, and diseases of the human immune system. Several important advances in the humanized mouse technology have been reported over the last few years, thereby resulting in improved engraftment, high levels of human chimerism, and sustained human hematopoiesis. This chapter describes the detailed procedures for generating various humanized mouse models including hu-PBL, hu-HSC, and BLT models and discusses considerations for choosing the appropriate model system. PMID:21909931

  5. Teleoperator Human Factors Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the spectrum of space teleoperation activities likely in the 1985 to 1995 decade focused on the resolution of critical human engineering issues and characterization of the technology effect on performance of remote human operators. The study began with the identification and documentation of a set of representative reference teleoperator tasks. For each task, technology, development, and design options, issues, and alternatives that bear on human operator performance were defined and categorized. A literature survey identified existing studies of man/machine issues. For each teleoperations category, an assessment was made of the state of knowledge on a scale from adequate to void. The tests, experiments, and analyses necessary to provide the missing elements of knowledge were then defined. A limited set of tests were actually performed, including operator selection, baseline task definition, control mode study, lighting study, camera study, and preliminary time delay study.

  6. Human factors in aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L. (Editor); Nagel, David C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of human-factors (HF) analysis for aviation applications are examined in a collection of reviews by leading experts, with an emphasis on recent developments. The aim is to provide information and guidance to the aviation community outside the HF field itself. Topics addressed include the systems approach to HF, system safety considerations, the human senses in flight, information processing, aviation workloads, group interaction and crew performance, flight training and simulation, human error in aviation operations, and aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythms. Also discussed are pilot control; aviation displays; cockpit automation; HF aspects of software interfaces; the design and integration of cockpit-crew systems; and HF issues for airline pilots, general aviation, helicopters, and ATC.

  7. Seaweed and human health.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emma S; Allsopp, Philip J; Magee, Pamela J; Gill, Chris I R; Nitecki, Sonja; Strain, Conall R; McSorley, Emeir M

    2014-03-01

    Seaweeds may have an important role in modulating chronic disease. Rich in unique bioactive compounds not present in terrestrial food sources, including different proteins (lectins, phycobiliproteins, peptides, and amino acids), polyphenols, and polysaccharides, seaweeds are a novel source of compounds with potential to be exploited in human health applications. Purported benefits include antiviral, anticancer, and anticoagulant properties as well as the ability to modulate gut health and risk factors for obesity and diabetes. Though the majority of studies have been performed in cell and animal models, there is evidence of the beneficial effect of seaweed and seaweed components on markers of human health and disease status. This review is the first to critically evaluate these human studies, aiming to draw attention to gaps in current knowledge, which will aid the planning and implementation of future studies.

  8. Human trichromacy revisited.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Hiroshi; Winawer, Jonathan; Dougherty, Robert F; Wandell, Brian A

    2013-01-15

    The presence of a photopigment (melanopsin) within certain retinal ganglion cells was a surprising and significant discovery. This pigment is routinely described as "nonvisual" to highlight its signaling role in pupil dilation and circadian rhythms. Here we asked whether light absorbed by melanopsin can be seen by healthy human subjects. To answer this requires delivering intense (above rod saturation), well-controlled lights using four independent primaries. We collected detection thresholds to many four-primary stimuli. Threshold measurements in the fovea are explained by trichromatic theory, with no need to invoke a fourth photopigment. In the periphery, where melanopsin is present, threshold measurements deviate from trichromatic theory; at high photopic levels, sensitivity is explained by absorptions in four, not three, photopigment classes. We consider a series of hypotheses to explain the tetrasensitivity at high photopic levels in the human peripheral field. The most likely hypothesis is that in healthy human subjects melanopsin absorptions influence visibility. PMID:23256158

  9. Abortion and human rights.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2010-10-01

    Abortion has been a reality in women's lives since the beginning of recorded history, typically with a high risk of fatal consequences, until the last century when evolutions in the field of medicine, including techniques of safe abortion and effective methods of family planning, could have ended the need to seek unsafe abortion. The context of women's lives globally is an important but often ignored variable, increasingly recognised in evolving human rights especially related to gender and reproduction. International and regional human rights instruments are being invoked where national laws result in violations of human rights such as health and life. The individual right to conscientious objection must be respected and better understood, and is not absolute. Health professional organisations have a role to play in clarifying responsibilities consistent with national laws and respecting reproductive rights. Seeking common ground using evidence rather than polarised opinion can assist the future focus. PMID:20303830

  10. Highest permanent human habitation.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this analysis was to determine the altitude of the highest permanent human habitation in the hope that this will throw some light on what determines the highest altitude that a community can tolerate indefinitely. A number of places where people have lived at very high altitudes for long periods of time are reviewed. Individuals have lived for as long as 2 yr at an altitude of 5950 m, and there was a miner's camp at 5300 m for several years. The highest permanently inhabited town in the world at the present time appears to be La Rinconada, a mining village of over 7000 people in southern Peru at an altitude of up to 5100 m, which has been in existence for over 40 yr. The altitude of the highest permanent human habitation is determined partly by economic factors, rather than solely by human tolerance to hypoxia. PMID:12631426

  11. [Human rights and procreation].

    PubMed

    Leroy, F

    1990-04-01

    The impact of procreation on freedom, health and welfare of human beings, is considerable. This relationship, however, is not mirrored in texts devoted to Human Rights. This omission obviously implies a neglect of women's and children's rights. The history of anticonceptive methods exemplifies the struggle for these rights. This conquest, which has lasted two hundred years, is far from completed. Because of the demographic outbreak in Third World countries, an ideological conflict has appeared between first generation Human Rights concerned with individual freedom ("rights of") and those of second generation aiming at social fairness ("rights to"). Adequate political and economic adjustment between North and South is a prerequisite to any balanced compromise that would resolve this conflict through democratic, albeit intensive, birth control.

  12. Is humanity suicidal?

    PubMed

    Wilson, E O

    1993-01-01

    The world's fauna and flora has entered a crisis unparalleled since the end of the Mesozoic Era, with the extinction rate of species now elevated to more than a thousand times that existing before the coming of humanity. Scientists and policy makers are ill-prepared to moderate this hemorrhaging, because so little is known of the biology of the Earth's millions of species and because so little effort has been directed toward conservation thus far. With the vanished species will go great potential wealth in scientific knowledge, new products, ecosystems services, and part of the natural world in which the human species originated. The need for new research and improved management is thus urgent. If it is not met, humanity will likely survive, but in a world biologically impoverished for all time.

  13. Human nutrition: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barnicot, N A

    2005-01-01

    In recent decades, much new evidence relating to the ape forerunners of modern humans has come to hand and diet appears to be an important factor. At some stage, there must have been a transition from a largely vegetarian ape diet to a modern human hunting economy providing significant amounts of meat. On an even longer evolutionary time scale the change was more complex. The mechanisms of evolutionary change are now better understood than they were in Darwin's time, thanks largely to great advances in genetics, both experimental and theoretical. It is virtually certain that diet, as a major component of the human environment, must have exerted evolutionary effects, but researchers still have little good evidence. PMID:17393680

  14. Human-Robot Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  15. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  16. Preparing for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.; Joosten, B. Kent

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise is defining architectures and requirements for human exploration that radically reduce the costs of such missions through the use of advanced technologies, commercial partnerships and innovative systems strategies. In addition, the HEDS Enterprise is collaborating with the Space Science Enterprise to acquire needed early knowledge about Mars and to demonstrate critical technologies via robotic missions. This paper provides an overview of the technological challenges facing NASA as it prepares for human exploration. Emphasis is placed on identifying the key technologies including those which will provide the most return in terms of reducing total mission cost and/or reducing potential risk to the mission crew. Top-level requirements are provided for those critical enabling technology options currently under consideration.

  17. Scientists and Human Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  18. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  19. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  20. The Exploration of Mars by Humans: Why Mars? Why Humans?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's historic flight in 1961, the first flight of a human in space, plans are underway for another historic human mission. Plans are being developed for a human mission to Mars. Once we reach Mars, the human species will become the first two-planet species. Both the Bush Administration (in 2004) and the Obama Administration (in 2010) proposed a human mission to Mars as a national goal of the United States.

  1. Disorders of Human Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Arthur; Mears, J. Gregory; Ramirez, Francesco

    1980-02-01

    Studies of the human hemoglobin system have provided new insights into the regulation of expression of a group of linked human genes, the γ -δ -β globin gene complex in man. In particular, the thalassemia syndromes and related disorders of man are inherited anemias that provide mutations for the study of the regulation of globin gene expression. New methods, including restriction enzyme analysis and cloning of cellular DNA, have made it feasible to define more precisely the structure and organization of the globin genes in cellular DNA. Deletions of specific globin gene fragments have already been found in certain of these disorders and have been applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  2. Artificial human vision.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Can vision be restored to the blind? As early as 1929 it was discovered that stimulating the visual cortex of an individual led to the perception of spots of light, known as phosphenes [1] . The aim of artificial human vision systems is to attempt to utilize the perception of phosphenes to provide a useful substitute for normal vision. Currently, four locations for electrical stimulation are being investigated; behind the retina (subretinal), in front of the retina (epiretinal), the optic nerve and the visual cortex (using intra- and surface electrodes). This review discusses artificial human vision technology and requirements, and reviews the current development projects.

  3. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  4. We Are Human Beings.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan's arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients.

  5. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The nation's efforts to expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system was given renewed emphasis in January of 1988 when the Presidential Directive on National Space Policy was signed into effect. The expansion of human presence into the solar system has particular significance, in that it defines long-range goals for NASA's future missions. To embark and achieve such ambitious ventures is a significant undertaking, particularly compared to past space activities. Missions to Mars, the Moon, and Phobos, as well as an observatory based on the dark side of the Moon are discussed.

  6. Defining the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ursell, Luke K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Knight, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly developing sequencing methods and analytical techniques are enhancing our ability to understand the human microbiome, and, indeed, how we define the microbiome and its constituents. In this review we highlight recent research that expands our ability to understand the human microbiome on different spatial and temporal scales, including daily timeseries datasets spanning months. Furthermore, we discuss emerging concepts related to defining operational taxonomic units, diversity indices, core versus transient microbiomes and the possibility of enterotypes. Additional advances in sequencing technology and in our understanding of the microbiome will provide exciting prospects for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine. PMID:22861806

  7. Human push capability.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Ralph L; Liber, Theodore

    2006-02-22

    Use of unassisted human push capability arises from time to time in the areas of crowd and animal control, the security of locked doors, the integrity of railings, the removal of tree stumps and entrenched vehicles, the manoeuvering of furniture, and athletic pursuits such as US football or wrestling. Depending on the scenario, human push capability involves strength, weight, weight distribution, push angle, footwear/floor friction, and the friction between the upper body and the pushed object. Simple models are used to establish the relationships among these factors.

  8. Mapping Human Epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Chloe M.; Ren, Bing

    2013-01-01

    As the second dimension to the genome, the epigenome contains key information specific to every type of cells. Thousands of human epigenome maps have been produced in recent years thanks to rapid development of high throughput epigenome mapping technologies. In this review, we discuss the current epigenome mapping toolkit and utilities of epigenome maps. We focus particularly on mapping of DNA methylation, chromatin modification state and chromatin structures, and emphasize the use of epigenome maps to delineate human gene regulatory sequences and developmental programs. We also provide a perspective on the progress of the epigenomics field and challenges ahead. PMID:24074860

  9. Microsporidia and human infections.

    PubMed Central

    Shadduck, J A; Greeley, E

    1989-01-01

    Protozoa of the phylum Microspora are obligate intracellular pathogens that are being detected with increasing frequency in humans, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Organisms from four genera have been reported to date, and serological data suggest the occurrence of latent infections. Sources of human infections are not known, but microsporidia are widespread in lower vertebrates and invertebrates. There is no known treatment. Study of the disease in mammals suggests that infection often will be clinically silent, that intact T-cell-mediated host defenses are required for resistance, and that serious clinical disease may occur under circumstances in which extensive parasite replication can occur. Images PMID:2650860

  10. Human disease genes.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sanchez, G; Childs, B; Valle, D

    2001-02-15

    The complete human genome sequence will facilitate the identification of all genes that contribute to disease. We propose that the functional classification of disease genes and their products will reveal general principles of human disease. We have determined functional categories for nearly 1,000 documented disease genes, and found striking correlations between the function of the gene product and features of disease, such as age of onset and mode of inheritance. As knowledge of disease genes grows, including those contributing to complex traits, more sophisticated analyses will be possible; their results will yield a deeper understanding of disease and an enhanced integration of medicine with biology.

  11. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  12. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  13. Biodemography of human ageing

    PubMed Central

    Vaupel, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Human senescence has been delayed by a decade. This finding, documented in 1994 and bolstered since, is a fundamental discovery about the biology of human ageing, and one with profound implications for individuals, society and the economy. Remarkably, the rate of deterioration with age seems to be constant across individuals and over time: it seems that death is being delayed because people are reaching old age in better health. Research by demographers, epidemiologists and other biomedical researchers suggests that further progress is likely to be made in advancing the frontier of survival — and healthy survival — to even greater ages. PMID:20336136

  14. We Are Human Beings.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan's arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients. PMID:26810918

  15. Human dignity and human tissue: a meaningful ethical relationship?

    PubMed

    Kirchhoffer, David G; Dierickx, Kris

    2011-09-01

    Human dignity has long been used as a foundational principle in policy documents and ethical guidelines intended to govern various forms of biomedical research. Despite the vast amount of literature concerning human dignity and embryonic tissues, the majority of biomedical research uses non-embryonic human tissue. Therefore, this contribution addresses a notable lacuna in the literature: the relationship, if any, between human dignity and human tissue. This paper first elaborates a multidimensional understanding of human dignity that overcomes many of the shortcomings associated with the use of human dignity in other ethical debates. Second, it discusses the relationship between such an understanding of human dignity and 'non-embryonic' human tissue. Finally, it considers the implications of this relationship for biomedical research and practice involving human tissue. The contribution demonstrates that while human tissue cannot be said to have human dignity, human dignity is nevertheless implicated by human tissue, making what is done with human tissue and how it is done worthy of moral consideration.

  16. Human Rights: The Essential Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Carol; Hansen, Carol Rae; Wilde, Ralph; Bronkhorst, Daan; Moritz, Frederic A.; Rolle, Baptiste; Sherman, Rebecca; Southard, Jo Lynn; Wilkinson, Robert; Poole, Hilary, Ed.

    This reference work documents the history of human rights theory, explains each article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, explores the contemporary human rights movement, and examines the major human rights issues facing the world today. This book is the first to combine historical and contemporary perspectives on these critical…

  17. Making IBM's Computer, Watson, Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This essay uses the recent victory of an IBM computer (Watson) in the TV game, "Jeopardy," to speculate on the abilities Watson would need, in addition to those it has, to be human. The essay's basic premise is that to be human is to behave as humans behave and to function in society as humans function. Alternatives to this premise are considered…

  18. Human Challenges in Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presents an overview using pictures some of the history of human exploration of the new frontiers of Earth and then examines some of the challenges to human exploration of space. Particular attention is given to the environmental factors and to the social and human factors that effect humans in space environments.

  19. Sacred Sounds in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Robert A.

    To see literature as a sign and a symbol simply reasserts the view of the humanities as the embodiment of the highest aspirations of human nature. Human beings are sign givers and symbol makers as they look for the sacred meaning in their lives. Through a college humanities course, some of the symbols that artists employ in fiction, poetry, drama,…

  20. Transcriptional Profiling of mRNAs and microRNAs in Human Bone Marrow Precursor B Cells Identifies Subset- and Age-Specific Variations

    PubMed Central

    Aass, Hans Christian Dalsbotten; Olstad, Ole K.; Kierulf, Peter; Gautvik, Kaare M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular mechanisms explaining age-related changes in the bone marrow with reduced precursor B cell output are poorly understood. Methods We studied the transcriptome of five precursor B cell subsets in individual bone marrow samples from 4 healthy children and 4 adults employing GeneChip® Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays (Affymetrix®) and TaqMan® Array MicroRNA Cards (Life Technologies™). Results A total of 1796 mRNAs (11%) were at least once differentially expressed between the various precursor B cell subsets in either age group (FDR 0.1%, p≤1.13×10−4) with more marked cell stage specific differences than those related to age. In contrast, microRNA profiles of the various precursor B cell subsets showed less hierarchical clustering as compared to the corresponding mRNA profiles. However, 17 of the 667 microRNA assays (2.5%) were at least once differentially expressed between the subsets (FDR 10%, p≤0.004). From target analysis (Ingenuity® Systems), functional assignment between postulated interacting mRNAs and microRNAs showed especially association to cellular growth, proliferation and cell cycle regulation. One functional network connected up-regulation of the differentiation inhibitor ID2 mRNA to down-regulation of the hematopoiesis- or cell cycle regulating miR-125b-5p, miR-181a-5p, miR-196a-5p, miR-24-3p and miR-320d in adult PreBII large cells. Noteworthy was also the stage-dependent expression of the growth promoting miR-17-92 cluster, showing a partly inverse trend with age, reaching statistical significance at the PreBII small stage (up 3.1–12.9 fold in children, p = 0.0084–0.0270). Conclusions The global mRNA profile is characteristic for each precursor B cell developmental stage and largely similar in children and adults. The microRNA profile is much cell stage specific and not changing much with age. Importantly, however, specific age-dependent differences involving key networks like differentiation and cellular growth may

  1. Humanizing the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubos, Rene J.

    1973-01-01

    By using scientific knowledge and ecological wisdom, new ecosystems can be created which will be more stable, profitable, and favorable to the continued growth of civilization. Nature by itself has not taken care of many problems of ecological interest in past and human intervention is necessary. (PS)

  2. Animal and human influenzas.

    PubMed

    Peiris, M; Yen, H-L

    2014-08-01

    Influenza type A viruses affect humans and other animals and cause significant morbidity, mortality and economic impact. Influenza A viruses are well adapted to cross species barriers and evade host immunity. Viruses that cause no clinical signs in wild aquatic birds may adapt in domestic poultry to become highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses which decimate poultry flocks. Viruses that cause asymptomatic infection in poultry (e.g. the recently emerged A/H7N9 virus) may cause severe zoonotic disease and pose a major pandemic threat. Pandemic influenza arises at unpredictable intervals from animal viruses and, in its global spread, outpaces current technologies for making vaccines against such novel viruses. Confronting the threat of influenza in humans and other animals is an excellent example of a task that requires a One Health approach. Changes in travel, trade in livestock and pets, changes in animal husbandry practices, wet markets and complex marketing chains all contribute to an increased risk of the emergence of novel influenza viruses with the ability to cross species barriers, leading to epizootics or pandemics. Coordinated surveillance at the animal- human interface for pandemic preparedness, risk assessment, risk reduction and prevention at source requires coordinated action among practitioners in human and animal health and the environmental sciences. Implementation of One Health in the field can be challenging because of divergent short-term objectives. Successful implementation requires effort, mutual trust, respect and understanding to ensure that long-term goals are achieved without adverse impacts on agricultural production and food security.

  3. Futures of Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, L. S.

    There are several research areas basic to the long-range future of human communications. Telecommunication and transportation offer the possiblity of two worldwide communications networks whose interrelationships need to be explored in terms of the needs of the individual, the community, and the world at large. Expanding possibilities of…

  4. Human Resource Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinford, Paul

    1978-01-01

    A computer at Valley View Schools, Illinois, is used to collect, store, maintain, and retrieve information about a school district's human resources. The system was designed to increase the efficiency and thoroughness of personnel and payroll record keeping, and reporting functions. (Author/MLF)

  5. Toward a Technical Humanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malassis, Louis

    1977-01-01

    Examines the relationship between education and development in developing nations. Advocates the fostering of a technical humanism--the development of knowledge in all its forms as a basis for action. In this system, technical education is as highly valued as general education. The system, and its applications to rural education is discussed. (CP)

  6. Humane Treatment of Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joan Smithey

    This booklet is designed to give teachers resource information about the humane treatment of and care for animals. The topics are presented as springboards for discussion and class activity. Topics include the care of dogs, cats, birds, horses, and fish; wildlife and ecological relationships; and careers with animals. Illustrations on some pages…

  7. The Human Potential Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamashiro, Roy T.

    The advent of the human potential movement has generated the expectation that educators unleash the intellectual, emotional, physical, and spiritual talents of students. This movement is characterized by its focus on (1) the person as a total being, (2) the needs and concerns of students, (3) phenomenology, (4) personal values and goals, and (5)…

  8. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  9. Designers of Human Settlements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, Ursula

    1976-01-01

    Reviewed herein are the ideas of nine men who have addressed themselves to the problems of human settlements in this century. The ideas reviewed include those of Arnold Toynbee, Lewis Mumford, Hassan Fathy, Buckminster Fuller, Constantinos Doxiadis, Charles Correa, Paul Mwaluko, Robert McNamara and John F. C. Turner. (BT)

  10. Who Hung the Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper is partly based on a lecture given at the AGTA conference in Perth in January 2013. It argues for a progressive subject based curriculum in which geography plays an essential part. This is based on an analysis of why and how subjects like geography, as part of the humanities, have been undermined and diminished in recent times. In a way…

  11. Human grasp point selection.

    PubMed

    Kleinholdermann, Urs; Franz, Volker H; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2013-07-25

    When we grasp an object, our visuomotor system has to solve an intricate problem: how to find the best out of an infinity of possible contact points of the fingers with the object? The contact point selection model (CoPS) we present here solves this problem and predicts human grasp point selection in precision grip grasping by combining a few basic rules that have been identified in human and robotic grasping. Usually, not all of the rules can be perfectly satisfied. Therefore, we assessed their relative importance by creating simple stimuli that put them into conflict with each other in pairs. Based on these conflict experiments we made model-based grasp point predictions for another experiment with a novel set of complexly shaped objects. The results show that our model predicts the human choice of grasp points very well, and that observers' preferences for their natural grasp angles is as important as physical stability constraints. Incorporating a human grasp point selection model like the one presented here could markedly improve current approaches to cortically guided arm and hand prostheses by making movements more natural while also allowing for a more efficient use of the available information.

  12. Parasites and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Perry, George H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of human evolutionary and population history can be advanced by ecological and evolutionary studies of our parasites. Many parasites flourish only in the presence of very specific human behaviors and in specific habitats, are wholly dependent on us, and have evolved with us for thousands or millions of years. Therefore, by asking when and how we first acquired those parasites, under which environmental and cultural conditions we are the most susceptible, and how the parasites have evolved and adapted to us and we in response to them, we can gain considerable insight into our own evolutionary history. As examples, the tapeworm life cycle is dependent on our consumption of meat, the divergence of body and head lice may have been subsequent to the development of clothing, and malaria hyperendemicity may be associated with agriculture. Thus, the evolutionary and population histories of these parasites are likely intertwined with critical aspects of human biology and culture. Here I review the mechanics of these and multiple other parasite proxies for human evolutionary history and discuss how they currently complement our fossil, archeological, molecular, linguistic, historical, and ethnographic records. I also highlight potential future applications of this promising model for the field of evolutionary anthropology.

  13. "HUMANITIES" AS A SUBJECT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KUHNS, RICHARD

    SINCE MOST OF THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM IS DEVOTED TO SPECIALIZED DISCIPLINES, HUMANITIES COURSES PROVIDE THE OPPORTUNITY FOR CREATING IN STUDENTS AN AWARENESS OF THE UNITY WHICH EXISTS AMONG PHILOSOPHY, HISTORY, AND THE ARTS. INTENSIVE STUDY AND CLASS DISCUSSION OF INDIVIDUAL WORKS BECOMES IMPOSSIBLE, HOWEVER, WHEN TOO MANY BOOKS ARE CROWDED INTO A…

  14. Antihumanism in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the antihumanistic elements of Jacques Derrida's theory of deconstruction. Argues that the modern French intellectuals, including Foucault, Derrida, and Lacan, have had an antihumanistic effect on the American social sciences and humanities by rejecting the existence of truth, morality, and rationality. (FMW)

  15. Reconsidering Human Performance Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Hwan Young

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses three perceived challenges in the field of human performance technology: a missing link from training to performance, limitations in gap analysis and cause analysis, and a lack of attention to business and organization performance. It then provides possible alternatives for each issue, such as instructional system…

  16. Occupying the Digital Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This essay questions the digital humanities' dependence on interpretation and critique as strategies for reading and responding to texts. Instead, the essay proposes suggestion as a digital rhetorical practice, one that does not replace hermeneutics, but instead offers alternative ways to respond to texts. The essay uses the Occupy movement as an…

  17. Human Biology: Experimental.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    Education is a process of adapting to change, and the rate of change is especially rapid in science today. This curriculum in human biology is an alternative to the New York State courses in general and Regents biology, and it has been designed to focus on change from the standpoint of the urban student. It is designed to provide students with…

  18. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  19. Human Memory: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  20. Human Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  1. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  2. Humanizing the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfield, Roy P., Ed.

    A series of essays discussing ideas about humanizing work are presented in the document. Three major sections divide the essays, and each includes a preface with comments suggesting the central focus and questions with which the authors are concerned. The first section deals with the history, philosophy, and issues related to work and contains…

  3. Strengthening Career Human Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    Rooted in A. Bandura's (1982, 2001b) social cognitive theory, the notion of human agency has received considerable attention in vocational and career psychology for the last 2 decades, especially with the recent emergence of social constructivist thinking in the field. This article continues in the same direction. In reviewing the notion of human…

  4. Sarcocystis in Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humans serve as definitive hosts for two known species of Sarcocystis, acquired from eating undercooked pork or beef, and resulting in gastrointestinal infection. Sporocysts excreted from these infected persons are each infectious for pigs and cattle, the intermediate hosts, resulting in the develop...

  5. Human thimet oligopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Dando, P M; Brown, M A; Barrett, A J

    1993-01-01

    We have purified human thimet oligopeptidase to homogeneity from erythrocytes, and compared it with the enzyme from rat testis and chicken liver. An antiserum raised against rat thimet oligopeptidase also recognized the human and chicken enzymes, suggesting that the structure of the enzyme has been strongly conserved in evolution. Consistent with this, the properties of the human enzyme were very similar to those for the other species. Thus human thimet oligopeptidase also is a thiol-dependent metallo-oligopeptidase with M(r) about 75,000. Specificity for cleavage of a number of peptides was indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme, but Ki values for the four potent reversible inhibitors tested were lower. In discussing the results, we consider the determinants of the complex substrate specificity of thimet oligopeptidase. We question whether substrates containing more than 17 amino acid residues are cleaved, as has been suggested. We also point out that the favourable location of a proline residue and a free C-terminus in the substrate may be as important as the hydrophobic residues in the P2, P1 and P3' positions that have been emphasized in the past. Images Figure 1 PMID:8373360

  6. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  7. Communicating Humanism Nonverbally.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillison, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the importance of nonverbal communication by counselors in expressing humanistic feeling. Notes that facial expression (i.e., smiling) provides immediate feedback to the observer; use of space (i.e., close proximity) communicates warmth and humaneness; and tone of voice can complement spoken words and give them more meaning. (WAS)

  8. Trends in Humanities Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavrek, Bernard, Ed.; Whitney, Loralyn, Ed.

    Proceedings from this workshop sponsored by the Center for the Study of Rural Librarianship are intended to disseminate information to assist rural librarians engaged in planning and conducting public programs that explore issues related to the humanities. This report of the proceedings includes the texts of three presented papers, reactions from…

  9. Television's New Humane Collectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Robert L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Analyzes "Taxi,""Barney Miller,""Lou Grant," and "M*A*S*H" in terms of three fantasy themes: the realization of significant others, the alliance in action, and membership into personhood. From these themes emerges a rhetorical vision of the new humane collectivity. (PD)

  10. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Neurobiology and the Humanities

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Can the arts and humanities contribute significantly to the study of the brain? Similar brain processes are involved in humanistic and scientific inference, and in this essay, I argue that conclusions reached by one are relevant to the other. PMID:25277451

  12. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  13. Developing Human Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Brian P.; And Others

    The process by which human beings, as they grow toward maturity, develop values is not an automatic one. The process can be fostered by a number of teaching strategies. The strategies include the techniques of self-discovery, the provision of learning environments that encourage growth, and the practice of specific skills. This volume provides a…

  14. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection. PMID:27486731

  15. Human Babesiosis, Bolivia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Simona; Totino, Valentina; Macchioni, Fabio; Zuñiga, Freddy; Rojas, Patricia; Lara, Yuni; Roselli, Mimmo; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    To investigate human babesiosis in the Bolivian Chaco, in 2013 we tested blood samples from 271 healthy persons living in 2 rural communities in this region. Microscopy and PCR indicated that 3.3% of persons were positive for Babesia microti parasites (US lineage); seroprevalence was 45.7%. Appropriate screening should mitigate the risk for transfusion-associated babesiosis. PMID:27434696

  16. Human Development Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This set of 61 student learning modules deals with various topics pertaining to human development. The modules, which are designed for use in performance-based vocational education programs, each contain the following components: an introduction for the student, a performance objective, a variety of learning activities, content information, a…

  17. Humans as Lie Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaulo, Bella; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses several studies of whether and how well humans can detect lies. Examines the accuracy of such persons as well as the process of how they actually detect lies, how they think they detect lies, and whether the actual and perceived processes of lie detection correspond to one another. (JMF)

  18. Food Affects Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1982-01-01

    A conference on whether food and nutrients affect human behavior was held on November 9, 1982 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Various research studies on this topic are reviewed, including the effects of food on brain biochemistry (particularly sleep) and effects of tryptophane as a pain reducer. (JN)

  19. The Humanities, Unraveled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berube, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Graduate education in the humanities is in crisis. Every aspect, from the most specific details of the curriculum to the broadest questions about its purpose, is in crisis. It is a seamless garment of crisis: If one pulls on any one thread, the entire thing unravels. It is therefore exceptionally difficult to discuss any one aspect of graduate…

  20. Conceptualizations of Human Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Rudolf H.

    1973-01-01

    Presents six major methods by which characteristics of environments have been related to indexes of human functioning: (1) ecological dimensions; (2) behavior settings; (3) dimensions of organizational structure; and, (4) dimensions identifying the collective personal and/or behavioral characteristics of the milieu inhabitants; and two others.…

  1. Predictors of human rotation.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  2. Tackling Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, four high school students from the Tashkent International School in the capital city confronted the issue of their nation's human rights problems head on by researching the topic and publishing their findings on the Web. The site, "Uzbekistan: Opaque Reality," was created as an entry for the non-profit Global SchoolNet's Doors to…

  3. Learning to Be Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macmurray, John

    2012-01-01

    This article presents "Learning to be Human", which John Macmurray delivered on 5 May 1958 as the annual public lecture at Moray House College of Education, now part of Edinburgh University. The key themes of the paper are ones to which Macmurray returned again and again in both his educational and his philosophical writing for over 40 years and…

  4. Communicating with Virtual Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalmann, Nadia Magnenat

    The face is a small part of a human, but it plays an essential role in communication. An open hybrid system for facial animation is presented. It encapsulates a considerable amount of information regarding facial models, movements, expressions, emotions, and speech. The complex description of facial animation can be handled better by assigning…

  5. Humanism in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This is the text of Michael Armstrong's address to the Brian Simon Centenary conference, held at the Institute of Education on 26 March 2015. Michael Armstrong celebrates the humanism that underlay Brian's belief in a common system of education, democratic and non-selective, and finds its counterpart in the creative practice of school children.

  6. Human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Strobl, J S; Thomas, M J

    1994-03-01

    The study of human growth hormone is a little more than 100 years old. Growth hormone, first identified for its dramatic effect on longitudinal growth, is now known to exert generalized effects on protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional roles for growth hormone in human physiology are likely to be discovered in the areas of sleep research and reproduction. Furthermore, there is some indication that growth hormone also may be involved in the regulation of immune function, mental well-being, and the aging process. Recombinant DNA technology has provided an abundant and safe, albeit expensive, supply of human growth hormone for human use, but the pharmacological properties of growth hormone are poor. Most growth hormone-deficient individuals exhibit a secretory defect rather than a primary defect in growth hormone production, however, and advances in our understanding of the neuroendocrine regulation of growth hormone secretion have established the basis for the use of drugs to stimulate release of endogenously synthesized growth hormone. This promises to be an important area for future drug development. PMID:8190748

  7. Human Social Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural “social signal transduction” pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving. PMID:25166010

  8. Human performance measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J.; Scow, J.

    1970-01-01

    Complex coordinator, consisting of operator control console, recorder, subject display panel, and limb controls, measures human performance by testing perceptual and motor skills. Device measures psychophysiological functions in drug and environmental studies, and is applicable to early detection of psychophysiological body changes.

  9. Human chromosome 8.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S

    1988-01-01

    The role of human chromosome 8 in genetic disease together with the current status of the genetic linkage map for this chromosome is reviewed. Both hereditary genetic disease attributed to mutant alleles at gene loci on chromosome 8 and neoplastic disease owing to somatic mutation, particularly chromosomal translocations, are discussed. PMID:3070042

  10. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection.

  11. The Human Toxome Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Toxome project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011--‐ 2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating, and sharing molecular Pathways of Toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the respo...

  12. Fighting for the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Cary

    2012-01-01

    The question, "Who will bankroll poetry?", succinctly embodies what is now a widespread recognition that the humanities may have more to lose in the current budget wars than either the sciences or a number of technical fields. The only budget war that can unite individuals, rather than divide them, is one arguing that too much is being spent on…

  13. Fighting for Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Bao

    2011-01-01

    Speak Truth To Power consists of 17 teacher-developed lessons based on the stories of rights advocates from all over the world. The lessons were created for sixth-through 12th-grade students, and have come to New York schools thanks to the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights and the New York State United Teachers union. Speak…

  14. Human-Robot Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, E. Vincent, II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2015-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces affect the human's ability to perform tasks effectively and efficiently when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. For efficient and effective remote navigation of a rover, a human operator needs to be aware of the robot's environment. However, during teleoperation, operators may get information about the environment only through a robot's front-mounted camera causing a keyhole effect. The keyhole effect reduces situation awareness which may manifest in navigation issues such as higher number of collisions, missing critical aspects of the environment, or reduced speed. One way to compensate for the keyhole effect and the ambiguities operators experience when they teleoperate a robot is adding multiple cameras and including the robot chassis in the camera view. Augmented reality, such as overlays, can also enhance the way a person sees objects in the environment or in camera views by making them more visible. Scenes can be augmented with integrated telemetry, procedures, or map information. Furthermore, the addition of an exocentric (i.e., third-person) field of view from a camera placed in the robot's environment may provide operators with the additional information needed to gain spatial awareness of the robot. Two research studies investigated possible mitigation approaches to address the keyhole effect: 1) combining the inclusion of the robot chassis in the camera view with augmented reality overlays, and 2) modifying the camera

  15. Making Human Beings Human: Bioecological Perspectives on Human Development. The SAGE Program on Applied Developmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    To a greater extent than any other species, human beings create the environments that, in turn, shape their own development. This book endeavors to demonstrate that human beings can also develop those environments to optimize their most constructive genetic potentials. What makes human beings human, therefore, is both the potential to shape their…

  16. Helicopter Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  17. [Tuberculosis and human rights].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hideaki; Inagaki, Tomokazu; Toyoda, Emiko; Kawabe, Yoshiko; Fujiwara, Keiko; Masuyama, Hidenori; Takahashi, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) patients must be hospitalized while the smear of sputum is positive because TB spreads through air. Cooperation of a patient is important in order to complete the treatment of TB. However, a small number of patients are noncooperative for the treatment and may sometimes refuse it. At this symposium, we discussed about whether we could restrict the human rights of noncooperative TB patients. Although the patients' human rights must be protected, we also have to protect the human rights of people who may receive TB infection. The balance of the both people's rights is fully considered in the TB control policy. It is epoch-making that the TB society took up the theme about the human rights' restriction of TB patients. Five speakers presented their papers from each position. There were presentations about the scientific evidence of isolation, the actual cases, the situation of the United States, and the legal view on the human rights' restriction of TB patients. The present situation and the legal problems in Japan became clear at this symposium. We need further discussion about the human rights' restriction of TB patients for the revision of the Tuberculosis Protection Act and have to obtain the national consensus on it. 1. The evidence for isolation: Emiko TOYODA (International Medical Center of Japan) To determine appropriate periods of respiratory isolation, available biological, clinical, and epidemiological issues and data were studied. Although absolute lack of infectiousness requires consecutive culture negative and it takes too long and impractical periods. There seems to be no established evidence for noncontagiousness after 2 to 3 weeks effective treatment. Practically conversion to 3 negative consecutive smear results may used as a surrogate for noninfectiousness, even though a small risk of transmission still be present. Chemical isolation has been more important and administration with DOT should be indicated to keep compliance. 2

  18. The Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Federico

    2003-01-01

    Since 1985, UNESCO studies ethical questions arising in genetics. In 1992, I established the International Bioethics Committee at UNESCO with the mission to draft the Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights, which was adopted by UNESCO in 1997 and the United Nations in 1998. The Declaration relates the human genome with human dignity, deals with the rights of the persons concerned by human genome research and provides a reference legal framework for both stimulating the ethical debate and the harmonization of the law worldwide, favouring useful developments that respect human dignity. PMID:14744123

  19. The science of unitary human beings and interpretive human science.

    PubMed

    Reeder, F

    1993-01-01

    Natural science and human science are identified as the bases of most nursing theories and research programs. Natural science has been disclaimed by Martha Rogers as the philosophy of science that undergirds her work. The question remains, is the science of unitary human beings an interpretive human science? The author explores the works of Rogers through a dialectic with two human scientists' works. Wilhelm Dilthey's works represent the founding or traditional view, and Jurgen Habermas' works represent a contemporary, reconstructionist view. The ways Rogerian thought contributes to human studies but is distinct from traditional and reconstructionist human sciences are illuminated.

  20. Zygomycetes in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ribes, Julie A.; Vanover-Sams, Carolyn L.; Baker, Doris J.

    2000-01-01

    The Zygomycetes represent relatively uncommon isolates in the clinical laboratory, reflecting either environmental contaminants or, less commonly, a clinical disease called zygomycosis. There are two orders of Zygomycetes containing organisms that cause human disease, the Mucorales and the Entomophthorales. The majority of human illness is caused by the Mucorales. While disease is most commonly linked to Rhizopus spp., other organisms are also associated with human infection, including Mucor, Rhizomucor, Absidia, Apophysomyces, Saksenaea, Cunninghamella, Cokeromyces, and Syncephalastrum spp. Although Mortierella spp. do cause disease in animals, there is no longer sufficient evidence to suggest that they are true human pathogens. The spores from these molds are transmitted by inhalation, via a variety of percutaneous routes, or by ingestion of spores. Human zygomycosis caused by the Mucorales generally occurs in immunocompromised hosts as opportunistic infections. Host risk factors include diabetes mellitus, neutropenia, sustained immunosuppressive therapy, chronic prednisone use, iron chelation therapy, broad-spectrum antibiotic use, severe malnutrition, and primary breakdown in the integrity of the cutaneous barrier such as trauma, surgical wounds, needle sticks, or burns. Zygomycosis occurs only rarely in immunocompetent hosts. The disease manifestations reflect the mode of transmission, with rhinocerebral and pulmonary diseases being the most common manifestations. Cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and allergic diseases are also seen. The Mucorales are associated with angioinvasive disease, often leading to thrombosis, infarction of involved tissues, and tissue destruction mediated by a number of fungal proteases, lipases, and mycotoxins. If the diagnosis is not made early, dissemination often occurs. Therapy, if it is to be effective, must be started early and requires combinations of antifungal drugs, surgical intervention, and reversal of the underlying risk