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Sample records for affymetrix genome-wide human

  1. Genome-wide signals of positive selection in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Enard, David; Messer, Philipp W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    The role of positive selection in human evolution remains controversial. On the one hand, scans for positive selection have identified hundreds of candidate loci, and the genome-wide patterns of polymorphism show signatures consistent with frequent positive selection. On the other hand, recent studies have argued that many of the candidate loci are false positives and that most genome-wide signatures of adaptation are in fact due to reduction of neutral diversity by linked deleterious mutations, known as background selection. Here we analyze human polymorphism data from the 1000 Genomes Project and detect signatures of positive selection once we correct for the effects of background selection. We show that levels of neutral polymorphism are lower near amino acid substitutions, with the strongest reduction observed specifically near functionally consequential amino acid substitutions. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions are associated with signatures of recent adaptation that should not be generated by background selection, such as unusually long and frequent haplotypes and specific distortions in the site frequency spectrum. We use forward simulations to argue that the observed signatures require a high rate of strongly adaptive substitutions near amino acid changes. We further demonstrate that the observed signatures of positive selection correlate better with the presence of regulatory sequences, as predicted by the ENCODE Project Consortium, than with the positions of amino acid substitutions. Our results suggest that adaptation was frequent in human evolution and provide support for the hypothesis of King and Wilson that adaptive divergence is primarily driven by regulatory changes. PMID:24619126

  2. Genome-wide analyses of human perisylvian cerebral cortical patterning

    PubMed Central

    Abrahams, B. S.; Tentler, D.; Perederiy, J. V.; Oldham, M. C.; Coppola, G.; Geschwind, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the well established role of the frontal and posterior perisylvian cortices in many facets of human-cognitive specializations, including language, little is known about the developmental patterning of these regions in the human brain. We performed a genome-wide analysis of human cerebral patterning during midgestation, a critical epoch in cortical regionalization. A total of 345 genes were identified as differentially expressed between superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the remaining cerebral cortex. Gene ontology categories representing transcription factors were enriched in STG, whereas cell-adhesion and extracellular matrix molecules were enriched in the other cortical regions. Quantitative RT-PCR or in situ hybridization was performed to validate differential expression in a subset of 32 genes, most of which were confirmed. LIM domain-binding 1 (LDB1), which we show to be enriched in the STG, is a recently identified interactor of LIM domain only 4 (LMO4), a gene known to be involved in the asymmetric pattering of the perisylvian region in the developing human brain. Protocadherin 17 (PCDH17), a neuronal cell adhesion molecule, was highly enriched in focal regions of the human prefrontal cortex. Contactin associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2), in which mutations are known to cause autism, epilepsy, and language delay, showed a remarkable pattern of anterior-enriched cortical expression in human that was not observed in mouse or rat. These data highlight the importance of expression analysis of human brain and the utility of cross-species comparisons of gene expression. Genes identified here provide a foundation for understanding molecular aspects of human-cognitive specializations and the disorders that disrupt them. PMID:17978184

  3. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human epidermal melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haltaufderhyde, Kirk D.; Oancea, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Because human epidermal melanocytes (HEMs) provide critical protection against skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging, a genome-wide perspective of gene expression in these cells is vital to understanding human skin physiology. In this study we performed high throughput sequencing of HEMs to obtain a complete data set of transcript sizes, abundances, and splicing. As expected, we found that melanocyte specific genes that function in pigmentation were among the highest expressed genes. We analyzed receptor, ion channel and transcription factor gene families to get a better understanding of the cell signalling pathways used by melanocytes. We also performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of lightly versus darkly pigmented HEMs and found 16 genes differentially expressed in the two pigmentation phenotypes; of those, only one putative melanosomal transporter (SLC45A2) has known function in pigmentation. In addition, we found 166 genes with splice isoforms expressed exclusively in one pigmentation phenotype, 17 of which are genes involved in signal transduction. Our melanocyte transcriptome study provides a comprehensive view and may help identify novel pigmentation genes and potential pharmacological targets. PMID:25451175

  4. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Emily R; Cusanovich, Darren A; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10-7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  5. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Cusanovich, Darren A.; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10−7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of Human Metapneumovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob; Park, Kwang Sook; Kwak, Eun Jung; Moon, Kwang Mee; Lee, Chang Kyu; Bae, Joon-Yong; Park, Man-Seong; Song, Ki-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) has been described as an important etiologic agent of upper and lower respiratory tract infections, especially in young children and the elderly. Most of school-aged children might be introduced to HMPVs, and exacerbation with other viral or bacterial super-infection is common. However, our understanding of the molecular evolution of HMPVs remains limited. To address the comprehensive evolutionary dynamics of HMPVs, we report a genome-wide analysis of the eight genes (N, P, M, F, M2, SH, G, and L) using 103 complete genome sequences. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that the eight genes from one HMPV strain grouped into the same genetic group among the five distinct lineages (A1, A2a, A2b, B1, and B2). A few exceptions of phylogenetic incongruence might suggest past recombination events, and we detected possible recombination breakpoints in the F, SH, and G coding regions. The five genetic lineages of HMPVs shared quite remote common ancestors ranging more than 220 to 470 years of age with the most recent origins for the A2b sublineage. Purifying selection was common, but most protein genes except the F and M2-2 coding regions also appeared to experience episodic diversifying selection. Taken together, these suggest that the five lineages of HMPVs maintain their individual evolutionary dynamics and that recombination and selection forces might work on shaping the genetic diversity of HMPVs. PMID:27046055

  7. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression. PMID:24789080

  8. Application of genome-wide expression analysis to human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, J. Perren; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Baker, Henry V.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Laudanski, Krzysztof; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Elson, Constance M.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Herndon, David N.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.

    2005-01-01

    The application of genome-wide expression analysis to a large-scale, multicentered program in critically ill patients poses a number of theoretical and technical challenges. We describe here an analytical and organizational approach to a systematic evaluation of the variance associated with genome-wide expression analysis specifically tailored to study human disease. We analyzed sources of variance in genome-wide expression analyses performed with commercial oligonucleotide arrays. In addition, variance in gene expression in human blood leukocytes caused by repeated sampling in the same subject, among different healthy subjects, among different leukocyte subpopulations, and the effect of traumatic injury, were also explored. We report that analytical variance caused by sample processing was acceptably small. Blood leukocyte gene expression in the same individual over a 24-h period was remarkably constant. In contrast, genome-wide expression varied significantly among different subjects and leukocyte subpopulations. Expectedly, traumatic injury induced dramatic changes in apparent gene expression that were greater in magnitude than the analytical noise and interindividual variance. We demonstrate that the development of a nation-wide program for gene expression analysis with careful attention to analytical details can reduce the variance in the clinical setting to a level where patterns of gene expression are informative among different healthy human subjects, and can be studied with confidence in human disease. PMID:15781863

  9. A Genome-Wide Map of AAV-Mediated Human Gene Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Deyle, David R.; Hansen, R. Scott; Cornea, Anda M.; Li, Li B.; Burt, Amber A.; Alexander, Ian E.; Sandstrom, Richard S.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Wei, Chia-Lin; Russell, David W.

    2014-01-01

    To determine which genomic features promote homologous recombination, we created a genome-wide map of gene targeting sites. An adeno-associated virus vector was used to target identical loci introduced as transcriptionally active retroviral vector proviruses. A comparison of ~2,000 targeted and untargeted sites showed that targeting occurred throughout the human genome and was not influenced by the presence of nearby CpG islands, sequence repeats, or DNase I hypersensitive sites. Targeted sites were preferentially found within transcription units, especially when the target loci were transcribed in the opposite orientation to their surrounding chromosomal genes. The impact of DNA replication was determined by mapping replication forks, which revealed a preference for recombination at target loci transcribed towards an incoming fork. Our results constitute the first genome-wide screen of gene targeting in mammalian cells, and they demonstrate a strong recombinogenic effect of colliding polymerases. PMID:25282150

  10. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  11. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  12. Genome-wide analysis of epistasis in body mass index using multiple human populations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Hemani, Gib; Gyenesei, Attila; Vitart, Veronique; Navarro, Pau; Hayward, Caroline; Cabrera, Claudia P; Huffman, Jennifer E; Knott, Sara A; Hicks, Andrew A; Rudan, Igor; Pramstaller, Peter P; Wild, Sarah H; Wilson, James F; Campbell, Harry; Hastie, Nicholas D; Wright, Alan F; Haley, Chris S

    2012-01-01

    We surveyed gene–gene interactions (epistasis) in human body mass index (BMI) in four European populations (n<1200) via exhaustive pair-wise genome scans where interactions were computed as F ratios by testing a linear regression model fitting two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with interactions against the one without. Before the association tests, BMI was corrected for sex and age, normalised and adjusted for relatedness. Neither single SNPs nor SNP interactions were genome-wide significant in either cohort based on the consensus threshold (P=5.0E−08) and a Bonferroni corrected threshold (P=1.1E−12), respectively. Next we compared sub genome-wide significant SNP interactions (P<5.0E−08) across cohorts to identify common epistatic signals, where SNPs were annotated to genes to test for gene ontology (GO) enrichment. Among the epistatic genes contributing to the commonly enriched GO terms, 19 were shared across study cohorts of which 15 are previously published genome-wide association loci, including CDH13 (cadherin 13) associated with height and SORCS2 (sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2) associated with circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 and binding protein 3. Interactions between the 19 shared epistatic genes and those involving BMI candidate loci (P<5.0E−08) were tested across cohorts and found eight replicated at the SNP level (P<0.05) in at least one cohort, which were further tested and showed limited replication in a separate European population (n>5000). We conclude that genome-wide analysis of epistasis in multiple populations is an effective approach to provide new insights into the genetic regulation of BMI but requires additional efforts to confirm the findings. PMID:22333899

  13. Genome-wide analysis of high risk human papillomavirus E2 proteins in human primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Sunthamala, Nuchsupha; Pang, Chai Ling; Thierry, Francoise; Teissier, Sebastien; Pientong, Chamsai; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2014-12-01

    The E2 protein is expressed in the early stage of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection that is associated with cervical lesions. This protein plays important roles in regulation of viral replication and transcription. To characterize the role of E2 protein in modulation of cellular gene expression in HPV infected cells, genome-wide expression profiling of human primary keratinocytes (HPK) harboring HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 was investigated using microarray. The Principle Components Analysis (PCA) revealed that the expression data of HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2-transduced HPKs were rather closely clustered. The Venn diagram of modulated genes showed an overlap of 10 common genes in HPV16 E2 expressing HPK and HPV18 E2 expressing HPK. These genes were expressed with significant difference by comparison with control cells. In addition, the distinct sets of modulated genes were detected 14 and 34 genes in HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 expressing HPKs, respectively. PMID:26484085

  14. Genome-wide landscape of liver X receptor chromatin binding and gene regulation in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The liver X receptors (LXRs) are oxysterol sensing nuclear receptors with multiple effects on metabolism and immune cells. However, the complete genome-wide cistrome of LXR in cells of human origin has not yet been provided. Results We performed ChIP-seq in phorbol myristate acetate-differentiated THP-1 cells (macrophage-type) after stimulation with the potent synthetic LXR ligand T0901317 (T09). Microarray gene expression analysis was performed in the same cellular model. We identified 1357 genome-wide LXR locations (FDR < 1%), of which 526 were observed after T09 treatment. De novo analysis of LXR binding sequences identified a DR4-type element as the major motif. On mRNA level T09 up-regulated 1258 genes and repressed 455 genes. Our results show that LXR actions are focused on 112 genomic regions that contain up to 11 T09 target genes per region under the control of highly stringent LXR binding sites with individual constellations for each region. We could confirm that LXR controls lipid metabolism and transport and observed a strong association with apoptosis-related functions. Conclusions This first report on genome-wide binding of LXR in a human cell line provides new insights into the transcriptional network of LXR and its target genes with their link to physiological processes, such as apoptosis. The gene expression microarray and sequence data have been submitted collectively to the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo under accession number GSE28319. PMID:22292898

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Raffensperger, Zachary D.; Heike, Carrie L.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Kau, Chung How; Moreno, Lina M.; Wehby, George L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A.; Marazita, Mary L.; Weinberg, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10−8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, John R; Orlova, Ekaterina; Lee, Myoung Keun; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Raffensperger, Zachary D; Heike, Carrie L; Cunningham, Michael L; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Kau, Chung How; Nidey, Nichole L; Moreno, Lina M; Wehby, George L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Laurie, Cathy C; Cole, Joanne; Ferrara, Tracey; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Mio, Washington; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A; Marazita, Mary L; Weinberg, Seth M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10-8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  17. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  18. Heritability and Genome-Wide Association Analyses of Human Gait Suggest Contribution of Common Variants.

    PubMed

    Adams, Hieab H H; Verlinden, Vincentius J A; Callisaya, Michele L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hofman, Albert; Thomson, Russell; Uitterlinden, André G; Vernooij, Meike W; van der Geest, Jos N; Srikanth, Velandai; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-06-01

    Human gait is a complex neurological and musculoskeletal function, of which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. To determine the influence of common genetic variants on gait parameters, we studied 2,946 participants of the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort of unrelated elderly individuals. We assessed 30 gait parameters using an electronic walkway, which yielded seven independent gait domains after principal component analysis. Genotypes of participants were imputed to the 1,000 Genomes reference panel for generating genetic relationship matrices to estimate heritability of gait parameters, and for subsequent genome-wide association scans (GWASs) to identify specific variants. Gait domains with the highest age- and sex-adjusted heritability were Variability (h (2) = 61%), Rhythm (37%), and Tandem (32%). For other gait domains, heritability estimates attenuated after adjustment for height and weight. Genome-wide association scans identified a variant on 1p22.3 that was significantly associated with single support time, a variable from the Rhythm domain (rs72953990; N = 2,946; β [SE] = 0.0069 (0.0012), p = 2.30×10(-8)). This variant did not replicate in an independent sample (N = 362; p = .78). In conclusion, human gait has highly heritable components that are explained by common genetic variation, which are partly attributed to height and weight. Collaborative efforts are needed to identify robust single variant associations for the heritable parameters. PMID:26219847

  19. Genome-wide uniparental disomy screen in human discarded morphologically abnormal embryos

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiawei; Zhang, Meixiang; Niu, Wenbin; Yao, Guidong; Sun, Bo; Bao, Xiao; Wang, Linlin; Du, Linqing; Sun, Yingpu

    2015-01-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) has been shown to be rare in human normal blastocysts, but its frequency in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos and its relevance to embryonic self-correction of aneuploid remains unknown. The aim of this study was to detect UPD in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos. Both discarded morphologically abnormal embryos, including zero-pronuclear zygotes (0PN), one-pronuclear zygotes (1PN), three-pronuclear zygotes (3PN) and 2PN embryos scored as low development potential were cultured into blastocysts then underwent trophectoderm biopsy. Genome-wide UPD screening of the trophectoderm of 241 discarded morphologically abnormal embryo sourced blastocysts showed that UPD occurred in nine embryos. Five embryos exhibited UPDs with euploid chromosomes, and four displayed UPDs with chromosomal aneuploid. The percentage of UPDs among the morphologically abnormal sourced blastocysts was 3.73%, which is significant higher than the percentage observed in normal blastocysts. The frequency of UPD in 3PN-sourced blastocysts was 7.69%, which is significantly higher than that in normal blastocysts. This study provides the first systematic genome-wide profile of UPD in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos. Our results indicated that UPD may be a common phenomenon in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos and may be relevant to human embryonic self-correction. PMID:26194013

  20. Genome-wide uniparental disomy screen in human discarded morphologically abnormal embryos.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiawei; Zhang, Meixiang; Niu, Wenbin; Yao, Guidong; Sun, Bo; Bao, Xiao; Wang, Linlin; Du, Linqing; Sun, Yingpu

    2015-01-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) has been shown to be rare in human normal blastocysts, but its frequency in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos and its relevance to embryonic self-correction of aneuploid remains unknown. The aim of this study was to detect UPD in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos. Both discarded morphologically abnormal embryos, including zero-pronuclear zygotes (0PN), one-pronuclear zygotes (1PN), three-pronuclear zygotes (3PN) and 2PN embryos scored as low development potential were cultured into blastocysts then underwent trophectoderm biopsy. Genome-wide UPD screening of the trophectoderm of 241 discarded morphologically abnormal embryo sourced blastocysts showed that UPD occurred in nine embryos. Five embryos exhibited UPDs with euploid chromosomes, and four displayed UPDs with chromosomal aneuploid. The percentage of UPDs among the morphologically abnormal sourced blastocysts was 3.73%, which is significant higher than the percentage observed in normal blastocysts. The frequency of UPD in 3PN-sourced blastocysts was 7.69%, which is significantly higher than that in normal blastocysts. This study provides the first systematic genome-wide profile of UPD in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos. Our results indicated that UPD may be a common phenomenon in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos and may be relevant to human embryonic self-correction. PMID:26194013

  1. Genome-wide patterns and properties of de novo mutations in humans.

    PubMed

    Francioli, Laurent C; Polak, Paz P; Koren, Amnon; Menelaou, Androniki; Chun, Sung; Renkens, Ivo; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Swertz, Morris; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Ommen, Gertjan; Slagboom, P Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor; Arndt, Peter F; Kloosterman, Wigard P; de Bakker, Paul I W; Sunyaev, Shamil R

    2015-07-01

    Mutations create variation in the population, fuel evolution and cause genetic diseases. Current knowledge about de novo mutations is incomplete and mostly indirect. Here we analyze 11,020 de novo mutations from the whole genomes of 250 families. We show that de novo mutations in the offspring of older fathers are not only more numerous but also occur more frequently in early-replicating, genic regions. Functional regions exhibit higher mutation rates due to CpG dinucleotides and show signatures of transcription-coupled repair, whereas mutation clusters with a unique signature point to a new mutational mechanism. Mutation and recombination rates independently associate with nucleotide diversity, and regional variation in human-chimpanzee divergence is only partly explained by heterogeneity in mutation rate. Finally, we provide a genome-wide mutation rate map for medical and population genetics applications. Our results provide new insights and refine long-standing hypotheses about human mutagenesis. PMID:25985141

  2. Genome-wide identification of human- and primate-specific core promoter short tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Bushehri, A; Barez, M R Mashhoudi; Mansouri, S K; Biglarian, A; Ohadi, M

    2016-08-01

    Recent reports of a link between human- and primate-specific genetic factors and human/primate-specific characteristics and diseases necessitate genome-wide identification of those factors. We have previously reported core promoter short tandem repeats (STRs) of extreme length (≥6-repeats) that have expanded exceptionally in primates vs. non-primates, and may have a function in adaptive evolution. In the study reported here, we extended our study to the human STRs of ≥3-repeats in the category of penta and hexaucleotide STRs, across the entire human protein coding gene core promoters, and analyzed their status in several superorders and orders of vertebrates, using the Ensembl database. The ConSite software was used to identify the transcription factor (TF) sets binding to those STRs. STR specificity was observed at different levels of human and non-human primate (NHP) evolution. 73% of the pentanucleotide STRs and 68% of the hexanucleotide STRs were found to be specific to human and NHPs. AP-2alpha, Sp1, and MZF were the predominantly selected TFs (90%) binding to the human-specific STRs. Furthermore, the number of TF sets binding to a given STR was found to be a selection factor for that STR. Our findings indicate that selected STRs, the cognate binding TFs, and the number of TF set binding to those STRs function as switch codes at different levels of human and NHP evolution and speciation. PMID:27108803

  3. Genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Ponts, Nadia; Fu, Lijuan; Harris, Elena Y.; Zhang, Jing; Chung, Duk-Won D.; Cervantes, Michael C.; Prudhomme, Jacques; Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela; Zehraoui, Enric; Bunnik, Evelien; Rodrigues, Elisandra M.; Lonardi, Stefano; Hicks, Glenn R.; Wang, Yinsheng; Le Roch, Karine G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cytosine DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark in most eukaryotic cells that regulates numerous processes, including gene expression and stress responses. We performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We mapped the positions of methylated cytosines and identified a single functional DNA methyltransferase, PfDNMT, that may mediate these genomic modifications. These analyses revealed that the malaria genome is asymmetrically methylated, in which only one DNA strand is methylated, and shares common features with undifferentiated plant and mammalian cells. Notably, core promoters are hypomethylated and transcript levels correlate with intra-exonic methylation. Additionally, there are sharp methylation transitions at nucleosome and exon-intron boundaries. These data suggest that DNA methylation could regulate virulence gene expression and transcription elongation. Furthermore, the broad range of action of DNA methylation and uniqueness of PfDNMT suggest that the methylation pathway is a potential target for anti-malarial strategies. PMID:24331467

  4. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F.; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents. PMID:27177310

  5. Human genome-wide expression analysis reorients the study of inflammatory mediators and biomechanics in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sandy, J D; Chan, D D; Trevino, R L; Wimmer, M A; Plaas, A

    2015-11-01

    A major objective of this article is to examine the research implications of recently available genome-wide expression profiles of cartilage from human osteoarthritis (OA) joints. We propose that, when viewed in the light of extensive earlier work, this novel data provides a unique opportunity to reorient the design of experimental systems toward clinical relevance. Specifically, in the area of cartilage explant biology, this will require a fresh evaluation of existing paradigms, so as to optimize the choices of tissue source, cytokine/growth factor/nutrient addition, and biomechanical environment for discovery. Within this context, we firstly discuss the literature on the nature and role of potential catabolic mediators in OA pathology, including data from human OA cartilage, animal models of OA, and ex vivo studies. Secondly, due to the number and breadth of studies on IL-1β in this area, a major focus of the article is a critical analysis of the design and interpretation of cartilage studies where IL-1β has been used as a model cytokine. Thirdly, the article provides a data-driven perspective (including genome-wide analysis of clinical samples, studies on mutant mice, and clinical trials), which concludes that IL-1β should be replaced by soluble mediators such as IL-17 or TGF-β1, which are much more likely to mimic the disease in OA model systems. We also discuss the evidence that changes in early OA can be attributed to the activity of such soluble mediators, whereas late-stage disease results more from a chronic biomechanical effect on the matrix and cells of the remaining cartilage and on other local mediator-secreting cells. Lastly, an updated protocol for in vitro studies with cartilage explants and chondrocytes (including the use of specific gene expression arrays) is provided to motivate more disease-relevant studies on the interplay of cytokines, growth factors, and biomechanics on cellular behavior. PMID:26521740

  6. Exhaustive Genome-Wide Search for SNP-SNP Interactions Across 10 Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Murk, William; DeWan, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    The identification of statistical SNP-SNP interactions may help explain the genetic etiology of many human diseases, but exhaustive genome-wide searches for these interactions have been difficult, due to a lack of power in most datasets. We aimed to use data from the Resource for Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) study to search for SNP-SNP interactions associated with 10 common diseases. FastEpistasis and BOOST were used to evaluate all pairwise interactions among approximately N = 300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.15, for the dichotomous outcomes of allergic rhinitis, asthma, cardiac disease, depression, dermatophytosis, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hemorrhoids, hypertensive disease, and osteoarthritis. A total of N = 45,171 subjects were included after quality control steps were applied. These data were divided into discovery and replication subsets; the discovery subset had > 80% power, under selected models, to detect genome-wide significant interactions (P < 10(-12)). Interactions were also evaluated for enrichment in particular SNP features, including functionality, prior disease relevancy, and marginal effects. No interaction in any disease was significant in both the discovery and replication subsets. Enrichment analysis suggested that, for some outcomes, interactions involving SNPs with marginal effects were more likely to be nominally replicated, compared to interactions without marginal effects. If SNP-SNP interactions play a role in the etiology of the studied conditions, they likely have weak effect sizes, involve lower-frequency variants, and/or involve complex models of interaction that are not captured well by the methods that were utilized. PMID:27185397

  7. Generation of meiomaps of genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ottolini, Christian S; Capalbo, Antonio; Newnham, Louise; Cimadomo, Danilo; Natesan, Senthilkumar A; Hoffmann, Eva R; Ubaldi, Filippo M; Rienzi, Laura; Handyside, Alan H

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a protocol for the generation of genome-wide maps (meiomaps) of recombination and chromosome segregation for the three products of human female meiosis: the first and second polar bodies (PB1 and PB2) and the corresponding oocyte. PB1 is biopsied and the oocyte is artificially activated by exposure to calcium ionophore, after which PB2 is biopsied and collected with the corresponding oocyte. The whole genomes of the polar bodies and oocytes are amplified by multiple displacement amplification and, together with maternal genomic DNA, genotyped for ∼300,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genome-wide by microarray. Informative maternal heterozygous SNPs are phased using a haploid PB2 or oocyte as a reference. A simple algorithm is then used to identify the maternal haplotypes for each chromosome, in all of the products of meiosis for each oocyte. This allows mapping of crossovers and analysis of chromosome segregation patterns. The protocol takes a minimum of 3-5 d and requires a clinical embryologist with micromanipulation experience and a molecular biologist with basic bioinformatic skills. It has several advantages over previous methods; importantly, the use of artificial oocyte activation avoids the creation of embryos for research purposes. In addition, compared with next-generation sequencing, targeted SNP genotyping is cost-effective and it simplifies the bioinformatic analysis, as only one haploid reference sample is required to establish phase for maternal haplotyping. Finally, meiomapping is more informative than copy-number analysis alone for analysis of chromosome segregation patterns. Using this protocol, we have provided new insights that may lead to improvements in assisted reproduction for the treatment of infertility. PMID:27310263

  8. Genome-Wide and Paternal Diversity Reveal a Recent Origin of Human Populations in North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Zalloua, Pierre; Benammar Elgaaied, Amel; Comas, David

    2013-01-01

    The geostrategic location of North Africa as a crossroad between three continents and as a stepping-stone outside Africa has evoked anthropological and genetic interest in this region. Numerous studies have described the genetic landscape of the human population in North Africa employing paternal, maternal, and biparental molecular markers. However, information from these markers which have different inheritance patterns has been mostly assessed independently, resulting in an incomplete description of the region. In this study, we analyze uniparental and genome-wide markers examining similarities or contrasts in the results and consequently provide a comprehensive description of the evolutionary history of North Africa populations. Our results show that both males and females in North Africa underwent a similar admixture history with slight differences in the proportions of admixture components. Consequently, genome-wide diversity show similar patterns with admixture tests suggesting North Africans are a mixture of ancestral populations related to current Africans and Eurasians with more affinity towards the out-of-Africa populations than to sub-Saharan Africans. We estimate from the paternal lineages that most North Africans emerged ∼15,000 years ago during the last glacial warming and that population splits started after the desiccation of the Sahara. Although most North Africans share a common admixture history, the Tunisian Berbers show long periods of genetic isolation and appear to have diverged from surrounding populations without subsequent mixture. On the other hand, continuous gene flow from the Middle East made Egyptians genetically closer to Eurasians than to other North Africans. We show that genetic diversity of today's North Africans mostly captures patterns from migrations post Last Glacial Maximum and therefore may be insufficient to inform on the initial population of the region during the Middle Paleolithic period. PMID:24312208

  9. Exhaustive Genome-Wide Search for SNP-SNP Interactions Across 10 Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Murk, William; DeWan, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of statistical SNP-SNP interactions may help explain the genetic etiology of many human diseases, but exhaustive genome-wide searches for these interactions have been difficult, due to a lack of power in most datasets. We aimed to use data from the Resource for Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) study to search for SNP-SNP interactions associated with 10 common diseases. FastEpistasis and BOOST were used to evaluate all pairwise interactions among approximately N = 300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.15, for the dichotomous outcomes of allergic rhinitis, asthma, cardiac disease, depression, dermatophytosis, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hemorrhoids, hypertensive disease, and osteoarthritis. A total of N = 45,171 subjects were included after quality control steps were applied. These data were divided into discovery and replication subsets; the discovery subset had > 80% power, under selected models, to detect genome-wide significant interactions (P < 10−12). Interactions were also evaluated for enrichment in particular SNP features, including functionality, prior disease relevancy, and marginal effects. No interaction in any disease was significant in both the discovery and replication subsets. Enrichment analysis suggested that, for some outcomes, interactions involving SNPs with marginal effects were more likely to be nominally replicated, compared to interactions without marginal effects. If SNP-SNP interactions play a role in the etiology of the studied conditions, they likely have weak effect sizes, involve lower-frequency variants, and/or involve complex models of interaction that are not captured well by the methods that were utilized. PMID:27185397

  10. Combining genome-wide data from humans and animal models of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, Stela Z.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Comparative genomics allows researchers to combine genome wide association data from humans with studies in animal models in order to assist in the identification of the genes and the genetic variants that modify susceptibility to dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis. Recent findings Association and linkage studies in human and rodent species have been successful in identifying genetic loci associated with complex traits, but have been less robust in identifying and validating the responsible gene and/or genetic variants. Recent technological advancements have assisted in the development of comparative genomic approaches, which rely on the combination of human and rodent datasets and bioinformatics tools, followed by the narrowing of concordant loci and improved identification of candidate genes and genetic variants. Additionally, candidate genes and genetic variants identified by these methods have been further validated and functionally investigated in animal models, a process that is not feasible in humans. Summary Comparative genomic approaches have lead to the identification and validation of several new genes, including a few not previously implicated, as modifiers of plasma lipid levels and atherosclerosis, yielding new insights into the biological mechanisms of these complex traits. PMID:21178769

  11. Progress and Promise of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Human Complex Trait Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Stranger, Barbara E.; Stahl, Eli A.; Raj, Towfique

    2011-01-01

    Enormous progress in mapping complex traits in humans has been made in the last 5 yr. There has been early success for prevalent diseases with complex phenotypes. These studies have demonstrated clearly that, while complex traits differ in their underlying genetic architectures, for many common disorders the predominant pattern is that of many loci, individually with small effects on phenotype. For some traits, loci of large effect have been identified. For almost all complex traits studied in humans, the sum of the identified genetic effects comprises only a portion, generally less than half, of the estimated trait heritability. A variety of hypotheses have been proposed to explain why this might be the case, including untested rare variants, and gene–gene and gene–environment interaction. Effort is currently being directed toward implementation of novel analytic approaches and testing rare variants for association with complex traits using imputed variants from the publicly available 1000 Genomes Project resequencing data and from direct resequencing of clinical samples. Through integration with annotations and functional genomic data as well as by in vitro and in vivo experimentation, mapping studies continue to characterize functional variants associated with complex traits and address fundamental issues such as epistasis and pleiotropy. This review focuses primarily on the ways in which genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the field of human quantitative genetics. PMID:21115973

  12. Detection of Convergent Genome-Wide Signals of Adaptation to Tropical Forests in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Carlos Eduardo G.; Daub, Josephine T.; Salzano, Francisco M.; Foll, Matthieu; Excoffier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Tropical forests are believed to be very harsh environments for human life. It is unclear whether human beings would have ever subsisted in those environments without external resources. It is therefore possible that humans have developed recent biological adaptations in response to specific selective pressures to cope with this challenge. To understand such biological adaptations we analyzed genome-wide SNP data under a Bayesian statistics framework, looking for outlier markers with an overly large extent of differentiation between populations living in a tropical forest, as compared to genetically related populations living outside the forest in Africa and the Americas. The most significant positive selection signals were found in genes related to lipid metabolism, the immune system, body development, and RNA Polymerase III transcription initiation. The results are discussed in the light of putative tropical forest selective pressures, namely food scarcity, high prevalence of pathogens, difficulty to move, and inefficient thermoregulation. Agreement between our results and previous studies on the pygmy phenotype, a putative prototype of forest adaptation, were found, suggesting that a few genetic regions previously described as associated with short stature may be evolving under similar positive selection in Africa and the Americas. In general, convergent evolution was less pervasive than local adaptation in one single continent, suggesting that Africans and Amerindians may have followed different routes to adapt to similar environmental selective pressures. PMID:25849546

  13. Genome-wide DNA methylation levels and altered cortisol stress reactivity following childhood trauma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Houtepen, Lotte C.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Hiemstra, Marieke; van Lier, Pol A.; Meeus, Wim; Branje, Susan; Heim, Christine M.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Mill, Jonathan; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Creyghton, Menno P.; Kahn, René S.; Joëls, Marian; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Boks, Marco P. M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation likely plays a role in the regulation of human stress reactivity. Here we show that in a genome-wide analysis of blood DNA methylation in 85 healthy individuals, a locus in the Kit ligand gene (KITLG; cg27512205) showed the strongest association with cortisol stress reactivity (P=5.8 × 10−6). Replication was obtained in two independent samples using either blood (N=45, P=0.001) or buccal cells (N=255, P=0.004). KITLG methylation strongly mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and cortisol stress reactivity in the discovery sample (32% mediation). Its genomic location, a CpG island shore within an H3K27ac enhancer mark, and the correlation between methylation in the blood and prefrontal cortex provide further evidence that KITLG methylation is functionally relevant for the programming of stress reactivity in the human brain. Our results extend preclinical evidence for epigenetic regulation of stress reactivity to humans and provide leads to enhance our understanding of the neurobiological pathways underlying stress vulnerability. PMID:26997371

  14. Genome-wide DNA methylation levels and altered cortisol stress reactivity following childhood trauma in humans.

    PubMed

    Houtepen, Lotte C; Vinkers, Christiaan H; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Hiemstra, Marieke; van Lier, Pol A; Meeus, Wim; Branje, Susan; Heim, Christine M; Nemeroff, Charles B; Mill, Jonathan; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Creyghton, Menno P; Kahn, René S; Joëls, Marian; Binder, Elisabeth B; Boks, Marco P M

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation likely plays a role in the regulation of human stress reactivity. Here we show that in a genome-wide analysis of blood DNA methylation in 85 healthy individuals, a locus in the Kit ligand gene (KITLG; cg27512205) showed the strongest association with cortisol stress reactivity (P=5.8 × 10(-6)). Replication was obtained in two independent samples using either blood (N=45, P=0.001) or buccal cells (N=255, P=0.004). KITLG methylation strongly mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and cortisol stress reactivity in the discovery sample (32% mediation). Its genomic location, a CpG island shore within an H3K27ac enhancer mark, and the correlation between methylation in the blood and prefrontal cortex provide further evidence that KITLG methylation is functionally relevant for the programming of stress reactivity in the human brain. Our results extend preclinical evidence for epigenetic regulation of stress reactivity to humans and provide leads to enhance our understanding of the neurobiological pathways underlying stress vulnerability. PMID:26997371

  15. Consensus Genome-Wide Expression Quantitative Trait Loci and Their Relationship with Human Complex Trait Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chen-Hsin; Pal, Lipika R; Moult, John

    2016-07-01

    Most of the risk loci identified from genome-wide association (GWA) studies do not provide direct information on the biological basis of a disease or on the underlying mechanisms. Recent expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) association studies have provided information on genetic factors associated with gene expression variation. These eQTLs might contribute to phenotype diversity and disease susceptibility, but interpretation is handicapped by low reproducibility of the expression results. To address this issue, we have generated a set of consensus eQTLs by integrating publicly available data for specific human populations and cell types. Overall, we find over 4000 genes that are involved in high-confidence eQTL relationships. To elucidate the role that eQTLs play in human common diseases, we matched the high-confidence eQTLs to a set of 335 disease risk loci identified from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWA study and follow-up studies for 7 human complex trait diseases-bipolar disorder (BD), coronary artery disease (CAD), Crohn's disease (CD), hypertension (HT), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), type 1 diabetes (T1D), and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The results show that the data are consistent with ∼50% of these disease loci arising from an underlying expression change mechanism. PMID:27428252

  16. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in cohesin mutant human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinglan; Zhang, Zhe; Bando, Masashige; Itoh, Takehiko; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Li, Jennifer R.; Clark, Dinah; Kaur, Maninder; Tatsuro, Kondo; Kline, Antonie D.; Chang, Celia; Vega, Hugo; Jackson, Laird G.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Krantz, Ian D.

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin complex has recently been shown to be a key regulator of eukaryotic gene expression, although the mechanisms by which it exerts its effects are poorly understood. We have undertaken a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in cohesin-deficient cell lines from probands with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). Heterozygous mutations in NIPBL, SMC1A and SMC3 genes account for ∼65% of individuals with CdLS. SMC1A and SMC3 are subunits of the cohesin complex that controls sister chromatid cohesion, whereas NIPBL facilitates cohesin loading and unloading. We have examined the methylation status of 27 578 CpG dinucleotides in 72 CdLS and control samples. We have documented the DNA methylation pattern in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as well as identified specific differential DNA methylation in CdLS. Subgroups of CdLS probands and controls can be classified using selected CpG loci. The X chromosome was also found to have a unique DNA methylation pattern in CdLS. Cohesin preferentially binds to hypo-methylated DNA in control LCLs, whereas the differential DNA methylation alters cohesin binding in CdLS. Our results suggest that in addition to DNA methylation multiple mechanisms may be involved in transcriptional regulation in human cells and in the resultant gene misexpression in CdLS. PMID:20448023

  17. Human Genome-Wide RNAi Screen for Host Factors That Modulate Intracellular Salmonella Growth

    PubMed Central

    Thornbrough, Joshua M.; Hundley, Tom; Valdivia, Raphael; Worley, Micah J.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a bacterial pathogen of humans that can proliferate within epithelial cells as well as professional phagocytes of the immune system. While much has been learned about the microbial genes that influence the infectious process through decades of intensive research, relatively little is known about the host factors that affect infection. We performed a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host genes that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) utilizes to facilitate growth within human epithelial cells. In this screen, with siRNAs targeting every predicted gene in the human genome, we identified 252 new human-host-susceptibility factors (HSFs) for S. typhimurium. We also identified 39 genes whose silencing results in increased intracellular growth of S. typhimurium. The HSFs identified are regulated most centrally by NFκB and associate with each other through an extremely dense network of interactions that center around a group of kinases. Most genes identified were not previously appreciated as playing roles in the intracellular lifecycle of S. enterica. Numerous HSFs identified with interesting characteristics that could play plausible roles in mediating intracellular microbial growth are discussed. Importantly, this study reveals significant overlap between the host network that supports S. typhimurium growth within human epithelial cells and the one that promotes the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within human macrophages. In addition to providing much new information about the molecular mechanisms underlying S. enterica-host cell interplay, all 252 HSFs identified are candidates for new anti-microbial targets for controlling S. enterica infections, and some may provide broad-spectrum anti-microbial activity. PMID:22701604

  18. Genome-wide map of regulatory interactions in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Nastaran; Phanstiel, Douglas H; He, Chao; Grubert, Fabian; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Kasowski, Maya; Zhang, Michael Q; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that interactions between regulatory genomic elements play an important role in regulating gene expression. We generated a genome-wide interaction map of regulatory elements in human cells (ENCODE tier 1 cells, K562, GM12878) using Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) experiments targeting six broadly distributed factors. Bound regions covered 80% of DNase I hypersensitive sites including 99.7% of TSS and 98% of enhancers. Correlating this map with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data sets revealed cohesin, CTCF, and ZNF143 as key components of three-dimensional chromatin structure and revealed how the distal chromatin state affects gene transcription. Comparison of interactions between cell types revealed that enhancer-promoter interactions were highly cell-type-specific. Construction and comparison of distal and proximal regulatory networks revealed stark differences in structure and biological function. Proximal binding events are enriched at genes with housekeeping functions, while distal binding events interact with genes involved in dynamic biological processes including response to stimulus. This study reveals new mechanistic and functional insights into regulatory region organization in the nucleus. PMID:25228660

  19. Integrated genome-wide analysis of genomic changes and gene regulation in human adrenocortical tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Wang, Yonghong; Patel, Dhaval; Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S.; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and whether there is progression from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma, we performed genome-wide gene expression, gene methylation, microRNA expression and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis in human adrenocortical tissue (normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC) samples. A pairwise comparison of normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC gene expression profiles with more than four-fold expression differences and an adjusted P-value < 0.05 revealed no major differences in normal versus adrenocortical adenoma whereas there are 808 and 1085, respectively, dysregulated genes between ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma and ACC versus normal. The majority of the dysregulated genes in ACC were downregulated. By integrating the CGH, gene methylation and expression profiles of potential miRNAs with the gene expression of dysregulated genes, we found that there are higher alterations in ACC versus normal compared to ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma. Importantly, we identified several novel molecular pathways that are associated with dysregulated genes and further experimentally validated that oncostatin m signaling induces caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation. Finally, we propose that there is higher number of genomic changes from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma and identified oncostatin m signaling as a plausible druggable pathway for therapeutics. PMID:26446994

  20. Genome-wide map of regulatory interactions in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Nastaran; Phanstiel, Douglas H.; He, Chao; Grubert, Fabian; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Kasowski, Maya; Zhang, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that interactions between regulatory genomic elements play an important role in regulating gene expression. We generated a genome-wide interaction map of regulatory elements in human cells (ENCODE tier 1 cells, K562, GM12878) using Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) experiments targeting six broadly distributed factors. Bound regions covered 80% of DNase I hypersensitive sites including 99.7% of TSS and 98% of enhancers. Correlating this map with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data sets revealed cohesin, CTCF, and ZNF143 as key components of three-dimensional chromatin structure and revealed how the distal chromatin state affects gene transcription. Comparison of interactions between cell types revealed that enhancer–promoter interactions were highly cell-type-specific. Construction and comparison of distal and proximal regulatory networks revealed stark differences in structure and biological function. Proximal binding events are enriched at genes with housekeeping functions, while distal binding events interact with genes involved in dynamic biological processes including response to stimulus. This study reveals new mechanistic and functional insights into regulatory region organization in the nucleus. PMID:25228660

  1. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression patterns in purified, uncultured human liver cells and activated hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Andrew H.; Coll, Mar; Verhulst, Stefaan; Mannaerts, Inge; Øie, Cristina I.; Smedsrød, Bård; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Luttun, Aernout; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Collas, Philippe; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver fibrogenesis – scarring of the liver that can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer – is characterized by hepatocyte impairment, capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. To date, the molecular determinants of a healthy human liver cell phenotype remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we assess the transcriptome and the genome-wide promoter methylome specific for purified, non-cultured human hepatocytes, LSECs and HSCs, and investigate the nature of epigenetic changes accompanying transcriptional changes associated with activation of HSCs. Material and methods Gene expression profile and promoter methylome of purified, uncultured human liver cells and culture-activated HSCs were respectively determined using Affymetrix HG-U219 genechips and by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation coupled to promoter array hybridization. Histone modification patterns were assessed at the single-gene level by chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR. Results We unveil a DNA-methylation-based epigenetic relationship between hepatocytes, LSECs and HSCs despite their distinct ontogeny. We show that liver cell type-specific DNA methylation targets early developmental and differentiation-associated functions. Integrative analysis of promoter methylome and transcriptome reveals partial concordance between DNA methylation and transcriptional changes associated with human HSC activation. Further, we identify concordant histone methylation and acetylation changes in the promoter and putative novel enhancer elements of genes involved in liver fibrosis. Conclusions Our study provides the first epigenetic blueprint of three distinct freshly isolated, human hepatic cell types and of epigenetic changes elicited upon HSC activation. PMID:26353929

  2. Genome-wide linkage analysis for human longevity: Genetics of Healthy Ageing Study

    PubMed Central

    Beekman, Marian; Blanché, Hélène; Perola, Markus; Hervonen, Anti; Bezrukov, Vladyslav; Sikora, Ewa; Flachsbart, Frederieke; Christiansen, Lene; De Craen, Anton J.M.; Kirkwood, Tom B.L.; Rea, I. Meave; Poulain, Michel; Robine, Jean-Marie; Stazi, Maria Antonietta; Passarino, Giuseppe; Deiana, Luca; Gonos, Efstathios S.; Valensin, Silvana; Paternoster, Lavinia; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Tan, Qihua; Helmer, Quinta; Van den Akker, Erik B.; Deelen, Joris; Martella, Francesca; Cordell, Heather J.; Ayers, Kristin L.; Vaupel, James W.; Törnwall, Outi; Johnson, Thomas E.; Schreiber, Stefan; Lathrop, Mark; Skytthe, Axel; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Christensen, Kaare; Gampe, Jutta; Nebel, Almut; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Summary Clear evidence exists for heritability of human longevity, and much interest is focused on identifying genes associated with longer lives. To identify such longevity alleles, we performed the largest genome-wide linkage scan thus far reported. Linkage analyses included 2118 nonagenarian Caucasian sibling pairs that have been enrolled in fifteen study centers of eleven European countries as part of the Genetics of Healthy Ageing (GEHA) project. In the joint linkage analyses we observed four regions that show linkage with longevity; chromosome 14q11.2 (LOD=3.47), chromosome 17q12-q22 (LOD=2.95), chromosome 19p13.3-p13.11 (LOD=3.76) and chromosome 19q13.11-q13.32 (LOD=3.57). To fine map these regions linked to longevity, we performed association analysis using GWAS data in a subgroup of 1,228 unrelated nonagenarian and 1,907 geographically matched controls. Using a fixed effect meta-analysis approach, rs4420638 at the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 gene locus showed significant association with longevity (p-value=9.6 × 10−8). By combined modeling of linkage and association we showed that association of longevity with APOEε4 and APOEε2 alleles explain the linkage at 19q13.11-q13.32 with p-value=0.02 and p-value=1.0 × 10−5, respectively. In the largest linkage scan thus far performed for human familial longevity, we confirm that the APOE locus is a longevity gene and that additional longevity loci may be identified at 14q11.2, 17q12-q22 and 19p13.3-p13.11. Since the latter linkage results are not explained by common variants, we suggest that rare variants play an important role in human familial longevity. PMID:23286790

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies a potent locus associated with human opioid sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, D; Fukuda, K; Kasai, S; Hasegawa, J; Aoki, Y; Nishi, A; Saita, N; Koukita, Y; Nagashima, M; Katoh, R; Satoh, Y; Tagami, M; Higuchi, S; Ujike, H; Ozaki, N; Inada, T; Iwata, N; Sora, I; Iyo, M; Kondo, N; Won, M-J; Naruse, N; Uehara-Aoyama, K; Itokawa, M; Koga, M; Arinami, T; Kaneko, Y; Hayashida, M; Ikeda, K

    2014-01-01

    Opioids, such as morphine and fentanyl, are widely used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In addition, the opioid system has a key role in the rewarding effects of morphine, ethanol, cocaine and various other drugs. Although opioid sensitivity is well known to vary widely among individual subjects, several candidate genetic polymorphisms reported so far are not sufficient for fully understanding the wide range of interindividual differences in human opioid sensitivity. By conducting a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in healthy subjects, we found that genetic polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block that spans 2q33.3–2q34 were strongly associated with the requirements for postoperative opioid analgesics after painful cosmetic surgery. The C allele of the best candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2952768, was associated with more analgesic requirements, and consistent results were obtained in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In addition, carriers of the C allele in this SNP exhibited less vulnerability to severe drug dependence in patients with methamphetamine dependence, alcohol dependence, and eating disorders and a lower ‘Reward Dependence' score on a personality questionnaire in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the C/C genotype of this SNP was significantly associated with the elevated expression of a neighboring gene, CREB1. These results show that SNPs in this locus are the most potent genetic factors associated with human opioid sensitivity known to date, affecting both the efficacy of opioid analgesics and liability to severe substance dependence. Our findings provide valuable information for the personalized treatment of pain and drug dependence. PMID:23183491

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies a potent locus associated with human opioid sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, D; Fukuda, K; Kasai, S; Hasegawa, J; Aoki, Y; Nishi, A; Saita, N; Koukita, Y; Nagashima, M; Katoh, R; Satoh, Y; Tagami, M; Higuchi, S; Ujike, H; Ozaki, N; Inada, T; Iwata, N; Sora, I; Iyo, M; Kondo, N; Won, M-J; Naruse, N; Uehara-Aoyama, K; Itokawa, M; Koga, M; Arinami, T; Kaneko, Y; Hayashida, M; Ikeda, K

    2014-01-01

    Opioids, such as morphine and fentanyl, are widely used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In addition, the opioid system has a key role in the rewarding effects of morphine, ethanol, cocaine and various other drugs. Although opioid sensitivity is well known to vary widely among individual subjects, several candidate genetic polymorphisms reported so far are not sufficient for fully understanding the wide range of interindividual differences in human opioid sensitivity. By conducting a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in healthy subjects, we found that genetic polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block that spans 2q33.3-2q34 were strongly associated with the requirements for postoperative opioid analgesics after painful cosmetic surgery. The C allele of the best candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2952768, was associated with more analgesic requirements, and consistent results were obtained in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In addition, carriers of the C allele in this SNP exhibited less vulnerability to severe drug dependence in patients with methamphetamine dependence, alcohol dependence, and eating disorders and a lower 'Reward Dependence' score on a personality questionnaire in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the C/C genotype of this SNP was significantly associated with the elevated expression of a neighboring gene, CREB1. These results show that SNPs in this locus are the most potent genetic factors associated with human opioid sensitivity known to date, affecting both the efficacy of opioid analgesics and liability to severe substance dependence. Our findings provide valuable information for the personalized treatment of pain and drug dependence. PMID:23183491

  5. Brain Expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) Identifies Human Disease-Associated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n = 197, temporal cortex n = 202) and with other brain pathologies (non–AD, cerebellar n = 177, temporal cortex n = 197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ±100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non–ADs (q<0.05, p = 7.70×10−5–1.67×10−82). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p = 1.85×10−5–1.70×10−141). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10−6). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9–3.3 fold enrichment (p<10−6) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD–risk association (p<10−3) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non–CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with

  6. Brain expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) identifies human disease-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Allen, Mariet; Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nair, Asha A; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n=197, temporal cortex n=202) and with other brain pathologies (non-AD, cerebellar n=177, temporal cortex n=197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ± 100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non-ADs (q<0.05, p=7.70 × 10(-5)-1.67 × 10(-82)). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p=1.85 × 10(-5)-1.70 × 10(-141)). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10(-6)). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9-3.3 fold enrichment (p<10(-6)) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD-risk association (p<10(-3)) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non-CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings

  7. Genome-wide association study of NMDA receptor coagonists in human cerebrospinal fluid and plasma.

    PubMed

    Luykx, J J; Bakker, S C; Visser, W F; Verhoeven-Duif, N; Buizer-Voskamp, J E; den Heijer, J M; Boks, M P M; Sul, J H; Eskin, E; Ori, A P; Cantor, R M; Vorstman, J; Strengman, E; DeYoung, J; Kappen, T H; Pariama, E; van Dongen, E P A; Borgdorff, P; Bruins, P; de Koning, T J; Kahn, R S; Ophoff, R A

    2015-12-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) coagonists glycine, D-serine and L-proline play crucial roles in NMDAR-dependent neurotransmission and are associated with a range of neuropsychiatric disorders. We conducted the first genome-wide association study of concentrations of these coagonists and their enantiomers in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of human subjects from the general population (N=414). Genetic variants at chromosome 22q11.2, located in and near PRODH (proline dehydrogenase), were associated with L-proline in plasma (β=0.29; P=6.38 × 10(-10)). The missense variant rs17279437 in the proline transporter SLC6A20 was associated with L-proline in CSF (β=0.28; P=9.68 × 10(-9)). Suggestive evidence of association was found for the D-serine plasma-CSF ratio at the D-amino-acid oxidase (DAO) gene (β=-0.28; P=9.08 × 10(-8)), whereas a variant in SRR (that encodes serine racemase and is associated with schizophrenia) constituted the most strongly associated locus for the L-serine to D-serine ratio in CSF. All these genes are highly expressed in rodent meninges and choroid plexus, anatomical regions relevant to CSF physiology. The enzymes and transporters they encode may be targeted to further construe the nature of NMDAR coagonist involvement in NMDAR gating. Furthermore, the highlighted genetic variants may be followed up in clinical populations, for example, schizophrenia and 22q11 deletion syndrome. Overall, this targeted metabolomics approach furthers the understanding of NMDAR coagonist concentration variability and sets the stage for non-targeted CSF metabolomics projects. PMID:25666758

  8. From Human Monocytes to Genome-Wide Binding Sites - A Protocol for Small Amounts of Blood: Monocyte Isolation/ChIP-Protocol/Library Amplification/Genome Wide Computational Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weiterer, Sebastian; Uhle, Florian; Bhuju, Sabin; Jarek, Michael; Weigand, Markus A.; Bartkuhn, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with a genome-wide analysis via high-throughput sequencing is the state of the art method to gain genome-wide representation of histone modification or transcription factor binding profiles. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis in the context of human experimental samples is limited, especially in the case of blood cells. The typically extremely low yields of precipitated DNA are usually not compatible with library amplification for next generation sequencing. We developed a highly reproducible protocol to present a guideline from the first step of isolating monocytes from a blood sample to analyse the distribution of histone modifications in a genome-wide manner. Conclusion: The protocol describes the whole work flow from isolating monocytes from human blood samples followed by a high-sensitivity and small-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation assay with guidance for generating libraries compatible with next generation sequencing from small amounts of immunoprecipitated DNA. PMID:24732314

  9. Genome-wide nucleosome map and cytosine methylation levels of an ancient human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Valen, Eivind; Velazquez, Amhed M. Vargas; Parker, Brian J.; Rasmussen, Morten; Lindgreen, Stinus; Lilje, Berit; Tobin, Desmond J.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Vang, Søren; Andersson, Robin; Jones, Peter A.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Tikhonov, Alexei; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Rubin, Edward M.; Sandelin, Albin; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Krogh, Anders; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic information is available from contemporary organisms, but is difficult to track back in evolutionary time. Here, we show that genome-wide epigenetic information can be gathered directly from next-generation sequence reads of DNA isolated from ancient remains. Using the genome sequence data generated from hair shafts of a 4000-yr-old Paleo-Eskimo belonging to the Saqqaq culture, we generate the first ancient nucleosome map coupled with a genome-wide survey of cytosine methylation levels. The validity of both nucleosome map and methylation levels were confirmed by the recovery of the expected signals at promoter regions, exon/intron boundaries, and CTCF sites. The top-scoring nucleosome calls revealed distinct DNA positioning biases, attesting to nucleotide-level accuracy. The ancient methylation levels exhibited high conservation over time, clustering closely with modern hair tissues. Using ancient methylation information, we estimated the age at death of the Saqqaq individual and illustrate how epigenetic information can be used to infer ancient gene expression. Similar epigenetic signatures were found in other fossil material, such as 110,000- to 130,000-yr-old bones, supporting the contention that ancient epigenomic information can be reconstructed from a deep past. Our findings lay the foundation for extracting epigenomic information from ancient samples, allowing shifts in epialleles to be tracked through evolutionary time, as well as providing an original window into modern epigenomics. PMID:24299735

  10. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci for variation in human ear morphology.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Reales, Guillermo; Smith, Andrew J P; Konka, Esra; Palmen, Jutta; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Calderón, Rosario; Rosique, Javier; Cheeseman, Michael; Bhutta, Mahmood F; Humphries, Steve E; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a genome-wide association study for non-pathological pinna morphology in over 5,000 Latin Americans. We find genome-wide significant association at seven genomic regions affecting: lobe size and attachment, folding of antihelix, helix rolling, ear protrusion and antitragus size (linear regression P values 2 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-14)). Four traits are associated with a functional variant in the Ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR) gene, a key regulator of embryonic skin appendage development. We confirm expression of Edar in the developing mouse ear and that Edar-deficient mice have an abnormally shaped pinna. Two traits are associated with SNPs in a region overlapping the T-Box Protein 15 (TBX15) gene, a major determinant of mouse skeletal development. Strongest association in this region is observed for SNP rs17023457 located in an evolutionarily conserved binding site for the transcription factor Cartilage paired-class homeoprotein 1 (CART1), and we confirm that rs17023457 alters in vitro binding of CART1. PMID:26105758

  11. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci for variation in human ear morphology

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Reales, Guillermo; Smith, Andrew J. P.; Konka, Esra; Palmen, Jutta; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Calderón, Rosario; Rosique, Javier; Cheeseman, Michael; Bhutta, Mahmood F.; Humphries, Steve E.; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a genome-wide association study for non-pathological pinna morphology in over 5,000 Latin Americans. We find genome-wide significant association at seven genomic regions affecting: lobe size and attachment, folding of antihelix, helix rolling, ear protrusion and antitragus size (linear regression P values 2 × 10−8 to 3 × 10−14). Four traits are associated with a functional variant in the Ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR) gene, a key regulator of embryonic skin appendage development. We confirm expression of Edar in the developing mouse ear and that Edar-deficient mice have an abnormally shaped pinna. Two traits are associated with SNPs in a region overlapping the T-Box Protein 15 (TBX15) gene, a major determinant of mouse skeletal development. Strongest association in this region is observed for SNP rs17023457 located in an evolutionarily conserved binding site for the transcription factor Cartilage paired-class homeoprotein 1 (CART1), and we confirm that rs17023457 alters in vitro binding of CART1. PMID:26105758

  12. The genome-wide DNA sequence specificity of the anti-tumour drug bleomycin in human cells.

    PubMed

    Murray, Vincent; Chen, Jon K; Tanaka, Mark M

    2016-07-01

    The cancer chemotherapeutic agent, bleomycin, cleaves DNA at specific sites. For the first time, the genome-wide DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin breakage was determined in human cells. Utilising Illumina next-generation DNA sequencing techniques, over 200 million bleomycin cleavage sites were examined to elucidate the bleomycin genome-wide DNA selectivity. The genome-wide bleomycin cleavage data were analysed by four different methods to determine the cellular DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin strand breakage. For the most highly cleaved DNA sequences, the preferred site of bleomycin breakage was at 5'-GT* dinucleotide sequences (where the asterisk indicates the bleomycin cleavage site), with lesser cleavage at 5'-GC* dinucleotides. This investigation also determined longer bleomycin cleavage sequences, with preferred cleavage at 5'-GT*A and 5'- TGT* trinucleotide sequences, and 5'-TGT*A tetranucleotides. For cellular DNA, the hexanucleotide DNA sequence 5'-RTGT*AY (where R is a purine and Y is a pyrimidine) was the most highly cleaved DNA sequence. It was striking that alternating purine-pyrimidine sequences were highly cleaved by bleomycin. The highest intensity cleavage sites in cellular and purified DNA were very similar although there were some minor differences. Statistical nucleotide frequency analysis indicated a G nucleotide was present at the -3 position (relative to the cleavage site) in cellular DNA but was absent in purified DNA. PMID:27188426

  13. A Genome-Wide Association Study of the Human Metabolome in a Community-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Eugene P.; Ho, Jennifer E.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Shen, Dongxiao; Cheng, Susan; Larson, Martin G.; Ghorbani, Anahita; Shi, Xu; Helenius, Iiro T.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Souza, Amanda L.; Deik, Amy; Pierce, Kerry A.; Bullock, Kevin; Walford, Geoffrey A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Florez, Jose C.; Clish, Clary; Yeh, J.-R. Joanna; Wang, Thomas J.; Gerszten, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Because metabolites are hypothesized to play key roles as markers and effectors of cardio-metabolic diseases, recent studies have sought to annotate the genetic determinants of circulating metabolite levels. We report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 217 plasma metabolites, including >100 not measured in prior GWAS, in 2,076 participants of the Framingham Heart Study. For the majority of analytes, we find that estimated heritability explains >20% of inter-individual variation, and that variation attributable to heritable factors is greater than that attributable to clinical factors. Further, we identify 31 genetic loci associated with plasma metabolites, including 23 that have not previously been reported. Importantly, we include GWAS results for all surveyed metabolites, and demonstrate how this information highlights a role for AGXT2 in cholesterol ester and triacylglycerol metabolism. Thus, our study outlines the relative contributions of inherited and clinical factors on the plasma metabolome and provides a resource for metabolism research. PMID:23823483

  14. Cytokine Gene Polymorphisms and Human Autoimmune Disease in the Era of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cytokine (receptor) genes have traditionally attracted great interest as plausible genetic risk factors for autoimmune disease. Since 2007, the implementation of genome-wide association studies has facilitated the robust identification of allelic variants in more than 35 cytokine loci as susceptibility factors for a wide variety of over 15 autoimmune disorders. In this review, we catalog the gene loci of interleukin, chemokine, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and ligands that have emerged as autoimmune risk factors. We examine recent progress made in the clarification of the functional mechanisms by which polymorphisms in the genes coding for interleukin-2 receptor alpha (IL2RA), IL7R, and IL23R may alter risk for autoimmune disease, and discuss opposite autoimmune risk alleles found, among others, at the IL10 locus. PMID:22191464

  15. Genome-wide transcriptional reorganization associated with senescence-to-immortality switch during human hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Gokhan; Arslan-Ergul, Ayca; Bagislar, Sevgi; Konu, Ozlen; Yuzugullu, Haluk; Gursoy-Yuzugullu, Ozge; Ozturk, Nuri; Ozen, Cigdem; Ozdag, Hilal; Erdal, Esra; Karademir, Sedat; Sagol, Ozgul; Mizrak, Dilsa; Bozkaya, Hakan; Ilk, Hakki Gokhan; Ilk, Ozlem; Bilen, Biter; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Akar, Nejat; Ozturk, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a permanent proliferation arrest in response to cell stress such as DNA damage. It contributes strongly to tissue aging and serves as a major barrier against tumor development. Most tumor cells are believed to bypass the senescence barrier (become "immortal") by inactivating growth control genes such as TP53 and CDKN2A. They also reactivate telomerase reverse transcriptase. Senescence-to-immortality transition is accompanied by major phenotypic and biochemical changes mediated by genome-wide transcriptional modifications. This appears to happen during hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in patients with liver cirrhosis, however, the accompanying transcriptional changes are virtually unknown. We investigated genome-wide transcriptional changes related to the senescence-to-immortality switch during hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Initially, we performed transcriptome analysis of senescent and immortal clones of Huh7 HCC cell line, and identified genes with significant differential expression to establish a senescence-related gene list. Through the analysis of senescence-related gene expression in different liver tissues we showed that cirrhosis and HCC display expression patterns compatible with senescent and immortal phenotypes, respectively; dysplasia being a transitional state. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that cirrhosis/senescence-associated genes were preferentially expressed in non-tumor tissues, less malignant tumors, and differentiated or senescent cells. In contrast, HCC/immortality genes were up-regulated in tumor tissues, or more malignant tumors and progenitor cells. In HCC tumors and immortal cells genes involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, telomere extension and branched chain amino acid metabolism were up-regulated, whereas genes involved in cell signaling, as well as in drug, lipid, retinoid and glycolytic metabolism were down-regulated. Based on these distinctive gene expression features we developed a 15-gene

  16. CMS: A Web-Based System for Visualization and Analysis of Genome-Wide Methylation Data of Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Roa, Juan C.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Kizer, E. Lynette; Huang, Tim H. M.; Chen, Yidong

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA methylation of promoter CpG islands is associated with gene suppression, and its unique genome-wide profiles have been linked to tumor progression. Coupled with high-throughput sequencing technologies, it can now efficiently determine genome-wide methylation profiles in cancer cells. Also, experimental and computational technologies make it possible to find the functional relationship between cancer-specific methylation patterns and their clinicopathological parameters. Methodology/Principal Findings Cancer methylome system (CMS) is a web-based database application designed for the visualization, comparison and statistical analysis of human cancer-specific DNA methylation. Methylation intensities were obtained from MBDCap-sequencing, pre-processed and stored in the database. 191 patient samples (169 tumor and 22 normal specimen) and 41 breast cancer cell-lines are deposited in the database, comprising about 6.6 billion uniquely mapped sequence reads. This provides comprehensive and genome-wide epigenetic portraits of human breast cancer and endometrial cancer to date. Two views are proposed for users to better understand methylation structure at the genomic level or systemic methylation alteration at the gene level. In addition, a variety of annotation tracks are provided to cover genomic information. CMS includes important analytic functions for interpretation of methylation data, such as the detection of differentially methylated regions, statistical calculation of global methylation intensities, multiple gene sets of biologically significant categories, interactivity with UCSC via custom-track data. We also present examples of discoveries utilizing the framework. Conclusions/Significance CMS provides visualization and analytic functions for cancer methylome datasets. A comprehensive collection of datasets, a variety of embedded analytic functions and extensive applications with biological and translational significance make this system powerful

  17. Genome-wide identification of regulatory RNAs in the human pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Soutourina, Olga A; Monot, Marc; Boudry, Pierre; Saujet, Laure; Pichon, Christophe; Sismeiro, Odile; Semenova, Ekaterina; Severinov, Konstantin; Le Bouguenec, Chantal; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Dupuy, Bruno; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emergent pathogen, and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In an effort to understand the role of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) in C. difficile physiology and pathogenesis, we used an in silico approach to identify 511 sRNA candidates in both intergenic and coding regions. In parallel, RNA-seq and differential 5'-end RNA-seq were used for global identification of C. difficile sRNAs and their transcriptional start sites at three different growth conditions (exponential growth phase, stationary phase, and starvation). This global experimental approach identified 251 putative regulatory sRNAs including 94 potential trans riboregulators located in intergenic regions, 91 cis-antisense RNAs, and 66 riboswitches. Expression of 35 sRNAs was confirmed by gene-specific experimental approaches. Some sRNAs, including an antisense RNA that may be involved in control of C. difficile autolytic activity, showed growth phase-dependent expression profiles. Expression of each of 16 predicted c-di-GMP-responsive riboswitches was observed, and experimental evidence for their regulatory role in coordinated control of motility and biofilm formation was obtained. Finally, we detected abundant sRNAs encoded by multiple C. difficile CRISPR loci. These RNAs may be important for C. difficile survival in bacteriophage-rich gut communities. Altogether, this first experimental genome-wide identification of C. difficile sRNAs provides a firm basis for future RNome characterization and identification of molecular mechanisms of sRNA-based regulation of gene expression in this emergent enteropathogen. PMID:23675309

  18. Genome-Wide Identification of Regulatory RNAs in the Human Pathogen Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Soutourina, Olga A.; Monot, Marc; Boudry, Pierre; Saujet, Laure; Pichon, Christophe; Sismeiro, Odile; Semenova, Ekaterina; Severinov, Konstantin; Le Bouguenec, Chantal; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Dupuy, Bruno; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emergent pathogen, and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In an effort to understand the role of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) in C. difficile physiology and pathogenesis, we used an in silico approach to identify 511 sRNA candidates in both intergenic and coding regions. In parallel, RNA–seq and differential 5′-end RNA–seq were used for global identification of C. difficile sRNAs and their transcriptional start sites at three different growth conditions (exponential growth phase, stationary phase, and starvation). This global experimental approach identified 251 putative regulatory sRNAs including 94 potential trans riboregulators located in intergenic regions, 91 cis-antisense RNAs, and 66 riboswitches. Expression of 35 sRNAs was confirmed by gene-specific experimental approaches. Some sRNAs, including an antisense RNA that may be involved in control of C. difficile autolytic activity, showed growth phase-dependent expression profiles. Expression of each of 16 predicted c-di-GMP-responsive riboswitches was observed, and experimental evidence for their regulatory role in coordinated control of motility and biofilm formation was obtained. Finally, we detected abundant sRNAs encoded by multiple C. difficile CRISPR loci. These RNAs may be important for C. difficile survival in bacteriophage-rich gut communities. Altogether, this first experimental genome-wide identification of C. difficile sRNAs provides a firm basis for future RNome characterization and identification of molecular mechanisms of sRNA–based regulation of gene expression in this emergent enteropathogen. PMID:23675309

  19. Genome-wide patterns of recombination in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Dettman, Jeremy R; Rodrigue, Nicolas; Kassen, Rees

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a significant cause of acute nosocomial infections as well as chronic respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Recent reports of the intercontinental spread of a CF-specific epidemic strain, combined with high intrinsic levels of antibiotic resistance, have made this opportunistic pathogen an important public health concern. Strain-specific differences correlate with variation in clinical outcomes of infected CF patients, increasing the urgency to understand the evolutionary origin of genetic factors conferring important phenotypes that enable infection, virulence, or resistance. Here, we describe the genome-wide patterns of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in P. aeruginosa, and the extent to which the genomes are affected by these diversity-generating processes. Based on whole-genome sequence data from 32 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa, we examined the rate and distribution of recombination along the genome, and its effect on the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships. Multiple lines of evidence suggested that recombination was common and usually involves short stretches of DNA (200-300 bp). Although mutation was the main source of nucleotide diversity, the import of polymorphisms by homologous recombination contributed nearly as much. We also identified the genomic regions with frequent recombination, and the specific sequences of recombinant origin within epidemic strains. The functional characteristics of the genes contained therein were examined for potential associations with a pathogenic lifestyle or adaptation to the CF lung environment. A common link between many of the high-recombination genes was their functional affiliation with the cell wall, suggesting that the products of recombination may be maintained by selection for variation in cell-surface molecules that allows for evasion of the host immune system. PMID:25480685

  20. Genetic determinants of antithyroid drug-induced agranulocytosis by human leukocyte antigen genotyping and genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Lung; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Wang, Pei-Wen; Lin, Ying-Chao; Chu, Chen-Chung; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chi; Chang, Ching-Chung; Huang, Tien-Shang; Tsai, Keh Sung; Tseng, Fen-Yu; Wang, Chih-Yuan; Lu, Jin-Ying; Chiu, Wei-Yih; Chang, Chien-Ching; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Fann, Cathy Shen-Jang; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Graves' disease is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism affecting 1.0–1.6% of the population. Antithyroid drugs are the treatment cornerstone, but may cause life-threatening agranulocytosis. Here we conduct a two-stage association study on two separate subject sets (in total 42 agranulocytosis cases and 1,208 Graves' disease controls), using direct human leukocyte antigen genotyping and SNP-based genome-wide association study. We demonstrate HLA-B*38:02 (Armitage trend Pcombined=6.75 × 10−32) and HLA-DRB1*08:03 (Pcombined=1.83 × 10−9) as independent susceptibility loci. The genome-wide association study identifies the same signals. Estimated odds ratios for these two loci comparing effective allele carriers to non-carriers are 21.48 (95% confidence interval=11.13–41.48) and 6.13 (95% confidence interval=3.28–11.46), respectively. Carrying both HLA-B*38:02 and HLA-DRB1*08:03 increases odds ratio to 48.41 (Pcombined=3.32 × 10−21, 95% confidence interval=21.66–108.22). Our results could be useful for antithyroid-induced agranulocytosis and potentially for agranulocytosis caused by other chemicals. PMID:26151496

  1. Genome-wide RNAi Screening Identifies Protein Modules Required for 40S Subunit Synthesis in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Badertscher, Lukas; Wild, Thomas; Montellese, Christian; Alexander, Leila T; Bammert, Lukas; Sarazova, Marie; Stebler, Michael; Csucs, Gabor; Mayer, Thomas U; Zamboni, Nicola; Zemp, Ivo; Horvath, Peter; Kutay, Ulrike

    2015-12-29

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex process requiring many assisting factors. Studies in yeast have yielded comprehensive knowledge of the cellular machinery involved in this process. However, many aspects of ribosome synthesis are different in higher eukaryotes, and the global set of mammalian ribosome biogenesis factors remains unexplored. We used an imaging-based, genome-wide RNAi screen to find human proteins involved in 40S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Our analysis identified ∼ 300 factors, many part of essential protein modules such as the small subunit (SSU) processome, the eIF3 and chaperonin complexes, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We demonstrate a role for the vertebrate-specific factor RBIS in ribosome synthesis, uncover a requirement for the CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in nucleolar ribosome biogenesis, and reveal that intracellular glutamine synthesis supports 40S subunit production. PMID:26711351

  2. Genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes and embryos reveal selection for maternal recombination rates”

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Senthilkumar A.; Joshi, Hrishikesh A.; Cimadomo, Danilo; Griffin, Darren K.; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C.; Thornhill, Alan R.; Housworth, Elizabeth; Herbert, Alex D.; Rienzi, Laura; Ubaldi, Filippo M.; Handyside, Alan H.; Hoffmann, Eva R.

    2015-01-01

    Crossover recombination reshuffles genes and prevents errors in segregation that lead to extra or missing chromosomes (aneuploidy) in human eggs, a major cause of pregnancy failure and congenital disorders. Here, we generate genome-wide maps of crossovers and chromosome segregation patterns by recovering all three products of single female meioses. Genotyping > 4 million informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 23 complete meioses allowed us to map 2,032 maternal and 1,342 paternal crossovers and to infer the segregation patterns of 529 chromosome pairs. We uncover a novel reverse chromosome segregation pattern in which both homologs separate their sister chromatids at meiosis I; detect selection for higher recombination rates in the female germline by the elimination of aneuploid embryos; and report chromosomal drive against non-recombinant chromatids at meiosis II. Collectively, our findings reveal that recombination not only affects homolog segregation at meiosis I but also the fate of sister chromatids at meiosis II. PMID:25985139

  3. Genome-wide maps of recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes and embryos show selection for maternal recombination rates.

    PubMed

    Ottolini, Christian S; Newnham, Louise J; Capalbo, Antonio; Natesan, Senthilkumar A; Joshi, Hrishikesh A; Cimadomo, Danilo; Griffin, Darren K; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C; Thornhill, Alan R; Housworth, Elizabeth; Herbert, Alex D; Rienzi, Laura; Ubaldi, Filippo M; Handyside, Alan H; Hoffmann, Eva R

    2015-07-01

    Crossover recombination reshuffles genes and prevents errors in segregation that lead to extra or missing chromosomes (aneuploidy) in human eggs, a major cause of pregnancy failure and congenital disorders. Here we generate genome-wide maps of crossovers and chromosome segregation patterns by recovering all three products of single female meioses. Genotyping >4 million informative SNPs from 23 complete meioses allowed us to map 2,032 maternal and 1,342 paternal crossovers and to infer the segregation patterns of 529 chromosome pairs. We uncover a new reverse chromosome segregation pattern in which both homologs separate their sister chromatids at meiosis I; detect selection for higher recombination rates in the female germ line by the elimination of aneuploid embryos; and report chromosomal drive against non-recombinant chromatids at meiosis II. Collectively, our findings show that recombination not only affects homolog segregation at meiosis I but also the fate of sister chromatids at meiosis II. PMID:25985139

  4. Toward a Genome-Wide Reconstruction of Cis-Regulatory Networks in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Katharine R.; Banerjee, A. Raja; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The vast amount of recent progress made on the sequence of the human genome has allowed an unprecedented examination of cis-regulatory networks. These networks consist of functional elements such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, and insulators, and their coordinated activity is responsible for regulation of gene expression. Recent studies surveyed the entire genome, identifying novel elements and evaluating functional differences in respect to development. These investigations present the first steps towards a global regulatory map for expression in the human genome. PMID:19560550

  5. Multidimensional Genome-wide Analyses Show Accurate FVIII Integration by ZFN in Primary Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sivalingam, Jaichandran; Kenanov, Dimitar; Han, Hao; Nirmal, Ajit Johnson; Ng, Wai Har; Lee, Sze Sing; Masilamani, Jeyakumar; Phan, Toan Thang; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Kon, Oi Lian

    2016-01-01

    Costly coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy is a barrier to optimal clinical management of hemophilia A. Therapy using FVIII-secreting autologous primary cells is potentially efficacious and more affordable. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) mediate transgene integration into the AAVS1 locus but comprehensive evaluation of off-target genome effects is currently lacking. In light of serious adverse effects in clinical trials which employed genome-integrating viral vectors, this study evaluated potential genotoxicity of ZFN-mediated transgenesis using different techniques. We employed deep sequencing of predicted off-target sites, copy number analysis, whole-genome sequencing, and RNA-seq in primary human umbilical cord-lining epithelial cells (CLECs) with AAVS1 ZFN-mediated FVIII transgene integration. We combined molecular features to enhance the accuracy and activity of ZFN-mediated transgenesis. Our data showed a low frequency of ZFN-associated indels, no detectable off-target transgene integrations or chromosomal rearrangements. ZFN-modified CLECs had very few dysregulated transcripts and no evidence of activated oncogenic pathways. We also showed AAVS1 ZFN activity and durable FVIII transgene secretion in primary human dermal fibroblasts, bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived stromal cells. Our study suggests that, with close attention to the molecular design of genome-modifying constructs, AAVS1 ZFN-mediated FVIII integration in several primary human cell types may be safe and efficacious. PMID:26689265

  6. [Genome-wide molecular screening for the identification of new targets in human hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Longerich, T

    2012-11-01

    Molecular hepatocarcinogenesis represents a step-wise process which in most cases is associated with a well-defined chronic liver disease. By meta-analysis of classical comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) data an oncogenetic progression model could be generated (1q gain→ 8q gain → 4q loss → 16q loss → 13q loss). Array-based CGH allows the identification of etiology-dependent and independent genomic alterations. The Mouse Double Minute homologue 4 (MDM4) was shown to act as an oncogene of 1q32.1 gains in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Integration of genomic and epigenomic data facilitated the identification of tumor suppressor gene candidates in human HCC. For instance, Polo-like kinase 3 (PLK3) is frequently inactivated via promoter hypermethylation in combination with a loss of the second allele at 1p34.1. Both MDM4 overexpression and methylation-dependent inactivation of PLK3 represent potential targets for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:22948473

  7. Genome-wide prediction and analysis of human tissue-selective genes using microarray expression data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding how genes are expressed specifically in particular tissues is a fundamental question in developmental biology. Many tissue-specific genes are involved in the pathogenesis of complex human diseases. However, experimental identification of tissue-specific genes is time consuming and difficult. The accurate predictions of tissue-specific gene targets could provide useful information for biomarker development and drug target identification. Results In this study, we have developed a machine learning approach for predicting the human tissue-specific genes using microarray expression data. The lists of known tissue-specific genes for different tissues were collected from UniProt database, and the expression data retrieved from the previously compiled dataset according to the lists were used for input vector encoding. Random Forests (RFs) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) were used to construct accurate classifiers. The RF classifiers were found to outperform SVM models for tissue-specific gene prediction. The results suggest that the candidate genes for brain or liver specific expression can provide valuable information for further experimental studies. Our approach was also applied for identifying tissue-selective gene targets for different types of tissues. Conclusions A machine learning approach has been developed for accurately identifying the candidate genes for tissue specific/selective expression. The approach provides an efficient way to select some interesting genes for developing new biomedical markers and improve our knowledge of tissue-specific expression. PMID:23369200

  8. Genome-wide transcriptomic alterations induced by ethanol treatment in human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs).

    PubMed

    Khalid, Omar; Kim, Jeffrey J; Duan, Lewei; Hoang, Michael; Elashoff, David; Kim, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from adult dental pulp are multipotent mesenchymal stem cells that can be directed to differentiate into osteogenic/odontogenic cells and also trans-differentiate into neuronal cells. The utility of DPSC has been explored in odontogenic differentiation for tooth regeneration. Alcohol abuse appears to lead to periodontal disease, tooth decay and mouth sores that are potentially precancerous. Persons who abuse alcohol are at high risk of having seriously deteriorated teeth, gums and compromised oral health in general. It is currently unknown if alcohol exposure has any impact on adult stem cell maintenance, stem cell fate determination and plasticity, and stem cell niche environment. Here we provide detailed experimental methods, analysis and information associated with our data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under GSE57255. Our data provide transcriptomic changes that are occurring by EtOH treatment of DPSCs at 24-hour and 48-hour time point. PMID:25045622

  9. Variation in genome-wide mutation rates within and between human families.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Donald F; Keebler, Jonathan E M; DePristo, Mark A; Lindsay, Sarah J; Zhang, Yujun; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Hartl, Chris L; Torroja, Carlos; Garimella, Kiran V; Zilversmit, Martine; Cartwright, Reed; Rouleau, Guy A; Daly, Mark; Stone, Eric A; Hurles, Matthew E; Awadalla, Philip

    2011-07-01

    J.B.S. Haldane proposed in 1947 that the male germline may be more mutagenic than the female germline. Diverse studies have supported Haldane's contention of a higher average mutation rate in the male germline in a variety of mammals, including humans. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first direct comparative analysis of male and female germline mutation rates from the complete genome sequences of two parent-offspring trios. Through extensive validation, we identified 49 and 35 germline de novo mutations (DNMs) in two trio offspring, as well as 1,586 non-germline DNMs arising either somatically or in the cell lines from which the DNA was derived. Most strikingly, in one family, we observed that 92% of germline DNMs were from the paternal germline, whereas, in contrast, in the other family, 64% of DNMs were from the maternal germline. These observations suggest considerable variation in mutation rates within and between families. PMID:21666693

  10. Genome-wide identification of genes required for fitness of group A Streptococcus in human blood.

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Yoann; Mistry, Pragnesh; Valdes, Kayla M; Quigley, Jeffrey; Kumar, Nikhil; Tettelin, Hervé; McIver, Kevin S

    2013-03-01

    The group A streptococcus (GAS) is a strict human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases. Although GAS genome sequences are available, functional genomic analyses have been limited. We developed a mariner-based transposon, osKaR, designed to perform Transposon-Site Hybridization (TraSH) in GAS and successfully tested its use in several invasive serotypes. A complex osKaR mutant library in M1T1 GAS strain 5448 was subjected to negative selection in human blood to identify genes important for GAS fitness in this clinically relevant environment. Mutants underrepresented after growth in blood (output pool) compared to growth in rich media (input pool) were identified using DNA microarray hybridization of transposon-specific tags en masse. Using blood from three different donors, we identified 81 genes that met our criteria for reduced fitness in blood from at least two individuals. Genes known to play a role in survival of GAS in blood were found, including those encoding the virulence regulator Mga (mga), the peroxide response regulator PerR (perR), and the RofA-like regulator Ralp-3 (ralp3). We also identified genes previously reported for their contribution to sepsis in other pathogens, such as de novo nucleotide synthesis (purD, purA, pyrB, carA, carB, guaB), sugar metabolism (scrB, fruA), zinc uptake (adcC), and transcriptional regulation (cpsY). To validate our findings, independent mutants with mutations in 10 different genes identified in our screen were confirmed to be defective for survival in blood bactericidal assays. Overall, this work represents the first use of TraSH in GAS to identify potential virulence genes. PMID:23297387

  11. Genome-Wide Identification of Genes Required for Fitness of Group A Streptococcus in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Yoann; Mistry, Pragnesh; Valdes, Kayla M.; Quigley, Jeffrey; Kumar, Nikhil; Tettelin, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    The group A streptococcus (GAS) is a strict human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases. Although GAS genome sequences are available, functional genomic analyses have been limited. We developed a mariner-based transposon, osKaR, designed to perform Transposon-Site Hybridization (TraSH) in GAS and successfully tested its use in several invasive serotypes. A complex osKaR mutant library in M1T1 GAS strain 5448 was subjected to negative selection in human blood to identify genes important for GAS fitness in this clinically relevant environment. Mutants underrepresented after growth in blood (output pool) compared to growth in rich media (input pool) were identified using DNA microarray hybridization of transposon-specific tags en masse. Using blood from three different donors, we identified 81 genes that met our criteria for reduced fitness in blood from at least two individuals. Genes known to play a role in survival of GAS in blood were found, including those encoding the virulence regulator Mga (mga), the peroxide response regulator PerR (perR), and the RofA-like regulator Ralp-3 (ralp3). We also identified genes previously reported for their contribution to sepsis in other pathogens, such as de novo nucleotide synthesis (purD, purA, pyrB, carA, carB, guaB), sugar metabolism (scrB, fruA), zinc uptake (adcC), and transcriptional regulation (cpsY). To validate our findings, independent mutants with mutations in 10 different genes identified in our screen were confirmed to be defective for survival in blood bactericidal assays. Overall, this work represents the first use of TraSH in GAS to identify potential virulence genes. PMID:23297387

  12. Genome-Wide Prediction and Validation of Peptides That Bind Human Prosurvival Bcl-2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    DeBartolo, Joe; Taipale, Mikko; Keating, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death is regulated by interactions between pro-apoptotic and prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. Pro-apoptotic family members contain a weakly conserved BH3 motif that can adopt an alpha-helical structure and bind to a groove on prosurvival partners Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bfl-1. Peptides corresponding to roughly 13 reported BH3 motifs have been verified to bind in this manner. Due to their short lengths and low sequence conservation, BH3 motifs are not detected using standard sequence-based bioinformatics approaches. Thus, it is possible that many additional proteins harbor BH3-like sequences that can mediate interactions with the Bcl-2 family. In this work, we used structure-based and data-based Bcl-2 interaction models to find new BH3-like peptides in the human proteome. We used peptide SPOT arrays to test candidate peptides for interaction with one or more of the prosurvival proteins Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bfl-1. For the 36 most promising array candidates, we quantified binding to all five human receptors using direct and competition binding assays in solution. All 36 peptides showed evidence of interaction with at least one prosurvival protein, and 22 peptides bound at least one prosurvival protein with a dissociation constant between 1 and 500 nM; many peptides had specificity profiles not previously observed. We also screened the full-length parent proteins of a subset of array-tested peptides for binding to Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Finally, we used the peptide binding data, in conjunction with previously reported interactions, to assess the affinity and specificity prediction performance of different models. PMID:24967846

  13. Genome-Wide Scan Informed by Age-Related Disease Identifies Loci for Exceptional Human Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Fortney, Kristen; Dobriban, Edgar; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Monti, Daniela; Mari, Daniela; Atzmon, Gil; Barzilai, Nir; Franceschi, Claudio; Owen, Art B.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new statistical framework to find genetic variants associated with extreme longevity. The method, informed GWAS (iGWAS), takes advantage of knowledge from large studies of age-related disease in order to narrow the search for SNPs associated with longevity. To gain support for our approach, we first show there is an overlap between loci involved in disease and loci associated with extreme longevity. These results indicate that several disease variants may be depleted in centenarians versus the general population. Next, we used iGWAS to harness information from 14 meta-analyses of disease and trait GWAS to identify longevity loci in two studies of long-lived humans. In a standard GWAS analysis, only one locus in these studies is significant (APOE/TOMM40) when controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at 10%. With iGWAS, we identify eight genetic loci to associate significantly with exceptional human longevity at FDR < 10%. We followed up the eight lead SNPs in independent cohorts, and found replication evidence of four loci and suggestive evidence for one more with exceptional longevity. The loci that replicated (FDR < 5%) included APOE/TOMM40 (associated with Alzheimer’s disease), CDKN2B/ANRIL (implicated in the regulation of cellular senescence), ABO (tags the O blood group), and SH2B3/ATXN2 (a signaling gene that extends lifespan in Drosophila and a gene involved in neurological disease). Our results implicate new loci in longevity and reveal a genetic overlap between longevity and age-related diseases and traits, including coronary artery disease and Alzheimer’s disease. iGWAS provides a new analytical strategy for uncovering SNPs that influence extreme longevity, and can be applied more broadly to boost power in other studies of complex phenotypes. PMID:26677855

  14. Genome-wide analysis of the genetic regulation of gene expression in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Melchiotti, Rossella; Poh, Tuang Yeow; Nah, Michelle; Puan, Kia Joo; Vigano, Elena; Haase, Doreen; Yusof, Nurhashikin; San Luis, Boris; Lum, Josephine; Kumar, Dilip; Foo, Shihui; Zhuang, Li; Vasudev, Anusha; Irwanto, Astrid; Lee, Bernett; Nardin, Alessandra; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Connolly, John; Liu, Jianjun; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Wang, De Yun; Poidinger, Michael; Larbi, Anis; Zolezzi, Francesca; Rotzschke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are an abundant immune cell type involved in both antimicrobial defence and autoimmunity. The regulation of their gene expression, however, is still largely unknown. Here we report an eQTL study on isolated neutrophils from 114 healthy individuals of Chinese ethnicity, identifying 21,210 eQTLs on 832 unique genes. Unsupervised clustering analysis of these eQTLs confirms their role in inflammatory responses and immunological diseases but also indicates strong involvement in dermatological pathologies. One of the strongest eQTL identified (rs2058660) is also the tagSNP of a linkage block reported to affect leprosy and Crohn's disease in opposite directions. In a functional study, we can link the C allele with low expression of the β-chain of IL18-receptor (IL18RAP). In neutrophils, this results in a reduced responsiveness to IL-18, detected both on the RNA and protein level. Thus, the polymorphic regulation of human neutrophils can impact beneficial as well as pathological inflammatory responses. PMID:26259071

  15. Genome-Wide Functional Annotation of Human Protein-Coding Splice Variants Using Multiple Instance Learning.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bharat; Menon, Rajasree; Eksi, Ridvan; Li, Hong-Dong; Omenn, Gilbert S; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of human multiexon genes undergo alternative splicing and produce a variety of splice variant transcripts and proteins, which can perform different functions. These protein-coding splice variants (PCSVs) greatly increase the functional diversity of proteins. Most functional annotation algorithms have been developed at the gene level; the lack of isoform-level gold standards is an important intellectual limitation for currently available machine learning algorithms. The accumulation of a large amount of RNA-seq data in the public domain greatly increases our ability to examine the functional annotation of genes at isoform level. In the present study, we used a multiple instance learning (MIL)-based approach for predicting the function of PCSVs. We used transcript-level expression values and gene-level functional associations from the Gene Ontology database. A support vector machine (SVM)-based 5-fold cross-validation technique was applied. Comparatively, genes with multiple PCSVs performed better than single PCSV genes, and performance also improved when more examples were available to train the models. We demonstrated our predictions using literature evidence of ADAM15, LMNA/C, and DMXL2 genes. All predictions have been implemented in a web resource called "IsoFunc", which is freely available for the global scientific community through http://guanlab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/isofunc . PMID:27142340

  16. Genome-wide analysis of the genetic regulation of gene expression in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Melchiotti, Rossella; Poh, Tuang Yeow; Nah, Michelle; Puan, Kia Joo; Vigano, Elena; Haase, Doreen; Yusof, Nurhashikin; San Luis, Boris; Lum, Josephine; Kumar, Dilip; Foo, Shihui; Zhuang, Li; Vasudev, Anusha; Irwanto, Astrid; Lee, Bernett; Nardin, Alessandra; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Connolly, John; Liu, Jianjun; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Wang, De Yun; Poidinger, Michael; Larbi, Anis; Zolezzi, Francesca; Rotzschke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are an abundant immune cell type involved in both antimicrobial defence and autoimmunity. The regulation of their gene expression, however, is still largely unknown. Here we report an eQTL study on isolated neutrophils from 114 healthy individuals of Chinese ethnicity, identifying 21,210 eQTLs on 832 unique genes. Unsupervised clustering analysis of these eQTLs confirms their role in inflammatory responses and immunological diseases but also indicates strong involvement in dermatological pathologies. One of the strongest eQTL identified (rs2058660) is also the tagSNP of a linkage block reported to affect leprosy and Crohn's disease in opposite directions. In a functional study, we can link the C allele with low expression of the β-chain of IL18-receptor (IL18RAP). In neutrophils, this results in a reduced responsiveness to IL-18, detected both on the RNA and protein level. Thus, the polymorphic regulation of human neutrophils can impact beneficial as well as pathological inflammatory responses. PMID:26259071

  17. Topological Data Analysis Generates High-Resolution, Genome-wide Maps of Human Recombination.

    PubMed

    Camara, Pablo G; Rosenbloom, Daniel I S; Emmett, Kevin J; Levine, Arnold J; Rabadan, Raul

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic recombination is a fundamental evolutionary process driving diversity in eukaryotes. In mammals, recombination is known to occur preferentially at specific genomic regions. Using topological data analysis (TDA), a branch of applied topology that extracts global features from large data sets, we developed an efficient method for mapping recombination at fine scales. When compared to standard linkage-based methods, TDA can deal with a larger number of SNPs and genomes without incurring prohibitive computational costs. We applied TDA to 1,000 Genomes Project data and constructed high-resolution whole-genome recombination maps of seven human populations. Our analysis shows that recombination is generally under-represented within transcription start sites. However, the binding sites of specific transcription factors are enriched for sites of recombination. These include transcription factors that regulate the expression of meiosis- and gametogenesis-specific genes, cell cycle progression, and differentiation blockage. Additionally, our analysis identifies an enrichment for sites of recombination at repeat-derived loci matched by piwi-interacting RNAs. PMID:27345159

  18. A cellular genome-wide association study reveals human variation in microtubule stability and a role in inflammatory cell death

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Raul E.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Thomas, Monica I.; Shukla, Kajal P.; Miller, Samuel I.; Ko, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Pyroptosis is proinflammatory cell death that occurs in response to certain microbes. Activation of the protease caspase-1 by molecular platforms called inflammasomes is required for pyroptosis. We performed a cellular genome-wide association study (GWAS) using Salmonella typhimurium infection of human lymphoblastoid cell lines as a means of dissecting the genetic architecture of susceptibility to pyroptosis and identifying unknown regulatory mechanisms. Cellular GWAS revealed that a common human genetic difference that regulates pyroptosis also alters microtubule stability. An intergenic single-nucleotide polymorphism on chromosome 18 is associated with decreased pyroptosis and increased expression of TUBB6 (tubulin, β 6 class V). TUBB6 is unique among tubulin isoforms in that its overexpression can completely disrupt the microtubule network. Cells from individuals with higher levels of TUBB6 expression have lower microtubule stability and less pyroptosis. Reducing TUBB6 expression or stabilizing microtubules pharmacologically with paclitaxel (Taxol) increases pyroptosis without affecting the other major readout of caspase-1 activation, interleukin-1β secretion. The results reveal a new role for microtubules and possibly specific tubulin isoforms in the execution of pyroptosis. Furthermore, the finding that there is common diversity in TUBB6 expression and microtubule stability could have broad consequences for other microtubule-dependent phenotypes, diseases, and pharmacological responses. PMID:24173717

  19. An Isogenic Human ESC Platform for Functional Evaluation of Genome-wide-Association-Study-Identified Diabetes Genes and Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Guo, Min; Zhou, Ting; Tan, Lei; Chong, Chi Nok; Zhang, Tuo; Dong, Xue; Xiang, Jenny Zhaoying; Yu, Albert S; Yue, Lixia; Qi, Qibin; Evans, Todd; Graumann, Johannes; Chen, Shuibing

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have increased our knowledge of loci associated with a range of human diseases. However, applying such findings to elucidate pathophysiology and promote drug discovery remains challenging. Here, we created isogenic human ESCs (hESCs) with mutations in GWAS-identified susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes. In pancreatic beta-like cells differentiated from these lines, we found that mutations in CDKAL1, KCNQ1, and KCNJ11 led to impaired glucose secretion in vitro and in vivo, coinciding with defective glucose homeostasis. CDKAL1 mutant insulin+ cells were also hypersensitive to glucolipotoxicity. A high-content chemical screen identified a candidate drug that rescued CDKAL1-specific defects in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the FOS/JUN pathway. Our approach of a proof-of-principle platform, which uses isogenic hESCs for functional evaluation of GWAS-identified loci and identification of a drug candidate that rescues gene-specific defects, paves the way for precision therapy of metabolic diseases. PMID:27524441

  20. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of the human cell cycle identifies genes differentially regulated in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Siegfried, Zahava; Brandeis, Michael; Brors, Benedikt; Lu, Yong; Eils, Roland; Dynlacht, Brian D.; Simon, Itamar

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of the transcriptional regulatory network of the normal cell cycle is essential for understanding the perturbations that lead to cancer. However, the complete set of cycling genes in primary cells has not yet been identified. Here, we report the results of genome-wide expression profiling experiments on synchronized primary human foreskin fibroblasts across the cell cycle. Using a combined experimental and computational approach to deconvolve measured expression values into “single-cell” expression profiles, we were able to overcome the limitations inherent in synchronizing nontransformed mammalian cells. This allowed us to identify 480 periodically expressed genes in primary human foreskin fibroblasts. Analysis of the reconstructed primary cell profiles and comparison with published expression datasets from synchronized transformed cells reveals a large number of genes that cycle exclusively in primary cells. This conclusion was supported by both bioinformatic analysis and experiments performed on other cell types. We suggest that this approach will help pinpoint genetic elements contributing to normal cell growth and cellular transformation. PMID:18195366

  1. Genome-wide association study of periodontal pathogen colonization.

    PubMed

    Divaris, K; Monda, K L; North, K E; Olshan, A F; Lange, E M; Moss, K; Barros, S P; Beck, J D; Offenbacher, S

    2012-07-01

    Pathological shifts of the human microbiome are characteristic of many diseases, including chronic periodontitis. To date, there is limited evidence on host genetic risk loci associated with periodontal pathogen colonization. We conducted a genome-wide association (GWA) study among 1,020 white participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy to severe chronic periodontitis, and for whom "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization quantification of 8 periodontal pathogens was performed. We examined 3 traits: "high red" and "high orange" bacterial complexes, and "high" Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) colonization. Genotyping was performed on the Affymetrix 6.0 platform. Imputation to 2.5 million markers was based on HapMap II-CEU, and a multiple-test correction was applied (genome-wide threshold of p < 5 × 10(-8)). We detected no genome-wide significant signals. However, 13 loci, including KCNK1, FBXO38, UHRF2, IL33, RUNX2, TRPS1, CAMTA1, and VAMP3, provided suggestive evidence (p < 5 × 10(-6)) of association. All associations reported for "red" and "orange" complex microbiota, but not for Aa, had the same effect direction in a second sample of 123 African-American participants. None of these polymorphisms was associated with periodontitis diagnosis. Investigations replicating these findings may lead to an improved understanding of the complex nature of host-microbiome interactions that characterizes states of health and disease. PMID:22699663

  2. Novel insights into the relationships between dendritic cell subsets in human and mouse revealed by genome-wide expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Scott H; Walzer, Thierry; Dembélé, Doulaye; Thibault, Christelle; Defays, Axel; Bessou, Gilles; Xu, Huichun; Vivier, Eric; Sellars, MacLean; Pierre, Philippe; Sharp, Franck R; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Dalod, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are a complex group of cells that play a critical role in vertebrate immunity. Lymph-node resident DCs (LN-DCs) are subdivided into conventional DC (cDC) subsets (CD11b and CD8α in mouse; BDCA1 and BDCA3 in human) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). It is currently unclear if these various DC populations belong to a unique hematopoietic lineage and if the subsets identified in the mouse and human systems are evolutionary homologs. To gain novel insights into these questions, we sought conserved genetic signatures for LN-DCs and in vitro derived granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) DCs through the analysis of a compendium of genome-wide expression profiles of mouse or human leukocytes. Results We show through clustering analysis that all LN-DC subsets form a distinct branch within the leukocyte family tree, and reveal a transcriptomal signature evolutionarily conserved in all LN-DC subsets. Moreover, we identify a large gene expression program shared between mouse and human pDCs, and smaller conserved profiles shared between mouse and human LN-cDC subsets. Importantly, most of these genes have not been previously associated with DC function and many have unknown functions. Finally, we use compendium analysis to re-evaluate the classification of interferon-producing killer DCs, lin-CD16+HLA-DR+ cells and in vitro derived GM-CSF DCs, and show that these cells are more closely linked to natural killer and myeloid cells, respectively. Conclusion Our study provides a unique database resource for future investigation of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways governing the ontogeny and functions of leukocyte subsets, especially DCs. PMID:18218067

  3. Genome-wide RNAi Screen Identifies Cohesin Genes as Modifiers of Renewal and Differentiation in Human HSCs.

    PubMed

    Galeev, Roman; Baudet, Aurélie; Kumar, Praveen; Rundberg Nilsson, Alexandra; Nilsson, Björn; Soneji, Shamit; Törngren, Therese; Borg, Åke; Kvist, Anders; Larsson, Jonas

    2016-03-29

    To gain insights into the regulatory mechanisms of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), we employed a genome-wide RNAi screen in human cord-blood derived cells and identified candidate genes whose knockdown maintained the HSC phenotype during culture. A striking finding was the identification of members of the cohesin complex (STAG2, RAD21, STAG1, and SMC3) among the top 20 genes from the screen. Upon individual validation of these cohesin genes, we found that their knockdown led to an immediate expansion of cells with an HSC phenotype in vitro. A similar expansion was observed in vivo following transplantation to immunodeficient mice. Transcriptome analysis of cohesin-deficient CD34(+) cells showed an upregulation of HSC-specific genes, demonstrating an immediate shift toward a more stem-cell-like gene expression signature upon cohesin deficiency. Our findings implicate cohesin as a major regulator of HSCs and illustrate the power of global RNAi screens to identify modifiers of cell fate. PMID:26997282

  4. Genome-wide RNAi screens in human brain tumor isolates reveal a novel viability requirement for PHF5A

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Christopher G.; Bradley, Robert K.; Ding, Yu; Toledo, Chad M.; Herman, Jacob; Skutt-Kakaria, Kyobi; Girard, Emily J.; Davison, Jerry; Berndt, Jason; Corrin, Philip; Hardcastle, Justin; Basom, Ryan; Delrow, Jeffery J.; Webb, Thomas; Pollard, Steven M.; Lee, Jeongwu; Olson, James M.; Paddison, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    To identify key regulators of human brain tumor maintenance and initiation, we performed multiple genome-wide RNAi screens in patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) stem cells (GSCs). These screens identified the plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger domain protein PHF5A as differentially required for GSC expansion, as compared with untransformed neural stem cells (NSCs) and fibroblasts. Given PHF5A's known involvement in facilitating interactions between the U2 snRNP complex and ATP-dependent helicases, we examined cancer-specific roles in RNA splicing. We found that in GSCs, but not untransformed controls, PHF5A facilitates recognition of exons with unusual C-rich 3′ splice sites in thousands of essential genes. PHF5A knockdown in GSCs, but not untransformed NSCs, astrocytes, or fibroblasts, inhibited splicing of these genes, leading to cell cycle arrest and loss of viability. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of U2 snRNP activity phenocopied PHF5A knockdown in GSCs and also in NSCs or fibroblasts overexpressing MYC. Furthermore, PHF5A inhibition compromised GSC tumor formation in vivo and inhibited growth of established GBM patient-derived xenograft tumors. Our results demonstrate a novel viability requirement for PHF5A to maintain proper exon recognition in brain tumor-initiating cells and may provide new inroads for novel anti-GBM therapeutic strategies. PMID:23651857

  5. Genome-wide RNAi screens in human brain tumor isolates reveal a novel viability requirement for PHF5A.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Christopher G; Bradley, Robert K; Ding, Yu; Toledo, Chad M; Herman, Jacob; Skutt-Kakaria, Kyobi; Girard, Emily J; Davison, Jerry; Berndt, Jason; Corrin, Philip; Hardcastle, Justin; Basom, Ryan; Delrow, Jeffery J; Webb, Thomas; Pollard, Steven M; Lee, Jeongwu; Olson, James M; Paddison, Patrick J

    2013-05-01

    To identify key regulators of human brain tumor maintenance and initiation, we performed multiple genome-wide RNAi screens in patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) stem cells (GSCs). These screens identified the plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger domain protein PHF5A as differentially required for GSC expansion, as compared with untransformed neural stem cells (NSCs) and fibroblasts. Given PHF5A's known involvement in facilitating interactions between the U2 snRNP complex and ATP-dependent helicases, we examined cancer-specific roles in RNA splicing. We found that in GSCs, but not untransformed controls, PHF5A facilitates recognition of exons with unusual C-rich 3' splice sites in thousands of essential genes. PHF5A knockdown in GSCs, but not untransformed NSCs, astrocytes, or fibroblasts, inhibited splicing of these genes, leading to cell cycle arrest and loss of viability. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of U2 snRNP activity phenocopied PHF5A knockdown in GSCs and also in NSCs or fibroblasts overexpressing MYC. Furthermore, PHF5A inhibition compromised GSC tumor formation in vivo and inhibited growth of established GBM patient-derived xenograft tumors. Our results demonstrate a novel viability requirement for PHF5A to maintain proper exon recognition in brain tumor-initiating cells and may provide new inroads for novel anti-GBM therapeutic strategies. PMID:23651857

  6. Computational analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells along the endodermal lineage.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Lukas; Jozefczuk, Justyna; Grimm, Christina; Dietrich, Jörn; Timmermann, Bernd; Lehrach, Hans; Herwig, Ralf; Adjaye, James

    2010-10-01

    The generation of genome-wide data derived from methylated DNA immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (MeDIP-seq) has become a major tool for epigenetic studies in health and disease. The computational analysis of such data, however, still falls short on accuracy, sensitivity, and speed. We propose a time-efficient statistical method that is able to cope with the inherent complexity of MeDIP-seq data with similar performance compared with existing methods. In order to demonstrate the computational approach, we have analyzed alterations in DNA methylation during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to definitive endoderm. We show improved correlation of normalized MeDIP-seq data in comparison to available whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data, and investigated the effect of differential methylation on gene expression. Furthermore, we analyzed the interplay between DNA methylation, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding and show that in contrast to de novo methylation, demethylation is mainly associated with regions of low CpG densities. PMID:20802089

  7. GWASdb v2: an update database for human genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mulin Jun; Liu, Zipeng; Wang, Panwen; Wong, Maria P.; Nelson, Matthew R.; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A.; Yeager, Meredith; Sham, Pak Chung; Chanock, Stephen J.; Xia, Zhengyuan; Wang, Junwen

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs), now as a routine approach to study single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-trait association, have uncovered over ten thousand significant trait/disease associated SNPs (TASs). Here, we updated GWASdb (GWASdb v2, http://jjwanglab.org/gwasdb) which provides comprehensive data curation and knowledge integration for GWAS TASs. These updates include: (i) Up to August 2015, we collected 2479 unique publications from PubMed and other resources; (ii) We further curated moderate SNP-trait associations (P-value < 1.0×10−3) from each original publication, and generated a total of 252 530 unique TASs in all GWASdb v2 collected studies; (iii) We manually mapped 1610 GWAS traits to 501 Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) terms, 435 Disease Ontology (DO) terms and 228 Disease Ontology Lite (DOLite) terms. For each ontology term, we also predicted the putative causal genes; (iv) We curated the detailed sub-populations and related sample size for each study; (v) Importantly, we performed extensive function annotation for each TAS by incorporating gene-based information, ENCODE ChIP-seq assays, eQTL, population haplotype, functional prediction across multiple biological domains, evolutionary signals and disease-related annotation; (vi) Additionally, we compiled a SNP-drug response association dataset for 650 pharmacogenetic studies involving 257 drugs in this update; (vii) Last, we improved the user interface of website. PMID:26615194

  8. Genome-wide meta-analysis points to CTC1 and ZNF676 as genes regulating telomere homeostasis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Massimo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Spector, Timothy D.; Hunt, Steven C.; Kimura, Masayuki; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Christiansen, Lene; Petersen, Inge; Elbers, Clara C.; Harris, Tamara; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Kark, Jeremy D.; Benetos, Athanase; El Shamieh, Said; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Christensen, Kaare; Berenson, Gerald S.; Valdes, Ana M.; Viñuela, Ana; Garcia, Melissa; Arnett, Donna K.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Province, Michael A.; Pankow, James S.; Kammerer, Candace; Liu, Yongmei; Nalls, Michael; Tishkoff, Sarah; Thomas, Fridtjof; Ziv, Elad; Psaty, Bruce M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Smith, Erin; Schork, Nicholas J.; Levy, Daniel; Aviv, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with a number of common age-related diseases and is a heritable trait. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified two loci on chromosomes 3q26.2 (TERC) and 10q24.33 (OBFC1) that are associated with the inter-individual LTL variation. We performed a meta-analysis of 9190 individuals from six independent GWAS and validated our findings in 2226 individuals from four additional studies. We confirmed previously reported associations with OBFC1 (rs9419958 P = 9.1 × 10−11) and with the telomerase RNA component TERC (rs1317082, P = 1.1 × 10−8). We also identified two novel genomic regions associated with LTL variation that map near a conserved telomere maintenance complex component 1 (CTC1; rs3027234, P = 3.6 × 10−8) on chromosome17p13.1 and zinc finger protein 676 (ZNF676; rs412658, P = 3.3 × 10−8) on 19p12. The minor allele of rs3027234 was associated with both shorter LTL and lower expression of CTC1. Our findings are consistent with the recent observations that point mutations in CTC1 cause short telomeres in both Arabidopsis and humans affected by a rare Mendelian syndrome. Overall, our results provide novel insights into the genetic architecture of inter-individual LTL variation in the general population. PMID:23001564

  9. Genome-wide genotype and sequence-based reconstruction of the 140,000 year history of modern human ancestry.

    PubMed

    Shriner, Daniel; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    We investigated ancestry of 3,528 modern humans from 163 samples. We identified 19 ancestral components, with 94.4% of individuals showing mixed ancestry. After using whole genome sequences to correct for ascertainment biases in genome-wide genotype data, we dated the oldest divergence event to 140,000 years ago. We detected an Out-of-Africa migration 100,000-87,000 years ago, leading to peoples of the Americas, east and north Asia, and Oceania, followed by another migration 61,000-44,000 years ago, leading to peoples of the Caucasus, Europe, the Middle East, and south Asia. We dated eight divergence events to 33,000-20,000 years ago, coincident with the Last Glacial Maximum. We refined understanding of the ancestry of several ethno-linguistic groups, including African Americans, Ethiopians, the Kalash, Latin Americans, Mozabites, Pygmies, and Uygurs, as well as the CEU sample. Ubiquity of mixed ancestry emphasizes the importance of accounting for ancestry in history, forensics, and health. PMID:25116736

  10. A genome wide analysis of alternative splicing events during the osteogenic differentiation of human cartilage endplate-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jin; Wang, Honggang; Fan, Xin; Shangguan, Lei; Liu, Huan

    2016-08-01

    Low back pain is a prevalent disease, which leads to suffering and disabilities in a vast number of individuals. Degenerative disc diseases are usually the underlying causes of low back pain. However, the pathogenesis of degenerative disc diseases is highly complex and difficult to determine. Current therapies for degenerative disc diseases are various. In particular, cell-based therapies have proven to be effective and promising. Our research group has previously isolated and identified the cartilage endplate‑derived stem cells. In addition, alternative splicing is a sophisticated regulatory mechanism, which greatly increases cellular complexity and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic organisms. The present study continued to investigate alternative splicing events in osteogenic differentiation of cartilage endplate‑derived stem cells. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to detect splicing changes between the control and differentiated samples. Additionally, molecular function and pathway analysis were also performed. Following rigorous bioinformatics analysis of the data, 3,802 alternatively spliced genes were identified, and 10 of these were selected for validation by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis also revealed numerous enriched GO terms and signaling pathways. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate alternative splicing mechanisms in osteogenic differentiation of stem cells on a genome‑wide scale. The illumination of molecular mechanisms of stem cell osteogenic differentiation may assist the development novel bioengineered methods to treat degenerative disc diseases. PMID:27278552

  11. The activation of human gene MAGE-1 in tumor cells is correlated with genome-wide demethylation.

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, C; De Backer, O; Faraoni, I; Lurquin, C; Brasseur, F; Boon, T

    1996-01-01

    Human gene MAGE-1 encodes tumor-specific antigens that are recognized on melanoma cells by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes. This gene is expressed in a significant proportion of tumors of various histological types, but not in normal tissues except male germ-line cells. We reported previously that reporter genes driven by the MAGE-1 promoter are active not only in the tumor cell lines that express MAGE-1 but also in those that do not. This suggests that the critical factor causing the activation of MAGE-1 in certain tumors is not the presence of the appropriate transcription factors. The two major MAGE-1 promoter elements have an Ets binding site, which contains a CpG dinucleotide. We report here that these CpG are demethylated in the tumor cell lines that express MAGE-1, and are methylated in those that do not express the gene. Methylation of these CpG inhibits the binding of transcription factors, as seen by mobility shift assay. Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine activated gene MAGE-1 not only in tumor cell lines but also in primary fibroblasts. Finally, the overall level of CpG methylation was evaluated in 20 different tumor cell lines. It was inversely correlated with the expression of MAGE-1. We conclude that the activation of MAGE-1 in cancer cells is due to the demethylation of the promoter. This appears to be a consequence of a genome-wide demethylation process that occurs in many cancers and is correlated with tumor progression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692960

  12. p53 shapes genome-wide and cell type-specific changes in microRNA expression during the human DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Janky, Rekin’s; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Aerts, Stein; Madan Babu, M; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2014-01-01

    The human DNA damage response (DDR) triggers profound changes in gene expression, whose nature and regulation remain uncertain. Although certain micro-(mi)RNA species including miR34, miR-18, miR-16 and miR-143 have been implicated in the DDR, there is as yet no comprehensive description of genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs triggered by DNA breakage in human cells. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS), combined with rigorous integrative computational analyses, to describe genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs during the human DDR. The changes affect 150 of 1523 miRNAs known in miRBase v18 from 4–24 h after the induction of DNA breakage, in cell-type dependent patterns. The regulatory regions of the most-highly regulated miRNA species are enriched in conserved binding sites for p53. Indeed, genome-wide changes in miRNA expression during the DDR are markedly altered in TP53-/- cells compared to otherwise isogenic controls. The expression levels of certain damage-induced, p53-regulated miRNAs in cancer samples correlate with patient survival. Our work reveals genome-wide and cell type-specific alterations in miRNA expression during the human DDR, which are regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53. These findings provide a genomic resource to identify new molecules and mechanisms involved in the DDR, and to examine their role in tumor suppression and the clinical outcome of cancer patients. PMID:25486198

  13. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision. PMID:26176695

  14. Exploring Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiles Altered in Kashin-Beck Disease Using Infinium Human Methylation 450 Bead Chips.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Wei; Shi, Bo Hui; Lyu, Ai Li; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Tian Tian; Guo, Xiong

    2016-07-01

    To understand how differentially methylated genes (DMGs) might affect the pathogenesis of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD). Genome-wide methylation profiling of whole blood from 12 matched KBD and controls pairs was performed using a high-resolution Infinium 450 K methylation array. In total, 97 CpG sites were differentially methylated in KBD compared to the normal controls; of these sites, 36 sites were significantly hypermethylated (covering 22 genes) and 61 sites were significantly hypomethylated (covering 34 genes). Of these genes, 14 significant pathways were identified, the most significant P value pathway was type I diabetes mellitus pathway and pathways associated with autoimmune diseases and inflammatory diseases were included in this study. Subsequently, 4 CpG sites in HLA-DRB1 were validated using bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction (BSP) in articular cartilage, and the results showed significant differences in the methylation status between KBD and controls, consistent with the results of the high-resolution array. These results suggested that differences in genome-wide DNA methylation exist between KBD and the controls, and the biological pathways support the autoimmune disease and inflammatory disease hypothesis of KBD. PMID:27554126

  15. Defining the RNA polymerase III transcriptome: Genome-wide localization of the RNA polymerase III transcription machinery in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Donatella; Praz, Viviane; Reina, Jaime H.; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2010-01-01

    Our view of the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription machinery in mammalian cells arises mostly from studies of the RN5S (5S) gene, the Ad2 VAI gene, and the RNU6 (U6) gene, as paradigms for genes with type 1, 2, and 3 promoters. Recruitment of Pol III onto these genes requires prior binding of well-characterized transcription factors. Technical limitations in dealing with repeated genomic units, typically found at mammalian Pol III genes, have so far hampered genome-wide studies of the Pol III transcription machinery and transcriptome. We have localized, genome-wide, Pol III and some of its transcription factors. Our results reveal broad usage of the known Pol III transcription machinery and define a minimal Pol III transcriptome in dividing IMR90hTert fibroblasts. This transcriptome consists of some 500 actively transcribed genes including a few dozen candidate novel genes, of which we confirmed nine as Pol III transcription units by additional methods. It does not contain any of the microRNA genes previously described as transcribed by Pol III, but reveals two other microRNA genes, MIR886 (hsa-mir-886) and MIR1975 (RNY5, hY5, hsa-mir-1975), which are genuine Pol III transcription units. PMID:20413673

  16. Human CST Facilitates Genome-wide RAD51 Recruitment to GC-Rich Repetitive Sequences in Response to Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Megan; Zhou, Qing; Shiva, Olga; Whitmore, Leanne; Jia, Pingping; Dai, Xueyu; Huang, Chenhui; Fadri-Moskwik, Maria; Ye, Ping; Chai, Weihang

    2016-08-01

    The telomeric CTC1/STN1/TEN1 (CST) complex has been implicated in promoting replication recovery under replication stress at genomic regions, yet its precise role is unclear. Here, we report that STN1 is enriched at GC-rich repetitive sequences genome-wide in response to hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication stress. STN1 deficiency exacerbates the fragility of these sequences under replication stress, resulting in chromosome fragmentation. We find that upon fork stalling, CST proteins form distinct nuclear foci that colocalize with RAD51. Furthermore, replication stress induces physical association of CST with RAD51 in an ATR-dependent manner. Strikingly, CST deficiency diminishes HU-induced RAD51 foci formation and reduces RAD51 recruitment to telomeres and non-telomeric GC-rich fragile sequences. Collectively, our findings establish that CST promotes RAD51 recruitment to GC-rich repetitive sequences in response to replication stress to facilitate replication restart, thereby providing insights into the mechanism underlying genome stability maintenance. PMID:27487043

  17. An association analysis between psychophysical characteristics and genome-wide gene expression changes in human adaptation to the extreme climate at the Antarctic Dome Argus.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Ju, X; Song, D; Huang, F; Tang, D; Zou, Z; Zhang, C; Joshi, T; Jia, L; Xu, W; Xu, K-F; Wang, Q; Xiong, Y; Guo, Z; Chen, X; Huang, F; Xu, J; Zhong, Y; Zhu, Y; Peng, Y; Wang, L; Zhang, X; Jiang, R; Li, D; Jiang, T; Xu, D; Jiang, C

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide gene expression measurements have enabled comprehensive studies that integrate the changes of gene expression and phenotypic information to uncover their novel associations. Here we reported the association analysis between psychophysical phenotypes and genome-wide gene expression changes in human adaptation to one of the most extreme climates on Earth, the Antarctic Dome Argus. Dome A is the highest ice feature in Antarctica, and may be the coldest, driest and windiest location on earth. It is considered unapproachable due to its hostile environment. In 2007, a Chinese team of 17 male explorers made the expedition to Dome A for scientific investigation. Overall, 133 psychophysical phenotypes were recorded, and genome-wide gene expression profiles from the blood samples of the explorers were measured before their departure and upon their arrival at Dome A. We found that mood disturbances, including tension (anxiety), depression, anger and fatigue, had a strong, positive, linear relationship with the level of a male sex hormone, testosterone, using the Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) analysis. We also demonstrated that significantly lowest-level Gene Ontology groups in changes of gene expression in blood cells with erythrocyte removal were consistent with the adaptation of the psychophysical characteristics. Interestingly, we discovered a list of genes that were strongly related to significant phenotypes using phenotype and gene expression PCC analysis. Importantly, among the 70 genes that were identified, most were significantly related to mood disturbances, where 42 genes have been reported in the literature mining, suggesting that the other 28 genes were likely novel genes involved in the mood disturbance mechanism. Taken together, our association analysis provides a reliable method to uncover novel genes and mechanisms related to phenotypes, although further studies are needed. PMID:25199918

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylation detection by MethylCap-seq and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips: an independent large-scale comparison

    PubMed Central

    De Meyer, Tim; Bady, Pierre; Trooskens, Geert; Kurscheid, Sebastian; Bloch, Jocelyne; Kros, Johan M.; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Stupp, Roger; Delorenzi, Mauro; Hegi, Monika E.; Van Criekinge, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Two cost-efficient genome-scale methodologies to assess DNA-methylation are MethylCap-seq and Illumina’s Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips (HM450). Objective information regarding the best-suited methodology for a specific research question is scant. Therefore, we performed a large-scale evaluation on a set of 70 brain tissue samples, i.e. 65 glioblastoma and 5 non-tumoral tissues. As MethylCap-seq coverages were limited, we focused on the inherent capacity of the methodology to detect methylated loci rather than a quantitative analysis. MethylCap-seq and HM450 data were dichotomized and performances were compared using a gold standard free Bayesian modelling procedure. While conditional specificity was adequate for both approaches, conditional sensitivity was systematically higher for HM450. In addition, genome-wide characteristics were compared, revealing that HM450 probes identified substantially fewer regions compared to MethylCap-seq. Although results indicated that the latter method can detect more potentially relevant DNA-methylation, this did not translate into the discovery of more differentially methylated loci between tumours and controls compared to HM450. Our results therefore indicate that both methodologies are complementary, with a higher sensitivity for HM450 and a far larger genome-wide coverage for MethylCap-seq, but also that a more comprehensive character does not automatically imply more significant results in biomarker studies. PMID:26482909

  19. Genome-Wide Associations between Genetic and Epigenetic Variation Influence mRNA Expression and Insulin Secretion in Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Anders H.; Volkov, Petr; Bacos, Karl; Dayeh, Tasnim; Hall, Elin; Nilsson, Emma A.; Ladenvall, Claes; Rönn, Tina; Ling, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms may interact and together affect biological processes and disease development. However, most previous studies have investigated genetic and epigenetic mechanisms independently, and studies examining their interactions throughout the human genome are lacking. To identify genetic loci that interact with the epigenome, we performed the first genome-wide DNA methylation quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analysis in human pancreatic islets. We related 574,553 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide DNA methylation data of 468,787 CpG sites targeting 99% of RefSeq genes in islets from 89 donors. We identified 67,438 SNP-CpG pairs in cis, corresponding to 36,783 SNPs (6.4% of tested SNPs) and 11,735 CpG sites (2.5% of tested CpGs), and 2,562 significant SNP-CpG pairs in trans, corresponding to 1,465 SNPs (0.3% of tested SNPs) and 383 CpG sites (0.08% of tested CpGs), showing significant associations after correction for multiple testing. These include reported diabetes loci, e.g. ADCY5, KCNJ11, HLA-DQA1, INS, PDX1 and GRB10. CpGs of significant cis-mQTLs were overrepresented in the gene body and outside of CpG islands. Follow-up analyses further identified mQTLs associated with gene expression and insulin secretion in human islets. Causal inference test (CIT) identified SNP-CpG pairs where DNA methylation in human islets is the potential mediator of the genetic association with gene expression or insulin secretion. Functional analyses further demonstrated that identified candidate genes (GPX7, GSTT1 and SNX19) directly affect key biological processes such as proliferation and apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Finally, we found direct correlations between DNA methylation of 22,773 (4.9%) CpGs with mRNA expression of 4,876 genes, where 90% of the correlations were negative when CpGs were located in the region surrounding transcription start site. Our study demonstrates for the first time how genome-wide genetic and epigenetic

  20. A Genome-wide In Vitro Bacterial-Infection Screen Reveals Human Variation in the Host Response Associated with Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Dennis C.; Shukla, Kajal P.; Fong, Christine; Wasnick, Michael; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Holden, Tarah D.; O'Keefe, Grant E.; Van Yserloo, Brian; Akey, Joshua M.; Miller, Samuel I.

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in cataloguing common genetic variation has made possible genome-wide studies that are beginning to elucidate the causes and consequences of our genetic differences. Approaches that provide a mechanistic understanding of how genetic variants function to alter disease susceptibility and why they were substrates of natural selection would complement other approaches to human-genome analysis. Here we use a novel cell-based screen of bacterial infection to identify human variation in Salmonella-induced cell death. A loss-of-function allele of CARD8, a reported inhibitor of the proinflammatory protease caspase-1, was associated with increased cell death in vitro (p = 0.013). The validity of this association was demonstrated through overexpression of alternative alleles and RNA interference in cells of varying genotype. Comparison of mammalian CARD8 orthologs and examination of variation among different human populations suggest that the increase in infectious-disease burden associated with larger animal groups (i.e., herds and colonies), and possibly human population expansion, may have naturally selected for loss of CARD8. We also find that the loss-of-function CARD8 allele shows a modest association with an increased risk of systemic inflammatory response syndrome in a small study (p = 0.05). Therefore, a by-product of the selected benefit of loss of CARD8 could be increased inflammatory diseases. These results demonstrate the utility of genome-wide cell-based association screens with microbes in the identification of naturally selected variants that can impact human health. PMID:19664744

  1. Analysis of the human tissue-specific expression by genome-wide integration of transcriptomics and antibody-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Oksvold, Per; Kampf, Caroline; Djureinovic, Dijana; Odeberg, Jacob; Habuka, Masato; Tahmasebpoor, Simin; Danielsson, Angelika; Edlund, Karolina; Asplund, Anna; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Lundberg, Emma; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Skogs, Marie; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Berling, Holger; Tegel, Hanna; Mulder, Jan; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Danielsson, Frida; Mardinoglu, Adil; Sivertsson, Asa; von Feilitzen, Kalle; Forsberg, Mattias; Zwahlen, Martin; Olsson, IngMarie; Navani, Sanjay; Huss, Mikael; Nielsen, Jens; Ponten, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias

    2014-02-01

    Global classification of the human proteins with regards to spatial expression patterns across organs and tissues is important for studies of human biology and disease. Here, we used a quantitative transcriptomics analysis (RNA-Seq) to classify the tissue-specific expression of genes across a representative set of all major human organs and tissues and combined this analysis with antibody-based profiling of the same tissues. To present the data, we launch a new version of the Human Protein Atlas that integrates RNA and protein expression data corresponding to ∼80% of the human protein-coding genes with access to the primary data for both the RNA and the protein analysis on an individual gene level. We present a classification of all human protein-coding genes with regards to tissue-specificity and spatial expression pattern. The integrative human expression map can be used as a starting point to explore the molecular constituents of the human body. PMID:24309898

  2. Analysis of the Human Tissue-specific Expression by Genome-wide Integration of Transcriptomics and Antibody-based Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.; Oksvold, Per; Kampf, Caroline; Djureinovic, Dijana; Odeberg, Jacob; Habuka, Masato; Tahmasebpoor, Simin; Danielsson, Angelika; Edlund, Karolina; Asplund, Anna; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Lundberg, Emma; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Skogs, Marie; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Berling, Holger; Tegel, Hanna; Mulder, Jan; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Lindskog, Cecilia; Danielsson, Frida; Mardinoglu, Adil; Sivertsson, Åsa; von Feilitzen, Kalle; Forsberg, Mattias; Zwahlen, Martin; Olsson, IngMarie; Navani, Sanjay; Huss, Mikael; Nielsen, Jens; Ponten, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Global classification of the human proteins with regards to spatial expression patterns across organs and tissues is important for studies of human biology and disease. Here, we used a quantitative transcriptomics analysis (RNA-Seq) to classify the tissue-specific expression of genes across a representative set of all major human organs and tissues and combined this analysis with antibody-based profiling of the same tissues. To present the data, we launch a new version of the Human Protein Atlas that integrates RNA and protein expression data corresponding to ∼80% of the human protein-coding genes with access to the primary data for both the RNA and the protein analysis on an individual gene level. We present a classification of all human protein-coding genes with regards to tissue-specificity and spatial expression pattern. The integrative human expression map can be used as a starting point to explore the molecular constituents of the human body. PMID:24309898

  3. The First Pilot Genome-Wide Gene-Environment Study of Depression in the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Otowa, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Kawakami, Norito; Kan, Chiemi; Shimada, Takafumi; Umekage, Tadashi; Kasai, Kiyoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sasaki, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Stressful events have been identified as a risk factor for depression. Although gene–environment (G × E) interaction in a limited number of candidate genes has been explored, no genome-wide search has been reported. The aim of the present study is to identify genes that influence the association of stressful events with depression. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide G × E interaction analysis in the Japanese population. A genome-wide screen with 320 subjects was performed using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human Array 6.0. Stressful life events were assessed using the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS) and depression symptoms were assessed with self-rating questionnaires using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale. The p values for interactions between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and stressful events were calculated using the linear regression model adjusted for sex and age. After quality control of genotype data, a total of 534,848 SNPs on autosomal chromosomes were further analyzed. Although none surpassed the level of the genome-wide significance, a marginal significant association of interaction between SRRS and rs10510057 with depression were found (p = 4.5 × 10−8). The SNP is located on 10q26 near Regulators of G-protein signaling 10 (RGS10), which encodes a regulatory molecule involved in stress response. When we investigated a similar G × E interaction between depression (K6 scale) and work-related stress in an independent sample (n = 439), a significant G × E effect on depression was observed (p = 0.015). Our findings suggest that rs10510057, interacting with stressors, may be involved in depression risk. Incorporating G × E interaction into GWAS can contribute to find susceptibility locus that are potentially missed by conventional GWAS. PMID:27529621

  4. The First Pilot Genome-Wide Gene-Environment Study of Depression in the Japanese Population.

    PubMed

    Otowa, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Kawakami, Norito; Kan, Chiemi; Shimada, Takafumi; Umekage, Tadashi; Kasai, Kiyoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sasaki, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Stressful events have been identified as a risk factor for depression. Although gene-environment (G × E) interaction in a limited number of candidate genes has been explored, no genome-wide search has been reported. The aim of the present study is to identify genes that influence the association of stressful events with depression. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide G × E interaction analysis in the Japanese population. A genome-wide screen with 320 subjects was performed using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human Array 6.0. Stressful life events were assessed using the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS) and depression symptoms were assessed with self-rating questionnaires using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale. The p values for interactions between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and stressful events were calculated using the linear regression model adjusted for sex and age. After quality control of genotype data, a total of 534,848 SNPs on autosomal chromosomes were further analyzed. Although none surpassed the level of the genome-wide significance, a marginal significant association of interaction between SRRS and rs10510057 with depression were found (p = 4.5 × 10-8). The SNP is located on 10q26 near Regulators of G-protein signaling 10 (RGS10), which encodes a regulatory molecule involved in stress response. When we investigated a similar G × E interaction between depression (K6 scale) and work-related stress in an independent sample (n = 439), a significant G × E effect on depression was observed (p = 0.015). Our findings suggest that rs10510057, interacting with stressors, may be involved in depression risk. Incorporating G × E interaction into GWAS can contribute to find susceptibility locus that are potentially missed by conventional GWAS. PMID:27529621

  5. Genome-wide association studies in dogs and humans identify ADAMTS20 as a risk variant for cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zena T; Brand, Harrison A; Shaffer, John R; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Arzi, Boaz; Willet, Cali E; Cox, Timothy C; McHenry, Toby; Narayan, Nicole; Feingold, Eleanor; Wang, Xioajing; Sliskovic, Saundra; Karmi, Nili; Safra, Noa; Sanchez, Carla; Deleyiannis, Frederic W B; Murray, Jeffrey C; Wade, Claire M; Marazita, Mary L; Bannasch, Danika L

    2015-03-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is the most commonly occurring craniofacial birth defect. We provide insight into the genetic etiology of this birth defect by performing genome-wide association studies in two species: dogs and humans. In the dog, a genome-wide association study of 7 CL/P cases and 112 controls from the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever (NSDTR) breed identified a significantly associated region on canine chromosome 27 (unadjusted p=1.1 x 10(-13); adjusted p= 2.2 x 10(-3)). Further analysis in NSDTR families and additional full sibling cases identified a 1.44 Mb homozygous haplotype (chromosome 27: 9.29 - 10.73 Mb) segregating with a more complex phenotype of cleft lip, cleft palate, and syndactyly (CLPS) in 13 cases. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 CLPS cases and 4 controls at 15X coverage led to the discovery of a frameshift mutation within ADAMTS20 (c.1360_1361delAA (p.Lys453Ilefs*3)), which segregated concordant with the phenotype. In a parallel study in humans, a family-based association analysis (DFAM) of 125 CL/P cases, 420 unaffected relatives, and 392 controls from a Guatemalan cohort, identified a suggestive association (rs10785430; p =2.67 x 10-6) with the same gene, ADAMTS20. Sequencing of cases from the Guatemalan cohort was unable to identify a causative mutation within the coding region of ADAMTS20, but four coding variants were found in additional cases of CL/P. In summary, this study provides genetic evidence for a role of ADAMTS20 in CL/P development in dogs and as a candidate gene for CL/P development in humans. PMID:25798845

  6. Genome-Wide Association Studies in Dogs and Humans Identify ADAMTS20 as a Risk Variant for Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Arzi, Boaz; Willet, Cali E.; Cox, Timothy C.; McHenry, Toby; Narayan, Nicole; Feingold, Eleanor; Wang, Xioajing; Sliskovic, Saundra; Karmi, Nili; Safra, Noa; Sanchez, Carla; Deleyiannis, Frederic W. B.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Wade, Claire M.; Marazita, Mary L.; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is the most commonly occurring craniofacial birth defect. We provide insight into the genetic etiology of this birth defect by performing genome-wide association studies in two species: dogs and humans. In the dog, a genome-wide association study of 7 CL/P cases and 112 controls from the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever (NSDTR) breed identified a significantly associated region on canine chromosome 27 (unadjusted p=1.1 x 10-13; adjusted p= 2.2 x 10-3). Further analysis in NSDTR families and additional full sibling cases identified a 1.44 Mb homozygous haplotype (chromosome 27: 9.29 – 10.73 Mb) segregating with a more complex phenotype of cleft lip, cleft palate, and syndactyly (CLPS) in 13 cases. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 CLPS cases and 4 controls at 15X coverage led to the discovery of a frameshift mutation within ADAMTS20 (c.1360_1361delAA (p.Lys453Ilefs*3)), which segregated concordant with the phenotype. In a parallel study in humans, a family-based association analysis (DFAM) of 125 CL/P cases, 420 unaffected relatives, and 392 controls from a Guatemalan cohort, identified a suggestive association (rs10785430; p =2.67 x 10-6) with the same gene, ADAMTS20. Sequencing of cases from the Guatemalan cohort was unable to identify a causative mutation within the coding region of ADAMTS20, but four coding variants were found in additional cases of CL/P. In summary, this study provides genetic evidence for a role of ADAMTS20 in CL/P development in dogs and as a candidate gene for CL/P development in humans. PMID:25798845

  7. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Differences Between Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease and Cognitively Normal Controls in Human Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bakulski, Kelly M.; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Paulson, Henry L.; Konen, John R.; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Hu, Howard; Rozek, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence supports a role for epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), but little has been done on a genome-wide scale to identify potential sites involved in disease. This study investigates human postmortem frontal cortex genome-wide DNA methylation profiles between 12 LOAD and 12 cognitively normal age- and gender-matched subjects. Quantitative DNA methylation is determined at 27,578 CpG sites spanning 14,475 genes via the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadArray. Data are analyzed using parallel linear models adjusting for age and gender with empirical Bayes standard error methods. Gene-specific technical and functional validation is performed on an additional 13 matched pair samples, encompassing a wider age range. Analysis reveals 948 CpG sites representing 918 unique genes as potentially associated with LOAD disease status pending confirmation in additional study populations. Across these 948 sites the subtle mean methylation difference between cases and controls is 2.9%. The CpG site with a minimum false discovery rate located in the promoter of the gene Transmembrane Protein 59 (TMEM59) is 7.3% hypomethylated in cases. Methylation at this site is functionally associated with tissue RNA and protein levels of the TMEM59 gene product. The TMEM59 gene identified from our discovery approach was recently implicated in amyloid-β protein precursor post-translational processing, supporting a role for epigenetic change in LOAD pathology. This study demonstrates widespread, modest discordant DNA methylation in LOAD-diseased tissue independent from DNA methylation changes with age. Identification of epigenetic biomarkers of LOAD risk may allow for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:22451312

  8. Genome-Wide Prediction and Analysis of 3D-Domain Swapped Proteins in the Human Genome from Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Atul Kumar; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    3D-domain swapping is one of the mechanisms of protein oligomerization and the proteins exhibiting this phenomenon have many biological functions. These proteins, which undergo domain swapping, have acquired much attention owing to their involvement in human diseases, such as conformational diseases, amyloidosis, serpinopathies, proteionopathies etc. Early realisation of proteins in the whole human genome that retain tendency to domain swap will enable many aspects of disease control management. Predictive models were developed by using machine learning approaches with an average accuracy of 78% (85.6% of sensitivity, 87.5% of specificity and an MCC value of 0.72) to predict putative domain swapping in protein sequences. These models were applied to many complete genomes with special emphasis on the human genome. Nearly 44% of the protein sequences in the human genome were predicted positive for domain swapping. Enrichment analysis was performed on the positively predicted sequences from human genome for their domain distribution, disease association and functional importance based on Gene Ontology (GO). Enrichment analysis was also performed to infer a better understanding of the functional importance of these sequences. Finally, we developed hinge region prediction, in the given putative domain swapped sequence, by using important physicochemical properties of amino acids. PMID:27467780

  9. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age.

    PubMed

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won; Broer, Linda; Ayers, Kristin L; Tan, Qihua; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Bennet, Anna M; Tamm, Riin; Trompet, Stella; Guðbjartsson, Daníel F; Flachsbart, Friederike; Rose, Giuseppina; Viktorin, Alexander; Fischer, Krista; Nygaard, Marianne; Cordell, Heather J; Crocco, Paolina; van den Akker, Erik B; Böhringer, Stefan; Helmer, Quinta; Nelson, Christopher P; Saunders, Gary I; Alver, Maris; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; Breen, Marie E; van der Breggen, Ruud; Caliebe, Amke; Capri, Miriam; Cevenini, Elisa; Collerton, Joanna C; Dato, Serena; Davies, Karen; Ford, Ian; Gampe, Jutta; Garagnani, Paolo; de Geus, Eco J C; Harrow, Jennifer; van Heemst, Diana; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hofman, Albert; Jeune, Bernard; Jonsson, Palmi V; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner, Doris; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Mcnerlan, Susan E; Mihailov, Evelin; Montesanto, Alberto; Mooijaart, Simon P; Murphy, Anne; Nohr, Ellen A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Postmus, Iris; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ross, Owen A; Salvioli, Stefano; Sattar, Naveed; Schreiber, Stefan; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stott, David J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Samani, Nilesh J; Galan, Pilar; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Jukema, J Wouter; Rea, Irene Maeve; Passarino, Giuseppe; de Craen, Anton J M; Christensen, Kaare; Nebel, Almut; Stefánsson, Kári; Metspalu, Andres; Magnusson, Patrik; Blanché, Hélène; Christiansen, Lene; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franceschi, Claudio; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Slagboom, P Eline

    2014-08-15

    The genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is ∼ 25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of European descent (≥ 85 years) and 16 121 younger controls (<65 years) followed by replication in an additional set of 13 060 long-lived individuals and 61 156 controls. In addition, we performed a subset analysis in cases aged ≥ 90 years. We observed genome-wide significant association with longevity, as reflected by survival to ages beyond 90 years, at a novel locus, rs2149954, on chromosome 5q33.3 (OR = 1.10, P = 1.74 × 10(-8)). We also confirmed association of rs4420638 on chromosome 19q13.32 (OR = 0.72, P = 3.40 × 10(-36)), representing the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 locus. In a prospective meta-analysis (n = 34 103), the minor allele of rs2149954 (T) on chromosome 5q33.3 associates with increased survival (HR = 0.95, P = 0.003). This allele has previously been reported to associate with low blood pressure in middle age. Interestingly, the minor allele (T) associates with decreased cardiovascular mortality risk, independent of blood pressure. We report on the first GWAS-identified longevity locus on chromosome 5q33.3 influencing survival in the general European population. The minor allele of this locus associates with low blood pressure in middle age, although the contribution of this allele to survival may be less dependent on blood pressure. Hence, the pleiotropic mechanisms by which this intragenic variation contributes to lifespan regulation have to be elucidated. PMID:24688116

  10. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won; Broer, Linda; Ayers, Kristin L.; Tan, Qihua; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Bennet, Anna M.; Tamm, Riin; Trompet, Stella; Guðbjartsson, Daníel F.; Flachsbart, Friederike; Rose, Giuseppina; Viktorin, Alexander; Fischer, Krista; Nygaard, Marianne; Cordell, Heather J.; Crocco, Paolina; van den Akker, Erik B.; Böhringer, Stefan; Helmer, Quinta; Nelson, Christopher P.; Saunders, Gary I.; Alver, Maris; Andersen-Ranberg, Karen; Breen, Marie E.; van der Breggen, Ruud; Caliebe, Amke; Capri, Miriam; Cevenini, Elisa; Collerton, Joanna C.; Dato, Serena; Davies, Karen; Ford, Ian; Gampe, Jutta; Garagnani, Paolo; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Harrow, Jennifer; van Heemst, Diana; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hofman, Albert; Jeune, Bernard; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner, Doris; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Mcnerlan, Susan E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Montesanto, Alberto; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Murphy, Anne; Nohr, Ellen A.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Postmus, Iris; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ross, Owen A.; Salvioli, Stefano; Sattar, Naveed; Schreiber, Stefan; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stott, David J.; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Samani, Nilesh J.; Galan, Pilar; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Rea, Irene Maeve; Passarino, Giuseppe; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Christensen, Kaare; Nebel, Almut; Stefánsson, Kári; Metspalu, Andres; Magnusson, Patrik; Blanché, Hélène; Christiansen, Lene; Kirkwood, Thomas B.L.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Franceschi, Claudio; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Slagboom, P. Eline

    2014-01-01

    The genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is ∼25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of European descent (≥85 years) and 16 121 younger controls (<65 years) followed by replication in an additional set of 13 060 long-lived individuals and 61 156 controls. In addition, we performed a subset analysis in cases aged ≥90 years. We observed genome-wide significant association with longevity, as reflected by survival to ages beyond 90 years, at a novel locus, rs2149954, on chromosome 5q33.3 (OR = 1.10, P = 1.74 × 10−8). We also confirmed association of rs4420638 on chromosome 19q13.32 (OR = 0.72, P = 3.40 × 10−36), representing the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 locus. In a prospective meta-analysis (n = 34 103), the minor allele of rs2149954 (T) on chromosome 5q33.3 associates with increased survival (HR = 0.95, P = 0.003). This allele has previously been reported to associate with low blood pressure in middle age. Interestingly, the minor allele (T) associates with decreased cardiovascular mortality risk, independent of blood pressure. We report on the first GWAS-identified longevity locus on chromosome 5q33.3 influencing survival in the general European population. The minor allele of this locus associates with low blood pressure in middle age, although the contribution of this allele to survival may be less dependent on blood pressure. Hence, the pleiotropic mechanisms by which this intragenic variation contributes to lifespan regulation have to be elucidated. PMID:24688116

  11. Genome-Wide Profiling of Pluripotent Cells Reveals a Unique Molecular Signature of Human Embryonic Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pashai, Nikta; Hao, Haiping; All, Angelo; Gupta, Siddharth; Chaerkady, Raghothama; De Los Angeles, Alejandro; Gearhart, John D.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic germ cells (EGCs) provide a powerful model for identifying molecules involved in the pluripotent state when compared to their progenitors, primordial germ cells (PGCs), and other pluripotent stem cells. Microarray and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) reveals for the first time that human EGCs possess a transcription profile distinct from PGCs and other pluripotent stem cells. Validation with qRT-PCR confirms that human EGCs and PGCs express many pluripotency-associated genes but with quantifiable differences compared to pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs), and embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs). Analyses also identified a number of target genes that may be potentially associated with their unique pluripotent states. These include IPO7, MED7, RBM26, HSPD1, and KRAS which were upregulated in EGCs along with other pluripotent stem cells when compared to PGCs. Other potential target genes were also found which may contribute toward a primed ESC-like state. These genes were exclusively up-regulated in ESCs, IPSCs and ECCs including PARP1, CCNE1, CDK6, AURKA, MAD2L1, CCNG1, and CCNB1 which are involved in cell cycle regulation, cellular metabolism and DNA repair and replication. Gene classification analysis also confirmed that the distinguishing feature of EGCs compared to ESCs, ECCs, and IPSCs lies primarily in their genetic contribution to cellular metabolism, cell cycle, and cell adhesion. In contrast, several genes were found upregulated in PGCs which may help distinguish their unipotent state including HBA1, DMRT1, SPANXA1, and EHD2. Together, these findings provide the first glimpse into a unique genomic signature of human germ cells and pluripotent stem cells and provide genes potentially involved in defining different states of germ-line pluripotency. PMID:22737227

  12. Effects of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) on genome-wide DNA methylation in human B lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jianlin; Wang, Yu; Chen, Junqiang; Ju, Li; Yu, Min; Jiang, Zhaoqiang; Feng, Lingfang; Jin, Lingzhi; Zhang, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Several previous studies highlighted the potential epigenetic effects of Cr(VI), especially DNA methylation. However, few studies have compared the effects of Cr(VI) on DNA methylation profiles between soluble and particulate chromate in vitro. Accordingly, Illumina Infinium Human Methylation 450K BeadChip array was used to analyze DNA methylation profiles of human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to potassium dichromate or lead chromate, and the cell viability was also studied. Array based DNA methylation analysis showed that the impacts of Cr(VI) on DNA methylation were limited, only about 40 differentially methylated CpG sites, with an overlap of 15CpG sites, were induced by both potassium dichromate and lead chromate. The results of mRNA expression showed that after Cr(VI) treatment, mRNA expression changes of four genes (TBL1Y, FZD5, IKZF2, and KIAA1949) were consistent with their DNA methylation alteration, but DNA methylation changes of other six genes did not correlate with mRNA expression. In conclusion, both of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) could induce a small amount of differentially methylated sites in human B lymphoblastoid cells, and the correlations between DNA methylation changes and mRNA expression varied between different genes. PMID:26433257

  13. Construction of a genome-wide human BAC-Unigene resource. Final progress report, 1989--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C.S.; Xu, R.X.; Wang, M.

    1996-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 mapped STSs and 27,000 mapped Unigenes (non-redundant, unigene sets of cDNA representing EST clusters) are available for human alone. A total of 44,000 Unigene cDNA clones have been supplied by Research Genetics. Unigenes, or cDNAs are excellent resource for map building for two reasons. Firstly, they exist in two alternative forms -- as both sequence information for PCR primer pairs, and cDNA clones -- thus making library screening by colony hybridization as well as pooled library PCR possible. The authors have developed an efficient and robust procedure to screen genomic libraries with large number of DNA probes. Secondly, the linkage and order of expressed sequences, or genes are highly conserved among human, mouse and other mammalian species. Therefore, mapping with cDNA markers rather than random anonymous STSs will greatly facilitate comparative, evolutionary studies as well as physical map building. They have currently deconvoluted over 10,000 Unigene probes against a 4X coverage human BAC clones from the approved library D by high density colony hybridization method. 10,000 batches of Unigenes are arrayed in an imaginary 100 X 100 matrix from which 100 row pools and 100 column pools are obtained. Library filters are hybridized with pooled probes, thus reducing the number of hybridization required for addressing the positives for each Unigene from 10,000 to 200. Details on the experimental scheme as well as daily progress report is posted on the Web site (http://www.tree.caltech.edu).

  14. A genome-wide linkage scan for quantitative trait loci influencing the craniofacial complex in humans(Homo sapiens sapiens)

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Richard J.; Duren, Dana L.; Mahaney, Michael C.; Blangero, John; Dyer, Thomas D.; Cole, Shelley A.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Chumlea, Wm. Cameron; Siervogel, Roger M.; Choh, Audrey C.; Nahhas, Ramzi W.; Lee, Miryoung; Towne, Bradford

    2011-01-01

    The genetic architecture of the craniofacial complex has been the subject of intense scrutiny because of the high frequency of congenital malformations. Numerous animal models have been used to document the early development of the craniofacial complex, but few studies have focused directly on the genetic underpinnings of normal variation in the human craniofacial complex. The current study examines 80 quantitative traits derived from lateral cephalographs of 981 participants in the Fels Longitudinal Study, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio. Quantitative genetic analyses were conducted using the SOLAR analytic platform, a maximum-likelihood variance components method that incorporates all familial information for parameter estimation. Heritability estimates were significant and of moderate to high magnitude for all craniofacial traits. Additionally, significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for 10 traits from the three developmental components (basicranium, splanchnocranium, and neurocranium) of the craniofacial complex. These QTL were found on chromosomes 3, 6, 11, 12, and 14. This study of the genetic architecture of the craniofacial complex elucidates fundamental information of the genetic architecture of the craniofacial complex in humans. PMID:21328561

  15. A human in vitro model system for investigating genome-wide host responses to SARS coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Lisa FP; Hibberd, Martin L; Ooi, Eng-Eong; Tang, Kin-Fai; Neo, Soek-Ying; Tan, Jenny; Krishna Murthy, Karuturi R; Vega, Vinsensius B; Chia, Jer-Ming; Liu, Edison T; Ren, Ee-Chee

    2004-01-01

    Background The molecular basis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) induced pathology is still largely unclear. Many SARS patients suffer respiratory distress brought on by interstitial infiltration and frequently show peripheral blood lymphopenia and occasional leucopenia. One possible cause of this could be interstitial inflammation, following a localized host response. In this study, we therefore examine the immune response of SARS-CoV in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) over the first 24 hours. Methods PBMCs from normal healthy donors were inoculated in vitro with SARS-CoV and the viral replication kinetics was studied by real-time quantitative assays. SARS-CoV specific gene expression changes were examined by high-density oligonucleotide array analysis. Results We observed that SARS-CoV was capable of infecting and replicating in PBMCs and the kinetics of viral replication was variable among the donors. SARS-CoV antibody binding assays indicated that SARS specific antibodies inhibited SARS-CoV viral replication. Array data showed monocyte-macrophage cell activation, coagulation pathway upregulation and cytokine production together with lung trafficking chemokines such as IL8 and IL17, possibly activated through the TLR9 signaling pathway; that mimicked clinical features of the disease. Conclusions The identification of human blood mononuclear cells as a direct target of SARS-CoV in the model system described here provides a new insight into disease pathology and a tool for investigating the host response and mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:15357874

  16. Genome-wide co-localization of Polycomb orthologs and their effects on gene expression in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycomb group proteins form multicomponent complexes that are important for establishing lineage-specific patterns of gene expression. Mammalian cells encode multiple permutations of the prototypic Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) with little evidence for functional specialization. An aim of this study is to determine whether the multiple orthologs that are co-expressed in human fibroblasts act on different target genes and whether their genomic location changes during cellular senescence. Results Deep sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitated with antibodies against CBX6, CBX7, CBX8, RING1 and RING2 reveals that the orthologs co-localize at multiple sites. PCR-based validation at representative loci suggests that a further six PRC1 proteins have similar binding patterns. Importantly, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies against different orthologs implies that multiple variants of PRC1 associate with the same DNA. At many loci, the binding profiles have a distinctive architecture that is preserved in two different types of fibroblast. Conversely, there are several hundred loci at which PRC1 binding is cell type-specific and, contrary to expectations, the presence of PRC1 does not necessarily equate with transcriptional silencing. Interestingly, the PRC1 binding profiles are preserved in senescent cells despite changes in gene expression. Conclusions The multiple permutations of PRC1 in human fibroblasts congregate at common rather than specific sites in the genome and with overlapping but distinctive binding profiles in different fibroblasts. The data imply that the effects of PRC1 complexes on gene expression are more subtle than simply repressing the loci at which they bind. PMID:24485159

  17. Genome-wide identification of new Wnt/β-catenin target genes in the human genome using CART method

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The importance of in silico predictions for understanding cellular processes is now widely accepted, and a variety of algorithms useful for studying different biological features have been designed. In particular, the prediction of cis regulatory modules in non-coding human genome regions represents a major challenge for understanding gene regulation in several diseases. Recently, studies of the Wnt signaling pathway revealed a connection with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. In this article, we construct a classification tool that uses the transcription factor binding site motifs composition of some gene promoters to identify new Wnt/β-catenin pathway target genes potentially involved in brain diseases. Results In this study, we propose 89 new Wnt/β-catenin pathway target genes predicted in silico by using a method based on multiple Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis. We used as decision variables the presence of transcription factor binding site motifs in the upstream region of each gene. This prediction was validated by RT-qPCR in a sample of 9 genes. As expected, LEF1, a member of the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor family (TCF/LEF1), was relevant for the classification algorithm and, remarkably, other factors related directly or indirectly to the inflammatory response and amyloidogenic processes also appeared to be relevant for the classification. Among the 89 new Wnt/β-catenin pathway targets, we found a group expressed in brain tissue that could be involved in diverse responses to neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease (AD). These genes represent new candidates to protect cells against amyloid β toxicity, in agreement with the proposed neuroprotective role of the Wnt signaling pathway. Conclusions Our multiple CART strategy proved to be an effective tool to identify new Wnt/β-catenin pathway targets based on the study of their regulatory regions in the human genome. In particular

  18. Genome-Wide Reprogramming of Transcript Architecture by Temperature Specifies the Developmental States of the Human Pathogen Histoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Sarah A.; Voorhies, Mark; Gebhart, Dana; Sil, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells integrate layers of gene regulation to coordinate complex cellular processes; however, mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation remain poorly studied. The human fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) responds to environmental or host temperature by initiating unique transcriptional programs to specify multicellular (hyphae) or unicellular (yeast) developmental states that function in infectivity or pathogenesis, respectively. Here we used recent advances in next-generation sequencing to uncover a novel re-programming of transcript length between Hc developmental cell types. We found that ~2% percent of Hc transcripts exhibit 5’ leader sequences that differ markedly in length between morphogenetic states. Ribosome density and mRNA abundance measurements of differential leader transcripts revealed nuanced transcriptional and translational regulation. One such class of regulated longer leader transcripts exhibited tight transcriptional and translational repression. Further examination of these dually repressed genes revealed that some control Hc morphology and that their strict regulation is necessary for the pathogen to make appropriate developmental decisions in response to temperature. PMID:26177267

  19. Genome-wide expression profiling of 8-chloroadenosine- and 8-chloro-cAMP-treated human neuroblastoma cells using radioactive human cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Park, Gil Hong; Choe, Jaegol; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Park, Yun Gyu; Sohn, Jeongwon; Kim, Meyoung-kon

    2002-07-31

    Previous reports raised question as to whether 8-chloro-cyclic adenosine 3,5-monophosphate (8-Cl-cAMP) is a prodrug for its metabolite, 8-Cl-adenosine which exerts growth inhibition in a broad spectrum of cancer cells. The present study was carried out to clarify overall cellular affects of 8-Cl-cAMP and 8-Cl-adenosine on SK-N-DZ human neuroblastoma cells by systematically characterizing gene expression using radioactive human cDNA microarray. Microarray was prepared with PCR-amplified cDNA of 2,304 known genes spotted on nylon membranes, employing (33)P-labeled cDNAs of SK-N-DZ cells as a probe. The expression levels of approximately 100 cDNAs, representing about 8% of the total DNA elements on the array, were altered in 8-Cl-adenosine- or 8-Cl-cAMP-treated cells, respectively. The genome-wide expression of the two samples exhibited partial overlaps; different sets of up-regulated genes but the same set of down-regulated genes. 8-Cl-adenosine treatment up-regulated genes involved in differentiation and development (LIM protein, connexin 26, neogenin, neurofilament triplet L protein and p21(WAF1/CIP1)) and immune response such as natural killer cells protein 4, and down-regulated ones involved in proliferation and transformation (transforming growth factor-beta, DYRK2, urokinase-type plasminogen activator and proteins involved in transcription and translation) which were in close parallel with those by 8-Cl-cAMP. Our results indicated that the two drugs shared common genomic pathways for the down-regulation of certain genes, but used distinct pathways for the up-regulation of different gene clusters. Based on the findings, we suggest that the anti-cancer activity of 8-Cl-cAMP results at least in part through 8-Cl-adenosine. Thus, the systematic use of DNA arrays can provide insight into the dynamic cellular pathways involved in anticancer activities of chemotherapeutics. PMID:12216110

  20. Dominant Genetic Variation and Missing Heritability for Human Complex Traits: Insights from Twin versus Genome-wide Common SNP Models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Rahman, Iffat; Arpegård, Johannes; Viktorin, Alexander; Karlsson, Robert; Hägg, Sara; Svensson, Per; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further illuminate the potential role of dominant genetic variation in the “missing heritability” debate, we investigated the additive (narrow-sense heritability, h2) and dominant (δ2) genetic variance for 18 human complex traits. Within the same study base (10,682 Swedish twins), we calculated and compared the estimates from classic twin-based structural equation model with SNP-based genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum likelihood [GREML(d)] method. Contributions of δ2 were evident for 14 traits in twin models (average δ2twin = 0.25, range 0.14–0.49), two of which also displayed significant δ2 in the GREMLd analyses (triglycerides δ2SNP = 0.28 and waist circumference δ2SNP = 0.19). On average, the proportion of h2SNP/h2twin was 70% for ADE-fitted traits (for which the best-fitting model included additive and dominant genetic and unique environmental components) and 31% for AE-fitted traits (for which the best-fitting model included additive genetic and unique environmental components). Independent evidence for contribution from shared environment, also in ADE-fitted traits, was obtained from self-reported within-pair contact frequency and age at separation. We conclude that despite the fact that additive genetics appear to constitute the bulk of genetic influences for most complex traits, dominant genetic variation might often be masked by shared environment in twin and family studies and might therefore have a more prominent role than what family-based estimates often suggest. The risk of erroneously attributing all inherited genetic influences (additive and dominant) to the h2 in too-small twin studies might also lead to exaggerated “missing heritability” (the proportion of h2 that remains unexplained by SNPs). PMID:26544805

  1. Genome-wide analysis of the effect of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma on human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guoguo; Yang, Yi; Liu, Hangfan; Liu, Kangdong; Zhao, Jimin; Chen, Xinhuan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yanyan; Lu, Jing; Dong, Ziming

    2016-07-01

    A large volume of data indicates that controlling tumor-associated angiogenesis is a promising therapy against cancer. However, angiogenesis is a complex process, little is known about the differential gene expression in the process of normal endothelial cell differentiation toward tumor vascular endothelial cells induced by tumor microenvironment. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of tumor microenvironment simulated by the supernatant of esophageal squamous cancer cells (KYSE70) on normal endothelial cells (HUVECs) at the whole genome level. The gene expression profile was studied through gene ontology and signal pathway analysis. Compared with the normal HUVECs, a total of 3769 differentially expressed genes in induced HUVECs were detected, including 1609 upregulated genes and 2160 downregulated genes. Moreover, the microarray data analysis showed that 11 significant biological processes and 10 significant signaling pathways changed most, which are associated with angiogenesis and cell differentiation. According to the different expression levels in the microarrays and their functions, four differentially expressed genes involved in tumor angiogenesis and cell differentiation (IL6, VEGFA, S1PR1, TYMP) were selected and analyzed by qRT-PCR. The qRT-PCR results were consistent with the microarray data. Furthermore, we simulated the tumor microenvironment by human esophageal carcinoma tissue homogenate to investigate its effect on HUVECs, the qRT-PCR results indicated that the above genes were highly expressed in HUVECs after induction by esophageal carcinoma tissue homogenate. In conclusion, tumor microenvironment impact on normal endothelial cells differentiated toward tumor vascular endothelial cells, and the selected genes, which are associated with tumor angiogenesis, would be anti-angiogenesis targets against esophageal carcinoma. PMID:27222202

  2. Genome-wide RNA profiling of long-lasting stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells induced by Yellow Fever vaccination in humans.

    PubMed

    Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Soneson, Charlotte; Delorenzi, Mauro; Speiser, Daniel E

    2015-09-01

    The live-attenuated Yellow Fever (YF) vaccine YF-17D induces a broad and polyfunctional CD8 T cell response in humans. Recently, we identified a population of stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells induced by YF-17D that persists at stable frequency for at least 25 years after vaccination. The YF-17D is thus a model system of human CD8 T cell biology that furthermore allows to track and study long-lasting and antigen-specific human memory CD8 T cells. Here, we describe in detail the sample characteristics and preparation of a microarray dataset acquired for genome-wide gene expression profiling of long-lasting YF-specific stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells, compared to the reference CD8 T cell differentiation subsets from total CD8 T cells. We also describe the quality controls, annotations and exploratory analyses of the dataset. The microarray data is available from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public repository with accession number GSE65804. PMID:26484272

  3. Genome-wide association studies in Africans and African Americans: Expanding the Framework of the Genomics of Human Traits and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Peprah, Emmanuel; Xu, Huichun; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Royal, Charmaine D.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic research is one of the tools for elucidating the pathogenesis of diseases of global health relevance, and paving the research dimension to clinical and public health translation. Recent advances in genomic research and technologies have increased our understanding of human diseases, genes associated with these disorders, and the relevant mechanisms. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have proliferated since the first studies were published several years ago, and have become an important tool in helping researchers comprehend human variation and the role genetic variants play in disease. However, the need to expand the diversity of populations in GWAS has become increasingly apparent as new knowledge is gained about genetic variation. Inclusion of diverse populations in genomic studies is critical to a more complete understanding of human variation and elucidation of the underpinnings of complex diseases. In this review, we summarize the available data on GWAS in recent-African ancestry populations within the western hemisphere (i.e. African Americans and peoples of the Caribbean) and continental African populations. Furthermore, we highlight ways in which genomic studies in populations of recent African ancestry have led to advances in the areas of malaria, HIV, prostate cancer, and other diseases. Finally, we discuss the advantages of conducting GWAS in recent African ancestry populations in the context of addressing existing and emerging global health conditions. PMID:25427668

  4. Genome-wide analysis of human global and transcription-coupled excision repair of UV damage at single-nucleotide resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera; Selby, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a method for genome-wide mapping of DNA excision repair named XR-seq (excision repair sequencing). Human nucleotide excision repair generates two incisions surrounding the site of damage, creating an ∼30-mer. In XR-seq, this fragment is isolated and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. We used XR-seq to produce stranded, nucleotide-resolution maps of repair of two UV-induced DNA damages in human cells: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) pyrimidine–pyrimidone photoproducts [(6-4)PPs]. In wild-type cells, CPD repair was highly associated with transcription, specifically with the template strand. Experiments in cells defective in either transcription-coupled excision repair or general excision repair isolated the contribution of each pathway to the overall repair pattern and showed that transcription-coupled repair of both photoproducts occurs exclusively on the template strand. XR-seq maps capture transcription-coupled repair at sites of divergent gene promoters and bidirectional enhancer RNA (eRNA) production at enhancers. XR-seq data also uncovered the repair characteristics and novel sequence preferences of CPDs and (6-4)PPs. XR-seq and the resulting repair maps will facilitate studies of the effects of genomic location, chromatin context, transcription, and replication on DNA repair in human cells. PMID:25934506

  5. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  6. A Genome-Wide mQTL Analysis in Human Adipose Tissue Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with DNA Methylation, Gene Expression and Metabolic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Petr; Olsson, Anders H.; Gillberg, Linn; Jørgensen, Sine W.; Brøns, Charlotte; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Jansson, Per-Anders; Nilsson, Emma; Rönn, Tina; Vaag, Allan; Ling, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which interactions between genetics and epigenetics may affect the risk of complex metabolic diseases and/or their intermediary phenotypes. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analysis in human adipose tissue of 119 men, where 592,794 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were related to DNA methylation of 477,891 CpG sites, covering 99% of RefSeq genes. SNPs in significant mQTLs were further related to gene expression in adipose tissue and obesity related traits. We found 101,911 SNP-CpG pairs (mQTLs) in cis and 5,342 SNP-CpG pairs in trans showing significant associations between genotype and DNA methylation in adipose tissue after correction for multiple testing, where cis is defined as distance less than 500 kb between a SNP and CpG site. These mQTLs include reported obesity, lipid and type 2 diabetes loci, e.g. ADCY3/POMC, APOA5, CETP, FADS2, GCKR, SORT1 and LEPR. Significant mQTLs were overrepresented in intergenic regions meanwhile underrepresented in promoter regions and CpG islands. We further identified 635 SNPs in significant cis-mQTLs associated with expression of 86 genes in adipose tissue including CHRNA5, G6PC2, GPX7, RPL27A, THNSL2 and ZFP57. SNPs in significant mQTLs were also associated with body mass index (BMI), lipid traits and glucose and insulin levels in our study cohort and public available consortia data. Importantly, the Causal Inference Test (CIT) demonstrates how genetic variants mediate their effects on metabolic traits (e.g. BMI, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)) via altered DNA methylation in human adipose tissue. This study identifies genome-wide interactions between genetic and epigenetic variation in both cis and trans positions influencing gene expression in adipose tissue and in vivo (dys)metabolic traits associated with the development of obesity and

  7. A Genome-Wide mQTL Analysis in Human Adipose Tissue Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with DNA Methylation, Gene Expression and Metabolic Traits.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Petr; Olsson, Anders H; Gillberg, Linn; Jørgensen, Sine W; Brøns, Charlotte; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Jansson, Per-Anders; Nilsson, Emma; Rönn, Tina; Vaag, Allan; Ling, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which interactions between genetics and epigenetics may affect the risk of complex metabolic diseases and/or their intermediary phenotypes. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analysis in human adipose tissue of 119 men, where 592,794 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were related to DNA methylation of 477,891 CpG sites, covering 99% of RefSeq genes. SNPs in significant mQTLs were further related to gene expression in adipose tissue and obesity related traits. We found 101,911 SNP-CpG pairs (mQTLs) in cis and 5,342 SNP-CpG pairs in trans showing significant associations between genotype and DNA methylation in adipose tissue after correction for multiple testing, where cis is defined as distance less than 500 kb between a SNP and CpG site. These mQTLs include reported obesity, lipid and type 2 diabetes loci, e.g. ADCY3/POMC, APOA5, CETP, FADS2, GCKR, SORT1 and LEPR. Significant mQTLs were overrepresented in intergenic regions meanwhile underrepresented in promoter regions and CpG islands. We further identified 635 SNPs in significant cis-mQTLs associated with expression of 86 genes in adipose tissue including CHRNA5, G6PC2, GPX7, RPL27A, THNSL2 and ZFP57. SNPs in significant mQTLs were also associated with body mass index (BMI), lipid traits and glucose and insulin levels in our study cohort and public available consortia data. Importantly, the Causal Inference Test (CIT) demonstrates how genetic variants mediate their effects on metabolic traits (e.g. BMI, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)) via altered DNA methylation in human adipose tissue. This study identifies genome-wide interactions between genetic and epigenetic variation in both cis and trans positions influencing gene expression in adipose tissue and in vivo (dys)metabolic traits associated with the development of obesity and

  8. Transcript Expression Data from Human Islets Links Regulatory Signals from Genome-Wide Association Studies for Type 2 Diabetes and Glycemic Traits to Their Downstream Effectors.

    PubMed

    van de Bunt, Martijn; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; Dai, Xiaoqing; Barrett, Amy; Grey, Caleb; Li, Lei; Bennett, Amanda J; Johnson, Paul R; Rajotte, Raymond V; Gaulton, Kyle J; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; MacDonald, Patrick E; McCarthy, Mark I; Gloyn, Anna L

    2015-12-01

    The intersection of genome-wide association analyses with physiological and functional data indicates that variants regulating islet gene transcription influence type 2 diabetes (T2D) predisposition and glucose homeostasis. However, the specific genes through which these regulatory variants act remain poorly characterized. We generated expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data in 118 human islet samples using RNA-sequencing and high-density genotyping. We identified fourteen loci at which cis-exon-eQTL signals overlapped active islet chromatin signatures and were coincident with established T2D and/or glycemic trait associations. ‎At some, these data provide an experimental link between GWAS signals and biological candidates, such as DGKB and ADCY5. At others, the cis-signals implicate genes with no prior connection to islet biology, including WARS and ZMIZ1. At the ZMIZ1 locus, we show that perturbation of ZMIZ1 expression in human islets and beta-cells influences exocytosis and insulin secretion, highlighting a novel role for ZMIZ1 in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Together, these findings provide a significant advance in the mechanistic insights of T2D and glycemic trait association loci. PMID:26624892

  9. Genome-wide parent-of-origin DNA methylation analysis reveals the intricacies of human imprinting and suggests a germline methylation-independent mechanism of establishment

    PubMed Central

    Court, Franck; Tayama, Chiharu; Romanelli, Valeria; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Okamura, Kohji; Sugahara, Naoko; Simón, Carlos; Moore, Harry; Harness, Julie V.; Keirstead, Hans; Sanchez-Mut, Jose Vicente; Kaneki, Eisuke; Lapunzina, Pablo; Soejima, Hidenobu; Wake, Norio; Esteller, Manel; Ogata, Tsutomu; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Monk, David

    2014-01-01

    Differential methylation between the two alleles of a gene has been observed in imprinted regions, where the methylation of one allele occurs on a parent-of-origin basis, the inactive X-chromosome in females, and at those loci whose methylation is driven by genetic variants. We have extensively characterized imprinted methylation in a substantial range of normal human tissues, reciprocal genome-wide uniparental disomies, and hydatidiform moles, using a combination of whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and high-density methylation microarrays. This approach allowed us to define methylation profiles at known imprinted domains at base-pair resolution, as well as to identify 21 novel loci harboring parent-of-origin methylation, 15 of which are restricted to the placenta. We observe that the extent of imprinted differentially methylated regions (DMRs) is extremely similar between tissues, with the exception of the placenta. This extra-embryonic tissue often adopts a different methylation profile compared to somatic tissues. Further, we profiled all imprinted DMRs in sperm and embryonic stem cells derived from parthenogenetically activated oocytes, individual blastomeres, and blastocysts, in order to identify primary DMRs and reveal the extent of reprogramming during preimplantation development. Intriguingly, we find that in contrast to ubiquitous imprints, the majority of placenta-specific imprinted DMRs are unmethylated in sperm and all human embryonic stem cells. Therefore, placental-specific imprinting provides evidence for an inheritable epigenetic state that is independent of DNA methylation and the existence of a novel imprinting mechanism at these loci. PMID:24402520

  10. A Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Important Roles of DNA Methylation in Human Longevity by Regulating Age-Related Disease Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi-Gang; Wu, Huan; Luo, Long-Hai; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2015-01-01

    It is recognized that genetic factors contribute to human longevity. Besides the hypothesis of existence of longevity genes, another suggests that a lower frequency of risk alleles decreases the incidence of age-related diseases in the long-lived people. However, the latter finds no support from recent genetic studies. Considering the crucial role of epigenetic modification in gene regulation, we then hypothesize that suppressing disease-related genes in longevity individuals is likely achieved by epigenetic modification, e.g. DNA methylation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the genome-wide methylation profile in 4 Chinese female centenarians and 4 middle-aged controls using methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing. 626 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were observed between both groups. Interestingly, genes with these DMRs were enriched in age-related diseases, including type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. This pattern remains rather stable after including methylomes of two white individuals. Further analyses suggest that the observed DMRs likely have functional roles in regulating disease-associated gene expressions, with some genes [e.g. caspase 3 (CASP3)] being down-regulated whereas the others [i.e. interleukin 1 receptor, type 2 (IL1R2)] up-regulated. Therefore, our study suggests that suppressing the disease-related genes via epigenetic modification is an important contributor to human longevity. PMID:25793257

  11. Transcript Expression Data from Human Islets Links Regulatory Signals from Genome-Wide Association Studies for Type 2 Diabetes and Glycemic Traits to Their Downstream Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoqing; Barrett, Amy; Grey, Caleb; Li, Lei; Bennett, Amanda J.; Johnson, Paul R.; Rajotte, Raymond V.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; MacDonald, Patrick E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    The intersection of genome-wide association analyses with physiological and functional data indicates that variants regulating islet gene transcription influence type 2 diabetes (T2D) predisposition and glucose homeostasis. However, the specific genes through which these regulatory variants act remain poorly characterized. We generated expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data in 118 human islet samples using RNA-sequencing and high-density genotyping. We identified fourteen loci at which cis-exon-eQTL signals overlapped active islet chromatin signatures and were coincident with established T2D and/or glycemic trait associations. ‎At some, these data provide an experimental link between GWAS signals and biological candidates, such as DGKB and ADCY5. At others, the cis-signals implicate genes with no prior connection to islet biology, including WARS and ZMIZ1. At the ZMIZ1 locus, we show that perturbation of ZMIZ1 expression in human islets and beta-cells influences exocytosis and insulin secretion, highlighting a novel role for ZMIZ1 in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Together, these findings provide a significant advance in the mechanistic insights of T2D and glycemic trait association loci. PMID:26624892

  12. Mouse BMD Quantitative Trait Loci Show Improved Concordance With Human Genome-wide Association Loci When Recalculated on a New, Common Mouse Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Karasik, David; Li, Qian; Smith, Randy V; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Churchill, Gary A; Paigen, Beverly J; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern

    2010-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a heritable trait, and in mice, over 100 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been reported, but candidate genes have been identified for only a small percentage. Persistent errors in the mouse genetic map have negatively affected QTL localization, spurring the development of a new, corrected map. In this study, QTLs for BMD were remapped in 11 archival mouse data sets using this new genetic map. Since these QTLs all were mapped in a comparable way, direct comparisons of QTLs for concordance would be valid. We then compared human genome-wide association study (GWAS) BMD loci with the mouse QTLs. We found that 26 of the 28 human GWAS loci examined were located within the confidence interval of a mouse QTL. Furthermore, 14 of the GWAS loci mapped to within 3 cM of a mouse QTL peak. Lastly, we demonstrated that these newly remapped mouse QTLs can substantiate a candidate gene for a human GWAS locus, for which the peak single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) fell in an intergenic region. Specifically, we suggest that MEF2C (human chromosome 5, mouse chromosome 13) should be considered a candidate gene for the genetic regulation of BMD. In conclusion, use of the new mouse genetic map has improved the localization of mouse BMD QTLs, and these remapped QTLs show high concordance with human GWAS loci. We believe that this is an opportune time for a renewed effort by the genetics community to identify the causal variants regulating BMD using a synergistic mouse-human approach. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20200990

  13. Genome wide expression analysis of the effect of the Chinese patent medicine Zilongjin tablet on four human lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xin; Xiong, Songjin; Wen, Shaoping; Gao, Song; Wang, Lei; Cao, Boyang

    2011-10-01

    Zilongjin (ZLJ) tablet, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has been approved as a new anti-tumor drug by the State Food and Drug Administration of China; however, its anti-cancer mechanisms remain elusive. The goal of this study was to investigate the underlying anti-cancer activities of ZLJ tablet in vitro. In this study, four lung cancer cell lines, A549, H446, H460 and H520, were treated with 2.2 mg/mL of ZLJ solution for 24 h at 37 °C under 5% CO(2) . RNA was isolated and a microarray experiment using the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 plus 2.0 Array was employed to differentiate the expression patterns of cancer-related genes after drug treatment. Of 483 genes in 63 functional categories and 25 different pathways that showed at least a 2-fold change of expression level in the four cancer cell lines, 170 genes were upregulated, and 313 genes were downregulated. Eleven of the 483 genes were cancer-related and belong to the three known pathways: apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The microarray data were validated by real-time RT-PCR. The results of this investigation suggest possible anti-cancer mechanisms of the ZLJ tablet, and lay a foundation to further analyse its therapeutic roles. PMID:21953710

  14. Rank-based genome-wide analysis reveals the association of Ryanodine receptor-2 gene variants with childhood asthma among human populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The standard approach to determine unique or shared genetic factors across populations is to identify risk alleles in one population and investigate replication in others. However, since populations differ in DNA sequence information, allele frequencies, effect sizes, and linkage disequilibrium patterns, SNP association using a uniform stringent threshold on p values may not be reproducible across populations. Here, we developed rank-based methods to investigate shared or population-specific loci and pathways for childhood asthma across individuals of diverse ancestry. We performed genome-wide association studies on 859,790 SNPs genotyped in 527 affected offspring trios of European, African, and Hispanic ancestry using publically available asthma database in the Genotypes and Phenotypes database. Results Rank-based analyses showed that there are shared genetic factors for asthma across populations, more at the gene and pathway levels than at the SNP level. Although the top 1,000 SNPs were not shared, 11 genes (RYR2, PDE4D, CSMD1, CDH13, ROBO2, RBFOX1, PTPRD, NPAS3, PDE1C, SEMA5A, and CTNNA2) mapped by these SNPs were shared across populations. Ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2, a statin response-related gene) showed the strongest association in European (p value = 2.55 × 10−7) and was replicated in African (2.57 × 10−4) and Hispanic (1.18 × 10−3) Americans. Imputation analyses based on the 1000 Genomes Project uncovered additional RYR2 variants associated with asthma. Network and functional ontology analyses revealed that RYR2 is an integral part of dermatological or allergic disorder biological networks, specifically in the functional classes involving inflammatory, eosinophilic, and respiratory diseases. Conclusion Our rank-based genome-wide analysis revealed for the first time an association of RYR2 variants with asthma and replicated previously discovered PDE4D asthma gene across human populations. The replication of top

  15. Integrative Tissue-Specific Functional Annotations in the Human Genome Provide Novel Insights on Many Complex Traits and Improve Signal Prioritization in Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; He, Beixin Julie; Zhao, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to understand genomic function through both experimental and computational approaches, yet proper annotation still remains challenging, especially in non-coding regions. In this manuscript, we introduce GenoSkyline, an unsupervised learning framework to predict tissue-specific functional regions through integrating high-throughput epigenetic annotations. GenoSkyline successfully identified a variety of non-coding regulatory machinery including enhancers, regulatory miRNA, and hypomethylated transposable elements in extensive case studies. Integrative analysis of GenoSkyline annotations and results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to novel biological insights on the etiologies of a number of human complex traits. We also explored using tissue-specific functional annotations to prioritize GWAS signals and predict relevant tissue types for each risk locus. Brain and blood-specific annotations led to better prioritization performance for schizophrenia than standard GWAS p-values and non-tissue-specific annotations. As for coronary artery disease, heart-specific functional regions was highly enriched of GWAS signals, but previously identified risk loci were found to be most functional in other tissues, suggesting a substantial proportion of still undetected heart-related loci. In summary, GenoSkyline annotations can guide genetic studies at multiple resolutions and provide valuable insights in understanding complex diseases. GenoSkyline is available at http://genocanyon.med.yale.edu/GenoSkyline. PMID:27058395

  16. Genome-wide analysis reveals conserved transcriptional responses downstream of resting potential change in Xenopus embryos, axolotl regeneration, and human mesenchymal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pai, Vaibhav P; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Echeverri, Karen; Sundelacruz, Sarah; Kaplan, David L; Levin, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Endogenous bioelectric signaling via changes in cellular resting potential (V mem) is a key regulator of patterning during regeneration and embryogenesis in numerous model systems. Depolarization of V mem has been functionally implicated in dedifferentiation, tumorigenesis, anatomical re-specification, and appendage regeneration. However, no unbiased analyses have been performed to understand genome-wide transcriptional responses to V mem change in vivo. Moreover, it is unknown which genes or gene networks represent conserved targets of bioelectrical signaling across different patterning contexts and species. Here, we use microarray analysis to comparatively analyze transcriptional responses to V mem depolarization. We compare the response of the transcriptome during embryogenesis (Xenopus development), regeneration (axolotl regeneration), and stem cell differentiation (human mesenchymal stem cells in culture) to identify common networks across model species that are associated with depolarization. Both subnetwork enrichment and PANTHER analyses identified a number of key genetic modules as targets of V mem change, and also revealed important (well-conserved) commonalities in bioelectric signal transduction, despite highly diverse experimental contexts and species. Depolarization regulates specific transcriptional networks across all three germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) such as cell differentiation and apoptosis, and this information will be used for developing mechanistic models of bioelectric regulation of patterning. Moreover, our analysis reveals that V mem change regulates transcripts related to important disease pathways such as cancer and neurodegeneration, which may represent novel targets for emerging electroceutical therapies. PMID:27499876

  17. Telomeric repeat-containing RNA/G-quadruplex-forming sequences cause genome-wide alteration of gene expression in human cancer cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Kyotaro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Telomere erosion causes cell mortality, suggesting that longer telomeres enable more cell divisions. In telomerase-positive human cancer cells, however, telomeres are often kept shorter than those of surrounding normal tissues. Recently, we showed that cancer cell telomere elongation represses innate immune genes and promotes their differentiation in vivo. This implies that short telomeres contribute to cancer malignancy, but it is unclear how such genetic repression is caused by elongated telomeres. Here, we report that telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) induces a genome-wide alteration of gene expression in telomere-elongated cancer cells. Using three different cell lines, we found that telomere elongation up-regulates TERRA signal and down-regulates innate immune genes such as STAT1, ISG15 and OAS3 in vivo. Ectopic TERRA oligonucleotides repressed these genes even in cells with short telomeres under three-dimensional culture conditions. This appeared to occur from the action of G-quadruplexes (G4) in TERRA, because control oligonucleotides had no effect and a nontelomeric G4-forming oligonucleotide phenocopied the TERRA oligonucleotide. Telomere elongation and G4-forming oligonucleotides showed similar gene expression signatures. Most of the commonly suppressed genes were involved in the innate immune system and were up-regulated in various cancers. We propose that TERRA G4 counteracts cancer malignancy by suppressing innate immune genes. PMID:25653161

  18. Software comparison for evaluating genomic copy number variation for Affymetrix 6.0 SNP array platform

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Copy number data are routinely being extracted from genome-wide association study chips using a variety of software. We empirically evaluated and compared four freely-available software packages designed for Affymetrix SNP chips to estimate copy number: Affymetrix Power Tools (APT), Aroma.Affymetrix, PennCNV and CRLMM. Our evaluation used 1,418 GENOA samples that were genotyped on the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. We compared bias and variance in the locus-level copy number data, the concordance amongst regions of copy number gains/deletions and the false-positive rate amongst deleted segments. Results APT had median locus-level copy numbers closest to a value of two, whereas PennCNV and Aroma.Affymetrix had the smallest variability associated with the median copy number. Of those evaluated, only PennCNV provides copy number specific quality-control metrics and identified 136 poor CNV samples. Regions of copy number variation (CNV) were detected using the hidden Markov models provided within PennCNV and CRLMM/VanillaIce. PennCNV detected more CNVs than CRLMM/VanillaIce; the median number of CNVs detected per sample was 39 and 30, respectively. PennCNV detected most of the regions that CRLMM/VanillaIce did as well as additional CNV regions. The median concordance between PennCNV and CRLMM/VanillaIce was 47.9% for duplications and 51.5% for deletions. The estimated false-positive rate associated with deletions was similar for PennCNV and CRLMM/VanillaIce. Conclusions If the objective is to perform statistical tests on the locus-level copy number data, our empirical results suggest that PennCNV or Aroma.Affymetrix is optimal. If the objective is to perform statistical tests on the summarized segmented data then PennCNV would be preferred over CRLMM/VanillaIce. Specifically, PennCNV allows the analyst to estimate locus-level copy number, perform segmentation and evaluate CNV-specific quality-control metrics within a single software package

  19. Genome-wide analysis correlates Ayurveda Prakriti

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Sharath, Anugula; Jyothi, Vuskamalla; Rotti, Harish; Raval, Ritu; Nayak, Jayakrishna; Bhat, Balakrishna K.; Prasanna, B. V.; Shintre, Pooja; Sule, Mayura; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Dedge, Amrish P.; Bharadwaj, Ramachandra; Gangadharan, G. G.; Nair, Sreekumaran; Gopinath, Puthiya M.; Patwardhan, Bhushan; Kondaiah, Paturu; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Valiathan, Marthanda Varma Sankaran; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-01-01

    The practice of Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India, is based on the concept of three major constitutional types (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) defined as “Prakriti”. To the best of our knowledge, no study has convincingly correlated genomic variations with the classification of Prakriti. In the present study, we performed genome-wide SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) analysis (Affymetrix, 6.0) of 262 well-classified male individuals (after screening 3416 subjects) belonging to three Prakritis. We found 52 SNPs (p ≤ 1 × 10−5) were significantly different between Prakritis, without any confounding effect of stratification, after 106 permutations. Principal component analysis (PCA) of these SNPs classified 262 individuals into their respective groups (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) irrespective of their ancestry, which represent its power in categorization. We further validated our finding with 297 Indian population samples with known ancestry. Subsequently, we found that PGM1 correlates with phenotype of Pitta as described in the ancient text of Caraka Samhita, suggesting that the phenotypic classification of India’s traditional medicine has a genetic basis; and its Prakriti-based practice in vogue for many centuries resonates with personalized medicine. PMID:26511157

  20. Genome-Wide Association Mapping in Dogs Enables Identification of the Homeobox Gene, NKX2-8, as a Genetic Component of Neural Tube Defects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Safra, Noa; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Ferguson, Polly J.; Aguilar, Miriam; Coulson, Rochelle L.; Thomas, Nicholas; Hitchens, Peta L.; Dickinson, Peter J.; Vernau, Karen M.; Wolf, Zena T.; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome = 3.0×10−5), after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525) were found to be significantly over-represented (p = 0.036). This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs. PMID:23874236

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Small RNA and Novel MicroRNA Discovery in Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Based on Extensive Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Chen, Xiao; Wu, Jun; Xu, Ling; Luo, Xue-Qun; Ke, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Hui; Qu, Liang-Hu; Chen, Yue-Qin

    2009-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been proved to play an important role in various cellular processes and function as tumor suppressors or oncogenes in cancers including leukemia. The identification of a large number of novel miRNAs and other small regulatory RNAs will provide valuable insights into the roles they play in tumorgenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain further understanding of the role of miRNAs relevant to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), we employed the sequencing-by-synthesis (SBS) strategy to sequence small RNA libraries prepared from ALL patients and normal donors. In total we identified 159 novel miRNAs and 116 novel miRNA*s from both libraries. Among the 159 novel miRNAs, 42 were identified with high stringency in our data set. Furthermore, we demonstrated the different expression patterns of 20 newly identified and several known miRNAs between ALL patients and normal donors, suggesting these miRNAs may be associated with ALL and could constitute an ALL-specific miRNA signature. Interestingly, GO “biological process” classifications revealed that a set of significantly abnormally expressed miRNAs are associated with disease relapse, which implies that these dysregulated miRNAs might promote the progression of ALL by regulating genes involved in the pathway of the disease development. Conclusion/Significance The study presents a comprehensive picture of the expression of small RNAs in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia and highlights novel and known miRNAs differentially expressed between ALL patients and normal donors. To our knowledge, this is the first study to look at genome-wide known and novel miRNA expression patterns in in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Our data revealed that these deregulated miRNAs may be associated with ALL or the onset of relapse. PMID:19724645

  2. Linkage Disequilibrium And Genome-Wide Association Studies In O. sativa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increasing evidence that genome-wide association studies provide a powerful approach to find the genetic basis of complex phenotypic variation in all kinds of species. For this purpose, we developed the first generation 44K Affymetrix SNP array in rice (see Tung et al. poster). We genotyped...

  3. Genome-wide association study reveals genetic architecture of eating behavior in pigs and its implications for humans obesity by comparative mapping.

    PubMed

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Strathe, Anders Bjerring; Ostersen, Tage; Jensen, Just; Mark, Thomas; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying genomic regions controlling feeding behavior in Danish Duroc boars and its potential implications for eating behavior in humans. Data regarding individual daily feed intake (DFI), total daily time spent in feeder (TPD), number of daily visits to feeder (NVD), average duration of each visit (TPV), mean feed intake per visit (FPV) and mean feed intake rate (FR) were available for 1130 boars. All boars were genotyped using the Illumina Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. The association analyses were performed using the GenABEL package in the R program. Sixteen SNPs were found to have moderate genome-wide significance (p<5E-05) and 76 SNPs had suggestive (p<5E-04) association with feeding behavior traits. MSI2 gene on chromosome (SSC) 14 was very strongly associated with NVD. Thirty-six SNPs were located in genome regions where QTLs have previously been reported for behavior and/or feed intake traits in pigs. The regions: 64-65 Mb on SSC 1, 124-130 Mb on SSC 8, 63-68 Mb on SSC 11, 32-39 Mb and 59-60 Mb on SSC 12 harbored several signifcant SNPs. Synapse genes (GABRR2, PPP1R9B, SYT1, GABRR1, CADPS2, DLGAP2 and GOPC), dephosphorylation genes (PPM1E, DAPP1, PTPN18, PTPRZ1, PTPN4, MTMR4 and RNGTT) and positive regulation of peptide secretion genes (GHRH, NNAT and TCF7L2) were highly significantly associated with feeding behavior traits. This is the first GWAS to identify genetic variants and biological mechanisms for eating behavior in pigs and these results are important for genetic improvement of pig feed efficiency. We have also conducted pig-human comparative gene mapping to reveal key genomic regions and/or genes on the human genome that may influence eating behavior in human beings and consequently affect the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. This is the first translational genomics study of its kind to report potential candidate genes for eating behavior in humans. PMID:23977060

  4. A genome-wide analysis of open chromatin in human epididymis epithelial cells reveals candidate regulatory elements for genes coordinating epididymal function.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Jared M; Gillen, Austin E; Song, Lingyun; Gosalia, Nehal; London, Darin; Furey, Terrence S; Crawford, Gregory E; Harris, Ann

    2013-10-01

    The epithelium lining the epididymis has a pivotal role in ensuring a luminal environment that can support normal sperm maturation. Many of the individual genes that encode proteins involved in establishing the epididymal luminal fluid are well characterized. They include ion channels, ion exchangers, transporters, and solute carriers. However, the molecular mechanisms that coordinate expression of these genes and modulate their activities in response to biological stimuli are less well understood. To identify cis-regulatory elements for genes expressed in human epididymis epithelial cells, we generated genome-wide maps of open chromatin by DNase-seq. This analysis identified 33,542 epididymis-selective DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHS), which were not evident in five cell types of different lineages. Identification of genes with epididymis-selective DHS at their promoters revealed gene pathways that are active in immature epididymis epithelial cells. These include processes correlating with epithelial function and also others with specific roles in the epididymis, including retinol metabolism and ascorbate and aldarate metabolism. Peaks of epididymis-selective chromatin were seen in the androgen receptor gene and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which has a critical role in regulating ion transport across the epididymis epithelium. In silico prediction of transcription factor binding sites that were overrepresented in epididymis-selective DHS identified epithelial transcription factors, including ELF5 and ELF3, the androgen receptor, Pax2, and Sox9, as components of epididymis transcriptional networks. Active genes, which are targets of each transcription factor, reveal important biological processes in the epididymis epithelium. PMID:24006278

  5. Genome-wide association reveals genetic effects on human Aβ42 and τ protein levels in cerebrospinal fluids: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is common and highly heritable with many genes and gene variants associated with AD in one or more studies, including APOE ε2/ε3/ε4. However, the genetic backgrounds for normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD in terms of changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of Aβ1-42, T-tau, and P-tau181P, have not been clearly delineated. We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in order to better define the genetic backgrounds to these three states in relation to CSF levels. Methods Subjects were participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The GWAS dataset consisted of 818 participants (mainly Caucasian) genotyped using the Illumina Human Genome 610 Quad BeadChips. This sample included 410 subjects (119 Normal, 115 MCI and 176 AD) with measurements of CSF Aβ1-42, T-tau, and P-tau181P Levels. We used PLINK to find genetic associations with the three CSF biomarker levels. Association of each of the 498,205 SNPs was tested using additive, dominant, and general association models while considering APOE genotype and age. Finally, an effort was made to better identify relevant biochemical pathways for associated genes using the ALIGATOR software. Results We found that there were some associations with APOE genotype although CSF levels were about the same for each subject group; CSF Aβ1-42 levels decreased with APOE gene dose for each subject group. T-tau levels tended to be higher among AD cases than among normal subjects. From adjusted result using APOE genotype and age as covariates, no SNP was associated with CSF levels among AD subjects. CYP19A1 'aromatase' (rs2899472), NCAM2, and multiple SNPs located on chromosome 10 near the ARL5B gene demonstrated the strongest associations with Aβ1-42 in normal subjects. Two genes found to be near the top SNPs, CYP19A1 (rs2899472, p = 1.90 × 10-7) and NCAM2 (rs1022442, p = 2.75 × 10-7) have been reported as genetic factors related to

  6. Genome-wide association studies in neurology

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Shan; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful tool for understanding the genetic underpinnings of human disease. In this article, we briefly review the role and findings of GWAS in common neurological diseases, including Stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, migraine, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, restless legs syndrome, intracranial aneurysm, human prion diseases and moyamoya disease. We then discuss the present and future implications of these findings with regards to disease prediction, uncovering basic biology, and the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:25568877

  7. Genome wide expression profiling of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with BAY 50-4798, a novel T cell selective interleukin-2 analog.

    PubMed

    Steppan, Sonja; Kupfer, Kenneth; Mayer, Anja; Evans, Mark; Yamasaki, Glenn; Greve, Jeffrey M; Eckart, Michael R; Cassell, Delanie J

    2007-01-01

    BAY 50-4798, a novel, engineered form of interleukin (IL)-2, is a selective agonist for the high-affinity IL-2 receptor and induces the proliferation of activated human T cells with potency similar to recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2), but has reduced proliferative activity on natural killer cells and is associated with a diminished secondary cytokine cascade. In the current study, the transcriptional profiles of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated in vitro with BAY 50-4798 and rIL-2 were compared using Affymetrix microarray technology in combination with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to determine whether there are quantitative or qualitative differences in the molecular networks activated by these IL-2 analogs. A total of 299 genes were differentially expressed in response to the two IL-2 analogs, with an increase in the number of differences over time. Consistent with the fact that BAY 50-4798 interacts with fewer forms of the IL-2 receptor than rIL-2 to activate fewer cell types, 169 genes were expressed at lower levels in PBMCs cultured with BAY 50-4798 compared with IL-2. These genes were mainly categorized as cytokines and chemokines, and were used to build multiple molecular interaction networks, the most significant of which centered around a subunit of NF-kappaB, which is known to play a pivotal role in inflammation, and was associated with cell death. Of the genes induced in response to BAY 50-4798, only 25% were expressed at lower levels than those induced by rIL-2. Moreover, despite its more selective receptor targeting compared with rIL-2, BAY 50-4798 caused higher levels of expression of 130 genes, which predominantly fell into categories associated with metabolism and transcription. We interpret these results as consistent with the expected transcriptional profile of a mutein engineered and demonstrated to have diminished inflammatory effects yet fully retain selected features of IL-2 activity. In addition to demonstrating that the

  8. Multicentric Genome-Wide Association Study for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Inês; Abrantes, Patrícia; Francisco, Vânia; Teixeira, Gilberto; Monteiro, Marta; Neves, João; Norte, Ana; Robalo Cordeiro, Carlos; Moura E Sá, João; Reis, Ernestina; Santos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela; Sousa, Susana; Fradinho, Marta; Malheiro, Filipa; Negrão, Luís; Feijó, Salvato; Oliveira, Sofia A

    2016-01-01

    Despite elevated incidence and recurrence rates for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP), little is known about its etiology, and the genetics of idiopathic PSP remains unexplored. To identify genetic variants contributing to sporadic PSP risk, we conducted the first PSP genome-wide association study. Two replicate pools of 92 Portuguese PSP cases and of 129 age- and sex-matched controls were allelotyped in triplicate on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 arrays. Markers passing quality control were ranked by relative allele score difference between cases and controls (|RASdiff|), by a novel cluster method and by a combined Z-test. 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using these three approaches for technical validation by individual genotyping in the discovery dataset. 87 out of 94 successfully tested SNPs were nominally associated in the discovery dataset. Replication of the 87 technically validated SNPs was then carried out in an independent replication dataset of 100 Portuguese cases and 425 controls. The intergenic rs4733649 SNP in chromosome 8 (between LINC00824 and LINC00977) was associated with PSP in the discovery (P = 4.07E-03, ORC[95% CI] = 1.88[1.22-2.89]), replication (P = 1.50E-02, ORC[95% CI] = 1.50[1.08-2.09]) and combined datasets (P = 8.61E-05, ORC[95% CI] = 1.65[1.29-2.13]). This study identified for the first time one genetic risk factor for sporadic PSP, but future studies are warranted to further confirm this finding in other populations and uncover its functional role in PSP pathogenesis. PMID:27203581

  9. Multicentric Genome-Wide Association Study for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Abrantes, Patrícia; Francisco, Vânia; Teixeira, Gilberto; Monteiro, Marta; Neves, João; Norte, Ana; Robalo Cordeiro, Carlos; Moura e Sá, João; Reis, Ernestina; Santos, Patrícia; Oliveira, Manuela; Sousa, Susana; Fradinho, Marta; Malheiro, Filipa; Negrão, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Despite elevated incidence and recurrence rates for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP), little is known about its etiology, and the genetics of idiopathic PSP remains unexplored. To identify genetic variants contributing to sporadic PSP risk, we conducted the first PSP genome-wide association study. Two replicate pools of 92 Portuguese PSP cases and of 129 age- and sex-matched controls were allelotyped in triplicate on the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 arrays. Markers passing quality control were ranked by relative allele score difference between cases and controls (|RASdiff|), by a novel cluster method and by a combined Z-test. 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected using these three approaches for technical validation by individual genotyping in the discovery dataset. 87 out of 94 successfully tested SNPs were nominally associated in the discovery dataset. Replication of the 87 technically validated SNPs was then carried out in an independent replication dataset of 100 Portuguese cases and 425 controls. The intergenic rs4733649 SNP in chromosome 8 (between LINC00824 and LINC00977) was associated with PSP in the discovery (P = 4.07E-03, ORC[95% CI] = 1.88[1.22–2.89]), replication (P = 1.50E-02, ORC[95% CI] = 1.50[1.08–2.09]) and combined datasets (P = 8.61E-05, ORC[95% CI] = 1.65[1.29–2.13]). This study identified for the first time one genetic risk factor for sporadic PSP, but future studies are warranted to further confirm this finding in other populations and uncover its functional role in PSP pathogenesis. PMID:27203581

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study with Targeted and Non-targeted NMR Metabolomics Identifies 15 Novel Loci of Urinary Human Metabolic Individuality

    PubMed Central

    Raffler, Johannes; Friedrich, Nele; Arnold, Matthias; Kacprowski, Tim; Rueedi, Rico; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Bergmann, Sven; Budde, Kathrin; Gieger, Christian; Homuth, Georg; Pietzner, Maik; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Nauck, Matthias; Völker, Uwe; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Suhre, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies with metabolic traits (mGWAS) uncovered many genetic variants that influence human metabolism. These genetically influenced metabotypes (GIMs) contribute to our metabolic individuality, our capacity to respond to environmental challenges, and our susceptibility to specific diseases. While metabolic homeostasis in blood is a well investigated topic in large mGWAS with over 150 known loci, metabolic detoxification through urinary excretion has only been addressed by few small mGWAS with only 11 associated loci so far. Here we report the largest mGWAS to date, combining targeted and non-targeted 1H NMR analysis of urine samples from 3,861 participants of the SHIP-0 cohort and 1,691 subjects of the KORA F4 cohort. We identified and replicated 22 loci with significant associations with urinary traits, 15 of which are new (HIBCH, CPS1, AGXT, XYLB, TKT, ETNPPL, SLC6A19, DMGDH, SLC36A2, GLDC, SLC6A13, ACSM3, SLC5A11, PNMT, SLC13A3). Two-thirds of the urinary loci also have a metabolite association in blood. For all but one of the 6 loci where significant associations target the same metabolite in blood and urine, the genetic effects have the same direction in both fluids. In contrast, for the SLC5A11 locus, we found increased levels of myo-inositol in urine whereas mGWAS in blood reported decreased levels for the same genetic variant. This might indicate less effective re-absorption of myo-inositol in the kidneys of carriers. In summary, our study more than doubles the number of known loci that influence urinary phenotypes. It thus allows novel insights into the relationship between blood homeostasis and its regulation through excretion. The newly discovered loci also include variants previously linked to chronic kidney disease (CPS1, SLC6A13), pulmonary hypertension (CPS1), and ischemic stroke (XYLB). By establishing connections from gene to disease via metabolic traits our results provide novel hypotheses about molecular mechanisms

  11. Genome-Wide Association Studies: A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Corvin, Aiden; Craddock, Nick; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    There have been nearly 400genome-wide association studies published since 2005. The GWAS approach has been exceptionally successful in identifying common genetic variants that predispose to a variety of complex human diseases and biochemical and anthropometric traits. Although this approach is relatively new, there are many excellent reviews of different aspects of the GWAS method. Here, we provide a primer, an annotated overview of the GWAS method with particular reference to psychiatric genetics. We dissect the GWAS methodology into its components and provide a brief description with citations and links to reviews that cover the topic in detail. PMID:19895722

  12. Gene Expression Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of 16,000 Barley Genes Reveals a Complex Pattern of Genome-wide Transcriptional Regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcript abundance data from cRNA hybridizations to Affymetrix microarrays can be used for simultaneous marker development and genome-wide eQTL (expression Quantitative Trait Loci) analysis of crops. We have shown that it is easily possible to use the information from Affymetrix expression arrays ...

  13. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of low-dose, long-term exposure of human osteosarcoma cells to bisphenol A and its analogs bisphenols AF and S.

    PubMed

    Fic, A; Mlakar, S Jurković; Juvan, P; Mlakar, V; Marc, J; Dolenc, M Sollner; Broberg, K; Mašič, L Peterlin

    2015-08-01

    The bisphenols AF (BPAF) and S (BPS) are structural analogs of the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA), and are used in common products as a replacement for BPA. To elucidate genome-wide gene expression responses, estrogen-dependent osteosarcoma cells were cultured with 10 nM BPA, BPAF, or BPS, for 8 h and 3 months. Genome-wide gene expression was analyzed using the Illumina Expression BeadChip. Three months exposure had significant effects on gene expression, particularly for BPS, followed by BPAF and BPA, according to the number of differentially expressed genes (1980, 778, 60, respectively), the magnitude of changes in gene expression, and the number of enriched biological processes (800, 415, 33, respectively) and pathways (77, 52, 6, respectively). 'Embryonic skeletal system development' was the most enriched bone-related process, which was affected only by BPAF and BPS. Interestingly, all three bisphenols showed highest down-regulation of genes related to the cardiovascular system (e.g., NPPB, NPR3, TXNIP). BPA only and BPA/BPAF/BPS also affected genes related to the immune system and fetal development, respectively. For BPAF and BPS, the 'isoprenoid biosynthetic process' was enriched (up-regulated genes: HMGCS1, PDSS1, ACAT2, RCE1, DHDDS). Compared to BPA, BPAF and BPS had more effects on gene expression after long-term exposure. These findings stress the need for careful toxicological characterization of BPA analogs in the future. PMID:25912373

  14. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Zsofia K.; Thom, Peter; Robson, Mark E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Kauff, Noah D.; Hurley, Karen E.; Devlin, Vincent; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the inherited risk for cancer is an important component of preventive oncology. In addition to well-established syndromes of cancer predisposition, much remains to be discovered about the genetic variation underlying susceptibility to common malignancies. Increased knowledge about the human genome and advances in genotyping technology have made possible genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of human diseases. These studies have identified many important regions of genetic variation associated with an increased risk for human traits and diseases including cancer. Understanding the principles, major findings, and limitations of GWAS is becoming increasingly important for oncologists as dissemination of genomic risk tests directly to consumers is already occurring through commercial companies. GWAS have contributed to our understanding of the genetic basis of cancer and will shed light on biologic pathways and possible new strategies for targeted prevention. To date, however, the clinical utility of GWAS-derived risk markers remains limited. PMID:20585100

  15. GWIDD: Genome-wide protein docking database

    PubMed Central

    Kundrotas, Petras J.; Zhu, Zhengwei; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2010-01-01

    Structural information on interacting proteins is important for understanding life processes at the molecular level. Genome-wide docking database is an integrated resource for structural studies of protein–protein interactions on the genome scale, which combines the available experimental data with models obtained by docking techniques. Current database version (August 2009) contains 25 559 experimental and modeled 3D structures for 771 organisms spanned over the entire universe of life from viruses to humans. Data are organized in a relational database with user-friendly search interface allowing exploration of the database content by a number of parameters. Search results can be interactively previewed and downloaded as PDB-formatted files, along with the information relevant to the specified interactions. The resource is freely available at http://gwidd.bioinformatics.ku.edu. PMID:19900970

  16. Genome-wide Membrane Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Stefano; Suku, Eda; Garonzi, Marianna; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins allow cells to extensively communicate with the external world in a very accurate and specific way. They form principal nodes in several signaling pathways and attract large interest in therapeutic intervention, as the majority pharmaceutical compounds target membrane proteins. Thus, according to the current genome annotation methods, a detailed structural/functional characterization at the protein level of each of the elements codified in the genome is also required. The extreme difficulty in obtaining high-resolution three-dimensional structures, calls for computational approaches. Here we review to which extent the efforts made in the last few years, combining the structural characterization of membrane proteins with protein bioinformatics techniques, could help describing membrane proteins at a genome-wide scale. In particular we analyze the use of comparative modeling techniques as a way of overcoming the lack of high-resolution three-dimensional structures in the human membrane proteome. PMID:24403851

  17. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10−8) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  18. The allele frequency spectrum in genome-wide human variation data reveals signals of differential demographic history in three large world populations.

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Gabor T; Czabarka, Eva; Murvai, Janos; Sherry, Stephen T

    2004-01-01

    We have studied a genome-wide set of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele frequency measures for African-American, East Asian, and European-American samples. For this analysis we derived a simple, closed mathematical formulation for the spectrum of expected allele frequencies when the sampled populations have experienced nonstationary demographic histories. The direct calculation generates the spectrum orders of magnitude faster than coalescent simulations do and allows us to generate spectra for a large number of alternative histories on a multidimensional parameter grid. Model-fitting experiments using this grid reveal significant population-specific differences among the demographic histories that best describe the observed allele frequency spectra. European and Asian spectra show a bottleneck-shaped history: a reduction of effective population size in the past followed by a recent phase of size recovery. In contrast, the African-American spectrum shows a history of moderate but uninterrupted population expansion. These differences are expected to have profound consequences for the design of medical association studies. The analytical methods developed for this study, i.e., a closed mathematical formulation for the allele frequency spectrum, correcting the ascertainment bias introduced by shallow SNP sampling, and dealing with variable sample sizes provide a general framework for the analysis of public variation data. PMID:15020430

  19. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10(-8)) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  20. Performance of the Affymetrix GeneChip HIV PRT 440 Platform for Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Genotyping of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Clades and Viral Isolates with Length Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Vahey, Maryanne; Nau, Martin E.; Barrick, Sandra; Cooley, John D.; Sawyer, Robert; Sleeker, Alex A.; Vickerman, Peter; Bloor, Stuart; Larder, Brendan; Michael, Nelson L.; Wegner, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of a silica chip-based resequencing method, the Affymetrix HIV PRT 440 assay (hereafter referred to as the Affymetrix assay), was evaluated on a panel of well-characterized nonclade B viral isolates and on isolates exhibiting length polymorphisms. Sequencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol cDNAs from clades A, C, D, E, and F resulted in clade-specific regions of base-calling ambiguities in regions not known to be associated with resistance polymorphisms, as well as a small number of spurious resistance polymorphisms. The Affymetrix assay failed to detect the presence of additional serine codons distal to reverse transcriptase (RT) codon 68 that are associated with multinucleoside RT inhibitor resistance. The increasing prevalence of non-clade B HIV-1 strains in the United States and Europe and the identification of clinically relevant pol gene length polymorphisms will impact the generalizability of the Affymetrix assay, emphasizing the need to accommodate this expanding pool of pol genotypes in future assay versions. PMID:10405396

  1. A genome-wide study of preferential amplification/hybridization in microarray-based pooled DNA experiments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H.-C.; Liang, Y.-J.; Huang, M.-C.; Li, L.-H.; Lin, C.-H.; Wu, J.-Y.; Chen, Y.-T.; Fann, C.S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Microarray-based pooled DNA methods overcome the cost bottleneck of simultaneously genotyping more than 100 000 markers for numerous study individuals. The success of such methods relies on the proper adjustment of preferential amplification/hybridization to ensure accurate and reliable allele frequency estimation. We performed a hybridization-based genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping analysis to dissect preferential amplification/hybridization. The majority of SNPs had less than 2-fold signal amplification or suppression, and the lognormal distributions adequately modeled preferential amplification/hybridization across the human genome. Comparative analyses suggested that the distributions of preferential amplification/hybridization differed among genotypes and the GC content. Patterns among different ethnic populations were similar; nevertheless, there were striking differences for a small proportion of SNPs, and a slight ethnic heterogeneity was observed. To fulfill appropriate and gratuitous adjustments, databases of preferential amplification/hybridization for African Americans, Caucasians and Asians were constructed based on the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set. The robustness of allele frequency estimation using this database was validated by a pooled DNA experiment. This study provides a genome-wide investigation of preferential amplification/hybridization and suggests guidance for the reliable use of the database. Our results constitute an objective foundation for theoretical development of preferential amplification/hybridization and provide important information for future pooled DNA analyses. PMID:16931491

  2. An unbiased genome-wide Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene expression approach to discover antigens targeted by human T cells expressed during pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Commandeur, Susanna; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Prins, Corine; Pichugin, Alexander V; Dijkman, Karin; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Friggen, Annemieke H; Franken, Kees L M C; Dolganov, Gregory; Kramnik, Igor; Schoolnik, Gary K; Oftung, Fredrik; Korsvold, Gro Ellen; Geluk, Annemieke; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2013-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is responsible for almost 2 million deaths annually. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin, the only vaccine available against tuberculosis (TB), induces highly variable protection against TB, and better TB vaccines are urgently needed. A prerequisite for candidate vaccine Ags is that they are immunogenic and expressed by M. tuberculosis during infection of the primary target organ, that is, the lungs of susceptible individuals. In search of new TB vaccine candidate Ags, we have used a genome-wide, unbiased Ag discovery approach to investigate the in vivo expression of 2170 M. tuberculosis genes during M. tuberculosis infection in the lungs of mice. Four genetically related but distinct mouse strains were studied, representing a spectrum of TB susceptibility controlled by the supersusceptibility to TB 1 locus. We used stringent selection approaches to select in vivo-expressed M. tuberculosis (IVE-TB) genes and analyzed their expression patterns in distinct disease phenotypes such as necrosis and granuloma formation. To study the vaccine potential of these proteins, we analyzed their immunogenicity. Several M. tuberculosis proteins were recognized by immune cells from tuberculin skin test-positive, ESAT6/CFP10-responsive individuals, indicating that these Ags are presented during natural M. tuberculosis infection. Furthermore, TB patients also showed responses toward IVE-TB Ags, albeit lower than tuberculin skin test-positive, ESAT6/CFP10-responsive individuals. Finally, IVE-TB Ags induced strong IFN-γ(+)/TNF-α(+) CD8(+) and TNF-α(+)/IL-2(+) CD154(+)/CD4(+) T cell responses in PBMC from long-term latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. In conclusion, these IVE-TB Ags are expressed during pulmonary infection in vivo, are immunogenic, induce strong T cell responses in long-term latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals, and may therefore represent attractive Ags for new TB vaccines. PMID:23319735

  3. Investigating the Impact of a Genome-Wide Supported Bipolar Risk Variant of MAD1L1 on the Human Reward System.

    PubMed

    Trost, Sarah; Diekhof, Esther K; Mohr, Holger; Vieker, Henning; Krämer, Bernd; Wolf, Claudia; Keil, Maria; Dechent, Peter; Binder, Elisabeth B; Gruber, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified MAD1L1 (mitotic arrest deficient-like 1) as a susceptibility gene for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The minor allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11764590 in MAD1L1 was associated with bipolar disorder. Both diseases, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, are linked to functional alterations in the reward system. We aimed at investigating possible effects of the MAD1L1 rs11764590 risk allele on reward systems functioning in healthy adults. A large homogenous sample of 224 young (aged 18-31 years) participants was genotyped and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). All participants performed the 'Desire-Reason Dilemma' paradigm investigating the neural correlates that underlie reward processing and active reward dismissal in favor of a long-term goal. We found significant hypoactivations of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), the bilateral striatum and bilateral frontal and parietal cortices in response to conditioned reward stimuli in the risk allele carriers compared with major allele carriers. In the dilemma situation, functional connectivity between prefrontal brain regions and the ventral striatum was significantly diminished in the risk allele carriers. Healthy risk allele carriers showed a significant deficit of their bottom-up response to conditioned reward stimuli in the bilateral VTA and striatum. Furthermore, functional connectivity between the ventral striatum and prefrontal areas exerting top-down control on the mesolimbic reward system was reduced in this group. Similar alterations in reward processing and disturbances of prefrontal control mechanisms on mesolimbic brain circuits have also been reported in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Together, these findings suggest the existence of an intermediate phenotype associated with MAD1L1. PMID:27184339

  4. Genome-wide profiles of H2AX and γ-H2AX differentiate endogenous and exogenous DNA damage hotspots in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jungmin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Lee, Heun-Sik; Kim, Jung Kyu; Shon, Hye Jin; Salleh, Nur Lina Mohd; Desai, Kartiki Vasant; Lee, Jae Ho; Kang, Eun-Suk; Kim, Jin Sung; Choi, Jung Kyoon

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX forms γ-H2AX that marks DNA double-strand break (DSB). Here, we generated the sequencing-based maps of H2AX and γ-H2AX positioning in resting and proliferating cells before and after ionizing irradiation. Genome-wide locations of possible endogenous and exogenous DSBs were identified based on γ-H2AX distribution in dividing cancer cells without irradiation and that in resting cells upon irradiation, respectively. γ-H2AX-enriched regions of endogenous origin in replicating cells included sub-telomeres and active transcription start sites, apparently reflecting replication- and transcription-mediated stress during rapid cell division. Surprisingly, H2AX itself, prior to phosphorylation, was specifically located at these endogenous hotspots. This phenomenon was only observed in dividing cancer cells but not in resting cells. Endogenous H2AX was concentrated on the transcription start site of actively transcribed genes but was irrelevant to pausing of RNA polymerase II (pol II), which precisely coincided with γ-H2AX of endogenous origin. γ-H2AX enrichment upon irradiation also coincided with actively transcribed regions, but unlike endogenous γ-H2AX, it extended into the gene body and was not specifically concentrated on the pausing site of pol II. Sub-telomeres were less responsive to external DNA damage than to endogenous stress. Our findings provide insight into DNA repair programs of cancer and may have implications for cancer therapy. PMID:22467212

  5. A super powerful method for genome wide association study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-Wide Association Studies shed light on the identification of genes underlying human diseases and agriculturally important traits. This potential has been shadowed by false positive findings. The Mixed Linear Model (MLM) method is flexible enough to simultaneously incorporate population struct...

  6. Family based genome-wide copy number scan identifies complex rearrangements at 17q21.31 in dyslexics.

    PubMed

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Saldanha, Marita; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-10-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a complex heritable disorder with unexpected difficulty in learning to read and spell despite adequate intelligence, education, environment, and normal senses. We performed genome-wide screening for copy number variations (CNVs) in 10 large Indian dyslexic families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results revealed the complex genomic rearrangements due to one non-contiguous deletion and five contiguous micro duplications and micro deletions at 17q21.31 region in three dyslexic families. CNVs in this region harbor the genes KIAA1267, LRRC37A, ARL17A/B, NSFP1, and NSF. The CNVs in case 1 and case 2 at this locus were found to be in homozygous state and case 3 was a de novo CNV. These CNVs were found with at least one CNV having a common break and end points in the parents. This cluster of genes containing NSF is implicated in learning, cognition, and memory, though not formally associated with dyslexia. Molecular network analysis of these and other dyslexia related module genes suggests NSF and other genes to be associated with cellular/vesicular membrane fusion and synaptic transmission. Thus, we suggest that NSF in this cluster would be the nearest gene responsible for the learning disability phenotype. PMID:25139666

  7. High-resolution genome-wide linkage mapping identifies susceptibility loci for BMI in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong Feng; Pang, Zengchang; Li, Shuxia; Thomassen, Mads; Wang, Shaojie; Jiang, Wengjie; Hjelmborg, Jacob v B; Kruse, Torben A; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Christensen, Kaare; Tan, Qihua

    2012-04-01

    The genetic loci affecting the commonly used BMI have been intensively investigated using linkage approaches in multiple populations. This study aims at performing the first genome-wide linkage scan on BMI in the Chinese population in mainland China with hypothesis that heterogeneity in genetic linkage could exist in different ethnic populations. BMI was measured from 126 dizygotic twins in Qingdao municipality who were genotyped using high-resolution Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP arrays containing about 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Nonparametric linkage analysis was performed with Merlin software package for linkage analysis using variance components approach for quantitative trait loci mapping. We identified a strong linkage peak at the end of chromosome 7 (7q36 at 186 cM) with a lod score of 4.06 which overlaps with that reported by a large multicenter study in western countries. Multiple loci showing suggestive linkage were found on chromosome 1 (lod score 2.38 at 242 cM), chromosome 8 (2.48 at 95 cM), and chromosome 14 (2.2 at 89.4 cM). The strong linkage identified in the Chinese subjects that is consistent with that found in populations of European origin could suggest the existence of evolutionarily preserved genetic mechanisms for BMI whereas the multiple suggestive loci could represent genetic effect from gene-environment interaction as a result of population-specific environmental adaptation. PMID:21273998

  8. A Genome-Wide Association Study Uncovers a Genetic Locus Associated with Thoracic-to-Hip Ratio in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seongwon; Park, Ah Yeon; Kang, Changsoo

    2015-01-01

    The thoracic-to-hip circumference ratio (THR) is an anthropometric marker recently described as a predictor of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) followed by confirmatory analyses to identify genetic markers associated with THR. A total of 7,240 Korean subjects (4,988 for the discovery stage and 2,252 for the confirmatory analyses) were recruited for this study, and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of the initial 4,988 individuals was performed using Affymetrix Human SNP array 5.0. Linear regression analysis was then performed to adjust for the effects of age, sex, and current diabetes medication status on the THR of the study subjects. In the initial discovery stage, there was a statistically nominal association between minor alleles of SNP markers on chromosomes 4, 8, 10, and 12, and THR changes (p < 5.0 × 10−6). The subsequent confirmatory analyses of these markers, however, only detected a significant association between two SNPs in the HECTD4 gene and decreased THRs. Notably, this association was detected in male (rs11066280: p = 1.14 × 10−2; rs2074356: p = 1.10 × 10−2), but not in female subjects. Meanwhile, the combined results from the two analyses (initial and confirmatory) indicated that minor alleles of these two intronic variants exhibited a significant genome-wide association with decreased THR in the male subjects (n = 3,155; rs11066280: effect size = −0.008624, p = 6.19 × 10−9; rs2074356: effect size = −0.008762, p = 1.89 × 10−8). Furthermore, minor alleles of these two SNPs exhibited protective effects on patients’ risks for developing type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, we have identified two genetic variations in HECTD4 that are associated with THR, particularly in men. PMID:26675016

  9. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Rocke, David M.

    2013-09-09

    During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the response of human skin exposed in-vivo to radation, human skin exposed ex-vivo to radiation, and a human-skin model exposed to radiation. We have learned a great deal about the biological response of human skin to low-dose ionizing radiation.

  10. A Fast Implementation of a Scan Statistic for Identifying Chromosomal Patterns of Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan V.; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Turner, Stephen T.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kardia, Sharon L.R.

    2009-01-01

    In order to take into account the complex genomic distribution of SNP variations when identifying chromosomal regions with significant SNP effects, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association scan statistic was developed. To address the computational needs of genome wide association (GWA) studies, a fast Java application, which combines single-locus SNP tests and a scan statistic for identifying chromosomal regions with significant clusters of significant SNP effects, was developed and implemented. To illustrate this application, SNP associations were analyzed in a pharmacogenomic study of the blood pressure lowering effect of thiazide-diuretics (N=195) using the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K Set. 55,335 tagSNPs (pair-wise linkage disequilibrium R2<0.5) were selected to reduce the frequency correlation between SNPs. A typical workstation can complete the whole genome scan including 10,000 permutation tests within 3 hours. The most significant regions locate on chromosome 3, 6, 13 and 16, two of which contain candidate genes that may be involved in the underlying drug response mechanism. The computational performance of ChromoScan-GWA and its scalability were tested with up to 1,000,000 SNPs and up to 4,000 subjects. Using 10,000 permutations, the computation time grew linearly in these datasets. This scan statistic application provides a robust statistical and computational foundation for identifying genomic regions associated with disease and provides a method to compare GWA results even across different platforms. PMID:20161066

  11. Design and bioinformatics analysis of genome-wide CLIP experiments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Xiao, Guanghua; Chu, Yongjun; Zhang, Michael Q.; Corey, David R.; Xie, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The past decades have witnessed a surge of discoveries revealing RNA regulation as a central player in cellular processes. RNAs are regulated by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) at all post-transcriptional stages, including splicing, transportation, stabilization and translation. Defects in the functions of these RBPs underlie a broad spectrum of human pathologies. Systematic identification of RBP functional targets is among the key biomedical research questions and provides a new direction for drug discovery. The advent of cross-linking immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (genome-wide CLIP) technology has recently enabled the investigation of genome-wide RBP–RNA binding at single base-pair resolution. This technology has evolved through the development of three distinct versions: HITS-CLIP, PAR-CLIP and iCLIP. Meanwhile, numerous bioinformatics pipelines for handling the genome-wide CLIP data have also been developed. In this review, we discuss the genome-wide CLIP technology and focus on bioinformatics analysis. Specifically, we compare the strengths and weaknesses, as well as the scopes, of various bioinformatics tools. To assist readers in choosing optimal procedures for their analysis, we also review experimental design and procedures that affect bioinformatics analyses. PMID:25958398

  12. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61–0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  13. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Manman; Qu, Liang; Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61-0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  14. DNMT1 and AIM1 Imprinting in human placenta revealed through a genome-wide screen for allele-specific DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic imprinting is an epigenetically regulated process wherein genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Many imprinted genes were initially identified in mice; some of these were subsequently shown not to be imprinted in humans. Such discrepancy reflects developmental, morphological and physiological differences between mouse and human tissues. This is particularly relevant for the placenta. Study of genomic imprinting thus needs to be carried out in a species and developmental stage-specific manner. We describe here a new strategy to study allele-specific DNA methylation in the human placenta for the discovery of novel imprinted genes. Results Using this methodology, we confirmed 16 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with known imprinted genes. We chose 28 genomic regions for further testing and identified two imprinted genes (DNMT1 and AIM1). Both genes showed maternal allele-specific methylation and paternal allele-specific transcription. Imprinted expression for AIM1 was conserved in the cynomolgus macaque placenta, but not in other macaque tissues or in the mouse. Conclusions Our study indicates that while there are many genomic regions with allele-specific methylation in tissues like the placenta, only a small sub-set of them are associated with allele-specific transcription, suggesting alternative functions for such genomic regions. Nonetheless, novel tissue-specific imprinted genes remain to be discovered in humans. Their identification may help us better understand embryonic and fetal development. PMID:24094292

  15. Zinc-finger transcription factors are associated with guanine quadruplex motifs in human, chimpanzee, mouse and rat promoters genome-wide

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pankaj; Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Baral, Aradhita; Kumar, Parveen; Saha, Dhurjhoti; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2011-01-01

    Function of non-B DNA structures are poorly understood though several bioinformatics studies predict role of the G-quadruplex DNA structure in transcription. Earlier, using transcriptome profiling we found evidence of widespread G-quadruplex-mediated gene regulation. Herein, we asked whether potential G-quadruplex (PG4) motifs associate with transcription factors (TF). This was analyzed using 220 position weight matrices [designated as transcription factor binding sites (TFBS)], representing 187 unique TF, in >75 000 genes in human, chimpanzee, mouse and rat. Results show binding sites of nine TFs, including that of AP-2, SP1, MAZ and VDR, occurred significantly within 100 bases of the PG4 motif (P < 1.24E-10). PG4–TFBS combinations were conserved in ‘orthologously’ related promoters across all four organisms and were associated with >850 genes in each genome. Remarkably, seven of the nine TFs were zinc-finger binding proteins indicating a novel characteristic of PG4 motifs. To test these findings, transcriptome profiles from human cell lines treated with G-quadruplex-specific molecules were used; 66 genes were significantly differentially expressed across both cell-types, which also harbored conserved PG4 motifs along with one/more of the nine TFBS. In addition, genes regulated by PG4–TFBS combinations were found to be co-regulated in human tissues, further emphasizing the regulatory significance of the associations. PMID:21729868

  16. Bisphenol A-associated alterations in genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression patterns reveal sequence-dependent and non-monotonic effects in human fetal liver

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, Christopher; Kim, Jung H.; Jones, Tamara R.; McEachin, Richard C.; Nahar, Muna S.; Dolinoy, Dana C.; Sartor, Maureen A.

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a high production volume chemical widely used in consumer products, is an endocrine active compound associated with complex epigenetic responses in animal models and humans. Developmental BPA exposure in mice previously revealed widespread changes in the mouse liver methylome. Here, we undertake the first epigenome-wide analysis of the effect of BPA concentration on human fetal liver DNA methylation. Enzymatic enrichment of genomic DNA for high CG density and methylation followed by next-generation sequencing yielded data for positional methylation across the genome. Comparing three groups of BPA-exposed subjects (n=18; 6 per group), high (35.44–96.76 ng/g), low (3.50 to 5.79 ng/g), and non-detect (<0.83 ng/g), revealed regions of altered methylation. Similar numbers of regions of altered methylations were detected in pairwise comparisons; however, their genomic locations were distinct between the non-detect and low or high BPA groups. In general, BPA levels were positively associated with methylation in CpG islands and negatively associated with methylation in CpG shores, shelves, and repetitive regions. DNA methylation at the SNORD imprinted cluster (15q11q13) illustrated both linear and non-monotonic associations with BPA levels. Integrated methylation and RNA-sequencing gene expression analysis revealed differential regulation of transcription at low BPA levels, as well as expression changes in RNA for ligand-binding proteins as BPA levels increase. BPA levels in human fetal liver tissue are associated with complex linear and non-monotonic as well as sequence-dependent alterations in DNA methylation. Future longitudinal studies are needed to link these changes with altered health risks.

  17. Cross-Analysis of Gene and miRNA Genome-Wide Expression Profiles in Human Fibroblasts at Different Stages of Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Ostano, Paola; Bione, Silvia; Belgiovine, Cristina; Chiodi, Ilaria; Ghimenti, Chiara; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Chiorino, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a cellular system constituted of human telomerase immortalized fibroblasts that gradually underwent neoplastic transformation during propagation in culture. We exploited this cellular system to investigate gene and miRNA transcriptional programs in cells at different stages of propagation, representing five different phases along the road to transformation, from non-transformed cells up to tumorigenic and metastatic ones. Here we show that gene and miRNA expression profiles were both able to divide cells according to their transformation phase. We identified more than 1,700 genes whose expression was highly modulated in cells at at least one propagation stage and we found that the number of modulated genes progressively increased at successive stages of transformation. These genes identified processes significantly deregulated in tumorigenic cells, such as cell differentiation, cell movement and extracellular matrix remodeling, cell cycle and apoptosis, together with upregulation of several cancer testis antigens. Alterations in cell cycle, apoptosis, and cancer testis antigen expression were particular hallmarks of metastatic cells. A parallel deregulation of a panel of 43 miRNAs strictly connected to the p53 and c-Myc pathways and with oncogenic/oncosuppressive functions was also found. Our results indicate that cen3tel cells can be a useful model for human fibroblast neoplastic transformation, which appears characterized by complex and peculiar alterations involving both genetic and epigenetic reprogramming, whose elucidation could provide useful insights into regulatory networks underlying cancerogenesis. PMID:22321013

  18. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression during adipogenesis in human adipose-derived stromal cells reveals novel patterns of gene expression during adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ambele, Melvin Anyasi; Dessels, Carla; Durandt, Chrisna; Pepper, Michael Sean

    2016-05-01

    We have undertaken an in-depth transcriptome analysis of adipogenesis in human adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) induced to differentiate into adipocytes in vitro. Gene expression was assessed on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 post-induction and genes differentially expressed numbered 128, 218, 253 and 240 respectively. Up-regulated genes were associated with blood vessel development, leukocyte migration, as well as tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. They also shared common pathways with certain obesity-related pathophysiological conditions. Down-regulated genes were enriched for immune response processes. KLF15, LMO3, FOXO1 and ZBTB16 transcription factors were up-regulated throughout the differentiation process. CEBPA, PPARG, ZNF117, MLXIPL, MMP3 and RORB were up-regulated only on days 14 and 21, which coincide with the maturation of adipocytes and could possibly serve as candidates for controlling fat accumulation and the size of mature adipocytes. In summary, we have identified genes that were up-regulated only on days 1 and 7 or days 14 and 21 that could serve as potential early and late-stage differentiation markers. PMID:27108396

  19. Genome-wide expression analysis of human in vivo irritated epidermis: differential profiles induced by sodium lauryl sulfate and nonanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Anders; Andersen, Klaus E; Clemmensen, Ole; Tan, Qihua; Petersen, Thomas K; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads

    2010-09-01

    The pathogenesis of irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) is poorly understood, and genes participating in the epidermal response to chemical irritants are only partly known. It is commonly accepted that different irritants have different mechanisms of action in the development of ICD. To define the differential molecular events induced in the epidermis by different irritants, we collected sequential biopsies ((1/2), 4, and 24 hours after a single exposure and at day 11 after repeated exposure) from human volunteers exposed to either sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or nonanoic acid (NON). Gene expression analysis using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays (representing 47,000 transcripts) revealed essentially different pathway responses (1/2)hours after exposure: NON transiently induced the IL-6 pathway as well as a number of mitogen-activated signaling cascades including extracellular signal-regulated kinase and growth factor receptor signaling, whereas SLS transiently downregulated cellular energy metabolism pathways. Differential expression of the cyclooxygenase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase 3 transcripts was confirmed immunohistochemically. After cumulative exposure, 883 genes were differentially expressed, whereas we identified 23 suggested common biomarkers for ICD. In conclusion, we bring new insights into two hitherto less well-elucidated phases of skin irritancy: the very initial as well as the late phase after single and cumulative mild exposures, respectively. PMID:20428187

  20. Genome-Wide Relatedness of Treponema pedis, from Gingiva and Necrotic Skin Lesions of Pigs, with the Human Oral Pathogen Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Svartström, Olov; Mushtaq, Memoona; Pringle, Märit; Segerman, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Treponema pedis and T. denticola are two genetically related species with different origins of isolation. Treponema denticola is part of the human oral microbiota and is associated with periodontitis while T. pedis has been isolated from skin lesions in animals, e.g., digital dermatitis in cattle and necrotic ulcers in pigs. Although multiple Treponema phylotypes may exist in ulcerative lesions in pigs, T. pedis appears to be a predominant spirochete in these lesions. Treponema pedis can also be present in pig gingiva. In this study, we determined the complete genome sequence of T. pedis strain T A4, isolated from a porcine necrotic ear lesion, and compared its genome with that of T. denticola. Most genes in T. pedis were homologous to those in T. denticola and the two species were similar in general genomic features such as size, G+C content, and number of genes. In addition, many homologues of specific virulence-related genes in T. denticola were found in T. pedis. Comparing a selected pair of strains will usually not give a complete picture of the relatedness between two species. We therefore complemented the analysis with draft genomes from six T. pedis isolates, originating from gingiva and necrotic ulcers in pigs, and from twelve T. denticola strains. Each strain carried a considerable amount of accessory genetic material, of which a large part was strain specific. There was also extensive sequence variability in putative virulence-related genes between strains belonging to the same species. Signs of lateral gene-transfer events from bacteria known to colonize oral environments were found. This suggests that the oral cavity is an important habitat for T. pedis. In summary, we found extensive genomic similarities between T. pedis and T. denticola but also large variability within each species. PMID:23977007

  1. A Drosophila functional evaluation of candidates from human genome-wide association studies of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic traits identifies tissue-specific roles for dHHEX

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identify regions of the genome that are associated with particular traits, but do not typically identify specific causative genetic elements. For example, while a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and related traits have been identified by human GWAS, only a few genes have functional evidence to support or to rule out a role in cellular metabolism or dietary interactions. Here, we use a recently developed Drosophila model in which high-sucrose feeding induces phenotypes similar to T2D to assess orthologs of human GWAS-identified candidate genes for risk of T2D and related traits. Results Disrupting orthologs of certain T2D candidate genes (HHEX, THADA, PPARG, KCNJ11) led to sucrose-dependent toxicity. Tissue-specific knockdown of the HHEX ortholog dHHEX (CG7056) directed metabolic defects and enhanced lethality; for example, fat-body-specific loss of dHHEX led to increased hemolymph glucose and reduced insulin sensitivity. Conclusion Candidate genes identified in human genetic studies of metabolic traits can be prioritized and functionally characterized using a simple Drosophila approach. To our knowledge, this is the first large-scale effort to study the functional interaction between GWAS-identified candidate genes and an environmental risk factor such as diet in a model organism system. PMID:23445342

  2. Genome-wide semiquantitative microsatellite analysis of human hepatocellular carcinoma: discrete mapping of smallest region of overlap of recurrent chromosomal gains and losses.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takafumi; Nishida, Naoshi; Komeda, Toshiki; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Ikai, Iwao; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2006-05-01

    Recurrent chromosomal gains at 1q, 6p, 8q, and 17q, or losses at 1p, 4q, 6q, 8p, 9p, 13q, 16q, and 17p are common features of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). For precise determination of the shortest region of overlap (SRO), 49 HCC obtained at the time of surgery or autopsy were subjected to comprehensive microsatellite analysis by using 400 markers distributed at almost equal distances throughout the 22 autosomes and X chromosomes. Each allele showing imbalance was subjected to comparative duplex polymerase chain reaction using a retained allele as an internal control to determine whether the imbalance was the result of chromosomal gain or loss. The following SRO of recurrent chromosomal gains and losses were determined: -1p36.22 approximately p36.33, D1S450-D1S2893, 5.0 mega-base pairs (Mbp); +1q23.3 approximately q25.3, D1S2878-D1S2619, 16.9 Mbp; -4q21.2 approximately q24, D4S2964-D4S1572, 23.0 Mbp; -6q23.3 approximately qter, D6S292-qter, 34.7 Mb; -8p22 approximately p23.1, D8S549-D8S550, 4.8 Mbp; +8q12.2 approximately q24.13, D8S260-D8S514, 61.8 Mbp; -13q13.3 approximately q22.1, D13S218-D13S156, 35.6 Mbp; -16q22.1 approximately qter, D16S503-qter, 26.7 Mbp; and -17p12 approximately pter, D17S921-pter, 14.2 Mbp. Contrary to our initial expectations, many HCC showed major deletions or additions of chromosome arms, so that a number of genes were included in the SRO. Although some putative oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes mapped in these SRO may be important, relative copy number changes of numerous other genes may affect pathogenesis of HCC. PMID:16682288

  3. Exploring genome-wide – dietary heme iron intake interactions and the risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Louis R.; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Aschard, Hugues; Kang, Jae H.; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Qi, Lu; Kraft, Peter; Hu, Frank B.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Genome-wide association studies have identified over 50 new genetic loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Several studies conclude that higher dietary heme iron intake increases the risk of T2D. Therefore we assessed whether the relation between genetic loci and T2D is modified by dietary heme iron intake. Methods: We used Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human 6.0 array data [681,770 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)] and dietary information collected in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n = 725 cases; n = 1,273 controls) and the Nurses’ Health Study (n = 1,081 cases; n = 1,692 controls). We assessed whether genome-wide SNPs or iron metabolism SNPs interacted with dietary heme iron intake in relation to T2D, testing for associations in each cohort separately and then meta-analyzing to pool the results. Finally, we created 1,000 synthetic pathways matched to an iron metabolism pathway on number of genes, and number of SNPs in each gene. We compared the iron metabolic pathway SNPs with these synthetic SNP assemblies in their relation to T2D to assess if the pathway as a whole interacts with dietary heme iron intake. Results: Using a genomic approach, we found no significant gene–environment interactions with dietary heme iron intake in relation to T2D at a Bonferroni corrected genome-wide significance level of 7.33 ×10-8 (top SNP in pooled analysis: intergenic rs10980508; p = 1.03 × 10-6). Furthermore, no SNP in the iron metabolic pathway significantly interacted with dietary heme iron intake at a Bonferroni corrected significance level of 2.10 × 10-4 (top SNP in pooled analysis: rs1805313; p = 1.14 × 10-3). Finally, neither the main genetic effects (pooled empirical p by SNP = 0.41), nor gene – dietary heme–iron interactions (pooled empirical p-value for the interactions = 0.72) were significant for the iron metabolic pathway as a whole. Conclusions: We found no significant interactions between dietary heme iron intake and common SNPs in

  4. Genome-wide Profiling Reveals Remarkable Parallels Between Insertion Site Selection Properties of the MLV Retrovirus and the piggyBac Transposon in Primary Human CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Ammar, Ismahen; Gupta, Saumyashree; Bunse, Mario; Miskey, Csaba; Chen, Wei; Uckert, Wolfgang; Schulz, Thomas F; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-03-01

    The inherent risks associated with vector insertion in gene therapy need to be carefully assessed. We analyzed the genome-wide distributions of Sleeping Beauty (SB) and piggyBac (PB) transposon insertions as well as MLV retrovirus and HIV lentivirus insertions in human CD4(+) T cells with respect to a panel of 40 chromatin states. The distribution of SB transposon insertions displayed the least deviation from random, while the PB transposon and the MLV retrovirus showed unexpected parallels across all chromatin states. Both MLV and PB insertions are enriched at transcriptional start sites (TSSs) and co-localize with BRD4-associated sites. We demonstrate physical interaction between the PB transposase and bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins (including BRD4), suggesting convergent evolution of a tethering mechanism that directs integrating genetic elements into TSSs. We detect unequal biases across the four systems with respect to targeting genes whose deregulation has been previously linked to serious adverse events in gene therapy clinical trials. The SB transposon has the highest theoretical chance of targeting a safe harbor locus in the human genome. The data underscore the significance of vector choice to reduce the mutagenic load on cells in clinical applications. PMID:26755332

  5. Genome-wide Profiling Reveals Remarkable Parallels Between Insertion Site Selection Properties of the MLV Retrovirus and the piggyBac Transposon in Primary Human CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Ammar, Ismahen; Gupta, Saumyashree; Bunse, Mario; Miskey, Csaba; Chen, Wei; Uckert, Wolfgang; Schulz, Thomas F; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    The inherent risks associated with vector insertion in gene therapy need to be carefully assessed. We analyzed the genome-wide distributions of Sleeping Beauty (SB) and piggyBac (PB) transposon insertions as well as MLV retrovirus and HIV lentivirus insertions in human CD4+ T cells with respect to a panel of 40 chromatin states. The distribution of SB transposon insertions displayed the least deviation from random, while the PB transposon and the MLV retrovirus showed unexpected parallels across all chromatin states. Both MLV and PB insertions are enriched at transcriptional start sites (TSSs) and co-localize with BRD4-associated sites. We demonstrate physical interaction between the PB transposase and bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins (including BRD4), suggesting convergent evolution of a tethering mechanism that directs integrating genetic elements into TSSs. We detect unequal biases across the four systems with respect to targeting genes whose deregulation has been previously linked to serious adverse events in gene therapy clinical trials. The SB transposon has the highest theoretical chance of targeting a safe harbor locus in the human genome. The data underscore the significance of vector choice to reduce the mutagenic load on cells in clinical applications. PMID:26755332

  6. Identification of genes promoting skin youthfulness by genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anne L S; Atzmon, Gil; Bergman, Aviv; Brugmann, Samantha; Atwood, Scott X; Chang, Howard Y; Barzilai, Nir

    2014-03-01

    To identify genes that promote facial skin youthfulness (SY), a genome-wide association study on an Ashkenazi Jewish discovery group (n=428) was performed using Affymetrix 6.0 Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Array. After SNP quality controls, 901,470 SNPs remained for analysis. The eigenstrat method showed no stratification. Cases and controls were identified by global facial skin aging severity including intrinsic and extrinsic parameters. Linear regression adjusted for age and gender, with no significant differences in smoking history, body mass index, menopausal status, or personal or family history of centenarians. Six SNPs met the Bonferroni threshold with Pallele<10(-8); two of these six had Pgenotype<10(-8). Quantitative trait loci mapping confirmed linkage disequilibrium. The six SNPs were interrogated by MassARRAY in a replication group (n=436) with confirmation of rs6975107, an intronic region of KCND2 (potassium voltage-gated channel, Shal-related family member 2) (Pgenotype=0.023). A second replication group (n=371) confirmed rs318125, downstream of DIAPH2 (diaphanous homolog 2 (Drosophila)) (Pallele=0.010, Pgenotype=0.002) and rs7616661, downstream of EDEM1 (ER degradation enhancer, mannosidase α-like 1) (Pgenotype=0.042). DIAPH2 has been associated with premature ovarian insufficiency, an aging phenotype in humans. EDEM1 associates with lifespan in animal models, although not humans. KCND2 is expressed in human skin, but has not been associated with aging. These genes represent new candidate genes to study the molecular basis of healthy skin aging. PMID:24037343

  7. Chronic Periodontitis Genome-wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rhodin, K.; Divaris, K.; North, K.E.; Barros, S.P.; Moss, K.; Beck, J.D.; Offenbacher, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of chronic periodontitis (CP) offer rich data sources for the investigation of candidate genes, functional elements, and pathways. We used GWAS data of CP (n = 4,504) and periodontal pathogen colonization (n = 1,020) from a cohort of adult Americans of European descent participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and employed a MAGENTA approach (i.e., meta-analysis gene set enrichment of variant associations) to obtain gene-centric and gene set association results corrected for gene size, number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and local linkage disequilibrium characteristics based on the human genome build 18 (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 36). We used the Gene Ontology, Ingenuity, KEGG, Panther, Reactome, and Biocarta databases for gene set enrichment analyses. Six genes showed evidence of statistically significant association: 4 with severe CP (NIN, p = 1.6 × 10−7; ABHD12B, p = 3.6 × 10−7; WHAMM, p = 1.7 × 10−6; AP3B2, p = 2.2 × 10−6) and 2 with high periodontal pathogen colonization (red complex–KCNK1, p = 3.4 × 10−7; Porphyromonas gingivalis–DAB2IP, p = 1.0 × 10−6). Top-ranked genes for moderate CP were HGD (p = 1.4 × 10−5), ZNF675 (p = 1.5 × 10−5), TNFRSF10C (p = 2.0 × 10−5), and EMR1 (p = 2.0 × 10−5). Loci containing NIN, EMR1, KCNK1, and DAB2IP had showed suggestive evidence of association in the earlier single-nucleotide polymorphism–based analyses, whereas WHAMM and AP2B2 emerged as novel candidates. The top gene sets included severe CP (“endoplasmic reticulum membrane,” “cytochrome P450,” “microsome,” and “oxidation reduction”) and moderate CP (“regulation of gene expression,” “zinc ion binding,” “BMP signaling pathway,” and “ruffle”). Gene-centric analyses offer a promising avenue for efficient interrogation of large-scale GWAS data. These results highlight genes in previously identified loci and

  8. Genome-wide association study of 14,000 cases of seven common diseases and 3,000 shared controls.

    PubMed

    2007-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that genome-wide association (GWA) studies represent a powerful approach to the identification of genes involved in common human diseases. We describe a joint GWA study (using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500K Mapping Array Set) undertaken in the British population, which has examined approximately 2,000 individuals for each of 7 major diseases and a shared set of approximately 3,000 controls. Case-control comparisons identified 24 independent association signals at P < 5 x 10(-7): 1 in bipolar disorder, 1 in coronary artery disease, 9 in Crohn's disease, 3 in rheumatoid arthritis, 7 in type 1 diabetes and 3 in type 2 diabetes. On the basis of prior findings and replication studies thus-far completed, almost all of these signals reflect genuine susceptibility effects. We observed association at many previously identified loci, and found compelling evidence that some loci confer risk for more than one of the diseases studied. Across all diseases, we identified a large number of further signals (including 58 loci with single-point P values between 10(-5) and 5 x 10(-7)) likely to yield additional susceptibility loci. The importance of appropriately large samples was confirmed by the modest effect sizes observed at most loci identified. This study thus represents a thorough validation of the GWA approach. It has also demonstrated that careful use of a shared control group represents a safe and effective approach to GWA analyses of multiple disease phenotypes; has generated a genome-wide genotype database for future studies of common diseases in the British population; and shown that, provided individuals with non-European ancestry are excluded, the extent of population stratification in the British population is generally modest. Our findings offer new avenues for exploring the pathophysiology of these important disorders. We anticipate that our data, results and software, which will be widely available to other investigators, will provide a

  9. Genome-wide association study of 14,000 cases of seven common diseases and 3,000 shared controls

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genome-wide association (GWA) studies represent a powerful approach to the identification of genes involved in common human diseases. We describe a joint GWA study (using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500K Mapping Array Set) undertaken in the British population, which has examined ~2,000 individuals for each of 7 major diseases and a shared set of ~3,000 controls. Case-control comparisons identified 24 independent association signals at P<5×10-7: 1 in bipolar disorder, 1 in coronary artery disease, 9 in Crohn’s disease, 3 in rheumatoid arthritis, 7 in type 1 diabetes and 3 in type 2 diabetes. On the basis of prior findings and replication studies thus-far completed, almost all of these signals reflect genuine susceptibility effects. We observed association at many previously identified loci, and found compelling evidence that some loci confer risk for more than one of the diseases studied. Across all diseases, we identified a large number of further signals (including 58 loci with single-point P values between 10-5 and 5×10-7) likely to yield additional susceptibility loci. The importance of appropriately large samples was confirmed by the modest effect sizes observed at most loci identified. This study thus represents a thorough validation of the GWA approach. It has also demonstrated that careful use of a shared control group represents a safe and effective approach to GWA analyses of multiple disease phenotypes; has generated a genome-wide genotype database for future studies of common diseases in the British population; and shown that, provided individuals with non-European ancestry are excluded, the extent of population stratification in the British population is generally modest. Our findings offer new avenues for exploring the pathophysiology of these important disorders. We anticipate that our data, results and software, which will be widely available to other investigators, will provide a powerful resource for human genetics

  10. "Replicated" genome wide association for dependence on illegal substances: genomic regions identified by overlapping clusters of nominally positive SNPs.

    PubMed

    Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine A; Nino, Michelle; Drgonova, Jana; Walther, Donna M; Uhl, George R

    2011-03-01

    Declaring "replication" from results of genome wide association (GWA) studies is straightforward when major gene effects provide genome-wide significance for association of the same allele of the same SNP in each of multiple independent samples. However, such unambiguous replication may be unlikely when phenotypes display polygenic genetic architecture, allelic heterogeneity, locus heterogeneity, and when different samples display linkage disequilibria with different fine structures. We seek chromosomal regions that are tagged by clustered SNPs that display nominally significant association in each of several independent samples. This approach provides one "nontemplate" approach to identifying overall replication of groups of GWA results in the face of difficult genetic architectures. We apply this strategy to 1 million (1M) SNP Affymetrix and Illumina GWA results for dependence on illegal substances. This approach provides high confidence in rejecting the null hypothesis that chance alone accounts for the extent to which clustered, nominally significant SNPs from samples of the same racial/ethnic background identify the same chromosomal regions. There is more modest confidence in: (a) identification of individual chromosomal regions and genes and (b) overlap between results from samples of different racial/ethnic backgrounds. The strong overlap identified among the samples with similar racial/ethnic backgrounds, together with prior work that identified overlapping results in samples of different racial/ethnic backgrounds, support contributions to individual differences in vulnerability to addictions that come from both relatively older allelic variants that are common in many current human populations and newer allelic variants that are common in fewer current human populations. PMID:21302341

  11. XRCC5 as a Risk Gene for Alcohol Dependence: Evidence from a Genome-Wide Gene-Set-Based Analysis and Follow-up Studies in Drosophila and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Juraeva, Dilafruz; Treutlein, Jens; Scholz, Henrike; Frank, Josef; Degenhardt, Franziska; Cichon, Sven; Ridinger, Monika; Mattheisen, Manuel; Witt, Stephanie H; Lang, Maren; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Hoffmann, Per; Herms, Stefan; Wodarz, Norbert; Soyka, Michael; Zill, Peter; Maier, Wolfgang; Jünger, Elisabeth; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Dahmen, Norbert; Scherbaum, Norbert; Schmäl, Christine; Steffens, Michael; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Smolka, Michael N; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nöthen, Markus M; Mann, Karl; Kiefer, Falk; Spanagel, Rainer; Brors, Benedikt; Rietschel, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors have as large role as environmental factors in the etiology of alcohol dependence (AD). Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) enable systematic searches for loci not hitherto implicated in the etiology of AD, many true findings may be missed owing to correction for multiple testing. The aim of the present study was to circumvent this limitation by searching for biological system-level differences, and then following up these findings in humans and animals. Gene-set-based analysis of GWAS data from 1333 cases and 2168 controls identified 19 significantly associated gene-sets, of which 5 could be replicated in an independent sample. Clustered in these gene-sets were novel and previously identified susceptibility genes. The most frequently present gene, ie in 6 out of 19 gene-sets, was X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 5 (XRCC5). Previous human and animal studies have implicated XRCC5 in alcohol sensitivity. This phenotype is inversely correlated with the development of AD, presumably as more alcohol is required to achieve the desired effects. In the present study, the functional role of XRCC5 in AD was further validated in animals and humans. Drosophila mutants with reduced function of Ku80—the homolog of mammalian XRCC5—due to RNAi silencing showed reduced sensitivity to ethanol. In humans with free access to intravenous ethanol self-administration in the laboratory, the maximum achieved blood alcohol concentration was influenced in an allele-dose-dependent manner by genetic variation in XRCC5. In conclusion, our convergent approach identified new candidates and generated independent evidence for the involvement of XRCC5 in alcohol dependence. PMID:25035082

  12. XRCC5 as a risk gene for alcohol dependence: evidence from a genome-wide gene-set-based analysis and follow-up studies in Drosophila and humans.

    PubMed

    Juraeva, Dilafruz; Treutlein, Jens; Scholz, Henrike; Frank, Josef; Degenhardt, Franziska; Cichon, Sven; Ridinger, Monika; Mattheisen, Manuel; Witt, Stephanie H; Lang, Maren; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Hoffmann, Per; Herms, Stefan; Wodarz, Norbert; Soyka, Michael; Zill, Peter; Maier, Wolfgang; Jünger, Elisabeth; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Dahmen, Norbert; Scherbaum, Norbert; Schmäl, Christine; Steffens, Michael; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Smolka, Michael N; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nöthen, Markus M; Mann, Karl; Kiefer, Falk; Spanagel, Rainer; Brors, Benedikt; Rietschel, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors have as large role as environmental factors in the etiology of alcohol dependence (AD). Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) enable systematic searches for loci not hitherto implicated in the etiology of AD, many true findings may be missed owing to correction for multiple testing. The aim of the present study was to circumvent this limitation by searching for biological system-level differences, and then following up these findings in humans and animals. Gene-set-based analysis of GWAS data from 1333 cases and 2168 controls identified 19 significantly associated gene-sets, of which 5 could be replicated in an independent sample. Clustered in these gene-sets were novel and previously identified susceptibility genes. The most frequently present gene, ie in 6 out of 19 gene-sets, was X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 5 (XRCC5). Previous human and animal studies have implicated XRCC5 in alcohol sensitivity. This phenotype is inversely correlated with the development of AD, presumably as more alcohol is required to achieve the desired effects. In the present study, the functional role of XRCC5 in AD was further validated in animals and humans. Drosophila mutants with reduced function of Ku80-the homolog of mammalian XRCC5-due to RNAi silencing showed reduced sensitivity to ethanol. In humans with free access to intravenous ethanol self-administration in the laboratory, the maximum achieved blood alcohol concentration was influenced in an allele-dose-dependent manner by genetic variation in XRCC5. In conclusion, our convergent approach identified new candidates and generated independent evidence for the involvement of XRCC5 in alcohol dependence. PMID:25035082

  13. Genome-Wide Detection and Analysis of Multifunctional Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pritykin, Yuri; Ghersi, Dario; Singh, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Many genes can play a role in multiple biological processes or molecular functions. Identifying multifunctional genes at the genome-wide level and studying their properties can shed light upon the complexity of molecular events that underpin cellular functioning, thereby leading to a better understanding of the functional landscape of the cell. However, to date, genome-wide analysis of multifunctional genes (and the proteins they encode) has been limited. Here we introduce a computational approach that uses known functional annotations to extract genes playing a role in at least two distinct biological processes. We leverage functional genomics data sets for three organisms—H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, and S. cerevisiae—and show that, as compared to other annotated genes, genes involved in multiple biological processes possess distinct physicochemical properties, are more broadly expressed, tend to be more central in protein interaction networks, tend to be more evolutionarily conserved, and are more likely to be essential. We also find that multifunctional genes are significantly more likely to be involved in human disorders. These same features also hold when multifunctionality is defined with respect to molecular functions instead of biological processes. Our analysis uncovers key features about multifunctional genes, and is a step towards a better genome-wide understanding of gene multifunctionality. PMID:26436655

  14. Genome-Wide Detection and Analysis of Multifunctional Genes.

    PubMed

    Pritykin, Yuri; Ghersi, Dario; Singh, Mona

    2015-10-01

    Many genes can play a role in multiple biological processes or molecular functions. Identifying multifunctional genes at the genome-wide level and studying their properties can shed light upon the complexity of molecular events that underpin cellular functioning, thereby leading to a better understanding of the functional landscape of the cell. However, to date, genome-wide analysis of multifunctional genes (and the proteins they encode) has been limited. Here we introduce a computational approach that uses known functional annotations to extract genes playing a role in at least two distinct biological processes. We leverage functional genomics data sets for three organisms--H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, and S. cerevisiae--and show that, as compared to other annotated genes, genes involved in multiple biological processes possess distinct physicochemical properties, are more broadly expressed, tend to be more central in protein interaction networks, tend to be more evolutionarily conserved, and are more likely to be essential. We also find that multifunctional genes are significantly more likely to be involved in human disorders. These same features also hold when multifunctionality is defined with respect to molecular functions instead of biological processes. Our analysis uncovers key features about multifunctional genes, and is a step towards a better genome-wide understanding of gene multifunctionality. PMID:26436655

  15. The efficacy of detecting variants with small effects on the Affymetrix 6.0 platform using pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Gajdos, Zofia K. Z.; Butler, Johannah L.; Hackett, Rachel; Guiducci, Candace; Nguyen, Thutrang T.; Wilks, Rainford; Forrester, Terrence; Henderson, Katherine D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Cooper, Richard S.; Lyon, Helen N.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; McKenzie, Colin A.; Palmer, Mark R.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide genotyping of a cohort using pools rather than individual samples has long been proposed as a cost-saving alternative for performing genome-wide association (GWA) studies. However, successful disease gene mapping using pooled genotyping has thus far been limited to detecting common variants with large effect sizes, which tend not to exist for many complex common diseases or traits. Therefore, for DNA pooling to be a viable strategy for conducting GWA studies, it is important to determine whether commonly used genome-wide SNP array platforms such as the Affymetrix 6.0 array can reliably detect common variants of small effect sizes using pooled DNA. Taking obesity and age at menarche as examples of human complex traits, we assessed the feasibility of genome-wide genotyping of pooled DNA as a single-stage design for phenotype association. By individually genotyping the top associations identified by pooling, we obtained a 14- to 16-fold enrichment of SNPs nominally associated with the phenotype, but we likely missed the top true associations. In addition, we assessed whether genotyping pooled DNA can serve as an inexpensive screen as the second stage of a multi-stage design with a large number of samples by comparing the most cost-effective 3-stage designs with 80% power to detect common variants with genotypic relative risk of 1.1, with and without pooling. Given the current state of the specific technology we employed and the associated genotyping costs, we showed through simulation that a design involving pooling would be 1.07 times more expensive than a design without pooling. Thus, while a significant amount of information exists within the data from pooled DNA, our analysis does not support genotyping pooled DNA as a means to efficiently identify common variants contributing small effects to phenotypes of interest. While our conclusions were based on the specific technology and study design we employed, the approach presented here will be useful for

  16. Impact of age, BMI and HbA1c levels on the genome-wide DNA methylation and mRNA expression patterns in human adipose tissue and identification of epigenetic biomarkers in blood.

    PubMed

    Rönn, Tina; Volkov, Petr; Gillberg, Linn; Kokosar, Milana; Perfilyev, Alexander; Jacobsen, Anna Louisa; Jørgensen, Sine W; Brøns, Charlotte; Jansson, Per-Anders; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Groop, Leif; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Vaag, Allan; Nilsson, Emma; Ling, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    Increased age, BMI and HbA1c levels are risk factors for several non-communicable diseases. However, the impact of these factors on the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue remains unknown. We analyzed the DNA methylation of ∼480 000 sites in human adipose tissue from 96 males and 94 females and related methylation to age, BMI and HbA1c. We also compared epigenetic signatures in adipose tissue and blood. Age was significantly associated with both altered DNA methylation and expression of 1050 genes (e.g. FHL2, NOX4 and PLG). Interestingly, many reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging in blood, including ELOVL2, FHL2, KLF14 and GLRA1, also showed significant correlations between adipose tissue DNA methylation and age in our study. The most significant association between age and adipose tissue DNA methylation was found upstream of ELOVL2. We identified 2825 genes (e.g. FTO, ITIH5, CCL18, MTCH2, IRS1 and SPP1) where both DNA methylation and expression correlated with BMI. Methylation at previously reported HIF3A sites correlated significantly with BMI in females only. HbA1c (range 28-46 mmol/mol) correlated significantly with the methylation of 711 sites, annotated to, for example, RAB37, TICAM1 and HLA-DPB1. Pathway analyses demonstrated that methylation levels associated with age and BMI are overrepresented among genes involved in cancer, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Our results highlight the impact of age, BMI and HbA1c on epigenetic variation of candidate genes for obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer in human adipose tissue. Importantly, we demonstrate that epigenetic biomarkers in blood can mirror age-related epigenetic signatures in target tissues for metabolic diseases such as adipose tissue. PMID:25861810

  17. Development and Evaluation of an Affymetrix array for Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-species Affymetrix GeneChip array was developed to study development, metabolism and pathogenicity of A. flavus. This chip based on the whole genome sequence of A. flavus, contains 13,000 A. flavus genes, 8,000 maize genes and 25 human and mouse innate immune response genes, as well as the ...

  18. Antiphospholipid antibodies in a large population-based cohort: genome-wide associations and effects on monocyte gene expression.

    PubMed

    Müller-Calleja, Nadine; Rossmann, Heidi; Müller, Christian; Wild, Philipp; Blankenberg, Stefan; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Binder, Harald; Beutel, Manfred E; Manukyan, Davit; Zeller, Tanja; Lackner, Karl J

    2016-07-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterised by venous and/or arterial thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in women combined with the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). We aimed to identify genetic factors associated with the presence of aPL in a population based cohort. Furthermore, we wanted to clarify if the presence of aPL affects gene expression in circulating monocytes. Titres of IgG and IgM against cardiolipin, β2glycoprotein 1 (anti-β2GPI), and IgG against domain 1 of β2GPI (anti-domain 1) were determined in approx. 5,000 individuals from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) a population based cohort of German descent. Genotyping was conducted on Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 arrays. Monocyte gene expression was determined in a subgroup of 1,279 individuals by using the Illumina HT-12 v3 BeadChip. Gene expression data were confirmed in vitro and ex vivo by qRT-PCR. Genome wide analysis revealed significant associations of anti-β2GPI IgG and APOH on chromosome 17, which had been previously identified by candidate gene approaches, and of anti-domain1 and MACROD2 on chromosome 20 which has been listed in a previous GWAS as a suggestive locus associated with the occurrence of anti-β2GPI antibodies. Expression analysis confirmed increased expression of TNFα in monocytes and identified and confirmed neuron navigator 3 (NAV3) as a novel gene induced by aPL. In conclusion, MACROD2 represents a novel genetic locus associated with aPL. Furthermore, we show that aPL induce the expression of NAV3 in monocytes and endothelial cells. This will stimulate further research into the role of these genes in the APS. PMID:27098658

  19. RNAi Screening in Primary Human Hepatocytes of Genes Implicated in Genome-Wide Association Studies for Roles in Type 2 Diabetes Identifies Roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among Others, in Hepatic Glucose Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Steven; Zhao, Juan; Tiwari, Shiwani; Eng, Kurt; Guey, Lin T.; Tien, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response) and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway. PMID:23840313

  20. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K

    2010-04-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies for pharmacogenomics-related traits are increasingly being performed to identify loci that affect either drug response or susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. Until now, only the largest effects have been detected, partly because of the challenges of obtaining large numbers of cases for pharmacogenomic studies. Since 2007, a range of pharmacogenomics GWA studies have been published that have identified several interesting and novel associations between drug responses or reactions and clinically relevant loci, showing the value of this approach. PMID:20300088

  1. Genome-wide screening of loci associated with drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Ooyama, Akio; Okayama, Yoshihiro; Takechi, Teiji; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Oka, Toshinori; Fukushima, Masakazu

    2007-04-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic agents represents the chief cause of mortality in cancer patients with advanced disease. Chromosomal aberration and altered gene expression are the main genetic mechanisms of tumor chemoresistance. In this study, we have established an algorithm to calculate DNA copy number using the Affymetrix 10K array, and performed a genome-wide correlation analysis between DNA copy number and antitumor activity against 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based drugs (S-1, tegafur + uracil [UFT], 5'-DFUR and capecitabine) to screen for loci influencing drug resistance using 27 human cancer xenografts. A correlation analysis confirmed that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) showing significant associations with drug sensitivity were concentrated in some cytogenetic regions (18p, 17p13.2, 17p12, 11q14.1, 11q11 and 11p11.12), and we identified some genes that have been indicated their relations to drug sensitivity. Among these regions, 18p11.32 at the location of the thymidylate synthase gene (TYMS) was strongly associated with resistance to 5-FU-based drugs. A change in copy number of the TYMS gene was reflected in the TYMS expression level, and showed a significant negative correlation with sensitivity against 5-FU-based drugs. These results suggest that amplification of the TYMS gene is associated with innate resistance, supporting the possibility that TYMS copy number might be a predictive marker of drug sensitivity to fluoropyrimidines. Further study is necessary to clarify the functional roles of other genes coded in significant cytogenetic regions. These promising data suggest that a comprehensive DNA copy number analysis might aid in the quest for optimal markers of drug response. PMID:17425594

  2. Genome-wide patterns of population structure and admixture in West Africans and African Americans.

    PubMed

    Bryc, Katarzyna; Auton, Adam; Nelson, Matthew R; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Hauser, Stephen L; Williams, Scott; Froment, Alain; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Wambebe, Charles; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2010-01-12

    Quantifying patterns of population structure in Africans and African Americans illuminates the history of human populations and is critical for undertaking medical genomic studies on a global scale. To obtain a fine-scale genome-wide perspective of ancestry, we analyze Affymetrix GeneChip 500K genotype data from African Americans (n = 365) and individuals with ancestry from West Africa (n = 203 from 12 populations) and Europe (n = 400 from 42 countries). We find that population structure within the West African sample reflects primarily language and secondarily geographical distance, echoing the Bantu expansion. Among African Americans, analysis of genomic admixture by a principal component-based approach indicates that the median proportion of European ancestry is 18.5% (25th-75th percentiles: 11.6-27.7%), with very large variation among individuals. In the African-American sample as a whole, few autosomal regions showed exceptionally high or low mean African ancestry, but the X chromosome showed elevated levels of African ancestry, consistent with a sex-biased pattern of gene flow with an excess of European male and African female ancestry. We also find that genomic profiles of individual African Americans afford personalized ancestry reconstructions differentiating ancient vs. recent European and African ancestry. Finally, patterns of genetic similarity among inferred African segments of African-American genomes and genomes of contemporary African populations included in this study suggest African ancestry is most similar to non-Bantu Niger-Kordofanian-speaking populations, consistent with historical documents of the African Diaspora and trans-Atlantic slave trade. PMID:20080753

  3. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association of Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J.L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schäfer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective Although twin and family studies have shown attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus, additional genomewide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method We used case-control analyses of 896 cases with DSM-IV ADHD genotyped using the Affymetrix 5.0 array and 2,455 repository controls screened for psychotic and bipolar symptoms genotyped using Affymetrix 6.0 arrays. A consensus SNP set was imputed using BEAGLE 3.0, resulting in an analysis dataset of 1,033,244 SNPs. The data were analyzed using a generalized linear model. Results No genome-wide significant associations were found. The most significant results implicated the following genes: PRKG1, FLNC, TCERG1L, PPM1H, NXPH1, PPM1H, CDH13, HK1 and HKDC1. Conclusions The current analyses are a useful addition to the present literature and will make a valuable contribution to future meta-analyses. The candidate gene findings are consistent with a prior meta-analysis in suggesting that the effects of ADHD risk variants must, individually, be very small and/or include multiple rare alleles. PMID:20732627

  4. Dating the age of admixture via wavelet transform analysis of genome-wide data.

    PubMed

    Pugach, Irina; Matveyev, Rostislav; Wollstein, Andreas; Kayser, Manfred; Stoneking, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We describe a PCA-based genome scan approach to analyze genome-wide admixture structure, and introduce wavelet transform analysis as a method for estimating the time of admixture. We test the wavelet transform method with simulations and apply it to genome-wide SNP data from eight admixed human populations. The wavelet transform method offers better resolution than existing methods for dating admixture, and can be applied to either SNP or sequence data from humans or other species. PMID:21352535

  5. Dating the age of admixture via wavelet transform analysis of genome-wide data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We describe a PCA-based genome scan approach to analyze genome-wide admixture structure, and introduce wavelet transform analysis as a method for estimating the time of admixture. We test the wavelet transform method with simulations and apply it to genome-wide SNP data from eight admixed human populations. The wavelet transform method offers better resolution than existing methods for dating admixture, and can be applied to either SNP or sequence data from humans or other species. PMID:21352535

  6. Genome-wide association discoveries of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lingjun; Lu, Lingeng; Tan, Yunlong; Pan, Xinghua; Cai, Yiqiang; Wang, Xiaoping; Hong, Jiang; Zhong, Chunlong; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Xiang-yang; Vanderlinden, Lauren A.; Tabakoff, Boris; Luo, Xingguang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the genome-wide significant and/or replicable risk variants for alcohol dependence and explore their potential biological functions. Methods We searched in PubMed for all genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of alcohol dependence. The following three types of the results were extracted: (1) genome-wide significant associations in an individual sample, the combined samples, or the meta-analysis (p<5×10−8); (2) top-ranked associations in an individual sample (p<10−5) that were nominally replicated in other samples (p<0.05); and (3) nominally replicable associations across at least three independent GWAS samples (p<0.05). These results were meta-analyzed. cis-eQTLs in human, RNA expression in rat and mouse brain and bioinformatics properties of all of these risk variants were analyzed. Results The variants located within ADH cluster were significantly associated with alcohol dependence at genome-wide level (p<5×10−8) in at least one sample. Some associations with the ADH cluster were replicable across six independent GWAS samples. The variants located within or near SERINC2, KIAA0040, MREG-PECR or PKNOX2 were significantly associated with alcohol dependence at genome-wide level (p<5×10−8) in meta-analysis or combined samples, and these associations were replicable across at least one sample. The associations with the variants within NRD1, GPD1L-CMTM8 or MAP3K9-PCNX were suggestive (5×10−8

  7. Genome-wide identification of enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Tulin, Sarah; Barsi, Julius C; Bocconcelli, Carlo; Smith, Joel

    2016-01-01

    We present a prospective genome-wide regulatory element database for the sea urchin embryo and the modified chromosome capture-related methodology used to create it. The method we developed is termed GRIP-seq for genome-wide regulatory element immunoprecipitation and combines features of chromosome conformation capture, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and paired-end next-generation sequencing with molecular steps that enrich for active cis-regulatory elements associated with basal transcriptional machinery. The first GRIP-seq database, available to the community, comes from S. purpuratus 24 hpf embryos and takes advantage of the extremely well-characterized cis-regulatory elements in this system for validation. In addition, using the GRIP-seq database, we identify and experimentally validate a novel, intronic cis-regulatory element at the onecut locus. We find GRIP-seq signal sensitively identifies active cis-regulatory elements with a high signal-to-noise ratio for both distal and intronic elements. This promising GRIP-seq protocol has the potential to address a rate-limiting step in resolving comprehensive, predictive network models in all systems. PMID:27389984

  8. Genome-wide significant schizophrenia risk variation on chromosome 10q24 is associated with altered cis-regulation of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rodrigo R R; Troakes, Claire; Nolan, Matthew; Srivastava, Deepak P; Murray, Robin M; Bray, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome 10q24.32-q24.33 is one of the most robustly supported risk loci to emerge from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia. However, extensive linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to distinguish the actual susceptibility gene(s) at the locus, limiting its value for improving biological understanding of the condition. In the absence of coding changes that can account for the association, risk is likely conferred by altered regulation of one or more genes in the region. We, therefore, used highly sensitive measures of allele-specific expression to assess cis-regulatory effects associated with the two best-supported schizophrenia risk variants (SNP rs11191419 and indel ch10_104957618_I/rs202213518) on the primary positional candidates BORCS7, AS3MT, CNNM2, and NT5C2 in the human brain. Heterozygosity at rs11191419 was associated with increased allelic expression of BORCS7 and AS3MT in the fetal and adult brain, and with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in the adult brain. Heterozygosity at ch10_104957618_I was associated with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in both the fetal and adult brain. Comparisons between cDNA ratios in heterozygotes and homozygotes for the risk alleles indicated that cis-effects on NT5C2 expression in the adult dorsolateral prefrontal cortex could be largely accounted for by genotype at these two risk variants. While not excluding effects on other genes in the region, this study implicates altered neural expression of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in susceptibility to schizophrenia arising from genetic variation at the chromosome 10q24 locus. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004590

  9. Genome-wide profiling of alternative splicing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Mitchell K.P.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Tan, Michelle G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process which generates transcriptome and proteome diversity through the skipping or inclusion of exons within gene loci. Identification of aberrant alternative splicing associated with human diseases has become feasible with the development of new genomic technologies and powerful bioinformatics. We have previously reported genome-wide gene alterations in the neocortex of a well-characterized cohort of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and matched elderly controls using a commercial exon microarray platform [1]. Here, we provide detailed description of analyses aimed at identifying differential alternative splicing events associated with AD. PMID:26484111

  10. Genome-wide association studies in diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Noah A; Huang, Lucy; Jewett, Ethan M; Szpiech, Zachary A; Jankovic, Ivana; Boehnke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified a large number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with disease phenotypes. As most GWA studies have been performed primarily in populations of European descent, this review examines the issues involved in extending consideration of GWA studies to diverse worldwide populations. Although challenges exist with such issues as imputation, admixture, and replication, investigation of diverse populations in GWA studies has significant potential to advance the project of mapping the genetic determinants of complex diseases for the human population as a whole. PMID:20395969

  11. CEL_INTERROGATOR: A FREE AND OPEN SOURCE PACKAGE FOR AFFYMETRIX CEL FILE PARSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CEL_Interrogator Package is a suite of programs designed to extract the average probe intensity and other information for each probe sequence from an Affymetrix GeneChip CEL file and unite them with their human-readable Affymetrix consensus sequence names. The resulting text file is suitable for di...

  12. USH1G with unique retinal findings caused by a novel truncating mutation identified by genome-wide linkage analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taibah, Khalid; Bin-Khamis, Ghada; Kennedy, Shelley; Hemidan, Amal; Al-Qahtani, Faisal; Tabbara, Khalid; Mubarak, Bashayer Al; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Meyer, Brian F.; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder divided into three distinct clinical subtypes based on the severity of the hearing loss, manifestation of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of retinitis pigmentosa and visual symptoms. To date, mutations in seven different genes have been reported to cause USH type 1 (USH1), the most severe form. Patients diagnosed with USH1 are known to be ideal candidates to benefit from cochlear implantation. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10K arrays were performed in three cochlear implanted Saudi siblings born from a consanguineous marriage, clinically diagnosed with USH1 by comprehensive clinical, audiological, and ophthalmological examinations. From the linkage results, the USH1G gene was screened for mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons. Results We report the identification of a novel p.S243X truncating mutation in USH1G that segregated with the disease phenotype and was not present in 300 ethnically matched normal controls. We also report on the novel retinal findings and the outcome of cochlear implantation in the affected individuals. Conclusions In addition to reporting a novel truncating mutation, this report expands the retinal phenotype in USH1G and presents the first report of successful cochlear implants in this disease. PMID:22876113

  13. Voxelwise genome-wide association study (vGWAS)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Ho, April J.; Leow, Alex D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Gerber, Jill D.; Allen, April N.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; DeChairo, Bryan M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the human brain is highly heritable, and is thought to be influenced by many common genetic variants, many of which are currently unknown. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have allowed collection of both highly detailed structural brain scans and genome-wide genotype information. This wealth of information presents a new opportunity to find the genes influencing brain structure. Here we explore the relation between 448,293 single nucleotide polymorphisms in each of 31,622 voxels of the entire brain across 740 elderly subjects (mean age±s.d.: 75.52±6.82 years; 438 male) including subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used tensor-based morphometry to measure individual differences in brain structure at the voxel level relative to a study-specific template based on healthy elderly subjects. We then conducted a genome-wide association at each voxel to identify genetic variants of interest. By studying only the most associated variant at each voxel, we developed a novel method to address the multiple comparisons problem and computational burden associated with the unprecedented amount of data. No variant survived the strict significance criterion, but several genes worthy of further exploration were identified, including CSMD2 and CADPS2. These genes have high relevance to brain structure. This is the first voxelwise genome wide association study to our knowledge, and offers a novel method to discover genetic influences on brain structure. PMID:20171287

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study of Parity in Bangladeshi Women

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L.; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Human fertility is a complex trait determined by gene-environment interactions in which genetic factors represent a significant component. To better understand inter-individual variability in fertility, we performed one of the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common fertility phenotypes, lifetime number of pregnancies and number of children in a developing country population. The fertility phenotype data and DNA samples were obtained at baseline recruitment from individuals participating in a large prospective cohort study in Bangladesh. GWAS analyses of fertility phenotypes were conducted among 1,686 married women. One SNP on chromosome 4 was non-significantly associated with number of children at P <10-7 and number of pregnancies at P <10-6. This SNP is located in a region without a gene within 1 Mb. One SNP on chromosome 6 was non-significantly associated with extreme number of children at P <10-6. The closest gene to this SNP is HDGFL1, a hepatoma-derived growth factor. When we excluded hormonal contraceptive users, a SNP on chromosome 5 was non-significantly associated at P <10-5 for number of children and number of pregnancies. This SNP is located near C5orf64, an open reading frame, and ZSWIM6, a zinc ion binding gene. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data using GCTA (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) for number of children (hg2 = 0.149, SE = 0.24, p-value = 0.265) and number of pregnancies (hg2 = 0.007, SE = 0.22, p-value = 0.487). Our genome-wide association study and heritability estimates of number of pregnancies and number of children in Bangladesh did not confer strong evidence of common variants for parity variation. However, our results suggest that future studies may want to consider the role of 3 notable SNPs in their analysis. PMID:25742292

  15. Genome-wide association study of parity in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Human fertility is a complex trait determined by gene-environment interactions in which genetic factors represent a significant component. To better understand inter-individual variability in fertility, we performed one of the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common fertility phenotypes, lifetime number of pregnancies and number of children in a developing country population. The fertility phenotype data and DNA samples were obtained at baseline recruitment from individuals participating in a large prospective cohort study in Bangladesh. GWAS analyses of fertility phenotypes were conducted among 1,686 married women. One SNP on chromosome 4 was non-significantly associated with number of children at P <10(-7) and number of pregnancies at P <10(-6). This SNP is located in a region without a gene within 1 Mb. One SNP on chromosome 6 was non-significantly associated with extreme number of children at P <10(-6). The closest gene to this SNP is HDGFL1, a hepatoma-derived growth factor. When we excluded hormonal contraceptive users, a SNP on chromosome 5 was non-significantly associated at P <10(-5) for number of children and number of pregnancies. This SNP is located near C5orf64, an open reading frame, and ZSWIM6, a zinc ion binding gene. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data using GCTA (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) for number of children (hg2 = 0.149, SE = 0.24, p-value = 0.265) and number of pregnancies (hg2 = 0.007, SE = 0.22, p-value = 0.487). Our genome-wide association study and heritability estimates of number of pregnancies and number of children in Bangladesh did not confer strong evidence of common variants for parity variation. However, our results suggest that future studies may want to consider the role of 3 notable SNPs in their analysis. PMID:25742292

  16. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in hepatoblastoma tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ximao; Liu, Baihui; Zheng, Shan; Dong, Kuiran; Dong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation has a crucial role in cancer biology. In the present study, a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in hepatoblastoma (HB) tissues was performed to verify differential methylation levels between HB and normal tissues. As alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has a critical role in HB, AFP methylation levels were also detected using pyrosequencing. Normal and HB liver tissue samples (frozen tissue) were obtained from patients with HB. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in these tissues was performed using an Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, and the results were confirmed with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip demonstrated distinctively less methylation in HB tissues than in non-tumor tissues. In addition, methylation enrichment was observed in positions near the transcription start site of AFP, which exhibited lower methylation levels in HB tissues than in non-tumor liver tissues. Lastly, a significant negative correlation was observed between AFP messenger RNA expression and DNA methylation percentage, using linear Pearson's R correlation coefficients. The present results demonstrate differential methylation levels between HB and normal tissues, and imply that aberrant methylation of AFP in HB could reflect HB development. Expansion of these findings could provide useful insight into HB biology. PMID:27446465

  17. [Genome-wide association study on complex diseases: study design and genetic markers].

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei-Li

    2008-04-01

    Genome-wide association study used to be a dream of geneticists years ago, but now it came true. Since the first paper reported the finding of genetic variation contributing to human age-related macular degeneration by genome-wide association study in 2005, a numbers of whole genome studies have been published. The present paper reviewed some common comments in whole genome association study on complex diseases, including achievements of genome-wide association studies on complex traits or diseases, principles of study design, selection of genetic marker in genome, and comparisons of different commercial products for whole genome association study. Finally a newly defined genetic variation, copy number variation, was briefly introduced. This paper also summarized the shortcomings of current genome-wide association studies and perspectives of its future. PMID:18424408

  18. Acetaminophen-NAPQI Hepatotoxicity: A Cell Line Model System Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Ann M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Batzler, Anthony J.; Pelleymounter, Linda L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Ji, Yuan; Chai, Yubo; Nordgren, Kendra K. S.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the leading cause of acute hepatic failure in many developed nations. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is mediated by the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine (NAPQI). We performed a “discovery” genome-wide association study using a cell line–based model system to study the possible contribution of genomics to NAPQI-induced cytotoxicity. A total of 176 lymphoblastoid cell lines from healthy subjects were treated with increasing concentrations of NAPQI. Inhibiting concentration 50 values were determined and were associated with “glutathione pathway” gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide basal messenger RNA expression, as well as with 1.3 million genome-wide SNPs. A group of SNPs in linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 3 was highly associated with NAPQI toxicity. The p value for rs2880961, the SNP with the lowest p value, was 1.88 × 10−7. This group of SNPs mapped to a “gene desert,” but chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated binding of several transcription factor proteins including heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and HSF2, at or near rs2880961. These chromosome 3 SNPs were not significantly associated with variation in basal expression for any of the genome-wide genes represented on the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip. We have used a cell line–based model system to identify a SNP signal associated with NAPQI cytotoxicity. If these observations are validated in future clinical studies, this SNP signal might represent a potential biomarker for risk of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear. PMID:21177773

  19. Genome-Wide Patterns of Nucleotide Polymorphism in Domesticated Rice

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ryan D; Boyko, Adam; Fledel-Alon, Adi; York, Thomas L; Polato, Nicholas R; Olsen, Kenneth M; Nielsen, Rasmus; McCouch, Susan R; Bustamante, Carlos D; Purugganan, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models to explain contemporary patterns of polymorphisms in rice, including a (i) selectively neutral population bottleneck model, (ii) bottleneck plus migration model, (iii) multiple selective sweeps model, and (iv) bottleneck plus selective sweeps model. We find that a simple bottleneck model, which has been the dominant demographic model for domesticated species, cannot explain the derived nucleotide polymorphism site frequency spectrum in rice. Instead, a bottleneck model that incorporates selective sweeps, or a more complex demographic model that includes subdivision and gene flow, are more plausible explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection results only in a local signature of variation. PMID:17907810

  20. Genome-wide gene-based association study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Chou; Liang, Yu-Jen; Chung, Chia-Min; Chen, Jia-Wei; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies, which analyzes hundreds of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to identify disease susceptibility genes, are challenging because the work involves intensive computation and complex modeling. We propose a two-stage genome-wide association scanning procedure, consisting of a single-locus association scan for the first stage and a gene-based association scan for the second stage. Marginal effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms are examined by using the exact Armitage trend test or logistic regression, and gene effects are examined by using a p-value combination method. Compared with some existing single-locus and multilocus methods, the proposed method has the following merits: 1) convenient for definition of biologically meaningful regions, 2) powerful for detection of minor-effect genes, 3) helpful for alleviation of a multiple-testing problem, and 4) convenient for result interpretation. The method was applied to study Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 Problem 1 rheumatoid arthritis data, and strong association signals were found. The results show that the human major histocompatibility complex region is the most important genomic region associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, previously reported genes including PTPN22, C5, and IL2RB were confirmed; novel genes including HLA-DRA, BTNL2, C6orf10, NOTCH4, TAP2, and TNXB were identified by our analysis. PMID:20018002

  1. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J.; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J.; Lohman, Kurt K.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiman, Eric M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D.; Smith, Albert V.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M. Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Bennett, David A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M.; Newman, Anne B.; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-01-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20–50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from nine studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for two outcomes: a) all-cause mortality and b) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10−8). We found fourteen independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and eight SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10−5). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity. PMID:21782286

  2. Advances in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Romi; Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    The covalent DNA modification of cytosine at position 5 (5-methylcytosine; 5mC) has emerged as an important epigenetic mark most commonly present in the context of CpG dinucleotides in mammalian cells. In pluripotent stem cells and plants, it is also found in non-CpG and CpNpG contexts, respectively. 5mC has important implications in a diverse set of biological processes, including transcriptional regulation. Aberrant DNA methylation has been shown to be associated with a wide variety of human ailments and thus is the focus of active investigation. Methods used for detecting DNA methylation have revolutionized our understanding of this epigenetic mark and provided new insights into its role in diverse biological functions. Here we describe recent technological advances in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis and discuss their relative utility and drawbacks, providing specific examples from studies that have used these technologies for genome-wide DNA methylation analysis to address important biological questions. Finally, we discuss a newly identified covalent DNA modification, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), and speculate on its possible biological function, as well as describe a new methodology that can distinguish 5hmC from 5mC. PMID:20964631

  3. Establishing an analytic pipeline for genome-wide DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle L; Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Wolen, Aaron R; Jackson-Cook, Colleen; Starkweather, Angela R; Lyon, Debra E; York, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    The need for research investigating DNA methylation (DNAm) in clinical studies has increased, leading to the evolution of new analytic methods to improve accuracy and reproducibility of the interpretation of results from these studies. The purpose of this article is to provide clinical researchers with a summary of the major data processing steps routinely applied in clinical studies investigating genome-wide DNAm using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450K BeadChip. In most studies, the primary goal of employing DNAm analysis is to identify differential methylation at CpG sites among phenotypic groups. Experimental design considerations are crucial at the onset to minimize bias from factors related to sample processing and avoid confounding experimental variables with non-biological batch effects. Although there are currently no de facto standard methods for analyzing these data, we review the major steps in processing DNAm data recommended by several research studies. We describe several variations available for clinical researchers to process, analyze, and interpret DNAm data. These insights are applicable to most types of genome-wide DNAm array platforms and will be applicable for the next generation of DNAm array technologies (e.g., the 850K array). Selection of the DNAm analytic pipeline followed by investigators should be guided by the research question and supported by recently published methods. PMID:27127542

  4. Genome-Wide Scan for Methylation Profiles in Keloids

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lamont R.; Young, William; Divine, George; Datta, Indrani; Chen, Kang Mei; Ozog, David; Worsham, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Keloids are benign fibroproliferative tumors of the skin which commonly occur after injury mainly in darker skinned patients. Medical treatment is fraught with high recurrence rates mainly because of an incomplete understanding of the biological mechanisms that lead to keloids. The purpose of this project was to examine keloid pathogenesis from the epigenome perspective of DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiling used the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to interrogate DNA from 6 fresh keloid and 6 normal skin samples from 12 anonymous donors. A 3-tiered approach was used to call out genes most differentially methylated between keloid and normal. When compared to normal, of the 685 differentially methylated CpGs at Tier 3, 510 were hypomethylated and 175 were hypermethylated with 190 CpGs in promoter and 495 in nonpromoter regions. The 190 promoter region CpGs corresponded to 152 genes: 96 (63%) were hypomethylated and 56 (37%) hypermethylated. This exploratory genome-wide scan of the keloid methylome highlights a predominance of hypomethylated genomic landscapes, favoring nonpromoter regions. DNA methylation, as an additional mechanism for gene regulation in keloid pathogenesis, holds potential for novel treatments that reverse deleterious epigenetic changes. As an alternative mechanism for regulating genes, epigenetics may explain why gene mutations alone do not provide definitive mechanisms for keloid formation. PMID:26074660

  5. Genome-wide methylation profiling of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rukova, B; Staneva, R; Hadjidekova, S; Stamenov, G; Milanova; Toncheva, D

    2014-12-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the major psychiatric disorders. It is a disorder of complex inheritance, involving both heritable and environmental factors. DNA methylation is an inheritable epigenetic modification that stably alters gene expression. We reasoned that genetic modifications that are a result of environmental stimuli could also make a contribution. We have performed 26 high-resolution genome-wide methylation array analyses to determine the methylation status of 27,627 CpG islands and compared the data between patients and healthy controls. Methylation profiles of DNAs were analyzed in six pools: 220 schizophrenia patients; 220 age-matched healthy controls; 110 female schizophrenia patients; 110 age-matched healthy females; 110 male schizophrenia patients; 110 age-matched healthy males. We also investigated the methylation status of 20 individual patient DNA samples (eight females and 12 males. We found significant differences in the methylation profile between schizophrenia and control DNA pools. We found new candidate genes that principally participate in apoptosis, synaptic transmission and nervous system development (GABRA2, LIN7B, CASP3). Methylation profiles differed between the genders. In females, the most important genes participate in apoptosis and synaptic transmission (XIAP, GABRD, OXT, KRT7), whereas in the males, the implicated genes in the molecular pathology of the disease were DHX37, MAP2K2, FNDC4 and GIPC1. Data from the individual methylation analyses confirmed, the gender-specific pools results. Our data revealed major differences in methylation profiles between schizophrenia patients and controls and between male and female patients. The dysregulated activity of the candidate genes could play a role in schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:25937794

  6. Genome-Wide Methylation Profiling of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Rukova, B; Staneva, R; Hadjidekova, S; Stamenov, G; Milanova; Toncheva, D

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the major psychiatric disorders. It is a disorder of complex inheritance, involving both heritable and environmental factors. DNA methylation is an inheritable epigenetic modification that stably alters gene expression. We reasoned that genetic modifications that are a result of environmental stimuli could also make a contribution. We have performed 26 high-resolution genome-wide methylation array analyses to determine the methylation status of 27,627 CpG islands and compared the data between patients and healthy controls. Methylation profiles of DNAs were analyzed in six pools: 220 schizophrenia patients; 220 age-matched healthy controls; 110 female schizophrenia patients; 110 age-matched healthy females; 110 male schizophrenia patients; 110 age-matched healthy males. We also investigated the methylation status of 20 individual patient DNA samples (eight females and 12 males. We found significant differences in the methylation profile between schizophrenia and control DNA pools. We found new candidate genes that principally participate in apoptosis, synaptic transmission and nervous system development (GABRA2, LIN7B, CASP3). Methylation profiles differed between the genders. In females, the most important genes participate in apoptosis and synaptic transmission (XIAP, GABRD, OXT, KRT7), whereas in the males, the implicated genes in the molecular pathology of the disease were DHX37, MAP2K2, FNDC4 and GIPC1. Data from the individual methylation analyses confirmed, the gender-specific pools results. Our data revealed major differences in methylation profiles between schizophrenia patients and controls and between male and female patients. The dysregulated activity of the candidate genes could play a role in schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:25937794

  7. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullapudi, Nandita; Ye, Bin; Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D; Spivack, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)-non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  8. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K.; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)–non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  9. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53-3.14), P=1.9 × 10(-5)). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951-LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37-1.85), P=1.6 × 10(-9)) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  10. Progress of genome wide association study in domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Domestic animals are invaluable resources for study of the molecular architecture of complex traits. Although the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for economically important traits in domestic animals has achieved remarkable results in recent decades, not all of the genetic variation in the complex traits has been captured because of the low density of markers used in QTL mapping studies. The genome wide association study (GWAS), which utilizes high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), provides a new way to tackle this issue. Encouraging achievements in dissection of the genetic mechanisms of complex diseases in humans have resulted from the use of GWAS. At present, GWAS has been applied to the field of domestic animal breeding and genetics, and some advances have been made. Many genes or markers that affect economic traits of interest in domestic animals have been identified. In this review, advances in the use of GWAS in domestic animals are described. PMID:22958308

  11. Genome-wide association studies for multiple diseases of the German Shepherd Dog.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kate L; Noorai, Rooksana E; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Quignon, Pascale; Rinz, Caitlin J; Ostrander, Elaine A; Steiner, Jörg M; Murphy, Keith E; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2012-02-01

    The German Shepherd Dog (GSD) is a popular working and companion breed for which over 50 hereditary diseases have been documented. Herein, SNP profiles for 197 GSDs were generated using the Affymetrix v2 canine SNP array for a genome-wide association study to identify loci associated with four diseases: pituitary dwarfism, degenerative myelopathy (DM), congenital megaesophagus (ME), and pancreatic acinar atrophy (PAA). A locus on Chr 9 is strongly associated with pituitary dwarfism and is proximal to a plausible candidate gene, LHX3. Results for DM confirm a major locus encompassing SOD1, in which an associated point mutation was previously identified, but do not suggest modifier loci. Several SNPs on Chr 12 are associated with ME and a 4.7 Mb haplotype block is present in affected dogs. Analysis of additional ME cases for a SNP within the haplotype provides further support for this association. Results for PAA indicate more complex genetic underpinnings. Several regions on multiple chromosomes reach genome-wide significance. However, no major locus is apparent and only two associated haplotype blocks, on Chrs 7 and 12 are observed. These data suggest that PAA may be governed by multiple loci with small effects, or it may be a heterogeneous disorder. PMID:22105877

  12. Genome Wide Association for Addiction: Replicated Results and Comparisons of Two Analytic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Drgon, Tomas; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Johnson, Catherine; Walther, Donna; Hess, Judith; Nino, Michelle; Uhl, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Vulnerabilities to dependence on addictive substances are substantially heritable complex disorders whose underlying genetic architecture is likely to be polygenic, with modest contributions from variants in many individual genes. “Nontemplate” genome wide association (GWA) approaches can identity groups of chromosomal regions and genes that, taken together, are much more likely to contain allelic variants that alter vulnerability to substance dependence than expected by chance. Methodology/Principal Findings We report pooled “nontemplate” genome-wide association studies of two independent samples of substance dependent vs control research volunteers (n = 1620), one European-American and the other African-American using 1 million SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) Affymetrix genotyping arrays. We assess convergence between results from these two samples using two related methods that seek clustering of nominally-positive results and assess significance levels with Monte Carlo and permutation approaches. Both “converge then cluster” and “cluster then converge” analyses document convergence between the results obtained from these two independent datasets in ways that are virtually never found by chance. The genes identified in this fashion are also identified by individually-genotyped dbGAP data that compare allele frequencies in cocaine dependent vs control individuals. Conclusions/Significance These overlapping results identify small chromosomal regions that are also identified by genome wide data from studies of other relevant samples to extents much greater than chance. These chromosomal regions contain more genes related to “cell adhesion” processes than expected by chance. They also contain a number of genes that encode potential targets for anti-addiction pharmacotherapeutics. “Nontemplate” GWA approaches that seek chromosomal regions in which nominally-positive associations are found in multiple independent samples are

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies GPC5 as a Novel Genetic Locus Protective against Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Post, Wendy; Jui, Jonathan; Hilton, Gina; O'Connor, Ashley; Prineas, Ronald J.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Rea, Thomas; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Siscovick, David S.; Burke, Gregory L.; Marban, Eduardo; Spooner, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Existing studies indicate a significant genetic component for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide an unbiased approach for identification of novel genes. We performed a GWAS to identify genetic determinants of SCA. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a case-control design within the ongoing Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study (Oregon-SUDS). Cases (n = 424) were SCAs with coronary artery disease (CAD) among residents of Portland, OR (2002–07, population ∼1,000,000) and controls (n = 226) were residents with CAD, but no history of SCA. All subjects were of White-European ancestry and GWAS was performed using Affymetrix 500K/5.0 and 6.0 arrays. High signal markers were genotyped in SCA cases (n = 521) identified from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) and the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) (combined n = 19,611). No SNPs reached genome-wide significance (p<5×10−8). SNPs at 6 loci were prioritized for follow-up primarily based on significance of p<10−4 and proximity to a known gene (CSMD2, GPR37L1, LIN9, B4GALNT3, GPC5, and ZNF592). The minor allele of GPC5 (GLYPICAN 5, rs3864180) was associated with a lower risk of SCA in Oregon-SUDS, an effect that was also observed in ARIC/CHS whites (p<0.05) and blacks (p<0.04). In a combined Cox proportional hazards model analysis that adjusted for race, the minor allele exhibited a hazard ratio of 0.85 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.98; p<0.01). Conclusions/Significance A novel genetic locus for SCA, GPC5, was identified from Oregon-SUDS and successfully validated in the ARIC and CHS cohorts. Three other members of the Glypican family have been previously implicated in human disease, including cardiac conditions. The mechanism of this specific association requires further study. PMID:20360844

  14. Genome-wide pathway analysis of genome-wide association studies on systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Choi, Sung Jae; Ji, Jong Dae; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and candidate mechanisms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Two SLE genome-wide association studies (GWASs) datasets were included in this study. Meta-analysis was conducted using 737,984 SNPs in 1,527 SLE cases and 3,421 controls of European ancestry, and 4,429 SNPs that met a threshold of p < 0.01 in a Korean RA GWAS dataset was used. ICSNPathway (identify candidate causal SNPs and pathways) analysis was applied to the meta-analysis results of the SLE GWAS datasets, and a RA GWAS dataset. The most significant result of SLE GWAS meta-analysis concerned rs2051549 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region (p = 3.36E-22). In the non-HLA region, meta-analysis identified 6 SNPs associated with SLE with genome-wide significance (STAT4, TNPO3, BLK, FAM167A, and IRF5). ICSNPathway identified five candidate causal SNPs and 13 candidate causal pathways. This pathway-based analysis provides three hypotheses of the biological mechanism involved. First, rs8084 and rs7192 → HLA-DRA → bystander B cell activation. Second, rs1800629 → TNF → cytokine network. Third, rs1150752 and rs185819 → TNXB → collagen metabolic process. ICSNPathway analysis identified three candidate causal non-HLA SNPs and four candidate causal pathways involving the PADI4, MTR, PADI2, and TPH2 genes of RA. We identified five candidate SNPs and thirteen pathways, involving bystander B cell activation, cytokine network, and collagen metabolic processing, which may contribute to SLE susceptibility, and we revealed candidate causal non-HLA SNPs, genes, and pathways of RA. PMID:23053960

  15. HLA-DPB1 and DPB2 are genetic loci for systemic sclerosis -Genome-wide association study in Koreans with Replication in North Americans

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Lee, Jong Eun; Arnett, Frank. C.; Xiong, Momiao; Park, Min Young; Yoo, Yeon Kyeong; Shin, Eun Soon; Reveille, John. D.; Mayes, Maureen D.; Kim, Jin Hyun; Song, Ran; Choi, Ji Yong; Park, Ji Ah; Lee, Yun Jong; Lee, Eun Young; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Eun Bong

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the most susceptible genetic loci in systemic sclerosis (SSc) with genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods A genome-wide association study was performed in 137 patients with systemic sclerosis and 564 controls from Korea using the Affymetrix Human SNP Array 5.0. After fine mapping study, the results were replicated in 1,107 SSc patients and 2,747 controls from a US Caucasian population. Results The SNPs (rs3128930, rs7763822, rs7764491, rs3117230 and rs3128965) of HLA-DPB1 and –DPB2 on chromosome 6 formed a distinctive peak with log p-values (p =8.16 × 10−13) for association with SSc susceptibility. Subtyping analysis of HLA-DPB1 showed that DPB1*1301 (p = 7.61×10−8) and DPB1*0901 (p = 2.56×10−5)were the most susceptible subtypes for SSc in Koreans. In US Caucasians, two pairs of SNPs, rs7763822/rs7764491 and rs3117230/rs3128965, showed strong association with SSc patients who had either circulating anti-DNA topoisomerase I (p = 7.58 × 10−17/4.84 × 10−16) or anti-centromere autoantibodies (p = 1.12 × 10−3/3.2 × 10−5), respectively. Conclusion Our GWAS in Koreans revealed that the region of HLA-DPB1 and –DPB2 contains the most susceptible loci to Korean SSc. The confirmatory studies in US Caucasians indicated that specific SNPs of the HLA-DPB1 and/or –DPB2 were strongly associated with US Caucasian SSc patients who were positive to anti-topoisomerase I or anti-centromere autoantibodies. PMID:19950302

  16. Genome-wide Association Study and Meta-Analysis Identify ISL1 as Genome-wide Significant Susceptibility Gene for Bladder Exstrophy

    PubMed Central

    Draaken, Markus; Knapp, Michael; Pennimpede, Tracie; Schmidt, Johanna M.; Ebert, Anne-Karolin; Rösch, Wolfgang; Stein, Raimund; Utsch, Boris; Hirsch, Karin; Boemers, Thomas M.; Mangold, Elisabeth; Heilmann, Stefanie; Ludwig, Kerstin U.; Jenetzky, Ekkehart; Zwink, Nadine; Moebus, Susanne; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Nöthen, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    The bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) represents the severe end of the uro-rectal malformation spectrum, and is thought to result from aberrant embryonic morphogenesis of the cloacal membrane and the urorectal septum. The most common form of BEEC is isolated classic bladder exstrophy (CBE). To identify susceptibility loci for CBE, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 110 CBE patients and 1,177 controls of European origin. Here, an association was found with a region of approximately 220kb on chromosome 5q11.1. This region harbors the ISL1 (ISL LIM homeobox 1) gene. Multiple markers in this region showed evidence for association with CBE, including 84 markers with genome-wide significance. We then performed a meta-analysis using data from a previous GWAS by our group of 98 CBE patients and 526 controls of European origin. This meta-analysis also implicated the 5q11.1 locus in CBE risk. A total of 138 markers at this locus reached genome-wide significance in the meta-analysis, and the most significant marker (rs9291768) achieved a P value of 2.13 × 10−12. No other locus in the meta-analysis achieved genome-wide significance. We then performed murine expression analyses to follow up this finding. Here, Isl1 expression was detected in the genital region within the critical time frame for human CBE development. Genital regions with Isl1 expression included the peri-cloacal mesenchyme and the urorectal septum. The present study identified the first genome-wide significant locus for CBE at chromosomal region 5q11.1, and provides strong evidence for the hypothesis that ISL1 is the responsible candidate gene in this region. PMID:25763902

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study of Intelligence: Additive Effects of Novel Brain Expressed Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Sandra K.; Shtir, Corina; Doyle, Alysa E.; Mick, Eric; McGough, James J.; McCracken, James; Biederman, Joseph; Smalley, Susan L.; Cantor, Rita M.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to identify common genetic variants that are associated with human intelligence or general cognitive ability. Method: We performed a genome-wide association analysis with a dense set of 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative intelligence scores within an ancestrally…

  18. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A ... out to see if a technology called whole genome sequencing would help them find other genetic risk ...

  19. Genome-wide sequencing to identify the cause of hereditary cancer syndromes: with examples from familial pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Nicholas J.; Klein, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the human genome and next-generation technologies have facilitated the use of genome-wide sequencing to decipher the genetic basis of Mendelian disease and hereditary cancer syndromes. The application of genome-wide sequencing in hereditary cancer syndromes has had mixed success, in part, due to complex nature of the underlying genetic architecture. In this review we discuss the use of genome-wide sequencing in both Mendelian diseases and hereditary cancer syndromes, highlighting the potential and challenges of this approach using familial pancreatic cancer as an example. PMID:23196058

  20. Minimalist ensemble algorithms for genome-wide protein localization prediction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational prediction of protein subcellular localization can greatly help to elucidate its functions. Despite the existence of dozens of protein localization prediction algorithms, the prediction accuracy and coverage are still low. Several ensemble algorithms have been proposed to improve the prediction performance, which usually include as many as 10 or more individual localization algorithms. However, their performance is still limited by the running complexity and redundancy among individual prediction algorithms. Results This paper proposed a novel method for rational design of minimalist ensemble algorithms for practical genome-wide protein subcellular localization prediction. The algorithm is based on combining a feature selection based filter and a logistic regression classifier. Using a novel concept of contribution scores, we analyzed issues of algorithm redundancy, consensus mistakes, and algorithm complementarity in designing ensemble algorithms. We applied the proposed minimalist logistic regression (LR) ensemble algorithm to two genome-wide datasets of Yeast and Human and compared its performance with current ensemble algorithms. Experimental results showed that the minimalist ensemble algorithm can achieve high prediction accuracy with only 1/3 to 1/2 of individual predictors of current ensemble algorithms, which greatly reduces computational complexity and running time. It was found that the high performance ensemble algorithms are usually composed of the predictors that together cover most of available features. Compared to the best individual predictor, our ensemble algorithm improved the prediction accuracy from AUC score of 0.558 to 0.707 for the Yeast dataset and from 0.628 to 0.646 for the Human dataset. Compared with popular weighted voting based ensemble algorithms, our classifier-based ensemble algorithms achieved much better performance without suffering from inclusion of too many individual predictors. Conclusions We

  1. Genome-wide survey for biologically functional pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Orjan; Arvestad, Lars; Lagergren, Jens

    2006-05-01

    According to current estimates there exist about 20,000 pseudogenes in a mammalian genome. The vast majority of these are disabled and nonfunctional copies of protein-coding genes which, therefore, evolve neutrally. Recent findings that a Makorin1 pseudogene, residing on mouse Chromosome 5, is, indeed, in vivo vital and also evolutionarily preserved, encouraged us to conduct a genome-wide survey for other functional pseudogenes in human, mouse, and chimpanzee. We identify to our knowledge the first examples of conserved pseudogenes common to human and mouse, originating from one duplication predating the human-mouse species split and having evolved as pseudogenes since the species split. Functionality is one possible way to explain the apparently contradictory properties of such pseudogene pairs, i.e., high conservation and ancient origin. The hypothesis of functionality is tested by comparing expression evidence and synteny of the candidates with proper test sets. The tests suggest potential biological function. Our candidate set includes a small set of long-lived pseudogenes whose unknown potential function is retained since before the human-mouse species split, and also a larger group of primate-specific ones found from human-chimpanzee searches. Two processed sequences are notable, their conservation since the human-mouse split being as high as most protein-coding genes; one is derived from the protein Ataxin 7-like 3 (ATX7NL3), and one from the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 protein (ATX1). Our approach is comparative and can be applied to any pair of species. It is implemented by a semi-automated pipeline based on cross-species BLAST comparisons and maximum-likelihood phylogeny estimations. To separate pseudogenes from protein-coding genes, we use standard methods, utilizing in-frame disablements, as well as a probabilistic filter based on Ka/Ks ratios. PMID:16680195

  2. Transcriptome profiling and genome-wide DNA binding define the differential role of fenretinide and all-trans RA in regulating the death and survival of human hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying; Liu, Hui-Xin; He, Yuqi; Fang, Yaping; Fang, Jianwen; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Fenretinide is significantly more effective in inducing apoptosis in cancer cells than all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). The current study uses a genome-wide approach to understand the differential role fenretinide and ATRA have in inducing apoptosis in Huh7 cells. Fenretinide and ATRA-induced gene expressions and DNA bindings were profiled using microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation with anti-RXRα antibody. The data showed that fenretinide was not a strong transcription regulator. Fenretinide only changed the expressions of 1 093 genes, approximately three times less than the number of genes regulated by ATRA (2 811). Biological function annotation demonstrated that both fenretinide and ATRA participated in pathways that determine cell fate and metabolic processes. However, fenretinide specifically induced Fas/TNFα-mediated apoptosis by increasing the expression of pro-apoptotic genes i.e., DEDD2, CASP8, CASP4, and HSPA1A/B; whereas, ATRA induced the expression of BIRC3 and TNFAIP3, which inhibit apoptosis by interacting with TRAF2. In addition, fenretinide inhibited the expression of the genes involved in RAS/RAF/ERK-mediated survival pathway. In contrast, ATRA increased the expression of SOSC2, BRAF, MEK, and ERK genes. Most genes regulated by fenretinide and ATRA were bound by RXRα, suggesting a direct effect. This study revealed that by regulating fewer genes, the effects of fenretinide become more specific and thus has fewer side effects than ATRA. The data also suggested that fenretinide induces apoptosis via death receptor effector and by inhibiting the RAS/RAF/ERK pathway. It provides insight on how retinoid efficacy can be improved and how side effects in cancer therapy can be reduced. PMID:23396089

  3. Next generation genome-wide association tool: Design and coverage of a high-throughput European-optimized SNP array

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Kvale, Mark N.; Hesselson, Stephanie E.; Zhan, Yiping; Aquino, Christine; Cao, Yang; Cawley, Simon; Chung, Elaine; Connell, Sheryl; Eshragh, Jasmin; Ewing, Marcia; Gollub, Jeremy; Henderson, Mary; Hubbell, Earl; Iribarren, Carlos; Kaufman, Jay; Lao, Richard Z.; Lu, Yontao; Ludwig, Dana; Mathauda, Gurpreet K.; McGuire, William; Mei, Gangwu; Miles, Sunita; Purdy, Matthew M.; Quesenberry, Charles; Ranatunga, Dilrini; Rowell, Sarah; Sadler, Marianne; Shapero, Michael H.; Shen, Ling; Shenoy, Tanushree R.; Smethurst, David; Van den Eeden, Stephen K.; Walter, Larry; Wan, Eunice; Wearley, Reid; Webster, Teresa; Wen, Christopher C.; Weng, Li; Whitmer, Rachel A.; Williams, Alan; Wong, Simon C.; Zau, Chia; Finn, Andrea; Schaefer, Catherine; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Risch, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The success of genome-wide association studies has paralleled the development of efficient genotyping technologies. We describe the development of a next-generation microarray based on the new highly-efficient Affymetrix Axiom genotyping technology that we are using to genotype individuals of European ancestry from the Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH). The array contains 674,517 SNPs, and provides excellent genome-wide as well as gene-based and candidate-SNP coverage. Coverage was calculated using an approach based on imputation and cross validation. Preliminary results for the first 80,301 saliva-derived DNA samples from the RPGEH demonstrate very high quality genotypes, with sample success rates above 94% and over 98% of successful samples having SNP call rates exceeding 98%. At steady state, we have produced 462 million genotypes per week for each Axiom system. The new array provides a valuable addition to the repertoire of tools for large scale genome-wide association studies. PMID:21565264

  4. Quality Control Procedures for Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Stephen; Armstrong, Loren L.; Bradford, Yuki; Carlson, Christopher S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; de Andrade, Mariza; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hayes, Geoffrey; Jarvik, Gail; Jiang, Lan; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Li, Rongling; Ling, Hua; Manolio, Teri A.; Matsumoto, Martha; McCarty, Catherine A.; McDavid, Andrew N.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Paschall, Justin E.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Wilke, Russell A.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are being conducted at an unprecedented rate in population-based cohorts and have increased our understanding of the pathophysiology of complex disease. The recent application of GWAS to clinic-based cohorts has also yielded genetic predictors of clinical outcomes. Regardless of context, the practical utility of this information will ultimately depend upon the quality of the original data. Quality control (QC) procedures for GWAS are computationally intensive, operationally challenging, and constantly evolving. With each new dataset, new realities are discovered about GWAS data and best practices continue to be developed. The Genomics Workgroup of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) funded electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network has invested considerable effort in developing strategies for QC of these data. The lessons learned by this group will be valuable for other investigators dealing with large scale genomic datasets. Here we enumerate some of the challenges in QC of GWAS data and describe the approaches that the eMERGE network is using for quality assurance in GWAS data, thereby minimizing potential bias and error in GWAS results. In this protocol we discuss common issues associated with QC of GWAS data, including data file formats, software packages for data manipulation and analysis, sex chromosome anomalies, sample identity, sample relatedness, population substructure, batch effects, and marker quality. We propose best practices and discuss areas of ongoing and future research. PMID:21234875

  5. Optical mapping discerns genome wide DNA methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ananiev, Gene E; Goldstein, Steve; Runnheim, Rod; Forrest, Dan K; Zhou, Shiguo; Potamousis, Konstantinos; Churas, Chris P; Bergendahl, Veit; Thomson, James A; Schwartz, David C

    2008-01-01

    Background Methylation of CpG dinucleotides is a fundamental mechanism of epigenetic regulation in eukaryotic genomes. Development of methods for rapid genome wide methylation profiling will greatly facilitate both hypothesis and discovery driven research in the field of epigenetics. In this regard, a single molecule approach to methylation profiling offers several unique advantages that include elimination of chemical DNA modification steps and PCR amplification. Results A single molecule approach is presented for the discernment of methylation profiles, based on optical mapping. We report results from a series of pilot studies demonstrating the capabilities of optical mapping as a platform for methylation profiling of whole genomes. Optical mapping was used to discern the methylation profile from both an engineered and wild type Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the methylation status of selected loci within the genome of human embryonic stem cells was profiled using optical mapping. Conclusion The optical mapping platform effectively detects DNA methylation patterns. Due to single molecule detection, optical mapping offers significant advantages over other technologies. This advantage stems from obviation of DNA modification steps, such as bisulfite treatment, and the ability of the platform to assay repeat dense regions within mammalian genomes inaccessible to techniques using array-hybridization technologies. PMID:18667073

  6. A SUPER Powerful Method for Genome Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yuchun; Buckler, Edward S.; Zhang, Zhiwu

    2014-01-01

    Genome-Wide Association Studies shed light on the identification of genes underlying human diseases and agriculturally important traits. This potential has been shadowed by false positive findings. The Mixed Linear Model (MLM) method is flexible enough to simultaneously incorporate population structure and cryptic relationships to reduce false positives. However, its intensive computational burden is prohibitive in practice, especially for large samples. The newly developed algorithm, FaST-LMM, solved the computational problem, but requires that the number of SNPs be less than the number of individuals to derive a rank-reduced relationship. This restriction potentially leads to less statistical power when compared to using all SNPs. We developed a method to extract a small subset of SNPs and use them in FaST-LMM. This method not only retains the computational advantage of FaST-LMM, but also remarkably increases statistical power even when compared to using the entire set of SNPs. We named the method SUPER (Settlement of MLM Under Progressively Exclusive Relationship) and made it available within an implementation of the GAPIT software package. PMID:25247812

  7. Genome-wide association study of selenium concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Fornage, Myriam; Foy, Millennia; Xun, Pengcheng; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Morris, Steve; Chasman, Daniel I.; Hu, Frank B.; Rimm, Eric B.; Kraft, Peter; Jordan, Joanne M.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; He, Ka

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in human nutrition, but its role in certain health conditions, particularly among Se sufficient populations, is controversial. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of blood Se concentrations previously identified a locus at 5q14 near BHMT. We performed a GW meta-analysis of toenail Se concentrations, which reflect a longer duration of exposure than blood Se concentrations, including 4162 European descendants from four US cohorts. Toenail Se was measured using neutron activation analysis. We identified a GW-significant locus at 5q14 (P < 1 × 10−16), the same locus identified in the published GWAS of blood Se based on independent cohorts. The lead single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) explained ∼1% of the variance in toenail Se concentrations. Using GW-summary statistics from both toenail and blood Se, we observed statistical evidence of polygenic overlap (P < 0.001) and meta-analysis of results from studies of either trait (n = 9639) yielded a second GW-significant locus at 21q22.3, harboring CBS (P < 4 × 10−8). Proteins encoded by genes at 5q14 and 21q22.3 function in homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism, and index SNPs for each have previously been associated with betaine and Hcy levels in GWAS. Our findings show evidence of a genetic link between Se and Hcy pathways, both involved in cardiometabolic disease. PMID:25343990

  8. Genome-wide association study of selenium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Marilyn C; Fornage, Myriam; Foy, Millennia; Xun, Pengcheng; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Morris, Steve; Chasman, Daniel I; Hu, Frank B; Rimm, Eric B; Kraft, Peter; Jordan, Joanne M; Mozaffarian, Dariush; He, Ka

    2015-03-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in human nutrition, but its role in certain health conditions, particularly among Se sufficient populations, is controversial. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of blood Se concentrations previously identified a locus at 5q14 near BHMT. We performed a GW meta-analysis of toenail Se concentrations, which reflect a longer duration of exposure than blood Se concentrations, including 4162 European descendants from four US cohorts. Toenail Se was measured using neutron activation analysis. We identified a GW-significant locus at 5q14 (P < 1 × 10(-16)), the same locus identified in the published GWAS of blood Se based on independent cohorts. The lead single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) explained ∼1% of the variance in toenail Se concentrations. Using GW-summary statistics from both toenail and blood Se, we observed statistical evidence of polygenic overlap (P < 0.001) and meta-analysis of results from studies of either trait (n = 9639) yielded a second GW-significant locus at 21q22.3, harboring CBS (P < 4 × 10(-8)). Proteins encoded by genes at 5q14 and 21q22.3 function in homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism, and index SNPs for each have previously been associated with betaine and Hcy levels in GWAS. Our findings show evidence of a genetic link between Se and Hcy pathways, both involved in cardiometabolic disease. PMID:25343990

  9. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenetics research debate

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kent R; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Will genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ‘work’ for pharmacogenetics research? This question was the topic of a staged debate, with pro and con sides, aimed to bring out the strengths and weaknesses of GWAS for pharmacogenetics studies. After a full day of seminars at the Fifth Statistical Analysis Workshop of the Pharmacogenetics Research Network, the lively debate was held – appropriately – at Goonies Comedy Club in Rochester (MN, USA). The pro side emphasized that the many GWAS successes for identifying genetic variants associated with disease risk show that it works; that the current genotyping platforms are efficient, with good imputation methods to fill in missing data; that its global assessment is always a success even if no significant associations are detected; and that genetic effects are likely to be large because humans have not evolved in a drug-therapy environment. By contrast, the con side emphasized that we have limited knowledge of the complexity of the genome; limited clinical phenotypes compromise studies; the likely multifactorial nature of drug response clouding the small genetic effects; and limitations of sample size and replication studies in pharmacogenetic studies. Lively and insightful discussions emphasized further research efforts that might benefit GWAS in pharmacogenetics. PMID:20235786

  10. Genome-Wide Association Studies in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Gulamhusein, Aliya F; Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been a significant technological advance in our ability to evaluate the genetic architecture of complex diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). To date, six large-scale studies have been performed that have identified 27 risk loci in addition to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associated with PBC. The identified risk variants emphasize important disease concepts; namely, that disturbances in immunoregulatory pathways are important in the pathogenesis of PBC and that such perturbations are shared among a diverse number of autoimmune diseases-suggesting the risk architecture may confer a generalized propensity to autoimmunity not necessarily specific to PBC. Furthermore, the impact of non-HLA risk variants, particularly in genes involved with interleukin-12 signaling, and ethnic variation in conferring susceptibility to PBC have been highlighted. Although GWASs have been a critical stepping stone in understanding common genetic variation contributing to PBC, limitations pertaining to power, sample availability, and strong linkage disequilibrium across genes have left us with an incomplete understanding of the genetic underpinnings of disease pathogenesis. Future efforts to gain insight into this missing heritability, the genetic variation that contributes to important disease outcomes, and the functional consequences of associated variants will be critical if practical clinical translation is to be realized. PMID:26676814

  11. Genome wide expression profiling of two accession of G. herbaceum L. in response to drought

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide gene expression profiling and detailed physiological investigation were used for understanding the molecular mechanism and physiological response of Gossypium herbaceum, which governs the adaptability of plants in drought conditions. Recently, microarray-based gene expression analysis is commonly used to decipher genes and genetic networks controlling the traits of interest. However, the results of such an analysis are often plagued due to a limited number of genes (probe sets) on microarrays. On the other hand, pyrosequencing of a transcriptome has the potential to detect rare as well as a large number of transcripts in the samples quantitatively. We used Affymetrix microarray as well as Roche's GS-FLX transcriptome sequencing for a comparative analysis of cotton transcriptome in leaf tissues under drought conditions. Results Fourteen accessions of Gossypium herbaceum were subjected to mannitol stress for preliminary screening; two accessions, namely Vagad and RAHS-14, were selected as being the most tolerant and most sensitive to osmotic stress, respectively. Affymetrix cotton arrays containing 24,045 probe sets and Roche's GS-FLX transcriptome sequencing of leaf tissue were used to analyze the gene expression profiling of Vagad and RAHS-14 under drought conditions. The analysis of physiological measurements and gene expression profiling showed that Vagad has the inherent ability to sense drought at a much earlier stage and to respond to it in a much more efficient manner than does RAHS-14. Gene Ontology (GO) studies showed that the phenyl propanoid pathway, pigment biosynthesis, polyketide biosynthesis, and other secondary metabolite pathways were enriched in Vagad under control and drought conditions as compared with RAHS-14. Similarly, GO analysis of transcriptome sequencing showed that the GO terms responses to various abiotic stresses were significantly higher in Vagad. Among the classes of transcription factors (TFs) uniquely

  12. Genome-Wide Association Study for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Taiwanese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Chuang, Li-Chung; Su, Mei-Hsin; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Yen, Chung-Jen; Wu, Yu-Yu; Liu, Shih-Kai; Chou, Miao-Chun; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Tsai, Wen-Che; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with strong genetic components. Several recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies in Caucasian samples have reported a number of gene regions and loci correlated with the risk of ASD—albeit with very little consensus across studies. Methods A two-stage GWA study was employed to identify common genetic variants for ASD in the Taiwanese Han population. The discovery stage included 315 patients with ASD and 1,115 healthy controls, using the Affymetrix SNP array 6.0 platform for genotyping. Several gene regions were then selected for fine-mapping and top markers were examined in extended samples. Single marker, haplotype, gene-based, and pathway analyses were conducted for associations. Results Seven SNPs had p-values ranging from 3.4~9.9*10−6, but none reached the genome-wide significant level. Five of them were mapped to three known genes (OR2M4, STYK1, and MNT) with significant empirical gene-based p-values in OR2M4 (p = 3.4*10−5) and MNT (p = 0.0008). Results of the fine-mapping study showed single-marker associations in the GLIS1 (rs12082358 and rs12080993) and NAALADL2 (rs3914502 and rs2222447) genes, and gene-based associations for the OR2M3-OR2T5 (olfactory receptor genes, p = 0.02), and GLIPR1/KRR1 gene regions (p = 0.015). Pathway analyses revealed important pathways for ASD, such as olfactory and G protein–coupled receptors signaling pathways. Conclusions We reported Taiwanese Han specific susceptibility genes and variants for ASD. However, further replication in other Asian populations is warranted to validate our findings. Investigation in the biological functions of our reported genetic variants might also allow for better understanding on the underlying pathogenesis of autism. PMID:26398136

  13. Identification of Promising Mutants Associated with Egg Production Traits Revealed by Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Taocun; Yi, Guoqiang; Qu, LuJiang; Qu, Liang; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Egg number (EN), egg laying rate (LR) and age at first egg (AFE) are important production traits related to egg production in poultry industry. To better understand the knowledge of genetic architecture of dynamic EN during the whole laying cycle and provide the precise positions of associated variants for EN, LR and AFE, laying records from 21 to 72 weeks of age were collected individually for 1,534 F2 hens produced by reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn and Dongxiang Blue-shelled chicken, and their genotypes were assayed by chicken 600 K Affymetrix high density genotyping arrays. Subsequently, pedigree and SNP-based genetic parameters were estimated and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted on EN, LR and AFE. The heritability estimates were similar between pedigree and SNP-based estimates varying from 0.17 to 0.36. In the GWA analysis, we identified nine genome-wide significant loci associated with EN of the laying periods from 21 to 26 weeks, 27 to 36 weeks and 37 to 72 weeks. Analysis of GTF2A1 and CLSPN suggested that they influenced the function of ovary and uterus, and may be considered as relevant candidates. The identified SNP rs314448799 for accumulative EN from 21 to 40 weeks on chromosome 5 created phenotypic differences of 6.86 eggs between two homozygous genotypes, which could be potentially applied to the molecular breeding for EN selection. Moreover, our finding showed that LR was a moderate polygenic trait. The suggestive significant region on chromosome 16 for AFE suggested the relationship between sex maturity and immune in the current population. The present study comprehensively evaluates the role of genetic variants in the development of egg laying. The findings will be helpful to investigation of causative genes function and future marker-assisted selection and genomic selection in chickens. PMID:26496084

  14. Genome-wide association study of sleep in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep is a highly conserved behavior, yet its duration and pattern vary extensively among species and between individuals within species. The genetic basis of natural variation in sleep remains unknown. Results We used the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to perform a genome-wide association (GWA) study of sleep in D. melanogaster. We identified candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in the mean as well as the environmental sensitivity of sleep traits; these SNPs typically had sex-specific or sex-biased effects, and were generally located in non-coding regions. The majority of SNPs (80.3%) affecting sleep were at low frequency and had moderately large effects. Additive models incorporating multiple SNPs explained as much as 55% of the genetic variance for sleep in males and females. Many of these loci are known to interact physically and/or genetically, enabling us to place them in candidate genetic networks. We confirmed the role of seven novel loci on sleep using insertional mutagenesis and RNA interference. Conclusions We identified many SNPs in novel loci that are potentially associated with natural variation in sleep, as well as SNPs within genes previously known to affect Drosophila sleep. Several of the candidate genes have human homologues that were identified in studies of human sleep, suggesting that genes affecting variation in sleep are conserved across species. Our discovery of genetic variants that influence environmental sensitivity to sleep may have a wider application to all GWA studies, because individuals with highly plastic genotypes will not have consistent phenotypes. PMID:23617951

  15. Bioinformatics challenges for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jason H.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Williams, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: The sequencing of the human genome has made it possible to identify an informative set of >1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome that can be used to carry out genome-wide association studies (GWASs). The availability of massive amounts of GWAS data has necessitated the development of new biostatistical methods for quality control, imputation and analysis issues including multiple testing. This work has been successful and has enabled the discovery of new associations that have been replicated in multiple studies. However, it is now recognized that most SNPs discovered via GWAS have small effects on disease susceptibility and thus may not be suitable for improving health care through genetic testing. One likely explanation for the mixed results of GWAS is that the current biostatistical analysis paradigm is by design agnostic or unbiased in that it ignores all prior knowledge about disease pathobiology. Further, the linear modeling framework that is employed in GWAS often considers only one SNP at a time thus ignoring their genomic and environmental context. There is now a shift away from the biostatistical approach toward a more holistic approach that recognizes the complexity of the genotype–phenotype relationship that is characterized by significant heterogeneity and gene–gene and gene–environment interaction. We argue here that bioinformatics has an important role to play in addressing the complexity of the underlying genetic basis of common human diseases. The goal of this review is to identify and discuss those GWAS challenges that will require computational methods. Contact: jason.h.moore@dartmouth.edu PMID:20053841

  16. Qualitative assessment of gene expression in affymetrix genechip arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix Genechip microarrays are used widely to determine the simultaneous expression of genes in a given biological paradigm. Probes on the Genechip array are atomic entities which by definition are randomly distributed across the array and in turn govern the gene expression. In the present study, we make several interesting observations. We show that there is considerable correlation between the probe intensities across the array which defy the independence assumption. While the mechanism behind such correlations is unclear, we show that scaling behavior and the profiles of perfect match (PM) as well as mismatch (MM) probes are similar and immune-to-background subtraction. We believe that the observed correlations are possibly an outcome of inherent non-stationarities or patchiness in the array devoid of biological significance. This is demonstrated by inspecting their scaling behavior and profiles of the PM and MM probe intensities obtained from publicly available Genechip arrays from three eukaryotic genomes, namely: Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), Homo sapiens (humans) and Mus musculus (house mouse) across distinct biological paradigms and across laboratories, with and without background subtraction. The fluctuation functions were estimated using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) with fourth-order polynomial detrending. The results presented in this study provide new insights into correlation signatures of PM and MM probe intensities and suggests the choice of DFA as a tool for qualitative assessment of Affymetrix Genechip microarrays prior to their analysis. A more detailed investigation is necessary in order to understand the source of these correlations.

  17. Genome-wide Association Study of Chicken Plumage Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Na; Choi, Jin Ae; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Tae-Hun; Cho, Seoae; Lee, Taeheon

    2013-11-01

    To increase plumage color uniformity and understand the genetic background of Korean chickens, we performed a genome-wide association study of different plumage color in Korean native chickens. We analyzed 60K SNP chips on 279 chickens with GEMMA methods for GWAS and estimated the genetic heritability for plumage color. The estimated heritability suggests that plumage coloration is a polygenic trait. We found new loci associated with feather pigmentation at the genome-wide level and from the results infer that there are additional genetic effect for plumage color. The results will be used for selecting and breeding chicken for plumage color uniformity. PMID:25049737

  18. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform. PMID:21498550

  19. A Genome-Wide Association Search for Type 2 Diabetes Genes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Nicholette D.; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Roh, Bong H.; Wing, Maria R.; An, S. Sandy; Hester, Jessica M.; Cooke, Jessica N.; Bostrom, Meredith A.; Rudock, Megan E.; Talbert, Matthew E.; Lewis, Joshua P.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Lu, Lingyi; Ziegler, Julie T.; Sale, Michele M.; Divers, Jasmin; Shriner, Daniel; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2012-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes (T2DM) yet few studies have examined T2DM using genome-wide association approaches in this ethnicity. The aim of this study was to identify genes associated with T2DM in the African American population. We performed a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using the Affymetrix 6.0 array in 965 African-American cases with T2DM and end-stage renal disease (T2DM-ESRD) and 1029 population-based controls. The most significant SNPs (n = 550 independent loci) were genotyped in a replication cohort and 122 SNPs (n = 98 independent loci) were further tested through genotyping three additional validation cohorts followed by meta-analysis in all five cohorts totaling 3,132 cases and 3,317 controls. Twelve SNPs had evidence of association in the GWAS (P<0.0071), were directionally consistent in the Replication cohort and were associated with T2DM in subjects without nephropathy (P<0.05). Meta-analysis in all cases and controls revealed a single SNP reaching genome-wide significance (P<2.5×10−8). SNP rs7560163 (P = 7.0×10−9, OR (95% CI) = 0.75 (0.67–0.84)) is located intergenically between RND3 and RBM43. Four additional loci (rs7542900, rs4659485, rs2722769 and rs7107217) were associated with T2DM (P<0.05) and reached more nominal levels of significance (P<2.5×10−5) in the overall analysis and may represent novel loci that contribute to T2DM. We have identified novel T2DM-susceptibility variants in the African-American population. Notably, T2DM risk was associated with the major allele and implies an interesting genetic architecture in this population. These results suggest that multiple loci underlie T2DM susceptibility in the African-American population and that these loci are distinct from those identified in other ethnic populations. PMID:22238593

  20. A genome-wide association search for type 2 diabetes genes in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Nicholette D; McDonough, Caitrin W; Hicks, Pamela J; Roh, Bong H; Wing, Maria R; An, S Sandy; Hester, Jessica M; Cooke, Jessica N; Bostrom, Meredith A; Rudock, Megan E; Talbert, Matthew E; Lewis, Joshua P; Ferrara, Assiamira; Lu, Lingyi; Ziegler, Julie T; Sale, Michele M; Divers, Jasmin; Shriner, Daniel; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N; Ng, Maggie C Y; Langefeld, Carl D; Freedman, Barry I; Bowden, Donald W; Voight, Benjamin F; Scott, Laura J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Morris, Andrew P; Dina, Christian; Welch, Ryan P; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Huth, Cornelia; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; McCulloch, Laura J; Ferreira, Teresa; Grallert, Harald; Amin, Najaf; Wu, Guanming; Willer, Cristen J; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; McCarroll, Steve A; Langenberg, Claudia; Hofmann, Oliver M; Dupuis, Josée; Qi, Lu; Segrè, Ayellet V; van Hoek, Mandy; Navarro, Pau; Ardlie, Kristin; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J; Blagieva, Roza; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bravenboer, Bert; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Burtt, Noël P; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S; Cornelis, Marilyn; Couper, David J; Crawford, Gabe; Doney, Alex S F; Elliott, Katherine S; Elliott, Amanda L; Erdos, Michael R; Fox, Caroline S; Franklin, Christopher S; Ganser, Martha; Gieger, Christian; Grarup, Niels; Green, Todd; Griffin, Simon; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hadjadj, Samy; Hassanali, Neelam; Herder, Christian; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Paul R V; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen H L; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kraft, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Man; Lieverse, Aloysius; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Midthjell, Kristian; Morken, Mario A; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John R B; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Platou, Carl; Proença, Christine; Prokopenko, Inga; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil R; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Roden, Michael; Sampson, Michael J; Saxena, Richa; Shields, Beverley M; Shrader, Peter; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Sparsø, Thomas; Strassburger, Klaus; Stringham, Heather M; Sun, Qi; Swift, Amy J; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Dam, Rob M; van Haeften, Timon W; van Herpt, Thijs; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Walters, G Bragi; Weedon, Michael N; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witteman, Jacqueline; Bergman, Richard N; Cauchi, Stephane; Collins, Francis S; Gloyn, Anna L; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hansen, Torben; Hide, Winston A; Hitman, Graham A; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Hveem, Kristian; Laakso, Markku; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rudan, Igor; Sijbrands, Eric; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watanabe, Richard M; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Boehm, Bernhard O; Campbell, Harry; Daly, Mark J; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hu, Frank B; Meigs, James B; Pankow, James S; Pedersen, Oluf; Wichmann, H-Erich; Barroso, Inês; Florez, Jose C; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif; Sladek, Rob; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Wilson, James F; Illig, Thomas; Froguel, Philippe; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Stefansson, Kari; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I; Soranzo, Nicole; Wheeler, Eleanor; Glazer, Nicole L; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua; Johnson, Toby; Elliott, Paul; Rybin, Denis; Henneman, Peter; Dehghan, Abbas; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Song, Kijoung; Goel, Anuj; Egan, Josephine M; Lajunen, Taina; Doney, Alex; Kanoni, Stavroula; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Kumari, Meena; Timpson, Nicholas J; Zabena, Carina; Ingelsson, Erik; An, Ping; O'Connell, Jeffrey; Luan, Jian'an; Elliott, Amanda; McCarroll, Steven A; Roccasecca, Rosa Maria; Pattou, François; Sethupathy, Praveen; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Barter, Philip; Beilby, John P; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergmann, Sven; Bochud, Murielle; Bonnefond, Amélie; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Böttcher, Yvonne; Brunner, Eric; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan J M; Cooper, Matthew N; Crisponi, Laura; Day, Ian N M; de Geus, Eco J C; Delplanque, Jerome; Fedson, Annette C; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Forouhi, Nita G; Frants, Rune; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Galan, Pilar; Goodarzi, Mark O; Graessler, Jürgen; Grundy, Scott; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hallmans, Göran; Hammond, Naomi; Han, Xijing; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon C; Hercberg, Serge; Hicks, Andrew A; Hillman, David R; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joe; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesaniemi, Y Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Knight, Beatrice; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Lathrop, G Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A; Le Bacquer, Olivier; Lecoeur, Cécile; Li, Yun; Mahley, Robert; Mangino, Massimo; Manning, Alisa K; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; McAteer, Jarred B; McPherson, Ruth; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Meyre, David; Mitchell, Braxton D; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Naitza, Silvia; Neville, Matthew J; Oostra, Ben A; Orrù, Marco; Pakyz, Ruth; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Pattaro, Cristian; Pearson, Daniel; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Pichler, Irene; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Potter, Simon C; Pouta, Anneli; Province, Michael A; Psaty, Bruce M; Rayner, Nigel W; Rice, Kenneth; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rolandsson, Olov; Sandbaek, Annelli; Sandhu, Manjinder; Sanna, Serena; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Scheet, Paul; Seedorf, Udo; Sharp, Stephen J; Shields, Beverley; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Silveira, Angela; Simpson, Laila; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Nicholas L; Sovio, Ulla; Swift, Amy; Syddall, Holly; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tönjes, Anke; Uitterlinden, André G; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Varma, Dhiraj; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Waeber, Gérard; Wagner, Peter J; Walley, Andrew; Ward, Kim L; Watkins, Hugh; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witteman, Jaqueline C M; Yarnell, John W G; Zelenika, Diana; Zethelius, Björn; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zillikens, M Carola; Borecki, Ingrid B; Loos, Ruth J F; Meneton, Pierre; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Nathan, David M; Williams, Gordon H; Silander, Kaisa; Salomaa, Veikko; Smith, George Davey; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter; Spranger, Joachim; Karpe, Fredrik; Shuldiner, Alan R; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George V; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Lind, Lars; Palmer, Lyle J; Franks, Paul W; Ebrahim, Shah; Marmot, Michael; Kao, W H Linda; Pramstaller, Peter Paul; Wright, Alan F; Stumvoll, Michael; Hamsten, Anders; Buchanan, Thomas A; Valle, Timo T; Rotter, Jerome I; Siscovick, David S; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Boomsma, Dorret I; Deloukas, Panos; Spector, Timothy D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Cao, Antonio; Scuteri, Angelo; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Waterworth, Dawn M; Vollenweider, Peter; Peltonen, Leena; Mooser, Vincent; Sladek, Robert

    2012-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes (T2DM) yet few studies have examined T2DM using genome-wide association approaches in this ethnicity. The aim of this study was to identify genes associated with T2DM in the African American population. We performed a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using the Affymetrix 6.0 array in 965 African-American cases with T2DM and end-stage renal disease (T2DM-ESRD) and 1029 population-based controls. The most significant SNPs (n = 550 independent loci) were genotyped in a replication cohort and 122 SNPs (n = 98 independent loci) were further tested through genotyping three additional validation cohorts followed by meta-analysis in all five cohorts totaling 3,132 cases and 3,317 controls. Twelve SNPs had evidence of association in the GWAS (P<0.0071), were directionally consistent in the Replication cohort and were associated with T2DM in subjects without nephropathy (P<0.05). Meta-analysis in all cases and controls revealed a single SNP reaching genome-wide significance (P<2.5×10(-8)). SNP rs7560163 (P = 7.0×10(-9), OR (95% CI) = 0.75 (0.67-0.84)) is located intergenically between RND3 and RBM43. Four additional loci (rs7542900, rs4659485, rs2722769 and rs7107217) were associated with T2DM (P<0.05) and reached more nominal levels of significance (P<2.5×10(-5)) in the overall analysis and may represent novel loci that contribute to T2DM. We have identified novel T2DM-susceptibility variants in the African-American population. Notably, T2DM risk was associated with the major allele and implies an interesting genetic architecture in this population. These results suggest that multiple loci underlie T2DM susceptibility in the African-American population and that these loci are distinct from those identified in other ethnic populations. PMID:22238593

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10−11) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10−9), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10−8) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10−9). PMID:21926974

  2. Genome-wide association mapping of soybean aphid resistance traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean aphid is the most damaging insect pest of soybean in the Upper Midwest and is primarily controlled by insecticides. Soybean aphid resistance (i.e., Rag genes) has been documented in some soybean lines at chromosomes 6, 7, 13, and 16, but more sources of resistance are needed. Genome-wide ass...

  3. Genome-wide characterization of maize miRNA genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play essential roles in plant growth and development. We conducted a genome-wide survey of maize miRNA genes, characterizing their structure, expression, and evolution. Computational approaches based on homology and secondary structure modeling ident...

  4. Massively expedited genome-wide heritability analysis (MEGHA)

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Tian; Nichols, Thomas E.; Lee, Phil H.; Holmes, Avram J.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Buckner, Randy L.; Sabuncu, Mert R.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and prioritization of heritable phenotypes is a computational challenge in a variety of settings, including neuroimaging genetics and analyses of the vast phenotypic repositories in electronic health record systems and population-based biobanks. Classical estimates of heritability require twin or pedigree data, which can be costly and difficult to acquire. Genome-wide complex trait analysis is an alternative tool to compute heritability estimates from unrelated individuals, using genome-wide data that are increasingly ubiquitous, but is computationally demanding and becomes difficult to apply in evaluating very large numbers of phenotypes. Here we present a fast and accurate statistical method for high-dimensional heritability analysis using genome-wide SNP data from unrelated individuals, termed massively expedited genome-wide heritability analysis (MEGHA) and accompanying nonparametric sampling techniques that enable flexible inferences for arbitrary statistics of interest. MEGHA produces estimates and significance measures of heritability with several orders of magnitude less computational time than existing methods, making heritability-based prioritization of millions of phenotypes based on data from unrelated individuals tractable for the first time to our knowledge. As a demonstration of application, we conducted heritability analyses on global and local morphometric measurements derived from brain structural MRI scans, using genome-wide SNP data from 1,320 unrelated young healthy adults of non-Hispanic European ancestry. We also computed surface maps of heritability for cortical thickness measures and empirically localized cortical regions where thickness measures were significantly heritable. Our analyses demonstrate the unique capability of MEGHA for large-scale heritability-based screening and high-dimensional heritability profile construction. PMID:25675487

  5. Massively expedited genome-wide heritability analysis (MEGHA).

    PubMed

    Ge, Tian; Nichols, Thomas E; Lee, Phil H; Holmes, Avram J; Roffman, Joshua L; Buckner, Randy L; Sabuncu, Mert R; Smoller, Jordan W

    2015-02-24

    The discovery and prioritization of heritable phenotypes is a computational challenge in a variety of settings, including neuroimaging genetics and analyses of the vast phenotypic repositories in electronic health record systems and population-based biobanks. Classical estimates of heritability require twin or pedigree data, which can be costly and difficult to acquire. Genome-wide complex trait analysis is an alternative tool to compute heritability estimates from unrelated individuals, using genome-wide data that are increasingly ubiquitous, but is computationally demanding and becomes difficult to apply in evaluating very large numbers of phenotypes. Here we present a fast and accurate statistical method for high-dimensional heritability analysis using genome-wide SNP data from unrelated individuals, termed massively expedited genome-wide heritability analysis (MEGHA) and accompanying nonparametric sampling techniques that enable flexible inferences for arbitrary statistics of interest. MEGHA produces estimates and significance measures of heritability with several orders of magnitude less computational time than existing methods, making heritability-based prioritization of millions of phenotypes based on data from unrelated individuals tractable for the first time to our knowledge. As a demonstration of application, we conducted heritability analyses on global and local morphometric measurements derived from brain structural MRI scans, using genome-wide SNP data from 1,320 unrelated young healthy adults of non-Hispanic European ancestry. We also computed surface maps of heritability for cortical thickness measures and empirically localized cortical regions where thickness measures were significantly heritable. Our analyses demonstrate the unique capability of MEGHA for large-scale heritability-based screening and high-dimensional heritability profile construction. PMID:25675487

  6. Genome-wide and fine-resolution association analysis of malaria in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jallow, Muminatou; Teo, Yik Ying; Small, Kerrin S; Rockett, Kirk A; Deloukas, Panos; Clark, Taane G; Kivinen, Katja; Bojang, Kalifa A; Conway, David J; Pinder, Margaret; Sirugo, Giorgio; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Usen, Stanley; Auburn, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Campino, Susana; Coffey, Alison; Dunham, Andrew; Fry, Andrew E; Green, Angela; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hunt, Sarah E; Inouye, Michael; Jeffreys, Anna E; Mendy, Alieu; Palotie, Aarno; Potter, Simon; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Rogers, Jane; Rowlands, Kate; Somaskantharajah, Elilan; Whittaker, Pamela; Widden, Claire; Donnelly, Peter; Howie, Bryan; Marchini, Jonathan; Morris, Andrew; SanJoaquin, Miguel; Achidi, Eric Akum; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Allen, Angela; Amodu, Olukemi; Corran, Patrick; Djimde, Abdoulaye; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Drakeley, Chris; Dunstan, Sarah; Evans, Jennifer; Farrar, Jeremy; Fernando, Deepika; Hien, Tran Tinh; Horstmann, Rolf D; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Karunaweera, Nadira; Kokwaro, Gilbert; Koram, Kwadwo A; Lemnge, Martha; Makani, Julie; Marsh, Kevin; Michon, Pascal; Modiano, David; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Mueller, Ivo; Parker, Michael; Peshu, Norbert; Plowe, Christopher V; Puijalon, Odile; Reeder, John; Reyburn, Hugh; Riley, Eleanor M; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Sirima, Sodiomon; Tall, Adama; Taylor, Terrie E; Thera, Mahamadou; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Williams, Thomas N; Wilson, Michael; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2009-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association (GWA) study of severe malaria in The Gambia. The initial GWA scan included 2,500 children genotyped on the Affymetrix 500K GeneChip, and a replication study included 3,400 children. We used this to examine the performance of GWA methods in Africa. We found considerable population stratification, and also that signals of association at known malaria resistance loci were greatly attenuated owing to weak linkage disequilibrium (LD). To investigate possible solutions to the problem of low LD, we focused on the HbS locus, sequencing this region of the genome in 62 Gambian individuals and then using these data to conduct multipoint imputation in the GWA samples. This increased the signal of association, from P = 4 × 10−7 to P = 4 × 10−14, with the peak of the signal located precisely at the HbS causal variant. Our findings provide proof of principle that fine-resolution multipoint imputation, based on population-specific sequencing data, can substantially boost authentic GWA signals and enable fine mapping of causal variants in African populations. PMID:19465909

  7. Genome-wide and fine-resolution association analysis of malaria in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Jallow, Muminatou; Teo, Yik Ying; Small, Kerrin S; Rockett, Kirk A; Deloukas, Panos; Clark, Taane G; Kivinen, Katja; Bojang, Kalifa A; Conway, David J; Pinder, Margaret; Sirugo, Giorgio; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Usen, Stanley; Auburn, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Campino, Susana; Coffey, Alison; Dunham, Andrew; Fry, Andrew E; Green, Angela; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hunt, Sarah E; Inouye, Michael; Jeffreys, Anna E; Mendy, Alieu; Palotie, Aarno; Potter, Simon; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Rogers, Jane; Rowlands, Kate; Somaskantharajah, Elilan; Whittaker, Pamela; Widden, Claire; Donnelly, Peter; Howie, Bryan; Marchini, Jonathan; Morris, Andrew; SanJoaquin, Miguel; Achidi, Eric Akum; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Allen, Angela; Amodu, Olukemi; Corran, Patrick; Djimde, Abdoulaye; Dolo, Amagana; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Drakeley, Chris; Dunstan, Sarah; Evans, Jennifer; Farrar, Jeremy; Fernando, Deepika; Hien, Tran Tinh; Horstmann, Rolf D; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Karunaweera, Nadira; Kokwaro, Gilbert; Koram, Kwadwo A; Lemnge, Martha; Makani, Julie; Marsh, Kevin; Michon, Pascal; Modiano, David; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Mueller, Ivo; Parker, Michael; Peshu, Norbert; Plowe, Christopher V; Puijalon, Odile; Reeder, John; Reyburn, Hugh; Riley, Eleanor M; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Sirima, Sodiomon; Tall, Adama; Taylor, Terrie E; Thera, Mahamadou; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Williams, Thomas N; Wilson, Michael; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2009-06-01

    We report a genome-wide association (GWA) study of severe malaria in The Gambia. The initial GWA scan included 2,500 children genotyped on the Affymetrix 500K GeneChip, and a replication study included 3,400 children. We used this to examine the performance of GWA methods in Africa. We found considerable population stratification, and also that signals of association at known malaria resistance loci were greatly attenuated owing to weak linkage disequilibrium (LD). To investigate possible solutions to the problem of low LD, we focused on the HbS locus, sequencing this region of the genome in 62 Gambian individuals and then using these data to conduct multipoint imputation in the GWA samples. This increased the signal of association, from P = 4 × 10(-7) to P = 4 × 10(-14), with the peak of the signal located precisely at the HbS causal variant. Our findings provide proof of principle that fine-resolution multipoint imputation, based on population-specific sequencing data, can substantially boost authentic GWA signals and enable fine mapping of causal variants in African populations. PMID:19465909

  8. Development of the catfish 250K SNP array for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Quantitative traits, such as disease resistance, are most often controlled by a set of genes involving a complex array of regulation. The dissection of genetic basis of quantitative traits requires large numbers of genetic markers with good genome coverage. The application of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed discovery of over eight million SNPs in catfish, but the challenge remains as to how to efficiently and economically use such SNP resources for genetic analysis. Results In this work, we developed a catfish 250K SNP array using Affymetrix Axiom genotyping technology. The SNPs were obtained from multiple sources including gene-associated SNPs, anonymous genomic SNPs, and inter-specific SNPs. A set of 640K high-quality SNPs obtained following specific requirements of array design were submitted. A panel of 250,113 SNPs was finalized for inclusion on the array. The performance evaluated by genotyping individuals from wild populations and backcross families suggested the good utility of the catfish 250K SNP array. Conclusions This is the first high-density SNP array for catfish. The array should be a valuable resource for genome-wide association studies (GWAS), fine QTL mapping, high-density linkage map construction, haplotype analysis, and whole genome-based selection. PMID:24618043

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study of a Varroa-Specific Defense Behavior in Honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Spötter, Andreas; Gupta, Pooja; Mayer, Manfred; Reinsch, Norbert; Bienefeld, Kaspar

    2016-05-01

    Honey bees are exposed to many damaging pathogens and parasites. The most devastating is Varroa destructor, which mainly affects the brood. A promising approach for preventing its spread is to breed Varroa-resistant honey bees. One trait that has been shown to provide significant resistance against the Varroa mite is hygienic behavior, which is a behavioral response of honeybee workers to brood diseases in general. Here, we report the use of an Affymetrix 44K SNP array to analyze SNPs associated with detection and uncapping of Varroa-parasitized brood by individual worker bees (Apis mellifera). For this study, 22 000 individually labeled bees were video-monitored and a sample of 122 cases and 122 controls was collected and analyzed to determine the dependence/independence of SNP genotypes from hygienic and nonhygienic behavior on a genome-wide scale. After false-discovery rate correction of the P values, 6 SNP markers had highly significant associations with the trait investigated (α < 0.01). Inspection of the genomic regions around these SNPs led to the discovery of putative candidate genes. PMID:26774061

  10. The HapMap and Genome-Wide Association Studies in Diagnosis and Therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Manolio, Teri A.; Collins, Francis S.

    2009-01-01

    The International HapMap Project produced a genome-wide database of human genetic variation for use in genetic association studies of common diseases. The initial output of these studies has been overwhelming, with over 150 risk loci identified in studies of more than 60 common diseases and traits. These associations have suggested previously unsuspected etiologic pathways for common diseases that will be of use in identifying new therapeutic targets and developing targeted interventions based on genetically defined risk. Here we examine the development and application of the HapMap to genome-wide association (GWA) studies; present and future technologies for GWA research; current major efforts in GWA studies; successes and limitations of the GWA approach in identifying polymorphisms related to complex diseases; data release and privacy polices; use of these findings by clinicians, the public, and academic physicians; and sources of ongoing authoritative information on this rapidly evolving field. PMID:19630580

  11. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, María Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Viňuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Åsa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O’Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, O. Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, H. Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR-129-2/HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX, and KCNJ2. Two (GSTCD and PTCH1) loci previously associated with spirometric measures were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed-up in samples of African American, Korean, Chinese, and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease. PMID:24929828

  12. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Gharib, Sina A; Wain, Louise V; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P; James, Alan L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K; Fall, Tove; Viñuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J; Loehr, Laura R; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B; North, Kari E; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F; Hastie, Nicholas D; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C; Rotter, Jerome I; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S; White, Wendy B; Rich, Stephen S; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J; Psaty, Bruce M; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G; Uitterlinden, André G; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R; McArdle, Wendy L; Musk, A Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C; Starr, John M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L; Lederer, David J; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J; Burkart, Kristin M; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B; Williams, O Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J; Boezen, H Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J; Lange, Leslie A; Barr, R Graham; Bracke, Ken R; Verhamme, Fien M; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cassano, Patricia A; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P; Brusselle, Guy G; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2014-07-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR129-2-HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX and KCNJ2. Two loci previously associated with spirometric measures (GSTCD and PTCH1) were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed up in samples from African-American, Korean, Chinese and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and the pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease. PMID:24929828

  13. Discovery and validation of sub-threshold genome-wide association study loci using epigenomic signatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinchen; Tucker, Nathan R; Rizki, Gizem; Mills, Robert; Krijger, Peter Hl; de Wit, Elzo; Subramanian, Vidya; Bartell, Eric; Nguyen, Xinh-Xinh; Ye, Jiangchuan; Leyton-Mange, Jordan; Dolmatova, Elena V; van der Harst, Pim; de Laat, Wouter; Ellinor, Patrick T; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Milan, David J; Kellis, Manolis; Boyer, Laurie A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies explain only a modest proportion of heritability, suggesting that meaningful associations lie 'hidden' below current thresholds. Here, we integrate information from association studies with epigenomic maps to demonstrate that enhancers significantly overlap known loci associated with the cardiac QT interval and QRS duration. We apply functional criteria to identify loci associated with QT interval that do not meet genome-wide significance and are missed by existing studies. We demonstrate that these 'sub-threshold' signals represent novel loci, and that epigenomic maps are effective at discriminating true biological signals from noise. We experimentally validate the molecular, gene-regulatory, cellular and organismal phenotypes of these sub-threshold loci, demonstrating that most sub-threshold loci have regulatory consequences and that genetic perturbation of nearby genes causes cardiac phenotypes in mouse. Our work provides a general approach for improving the detection of novel loci associated with complex human traits. PMID:27162171

  14. Genome-wide signatures of male-mediated migration shaping the Indian gene pool.

    PubMed

    ArunKumar, GaneshPrasad; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Duty, Jeff; Rollo, Debra; Syama, Adhikarla; Arun, Varatharajan Santhakumari; Kavitha, Valampuri John; Triska, Petr; Greenspan, Bennett; Wells, R Spencer; Pitchappan, Ramasamy

    2015-09-01

    Multiple questions relating to contributions of cultural and demographical factors in the process of human geographical dispersal remain largely unanswered. India, a land of early human settlement and the resulting diversity is a good place to look for some of the answers. In this study, we explored the genetic structure of India using a diverse panel of 78 males genotyped using the GenoChip. Their genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity was examined in the context of various covariates that influence Indian gene pool. Admixture analysis of genome-wide SNP data showed high proportion of the Southwest Asian component in all of the Indian samples. Hierarchical clustering based on admixture proportions revealed seven distinct clusters correlating to geographical and linguistic affiliations. Convex hull overlay of Y-chromosomal haplogroups on the genome-wide SNP principal component analysis brought out distinct non-overlapping polygons of F*-M89, H*-M69, L1-M27, O2a-M95 and O3a3c1-M117, suggesting a male-mediated migration and expansion of the Indian gene pool. Lack of similar correlation with mitochondrial DNA clades indicated a shared genetic ancestry of females. We suggest that ancient male-mediated migratory events and settlement in various regional niches led to the present day scenario and peopling of India. PMID:25994871

  15. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrell, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Guerra, Manuel A Rojo; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2015-12-24

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to observe natural selection directly by analysing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report a genome-wide scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest ancient DNA data set yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians who lived between 6500 and 300 bc, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide ancient DNA from Anatolian Neolithic farmers, whose genetic material we obtained by extracting from petrous bones, and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe's first farmers. We also report a transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5600 and 300 bc, which allows us to identify admixture into the steppe from at least two external sources. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height. PMID:26595274

  16. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R.; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrel, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vayacheslav; Rojo Guerra, Manuel A.; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W.; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to directly witness natural selection by analyzing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report the first scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest genome-wide dataset yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians dating to between 6500 and 1000 BCE, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include the first genome-wide data from the Anatolian Neolithic culture whose genetic material we extracted from the DNA-rich petrous bone and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe’s first farmers. We also report a complete transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5500 and 1200 BCE that allows us to recognize admixture from at least two external sources into steppe populations during this period. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height. PMID:26595274

  17. Genome-Wide Significant Loci: How Important Are They?

    PubMed Central

    Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Kovacic, Jason C.; Dudley, Joel T.; Schadt, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extensively used to study common complex diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), revealing 153 suggestive CAD loci, of which at least 46 have been validated as having genome-wide significance. However, these loci collectively explain <10% of the genetic variance in CAD. Thus, we must address the key question of what factors constitute the remaining 90% of CAD heritability. We review possible limitations of GWAS, and contextually consider some candidate CAD loci identified by this method. Looking ahead, we propose systems genetics as a complementary approach to unlocking the CAD heritability and etiology. Systems genetics builds network models of relevant molecular processes by combining genetic and genomic datasets to ultimately identify key “drivers” of disease. By leveraging systems-based genetic approaches, we can help reveal the full genetic basis of common complex disorders, enabling novel diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25720628

  18. Genome-wide association study of schizophrenia in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Goes, Fernando S; McGrath, John; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Wolyniec, Paula; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Ruczinski, Ingo; Nestadt, Gerald; Kenny, Eimear E; Vacic, Vladimir; Peters, Inga; Lencz, Todd; Darvasi, Ariel; Mulle, Jennifer G; Warren, Stephen T; Pulver, Ann E

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a common, clinically heterogeneous disorder associated with lifelong morbidity and early mortality. Several genetic variants associated with schizophrenia have been identified, but the majority of the heritability remains unknown. In this study, we report on a case-control sample of Ashkenazi Jews (AJ), a founder population that may provide additional insights into genetic etiology of schizophrenia. We performed a genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) of 592 cases and 505 controls of AJ ancestry ascertained in the US. Subsequently, we performed a meta-analysis with an Israeli AJ sample of 913 cases and 1640 controls, followed by a meta-analysis and polygenic risk scoring using summary results from Psychiatric GWAS Consortium 2 schizophrenia study. The U.S. AJ sample showed strong evidence of polygenic inheritance (pseudo-R(2) ∼9.7%) and a SNP-heritability estimate of 0.39 (P = 0.00046). We found no genome-wide significant associations in the U.S. sample or in the combined US/Israeli AJ meta-analysis of 1505 cases and 2145 controls. The strongest AJ specific associations (P-values in 10(-6) -10(-7) range) were in the 22q 11.2 deletion region and included the genes TBX1, GLN1, and COMT. Supportive evidence (meta P < 1 × 10(-4) ) was also found for several previously identified genome-wide significant findings, including the HLA region, CNTN4, IMMP2L, and GRIN2A. The meta-analysis of the U.S. sample with the PGC2 results provided initial genome-wide significant evidence for six new loci. Among the novel potential susceptibility genes is PEPD, a gene involved in proline metabolism, which is associated with a Mendelian disorder characterized by developmental delay and cognitive deficits. PMID:26198764

  19. A genome-wide scan for preeclampsia in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Lachmeijer, A M; Arngrímsson, R; Bastiaans, E J; Frigge, M L; Pals, G; Sigurdardóttir, S; Stéfansson, H; Pálsson, B; Nicolae, D; Kong, A; Aarnoudse, J G; Gulcher, J R; Dekker, G A; ten Kate, L P; Stéfansson, K

    2001-10-01

    Preeclampsia, hallmarked by de novo hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy, has a familial tendency. Recently, a large Icelandic genome-wide scan provided evidence for a maternal susceptibility locus for preeclampsia on chromosome 2p13 which was confirmed by a genome scan from Australia and New Zealand (NZ). The current study reports on a genome-wide scan of Dutch affected sib-pair families. In total 67 Dutch affected sib-pair families, comprising at least two siblings with proteinuric preeclampsia, eclampsia or HELLP-syndrome, were typed for 293 polymorphic markers throughout the genome and linkage analysis was performed. The highest allele sharing lod score of 1.99 was seen on chromosome 12q at 109.5 cM. Two peaks overlapped in the same regions between the Dutch and Icelandic genome-wide scan at chromosome 3p and chromosome 15q. No overlap was seen on 2p. Re-analysis in 38 families without HELLP-syndrome (preeclampsia families) and 34 families with at least one sibling with HELLP syndrome (HELLP families), revealed two peaks with suggestive evidence for linkage in the non-HELLP families on chromosome 10q (lod score 2.38, D10S1432, 93.9 cM) and 22q (lod score 2.41, D22S685, 32.4 cM). The peak on 12q appeared to be associated with HELLP syndrome; it increased to a lod score of 2.1 in the HELLP families and almost disappeared in the preeclampsia families. A nominal peak on chromosome 11 in the preeclampsia families showed overlap with the second highest peak in the Australian/NZ study. Results from our Dutch genome-wide scan indicate that HELLP syndrome might have a different genetic background than preeclampsia. PMID:11781687

  20. Genome-wide polymorphisms show unexpected targets of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Pespeni, Melissa H; Garfield, David A; Manier, Mollie K; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2012-04-01

    Natural selection can act on all the expressed genes of an individual, leaving signatures of genetic differentiation or diversity at many loci across the genome. New power to assay these genome-wide effects of selection comes from associating multi-locus patterns of polymorphism with gene expression and function. Here, we performed one of the first genome-wide surveys in a marine species, comparing purple sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, from two distant locations along the species' wide latitudinal range. We examined 9112 polymorphic loci from upstream non-coding and coding regions of genes for signatures of selection with respect to gene function and tissue- and ontogenetic gene expression. We found that genetic differentiation (F(ST)) varied significantly across functional gene classes. The strongest enrichment occurred in the upstream regions of E3 ligase genes, enzymes known to regulate protein abundance during development and environmental stress. We found enrichment for high heterozygosity in genes directly involved in immune response, particularly NALP genes, which mediate pro-inflammatory signals during bacterial infection. We also found higher heterozygosity in immune genes in the southern population, where disease incidence and pathogen diversity are greater. Similar to the major histocompatibility complex in mammals, balancing selection may enhance genetic diversity in the innate immune system genes of this invertebrate. Overall, our results show that how genome-wide polymorphism data coupled with growing databases on gene function and expression can combine to detect otherwise hidden signals of selection in natural populations. PMID:21993504

  1. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshis, Erin; Baumert, Jens; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Marciante, Kristin; Meirelles, Osorio; Nalls, Michael A.; Sun, Yan V.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Yu, Lei; Bandinelli, Stefania; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bennett, David A.; Boomsma, Dorret; Cannas, Alessandra; Coker, Laura H.; de Geus, Eco; De Jager, Philip L.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Purcell, Shaun; Hu, Frank B.; Rimma, Eric B.; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Curhan, Gary; Rice, Kenneth; Penman, Alan D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Emeny, Rebecca; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Illig, Thomas; Kardia, Sharon; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Koenen, Karestan; Kraft, Peter; Kuningas, Maris; Massaro, Joseph M.; Melzer, David; Mulas, Antonella; Mulder, Cornelis L.; Murray, Anna; Oostra, Ben A.; Palotie, Aarno; Penninx, Brenda; Petersmann, Astrid; Pilling, Luke C.; Psaty, Bruce; Rawal, Rajesh; Reiman, Eric M.; Schulz, Andrea; Shulman, Joshua M.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Smith, Albert V.; Sutin, Angelina R.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Völzke, Henry; Widen, Elisabeth; Yaffe, Kristine; Zonderman, Alan B.; Cucca, Francesco; Harris, Tamara; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Llewellyn, David J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Tanaka, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a heritable trait that exists on a continuum of varying severity and duration. Yet, the search for genetic variants associated with depression has had few successes. We exploit the entire continuum of depression to find common variants for depressive symptoms. Methods In this genome-wide association study, we combined the results of 17 population-based studies assessing depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Replication of the independent top hits (p < 1 × 10−5) was performed in five studies assessing depressive symptoms with other instruments. In addition, we performed a combined meta-analysis of all 22 discovery and replication studies. Results The discovery sample comprised 34,549 individuals (mean age of 66.5) and no loci reached genome-wide significance (lowest p = 1.05 × 10−7). Seven independent single nucleotide polymorphisms were considered for replication. In the replication set (n = 16,709), we found suggestive association of one single nucleotide polymorphism with depressive symptoms (rs161645, 5q21, p = 9.19 × 10−3). This 5q21 region reached genome-wide significance (p = 4.78 × 10−8) in the overall meta-analysis combining discovery and replication studies (n = 51,258). Conclusions The results suggest that only a large sample comprising more than 50,000 subjects may be sufficiently powered to detect genes for depressive symptoms. PMID:23290196

  2. Genome-wide inhibitory impact of the AMPK activator metformin on [kinesins, tubulins, histones, auroras and polo-like kinases] M-phase cell cycle genes in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Menendez, Javier A

    2009-05-15

    Prompted by the ever-growing scientific rationale for examining the antidiabetic drug metformin as a potential antitumor agent in breast cancer disease, we recently tested the hypothesis that the assessment of metformin-induced global changes in gene expression-as identified using 44 K (double density) Agilent's whole human genome arrays-could reveal gene-expression signatures that would allow proper selection of breast cancer patients who should be considered for metformin-based clinical trials. Using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery bioinformatics (DAVID) resources we herein reveal that, at doses that lead to activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), metformin not only downregulates genes coding for ribosomal proteins (i.e., protein and macromolecule biosynthesis) but unexpectedly suppresses numerous mitosis-related gene families including kinesins, tubulins, histones, auroras and polo-like kinases. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-scale evidence of a mitotic core component in the transcriptional response of human breast cancer cells to metformin. These findings further support a tight relationship between the activation status of AMPK and the chromosomal and cytoskeletal checkpoints of cell mitosis at the transcriptional level. PMID:19372741

  3. Genome-wide scan with nearly 700 000 SNPs in two Sardinian sub-populations suggests some regions as candidate targets for positive selection

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Ignazio Stefano; De Montis, Antonella; Calò, Carla Maria; Marini, Monica; Atzori, Manuela; Corrias, Laura; Sazzini, Marco; Boattini, Alessio; Vona, Giuseppe; Contu, Licinio

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the genetic structure and signatures of natural selection in different sub-populations from the Island of Sardinia, exploiting information from nearly 700 000 autosomal SNPs genotyped with the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 Array. The genetic structure of the Sardinian population and its position within the context of other Mediterranean and European human groups were investigated in depth by comparing our data with publicly available data sets. Principal components and admixture analyses suggest a clustering of the examined samples in two significantly differentiated sub-populations (Ogliastra and Southern Sardinia), as confirmed by AMOVA (FST=0.011; P<0.001). Differentiation of these sub-populations was still evident when they were pooled together with supplementary Sardinian samples from HGDP and compared with several other European, North-African and Near Eastern populations, confirming the uniqueness of the Sardinian genetic background. Moreover, by applying several statistical approaches aimed at assessing differences at the SNP level, the highest differentiated genomic regions between Ogliastra and Southern Sardinia were thus investigated via an extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH)-based test to point out potential selective sweeps. Using this approach, 40 genomic regions were detected, with significant differences between Ogliastra and Southern Sardinia. These regions were subsequently investigated using a long-range haplotype test, which found significant REHH values for SNPs rs11070188 and rs11070192 in the Ogliastra sub-population. In the light of these results and the overlap of the different computed statistics, the region encompassing these loci can be considered a strong candidate to have undergone selective pressure in Ogliastra. PMID:22535185

  4. A Single-Array-Based Method for Detecting Copy Number Variants Using Affymetrix High Density SNP Arrays and its Application to Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Fu, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence has shown that structural variations, due to insertions, deletions, and inversions of DNA, may contribute considerably to the development of complex human diseases, such as breast cancer. High-throughput genotyping technologies, such as Affymetrix high density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, have produced large amounts of genetic data for genome-wide SNP genotype calling and copy number estimation. Meanwhile, there is a great need for accurate and efficient statistical methods to detect copy number variants. In this article, we introduce a hidden-Markov-model (HMM)-based method, referred to as the PICR-CNV, for copy number inference. The proposed method first estimates copy number abundance for each single SNP on a single array based on the raw fluorescence values, and then standardizes the estimated copy number abundance to achieve equal footing among multiple arrays. This method requires no between-array normalization, and thus, maintains data integrity and independence of samples among individual subjects. In addition to our efforts to apply new statistical technology to raw fluorescence values, the HMM has been applied to the standardized copy number abundance in order to reduce experimental noise. Through simulations, we show our refined method is able to infer copy number variants accurately. Application of the proposed method to a breast cancer dataset helps to identify genomic regions significantly associated with the disease. PMID:26279618

  5. Genome-wide association analysis to predict optimal antipsychotic dosage in schizophrenia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Koga, Arthur T; Strauss, John; Zai, Clement; Remington, Gary; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several studies have investigated genetic polymorphisms of antipsychotic drug-metabolizing enzymes and receptors. However, most studies focused on drug response and very few have investigated the genetic influence on antipsychotic dosage. The aim of the present study is to test the association between antipsychotic dosages at genome-wide level. The current dosage of antipsychotic medications was collected from 79 schizophrenia patients. The dosage was standardized using three different methods: chlorpromazine equivalent (CPZe), defined daily dose (DDD), and percentage of maximum dose (PM %). The patients were then genotyped using the Illumina HumanOmni2.5-8 BeadChip Kit. All markers were screened for significance using linear regression, and the p values were visualized using a Manhattan plot. The genome-wide analysis showed that the top Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with dosage variation were rs981975 on chromosome 14 for CPZe, rs4470690 on chromosome 4 for PM %, and rs79323383 on chromosome 8 for DDD. However, no genome-wide significantly associated SNPs were identified. In this pilot sample, we found promising trends for pharmacodynamic targets associated with antipsychotic dosage. Therefore, studies combining large prescription databases may identify genetic predictors to adjust the dose of antipsychotic medication. PMID:26821981

  6. A twin study of breastfeeding with a preliminary genome wide association scan

    PubMed Central

    Colodro-Conde, L.; Zhu, G.; Power, R. A.; Henders, A.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Medland, S. E.; Ordoñana, J.R.; Martin, N.G.

    2015-01-01

    Breastfeeding has been an important survival trait during human history, though it has long been recognised that individuals differ in their exact breastfeeding behaviour. Here our aims were, first, to explore to what extent genetic and environmental influences contributed to the individual differences in breastfeeding behaviour; second, to detect possible genetic variants related to breastfeeding; and lastly, to test if the genetic variants associated with breastfeeding have been previously found to be related with breast size. Data were collected from a large community-based cohort of Australian twins, with 3,364 women for the twin modelling analyses and 1,521 of them included in the genome wide association study. Monozygotic twin correlations (rMZ = .52, 95% CI .46 – .57) were larger than dizygotic twin correlations (rDZ = .35, 95% CI .25 – .43) and the best-fitting model was the one composed by additive genetics and unique environmental factors, explaining 53% and 47% of the variance in breastfeeding behaviour, respectively. No breastfeeding-related genetic variants reached genome-wide significance. The polygenic risk score analyses showed no significant results, suggesting breast size does not influence breastfeeding. This study confers a replication of a previous one exploring the sources of variance of breastfeeding and, to our knowledge, is the first one to conduct a Genome-Wide Association Study on breastfeeding and look at the overlap with variants for breast size. PMID:25475840

  7. NSD1 mutations generate a genome-wide DNA methylation signature

    PubMed Central

    Choufani, S.; Cytrynbaum, C.; Chung, B. H. Y.; Turinsky, A. L.; Grafodatskaya, D.; Chen, Y. A.; Cohen, A. S. A.; Dupuis, L.; Butcher, D. T.; Siu, M. T.; Luk, H. M.; Lo, I. F. M.; Lam, S. T. S.; Caluseriu, O.; Stavropoulos, D. J.; Reardon, W.; Mendoza-Londono, R.; Brudno, M.; Gibson, W. T.; Chitayat, D.; Weksberg, R.

    2015-01-01

    Sotos syndrome (SS) represents an important human model system for the study of epigenetic regulation; it is an overgrowth/intellectual disability syndrome caused by mutations in a histone methyltransferase, NSD1. As layered epigenetic modifications are often interdependent, we propose that pathogenic NSD1 mutations have a genome-wide impact on the most stable epigenetic mark, DNA methylation (DNAm). By interrogating DNAm in SS patients, we identify a genome-wide, highly significant NSD1+/−-specific signature that differentiates pathogenic NSD1 mutations from controls, benign NSD1 variants and the clinically overlapping Weaver syndrome. Validation studies of independent cohorts of SS and controls assigned 100% of these samples correctly. This highly specific and sensitive NSD1+/− signature encompasses genes that function in cellular morphogenesis and neuronal differentiation, reflecting cardinal features of the SS phenotype. The identification of SS-specific genome-wide DNAm alterations will facilitate both the elucidation of the molecular pathophysiology of SS and the development of improved diagnostic testing. PMID:26690673

  8. Integrated analysis of genome-wide genetic and epigenetic association data for identification of disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xiayi; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Silva, Bruno Cesar; Lowe, Robert; Rakyan, Vardhman; Balding, David

    2013-11-01

    Many human diseases are multifactorial, involving multiple genetic and environmental factors impacting on one or more biological pathways. Much of the environmental effect is believed to be mediated through epigenetic changes. Although many genome-wide genetic and epigenetic association studies have been conducted for different diseases and traits, it is still far from clear to what extent the genomic loci and biological pathways identified in the genetic and epigenetic studies are shared. There is also a lack of statistical tools to assess these important aspects of disease mechanisms. In the present study, we describe a protocol for the integrated analysis of genome-wide genetic and epigenetic data based on permutation of a sum statistic for the combined effects in a locus or pathway. The method was then applied to published type 1 diabetes (T1D) genome-wide- and epigenome-wide-association studies data to identify genomic loci and biological pathways that are associated with T1D genetically and epigenetically. Through combined analysis, novel loci and pathways were also identified, which could add to our understanding of disease mechanisms of T1D as well as complex diseases in general. PMID:24071862

  9. Genome-wide detection of DNA double-stranded breaks induced by engineered nucleases.

    PubMed

    Frock, Richard L; Hu, Jiazhi; Meyers, Robin M; Ho, Yu-Jui; Kii, Erina; Alt, Frederick W

    2015-02-01

    Although great progress has been made in the characterization of the off-target effects of engineered nucleases, sensitive and unbiased genome-wide methods for the detection of off-target cleavage events and potential collateral damage are still lacking. Here we describe a linear amplification-mediated modification of a previously published high-throughput, genome-wide, translocation sequencing (HTGTS) method that robustly detects DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) generated by engineered nucleases across the human genome based on their translocation to other endogenous or ectopic DSBs. HTGTS with different Cas9:sgRNA or TALEN nucleases revealed off-target hotspot numbers for given nucleases that ranged from a few or none to dozens or more, and extended the number of known off-targets for certain previously characterized nucleases more than tenfold. We also identified translocations between bona fide nuclease targets on homologous chromosomes, an undesired collateral effect that has not been described previously. Finally, HTGTS confirmed that the Cas9D10A paired nickase approach suppresses off-target cleavage genome-wide. PMID:25503383

  10. NSD1 mutations generate a genome-wide DNA methylation signature.

    PubMed

    Choufani, S; Cytrynbaum, C; Chung, B H Y; Turinsky, A L; Grafodatskaya, D; Chen, Y A; Cohen, A S A; Dupuis, L; Butcher, D T; Siu, M T; Luk, H M; Lo, I F M; Lam, S T S; Caluseriu, O; Stavropoulos, D J; Reardon, W; Mendoza-Londono, R; Brudno, M; Gibson, W T; Chitayat, D; Weksberg, R

    2015-01-01

    Sotos syndrome (SS) represents an important human model system for the study of epigenetic regulation; it is an overgrowth/intellectual disability syndrome caused by mutations in a histone methyltransferase, NSD1. As layered epigenetic modifications are often interdependent, we propose that pathogenic NSD1 mutations have a genome-wide impact on the most stable epigenetic mark, DNA methylation (DNAm). By interrogating DNAm in SS patients, we identify a genome-wide, highly significant NSD1(+/-)-specific signature that differentiates pathogenic NSD1 mutations from controls, benign NSD1 variants and the clinically overlapping Weaver syndrome. Validation studies of independent cohorts of SS and controls assigned 100% of these samples correctly. This highly specific and sensitive NSD1(+/-) signature encompasses genes that function in cellular morphogenesis and neuronal differentiation, reflecting cardinal features of the SS phenotype. The identification of SS-specific genome-wide DNAm alterations will facilitate both the elucidation of the molecular pathophysiology of SS and the development of improved diagnostic testing. PMID:26690673

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies a maternal copy-number deletion in PSG11 enriched among preeclampsia patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Specific genetic contributions for preeclampsia (PE) are currently unknown. This genome-wide association study (GWAS) aims to identify maternal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy-number variants (CNVs) involved in the etiology of PE. Methods A genome-wide scan was performed on 177 PE cases (diagnosed according to National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute guidelines) and 116 normotensive controls. White female study subjects from Iowa were genotyped on Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. CNV calls made using a combination of four detection algorithms (Birdseye, Canary, PennCNV, and QuantiSNP) were merged using CNVision and screened with stringent prioritization criteria. Due to limited DNA quantities and the deleterious nature of copy-number deletions, it was decided a priori that only deletions would be selected for assay on the entire case-control dataset using quantitative real-time PCR. Results The top four SNP candidates had an allelic or genotypic p-value between 10-5 and 10-6, however, none surpassed the Bonferroni-corrected significance threshold. Three recurrent rare deletions meeting prioritization criteria detected in multiple cases were selected for targeted genotyping. A locus of particular interest was found showing an enrichment of case deletions in 19q13.31 (5/169 cases and 1/114 controls), which encompasses the PSG11 gene contiguous to a highly plastic genomic region. All algorithm calls for these regions were assay confirmed. Conclusions CNVs may confer risk for PE and represent interesting regions that warrant further investigation. Top SNP candidates identified from the GWAS, although not genome-wide significant, may be useful to inform future studies in PE genetics. PMID:22748001

  12. Genome-wide temporal-spatial gene expression profiling of drought responsiveness in rice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rice is highly sensitive to drought, and the effect of drought may vary with the different genotypes and development stages. Genome-wide gene expression profiling was used as the initial point to dissect molecular genetic mechanism of this complex trait and provide valuable information for the improvement of drought tolerance in rice. Affymetrix rice genome array containing 48,564 japonica and 1,260 indica sequences was used to analyze the gene expression pattern of rice exposed to drought stress. The transcriptome from leaf, root, and young panicle at three developmental stages was comparatively analyzed combined with bioinformatics exploring drought stress related cis-elements. Results There were 5,284 genes detected to be differentially expressed under drought stress. Most of these genes were tissue- or stage-specific regulated by drought. The tissue-specific down-regulated genes showed distinct function categories as photosynthesis-related genes prevalent in leaf, and the genes involved in cell membrane biogenesis and cell wall modification over-presented in root and young panicle. In a drought environment, several genes, such as GA2ox, SAP15, and Chitinase III, were regulated in a reciprocal way in two tissues at the same development stage. A total of 261 transcription factor genes were detected to be differentially regulated by drought stress. Most of them were also regulated in a tissue- or stage-specific manner. A cis-element containing special CGCG box was identified to over-present in the upstream of 55 common induced genes, and it may be very important for rice plants responding to drought environment. Conclusions Genome-wide gene expression profiling revealed that most of the drought differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were under temporal and spatial regulation, suggesting a crosstalk between various development cues and environmental stimuli. The identification of the differentially regulated DEGs, including TF genes and unique candidate

  13. A genome-wide DNA methylation study in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We performed a genome-wide scan of 27,578 CpG loci covering 14,475 genes to identify differentially methylated loci (DML) in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Methods We used Illumina's Infinium methylation assay in paired DNA samples extracted from 24 fresh frozen CRC tissues and their corresponding normal colon tissues from 24 consecutive diagnosed patients at a tertiary medical center. Results We found a total of 627 DML in CRC covering 513 genes, of which 535 are novel DML covering 465 genes. We also validated the Illumina Infinium methylation data for top-ranking genes by non-bisulfite conversion q-PCR-based methyl profiler assay in a subset of the same samples. We also carried out integration of genome-wide copy number and expression microarray along with methylation profiling to see the functional effect of methylation. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) showed that among the major "gene sets" that are hypermethylated in CRC are the sets: "inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by G-protein signaling", "Rac guanyl-nucleotide exchange factor activity", "regulation of retinoic acid receptor signaling pathway" and "estrogen receptor activity". Two-level nested cross validation showed that DML-based predictive models may offer reasonable sensitivity (around 89%), specificity (around 95%), positive predictive value (around 95%) and negative predictive value (around 89%), suggesting that these markers may have potential clinical application. Conclusion Our genome-wide methylation study in CRC clearly supports most of the previous findings; additionally we found a large number of novel DML in CRC tissue. If confirmed in future studies, these findings may lead to identification of genomic markers for potential clinical application. PMID:21699707

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study of Metabolic Syndrome in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok Won; Chung, Myungguen; Park, Soo-Jung; Cho, Seong Beom

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (METS) is a disorder of energy utilization and storage and increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To identify the genetic risk factors of METS, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for 2,657 cases and 5,917 controls in Korean populations. As a result, we could identify 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide significance level p-values (<5 × 10-8), 8 SNPs with genome-wide suggestive p-values (5 × 10-8 ≤ p < 1 × 10-5), and 2 SNPs of more functional variants with borderline p-values (5 × 10-5 ≤ p < 1 × 10-4). On the other hand, the multiple correction criteria of conventional GWASs exclude false-positive loci, but simultaneously, they discard many true-positive loci. To reconsider the discarded true-positive loci, we attempted to include the functional variants (nonsynonymous SNPs [nsSNPs] and expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL]) among the top 5,000 SNPs based on the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by genotypic variance. In total, 159 eQTLs and 18 nsSNPs were presented in the top 5,000 SNPs. Although they should be replicated in other independent populations, 6 eQTLs and 2 nsSNP loci were located in the molecular pathways of LPL, APOA5, and CHRM2, which were the significant or suggestive loci in the METS GWAS. Conclusively, our approach using the conventional GWAS, reconsidering functional variants and pathway-based interpretation, suggests a useful method to understand the GWAS results of complex traits and can be expanded in other genomewide association studies. PMID:25705157

  15. Genome-wide association study of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S E; Yu, D; Scharf, J M; Neale, B M; Fagerness, J A; Mathews, C A; Arnold, P D; Evans, P D; Gamazon, E R; Davis, L K; Osiecki, L; McGrath, L; Haddad, S; Crane, J; Hezel, D; Illman, C; Mayerfeld, C; Konkashbaev, A; Liu, C; Pluzhnikov, A; Tikhomirov, A; Edlund, C K; Rauch, S L; Moessner, R; Falkai, P; Maier, W; Ruhrmann, S; Grabe, H-J; Lennertz, L; Wagner, M; Bellodi, L; Cavallini, M C; Richter, M A; Cook, E H; Kennedy, J L; Rosenberg, D; Stein, D J; Hemmings, S M J; Lochner, C; Azzam, A; Chavira, D A; Fournier, E; Garrido, H; Sheppard, B; Umaña, P; Murphy, D L; Wendland, J R; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J; Denys, D; Blom, R; Deforce, D; Van Nieuwerburgh, F; Westenberg, H G M; Walitza, S; Egberts, K; Renner, T; Miguel, E C; Cappi, C; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Sampaio, A S; Vallada, H; Nicolini, H; Lanzagorta, N; Camarena, B; Delorme, R; Leboyer, M; Pato, C N; Pato, M T; Voyiaziakis, E; Heutink, P; Cath, D C; Posthuma, D; Smit, J H; Samuels, J; Bienvenu, O J; Cullen, B; Fyer, A J; Grados, M A; Greenberg, B D; McCracken, J T; Riddle, M A; Wang, Y; Coric, V; Leckman, J F; Bloch, M; Pittenger, C; Eapen, V; Black, D W; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; Cusi, D; Turiel, M; Frau, F; Macciardi, F; Gibbs, J R; Cookson, M R; Singleton, A; Hardy, J; Crenshaw, A T; Parkin, M A; Mirel, D B; Conti, D V; Purcell, S; Nestadt, G; Hanna, G L; Jenike, M A; Knowles, J A; Cox, N; Pauls, D L

    2013-07-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, debilitating neuropsychiatric illness with complex genetic etiology. The International OCD Foundation Genetics Collaborative (IOCDF-GC) is a multi-national collaboration established to discover the genetic variation predisposing to OCD. A set of individuals affected with DSM-IV OCD, a subset of their parents, and unselected controls, were genotyped with several different Illumina SNP microarrays. After extensive data cleaning, 1465 cases, 5557 ancestry-matched controls and 400 complete trios remained, with a common set of 469,410 autosomal and 9657 X-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ancestry-stratified case-control association analyses were conducted for three genetically-defined subpopulations and combined in two meta-analyses, with and without the trio-based analysis. In the case-control analysis, the lowest two P-values were located within DLGAP1 (P=2.49 × 10(-6) and P=3.44 × 10(-6)), a member of the neuronal postsynaptic density complex. In the trio analysis, rs6131295, near BTBD3, exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold with a P-value=3.84 × 10(-8). However, when trios were meta-analyzed with the case-control samples, the P-value for this variant was 3.62 × 10(-5), losing genome-wide significance. Although no SNPs were identified to be associated with OCD at a genome-wide significant level in the combined trio-case-control sample, a significant enrichment of methylation QTLs (P<0.001) and frontal lobe expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) (P=0.001) was observed within the top-ranked SNPs (P<0.01) from the trio-case-control analysis, suggesting these top signals may have a broad role in gene expression in the brain, and possibly in the etiology of OCD. PMID:22889921

  16. Genome-Wide Approaches to Drosophila Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The development of the dorsal vessel in Drosophila is one of the first systems in which key mechanisms regulating cardiogenesis have been defined in great detail at the genetic and molecular level. Due to evolutionary conservation, these findings have also provided major inputs into studies of cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Many of the major components that control Drosophila cardiogenesis were discovered based on candidate gene approaches and their functions were defined by employing the outstanding genetic tools and molecular techniques available in this system. More recently, approaches have been taken that aim to interrogate the entire genome in order to identify novel components and describe genomic features that are pertinent to the regulation of heart development. Apart from classical forward genetic screens, the availability of the thoroughly annotated Drosophila genome sequence made new genome-wide approaches possible, which include the generation of massive numbers of RNA interference (RNAi) reagents that were used in forward genetic screens, as well as studies of the transcriptomes and proteomes of the developing heart under normal and experimentally manipulated conditions. Moreover, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have been performed with the aim to define the full set of genomic binding sites of the major cardiogenic transcription factors, their relevant target genes, and a more complete picture of the regulatory network that drives cardiogenesis. This review will give an overview on these genome-wide approaches to Drosophila heart development and on computational analyses of the obtained information that ultimately aim to provide a description of this process at the systems level. PMID:27294102

  17. Genome-wide mapping of DNA hydroxymethylation in osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah E. B.; Li, Ye Henry; Wong, Wing H.; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine genome-wide 5hmC distribution in osteoarthritic (OA) and normal chondrocytes to investigate the effect on OA-specific gene expression. Methods Cartilage was obtained from OA patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty or control patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Genome-wide sequencing of 5hmC-enriched DNA (5hmC-seq) was performed for a small cohort of normal and OA chondrocytes to identify differentially hydroxymethylated regions (DhMRs) in OA chondrocytes. 5hmC-seq data was intersected with global OA gene expression data to define subsets of genes and pathways potentially affected by increased 5hmC levels in OA chondrocytes. Results 70591 DhMRs were identified in OA chondrocytes compared to normal chondrocytes, 44288 (63%) of which were increased in OA chondrocytes. The majority of DhMRs (66%) were gained in gene bodies. Increased DhMRs were observed in ~50% of genes previously implicated in OA pathology including MMP3, LRP5, GDF5 and COL11A1. Furthermore, analyses of gene expression data revealed gene body gain of 5hmC appears to be preferentially associated with activated but not repressed genes in OA chondrocytes. Conclusion This study provides the first genome-wide profiling of 5hmC distribution in OA chondrocytes. We had previously reported a global increase in 5hmC levels in OA chondrocytes. Gain of 5hmC in the gene body is found to be characteristic of activated genes in OA chondrocytes, highlighting the influence of 5hmC as an epigenetic mark in OA. In addition, this study identifies multiple OA-associated genes that are potentially regulated either singularly by gain of DNA hydroxymethylation or in combination with loss of DNA methylation. PMID:25940674

  18. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS. PMID:27013625

  19. [New insight of genome-wide association study (GWAS)].

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kikuko

    2013-02-01

    The number of obese patients is increasing in Japan, due to the westernization of lifestyle. Obesity, especially visceral fat obesity, is important for the development of metabolic syndrome. Genetic factors are important for the development of obesity as well as environmental factors. Importance of genetic factors of fat distribution is also reported. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed the obesity and fat distribution-related polymorphisms. GWAS will highlight a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms in the regulation of obesity and distribution of body fat. PMID:23631198

  20. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin; Zhao, Han; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Over the past several years, the field of reproductive medicine has witnessed great advances in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), leading to identification of several promising genes involved in hormone action, type 2 diabetes, and cell proliferation. This review summarizes the key findings and discusses their potential implications with regard to genetic mechanisms of PCOS. Limitations of GWAS are evaluated, emphasizing the understanding of the reasons for variability in results between individual studies. Root causes of misinterpretations of GWASs are also addressed. Finally, the impact of GWAS on future directions of multi- and interdisciplinary studies is discussed. PMID:27513023

  1. Genomic-Wide Analysis with Microarrays in Human Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Inaoka, Kenichi; Inokawa, Yoshikuni; Nomoto, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarray technologies have advanced rapidly and had a profound impact on examining gene expression on a genomic scale in research. This review discusses the history and development of microarray and DNA chip devices, and specific microarrays are described along with their methods and applications. In particular, microarrays have detected many novel cancer-related genes by comparing cancer tissues and non-cancerous tissues in oncological research. Recently, new methods have been in development, such as the double-combination array and triple-combination array, which allow more effective analysis of gene expression and epigenetic changes. Analysis of gene expression alterations in precancerous regions compared with normal regions and array analysis in drug-resistance cancer tissues are also successfully performed. Compared with next-generation sequencing, a similar method of genome analysis, several important differences distinguish these techniques and their applications. Development of novel microarray technologies is expected to contribute to further cancer research.

  2. A genome-wide survey for SNPs altering microRNA seed sites identifies functional candidates in GWAS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene variants within regulatory regions are thought to be major contributors of the variation of complex traits/diseases. Genome wide association studies (GWAS), have identified scores of genetic variants that appear to contribute to human disease risk. However, most of these variants do not appear...

  3. Genetic associations with neuroendocrine tumor risk: results from a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Du, Yeting; Ter-Minassian, Monica; Brais, Lauren; Brooks, Nichole; Waldron, Amanda; Chan, Jennifer A; Lin, Xihong; Kraft, Peter; Christiani, David C; Kulke, Matthew H

    2016-08-01

    The etiology of neuroendocrine tumors remains poorly defined. Although neuroendocrine tumors are in some cases associated with inherited genetic syndromes, such syndromes are rare. The majority of neuroendocrine tumors are thought to be sporadic. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify potential genetic risk factors for sporadic neuroendocrine tumors. Using germline DNA from blood specimens, we genotyped 909,622 SNPs using the Affymetrix 6.0 GeneChip, in a cohort comprising 832 neuroendocrine tumor cases from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital and 4542 controls from the Harvard School of Public Health. An additional 241 controls from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute were used for quality control. We assessed risk associations in the overall cohort, and in neuroendocrine tumor subgroups. We identified no potential risk associations in the cohort overall. In the small intestine neuroendocrine tumor subgroup, comprising 293 cases, we identified risk associations with three SNPs on chromosome 12, all in strong LD. The three SNPs are located upstream of ELK3, a transcription factor implicated in angiogenesis. We did not identify clear risk associations in the bronchial or pancreatic neuroendocrine subgroups. This large-scale study provides initial evidence that presumed sporadic small intestine neuroendocrine tumors may have a genetic etiology. Our results provide a basis for further exploring the role of genes implicated in this analysis, and for replication studies to confirm the observed associations. Additional studies to evaluate potential genetic risk factors for sporadic pancreatic and bronchial neuroendocrine tumors are warranted. PMID:27492634

  4. Evaluation of Genome Wide Association Study Associated Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci in Sub Saharan Africans.

    PubMed

    Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Doumatey, Ayo P; Bentley, Amy R; Chen, Guanjie; Huang, Hanxia; Zhou, Jie; Shriner, Daniel; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Okafor, Godfrey; Eghan, Benjamin; Agyenim-Boateng, Kofi; Adeleye, Jokotade; Balogun, Williams; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Owusu, Samuel; Amoah, Albert; Acheampong, Joseph; Johnson, Thomas; Oli, Johnnie; Adebamowo, Clement; Collins, Francis; Dunston, Georgia; Rotimi, Charles N

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for type 2 diabetes (T2D) undertaken in European and Asian ancestry populations have yielded dozens of robustly associated loci. However, the genomics of T2D remains largely understudied in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rates of T2D are increasing dramatically and where the environmental background is quite different than in these previous studies. Here, we evaluate 106 reported T2D GWAS loci in continental Africans. We tested each of these SNPs, and SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with these index SNPs, for an association with T2D in order to assess transferability and to fine map the loci leveraging the generally reduced LD of African genomes. The study included 1775 unrelated Africans (1035 T2D cases, 740 controls; mean age 54 years; 59% female) enrolled in Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya as part of the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM) study. All samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom PanAFR SNP array. Forty-one of the tested loci showed transferability to this African sample (p < 0.05, same direction of effect), 11 at the exact reported SNP and 30 others at SNPs in LD with the reported SNP (after adjustment for the number of tested SNPs). TCF7L2 SNP rs7903146 was the most significant locus in this study (p = 1.61 × 10(-8)). Most of the loci that showed transferability were successfully fine-mapped, i.e., localized to smaller haplotypes than in the original reports. The findings indicate that the genetic architecture of T2D in SSA is characterized by several risk loci shared with non-African ancestral populations and that data from African populations may facilitate fine mapping of risk loci. The study provides an important resource for meta-analysis of African ancestry populations and transferability of novel loci. PMID:26635871

  5. Genome-wide SNP analysis of the Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (Clarkson disease)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihui; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Iwaki, Shoko; Chan, Eunice; Wisch, Laura; Young, Michael; Nelson, Celeste M; Porcella, Stephen F; Druey, Kirk M

    2013-01-01

    The Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS) is an extremely rare, orphan disease that resembles, and is frequently erroneously diagnosed as, systemic anaphylaxis. The disorder is characterized by repeated, transient, and seemingly unprovoked episodes of hypotensive shock and peripheral edema due to transient endothelial hyperpermeability. SCLS is often accompanied by a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). Using Affymetrix Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) microarrays, we performed the first genome-wide SNP analysis of SCLS in a cohort of 12 disease subjects and 18 controls. Exome capture sequencing was performed on genomic DNA from nine of these patients as validation for the SNP-chip discoveries and de novo data generation. We identified candidate susceptibility loci for SCLS, which included a region flanking CAV3 (3p25.3) as well as SNP clusters in PON1 (7q21.3), PSORS1C1 (6p21.3), and CHCHD3 (7q33). Among the most highly ranked discoveries were gene-associated SNPs in the uncharacterized LOC100130480 gene (rs6417039, rs2004296). Top case-associated SNPs were observed in BTRC (rs12355803, 3rs4436485), ARHGEF18 (rs11668246), CDH13 (rs4782779), and EDG2 (rs12552348), which encode proteins with known or suspected roles in B cell function and/or vascular integrity. 61 SNPs that were significantly associated with SCLS by microarray analysis were also detected and validated by exome deep sequencing. Functional annotation of highly ranked SNPs revealed enrichment of cell projections, cell junctions and adhesion, and molecules containing pleckstrin homology, Ras/Rho regulatory, and immunoglobulin Ig-like C2/fibronectin type III domains, all of which involve mechanistic functions that correlate with the SCLS phenotype. These results highlight SNPs with potential relevance to SCLS. PMID:24808988

  6. Evaluation of Genome Wide Association Study Associated Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci in Sub Saharan Africans

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Bentley, Amy R.; Chen, Guanjie; Huang, Hanxia; Zhou, Jie; Shriner, Daniel; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Okafor, Godfrey; Eghan, Benjamin; Agyenim-Boateng, Kofi; Adeleye, Jokotade; Balogun, Williams; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Owusu, Samuel; Amoah, Albert; Acheampong, Joseph; Johnson, Thomas; Oli, Johnnie; Adebamowo, Clement; Collins, Francis; Dunston, Georgia; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for type 2 diabetes (T2D) undertaken in European and Asian ancestry populations have yielded dozens of robustly associated loci. However, the genomics of T2D remains largely understudied in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rates of T2D are increasing dramatically and where the environmental background is quite different than in these previous studies. Here, we evaluate 106 reported T2D GWAS loci in continental Africans. We tested each of these SNPs, and SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with these index SNPs, for an association with T2D in order to assess transferability and to fine map the loci leveraging the generally reduced LD of African genomes. The study included 1775 unrelated Africans (1035 T2D cases, 740 controls; mean age 54 years; 59% female) enrolled in Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya as part of the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM) study. All samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom PanAFR SNP array. Forty-one of the tested loci showed transferability to this African sample (p < 0.05, same direction of effect), 11 at the exact reported SNP and 30 others at SNPs in LD with the reported SNP (after adjustment for the number of tested SNPs). TCF7L2 SNP rs7903146 was the most significant locus in this study (p = 1.61 × 10−8). Most of the loci that showed transferability were successfully fine-mapped, i.e., localized to smaller haplotypes than in the original reports. The findings indicate that the genetic architecture of T2D in SSA is characterized by several risk loci shared with non-African ancestral populations and that data from African populations may facilitate fine mapping of risk loci. The study provides an important resource for meta-analysis of African ancestry populations and transferability of novel loci. PMID:26635871

  7. Population substructure and control selection in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Wang, Zhaoming; Li, Qizhai; Wacholder, Sholom; Hunter, David J; Hoover, Robert N; Chanock, Stephen; Thomas, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    Determination of the relevance of both demanding classical epidemiologic criteria for control selection and robust handling of population stratification (PS) represents a major challenge in the design and analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Empirical data from two GWAS in European Americans of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) project were used to evaluate the impact of PS in studies with different control selection strategies. In each of the two original case-control studies nested in corresponding prospective cohorts, a minor confounding effect due to PS (inflation factor lambda of 1.025 and 1.005) was observed. In contrast, when the control groups were exchanged to mimic a cost-effective but theoretically less desirable control selection strategy, the confounding effects were larger (lambda of 1.090 and 1.062). A panel of 12,898 autosomal SNPs common to both the Illumina and Affymetrix commercial platforms and with low local background linkage disequilibrium (pair-wise r(2)<0.004) was selected to infer population substructure with principal component analysis. A novel permutation procedure was developed for the correction of PS that identified a smaller set of principal components and achieved a better control of type I error (to lambda of 1.032 and 1.006, respectively) than currently used methods. The overlap between sets of SNPs in the bottom 5% of p-values based on the new test and the test without PS correction was about 80%, with the majority of discordant SNPs having both ranks close to the threshold. Thus, for the CGEMS GWAS of prostate and breast cancer conducted in European Americans, PS does not appear to be a major problem in well-designed studies. A study using suboptimal controls can have acceptable type I error when an effective strategy for the correction of PS is employed. PMID:18596976

  8. Genome-wide association study of Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scharf, J M; Yu, D; Mathews, C A; Neale, B M; Stewart, S E; Fagerness, J A; Evans, P; Gamazon, E; Edlund, C K; Service, S K; Tikhomirov, A; Osiecki, L; Illmann, C; Pluzhnikov, A; Konkashbaev, A; Davis, L K; Han, B; Crane, J; Moorjani, P; Crenshaw, A T; Parkin, M A; Reus, V I; Lowe, T L; Rangel-Lugo, M; Chouinard, S; Dion, Y; Girard, S; Cath, D C; Smit, J H; King, R A; Fernandez, T V; Leckman, J F; Kidd, K K; Kidd, J R; Pakstis, A J; State, M W; Herrera, L D; Romero, R; Fournier, E; Sandor, P; Barr, C L; Phan, N; Gross-Tsur, V; Benarroch, F; Pollak, Y; Budman, C L; Bruun, R D; Erenberg, G; Naarden, A L; Lee, P C; Weiss, N; Kremeyer, B; Berrío, G B; Campbell, D D; Cardona Silgado, J C; Ochoa, W C; Mesa Restrepo, S C; Muller, H; Valencia Duarte, A V; Lyon, G J; Leppert, M; Morgan, J; Weiss, R; Grados, M A; Anderson, K; Davarya, S; Singer, H; Walkup, J; Jankovic, J; Tischfield, J A; Heiman, G A; Gilbert, D L; Hoekstra, P J; Robertson, M M; Kurlan, R; Liu, C; Gibbs, J R; Singleton, A; Hardy, J; Strengman, E; Ophoff, R A; Wagner, M; Moessner, R; Mirel, D B; Posthuma, D; Sabatti, C; Eskin, E; Conti, D V; Knowles, J A; Ruiz-Linares, A; Rouleau, G A; Purcell, S; Heutink, P; Oostra, B A; McMahon, W M; Freimer, N B; Cox, N J; Pauls, D L

    2013-06-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (P<5 × 10(-8)); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (P=1.85 × 10(-6)). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely related Latin American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (P=3.6 × 10(-7) for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  9. Genome-wide association study of Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A; Evans, Patrick; Gamazon, Eric; Edlund, Christopher K.; Service, Susan; Tikhomirov, Anna; Osiecki, Lisa; Illmann, Cornelia; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Davis, Lea K; Han, Buhm; Crane, Jacquelyn; Moorjani, Priya; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; Parkin, Melissa A.; Reus, Victor I.; Lowe, Thomas L.; Rangel-Lugo, Martha; Chouinard, Sylvain; Dion, Yves; Girard, Simon; Cath, Danielle C; Smit, Jan H; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas; Leckman, James F.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; State, Matthew; Herrera, Luis Diego; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L; Phan, Nam; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Benarroch, Fortu; Pollak, Yehuda; Budman, Cathy L.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Erenberg, Gerald; Naarden, Allan L; Lee, Paul C; Weiss, Nicholas; Kremeyer, Barbara; Berrío, Gabriel Bedoya; Campbell, Desmond; Silgado, Julio C. Cardona; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Restrepo, Sandra C. Mesa; Muller, Heike; Duarte, Ana V. Valencia; Lyon, Gholson J; Leppert, Mark; Morgan, Jubel; Weiss, Robert; Grados, Marco A.; Anderson, Kelley; Davarya, Sarah; Singer, Harvey; Walkup, John; Jankovic, Joseph; Tischfield, Jay A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Robertson, Mary M.; Kurlan, Roger; Liu, Chunyu; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Strengman, Eric; Ophoff, Roel; Wagner, Michael; Moessner, Rainald; Mirel, Daniel B.; Posthuma, Danielle; Sabatti, Chiara; Eskin, Eleazar; Conti, David V.; Knowles, James A.; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Heutink, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; McMahon, William; Freimer, Nelson; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel, and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (p<5 × 10−8); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (p=1.85 × 10−6). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely-related Latin-American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (p=3.6 × 10−7 for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three psoriasis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Philip E.; Nair, Rajan P.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Ding, Jun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Gudjonsson, Johann E.; Li, Yun; Weidinger, Stephan; Eberlein, Bernadette; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H. Erich; Kunz, Manfred; Ike, Robert; Krueger, Gerald G.; Bowcock, Anne M.; Mroweitz, Ulrich; Lim, Henry W.; Voorhees, John J.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Weichenthal, Michael; Franke, Andre; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D.; Elder, James T.

    2010-01-01

    To identify novel psoriasis susceptibility loci, we carried out a meta-analysis of two recent genome-wide association studies 1,2, yielding a discovery sample of 1,831 cases and 2,546 controls. 102 of the most promising loci in the discovery analysis were followed up in a three-stage replication study using 4,064 cases and 4,685 controls from Michigan, Toronto, Newfoundland, and Germany. Association at a genome-wide level of significance for the combined discovery and replication samples was found for three genomic regions. One contains NOS2 (rs4795067, p = 4 × 10−11), another contains FBXL19 (rs10782001, p = 9 × 10−10), and a third contains PSMA6 and NFKBIA (rs12586317, p = 2 × 10−8). All three loci were also strongly associated with the subphenotypes of psoriatic arthritis and purely cutaneous psoriasis. Finally, we confirmed a recently identified3 association signal near RNF114. PMID:20953189

  11. Consistency of genome-wide associations across major ancestral groups.

    PubMed

    Ntzani, Evangelia E; Liberopoulos, George; Manolio, Teri A; Ioannidis, John P A

    2012-07-01

    It is not well known whether genetic markers identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confer similar or different risks across people of different ancestry. We screened a regularly updated catalog of all published GWAS curated at the NHGRI website for GWAS-identified associations that had reached genome-wide significance (p ≤ 5 × 10(-8)) in at least one major ancestry group (European, Asian, African) and for which replication data were available for comparison in at least two different major ancestry groups. These groups were compared for the correlation between and differences in risk allele frequencies and genetic effects' estimates. Data on 108 eligible GWAS-identified associations with a total of 900 datasets (European, n = 624; Asian, n = 217; African, n = 60) were analyzed. Risk-allele frequencies were modestly correlated between ancestry groups, with >10% absolute differences in 75-89% of the three pairwise comparisons of ancestry groups. Genetic effect (odds ratio) point estimates between ancestry groups correlated modestly (pairwise comparisons' correlation coefficients: 0.20-0.33) and point estimates of risks were opposite in direction or differed more than twofold in 57%, 79%, and 89% of the European versus Asian, European versus African, and Asian versus African comparisons, respectively. The modest correlations, differing risk estimates, and considerable between-association heterogeneity suggest that differential ancestral effects can be anticipated and genomic risk markers may need separate further evaluation in different ancestry groups. PMID:22183176

  12. Phenome-wide analysis of genome-wide polygenic scores.

    PubMed

    Krapohl, E; Euesden, J; Zabaneh, D; Pingault, J-B; Rimfeld, K; von Stumm, S; Dale, P S; Breen, G; O'Reilly, P F; Plomin, R

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide polygenic scores (GPS), which aggregate the effects of thousands of DNA variants from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have the potential to make genetic predictions for individuals. We conducted a systematic investigation of associations between GPS and many behavioral traits, the behavioral phenome. For 3152 unrelated 16-year-old individuals representative of the United Kingdom, we created 13 GPS from the largest GWAS for psychiatric disorders (for example, schizophrenia, depression and dementia) and cognitive traits (for example, intelligence, educational attainment and intracranial volume). The behavioral phenome included 50 traits from the domains of psychopathology, personality, cognitive abilities and educational achievement. We examined phenome-wide profiles of associations for the entire distribution of each GPS and for the extremes of the GPS distributions. The cognitive GPS yielded stronger predictive power than the psychiatric GPS in our UK-representative sample of adolescents. For example, education GPS explained variation in adolescents' behavior problems (~0.6%) and in educational achievement (~2%) but psychiatric GPS were associated with neither. Despite the modest effect sizes of current GPS, quantile analyses illustrate the ability to stratify individuals by GPS and opportunities for research. For example, the highest and lowest septiles for the education GPS yielded a 0.5 s.d. difference in mean math grade and a 0.25 s.d. difference in mean behavior problems. We discuss the usefulness and limitations of GPS based on adult GWAS to predict genetic propensities earlier in development. PMID:26303664

  13. Genome-wide identification of hypoxia-induced enhancer regions

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jessica L.; Randel, Melissa A.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a genome-wide method for de novo identification of enhancer regions. This approach enables massively parallel empirical investigation of DNA sequences that mediate transcriptional activation and provides a platform for discovery of regulatory modules capable of driving context-specific gene expression. The method links fragmented genomic DNA to the transcription of randomer molecule identifiers and measures the functional enhancer activity of the library by massively parallel sequencing. We transfected a Drosophila melanogaster library into S2 cells in normoxia and hypoxia, and assayed 4,599,881 genomic DNA fragments in parallel. The locations of the enhancer regions strongly correlate with genes up-regulated after hypoxia and previously described enhancers. Novel enhancer regions were identified and integrated with RNAseq data and transcription factor motifs to describe the hypoxic response on a genome-wide basis as a complex regulatory network involving multiple stress-response pathways. This work provides a novel method for high-throughput assay of enhancer activity and the genome-scale identification of 31 hypoxia-activated enhancers in Drosophila. PMID:26713262

  14. Measuring genome-wide nucleosome turnover using CATCH-IT.

    PubMed

    Teves, Sheila S; Deal, Roger B; Henikoff, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic interplay between DNA-binding proteins and nucleosomes underlies essential nuclear processes such as transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Manifestations of this interplay include the assembly, eviction, and replacement of nucleosomes. Hence, measurements of nucleosome turnover kinetics can lead to insights into the regulation of dynamic chromatin processes. In this chapter, we describe a genome-wide method for measuring nucleosome turnover that uses metabolic labeling followed by capture of newly synthesized histones, which we have termed Covalent Attachment of Tagged Histones to Capture and Identify Turnover (CATCH-IT). Although CATCH-IT can be used with any genome-wide mapping procedure, high-resolution profiling is attainable using paired-end sequencing of native chromatin. Our protocol also includes an efficient Solexa DNA sequencing library preparation protocol that can be used for single base-pair resolution mapping of both nucleosome and subnucleosomal particles. We not only describe the use of these protocols in the context of a Drosophila cell line but also provide the necessary changes for adaptation to other model systems. PMID:22929769

  15. Genome-wide association interaction analysis for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gusareva, Elena S.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Bellenguez, Céline; Cuyvers, Elise; Colon, Samuel; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mahachie Johna, Jestinah M.; Bessonov, Kyrylo; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Williams, Julie; Amouyel, Philippe; Sleegers, Kristel; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Van Steen, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a minimal protocol for exhaustive genome-wide association interaction analysis that involves screening for epistasis over large-scale genomic data combining strengths of different methods and statistical tools. The different steps of this protocol are illustrated on a real-life data application for Alzheimer's disease (AD) (2259 patients and 6017 controls from France). Particularly, in the exhaustive genome-wide epistasis screening we identified AD-associated interacting SNPs-pair from chromosome 6q11.1 (rs6455128, the KHDRBS2 gene) and 13q12.11 (rs7989332, the CRYL1 gene) (p = 0.006, corrected for multiple testing). A replication analysis in the independent AD cohort from Germany (555 patients and 824 controls) confirmed the discovered epistasis signal (p = 0.036). This signal was also supported by a meta-analysis approach in 5 independent AD cohorts that was applied in the context of epistasis for the first time. Transcriptome analysis revealed negative correlation between expression levels of KHDRBS2 and CRYL1 in both the temporal cortex (β = −0.19, p = 0.0006) and cerebellum (β = −0.23, p < 0.0001) brain regions. This is the first time a replicable epistasis associated with AD was identified using a hypothesis free screening approach. PMID:24958192

  16. Genome-Wide Mapping of DNA Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Frédéric; Faucher, David; Bikond Nkoma, Geneviève; Grégoire, Marie-Chantal; Arguin, Mélina; Wellinger, Raymund J.; Boissonneault, Guylain

    2011-01-01

    Determination of cellular DNA damage has so far been limited to global assessment of genome integrity whereas nucleotide-level mapping has been restricted to specific loci by the use of specific primers. Therefore, only limited DNA sequences can be studied and novel regions of genomic instability can hardly be discovered. Using a well-characterized yeast model, we describe a straightforward strategy to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks without compromising nucleotide-level resolution. This technique, termed “damaged DNA immunoprecipitation” (dDIP), uses immunoprecipitation and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin end-labeling (TUNEL) to capture DNA at break sites. When used in combination with microarray or next-generation sequencing technologies, dDIP will allow researchers to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks as well as other types of DNA damage and to establish a clear profiling of altered genes and/or intergenic sequences in various experimental conditions. This mapping technique could find several applications for instance in the study of aging, genotoxic drug screening, cancer, meiosis, radiation and oxidative DNA damage. PMID:21364894

  17. Genome-Wide Association Studies: Progress in Identifying Genetic Biomarkers in Common, Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; Mudge, Joann; Beavis, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Novel, comprehensive approaches for biomarker discovery and validation are urgently needed. One particular area of methodologic need is for discovery of novel genetic biomarkers in complex diseases and traits. Here, we review recent successes in the use of genome wide association (GWA) approaches to identify genetic biomarkers in common human diseases and traits. Such studies are yielding initial insights into the allelic architecture of complex traits. In general, it appears that complex diseases are associated with many common polymorphisms, implying profound genetic heterogeneity between affected individuals. PMID:19662211

  18. The era of genome-wide association studies: opportunities and challenges for asthma genetics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guicheng; Goldblatt, Jack; LeSouëf, Peter

    2009-11-01

    In the era of genome-wide association (GWA) studies, delineating pathogenic asthma genetic pathways has provided both challenges and opportunities. Initial GWA studies on asthma and asthma-like phenotypes provided some successes in terms of ascertaining new potential asthma candidate genes. However, due to asthma having a heterogeneous etiology, replications of these genotype-phenotype association studies are generally lacking. Furthermore, genes by environment interactions are generally not considered when GWA studies are conducted. Therefore, there is a need for extensive collaborations in multi-disciplinary research fields, including different environments and populations, to investigate the functional importance of variations in the human genome in relation to asthma pathogenesis. PMID:19816512

  19. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective . Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent multi-site GWAS of DSM-IV-TR ADHD. Method . Families were ascertained at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH, N=309 trios), Washington University at St Louis (WASH-U, N=272 trios), and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA, N=156 trios). Genotyping was conducted with the Illumina Human1M or Human1M-Duo BeadChip platforms. After applying quality control filters, association with ADHD was tested with 835,136 SNPs in 735 DSM-IV ADHD trios from 732 families. Results . Our smallest p-value (6.7E-07) did not reach the threshold for genome-wide statistical significance (5.0E-08) but one of the 20 most significant associations was located in a candidate gene of interest for ADHD, (SLC9A9, rs9810857, p=6.4E-6). We also conducted gene-based tests of candidate genes identified in the literature and found additional evidence of association with SLC9A9. Conclusion . We and our colleagues in the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium are working to pool together GWAS samples to establish the large data sets needed to follow-up on these results and to identify genes for ADHD and other disorders. PMID:20732626

  20. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Optic Disc Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Jansonius, Nomdo M.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hysi, Pirro; Hammond, Christopher J.; Lemij, Hans G.; Vingerling, Johannes R.

    2010-01-01

    The optic nerve head is involved in many ophthalmic disorders, including common diseases such as myopia and open-angle glaucoma. Two of the most important parameters are the size of the optic disc area and the vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR). Both are highly heritable but genetically largely undetermined. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) data to identify genetic variants associated with optic disc area and VCDR. The gene discovery included 7,360 unrelated individuals from the population-based Rotterdam Study I and Rotterdam Study II cohorts. These cohorts revealed two genome-wide significant loci for optic disc area, rs1192415 on chromosome 1p22 (p = 6.72×10−19) within 117 kb of the CDC7 gene and rs1900004 on chromosome 10q21.3-q22.1 (p = 2.67×10−33) within 10 kb of the ATOH7 gene. They revealed two genome-wide significant loci for VCDR, rs1063192 on chromosome 9p21 (p = 6.15×10−11) in the CDKN2B gene and rs10483727 on chromosome 14q22.3-q23 (p = 2.93×10−10) within 40 kbp of the SIX1 gene. Findings were replicated in two independent Dutch cohorts (Rotterdam Study III and Erasmus Rucphen Family study; N = 3,612), and the TwinsUK cohort (N = 843). Meta-analysis with the replication cohorts confirmed the four loci and revealed a third locus at 16q12.1 associated with optic disc area, and four other loci at 11q13, 13q13, 17q23 (borderline significant), and 22q12.1 for VCDR. ATOH7 was also associated with VCDR independent of optic disc area. Three of the loci were marginally associated with open-angle glaucoma. The protein pathways in which the loci of optic disc area are involved overlap with those identified for VCDR, suggesting a common genetic origin. PMID:20548946

  1. Genome-wide association for sensitivity to chronic oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Katherine W; Craver, Kyle L; Magwire, Michael M; Cubilla, Carmen E; Mackay, Trudy F C; Anholt, Robert R H

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a common byproduct of mitochondrial energy metabolism, and can also be induced by exogenous sources, including UV light, radiation, and environmental toxins. ROS generation is essential for maintaining homeostasis by triggering cellular signaling pathways and host defense mechanisms. However, an imbalance of ROS induces oxidative stress and cellular death and is associated with human disease, including age-related locomotor impairment. To identify genes affecting sensitivity and resistance to ROS-induced locomotor decline, we assessed locomotion of aged flies of the sequenced, wild-derived lines from the Drosophila melanogaster Genetics Reference Panel on standard medium and following chronic exposure to medium supplemented with 3 mM menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB). We found substantial genetic variation in sensitivity to oxidative stress with respect to locomotor phenotypes. We performed genome-wide association analyses to identify candidate genes associated with variation in sensitivity to ROS-induced decline in locomotor performance, and confirmed the effects for 13 of 16 mutations tested in these candidate genes. Candidate genes associated with variation in sensitivity to MSB-induced oxidative stress form networks of genes involved in neural development, immunity, and signal transduction. Many of these genes have human orthologs, highlighting the utility of genome-wide association in Drosophila for studying complex human disease. PMID:22715409

  2. Forward-time simulation of realistic samples for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Forward-time simulations have unique advantages in power and flexibility for the simulation of genetic samples of complex human diseases because they can closely mimic the evolution of human populations carrying these diseases. However, a number of methodological and computational constraints have prevented the power of this simulation method from being fully explored in existing forward-time simulation methods. Results Using a general-purpose forward-time population genetics simulation environment, we developed a forward-time simulation method that can be used to simulate realistic samples for genome-wide association studies. We examined the properties of this simulation method by comparing simulated samples with real data and demonstrated its wide applicability using four examples, including a simulation of case-control samples with a disease caused by multiple interacting genetic and environmental factors, a simulation of trio families affected by a disease-predisposing allele that had been subjected to either slow or rapid selective sweep, and a simulation of a structured population resulting from recent population admixture. Conclusions Our algorithm simulates populations that closely resemble the complex structure of the human genome, while allows the introduction of signals of natural selection. Because of its flexibility to generate different types of samples with arbitrary disease or quantitative trait models, this simulation method can simulate realistic samples to evaluate the performance of a wide variety of statistical gene mapping methods for genome-wide association studies. PMID:20809983

  3. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S

    2016-08-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) has become an established scientific method that provides an unbiased screen for genetic loci potentially associated with phenotypes of clinical interest, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, GWAS provides opportunities to gain new perspectives regarding the genetic architecture of CKD progression by identifying new candidate genes and targets for intervention. As such, it has become an important arm of translational science providing a complementary line of investigation to identify novel therapeutics to treat CKD. In this review, we describe the method and the challenges of performing GWAS in the pediatric CKD population. We also provide an overview of successful GWAS for kidney disease, and we discuss the established pediatric CKD cohorts in North America and Europe that are poised to identify genetic risk variants associated with CKD progression. PMID:26490952

  4. Ultrafast laser nanosurgery in microfluidics for genome-wide screenings

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yakar, Adela; Bourgeois, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    Summary The use of ultrafast laser pulses in surgery has allowed for unprecedented precision with minimal collateral damage to surrounding tissues. For these reasons, ultrafast laser nanosurgery, as an injury model, has gained tremendous momentum in experimental biology ranging from in-vitro manipulations of subcellular structures to in-vivo studies in whole living organisms. For example, femtosecond laser nanosurgery on such model organism as the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has opened new opportunities for in-vivo nerve regeneration studies. Meanwhile, the development of novel microfluidic devices has brought the control in experimental environment to the level required for precise nanosurgery in various animal models. Merging microfluidics and laser nanosurgery has recently improved the specificities and increased the speed of laser surgeries enabling fast genome-wide screenings that can more readily decode the genetic map of various biological processes. PMID:19278850

  5. Genome-wide nucleosome positioning during embryonic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Teif, Vladimir B; Vainshtein, Yevhen; Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Mallm, Jan-Philipp; Marth, Caroline; Höfer, Thomas; Rippe, Karsten

    2012-11-01

    We determined genome-wide nucleosome occupancies in mouse embryonic stem cells and their neural progenitor and embryonic fibroblast counterparts to assess features associated with nucleosome positioning during lineage commitment. Cell-type- and protein-specific binding preferences of transcription factors to sites with either low (Myc, Klf4 and Zfx) or high (Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2) nucleosome occupancy as well as complex patterns for CTCF were identified. Nucleosome-depleted regions around transcription start and transcription termination sites were broad and more pronounced for active genes, with distinct patterns for promoters classified according to CpG content or histone methylation marks. Throughout the genome, nucleosome occupancy was correlated with certain histone methylation or acetylation modifications. In addition, the average nucleosome repeat length increased during differentiation by 5-7 base pairs, with local variations for specific regions. Our results reveal regulatory mechanisms of cell differentiation that involve nucleosome repositioning. PMID:23085715

  6. Quantitative prediction of genome-wide resource allocation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goelzer, Anne; Muntel, Jan; Chubukov, Victor; Jules, Matthieu; Prestel, Eric; Nölker, Rolf; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Aymerich, Stéphane; Hecker, Michael; Noirot, Philippe; Becher, Dörte; Fromion, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    Predicting resource allocation between cell processes is the primary step towards decoding the evolutionary constraints governing bacterial growth under various conditions. Quantitative prediction at genome-scale remains a computational challenge as current methods are limited by the tractability of the problem or by simplifying hypotheses. Here, we show that the constraint-based modeling method Resource Balance Analysis (RBA), calibrated using genome-wide absolute protein quantification data, accurately predicts resource allocation in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis for a wide range of growth conditions. The regulation of most cellular processes is consistent with the objective of growth rate maximization except for a few suboptimal processes which likely integrate more complex objectives such as coping with stressful conditions and survival. As a proof of principle by using simulations, we illustrated how calibrated RBA could aid rational design of strains for maximizing protein production, offering new opportunities to investigate design principles in prokaryotes and to exploit them for biotechnological applications. PMID:26498510

  7. Metabolite-based genome-wide association studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie

    2015-04-01

    The plant metabolome is the readout of plant physiological status and is regarded as the bridge between the genome and the phenome of plants. Unraveling the natural variation and the underlying genetic basis of plant metabolism has received increasing interest from plant biologists. Enabled by the recent advances in high-throughput profiling and genotyping technologies, metabolite-based genome-wide association study (mGWAS) has emerged as a powerful alternative forward genetics strategy to dissect the genetic and biochemical bases of metabolism in model and crop plants. In this review, recent progress and applications of mGWAS in understanding the genetic control of plant metabolism and in interactive functional genomics and metabolomics are presented. Further directions and perspectives of mGWAS in plants are also discussed. PMID:25637954

  8. Genome-wide genetic changes during modern breeding of maize.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yinping; Zhao, Hainan; Ren, Longhui; Song, Weibin; Zeng, Biao; Guo, Jinjie; Wang, Baobao; Liu, Zhipeng; Chen, Jing; Li, Wei; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Shaojun; Lai, Jinsheng

    2012-07-01

    The success of modern maize breeding has been demonstrated by remarkable increases in productivity over the last four decades. However, the underlying genetic changes correlated with these gains remain largely unknown. We report here the sequencing of 278 temperate maize inbred lines from different stages of breeding history, including deep resequencing of 4 lines with known pedigree information. The results show that modern breeding has introduced highly dynamic genetic changes into the maize genome. Artificial selection has affected thousands of targets, including genes and non-genic regions, leading to a reduction in nucleotide diversity and an increase in the proportion of rare alleles. Genetic changes during breeding happen rapidly, with extensive variation (SNPs, indels and copy-number variants (CNVs)) occurring, even within identity-by-descent regions. Our genome-wide assessment of genetic changes during modern maize breeding provides new strategies as well as practical targets for future crop breeding and biotechnology. PMID:22660547

  9. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Murphy, P J; Cairns, B R

    2016-01-01

    Genomic DNA methylation functions to repress gene expression by interfering with transcription factor binding and/or recruiting repressive chromatin machinery. Recent data support contribution of regulated DNA methylation to embryonic pluripotency, development, and tissue differentiation; this important epigenetic mark is chemically stable yet enzymatically reversible-and heritable through the germline. Importantly, all the major components involved in dynamic DNA methylation are conserved in zebrafish, including the factors that "write, read, and erase" this mark. Therefore, the zebrafish has become an excellent model for studying most biological processes associated with DNA methylation in mammals. Here we briefly review the zebrafish model for studying DNA methylation and describe a series of methods for performing genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. We address and provide methods for methylated DNA immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq), bisulfite sequencing (BS-Seq), and reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS-Seq). PMID:27443935

  10. Quality control procedures for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Stephen; Armstrong, Loren L; Bradford, Yuki; Carlson, Christopher S; Crawford, Dana C; Crenshaw, Andrew T; de Andrade, Mariza; Doheny, Kimberly F; Haines, Jonathan L; Hayes, Geoffrey; Jarvik, Gail; Jiang, Lan; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Li, Rongling; Ling, Hua; Manolio, Teri A; Matsumoto, Martha; McCarty, Catherine A; McDavid, Andrew N; Mirel, Daniel B; Paschall, Justin E; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Rasmussen, Luke V; Wilke, Russell A; Zuvich, Rebecca L; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are being conducted at an unprecedented rate in population-based cohorts and have increased our understanding of the pathophysiology of complex disease. Regardless of context, the practical utility of this information will ultimately depend upon the quality of the original data. Quality control (QC) procedures for GWAS are computationally intensive, operationally challenging, and constantly evolving. Here we enumerate some of the challenges in QC of GWAS data and describe the approaches that the electronic MEdical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network is using for quality assurance in GWAS data, thereby minimizing potential bias and error in GWAS results. We discuss common issues associated with QC of GWAS data, including data file formats, software packages for data manipulation and analysis, sex chromosome anomalies, sample identity, sample relatedness, population substructure, batch effects, and marker quality. We propose best practices and discuss areas of ongoing and future research. PMID:21234875

  11. Genome Wide Association Identifies Novel Loci Involved in Fungal Communication

    PubMed Central

    Kowbel, David; Welch, Juliet; Taylor, John W.; Brem, Rachel B.; Glass, N. Louise

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how genomes encode complex cellular and organismal behaviors has become the outstanding challenge of modern genetics. Unlike classical screening methods, analysis of genetic variation that occurs naturally in wild populations can enable rapid, genome-scale mapping of genotype to phenotype with a medium-throughput experimental design. Here we describe the results of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) used to identify novel loci underlying trait variation in a microbial eukaryote, harnessing wild isolates of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We genotyped each of a population of wild Louisiana strains at 1 million genetic loci genome-wide, and we used these genotypes to map genetic determinants of microbial communication. In N. crassa, germinated asexual spores (germlings) sense the presence of other germlings, grow toward them in a coordinated fashion, and fuse. We evaluated germlings of each strain for their ability to chemically sense, chemotropically seek, and undergo cell fusion, and we subjected these trait measurements to GWAS. This analysis identified one gene, NCU04379 (cse-1, encoding a homolog of a neuronal calcium sensor), at which inheritance was strongly associated with the efficiency of germling communication. Deletion of cse-1 significantly impaired germling communication and fusion, and two genes encoding predicted interaction partners of CSE1 were also required for the communication trait. Additionally, mining our association results for signaling and secretion genes with a potential role in germling communication, we validated six more previously unknown molecular players, including a secreted protease and two other genes whose deletion conferred a novel phenotype of increased communication and multi-germling fusion. Our results establish protein secretion as a linchpin of germling communication in N. crassa and shed light on the regulation of communication molecules in this fungus. Our study demonstrates the power

  12. Systems-Level Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Data

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have emerged as the method of choice for identifying common variants affecting complex disease. In a GWAS, particular attention is placed, for obvious reasons, on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that exceed stringent genome-wide significance thresholds. However, it is expected that many SNPs with only nominal evidence of association (e.g., P < 0.05) truly influence disease. Efforts to extract additional biological information from entire GWAS datasets have primarily focused on pathway-enrichment analyses. However, these methods suffer from a number of limitations and typically fail to lead to testable hypotheses. To evaluate alternative approaches, we performed a systems-level analysis of GWAS data using weighted gene coexpression network analysis. A weighted gene coexpression network was generated for 1918 genes harboring SNPs that displayed nominal evidence of association (P ≤ 0.05) from a GWAS of bone mineral density (BMD) using microarray data on circulating monocytes isolated from individuals with extremely low or high BMD. Thirteen distinct gene modules were identified, each comprising coexpressed and highly interconnected GWAS genes. Through the characterization of module content and topology, we illustrate how network analysis can be used to discover disease-associated subnetworks and characterize novel interactions for genes with a known role in the regulation of BMD. In addition, we provide evidence that network metrics can be used as a prioritizing tool when selecting genes and SNPs for replication studies. Our results highlight the advantages of using systems-level strategies to add value to and inform GWAS. PMID:23316444

  13. The genome-wide structure of the Jewish people.

    PubMed

    Behar, Doron M; Yunusbayev, Bayazit; Metspalu, Mait; Metspalu, Ene; Rosset, Saharon; Parik, Jüri; Rootsi, Siiri; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Kutuev, Ildus; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Balanovsky, Oleg; Semino, Ornella; Pereira, Luisa; Comas, David; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Parfitt, Tudor; Hammer, Michael F; Skorecki, Karl; Villems, Richard

    2010-07-01

    Contemporary Jews comprise an aggregate of ethno-religious communities whose worldwide members identify with each other through various shared religious, historical and cultural traditions. Historical evidence suggests common origins in the Middle East, followed by migrations leading to the establishment of communities of Jews in Europe, Africa and Asia, in what is termed the Jewish Diaspora. This complex demographic history imposes special challenges in attempting to address the genetic structure of the Jewish people. Although many genetic studies have shed light on Jewish origins and on diseases prevalent among Jewish communities, including studies focusing on uniparentally and biparentally inherited markers, genome-wide patterns of variation across the vast geographic span of Jewish Diaspora communities and their respective neighbours have yet to be addressed. Here we use high-density bead arrays to genotype individuals from 14 Jewish Diaspora communities and compare these patterns of genome-wide diversity with those from 69 Old World non-Jewish populations, of which 25 have not previously been reported. These samples were carefully chosen to provide comprehensive comparisons between Jewish and non-Jewish populations in the Diaspora, as well as with non-Jewish populations from the Middle East and north Africa. Principal component and structure-like analyses identify previously unrecognized genetic substructure within the Middle East. Most Jewish samples form a remarkably tight subcluster that overlies Druze and Cypriot samples but not samples from other Levantine populations or paired Diaspora host populations. In contrast, Ethiopian Jews (Beta Israel) and Indian Jews (Bene Israel and Cochini) cluster with neighbouring autochthonous populations in Ethiopia and western India, respectively, despite a clear paternal link between the Bene Israel and the Levant. These results cast light on the variegated genetic architecture of the Middle East, and trace the origins

  14. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  15. Genome-wide linkage in Utah autism pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Allen-Brady, K; Robison, R; Cannon, D; Varvil, T; Villalobos, M; Pingree, C; Leppert, M F; Miller, J; McMahon, W M; Coon, H

    2010-10-01

    Genetic studies of autism over the past decade suggest a complex landscape of multiple genes. In the face of this heterogeneity, studies that include large extended pedigrees may offer valuable insights, as the relatively few susceptibility genes within single large families may be more easily discerned. This genome-wide screen of 70 families includes 20 large extended pedigrees of 6-9 generations, 6 moderate-sized families of 4-5 generations and 44 smaller families of 2-3 generations. The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) provided genotyping using the Illumina Linkage Panel 12, a 6K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) platform. Results from 192 subjects with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 461 of their relatives revealed genome-wide significance on chromosome 15q, with three possibly distinct peaks: 15q13.1-q14 (heterogeneity LOD (HLOD)=4.09 at 29 459 872 bp); 15q14-q21.1 (HLOD=3.59 at 36 837 208 bp); and 15q21.1-q22.2 (HLOD=5.31 at 55 629 733 bp). Two of these peaks replicate earlier findings. There were additional suggestive results on chromosomes 2p25.3-p24.1 (HLOD=1.87), 7q31.31-q32.3 (HLOD=1.97) and 13q12.11-q12.3 (HLOD=1.93). Affected subjects in families supporting the linkage peaks found in this study did not reveal strong evidence for distinct phenotypic subgroups. PMID:19455147

  16. Genome wide association identifies novel loci involved in fungal communication.

    PubMed

    Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Hall, Charles R; Kowbel, David; Welch, Juliet; Taylor, John W; Brem, Rachel B; Glass, N Louise

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how genomes encode complex cellular and organismal behaviors has become the outstanding challenge of modern genetics. Unlike classical screening methods, analysis of genetic variation that occurs naturally in wild populations can enable rapid, genome-scale mapping of genotype to phenotype with a medium-throughput experimental design. Here we describe the results of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) used to identify novel loci underlying trait variation in a microbial eukaryote, harnessing wild isolates of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We genotyped each of a population of wild Louisiana strains at 1 million genetic loci genome-wide, and we used these genotypes to map genetic determinants of microbial communication. In N. crassa, germinated asexual spores (germlings) sense the presence of other germlings, grow toward them in a coordinated fashion, and fuse. We evaluated germlings of each strain for their ability to chemically sense, chemotropically seek, and undergo cell fusion, and we subjected these trait measurements to GWAS. This analysis identified one gene, NCU04379 (cse-1, encoding a homolog of a neuronal calcium sensor), at which inheritance was strongly associated with the efficiency of germling communication. Deletion of cse-1 significantly impaired germling communication and fusion, and two genes encoding predicted interaction partners of CSE1 were also required for the communication trait. Additionally, mining our association results for signaling and secretion genes with a potential role in germling communication, we validated six more previously unknown molecular players, including a secreted protease and two other genes whose deletion conferred a novel phenotype of increased communication and multi-germling fusion. Our results establish protein secretion as a linchpin of germling communication in N. crassa and shed light on the regulation of communication molecules in this fungus. Our study demonstrates the power

  17. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Landt, Margarita CT Slof-Op t; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O'Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10-7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10-6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10-6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10-6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4×10-6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  18. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Slof-Op t Landt, Margarita CT; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O’Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10−7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10−6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10−6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10−6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P= 4×10−6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:21079607

  19. Comparative analysis of genome-wide divergence, domestication footprints and genome-wide association study of root traits for Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of 10,129 singleton SNPs of known genomic location in tetraploid cotton provided unique opportunities to characterize genome-wide diversity among 440 Gossypium hirsutum and 219 G. barbadense cultivars and landrace accessions of widespread origin. Using genome-wide distributed SNPs, we examined ...

  20. A Genome-Wide Survey of Date Palm Cultivars Supports Two Major Subpopulations in Phoenix dactylifera.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lisa S; Seidel, Michael A; George, Binu; Mathew, Sweety; Spannagl, Manuel; Haberer, Georg; Torres, Maria F; Al-Dous, Eman K; Al-Azwani, Eman K; Diboun, Ilhem; Krueger, Robert R; Mayer, Klaus F X; Mohamoud, Yasmin Ali; Suhre, Karsten; Malek, Joel A

    2015-07-01

    The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is one of the oldest cultivated trees and is intimately tied to the history of human civilization. There are hundreds of commercial cultivars with distinct fruit shapes, colors, and sizes growing mainly in arid lands from the west of North Africa to India. The origin of date palm domestication is still uncertain, and few studies have attempted to document genetic diversity across multiple regions. We conducted genotyping-by-sequencing on 70 female cultivar samples from across the date palm-growing regions, including four Phoenix species as the outgroup. Here, for the first time, we generate genome-wide genotyping data for 13,000-65,000 SNPs in a diverse set of date palm fruit and leaf samples. Our analysis provides the first genome-wide evidence confirming recent findings that the date palm cultivars segregate into two main regions of shared genetic background from North Africa and the Arabian Gulf. We identify genomic regions with high densities of geographically segregating SNPs and also observe higher levels of allele fixation on the recently described X-chromosome than on the autosomes. Our results fit a model with two centers of earliest cultivation including date palms autochthonous to North Africa. These results adjust our understanding of human agriculture history and will provide the foundation for more directed functional studies and a better understanding of genetic diversity in date palm. PMID:25957276

  1. Genome-wide genetic investigation of serological measures of common infections.

    PubMed

    Rubicz, Rohina; Yolken, Robert; Drigalenko, Eugene; Carless, Melanie A; Dyer, Thomas D; Kent, Jack; Curran, Joanne E; Johnson, Matthew P; Cole, Shelley A; Fowler, Sharon P; Arya, Rector; Puppala, Sobha; Almasy, Laura; Moses, Eric K; Kraig, Ellen; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Blangero, John; Leach, Charles T; Göring, Harald H H

    2015-11-01

    Populations and individuals differ in susceptibility to infections because of a number of factors, including host genetic variation. We previously demonstrated that differences in antibody titer, which reflect infection history, are significantly heritable. Here we attempt to identify the genetic factors influencing variation in these serological phenotypes. Blood samples from >1300 Mexican Americans were quantified for IgG antibody level against 12 common infections, selected on the basis of their reported role in cardiovascular disease risk: Chlamydia pneumoniae; Helicobacter pylori; Toxoplasma gondii; cytomegalovirus; herpes simplex I virus; herpes simplex II virus; human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6); human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8); varicella zoster virus; hepatitis A virus (HAV); influenza A virus; and influenza B virus. Pathogen-specific quantitative antibody levels were analyzed, as were three measures of pathogen burden. Genome-wide linkage and joint linkage and association analyses were performed using ~1 million SNPs. Significant linkage (lod scores >3.0) was obtained for HHV6 (on chromosome 7), HHV8 (on chromosome 6), and HAV (on chromosome 13). SNP rs4812712 on chromosome 20 was significantly associated with C. pneumoniae (P=5.3 × 10(-8)). However, no genome-wide significant loci were obtained for the other investigated antibodies. We conclude that it is possible to localize host genetic factors influencing some of these antibody traits, but that further larger-scale investigations will be required to elucidate the genetic mechanisms contributing to variation in antibody levels. PMID:25758998

  2. Genome-Wide Association Study of Copy Number Variations (CNVs) with Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Zhao, Hongyu; Kranzler, Henry R; Li, Ming D; Jensen, Kevin P; Zayats, Tetyana; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms that have been associated with opioid dependence (OD) altogether account for only a small proportion of the known heritability. Most of the genetic risk factors are unknown. Some of the ‘missing heritability' might be explained by copy number variations (CNVs) in the human genome. We used Illumina HumanOmni1 arrays to genotype 5152 African-American and European-American OD cases and screened controls and implemented combined CNV calling methods. After quality control measures were applied, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of CNVs with OD was performed. For common CNVs, two deletions and one duplication were significantly associated with OD genome-wide (eg, P=2 × 10−8 and OR (95% CI)=0.64 (0.54–0.74) for a chromosome 18q12.3 deletion). Several rare or unique CNVs showed suggestive or marginal significance with large effect sizes. This study is the first GWAS of OD using CNVs. Some identified CNVs harbor genes newly identified here to be of biological importance in addiction, whereas others affect genes previously known to contribute to substance dependence risk. Our findings augment our specific knowledge of the importance of genomic variation in addictive disorders, and provide an addiction CNV pool for further research. These findings require replication. PMID:25345593

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis Identifies Germ-Line Risk Factors Associated with Canine Mammary Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Malin; Murén, Eva; Gustafson, Ulla; Starkey, Mike; Borge, Kaja Sverdrup; Lingaas, Frode; Saellström, Sara; Rönnberg, Henrik; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMT) are the most common neoplasia in unspayed female dogs. CMTs are suitable naturally occurring models for human breast cancer and share many characteristics, indicating that the genetic causes could also be shared. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in English Springer Spaniel dogs and identified a genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 11 (praw = 5.6x10-7, pperm = 0.019). The most associated haplotype spans a 446 kb region overlapping the CDK5RAP2 gene. The CDK5RAP2 protein has a function in cell cycle regulation and could potentially have an impact on response to chemotherapy treatment. Two additional loci, both on chromosome 27, were nominally associated (praw = 1.97x10-5 and praw = 8.30x10-6). The three loci explain 28.1±10.0% of the phenotypic variation seen in the cohort, whereas the top ten associated regions account for 38.2±10.8% of the risk. Furthermore, the ten GWAS loci and regions with reduced genetic variability are significantly enriched for snoRNAs and tumour-associated antigen genes, suggesting a role for these genes in CMT development. We have identified several candidate genes associated with canine mammary tumours, including CDK5RAP2. Our findings enable further comparative studies to investigate the genes and pathways in human breast cancer patients. PMID:27158822

  4. Semiconductor-based sequencing of genome-wide DNA methylation states.

    PubMed

    Corley, Michael J; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Xin; Lum-Jones, Annette; Maunakea, Alika K

    2015-01-01

    Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) is a widely used approach to study DNA methylation genome-wide. Here, we developed a MeDIP-Seq protocol compatible with the Ion Torrent semiconductor-based sequencing platform that is low cost, rapid, and scalable. We applied this protocol to demonstrate MeDIP-Seq on the Ion Torrent platform provides adequate coverage of CpG cytosines, the methylation states of which we validated at single-base resolution on the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array, and accurately identifies sites of differential DNA methylation. Furthermore, we applied an integrative approach to further investigate and confirm the role of DNA methylation in alternative splicing and to profile 5mC and 5hmC variants of DNA methylation in normal human brain tissue that is localized over distinct genomic regions. These applications of MeDIP-Seq on the Ion Torrent platform have broad utility and add to the current methodologies for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation states in normal and disease conditions. PMID:25602802

  5. Genome-Wide Screen Reveals Valosin-Containing Protein Requirement for Coronavirus Exit from Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hui Hui; Kumar, Pankaj; Tay, Felicia Pei Ling; Moreau, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronaviruses are RNA viruses with a large zoonotic reservoir and propensity for host switching, representing a real threat for public health, as evidenced by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). Cellular factors required for their replication are poorly understood. Using genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening, we identified 83 novel genes supporting infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) replication in human cells. Thirty of these hits can be placed in a network of interactions with viral proteins and are involved in RNA splicing, membrane trafficking, and ubiquitin conjugation. In addition, our screen reveals an unexpected role for valosin-containing protein (VCP/p97) in early steps of infection. Loss of VCP inhibits a previously uncharacterized degradation of the nucleocapsid N protein. This inhibition derives from virus accumulation in early endosomes, suggesting a role for VCP in the maturation of virus-loaded endosomes. The several host factors identified in this study may provide avenues for targeted therapeutics. IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses are RNA viruses representing a real threat for public health, as evidenced by SARS and the emerging MERS. However, cellular factors required for their replication are poorly understood. Using genome-wide siRNA screening, we identified novel genes supporting infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) replication in human cells. The several host factors identified in this study may provide directions for future research on targeted therapeutics. PMID:26311884

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis Identifies Germ-Line Risk Factors Associated with Canine Mammary Tumours.

    PubMed

    Melin, Malin; Rivera, Patricio; Arendt, Maja; Elvers, Ingegerd; Murén, Eva; Gustafson, Ulla; Starkey, Mike; Borge, Kaja Sverdrup; Lingaas, Frode; Häggström, Jens; Saellström, Sara; Rönnberg, Henrik; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2016-05-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMT) are the most common neoplasia in unspayed female dogs. CMTs are suitable naturally occurring models for human breast cancer and share many characteristics, indicating that the genetic causes could also be shared. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in English Springer Spaniel dogs and identified a genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 11 (praw = 5.6x10-7, pperm = 0.019). The most associated haplotype spans a 446 kb region overlapping the CDK5RAP2 gene. The CDK5RAP2 protein has a function in cell cycle regulation and could potentially have an impact on response to chemotherapy treatment. Two additional loci, both on chromosome 27, were nominally associated (praw = 1.97x10-5 and praw = 8.30x10-6). The three loci explain 28.1±10.0% of the phenotypic variation seen in the cohort, whereas the top ten associated regions account for 38.2±10.8% of the risk. Furthermore, the ten GWAS loci and regions with reduced genetic variability are significantly enriched for snoRNAs and tumour-associated antigen genes, suggesting a role for these genes in CMT development. We have identified several candidate genes associated with canine mammary tumours, including CDK5RAP2. Our findings enable further comparative studies to investigate the genes and pathways in human breast cancer patients. PMID:27158822

  7. Genome-Wide Patterns of Genetic Polymorphism and Signatures of Selection in Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Omar E.; Fisher, David; Escalante, Ananias A.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent human malaria parasite outside of Africa. Yet, studies aimed to identify genes with signatures consistent with natural selection are rare. Here, we present a comparative analysis of the pattern of genetic variation of five sequenced isolates of P. vivax and its divergence with two closely related species, Plasmodium cynomolgi and Plasmodium knowlesi, using a set of orthologous genes. In contrast to Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes the most lethal form of human malaria, we did not find significant constraints on the evolution of synonymous sites genome wide in P. vivax. The comparative analysis of polymorphism and divergence across loci allowed us to identify 87 genes with patterns consistent with positive selection, including genes involved in the “exportome” of P. vivax, which are potentially involved in evasion of the host immune system. Nevertheless, we have found a pattern of polymorphism genome wide that is consistent with a significant amount of constraint on the replacement changes and prevalent negative selection. Our analyses also show that silent polymorphism tends to be larger toward the ends of the chromosomes, where many genes involved in antigenicity are located, suggesting that natural selection acts not only by shaping the patterns of variation within the genes but it also affects genome organization. PMID:25523904

  8. A Genome-Wide Survey of Date Palm Cultivars Supports Two Major Subpopulations in Phoenix dactylifera

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Lisa S.; Seidel, Michael A.; George, Binu; Mathew, Sweety; Spannagl, Manuel; Haberer, Georg; Torres, Maria F.; Al-Dous, Eman K.; Al-Azwani, Eman K.; Diboun, Ilhem; Krueger, Robert R.; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Mohamoud, Yasmin Ali; Suhre, Karsten; Malek, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is one of the oldest cultivated trees and is intimately tied to the history of human civilization. There are hundreds of commercial cultivars with distinct fruit shapes, colors, and sizes growing mainly in arid lands from the west of North Africa to India. The origin of date palm domestication is still uncertain, and few studies have attempted to document genetic diversity across multiple regions. We conducted genotyping-by-sequencing on 70 female cultivar samples from across the date palm–growing regions, including four Phoenix species as the outgroup. Here, for the first time, we generate genome-wide genotyping data for 13,000–65,000 SNPs in a diverse set of date palm fruit and leaf samples. Our analysis provides the first genome-wide evidence confirming recent findings that the date palm cultivars segregate into two main regions of shared genetic background from North Africa and the Arabian Gulf. We identify genomic regions with high densities of geographically segregating SNPs and also observe higher levels of allele fixation on the recently described X-chromosome than on the autosomes. Our results fit a model with two centers of earliest cultivation including date palms autochthonous to North Africa. These results adjust our understanding of human agriculture history and will provide the foundation for more directed functional studies and a better understanding of genetic diversity in date palm. PMID:25957276

  9. Using the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative Data to conduct a genome-wide association study of sleep duration.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeldt, Laura B; Gharani, Neda; Kasper, Rachel S; Schmidlen, Tara J; Gordon, Erynn S; Jarvis, Joseph P; Delaney, Susan; Kronenthal, Courtney J; Gerry, Norman P; Christman, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    Sleep is critical to health and functionality, and several studies have investigated the inherited component of insomnia and other sleep disorders using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, genome-wide studies focused on sleep duration are less common. Here, we used data from participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC) (n = 4,401) to examine putative associations between self-reported sleep duration, demographic and lifestyle variables, and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data to better understand genetic contributions to variation in sleep duration. We employed stepwise ordered logistic regression to select our model and retained the following predictive variables: age, gender, weight, physical activity, physical activity at work, smoking status, alcohol consumption, ethnicity, and ancestry (as measured by principal components analysis) in our association testing. Several of our strongest candidate genes were previously identified in GWAS related to sleep duration (TSHZ2, ABCC9, FBXO15) and narcolepsy (NFATC2, SALL4). In addition, we have identified novel candidate genes for involvement in sleep duration including SORCS1 and ELOVL2. Our results demonstrate that the self-reported data collected through the CPMC are robust, and our genome-wide association analysis has identified novel candidate genes involved in sleep duration. More generally, this study contributes to a better understanding of the complexity of human sleep. PMID:26333835

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation and Cigarette Smoking in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jun; Deng, Siyun; Yu, Kuai; Liu, Xuezhen; Deng, Qifei; Sun, Huizhen; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Guo, Huan; Chen, Weihong; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Kuang, Dan; He, Xiaosheng; Bai, Yansen; Han, Xu; Liu, Bing; Li, Xiaoliang; Yang, Liangle; Jiang, Haijing; Zhang, Yizhi; Hu, Jie; Cheng, Longxian; Luo, Xiaoting; Mei, Wenhua; Zhou, Zhiming; Sun, Shunchang; Zhang, Liyun; Liu, Chuanyao; Guo, Yanjun; Zhang, Zhihong; Hu, Frank B.; Liang, Liming; Wu, Tangchun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Smoking is a risk factor for many human diseases. DNA methylation has been related to smoking, but genome-wide methylation data for smoking in Chinese populations is limited. Objectives: We aimed to investigate epigenome-wide methylation in relation to smoking in a Chinese population. Methods: We measured the methylation levels at > 485,000 CpG sites (CpGs) in DNA from leukocytes using a methylation array and conducted a genome-wide meta-analysis of DNA methylation and smoking in a total of 596 Chinese participants. We further evaluated the associations of smoking-related CpGs with internal polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biomarkers and their correlations with the expression of corresponding genes. Results: We identified 318 CpGs whose methylation levels were associated with smoking at a genome-wide significance level (false discovery rate < 0.05), among which 161 CpGs annotated to 123 genes were not associated with smoking in recent studies of Europeans and African Americans. Of these smoking-related CpGs, methylation levels at 80 CpGs showed significant correlations with the expression of corresponding genes (including RUNX3, IL6R, PTAFR, ANKRD11, CEP135 and CDH23), and methylation at 15 CpGs was significantly associated with urinary 2-hydroxynaphthalene, the most representative internal monohydroxy-PAH biomarker for smoking. Conclusion: We identified DNA methylation markers associated with smoking in a Chinese population, including some markers that were also correlated with gene expression. Exposure to naphthalene, a byproduct of tobacco smoke, may contribute to smoking-related methylation. Citation: Zhu X, Li J, Deng S, Yu K, Liu X, Deng Q, Sun H, Zhang X, He M, Guo H, Chen W, Yuan J, Zhang B, Kuang D, He X, Bai Y, Han X, Liu B, Li X, Yang L, Jiang H, Zhang Y, Hu J, Cheng L, Luo X, Mei W, Zhou Z, Sun S, Zhang L, Liu C, Guo Y, Zhang Z, Hu FB, Liang L, Wu T. 2016. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation and cigarette smoking in Chinese. Environ

  11. Genome-wide de Novo Prediction of Proximal and Distal Tissue-Specific Enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I V

    2005-11-03

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory networks are encoded in the human genome is essential for understanding how cellular processes are directed. Here, we present a novel approach for systematically predicting tissue specific regulatory elements (REs) that blends genome-wide expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and pattern analysis of transcription factor binding sites. This analysis yields 4,670 candidate REs in the human genome with distinct tissue specificities, the majority of which reside far away from transcription start sites. We identify key transcription factors (TFs) for 34 distinct tissues and demonstrate that tissue-specific gene expression relies on multiple regulatory pathways employing similar, but different cohorts of interacting TFs. The methods and results we describe provide a global view of tissue specific gene regulation in humans, and propose a strategy for deciphering the transcriptional regulatory code in eukaryotes.

  12. Genome-Wide Association Study for Endothelial Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Wolfgang; Chen, Ming-Huei; Larson, Martin G.; Safa, Radwan; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Lin, Honghuang; Smith, Holly M.; Koch, Manja; Lorbeer, Roberto; Völker, Uwe; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial growth factors including angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), its soluble receptor Tie-2 (sTie-2) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) play important roles in angiogenesis, vascular remodeling, local tumor growth and metastatic potential of various cancers. Circulating levels of these biomarkers have a heritable component (between 13% and 56%), but the underlying genetic variation influencing these biomarker levels is largely unknown. Methods and Results We performed a genome-wide association study for circulating Ang-2, sTie-2, and HGF in 3571 Framingham Heart Study (FHS) participants and assessed replication of the top hits for Ang-2 and sTie-2 in 3184 participants of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). In multivariable-adjusted models, sTie-2 and HGF concentrations were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding the respective biomarkers (top p=2.40×10−65 [rs2273720] and 3.64×10−19 [rs5745687], respectively). Likewise, rs2442517 in the MCPH1 gene (in which the Ang-2 gene is embedded) was associated with Ang-2 levels (p=5.05×10−8 in FHS and 8.39×10−5 in SHIP). Furthermore, SNPs in the AB0 gene were associated with sTie-2 (top SNP rs8176693 with p=1.84×10−33 in FHS; p=2.53×10−30 in SHIP) and Ang-2 (rs8176746 with p=2.07×10−8 in FHS; p=0.001 in SHIP) levels on a genome-wide significant level. The top genetic loci explained between 1.7% (Ang-2) and 11.2% (sTie-2) of the inter-individual variation in biomarker levels. Conclusions Genetic variation contributes to the inter-individual variation in growth factor levels and explains a modest proportion of circulating HGF, Ang-2, and Tie-2. This may potentially contribute to the familial susceptibility to cancer, a premise that warrants further studies. PMID:25552591

  13. Genome wide identification of regulatory motifs in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Mwangi, Michael M; Siggia, Eric D

    2003-01-01

    Background To explain the vastly different phenotypes exhibited by the same organism under different conditions, it is essential that we understand how the organism's genes are coordinately regulated. While there are many excellent tools for predicting sequences encoding proteins or RNA genes, few algorithms exist to predict regulatory sequences on a genome wide scale with no prior information. Results To identify motifs involved in the control of transcription, an algorithm was developed that searches upstream of operons for improbably frequent dimers. The algorithm was applied to the B. subtilis genome, which is predicted to encode for approximately 200 DNA binding proteins. The dimers found to be over-represented could be clustered into 317 distinct groups, each thought to represent a class of motifs uniquely recognized by some transcription factor. For each cluster of dimers, a representative weight matrix was derived and scored over the regions upstream of the operons to predict the sites recognized by the cluster's factor, and a putative regulon of the operons immediately downstream of the sites was inferred. The distribution in number of operons per predicted regulon is comparable to that for well characterized transcription factors. The most highly over-represented dimers matched σA, the T-box, and σW sites. We have evidence to suggest that at least 52 of our clusters of dimers represent actual regulatory motifs, based on the groups' weight matrix matches to experimentally characterized sites, the functional similarity of the component operons of the groups' regulons, and the positional biases of the weight matrix matches. All predictions are assigned a significance value, and thresholds are set to avoid false positives. Where possible, we examine our false negatives, drawing examples from known regulatory motifs and regulons inferred from RNA expression data. Conclusions We have demonstrated that in the case of B. subtilis our algorithm allows for the

  14. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Kadeva, Neli; Miller, Mike B.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt; Stergiakouli, Evie; Davey Smith, George; Putallaz, Martha; Lubinski, David; Meaburn, Emma L.; Plomin, Robert; Simpson, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. The present study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case-control association analysis with 1 409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ > 170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3 253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina Human Exome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (SE 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence. PMID:26239293

  15. Genome-wide association scan suggests basis for microtia in Awassi sheep.

    PubMed

    Jawasreh, K; Boettcher, P J; Stella, A

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary underdevelopment of the ear, a condition also known as microtia, has been observed in several sheep breeds as well as in humans and other species. Its genetic basis in sheep is unknown. The Awassi sheep, a breed native to southwest Asia, carries this phenotype and was targeted for molecular characterization via a genome-wide association study. DNA samples were collected from sheep in Jordan. Eight affected and 12 normal individuals were genotyped with the Illumina OvineSNP50(®) chip. Multilocus analyses failed to identify any genotypic association. In contrast, a single-locus analysis revealed a statistically significant association (P = 0.012, genome-wide) with a SNP at basepair 34 647 499 on OAR23. This marker is adjacent to the gene encoding transcription factor GATA-6, which has been shown to play a role in many developmental processes, including chondrogenesis. The lack of extended homozygosity in this region suggests a fairly ancient mutation, and the time of occurrence was estimated to be approximately 3000 years ago. Many of the earless sheep breeds may thus share the causative mutation, especially within the subgroup of fat-tailed, wool sheep. PMID:26990958

  16. Heavy metals induce oxidative stress and genome-wide modulation in transcriptome of rice root.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sonali; Shri, Manju; Misra, Prashant; Lakhwani, Deepika; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Asif, Mehar H; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Tripathi, Rudro Deo; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2014-06-01

    Industrial growth, ecological disturbances and agricultural practices have contaminated the soil and water with many harmful compounds, including heavy metals. These heavy metals affect growth and development of plants as well as cause severe human health hazards through food chain contamination. In past, studies have been made to identify biochemical and molecular networks associated with heavy metal toxicity and uptake in plants. Studies suggested that most of the physiological and molecular processes affected by different heavy metals are similar to those affected by other abiotic stresses. To identify common and unique responses by different metals, we have studied biochemical and genome-wide modulation in transcriptome of rice (IR-64 cultivar) root after exposure to cadmium (Cd), arsenate [As(V)], lead (Pb) and chromium [Cr(VI)] in hydroponic condition. We observed that root tissue shows variable responses for antioxidant enzyme system for different heavy metals. Genome-wide expression analysis suggests variable number of genes differentially expressed in root in response to As(V), Cd, Pb and Cr(VI) stresses. In addition to unique genes, each heavy metal modulated expression of a large number of common genes. Study also identified cis-acting regions of the promoters which can be determinants for the modulated expression of the genes in response to different heavy metals. Our study advances understanding related to various processes and networks which might be responsible for heavy metal stresses, accumulation and detoxification. PMID:24553786

  17. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence.

    PubMed

    Spain, S L; Pedroso, I; Kadeva, N; Miller, M B; Iacono, W G; McGue, M; Stergiakouli, E; Smith, G D; Putallaz, M; Lubinski, D; Meaburn, E L; Plomin, R; Simpson, M A

    2016-08-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. This study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case-control association analysis with 1409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ >170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (genome-wide complex trait analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (s.e. 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence. PMID:26239293

  18. phenosim - A software to simulate phenotypes for testing in genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a great interest in understanding the genetic architecture of complex traits in natural populations. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are becoming routine in human, animal and plant genetics to understand the connection between naturally occurring genotypic and phenotypic variation. Coalescent simulations are commonly used in population genetics to simulate genotypes under different parameters and demographic models. Results Here, we present phenosim, a software to add a phenotype to genotypes generated in time-efficient coalescent simulations. Both qualitative and quantitative phenotypes can be generated and it is possible to partition phenotypic variation between additive effects and epistatic interactions between causal variants. The output formats of phenosim are directly usable as input for different GWAS tools. The applicability of phenosim is shown by simulating a genome-wide association study in Arabidopsis thaliana. Conclusions By using the coalescent approach to generate genotypes and phenosim to add phenotypes, the data sets can be used to assess the influence of various factors such as demography, genetic architecture or selection on the statistical power of association methods to detect causal genetic variants under a wide variety of population genetic scenarios. phenosim is freely available from the authors' website http://evoplant.uni-hohenheim.de PMID:21714868

  19. Development and application of a novel genome-wide SNP array reveals domestication history in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Chu, Shanshan; Zhang, Huairen; Zhu, Ying; Cheng, Hao; Yu, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Domestication of soybeans occurred under the intense human-directed selections aimed at developing high-yielding lines. Tracing the domestication history and identifying the genes underlying soybean domestication require further exploration. Here, we developed a high-throughput NJAU 355 K SoySNP array and used this array to study the genetic variation patterns in 367 soybean accessions, including 105 wild soybeans and 262 cultivated soybeans. The population genetic analysis suggests that cultivated soybeans have tended to originate from northern and central China, from where they spread to other regions, accompanied with a gradual increase in seed weight. Genome-wide scanning for evidence of artificial selection revealed signs of selective sweeps involving genes controlling domestication-related agronomic traits including seed weight. To further identify genomic regions related to seed weight, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted across multiple environments in wild and cultivated soybeans. As a result, a strong linkage disequilibrium region on chromosome 20 was found to be significantly correlated with seed weight in cultivated soybeans. Collectively, these findings should provide an important basis for genomic-enabled breeding and advance the study of functional genomics in soybean. PMID:26856884

  20. Discovery and validation of sub-threshold genome-wide association study loci using epigenomic signatures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinchen; Tucker, Nathan R; Rizki, Gizem; Mills, Robert; Krijger, Peter HL; de Wit, Elzo; Subramanian, Vidya; Bartell, Eric; Nguyen, Xinh-Xinh; Ye, Jiangchuan; Leyton-Mange, Jordan; Dolmatova, Elena V; van der Harst, Pim; de Laat, Wouter; Ellinor, Patrick T; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Milan, David J; Kellis, Manolis; Boyer, Laurie A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies explain only a modest proportion of heritability, suggesting that meaningful associations lie 'hidden' below current thresholds. Here, we integrate information from association studies with epigenomic maps to demonstrate that enhancers significantly overlap known loci associated with the cardiac QT interval and QRS duration. We apply functional criteria to identify loci associated with QT interval that do not meet genome-wide significance and are missed by existing studies. We demonstrate that these 'sub-threshold' signals represent novel loci, and that epigenomic maps are effective at discriminating true biological signals from noise. We experimentally validate the molecular, gene-regulatory, cellular and organismal phenotypes of these sub-threshold loci, demonstrating that most sub-threshold loci have regulatory consequences and that genetic perturbation of nearby genes causes cardiac phenotypes in mouse. Our work provides a general approach for improving the detection of novel loci associated with complex human traits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10557.001 PMID:27162171

  1. Development and application of a novel genome-wide SNP array reveals domestication history in soybean.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; Chu, Shanshan; Zhang, Huairen; Zhu, Ying; Cheng, Hao; Yu, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Domestication of soybeans occurred under the intense human-directed selections aimed at developing high-yielding lines. Tracing the domestication history and identifying the genes underlying soybean domestication require further exploration. Here, we developed a high-throughput NJAU 355 K SoySNP array and used this array to study the genetic variation patterns in 367 soybean accessions, including 105 wild soybeans and 262 cultivated soybeans. The population genetic analysis suggests that cultivated soybeans have tended to originate from northern and central China, from where they spread to other regions, accompanied with a gradual increase in seed weight. Genome-wide scanning for evidence of artificial selection revealed signs of selective sweeps involving genes controlling domestication-related agronomic traits including seed weight. To further identify genomic regions related to seed weight, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted across multiple environments in wild and cultivated soybeans. As a result, a strong linkage disequilibrium region on chromosome 20 was found to be significantly correlated with seed weight in cultivated soybeans. Collectively, these findings should provide an important basis for genomic-enabled breeding and advance the study of functional genomics in soybean. PMID:26856884

  2. Epigenetic Variation in Monozygotic Twins: A Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Buccal Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Dongen, Jenny; Ehli, Erik A.; Slieker, Roderick C.; Bartels, Meike; Weber, Zachary M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of the most extensively studied epigenetic marks in humans. Yet, it is largely unknown what causes variation in DNA methylation between individuals. The comparison of DNA methylation profiles of monozygotic (MZ) twins offers a unique experimental design to examine the extent to which such variation is related to individual-specific environmental influences and stochastic events or to familial factors (DNA sequence and shared environment). We measured genome-wide DNA methylation in buccal samples from ten MZ pairs (age 8–19) using the Illumina 450k array and examined twin correlations for methylation level at 420,921 CpGs after QC. After selecting CpGs showing the most variation in the methylation level between subjects, the mean genome-wide correlation (rho) was 0.54. The correlation was higher, on average, for CpGs within CpG islands (CGIs), compared to CGI shores, shelves and non-CGI regions, particularly at hypomethylated CpGs. This finding suggests that individual-specific environmental and stochastic influences account for more variation in DNA methylation in CpG-poor regions. Our findings also indicate that it is worthwhile to examine heritable and shared environmental influences on buccal DNA methylation in larger studies that also include dizygotic twins. PMID:24802513

  3. Epigenetic variation in monozygotic twins: a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in buccal cells.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Jenny; Ehli, Erik A; Slieker, Roderick C; Bartels, Meike; Weber, Zachary M; Davies, Gareth E; Slagboom, P Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of the most extensively studied epigenetic marks in humans. Yet, it is largely unknown what causes variation in DNA methylation between individuals. The comparison of DNA methylation profiles of monozygotic (MZ) twins offers a unique experimental design to examine the extent to which such variation is related to individual-specific environmental influences and stochastic events or to familial factors (DNA sequence and shared environment). We measured genome-wide DNA methylation in buccal samples from ten MZ pairs (age 8-19) using the Illumina 450k array and examined twin correlations for methylation level at 420,921 CpGs after QC. After selecting CpGs showing the most variation in the methylation level between subjects, the mean genome-wide correlation (rho) was 0.54. The correlation was higher, on average, for CpGs within CpG islands (CGIs), compared to CGI shores, shelves and non-CGI regions, particularly at hypomethylated CpGs. This finding suggests that individual-specific environmental and stochastic influences account for more variation in DNA methylation in CpG-poor regions. Our findings also indicate that it is worthwhile to examine heritable and shared environmental influences on buccal DNA methylation in larger studies that also include dizygotic twins. PMID:24802513

  4. Off-Target Effects of Psychoactive Drugs Revealed by Genome-Wide Assays in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Elke; Gebbia, Marinella; Heisler, Lawrence E.; Wildenhain, Jan; Tyers, Mike; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2008-01-01

    To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 compounds that inhibited wild-type yeast growth and were thus selected for genome-wide fitness profiling. Many of these drugs had a propensity to affect multiple cellular functions. The sensitivity profiles of half of the analyzed drugs were enriched for core cellular processes such as secretion, protein folding, RNA processing, and chromatin structure. Interestingly, fluoxetine (Prozac) interfered with establishment of cell polarity, cyproheptadine (Periactin) targeted essential genes with chromatin-remodeling roles, while paroxetine (Paxil) interfered with essential RNA metabolism genes, suggesting potential secondary drug targets. We also found that the more recently developed atypical antipsychotic clozapine (Clozaril) had no fewer off-target effects in yeast than the typical antipsychotics haloperidol (Haldol) and pimozide (Orap). Our results suggest that model organism pharmacogenetic studies provide a rational foundation for understanding the off-target effects of clinically important psychoactive agents and suggest a rational means both for devising compound derivatives with fewer side effects and for tailoring drug treatment to individual patient genotypes. PMID:18688276

  5. Meta-analysis of genome-wide linkage scans for renal function traits

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Madhumathi; Mottl, Amy K.; Cole, Shelley A.; Umans, Jason G.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Yang, Qiong; Cupples, Adrienne; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Hunt, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Several genome scans have explored the linkage of chronic kidney disease phenotypes to chromosomic regions with disparate results. Genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) is a quantitative method to synthesize linkage results from independent studies and assess their concordance. Methods. We searched PubMed to identify genome linkage analyses of renal function traits in humans, such as estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), albuminuria, serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance. We contacted authors for numerical data and extracted information from individual studies. We applied the GSMA nonparametric approach to combine results across 14 linkage studies for GFR, 11 linkage studies for albumin creatinine ratio, 11 linkage studies for serum creatinine and 4 linkage studies for creatinine clearance. Results. No chromosomal region reached genome-wide statistical significance in the main analysis which included all scans under each phenotype; however, regions on Chromosomes 7, 10 and 16 reached suggestive significance for linkage to two or more phenotypes. Subgroup analyses by disease status or ethnicity did not yield additional information. Conclusions. While heterogeneity across populations, methodologies and study designs likely explain this lack of agreement, it is possible that linkage scan methodologies lack the resolution for investigating complex traits. Combining family-based linkage studies with genome-wide association studies may be a powerful approach to detect private mutations contributing to complex renal phenotypes. PMID:21622988

  6. Genome-wide alterations of the DNA replication program during tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, A.; Goldar, A.; Argoul, F.; Hyrien, O.; Audit, B.

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic stress is a major driving force in the early stages of cancer development. Recent experimental findings reveal that, in precancerous lesions and cancers, activated oncogenes may induce stalling and dissociation of DNA replication forks resulting in DNA damage. Replication timing is emerging as an important epigenetic feature that recapitulates several genomic, epigenetic and functional specificities of even closely related cell types. There is increasing evidence that chromosome rearrangements, the hallmark of many cancer genomes, are intimately associated with the DNA replication program and that epigenetic replication timing changes often precede chromosomic rearrangements. The recent development of a novel methodology to map replication fork polarity using deep sequencing of Okazaki fragments has provided new and complementary genome-wide replication profiling data. We review the results of a wavelet-based multi-scale analysis of genomic and epigenetic data including replication profiles along human chromosomes. These results provide new insight into the spatio-temporal replication program and its dynamics during differentiation. Here our goal is to bring to cancer research, the experimental protocols and computational methodologies for replication program profiling, and also the modeling of the spatio-temporal replication program. To illustrate our purpose, we report very preliminary results obtained for the chronic myelogeneous leukemia, the archetype model of cancer. Finally, we discuss promising perspectives on using genome-wide DNA replication profiling as a novel efficient tool for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized treatment.

  7. Infection and Inflammation in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: A Genome Wide Study for Interactions with Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Pearce, Brad D.; McGrath, John; Wolyniec, Paula; Wang, Ruihua; Eckart, Nicole; Hatzimanolis, Alexandros; Goes, Fernando S.; Nestadt, Gerald; Mulle, Jennifer; Coneely, Karen; Hopkins, Myfanwy; Ruczinski, Ingo; Yolken, Robert; Pulver, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and maternal or fetal infections have been suggested as risk factors for schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP). It is likely that such environmental effects are contingent on genetic background. Here, in a genome-wide approach, we test the hypothesis that such exposures increase the risk for SZ and BP and that the increase is dependent on genetic variants. We use genome-wide genotype data, plasma IgG antibody measurements against Toxoplasma gondii, Herpes simplex virus type 1, Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpes Virus 6 and the food antigen gliadin as well as measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP), a peripheral marker of inflammation. The subjects are SZ cases, BP cases, parents of cases and screened controls. We look for higher levels of our immunity/infection variables and interactions between them and common genetic variation genome-wide. We find many of the antibody measurements higher in both disorders. While individual tests do not withstand correction for multiple comparisons, the number of nominally significant tests and the comparisons showing the expected direction are in significant excess (permutation p=0.019 and 0.004 respectively). We also find CRP levels highly elevated in SZ, BP and the mothers of BP cases, in agreement with existing literature, but possibly confounded by our inability to correct for smoking or body mass index. In our genome-wide interaction analysis no signal reached genome-wide significance, yet many plausible candidate genes emerged. In a hypothesis driven test, we found multiple interactions among SZ-associated SNPs in the HLA region on chromosome 6 and replicated an interaction between CMV infection and genotypes near the CTNNA3 gene reported by a recent GWAS. Our results support that inflammatory processes and infection may modify the risk for psychosis and suggest that the genotype at SZ-associated HLA loci modifies the effect of these variables on the risk to develop SZ. PMID:25781172

  8. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. PMID:25296770

  9. Assessing Predictive Properties of Genome-Wide Selection in Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Alencar; Muir, William M; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many economically important traits in plant breeding have low heritability or are difficult to measure. For these traits, genomic selection has attractive features and may boost genetic gains. Our goal was to evaluate alternative scenarios to implement genomic selection for yield components in soybean (Glycine max L. merr). We used a nested association panel with cross validation to evaluate the impacts of training population size, genotyping density, and prediction model on the accuracy of genomic prediction. Our results indicate that training population size was the factor most relevant to improvement in genome-wide prediction, with greatest improvement observed in training sets up to 2000 individuals. We discuss assumptions that influence the choice of the prediction model. Although alternative models had minor impacts on prediction accuracy, the most robust prediction model was the combination of reproducing kernel Hilbert space regression and BayesB. Higher genotyping density marginally improved accuracy. Our study finds that breeding programs seeking efficient genomic selection in soybeans would best allocate resources by investing in a representative training set. PMID:27317786

  10. Genome wide association scan for chronic periodontitis implicates novel locus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence for a genetic contribution to chronic periodontitis. In this study, we conducted a genome wide association study among 866 participants of the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy (N = 767) to severe chronic periodontitis (N = 99). Methods Genotypingi of over half-million single nucleotide polymorphisms was determined. Analyses were done twice, first in the complete dataset of all ethnicities, and second including only samples defined as self-reported Whites. From the top 100 results, twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms had consistent results in both analyses (borderline p-values ranging from 1E-05 to 1E-6) and were selected to be tested in two independent datasets derived from 1,460 individuals from Porto Alegre, and 359 from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Meta-analyses of the Single nucleotide polymorphisms showing a trend for association in the independent dataset were performed. Results The rs1477403 marker located on 16q22.3 showed suggestive association in the discovery phase and in the Porto Alegre dataset (p = 0.05). The meta-analysis suggested the less common allele decreases the risk of chronic periodontitis. Conclusions Our data offer a clear hypothesis to be independently tested regarding the contribution of the 16q22.3 locus to chronic periodontitis. PMID:25008200

  11. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  12. Genome-Wide Discriminatory Information Patterns of Cytosine DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a highly abundant, heritable but reversible chemical modification to the genome. Herein, a machine learning approach was applied to analyze the accumulation of epigenetic marks in methylomes of 152 ecotypes and 85 silencing mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In an information-thermodynamics framework, two measurements were used: (1) the amount of information gained/lost with the CDM changes I R and (2) the uncertainty of not observing a SNP L C R . We hypothesize that epigenetic marks are chromosomal footprints accounting for different ontogenetic and phylogenetic histories of individual populations. A machine learning approach is proposed to verify this hypothesis. Results support the hypothesis by the existence of discriminatory information (DI) patterns of CDM able to discriminate between individuals and between individual subpopulations. The statistical analyses revealed a strong association between the topologies of the structured population of Arabidopsis ecotypes based on I R and on LCR, respectively. A statistical-physical relationship between I R and L C R was also found. Results to date imply that the genome-wide distribution of CDM changes is not only part of the biological signal created by the methylation regulatory machinery, but ensures the stability of the DNA molecule, preserving the integrity of the genetic message under continuous stress from thermal fluctuations in the cell environment. PMID:27322251

  13. Imputing Phenotypes for Genome-wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Hormozdiari, Farhad; Kang, Eun Yong; Bilow, Michael; Ben-David, Eyal; Vulpe, Chris; McLachlan, Stela; Lusis, Aldons J; Han, Buhm; Eskin, Eleazar

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been successful in detecting variants correlated with phenotypes of clinical interest. However, the power to detect these variants depends on the number of individuals whose phenotypes are collected, and for phenotypes that are difficult to collect, the sample size might be insufficient to achieve the desired statistical power. The phenotype of interest is often difficult to collect, whereas surrogate phenotypes or related phenotypes are easier to collect and have already been collected in very large samples. This paper demonstrates how we take advantage of these additional related phenotypes to impute the phenotype of interest or target phenotype and then perform association analysis. Our approach leverages the correlation structure between phenotypes to perform the imputation. The correlation structure can be estimated from a smaller complete dataset for which both the target and related phenotypes have been collected. Under some assumptions, the statistical power can be computed analytically given the correlation structure of the phenotypes used in imputation. In addition, our method can impute the summary statistic of the target phenotype as a weighted linear combination of the summary statistics of related phenotypes. Thus, our method is applicable to datasets for which we have access only to summary statistics and not to the raw genotypes. We illustrate our approach by analyzing associated loci to triglycerides (TGs), body mass index (BMI), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort dataset. PMID:27292110

  14. Insights into kidney diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably improved our understanding of the genetic basis of kidney function and disease. Population-based studies, used to investigate traits that define chronic kidney disease (CKD), have identified >50 genomic regions in which common genetic variants associate with estimated glomerular filtration rate or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Case-control studies, used to study specific CKD aetiologies, have yielded risk loci for specific kidney diseases such as IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy. In this Review, we summarize important findings from GWAS and clinical and experimental follow-up studies. We also compare risk allele frequency, effect sizes, and specificity in GWAS of CKD-defining traits and GWAS of specific CKD aetiologies and the implications for study design. Genomic regions identified in GWAS of CKD-defining traits can contain causal genes for monogenic kidney diseases. Population-based research on kidney function traits can therefore generate insights into more severe forms of kidney diseases. Experimental follow-up studies have begun to identify causal genes and variants, which are potential therapeutic targets, and suggest mechanisms underlying the high allele frequency of causal variants. GWAS are thus a useful approach to advance knowledge in nephrology. PMID:27477491

  15. Reconstructing Roma History from Genome-Wide Data

    PubMed Central

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Loh, Po-Ru; Lipson, Mark; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Bela I.; Bonin, Michael; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Rieß, Olaf; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Melegh, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The Roma people, living throughout Europe and West Asia, are a diverse population linked by the Romani language and culture. Previous linguistic and genetic studies have suggested that the Roma migrated into Europe from South Asia about 1,000–1,500 years ago. Genetic inferences about Roma history have mostly focused on the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. To explore what additional information can be learned from genome-wide data, we analyzed data from six Roma groups that we genotyped at hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We estimate that the Roma harbor about 80% West Eurasian ancestry–derived from a combination of European and South Asian sources–and that the date of admixture of South Asian and European ancestry was about 850 years before present. We provide evidence for Eastern Europe being a major source of European ancestry, and North-west India being a major source of the South Asian ancestry in the Roma. By computing allele sharing as a measure of linkage disequilibrium, we estimate that the migration of Roma out of the Indian subcontinent was accompanied by a severe founder event, which appears to have been followed by a major demographic expansion after the arrival in Europe. PMID:23516520

  16. Assessing Predictive Properties of Genome-Wide Selection in Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Alencar; Muir, William M.; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many economically important traits in plant breeding have low heritability or are difficult to measure. For these traits, genomic selection has attractive features and may boost genetic gains. Our goal was to evaluate alternative scenarios to implement genomic selection for yield components in soybean (Glycine max L. merr). We used a nested association panel with cross validation to evaluate the impacts of training population size, genotyping density, and prediction model on the accuracy of genomic prediction. Our results indicate that training population size was the factor most relevant to improvement in genome-wide prediction, with greatest improvement observed in training sets up to 2000 individuals. We discuss assumptions that influence the choice of the prediction model. Although alternative models had minor impacts on prediction accuracy, the most robust prediction model was the combination of reproducing kernel Hilbert space regression and BayesB. Higher genotyping density marginally improved accuracy. Our study finds that breeding programs seeking efficient genomic selection in soybeans would best allocate resources by investing in a representative training set. PMID:27317786

  17. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; M. Lee, Janet; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqin; Spindler, Tassja J.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wlodzimierz, Sawicki; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sellers, Thomas A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Berchuck, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas (OC) but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOC). Genotypes from OC cases and controls were imputed into the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls identified three novel risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10−8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10−12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10−13). Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis in ovarian and colorectal tumors (which are histologically similar to MOC) identified significant eQTL associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10−4, FDR = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors, and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  18. Genome-Wide Mapping of Yeast RNA Polymerase II Termination

    PubMed Central

    Schaughency, Paul; Merran, Jonathan; Corden, Jeffry L.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) terminates transcription of coding transcripts through the polyadenylation (pA) pathway and non-coding transcripts through the non-polyadenylation (non-pA) pathway. We have used PAR-CLIP to map the position of Pol II genome-wide in living yeast cells after depletion of components of either the pA or non-pA termination complexes. We show here that Ysh1, responsible for cleavage at the pA site, is required for efficient removal of Pol II from the template. Depletion of Ysh1 from the nucleus does not, however, lead to readthrough transcription. In contrast, depletion of the termination factor Nrd1 leads to widespread runaway elongation of non-pA transcripts. Depletion of Sen1 also leads to readthrough at non-pA terminators, but in contrast to Nrd1, this readthrough is less processive, or more susceptible to pausing. The data presented here provide delineation of in vivo Pol II termination regions and highlight differences in the sequences that signal termination of different classes of non-pA transcripts. PMID:25299594

  19. Reconstructing Roma history from genome-wide data.

    PubMed

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Loh, Po-Ru; Lipson, Mark; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Bela I; Bonin, Michael; Kádaši, Ludevít; Rieß, Olaf; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Melegh, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The Roma people, living throughout Europe and West Asia, are a diverse population linked by the Romani language and culture. Previous linguistic and genetic studies have suggested that the Roma migrated into Europe from South Asia about 1,000-1,500 years ago. Genetic inferences about Roma history have mostly focused on the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. To explore what additional information can be learned from genome-wide data, we analyzed data from six Roma groups that we genotyped at hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We estimate that the Roma harbor about 80% West Eurasian ancestry-derived from a combination of European and South Asian sources-and that the date of admixture of South Asian and European ancestry was about 850 years before present. We provide evidence for Eastern Europe being a major source of European ancestry, and North-west India being a major source of the South Asian ancestry in the Roma. By computing allele sharing as a measure of linkage disequilibrium, we estimate that the migration of Roma out of the Indian subcontinent was accompanied by a severe founder event, which appears to have been followed by a major demographic expansion after the arrival in Europe. PMID:23516520

  20. Genome-Wide Specific Selection in Three Domestic Sheep Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jiaxve; Wu, Mingming; Ma, Xiaomeng; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Ruizao; Zhao, Fuping; Wei, Caihong; Du, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Commercial sheep raised for mutton grow faster than traditional Chinese sheep breeds. Here, we aimed to evaluate genetic selection among three different types of sheep breed: two well-known commercial mutton breeds and one indigenous Chinese breed. Results We first combined locus-specific branch lengths and di statistical methods to detect candidate regions targeted by selection in the three different populations. The results showed that the genetic distances reached at least medium divergence for each pairwise combination. We found these two methods were highly correlated, and identified many growth-related candidate genes undergoing artificial selection. For production traits, APOBR and FTO are associated with body mass index. For meat traits, ALDOA, STK32B and FAM190A are related to marbling. For reproduction traits, CCNB2 and SLC8A3 affect oocyte development. We also found two well-known genes, GHR (which affects meat production and quality) and EDAR (associated with hair thickness) were associated with German mutton merino sheep. Furthermore, four genes (POL, RPL7, MSL1 and SHISA9) were associated with pre-weaning gain in our previous genome-wide association study. Conclusions Our results indicated that combine locus-specific branch lengths and di statistical approaches can reduce the searching ranges for specific selection. And we got many credible candidate genes which not only confirm the results of previous reports, but also provide a suite of novel candidate genes in defined breeds to guide hybridization breeding. PMID:26083354

  1. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  2. cgmisc: enhanced genome-wide association analyses and visualization

    PubMed Central

    Kierczak, Marcin; Jabłońska, Jagoda; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Bianchi, Matteo; Tengvall, Katarina; Pettersson, Mats; Scholz, Veronika; Meadows, Jennifer R. S.; Jern, Patric; Carlborg, Örjan; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Summary: High-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies facilitate studies of complex genetic traits and provide new research opportunities. The increasing popularity of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) leads to the discovery of new associated loci and a better understanding of the genetic architecture underlying not only diseases, but also other monogenic and complex phenotypes. Several softwares are available for performing GWAS analyses, R environment being one of them. Results: We present cgmisc, an R package that enables enhanced data analysis and visualization of results from GWAS. The package contains several utilities and modules that complement and enhance the functionality of the existing software. It also provides several tools for advanced visualization of genomic data and utilizes the power of the R language to aid in preparation of publication-quality figures. Some of the package functions are specific for the domestic dog (Canis familiaris) data. Availability and implementation: The package is operating system-independent and is available from: https://github.com/cgmisc-team/cgmisc Contact: marcin.kierczak@imbim.uu.se Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26249815

  3. Realizing privacy preserving genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Sean; Berger, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: As genomics moves into the clinic, there has been much interest in using this medical data for research. At the same time the use of such data raises many privacy concerns. These circumstances have led to the development of various methods to perform genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on patient records while ensuring privacy. In particular, there has been growing interest in applying differentially private techniques to this challenge. Unfortunately, up until now all methods for finding high scoring SNPs in a differentially private manner have had major drawbacks in terms of either accuracy or computational efficiency. Results: Here we overcome these limitations with a substantially modified version of the neighbor distance method for performing differentially private GWAS, and thus are able to produce a more viable mechanism. Specifically, we use input perturbation and an adaptive boundary method to overcome accuracy issues. We also design and implement a convex analysis based algorithm to calculate the neighbor distance for each SNP in constant time, overcoming the major computational bottleneck in the neighbor distance method. It is our hope that methods such as ours will pave the way for more widespread use of patient data in biomedical research. Availability and implementation: A python implementation is available at http://groups.csail.mit.edu/cb/DiffPriv/. Contact: bab@csail.mit.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26769317

  4. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Linda E; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; Lee, Janet M; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Spindler, Tassja J; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia

    2015-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOCs). Our analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls with imputation identified 3 new risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10(-8)), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10(-12)) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10(-13)). We identified significant expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10(-4), false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk-associated SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  5. Genome wide association study on early puberty in Bos indicus.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, A V; Matos, M C; Seno, L O; Romero, A R S; Garcia, J F; Grisolia, A B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a genome wide association study (GWAS) approach to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with fertility traits (early puberty) in Nellore cattle (Bos indicus). Fifty-five Nellore cows were selected from a herd monitored for early puberty onset (positive pregnancy at 18 months of age). Extremes of this phenotype were selected; 30 and 25 individuals were pregnant and non-pregnant, respectively, at that age. DNA samples were genotyped using a high-density SNP chip (>777.000 SNP). GWAS using a case-control strategy highlighted a number of significant markers based on their proximity with the Bonferroni correction line. Results indicated that chromosomes 5, 6, 9, 10, and 22 were associated with the traits of interest. The most significant SNPs on these chromosomes were rs133039577, rs110013280, rs134702839, rs109551605, and rs41639155. Candidate genes, as well as quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously reported in the Ensembl and Cattle QTLdb databases, were further investigated. Analysis of the regions close to the SNP on chromosomes 9 and 10 revealed that four QTL had been previously classified under the reproduction category. In conclusion, we have identified SNPs in close proximity to genes associated with reproductive traits. Moreover, U6 spliceosomal RNA was present on three different chromosomes, which is possibly associated with age at first calving, suggesting that it might be a strong candidate for future studies. PMID:26909970

  6. Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiles in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jing; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Yu-Jing; Kappil, Maya; Wu, Hui-Chen; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Wang, Qiao; Jasmine, Farzana; Ahsan, Habib; Lee, Po-Huang; Yu, Ming-Whei; Chen, Chien-Jen; Santella, Regina M.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in DNA methylation frequently occur in hepatocellular cancer (HCC). We have previously demonstrated that hypermethylation in candidate genes can be detected in plasma DNA prior to HCC diagnosis. To identify with a genome-wide approach additional genes hypermethylated in HCC that could be used for more accurate analysis of plasma DNA for early diagnosis, we analyzed tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues from 62 Taiwanese HCC cases using Illumina methylation arrays that screen 26,486 autosomal CpG sites. After Bonferroni adjustment, a total of 2,324 CpG sites significantly differed in methylation level, with 684 CpG sites significantly hypermethylated and 1,640 hypomethylated in tumor compared to non-tumor tissues. Array data were validated with pyrosequencing in a subset of 5 of these genes; correlation coefficients ranged from 0.92 to 0.97. Analysis of plasma DNA from 38 cases demonstrated that 37% to 63% of cases had detectable hypermethylated DNA (≥5% methylation) for these 5 genes individually. At least one of these genes was hypermethylated in 87% of cases, suggesting that measurement of DNA methylation in plasma samples is feasible. The panel of methylated genes indentified in the current study will be further tested in large cohort of prospectively collected samples to determine their utility as early biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:22234943

  7. Genome-wide footprinting: ready for prime time?

    PubMed

    Sung, Myong-Hee; Baek, Songjoon; Hager, Gordon L

    2016-03-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have allowed many gene locus-level molecular biology assays to become genome-wide profiling methods. DNA-cleaving enzymes such as DNase I have been used to probe accessible chromatin. The accessible regions contain functional regulatory sites, including promoters, insulators and enhancers. Deep sequencing of DNase-seq libraries and computational analysis of the cut profiles have been used to infer protein occupancy in the genome at the nucleotide level, a method introduced as 'digital genomic footprinting'. The approach has been proposed as an attractive alternative to the analysis of transcription factors (TFs) by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq), and in theory it should overcome antibody issues, poor resolution and batch effects. Recent reports point to limitations of the DNase-based genomic footprinting approach and call into question the scope of detectable protein occupancy, especially for TFs with short-lived chromatin binding. The genomics community is grappling with issues concerning the utility of genomic footprinting and is reassessing the proposed approaches in terms of robust deliverables. Here we summarize the consensus as well as different views emerging from recent reports, and we describe the remaining issues and hurdles for genomic footprinting. PMID:26914206

  8. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Nobuhisa; Yasui, Kohichiroh; Dohi, Osamu; Gen, Yasuyuki; Tomie, Akira; Kitaichi, Tomoko; Iwai, Naoto; Mitsuyoshi, Hironori; Sumida, Yoshio; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Yamaguchi, Kanji; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Umemura, Atsushi; Naito, Yuji; Tanaka, Shinji; Arii, Shigeki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2016-04-01

    Epigenetic changes as well as genetic changes are mechanisms of tumorigenesis. We aimed to identify novel genes that are silenced by DNA hypermethylation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We screened for genes with promoter DNA hypermethylation using a genome-wide methylation microarray analysis in primary HCC (the discovery set). The microarray analysis revealed that there were 2,670 CpG sites that significantly differed in regards to the methylation level between the tumor and non-tumor liver tissues; 875 were significantly hypermethylated and 1,795 were significantly hypomethylated in the HCC tumors compared to the non‑tumor tissues. Further analyses using methylation-specific PCR, combined with expression analysis, in the validation set of primary HCC showed that, in addition to three known tumor-suppressor genes (APC, CDKN2A, and GSTP1), eight genes (AKR1B1, GRASP, MAP9, NXPE3, RSPH9, SPINT2, STEAP4, and ZNF154) were significantly hypermethylated and downregulated in the HCC tumors compared to the non-tumor liver tissues. Our results suggest that epigenetic silencing of these genes may be associated with HCC. PMID:26883180

  9. Genome-wide linkage-disequilibrium profiles from single individuals.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael; Xu, Sen; Maruki, Takahiro; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Pfaffelhuber, Peter; Haubold, Bernhard

    2014-09-01

    Although the analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) plays a central role in many areas of population genetics, the sampling variance of LD is known to be very large with high sensitivity to numbers of nucleotide sites and individuals sampled. Here we show that a genome-wide analysis of the distribution of heterozygous sites within a single diploid genome can yield highly informative patterns of LD as a function of physical distance. The proposed statistic, the correlation of zygosity, is closely related to the conventional population-level measure of LD, but is agnostic with respect to allele frequencies and hence likely less prone to outlier artifacts. Application of the method to several vertebrate species leads to the conclusion that >80% of recombination events are typically resolved by gene-conversion-like processes unaccompanied by crossovers, with the average lengths of conversion patches being on the order of one to several kilobases in length. Thus, contrary to common assumptions, the recombination rate between sites does not scale linearly with distance, often even up to distances of 100 kb. In addition, the amount of LD between sites separated by <200 bp is uniformly much greater than can be explained by the conventional neutral model, possibly because of the nonindependent origin of mutations within this spatial scale. These results raise questions about the application of conventional population-genetic interpretations to LD on short spatial scales and also about the use of spatial patterns of LD to infer demographic histories. PMID:24948778

  10. Genome-Wide Discriminatory Information Patterns of Cytosine DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a highly abundant, heritable but reversible chemical modification to the genome. Herein, a machine learning approach was applied to analyze the accumulation of epigenetic marks in methylomes of 152 ecotypes and 85 silencing mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In an information-thermodynamics framework, two measurements were used: (1) the amount of information gained/lost with the CDM changes IR and (2) the uncertainty of not observing a SNP LCR. We hypothesize that epigenetic marks are chromosomal footprints accounting for different ontogenetic and phylogenetic histories of individual populations. A machine learning approach is proposed to verify this hypothesis. Results support the hypothesis by the existence of discriminatory information (DI) patterns of CDM able to discriminate between individuals and between individual subpopulations. The statistical analyses revealed a strong association between the topologies of the structured population of Arabidopsis ecotypes based on IR and on LCR, respectively. A statistical-physical relationship between IR and LCR was also found. Results to date imply that the genome-wide distribution of CDM changes is not only part of the biological signal created by the methylation regulatory machinery, but ensures the stability of the DNA molecule, preserving the integrity of the genetic message under continuous stress from thermal fluctuations in the cell environment. PMID:27322251

  11. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-11-21

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We reportmore » distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). In conclusion, our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.« less

  12. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We report distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). Our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways. PMID:25415302

  13. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-11-21

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We report distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). In conclusion, our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.

  14. Genome-Wide Gene-Sodium Interaction Analyses on Blood Pressure: The Genetic Epidemiology Network of Salt-Sensitivity Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Changwei; He, Jiang; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Jinying; Gu, Dongfeng; Hixson, James E; Rao, Dabeeru C; Jaquish, Cashell E; Gu, Charles C; Chen, Jichun; Huang, Jianfeng; Chen, Shufeng; Kelly, Tanika N

    2016-08-01

    We performed genome-wide analyses to identify genomic loci that interact with sodium to influence blood pressure (BP) using single-marker-based (1 and 2 df joint tests) and gene-based tests among 1876 Chinese participants of the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Salt-Sensitivity (GenSalt) study. Among GenSalt participants, the average of 3 urine samples was used to estimate sodium excretion. Nine BP measurements were taken using a random zero sphygmomanometer. A total of 2.05 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms were imputed using Affymetrix 6.0 genotype data and the Chinese Han of Beijing and Japanese of Tokyo HapMap reference panel. Promising findings (P<1.00×10(-4)) from GenSalt were evaluated for replication among 775 Chinese participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Single-nucleotide polymorphism and gene-based results were meta-analyzed across the GenSalt and MESA studies to determine genome-wide significance. The 1 df tests identified interactions for UST rs13211840 on diastolic BP (P=3.13×10(-9)). The 2 df tests additionally identified associations for CLGN rs2567241 (P=3.90×10(-12)) and LOC105369882 rs11104632 (P=4.51×10(-8)) with systolic BP. The CLGN variant rs2567241 was also associated with diastolic BP (P=3.11×10(-22)) and mean arterial pressure (P=2.86×10(-15)). Genome-wide gene-based analysis identified MKNK1 (P=6.70×10(-7)), C2orf80 (P<1.00×10(-12)), EPHA6 (P=2.88×10(-7)), SCOC-AS1 (P=4.35×10(-14)), SCOC (P=6.46×10(-11)), CLGN (P=3.68×10(-13)), MGAT4D (P=4.73×10(-11)), ARHGAP42 (P≤1.00×10(-12)), CASP4 (P=1.31×10(-8)), and LINC01478 (P=6.75×10(-10)) that were associated with at least 1 BP phenotype. In summary, we identified 8 novel and 1 previously reported BP loci through the examination of single-nucleotide polymorphism and gene-based interactions with sodium. PMID:27271309

  15. A genome-wide RNAi screening method to discover novel genes involved in virus infection.

    PubMed

    Panda, Debasis; Cherry, Sara

    2015-12-01

    Systematic and comprehensive analysis of host cell proteins involved in virus infection has been difficult in large part due to the lack of robust unbiased methods for their identification. Recent technological breakthroughs allowing development of cell-based genetic screens have greatly facilitated our understanding of virus-host interactions. These include instrumentation for processing in microtiter plates (e.g., 384 well), coupled with sensitive readers and off-the-shelf analysis and informatics pipelines. Because viruses are a significant threat to human health, a better understanding of the cellular factors that impact infection would pave the way for the development of new therapeutics. Here we describe the development and implementation of a genome-wide siRNA screen against a virus using human cells. PMID:26164699

  16. Genome-wide association with select biomarker traits in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Emelia J; Dupuis, Josée; Larson, Martin G; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Booth, Sarah L; Govindaraju, Diddahally R; Kathiresan, Sekar; Keaney, John F; Keyes, Michelle J; Lin, Jing-Ping; Meigs, James B; Robins, Sander J; Rong, Jian; Schnabel, Renate; Vita, Joseph A; Wang, Thomas J; Wilson, Peter WF; Wolf, Philip A; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2007-01-01

    Background Systemic biomarkers provide insights into disease pathogenesis, diagnosis, and risk stratification. Many systemic biomarker concentrations are heritable phenotypes. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide mechanisms to investigate the genetic contributions to biomarker variability unconstrained by current knowledge of physiological relations. Methods We examined the association of Affymetrix 100K GeneChip single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to 22 systemic biomarker concentrations in 4 biological domains: inflammation/oxidative stress; natriuretic peptides; liver function; and vitamins. Related members of the Framingham Offspring cohort (n = 1012; mean age 59 ± 10 years, 51% women) had both phenotype and genotype data (minimum-maximum per phenotype n = 507–1008). We used Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE), Family Based Association Tests (FBAT) and variance components linkage to relate SNPs to multivariable-adjusted biomarker residuals. Autosomal SNPs (n = 70,987) meeting the following criteria were studied: minor allele frequency ≥ 10%, call rate ≥ 80% and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium p ≥ 0.001. Results With GEE, 58 SNPs had p < 10-6: the top SNPs were rs2494250 (p = 1.00*10-14) and rs4128725 (p = 3.68*10-12) for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1), and rs2794520 (p = 2.83*10-8) and rs2808629 (p = 3.19*10-8) for C-reactive protein (CRP) averaged from 3 examinations (over about 20 years). With FBAT, 11 SNPs had p < 10-6: the top SNPs were the same for MCP1 (rs4128725, p = 3.28*10-8, and rs2494250, p = 3.55*10-8), and also included B-type natriuretic peptide (rs437021, p = 1.01*10-6) and Vitamin K percent undercarboxylated osteocalcin (rs2052028, p = 1.07*10-6). The peak LOD (logarithm of the odds) scores were for MCP1 (4.38, chromosome 1) and CRP (3.28, chromosome 1; previously described) concentrations; of note the 1.5 support interval included the MCP1 and CRP SNPs reported above (GEE model). Previous candidate SNP associations

  17. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  18. Improved Statistics for Genome-Wide Interaction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Masao; Cordell, Heather J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, Wu and colleagues [1] proposed two novel statistics for genome-wide interaction analysis using case/control or case-only data. In computer simulations, their proposed case/control statistic outperformed competing approaches, including the fast-epistasis option in PLINK and logistic regression analysis under the correct model; however, reasons for its superior performance were not fully explored. Here we investigate the theoretical properties and performance of Wu et al.'s proposed statistics and explain why, in some circumstances, they outperform competing approaches. Unfortunately, we find minor errors in the formulae for their statistics, resulting in tests that have higher than nominal type 1 error. We also find minor errors in PLINK's fast-epistasis and case-only statistics, although theory and simulations suggest that these errors have only negligible effect on type 1 error. We propose adjusted versions of all four statistics that, both theoretically and in computer simulations, maintain correct type 1 error rates under the null hypothesis. We also investigate statistics based on correlation coefficients that maintain similar control of type 1 error. Although designed to test specifically for interaction, we show that some of these previously-proposed statistics can, in fact, be sensitive to main effects at one or both loci, particularly in the presence of linkage disequilibrium. We propose two new “joint effects” statistics that, provided the disease is rare, are sensitive only to genuine interaction effects. In computer simulations we find, in most situations considered, that highest power is achieved by analysis under the correct genetic model. Such an analysis is unachievable in practice, as we do not know this model. However, generally high power over a wide range of scenarios is exhibited by our joint effects and adjusted Wu statistics. We recommend use of these alternative or adjusted statistics and urge caution when using Wu et al

  19. Probabilistic Protein Function Prediction from Heterogeneous Genome-Wide Data

    PubMed Central

    Nariai, Naoki; Kolaczyk, Eric D.; Kasif, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in high throughput sequencing technologies have led to a staggering growth in the number of predicted genes. However, a large fraction of these newly discovered genes do not have a functional assignment. Fortunately, a variety of novel high-throughput genome-wide functional screening technologies provide important clues that shed light on gene function. The integration of heterogeneous data to predict protein function has been shown to improve the accuracy of automated gene annotation systems. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a probabilistic approach for protein function prediction that integrates protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, gene expression data, protein motif information, mutant phenotype data, and protein localization data. First, functional linkage graphs are constructed from PPI data and gene expression data, in which an edge between nodes (proteins) represents evidence for functional similarity. The assumption here is that graph neighbors are more likely to share protein function, compared to proteins that are not neighbors. The functional linkage graph model is then used in concert with protein domain, mutant phenotype and protein localization data to produce a functional prediction. Our method is applied to the functional prediction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, using Gene Ontology (GO) terms as the basis of our annotation. In a cross validation study we show that the integrated model increases recall by 18%, compared to using PPI data alone at the 50% precision. We also show that the integrated predictor is significantly better than each individual predictor. However, the observed improvement vs. PPI depends on both the new source of data and the functional category to be predicted. Surprisingly, in some contexts integration hurts overall prediction accuracy. Lastly, we provide a comprehensive assignment of putative GO terms to 463 proteins that currently have no assigned function. PMID:17396164

  20. Genome-wide activities of Polycomb complexes control pervasive transcription.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hun-Goo; Kahn, Tatyana G; Simcox, Amanda; Schwartz, Yuri B; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2015-08-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes PRC1 and PRC2 are well known for silencing specific developmental genes. PRC2 is a methyltransferase targeting histone H3K27 and producing H3K27me3, essential for stable silencing. Less well known but quantitatively much more important is the genome-wide role of PRC2 that dimethylates ∼70% of total H3K27. We show that H3K27me2 occurs in inverse proportion to transcriptional activity in most non-PcG target genes and intergenic regions and is governed by opposing roaming activities of PRC2 and complexes containing the H3K27 demethylase UTX. Surprisingly, loss of H3K27me2 results in global transcriptional derepression proportionally greatest in silent or weakly transcribed intergenic and genic regions and accompanied by an increase of H3K27ac and H3K4me1. H3K27me2 therefore sets a threshold that prevents random, unscheduled transcription all over the genome and even limits the activity of highly transcribed genes. PRC1-type complexes also have global roles. Unexpectedly, we find a pervasive distribution of histone H2A ubiquitylated at lysine 118 (H2AK118ub) outside of canonical PcG target regions, dependent on the RING/Sce subunit of PRC1-type complexes. We show, however, that H2AK118ub does not mediate the global PRC2 activity or the global repression and is predominantly produced by a new complex involving L(3)73Ah, a homolog of mammalian PCGF3. PMID:25986499

  1. Genome-wide signatures of convergent evolution in echolocating mammals

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Joe; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Cotton, James A.; Liu, Yuan; Provero, Paolo; Stupka, Elia; Rossiter, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Evolution is typically thought to proceed through divergence of genes, proteins, and ultimately phenotypes1-3. However, similar traits might also evolve convergently in unrelated taxa due to similar selection pressures4,5. Adaptive phenotypic convergence is widespread in nature, and recent results from a handful of genes have suggested that this phenomenon is powerful enough to also drive recurrent evolution at the sequence level6-9. Where homoplasious substitutions do occur these have long been considered the result of neutral processes. However, recent studies have demonstrated that adaptive convergent sequence evolution can be detected in vertebrates using statistical methods that model parallel evolution9,10 although the extent to which sequence convergence between genera occurs across genomes is unknown. Here we analyse genomic sequence data in mammals that have independently evolved echolocation and show for the first time that convergence is not a rare process restricted to a handful of loci but is instead widespread, continuously distributed and commonly driven by natural selection acting on a small number of sites per locus. Systematic analyses of convergent sequence evolution in 805,053 amino acids within 2,326 orthologous coding gene sequences compared across 22 mammals (including four new bat genomes) revealed signatures consistent with convergence in nearly 200 loci. Strong and significant support for convergence among bats and the dolphin was seen in numerous genes linked to hearing or deafness, consistent with an involvement in echolocation. Surprisingly we also found convergence in many genes linked to vision: the convergent signal of many sensory genes was robustly correlated with the strength of natural selection. This first attempt to detect genome-wide convergent sequence evolution across divergent taxa reveals the phenomenon to be much more pervasive than previously recognised. PMID:24005325

  2. Genome-wide signatures of convergent evolution in echolocating mammals.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joe; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Cotton, James A; Liu, Yuan; Provero, Paolo; Stupka, Elia; Rossiter, Stephen J

    2013-10-10

    Evolution is typically thought to proceed through divergence of genes, proteins and ultimately phenotypes. However, similar traits might also evolve convergently in unrelated taxa owing to similar selection pressures. Adaptive phenotypic convergence is widespread in nature, and recent results from several genes have suggested that this phenomenon is powerful enough to also drive recurrent evolution at the sequence level. Where homoplasious substitutions do occur these have long been considered the result of neutral processes. However, recent studies have demonstrated that adaptive convergent sequence evolution can be detected in vertebrates using statistical methods that model parallel evolution, although the extent to which sequence convergence between genera occurs across genomes is unknown. Here we analyse genomic sequence data in mammals that have independently evolved echolocation and show that convergence is not a rare process restricted to several loci but is instead widespread, continuously distributed and commonly driven by natural selection acting on a small number of sites per locus. Systematic analyses of convergent sequence evolution in 805,053 amino acids within 2,326 orthologous coding gene sequences compared across 22 mammals (including four newly sequenced bat genomes) revealed signatures consistent with convergence in nearly 200 loci. Strong and significant support for convergence among bats and the bottlenose dolphin was seen in numerous genes linked to hearing or deafness, consistent with an involvement in echolocation. Unexpectedly, we also found convergence in many genes linked to vision: the convergent signal of many sensory genes was robustly correlated with the strength of natural selection. This first attempt to detect genome-wide convergent sequence evolution across divergent taxa reveals the phenomenon to be much more pervasive than previously recognized. PMID:24005325

  3. Genome-wide characteristics of de novo mutations in autism

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Ryan K C; Merico, Daniele; Cao, Hongzhi; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Alipanahi, Babak; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Tong, Xin; Sun, Yuhui; Cao, Dandan; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Xueli; Jin, Xin; Zhou, Ze; Liu, Xiaomin; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Walker, Susan; Howe, Jennifer L.; Wang, Zhuozhi; MacDonald, Jeffrey R.; Chan, Ada; D’Abate, Lia; Deneault, Eric; Siu, Michelle T.; Tammimies, Kristiina; Uddin, Mohammed; Zarrei, Mehdi; Wang, Mingbang; Li, Yingrui; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Bookman, Matt; Bingham, Jonathan; Gross, Samuel S.; Loy, Dion; Pletcher, Mathew; Marshall, Christian R.; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Weksberg, Rosanna; Fernandez, Bridget A; Roberts, Wendy; Szatmari, Peter; Glazer, David; Frey, Brendan J.; Ring, Robert H.; Xu, Xun; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    De novo mutations (DNMs) are important in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but so far analyses have mainly been on the ~1.5% of the genome encoding genes. Here, we performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) of 200 ASD parent-child trios and characterized germline and somatic DNMs. We confirmed that the majority of germline DNMs (75.6%) originated from the father, and these increased significantly with paternal age only (p=4.2×10−10). However, when clustered DNMs (those within 20kb) were found in ASD, not only did they mostly originate from the mother (p=7.7×10−13), but they could also be found adjacent to de novo copy number variations (CNVs) where the mutation rate was significantly elevated (p=2.4×10−24). By comparing DNMs detected in controls, we found a significant enrichment of predicted damaging DNMs in ASD cases (p=8.0×10−9; OR=1.84), of which 15.6% (p=4.3×10−3) and 22.5% (p=7.0×10−5) were in the non-coding or genic non-coding, respectively. The non-coding elements most enriched for DNM were untranslated regions of genes, boundaries involved in exon-skipping and DNase I hypersensitive regions. Using microarrays and a novel outlier detection test, we also found aberrant methylation profiles in 2/185 (1.1%) of ASD cases. These same individuals carried independently identified DNMs in the ASD risk- and epigenetic- genes DNMT3A and ADNP. Our data begins to characterize different genome-wide DNMs, and highlight the contribution of non-coding variants, to the etiology of ASD. PMID:27525107

  4. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. PMID:26449254

  5. Identification of Neural Outgrowth Genes using Genome-Wide RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, Katharine J.; Hong, Pengyu; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Liu, Judy S.; Mejia, Luis A.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    While genetic screens have identified many genes essential for neurite outgrowth, they have been limited in their ability to identify neural genes that also have earlier critical roles in the gastrula, or neural genes for which maternally contributed RNA compensates for gene mutations in the zygote. To address this, we developed methods to screen the Drosophila genome using RNA-interference (RNAi) on primary neural cells and present the results of the first full-genome RNAi screen in neurons. We used live-cell imaging and quantitative image analysis to characterize the morphological phenotypes of fluorescently labelled primary neurons and glia in response to RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. From the full genome screen, we focused our analysis on 104 evolutionarily conserved genes that when downregulated by RNAi, have morphological defects such as reduced axon extension, excessive branching, loss of fasciculation, and blebbing. To assist in the phenotypic analysis of the large data sets, we generated image analysis algorithms that could assess the statistical significance of the mutant phenotypes. The algorithms were essential for the analysis of the thousands of images generated by the screening process and will become a valuable tool for future genome-wide screens in primary neurons. Our analysis revealed unexpected, essential roles in neurite outgrowth for genes representing a wide range of functional categories including signalling molecules, enzymes, channels, receptors, and cytoskeletal proteins. We also found that genes known to be involved in protein and vesicle trafficking showed similar RNAi phenotypes. We confirmed phenotypes of the protein trafficking genes Sec61alpha and Ran GTPase using Drosophila embryo and mouse embryonic cerebral cortical neurons, respectively. Collectively, our results showed that RNAi phenotypes in primary neural culture can parallel in vivo phenotypes, and the screening technique can be used to identify many new genes that have

  6. Mosaic paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Diana; Atwal, Paldeep Singh; Angell, Cathy; Gadi, Inder; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-10-01

    We report on a 6-month-old girl with two apparent cell lines; one with trisomy 21, and the other with paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy (GWUPiD), identified using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based microarray and microsatellite analysis of polymorphic loci. The patient has Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) due to paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) at chromosome location 11p15 (UPD 11p15), which was confirmed through methylation analysis. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is present, which is associated with paternal UPD 11p15.5; and she likely has medullary nephrocalcinosis, which is associated with paternal UPD 20, although this was not biochemically confirmed. Angelman syndrome (AS) analysis was negative but this testing is not completely informative; she has no specific features of AS. Clinical features of this patient include: dysmorphic features consistent with trisomy 21, tetralogy of Fallot, hemihypertrophy, swirled skin hyperpigmentation, hepatoblastoma, and Wilms tumor. Her karyotype is 47,XX,+21[19]/46,XX[4], and microarray results suggest that the cell line with trisomy 21 is biparentally inherited and represents 40-50% of the genomic material in the tested specimen. The difference in the level of cytogenetically detected mosaicism versus the level of mosaicism observed via microarray analysis is likely caused by differences in the test methodologies. While a handful of cases of mosaic paternal GWUPiD have been reported, this patient is the only reported case that also involves trisomy 21. Other GWUPiD patients have presented with features associated with multiple imprinted regions, as does our patient. PMID:26219535

  7. Genome-wide metabolic (re-) annotation of Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even before having its genome sequence published in 2004, Kluyveromyces lactis had long been considered a model organism for studies in genetics and physiology. Research on Kluyveromyces lactis is quite advanced and this yeast species is one of the few with which it is possible to perform formal genetic analysis. Nevertheless, until now, no complete metabolic functional annotation has been performed to the proteins encoded in the Kluyveromyces lactis genome. Results In this work, a new metabolic genome-wide functional re-annotation of the proteins encoded in the Kluyveromyces lactis genome was performed, resulting in the annotation of 1759 genes with metabolic functions, and the development of a methodology supported by merlin (software developed in-house). The new annotation includes novelties, such as the assignment of transporter superfamily numbers to genes identified as transporter proteins. Thus, the genes annotated with metabolic functions could be exclusively enzymatic (1410 genes), transporter proteins encoding genes (301 genes) or have both metabolic activities (48 genes). The new annotation produced by this work largely surpassed the Kluyveromyces lactis currently available annotations. A comparison with KEGG’s annotation revealed a match with 844 (~90%) of the genes annotated by KEGG, while adding 850 new gene annotations. Moreover, there are 32 genes with annotations different from KEGG. Conclusions The methodology developed throughout this work can be used to re-annotate any yeast or, with a little tweak of the reference organism, the proteins encoded in any sequenced genome. The new annotation provided by this study offers basic knowledge which might be useful for the scientific community working on this model yeast, because new functions have been identified for the so-called metabolic genes. Furthermore, it served as the basis for the reconstruction of a compartmentalized, genome-scale metabolic model of Kluyveromyces lactis, which is

  8. Genome-Wide Approaches for RNA Structure Probing.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Ian M; Berkowitz, Nathan D; Gosai, Sager J; Gregory, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules of all types fold into complex secondary and tertiary structures that are important for their function and regulation. Structural and catalytic RNAs such as ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and transfer RNA (tRNA) are central players in protein synthesis, and only function through their proper folding into intricate three-dimensional structures. Studies of messenger RNA (mRNA) regulation have also revealed that structural elements embedded within these RNA species are important for the proper regulation of their total level in the transcriptome. More recently, the discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) has shed light on the importance of RNA structure to genome, transcriptome, and proteome regulation. Due to the relatively small number, high conservation, and importance of structural and catalytic RNAs to all life, much early work in RNA structure analysis mapped out a detailed view of these molecules. Computational and physical methods were used in concert with enzymatic and chemical structure probing to create high-resolution models of these fundamental biological molecules. However, the recent expansion in our knowledge of the importance of RNA structure to coding and regulatory RNAs has left the field in need of faster and scalable methods for high-throughput structural analysis. To address this, nuclease and chemical RNA structure probing methodologies have been adapted for genome-wide analysis. These methods have been deployed to globally characterize thousands of RNA structures in a single experiment. Here, we review these experimental methodologies for high-throughput RNA structure determination and discuss the insights gained from each approach. PMID:27256381

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study of Proneness to Anger

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Eric; McGough, James; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Frazier, Jean A.; Kennedy, David; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community samples suggest that approximately 1 in 20 children and adults exhibit clinically significant anger, hostility, and aggression. Individuals with dysregulated emotional control have a greater lifetime burden of psychiatric morbidity, severe impairment in role functioning, and premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease. Methods With publically available data secured from dbGaP, we conducted a genome-wide association study of proneness to anger using the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Scale in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (n = 8,747). Results Subjects were, on average, 54 (range 45–64) years old at baseline enrollment, 47% (n = 4,117) were male, and all were of European descent by self-report. The mean Angry Temperament and Angry Reaction scores were 5.8±1.8 and 7.6±2.2. We observed a nominally significant finding (p = 2.9E-08, λ = 1.027 - corrected pgc = 2.2E-07, λ = 1.0015) on chromosome 6q21 in the gene coding for the non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, Fyn. Conclusions Fyn interacts with NDMA receptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-gated channels to regulate calcium influx and intracellular release in the post-synaptic density. These results suggest that signaling pathways regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis, which are relevant to memory, learning, and neuronal survival, may in part underlie the expression of Angry Temperament. PMID:24489884

  10. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K.; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. PMID:26449254

  11. Assessing statistical significance in multivariable genome wide association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buzdugan, Laura; Kalisch, Markus; Navarro, Arcadi; Schunk, Daniel; Fehr, Ernst; Bühlmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Although Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) genotype a very large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the data are often analyzed one SNP at a time. The low predictive power of single SNPs, coupled with the high significance threshold needed to correct for multiple testing, greatly decreases the power of GWAS. Results: We propose a procedure in which all the SNPs are analyzed in a multiple generalized linear model, and we show its use for extremely high-dimensional datasets. Our method yields P-values for assessing significance of single SNPs or groups of SNPs while controlling for all other SNPs and the family wise error rate (FWER). Thus, our method tests whether or not a SNP carries any additional information about the phenotype beyond that available by all the other SNPs. This rules out spurious correlations between phenotypes and SNPs that can arise from marginal methods because the ‘spuriously correlated’ SNP merely happens to be correlated with the ‘truly causal’ SNP. In addition, the method offers a data driven approach to identifying and refining groups of SNPs that jointly contain informative signals about the phenotype. We demonstrate the value of our method by applying it to the seven diseases analyzed by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). We show, in particular, that our method is also capable of finding significant SNPs that were not identified in the original WTCCC study, but were replicated in other independent studies. Availability and implementation: Reproducibility of our research is supported by the open-source Bioconductor package hierGWAS. Contact: peter.buehlmann@stat.math.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153677

  12. Genome-wide profiling of Populus small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Short RNAs, and in particular microRNAs, are important regulators of gene expression both within defined regulatory pathways and at the epigenetic scale. We investigated the short RNA (sRNA) population (18-24 nt) of the transcriptome of green leaves from the sequenced Populus trichocarpa using a concatenation strategy in combination with 454 sequencing. Results The most abundant size class of sRNAs were 24 nt. Long Terminal Repeats were particularly associated with 24 nt sRNAs. Additionally, some repetitive elements were associated with 22 nt sRNAs. We identified an sRNA hot-spot on chromosome 19, overlapping a region containing both the proposed sex-determining locus and a major cluster of NBS-LRR genes. A number of phased siRNA loci were identified, a subset of which are predicted to target PPR and NBS-LRR disease resistance genes, classes of genes that have been significantly expanded in Populus. Additional loci enriched for sRNA production were identified and characterised. We identified 15 novel predicted microRNAs (miRNAs), including miRNA*sequences, and identified a novel locus that may encode a dual miRNA or a miRNA and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Conclusions The short RNA population of P. trichocarpa is at least as complex as that of Arabidopsis thaliana. We provide a first genome-wide view of short RNA production for P. trichocarpa and identify new, non-conserved miRNAs. PMID:20021695

  13. A "candidate-interactome" aggregate analysis of genome-wide association data in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mechelli, Rosella; Umeton, Renato; Policano, Claudia; Annibali, Viviana; Coarelli, Giulia; Ricigliano, Vito A G; Vittori, Danila; Fornasiero, Arianna; Buscarinu, Maria Chiara; Romano, Silvia; Salvetti, Marco; Ristori, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Though difficult, the study of gene-environment interactions in multifactorial diseases is crucial for interpreting the relevance of non-heritable factors and prevents from overlooking genetic associations with small but measurable effects. We propose a "candidate interactome" (i.e. a group of genes whose products are known to physically interact with environmental factors that may be relevant for disease pathogenesis) analysis of genome-wide association data in multiple sclerosis. We looked for statistical enrichment of associations among interactomes that, at the current state of knowledge, may be representative of gene-environment interactions of potential, uncertain or unlikely relevance for multiple sclerosis pathogenesis: Epstein-Barr virus, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus, HHV8-Kaposi sarcoma, H1N1-influenza, JC virus, human innate immunity interactome for type I interferon, autoimmune regulator, vitamin D receptor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor and a panel of proteins targeted by 70 innate immune-modulating viral open reading frames from 30 viral species. Interactomes were either obtained from the literature or were manually curated. The P values of all single nucleotide polymorphism mapping to a given interactome were obtained from the last genome-wide association study of the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium & the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, 2. The interaction between genotype and Epstein Barr virus emerges as relevant for multiple sclerosis etiology. However, in line with recent data on the coexistence of common and unique strategies used by viruses to perturb the human molecular system, also other viruses have a similar potential, though probably less relevant in epidemiological terms. PMID:23696811

  14. Impact of vitamin D on immune function: lessons learned from genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Rene F.; Liu, Philip T.; Modlin, Robert L.; Adams, John S.; Hewison, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulatory responses to the active form of vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25D) have been recognized for many years, but it is only in the last 5 years that the potential role of this in normal human immune function has been recognized. Genome-wide analyses have played a pivotal role in redefining our perspective on vitamin D and immunity. The description of increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) and 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) expression in macrophages following a pathogen challenge, has underlined the importance of intracrine vitamin D as key mediator of innate immune function. It is now clear that both macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are able to respond to 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D), the major circulating vitamin D metabolite, thereby providing a link between the function of these cells and the variations in vitamin D status common to many humans. The identification of hundreds of primary 1,25D target genes in immune cells has also provided new insight into the role of vitamin D in the adaptive immune system, such as the modulation of antigen-presentation and T cells proliferation and phenotype, with the over-arching effects being to suppress inflammation and promote immune tolerance. In macrophages 1,25D promotes antimicrobial responses through the induction of antibacterial proteins, and stimulation of autophagy and autophagosome activity. In this way variations in 25D levels have the potential to influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. More recent genome-wide analyses have highlighted how cytokine signaling pathways can influence the intracrine vitamin D system and either enhance or abrogate responses to 25D. The current review will discuss the impact of intracrine vitamin D metabolism on both innate and adaptive immunity, whilst introducing the concept of disease-specific corruption of vitamin D metabolism and how this may alter the requirements for vitamin D in maintaining a healthy immune system in humans. PMID:24795646

  15. Impact of vitamin D on immune function: lessons learned from genome-wide analysis.

    PubMed

    Chun, Rene F; Liu, Philip T; Modlin, Robert L; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulatory responses to the active form of vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25D) have been recognized for many years, but it is only in the last 5 years that the potential role of this in normal human immune function has been recognized. Genome-wide analyses have played a pivotal role in redefining our perspective on vitamin D and immunity. The description of increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) and 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) expression in macrophages following a pathogen challenge, has underlined the importance of intracrine vitamin D as key mediator of innate immune function. It is now clear that both macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are able to respond to 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D), the major circulating vitamin D metabolite, thereby providing a link between the function of these cells and the variations in vitamin D status common to many humans. The identification of hundreds of primary 1,25D target genes in immune cells has also provided new insight into the role of vitamin D in the adaptive immune system, such as the modulation of antigen-presentation and T cells proliferation and phenotype, with the over-arching effects being to suppress inflammation and promote immune tolerance. In macrophages 1,25D promotes antimicrobial responses through the induction of antibacterial proteins, and stimulation of autophagy and autophagosome activity. In this way variations in 25D levels have the potential to influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. More recent genome-wide analyses have highlighted how cytokine signaling pathways can influence the intracrine vitamin D system and either enhance or abrogate responses to 25D. The current review will discuss the impact of intracrine vitamin D metabolism on both innate and adaptive immunity, whilst introducing the concept of disease-specific corruption of vitamin D metabolism and how this may alter the requirements for vitamin D in maintaining a healthy immune system in humans. PMID:24795646

  16. Genome-wide methylation study on depression: differential methylation and variable methylation in monozygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    Córdova-Palomera, A; Fatjó-Vilas, M; Gastó, C; Navarro, V; Krebs, M-O; Fañanás, L

    2015-01-01

    Depressive disorders have been shown to be highly influenced by environmental pathogenic factors, some of which are believed to exert stress on human brain functioning via epigenetic modifications. Previous genome-wide methylomic studies on depression have suggested that, along with differential DNA methylation, affected co-twins of monozygotic (MZ) pairs have increased DNA methylation variability, probably in line with theories of epigenetic stochasticity. Nevertheless, the potential biological roots of this variability remain largely unexplored. The current study aimed to evaluate whether DNA methylation differences within MZ twin pairs were related to differences in their psychopathological status. Data from the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip was used to evaluate peripheral blood DNA methylation of 34 twins (17 MZ pairs). Two analytical strategies were used to identify (a) differentially methylated probes (DMPs) and (b) variably methylated probes (VMPs). Most DMPs were located in genes previously related to neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Remarkably, one of these DMPs (cg01122889) was located in the WDR26 gene, the DNA sequence of which has been implicated in major depressive disorder from genome-wide association studies. Expression of WDR26 has also been proposed as a biomarker of depression in human blood. Complementarily, VMPs were located in genes such as CACNA1C, IGF2 and the p38 MAP kinase MAPK11, showing enrichment for biological processes such as glucocorticoid signaling. These results expand on previous research to indicate that both differential methylation and differential variability have a role in the etiology and clinical manifestation of depression, and provide clues on specific genomic loci of potential interest in the epigenetics of depression. PMID:25918994

  17. A “Candidate-Interactome” Aggregate Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Data in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Policano, Claudia; Annibali, Viviana; Coarelli, Giulia; Ricigliano, Vito A. G.; Vittori, Danila; Fornasiero, Arianna; Buscarinu, Maria Chiara; Romano, Silvia; Salvetti, Marco; Ristori, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Though difficult, the study of gene-environment interactions in multifactorial diseases is crucial for interpreting the relevance of non-heritable factors and prevents from overlooking genetic associations with small but measurable effects. We propose a “candidate interactome” (i.e. a group of genes whose products are known to physically interact with environmental factors that may be relevant for disease pathogenesis) analysis of genome-wide association data in multiple sclerosis. We looked for statistical enrichment of associations among interactomes that, at the current state of knowledge, may be representative of gene-environment interactions of potential, uncertain or unlikely relevance for multiple sclerosis pathogenesis: Epstein-Barr virus, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus, HHV8-Kaposi sarcoma, H1N1-influenza, JC virus, human innate immunity interactome for type I interferon, autoimmune regulator, vitamin D receptor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor and a panel of proteins targeted by 70 innate immune-modulating viral open reading frames from 30 viral species. Interactomes were either obtained from the literature or were manually curated. The P values of all single nucleotide polymorphism mapping to a given interactome were obtained from the last genome-wide association study of the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium & the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, 2. The interaction between genotype and Epstein Barr virus emerges as relevant for multiple sclerosis etiology. However, in line with recent data on the coexistence of common and unique strategies used by viruses to perturb the human molecular system, also other viruses have a similar potential, though probably less relevant in epidemiological terms. PMID:23696811

  18. Genome-wide comparison of African-ancestry populations from CARe and other cohorts reveals signals of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Patterson, Nick; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Zaitlen, Noah; Genovese, Giulio; Pollack, Samuela; Mallick, Swapan; Myers, Simon; Tandon, Arti; Spencer, Chris; Palmer, Cameron D; Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Akylbekova, Ermeg L; Cupples, L Adrienne; Divers, Jasmin; Fornage, Myriam; Kao, W H Linda; Lange, Leslie; Li, Mingyao; Musani, Solomon; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Papanicolaou, George; Rotimi, Charles N; Rotter, Jerome I; Ruczinski, Ingo; Salako, Babatunde; Siscovick, David S; Tayo, Bamidele O; Yang, Qiong; McCarroll, Steve; Sabeti, Pardis; Lettre, Guillaume; De Jager, Phil; Hirschhorn, Joel; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Cooper, Richard; Reich, David; Wilson, James G; Price, Alkes L

    2011-09-01

    The study of recent natural selection in human populations has important applications to human history and medicine. Positive natural selection drives the increase in beneficial alleles and plays a role in explaining diversity across human populations. By discovering traits subject to positive selection, we can better understand the population level response to environmental pressures including infectious disease. Our study examines unusual population differentiation between three large data sets to detect natural selection. The populations examined, African Americans, Nigerians, and Gambians, are genetically close to one another (F(ST) < 0.01 for all pairs), allowing us to detect selection even with moderate changes in allele frequency. We also develop a tree-based method to pinpoint the population in which selection occurred, incorporating information across populations. Our genome-wide significant results corroborate loci previously reported to be under selection in Africans including HBB and CD36. At the HLA locus on chromosome 6, results suggest the existence of multiple, independent targets of population-specific selective pressure. In addition, we report a genome-wide significant (p = 1.36 × 10(-11)) signal of selection in the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene. The most significantly differentiated marker in our analysis, rs2920283, is highly differentiated in both Africa and East Asia and has prior genome-wide significant associations to bladder and gastric cancers. PMID:21907010

  19. Open access resources for genome-wide association mapping in rice.

    PubMed

    McCouch, Susan R; Wright, Mark H; Tung, Chih-Wei; Maron, Lyza G; McNally, Kenneth L; Fitzgerald, Melissa; Singh, Namrata; DeClerck, Genevieve; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Korniliev, Pavel; Greenberg, Anthony J; Naredo, Ma Elizabeth B; Mercado, Sheila Mae Q; Harrington, Sandra E; Shi, Yuxin; Branchini, Darcy A; Kuser-Falcão, Paula R; Leung, Hei; Ebana, Kowaru; Yano, Masahiro; Eizenga, Georgia; McClung, Anna; Mezey, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Increasing food production is essential to meet the demands of a growing human population, with its rising income levels and nutritional expectations. To address the demand, plant breeders seek new sources of genetic variation to enhance the productivity, sustainability and resilience of crop varieties. Here we launch a high-resolution, open-access research platform to facilitate genome-wide association mapping in rice, a staple food crop. The platform provides an immortal collection of diverse germplasm, a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism data set tailored for gene discovery, well-documented analytical strategies, and a suite of bioinformatics resources to facilitate biological interpretation. Using grain length, we demonstrate the power and resolution of our new high-density rice array, the accompanying genotypic data set, and an expanded diversity panel for detecting major and minor effect QTLs and subpopulation-specific alleles, with immediate implications for rice improvement. PMID:26842267

  20. A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen to Dissect Centriole Duplication and Centrosome Maturation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dobbelaere, Jeroen; Josué, Filipe; Suijkerbuijk, Saskia; Baum, Buzz; Tapon, Nicolas; Raff, Jordan

    2008-01-01

    Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by an amorphous pericentriolar material (PCM). Here, we have performed a microscopy-based genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins required for centriole duplication and mitotic PCM recruitment. We analysed 92% of the Drosophila genome (13,059 genes) and identified 32 genes involved in centrosome function. An extensive series of secondary screens classified these genes into four categories: (1) nine are required for centriole duplication, (2) 11 are required for centrosome maturation, (3) nine are required for both functions, and (4) three genes regulate centrosome separation. These 32 hits include several new centrosomal components, some of which have human homologs. In addition, we find that the individual depletion of only two proteins, Polo and Centrosomin (Cnn) can completely block centrosome maturation. Cnn is phosphorylated during mitosis in a Polo-dependent manner, suggesting that the Polo-dependent phosphorylation of Cnn initiates centrosome maturation in flies. PMID:18798690

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Novel Regulators of Growth in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Lamparter, David; Mackay, Trudy F C; Bergmann, Sven; Hafen, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Organismal size depends on the interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses in humans have implied many genes in the control of height but suffer from the inability to control the environment. Genetic analyses in Drosophila have identified conserved signaling pathways controlling size; however, how these pathways control phenotypic diversity is unclear. We performed GWA of size traits using the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel of inbred, sequenced lines. We find that the top associated variants differ between traits and sexes; do not map to canonical growth pathway genes, but can be linked to these by epistasis analysis; and are enriched for genes and putative enhancers. Performing GWA on well-studied developmental traits under controlled conditions expands our understanding of developmental processes underlying phenotypic diversity. PMID:26751788

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Novel Regulators of Growth in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Lamparter, David; Mackay, Trudy F. C.; Bergmann, Sven; Hafen, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    Organismal size depends on the interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses in humans have implied many genes in the control of height but suffer from the inability to control the environment. Genetic analyses in Drosophila have identified conserved signaling pathways controlling size; however, how these pathways control phenotypic diversity is unclear. We performed GWA of size traits using the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel of inbred, sequenced lines. We find that the top associated variants differ between traits and sexes; do not map to canonical growth pathway genes, but can be linked to these by epistasis analysis; and are enriched for genes and putative enhancers. Performing GWA on well-studied developmental traits under controlled conditions expands our understanding of developmental processes underlying phenotypic diversity. PMID:26751788

  3. Genome-wide association study of Arabidopsis thaliana's leaf microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Matthew W.; Bodenhausen, Natacha; Beilsmith, Kathleen; Meng, Dazhe; Muegge, Brian D.; Subramanian, Sathish; Vetter, M. Madlen; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Nordborg, Magnus; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Bergelson, Joy

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the factors that influence the outcome of host-microbial interactions is critical to protecting biodiversity, minimizing agricultural losses, and improving human health. A few genes that determine symbiosis or resistance to infectious disease have been identified in model species, but a comprehensive examination of how a host's genotype influences the structure of its microbial community is lacking. Here we report the results of a field experiment with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to identify the fungi and bacteria that colonize its leaves and the host loci that influence the microbes’ numbers. The composition of this community differs among accessions of A. thaliana. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggest that plant loci responsible for defense and cell wall integrity affect variation in this community. Furthermore, species richness in the bacterial community is shaped by host genetic variation, notably at loci that also influence the reproduction of viruses, trichome branching and morphogenesis. PMID:25382143

  4. A Review of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Stimulant and Opioid Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kevin P

    2016-05-01

    Substance use disorders (SUD) are a major contributor to disability and disease burden worldwide. Risk for developing SUDs is influenced by variation in the genome. Identifying the genetic variants that influence SUD risk may help us to understand the biological mechanisms for the disorders and improve treatments. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying many regions of the genome associated with common human disorders. Here, findings from recent GWAS of SUDs that involve illicit substances will be reviewed. Several GWAS have been reported, including studies on opioid and stimulant use disorder (cocaine and methamphetamine). Several of these GWAS report associations that are biologically interesting and statistically robust. Replication of the associations in independent samples and functional studies to understand the basis for the statistical associations will be important next steps. PMID:27606319

  5. Mixed linear model approach adapted for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Ersoz, Elhan; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Todhunter, Rory J; Tiwari, Hemant K; Gore, Michael A; Bradbury, Peter J; Yu, Jianming; Arnett, Donna K; Ordovas, Jose M; Buckler, Edward S

    2010-01-01

    Mixed linear model (MLM) methods have proven useful in controlling for population structure and relatedness within genome-wide association studies. However, MLM-based methods can be computationally challenging for large datasets. We report a compression approach, called ‘compressed MLM’, that decreases the effective sample size of such datasets by clustering individuals into groups. We also present a complementary approach, ‘population parameters previously determined’ (P3D), that eliminates the need to re-compute variance components. We applied these two methods both independently and combined in selected genetic association datasets from human, dog and maize. The joint implementation of these two methods markedly reduced computing time and either maintained or improved statistical power. We used simulations to demonstrate the usefulness in controlling for substructure in genetic association datasets for a range of species and genetic architectures. We have made these methods available within an implementation of the software program TASSEL. PMID:20208535

  6. Exploring genome wide bisulfite sequencing for DNA methylation analysis in livestock: a technical assessment.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Rachael; Couldrey, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances made in "omics" technologies are contributing to a revolution in livestock selection and breeding practices. Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation are important determinants for the control of gene expression in mammals. DNA methylation research will help our understanding of how environmental factors contribute to phenotypic variation of complex production and health traits. High-throughput sequencing is a vital tool for the comprehensive analysis of DNA methylation, and bisulfite-based strategies coupled with DNA sequencing allows for quantitative, site-specific methylation analysis at the genome level or genome wide. Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) and more recently whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) have proven to be effective techniques for studying DNA methylation in both humans and mice. Here we report the development of RRBS and WGBS for use in sheep, the first application of this technology in livestock species. Important technical issues associated with these methodologies including fragment size selection and sequence depth are examined and discussed. PMID:24860595

  7. Open access resources for genome-wide association mapping in rice

    PubMed Central

    McCouch, Susan R.; Wright, Mark H.; Tung, Chih-Wei; Maron, Lyza G.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Fitzgerald, Melissa; Singh, Namrata; DeClerck, Genevieve; Agosto-Perez, Francisco; Korniliev, Pavel; Greenberg, Anthony J.; Naredo, Ma. Elizabeth B.; Mercado, Sheila Mae Q.; Harrington, Sandra E.; Shi, Yuxin; Branchini, Darcy A.; Kuser-Falcão, Paula R.; Leung, Hei; Ebana, Kowaru; Yano, Masahiro; Eizenga, Georgia; McClung, Anna; Mezey, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Increasing food production is essential to meet the demands of a growing human population, with its rising income levels and nutritional expectations. To address the demand, plant breeders seek new sources of genetic variation to enhance the productivity, sustainability and resilience of crop varieties. Here we launch a high-resolution, open-access research platform to facilitate genome-wide association mapping in rice, a staple food crop. The platform provides an immortal collection of diverse germplasm, a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism data set tailored for gene discovery, well-documented analytical strategies, and a suite of bioinformatics resources to facilitate biological interpretation. Using grain length, we demonstrate the power and resolution of our new high-density rice array, the accompanying genotypic data set, and an expanded diversity panel for detecting major and minor effect QTLs and subpopulation-specific alleles, with immediate implications for rice improvement. PMID:26842267

  8. GWIDD: a comprehensive resource for genome-wide structural modeling of protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are a key component of life processes. The knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of these interactions is important for understanding protein function. Genome-Wide Docking Database (http://gwidd.bioinformatics.ku.edu) offers an extensive source of data for structural studies of protein-protein complexes on genome scale. The current release of the database combines the available experimental data on the structure and characteristics of protein interactions with structural modeling of protein complexes for 771 organisms spanned over the entire universe of life from viruses to humans. The interactions are stored in a relational database with user-friendly interface that includes various search options. The search results can be interactively previewed; the structures, downloaded, along with the interaction characteristics. PMID:23245398

  9. Genome-wide association study of periweaning failure-to-thrive syndrome (PFTS) in pigs.

    PubMed

    Zanella, R; Morés, N; Morés, M A Z; Peixoto, J O; Zanella, E L; Ciacci-Zanella, J R; Ibelli, A M G; Gava, D; Cantão, M E; Ledur, M C

    2016-06-25

    Porcine periweaning-failure-to-thrive syndrome (PFTS) is a condition that affects newly weaned piglets. It is characterised by a progressive debilitation leading to death, in the absence of infectious, nutritional, management or environmental factors. In this study, we present the first report of PFTS in South America and the results of a genome-wide association study to identify the genetic markers associated with the appearance of this condition in a crossbred swine population. Four chromosomal regions were associated with PFTS predisposition, one located on SSCX, one on SSC8, and the two other regions on SSC14. Regions on SSC8 and SSC14 harbour important functional candidate genes involved in human depression and might have an important role in PFTS. Our findings contribute to the increasing knowledge about this syndrome, which has been investigated since 2007, and to the identification of the aetiology of this disease. PMID:27162284

  10. Methodological Issues in Multistage Genome-wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duncan C.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Haile, Robert W.; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Stram, Daniel O.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high cost of commercial genotyping chip technologies, many investigations have used a two-stage design for genome-wide association studies, using part of the sample for an initial discovery of “promising” SNPs at a less stringent significance level and the remainder in a joint analysis of just these SNPs using custom genotyping. Typical cost savings of about 50% are possible with this design to obtain comparable levels of overall type I error and power by using about half the sample for stage I and carrying about 0.1% of SNPs forward to the second stage, the optimal design depending primarily upon the ratio of costs per genotype for stages I and II. However, with the rapidly declining costs of the commercial panels, the generally low observed ORs of current studies, and many studies aiming to test multiple hypotheses and multiple endpoints, many investigators are abandoning the two-stage design in favor of simply genotyping all available subjects using a standard high-density panel. Concern is sometimes raised about the absence of a “replication” panel in this approach, as required by some high-profile journals, but it must be appreciated that the two-stage design is not a discovery/replication design but simply a more efficient design for discovery using a joint analysis of the data from both stages. Once a subset of highly-significant associations has been discovered, a truly independent “exact replication” study is needed in a similar population of the same promising SNPs using similar methods. This can then be followed by (1) “generalizability” studies to assess the full scope of replicated associations across different races, different endpoints, different interactions, etc.; (2) fine-mapping or re-sequencing to try to identify the causal variant; and (3) experimental studies of the biological function of these genes. Multistage sampling designs may be more useful at this stage, say for selecting subsets of subjects for deep re

  11. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer in Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Stephanie L; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Edlund, Christopher K; Conti, David V; Ihenacho, Ugonna; Wan, Peggy; Van Den Berg, David; Casey, Graham; Fortini, Barbara K; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Ordóñez-Sánchez, María Luisa; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Muñóz-Hernández, Linda Liliana; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Gómez, D