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Sample records for affymetrix human genome

  1. Software comparison for evaluating genomic copy number variation for Affymetrix 6.0 SNP array platform

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Copy number data are routinely being extracted from genome-wide association study chips using a variety of software. We empirically evaluated and compared four freely-available software packages designed for Affymetrix SNP chips to estimate copy number: Affymetrix Power Tools (APT), Aroma.Affymetrix, PennCNV and CRLMM. Our evaluation used 1,418 GENOA samples that were genotyped on the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. We compared bias and variance in the locus-level copy number data, the concordance amongst regions of copy number gains/deletions and the false-positive rate amongst deleted segments. Results APT had median locus-level copy numbers closest to a value of two, whereas PennCNV and Aroma.Affymetrix had the smallest variability associated with the median copy number. Of those evaluated, only PennCNV provides copy number specific quality-control metrics and identified 136 poor CNV samples. Regions of copy number variation (CNV) were detected using the hidden Markov models provided within PennCNV and CRLMM/VanillaIce. PennCNV detected more CNVs than CRLMM/VanillaIce; the median number of CNVs detected per sample was 39 and 30, respectively. PennCNV detected most of the regions that CRLMM/VanillaIce did as well as additional CNV regions. The median concordance between PennCNV and CRLMM/VanillaIce was 47.9% for duplications and 51.5% for deletions. The estimated false-positive rate associated with deletions was similar for PennCNV and CRLMM/VanillaIce. Conclusions If the objective is to perform statistical tests on the locus-level copy number data, our empirical results suggest that PennCNV or Aroma.Affymetrix is optimal. If the objective is to perform statistical tests on the summarized segmented data then PennCNV would be preferred over CRLMM/VanillaIce. Specifically, PennCNV allows the analyst to estimate locus-level copy number, perform segmentation and evaluate CNV-specific quality-control metrics within a single software package

  2. Development and Evaluation of an Affymetrix array for Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-species Affymetrix GeneChip array was developed to study development, metabolism and pathogenicity of A. flavus. This chip based on the whole genome sequence of A. flavus, contains 13,000 A. flavus genes, 8,000 maize genes and 25 human and mouse innate immune response genes, as well as the ...

  3. Global Expression Patterns of Three Festuca Species Exposed to Different Doses of Glyphosate Using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

    PubMed Central

    Cebeci, Ozge; Budak, Hikmet

    2009-01-01

    Glyphosate has been shown to act as an inhibitor of an aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway, while other pathways that may be affected by glyphosate are not known. Cross species hybridizations can provide a tool for elucidating biological pathways conserved among organisms. Comparative genome analyses have indicated a high level of colinearity among grass species and Festuca, on which we focus here, and showed rearrangements common to the Pooideae family. Based on sequence conservation among grass species, we selected the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array as a tool for the analysis of expression profiles of three Festuca (fescue) species with distinctly different tolerances to varying levels of glyphosate. Differences in transcript expression were recorded upon foliar glyphosate application at 1.58 mM and 6.32 mM, representing 5% and 20%, respectively, of the recommended rate. Differences highlighted categories of general metabolic processes, such as photosynthesis, protein synthesis, stress responses, and a larger number of transcripts responded to 20% glyphosate application. Differential expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the shikimic acid pathway could not be identified by cross hybridization. Microarray data were confirmed by RT-PCR and qRT-PCR analyses. This is the first report to analyze the potential of cross species hybridization in Fescue species and the data and analyses will help extend our knowledge on the cellular processes affected by glyphosate. PMID:20182642

  4. Performance of the Affymetrix GeneChip HIV PRT 440 Platform for Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Genotyping of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Clades and Viral Isolates with Length Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Vahey, Maryanne; Nau, Martin E.; Barrick, Sandra; Cooley, John D.; Sawyer, Robert; Sleeker, Alex A.; Vickerman, Peter; Bloor, Stuart; Larder, Brendan; Michael, Nelson L.; Wegner, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of a silica chip-based resequencing method, the Affymetrix HIV PRT 440 assay (hereafter referred to as the Affymetrix assay), was evaluated on a panel of well-characterized nonclade B viral isolates and on isolates exhibiting length polymorphisms. Sequencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol cDNAs from clades A, C, D, E, and F resulted in clade-specific regions of base-calling ambiguities in regions not known to be associated with resistance polymorphisms, as well as a small number of spurious resistance polymorphisms. The Affymetrix assay failed to detect the presence of additional serine codons distal to reverse transcriptase (RT) codon 68 that are associated with multinucleoside RT inhibitor resistance. The increasing prevalence of non-clade B HIV-1 strains in the United States and Europe and the identification of clinically relevant pol gene length polymorphisms will impact the generalizability of the Affymetrix assay, emphasizing the need to accommodate this expanding pool of pol genotypes in future assay versions. PMID:10405396

  5. Qualitative assessment of gene expression in affymetrix genechip arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2007-01-01

    Affymetrix Genechip microarrays are used widely to determine the simultaneous expression of genes in a given biological paradigm. Probes on the Genechip array are atomic entities which by definition are randomly distributed across the array and in turn govern the gene expression. In the present study, we make several interesting observations. We show that there is considerable correlation between the probe intensities across the array which defy the independence assumption. While the mechanism behind such correlations is unclear, we show that scaling behavior and the profiles of perfect match (PM) as well as mismatch (MM) probes are similar and immune-to-background subtraction. We believe that the observed correlations are possibly an outcome of inherent non-stationarities or patchiness in the array devoid of biological significance. This is demonstrated by inspecting their scaling behavior and profiles of the PM and MM probe intensities obtained from publicly available Genechip arrays from three eukaryotic genomes, namely: Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), Homo sapiens (humans) and Mus musculus (house mouse) across distinct biological paradigms and across laboratories, with and without background subtraction. The fluctuation functions were estimated using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) with fourth-order polynomial detrending. The results presented in this study provide new insights into correlation signatures of PM and MM probe intensities and suggests the choice of DFA as a tool for qualitative assessment of Affymetrix Genechip microarrays prior to their analysis. A more detailed investigation is necessary in order to understand the source of these correlations.

  6. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  7. Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  8. CEL_INTERROGATOR: A FREE AND OPEN SOURCE PACKAGE FOR AFFYMETRIX CEL FILE PARSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CEL_Interrogator Package is a suite of programs designed to extract the average probe intensity and other information for each probe sequence from an Affymetrix GeneChip CEL file and unite them with their human-readable Affymetrix consensus sequence names. The resulting text file is suitable for di...

  9. The human genome project.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, M V

    1993-01-01

    The Human Genome Project in the United States is now well underway. Its programmatic direction was largely set by a National Research Council report issued in 1988. The broad framework supplied by this report has survived almost unchanged despite an upheaval in the technology of genome analysis. This upheaval has primarily affected physical and genetic mapping, the two dominant activities in the present phase of the project. Advances in mapping techniques have allowed good progress toward the specific goals of the project and are also providing strong corollary benefits throughout biomedical research. Actual DNA sequencing of the genomes of the human and model organisms is still at an early stage. There has been little progress in the intrinsic efficiency of DNA-sequence determination. However, refinements in experimental protocols, instrumentation, and project management have made it practical to acquire sequence data on an enlarged scale. It is also increasingly apparent that DNA-sequence data provide a potent means of relating knowledge gained from the study of model organisms to human biology. There is as yet little indication that the infusion of technology from outside biology into the Human Genome Project has been effectively stimulated. Opportunities in this area remain large, posing substantial technical and policy challenges. PMID:8506271

  10. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  11. Human Genome Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstein, Mark

    A central problem for 21st century science is annotating the human genome and making this annotation useful for the interpretation of personal genomes. My talk will focus on annotating the 99% of the genome that does not code for canonical genes, concentrating on intergenic features such as structural variants (SVs), pseudogenes (protein fossils), binding sites, and novel transcribed RNAs (ncRNAs). In particular, I will describe how we identify regulatory sites and variable blocks (SVs) based on processing next-generation sequencing experiments. I will further explain how we cluster together groups of sites to create larger annotations. Next, I will discuss a comprehensive pseudogene identification pipeline, which has enabled us to identify >10K pseudogenes in the genome and analyze their distribution with respect to age, protein family, and chromosomal location. Throughout, I will try to introduce some of the computational algorithms and approaches that are required for genome annotation. Much of this work has been carried out in the framework of the ENCODE, modENCODE, and 1000 genomes projects.

  12. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  13. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-06-01

    The Human Genome Project will obtain high-resolution genetic and physical maps of each human chromosome and, somewhat later, of the complete nucleotide sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a human cell. The talk will begin with an extended introduction to explain the Project to nonbiologists and to show that map construction and sequence determination require extensive computation in order to determine the correct order of the mapped entities and to provide estimates of uncertainty. Computational analysis of the sequence data will become an increasingly important part of the project, and some computational challenges are described. 5 refs.

  14. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, Charles R.

    1989-06-01

    The following pages aim to lay a foundation for understanding the excitement surrounding the ''human genome project,'' as well as to convey a flavor of the ongoing efforts and plans at the Human Genome Center at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Our own work, of course, is only part of a broad international effort that will dramatically enhance our understanding of human molecular genetics before the end of this century. In this country, the bulk of the effort will be carried out under the auspices of the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, but significant contributions have already been made both by nonprofit private foundations and by private corporation. The respective roles of the DOE and the NIH are being coordinated by an inter-agency committee, the aims of which are to emphasize the strengths of each agency, to facilitate cooperation, and to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort. The NIH, for example, will continue its crucial work in medical genetics and in mapping the genomes of nonhuman species. The DOE, on the other hand, has unique experience in managing large projects, and its national laboratories are repositories of expertise in physics, engineering, and computer science, as well as the life sciences. The tools and techniques the project will ultimately rely on are thus likely to be developed in multidisciplinary efforts at laboratories like LBL. Accordingly, we at LBL take great pride in this enterprise -- an enterprise that will eventually transform our understanding of ourselves.

  15. National Human Genome Research Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers ... Education Kit Online Genetics Education Resources Smithsonian NHGRI Genome Exhibition Talking Glossary: English Talking Glossary: Español Issues ...

  16. Archaic human genomics.

    PubMed

    Disotell, Todd R

    2012-01-01

    For much of the 20th century, the predominant view of human evolutionary history was derived from the fossil record. Homo erectus was seen arising in Africa from an earlier member of the genus and then spreading throughout the Old World and into the Oceania. A regional continuity model of anagenetic change from H. erectus via various intermediate archaic species into the modern humans in each of the regions inhabited by H. erectus was labeled the multiregional model of human evolution (MRE). A contrasting model positing a single origin, in Africa, of anatomically modern H. sapiens with some populations later migrating out of Africa and replacing the local archaic populations throughout the world with complete replacement became known as the recent African origin (RAO) model. Proponents of both models used different interpretations of the fossil record to bolster their views for decades. In the 1980s, molecular genetic techniques began providing evidence from modern human variation that allowed not only the different models of modern human origins to be tested but also the exploration demographic history and the types of selection that different regions of the genome and even specific traits had undergone. The majority of researchers interpreted these data as strongly supporting the RAO model, especially analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Extrapolating backward from modern patterns of variation and using various calibration points and substitution rates, a consensus arose that saw modern humans evolving from an African population around 200,000 years ago. Much later, around 50,000 years ago, a subset of this population migrated out of Africa replacing Neanderthals in Europe and western Asia as well as archaics in eastern Asia and Oceania. mtDNA sequences from more than two-dozen Neanderthals and early modern humans re-enforced this consensus. In 2010, however, the complete draft genomes of Neanderthals and of heretofore unknown hominins from Siberia, called

  17. All about the Human Genome Project (HGP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... full human sequence All About The Human Genome Project (HGP) The Human Genome Project (HGP) was one of the great feats of ... Organisms A Quarter Century after the Human Genome Project's Launch: Lessons Beyond the Base Pairs October 1, ...

  18. Human genome. 1993 Program report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

  19. High Fidelity Copy Number Analysis of Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues Using Affymetrix Cytoscan HD Chip

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan P.; Michalopoulos, Amantha; Ding, Ying; Tseng, George; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Detection of human genome copy number variation (CNV) is one of the most important analyses in diagnosing human malignancies. Genome CNV detection in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues remains challenging due to suboptimal DNA quality and failure to use appropriate baseline controls for such tissues. Here, we report a modified method in analyzing CNV in FFPE tissues using microarray with Affymetrix Cytoscan HD chips. Gel purification was applied to select DNA with good quality and data of fresh frozen and FFPE tissues from healthy individuals were included as baseline controls in our data analysis. Our analysis showed a 91% overlap between CNV detection by microarray with FFPE tissues and chromosomal abnormality detection by karyotyping with fresh tissues on 8 cases of lymphoma samples. The CNV overlap between matched frozen and FFPE tissues reached 93.8%. When the analyses were restricted to regions containing genes, 87.1% concordance between FFPE and fresh frozen tissues was found. The analysis was further validated by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization on these samples using probes specific for BRAF and CITED2. The results suggested that the modified method using Affymetrix Cytoscan HD chip gave rise to a significant improvement over most of the previous methods in terms of accuracy in detecting CNV in FFPE tissues. This FFPE microarray methodology may hold promise for broad application of CNV analysis on clinical samples. PMID:24699316

  20. Discovery and mapping of single feature polymorphisms in wheat using affymetrix arrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single feature polymorphisms (SFPs) can be a rich source of markers for gene mapping and function studies. To explore the feasibility of using the Affymetrix GeneChip to discover and map SFPs in the large hexaploid wheat genome, six wheat varieties of diverse origins were analyzed for significant pr...

  1. Human Genome Education Program

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Myers; Lane Conn

    2000-05-01

    The funds from the DOE Human Genome Program, for the project period 2/1/96 through 1/31/98, have provided major support for the curriculum development and field testing efforts for two high school level instructional units: Unit 1, ''Exploring Genetic Conditions: Genes, Culture and Choices''; and Unit 2, ''DNA Snapshots: Peaking at Your DNA''. In the original proposal, they requested DOE support for the partial salary and benefits of a Field Test Coordinator position to: (1) complete the field testing and revision of two high school curriculum units, and (2) initiate the education of teachers using these units. During the project period of this two-year DOE grant, a part-time Field-Test Coordinator was hired (Ms. Geraldine Horsma) and significant progress has been made in both of the original proposal objectives. Field testing for Unit 1 has occurred in over 12 schools (local and non-local sites with diverse student populations). Field testing for Unit 2 has occurred in over 15 schools (local and non-local sites) and will continue in 12-15 schools during the 96-97 school year. For both curricula, field-test sites and site teachers were selected for their interest in genetics education and in hands-on science education. Many of the site teachers had no previous experience with HGEP or the unit under development. Both of these first-year biology curriculum units, which contain genetics, biotechnology, societal, ethical and cultural issues related to HGP, are being implemented in many local and non-local schools (SF Bay Area, Southern California, Nebraska, Hawaii, and Texas) and in programs for teachers. These units will reach over 10,000 students in the SF Bay Area and continues to receive support from local corporate and private philanthropic organizations. Although HGEP unit development is nearing completion for both units, data is still being gathered and analyzed on unit effectiveness and student learning. The final field testing result from this analysis will

  2. Decoding the human genome sequence.

    PubMed

    Bentley, D R

    2000-10-01

    The year 2000 is marked by the production of the sequence of the human genome. A 'working draft' of high quality sequence covering 90% of the genome has been determined and a quarter is in finished form, including the first two completed chromosomes. All sequence data from the project is made freely available to the community via the Internet, for further analysis and exploitation. The challenge which lies ahead is to decipher the information. Knowledge of the human genome sequence will enable us to understand how the genetic information determines the development, structure and function of the human body. We will be able to explore how variations within our DNA sequence cause disease, how they affect our interaction with our environment and ultimately to develop new and effective ways to improve human health. PMID:11005789

  3. Genomic expression during human myelopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Francesco; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Coppe, Alessandro; Basso, Dario; Bicciato, Silvio; Zini, Roberta; Gemelli, Claudia; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Ferrari, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Background Human myelopoiesis is an exciting biological model for cellular differentiation since it represents a plastic process where multipotent stem cells gradually limit their differentiation potential, generating different precursor cells which finally evolve into distinct terminally differentiated cells. This study aimed at investigating the genomic expression during myeloid differentiation through a computational approach that integrates gene expression profiles with functional information and genome organization. Results Gene expression data from 24 experiments for 8 different cell types of the human myelopoietic lineage were used to generate an integrated myelopoiesis dataset of 9,425 genes, each reliably associated to a unique genomic position and chromosomal coordinate. Lists of genes constitutively expressed or silent during myelopoiesis and of genes differentially expressed in commitment phase of myelopoiesis were first identified using a classical data analysis procedure. Then, the genomic distribution of myelopoiesis genes was investigated integrating transcriptional and functional characteristics of genes. This approach allowed identifying specific chromosomal regions significantly highly or weakly expressed, and clusters of differentially expressed genes and of transcripts related to specific functional modules. Conclusion The analysis of genomic expression during human myelopoiesis using an integrative computational approach allowed discovering important relationships between genomic position, biological function and expression patterns and highlighting chromatin domains, including genes with coordinated expression and lineage-specific functions. PMID:17683550

  4. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the μ-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in μ-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power

  5. Human genome protein function database.

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    A database which focuses on the normal functions of the currently-known protein products of the Human Genome was constructed. Information is stored as text, figures, tables, and diagrams. The program contains built-in functions to modify, update, categorize, hypertext, search, create reports, and establish links to other databases. The semi-automated categorization feature of the database program was used to classify these proteins in terms of biomedical functions. PMID:1807638

  6. The Human Genomic Melting Map

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Tøstesen, Eivind; Sundet, Jostein K; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian; Bock, Christoph; Jerstad, Geir Ivar; Thilly, William G; Hovig, Eivind

    2007-01-01

    In a living cell, the antiparallel double-stranded helix of DNA is a dynamically changing structure. The structure relates to interactions between and within the DNA strands, and the array of other macromolecules that constitutes functional chromatin. It is only through its changing conformations that DNA can organize and structure a large number of cellular functions. In particular, DNA must locally uncoil, or melt, and become single-stranded for DNA replication, repair, recombination, and transcription to occur. It has previously been shown that this melting occurs cooperatively, whereby several base pairs act in concert to generate melting bubbles, and in this way constitute a domain that behaves as a unit with respect to local DNA single-strandedness. We have applied a melting map calculation to the complete human genome, which provides information about the propensities of forming local bubbles determined from the whole sequence, and present a first report on its basic features, the extent of cooperativity, and correlations to various physical and biological features of the human genome. Globally, the melting map covaries very strongly with GC content. Most importantly, however, cooperativity of DNA denaturation causes this correlation to be weaker at resolutions fewer than 500 bps. This is also the resolution level at which most structural and biological processes occur, signifying the importance of the informational content inherent in the genomic melting map. The human DNA melting map may be further explored at http://meltmap.uio.no. PMID:17511513

  7. The Human Genome Diversity Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli-Sforza, L.

    1994-12-31

    The Human Genome Diversity Project (HGD Project) is an international anthropology project that seeks to study the genetic richness of the entire human species. This kind of genetic information can add a unique thread to the tapestry knowledge of humanity. Culture, environment, history, and other factors are often more important, but humanity`s genetic heritage, when analyzed with recent technology, brings another type of evidence for understanding species` past and present. The Project will deepen the understanding of this genetic richness and show both humanity`s diversity and its deep and underlying unity. The HGD Project is still largely in its planning stages, seeking the best ways to reach its goals. The continuing discussions of the Project, throughout the world, should improve the plans for the Project and their implementation. The Project is as global as humanity itself; its implementation will require the kinds of partnerships among different nations and cultures that make the involvement of UNESCO and other international organizations particularly appropriate. The author will briefly discuss the Project`s history, describe the Project, set out the core principles of the Project, and demonstrate how the Project will help combat the scourge of racism.

  8. Population Genomics of Human Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in genotyping technologies have facilitated genome-wide scans for natural selection. Identification of targets of natural selection will shed light on processes of human adaptation and evolution and could be important for identifying variation that influences both normal human phenotypic variation as well as disease susceptibility. Here we focus on studies of natural selection in modern humans who originated ~200,000 years go in Africa and migrated across the globe ~50,000 - 100,000 years ago. Movement into new environments, as well as changes in culture and technology including plant and animal domestication, resulted in local adaptation to diverse environments. We summarize statistical approaches for detecting targets of natural selection and for distinguishing the effects of demographic history from natural selection. On a genome-wide scale, immune-related genes appear to be major targets of positive selection. Genes associated with reproduction and fertility also appear to be fast evolving. Additional examples of recent human adaptation include genes associated with lactase persistence, eccrine glands, and response to hypoxia. Lastly, we emphasize the need to supplement scans of selection with functional studies to demonstrate the physiologic impact of candidate loci. PMID:25383060

  9. Population Genomics of Human Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Joseph; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping technologies have facilitated genome-wide scans for natural selection. Identification of targets of natural selection will shed light on processes of human adaptation and evolution and could be important for identifying variation that influences both normal human phenotypic variation as well as disease susceptibility. Here we focus on studies of natural selection in modern humans who originated ~200,000 years go in Africa and migrated across the globe ~50,000 – 100,000 years ago. Movement into new environments, as well as changes in culture and technology including plant and animal domestication, resulted in local adaptation to diverse environments. We summarize statistical approaches for detecting targets of natural selection and for distinguishing the effects of demographic history from natural selection. On a genome-wide scale, immune-related genes appear to be major targets of positive selection. Genes associated with reproduction and fertility also appear to be fast evolving. Additional examples of recent human adaptation include genes associated with lactase persistence, eccrine glands, and response to hypoxia. Lastly, we emphasize the need to supplement scans of selection with functional studies to demonstrate the physiologic impact of candidate loci. PMID:25383060

  10. A physical map of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J.D.; Marra, M.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R.H.; Chinwalla, A.; Wallis, J.; Sekhon, M.; Wylie, K.; Mardis, E.R.; Wilson, R.K.; Fulton, R.; Kucaba, T.A.; Wagner-McPherson, C.; Barbazuk, W.B.; Gregory, S.G.; Humphray, S.J.; French, L.; Evans, R.S.; Bethel, G.; Whittaker, A.; Holden, J.L.; McCann, O.T.; Dunham, A.; Soderlund, C.; Scott, C.E.; Bentley, D.R.; Schuler, G.; Chen, H.-C.; Jang, W.; Green, E.D.; Idol, J.R.; Maduro, V.V. Braden; Montgomery, K.T.; Lee, E.; Miller, A.; Emerling, S.; Kucherlapati; Gibbs, R.; Scherer, S.; Gorrell, J.H.; Sodergren, E.; Clerc-Blankenburg, K.; Tabor, P.; Naylor, S.; Garcia, D.; de Jong, P.J.; Catanese, J.J.; Nowak, N.; Osoegawa, K.; Qin, S.; Rowen, L.; Madan, A.; Dors, M.; Hood, L.; Trask, B.; Friedman, C.; Massa, H.; Cheung, V.G.; Kirsch, I.R.; Reid, T.; Yonescu, R.; Weissenbach, J.; Bruls, T.; Heilig, R.; Branscomb, E.; Olsen, A.; Doggett, N.; Cheng, J.F.; Hawkins, T.; Myers, R.M.; Shang, J.; Ramirez, L.; Schmutz, J.; Velasquez, O.; Dixon, K.; Stone, N.E.; Cox, D.R.; Haussler, D.; Kent, W.J.; Furey, T.; Rogic, S.; Kennedy, S.; Jones, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Wen, G.; Schilhabel, M.; Gloeckner, G.; Nyakatura, G.; Siebert, R.; Schlegelberger, B.; Korenberg, J.; Chen, X.N.; Fujiyama, A.; Hattori, M.; Toyoda, A.; Yada, T.; Park, H.S.; Sakaki, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Asakawa, S.; Kawasaki, K.; Sasaki, T.; Shintani, A.; Shimizu, A.; Shibuya, K.; Kudoh, J.; Minoshima, S.; Ramser, J.; Seranski, P.; Hoff, C.; Poustka, A.; Reinhardt, R.; Lehrach, H.

    2001-01-01

    The human genome is by far the largest genome to be sequenced, and its size and complexity present many challenges for sequence assembly. The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium constructed a map of the whole genome to enable the selection of clones for sequencing and for the accurate assembly of the genome sequence. Here we report the construction of the whole-genome bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) map and its integration with previous landmark maps and information from mapping efforts focused on specific chromosomal regions. We also describe the integration of sequence data with the map.

  11. Human Genome Diversity workshop 1

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The Human Genome Diversity Project (HGD) is an international interdisciplinary program whose goal is to reveal as much as possible about the current state of genetic diversity among humans and the processes that were responsible for that diversity. Classical premolecular techniques have already proved that a significant component of human genetic variability lies within populations rather than among them. New molecular techniques will permit a dramatic increase in the resolving power of genetic analysis at the population level. Recent social changes in many parts of the world threaten the identity of a number of populations that may be extremely important for understanding human evolutionary history. It is therefore urgent to conduct research on human variation in these areas, while there is still time. The plan is to identify the most representative descendants of ancestral human populations worldwide and then to preserve genetic records of these populations. This is a report of the Population Genetics Workshop (Workshop 1), the first of three to be held to plan HGD, which was focused on sampling strategies and analytic methods from population genetics. The topics discussed were sampling and population structure; analysis of populations; drift versus natural selection; modeling migration and population subdivision; and population structure and subdivision.

  12. Human Contamination in Public Genome Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, Kirill; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Contamination in genome assembly can lead to wrong or confusing results when using such genome as reference in sequence comparison. Although bacterial contamination is well known, the problem of human-originated contamination received little attention. In this study we surveyed 45,735 available genome assemblies for evidence of human contamination. We used lineage specificity to distinguish between contamination and conservation. We found that 154 genome assemblies contain fragments that with high confidence originate as contamination from human DNA. Majority of contaminating human sequences were present in the reference human genome assembly for over a decade. We recommend that existing contaminated genomes should be revised to remove contaminated sequence, and that new assemblies should be thoroughly checked for presence of human DNA before submitting them to public databases. PMID:27611326

  13. Human Genome Sequencing in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the “finished,” euchromatic, haploid human reference genome sequence, the rapid development of novel, faster, and cheaper sequencing technologies is making possible the era of personalized human genomics. Personal diploid human genome sequences have been generated, and each has contributed to our better understanding of variation in the human genome. We have consequently begun to appreciate the vastness of individual genetic variation from single nucleotide to structural variants. Translation of genome-scale variation into medically useful information is, however, in its infancy. This review summarizes the initial steps undertaken in clinical implementation of personal genome information, and describes the application of whole-genome and exome sequencing to identify the cause of genetic diseases and to suggest adjuvant therapies. Better analysis tools and a deeper understanding of the biology of our genome are necessary in order to decipher, interpret, and optimize clinical utility of what the variation in the human genome can teach us. Personal genome sequencing may eventually become an instrument of common medical practice, providing information that assists in the formulation of a differential diagnosis. We outline herein some of the remaining challenges. PMID:22248320

  14. The human genome: a multifractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that genomes can be studied via a multifractal formalism. Recently, we used a multifractal approach to study the genetic information content of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome. Here we investigate the possibility that the human genome shows a similar behavior to that observed in the nematode. Results We report here multifractality in the human genome sequence. This behavior correlates strongly on the presence of Alu elements and to a lesser extent on CpG islands and (G+C) content. In contrast, no or low relationship was found for LINE, MIR, MER, LTRs elements and DNA regions poor in genetic information. Gene function, cluster of orthologous genes, metabolic pathways, and exons tended to increase their frequencies with ranges of multifractality and large gene families were located in genomic regions with varied multifractality. Additionally, a multifractal map and classification for human chromosomes are proposed. Conclusions Based on these findings, we propose a descriptive non-linear model for the structure of the human genome, with some biological implications. This model reveals 1) a multifractal regionalization where many regions coexist that are far from equilibrium and 2) this non-linear organization has significant molecular and medical genetic implications for understanding the role of Alu elements in genome stability and structure of the human genome. Given the role of Alu sequences in gene regulation, genetic diseases, human genetic diversity, adaptation and phylogenetic analyses, these quantifications are especially useful. PMID:21999602

  15. The Human Microbiome: Our Second Genome*

    PubMed Central

    Grice, Elizabeth A.; Segre, Julia A.

    2012-01-01

    The human genome has been referred to as the blueprint of human biology. In this review we consider an essential but largely ignored overlay to that blueprint, the human microbiome, which is composed of those microbes that live in and on our bodies. The human microbiome is a source of genetic diversity, a modifier of disease, an essential component of immunity, and a functional entity that influences metabolism and modulates drug interactions. Characterization and analysis of the human microbiome have been greatly catalyzed by advances in genomic technologies. We discuss how these technologies have shaped this emerging field of study and advanced our understanding of the human microbiome. We also identify future challenges, many of which are common to human genetic studies, and predict that in the future, analyzing genetic variation and risk of human disease will sometimes necessitate the integration of human and microbial genomic data sets. PMID:22703178

  16. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  17. Comprehensive variation discovery in single human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Weisenfeld, Neil I.; Yin, Shuangye; Sharpe, Ted; Lau, Bayo; Hegarty, Ryan; Holmes, Laurie; Sogoloff, Brian; Tabbaa, Diana; Williams, Louise; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Lander, Eric S.; MacCallum, Iain; Jaffe, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Complete knowledge of the genetic variation in individual human genomes is a crucial foundation for understanding the etiology of disease. Genetic variation is typically characterized by sequencing individual genomes and comparing reads to a reference. Existing methods do an excellent job of detecting variants in approximately 90% of the human genome, however calling variants in the remaining 10% of the genome (largely low-complexity sequence and segmental duplications) is challenging. To improve variant calling, we developed a new algorithm, DISCOVAR, and examined its performance on improved, low-cost sequence data. Using a newly created reference set of variants from finished sequence of 103 randomly chosen Fosmids, we find that some standard variant call sets miss up to 25% of variants. We show that the combination of new methods and improved data increases sensitivity several-fold, with the greatest impact in challenging regions of the human genome. PMID:25326702

  18. Identifying characteristic scales in the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpena, P.; Bernaola-Galván, P.; Coronado, A. V.; Hackenberg, M.; Oliver, J. L.

    2007-03-01

    The scale-free, long-range correlations detected in DNA sequences contrast with characteristic lengths of genomic elements, being particularly incompatible with the isochores (long, homogeneous DNA segments). By computing the local behavior of the scaling exponent α of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), we discriminate between sequences with and without true scaling, and we find that no single scaling exists in the human genome. Instead, human chromosomes show a common compositional structure with two characteristic scales, the large one corresponding to the isochores and the other to small and medium scale genomic elements.

  19. The human genome project and international health

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.D.; Cook-Deegan, R.M. )

    1990-06-27

    The human genome project is designed to provide common resources for the study of human genetics, and to assist biomedical researchers in their assault on disease. The main benefit will be to provide several kinds of maps of the human genome, and those of other organisms, to permit rapid isolation of genes for further study about DNA structure and function. This article describes genome research programs in developed and developing countries, and the international efforts that have contributed to genome research programs. For example, the large-scale collaborations to study Duchenne's muscular dystrophy, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis involve collaborators from many nations and families spread throughout the world. In the USA, the US Department of Energy was first to start a dedicated genome research program in 1987. Since then, another major government program has begun at the National Center for Human Genome Research of the National Institutes of Health. Italy, China, Australia, France, Canada, and Japan have genome research programs also.

  20. Estimating Mutation Load in Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Brenna M.; Botigué, Laura R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Gravel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has facilitated the discovery of millions of variants in human genomes. A sizeable fraction of these alleles are thought to be deleterious. We review the pattern of deleterious alleles as ascertained in genomic data and ask whether human populations differ in their predicted burden of deleterious alleles, a phenomenon known as “mutation load.” We discuss three demographic models that are predicted to affect mutation load and relate these models to the evidence (or the lack thereof) for variation in the efficacy of purifying selection in diverse human genomes. We also discuss why accurate estimation of mutation load depends on assumptions regarding the distribution of dominance and selection coefficients, quantities that are poorly characterized for current genomic datasets. PMID:25963372

  1. Scientific Goals of the Human Genome Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Christopher

    1993-01-01

    The Human Genome Project, an effort to sequence all the DNA of a human cell, is needed to better understand the behavior of chromosomes during cell division, with the ultimate goal of understanding the specific genes contributing to specific diseases and disabilities. (MSE)

  2. Justice and the Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M.

    1992-12-31

    Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

  3. Justice and the Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.F.; Lappe, M.

    1992-01-01

    Most of the essays gathered in this volume were first presented at a conference, Justice and the Human Genome, in Chicago in early November, 1991. The goal of the, conference was to consider questions of justice as they are and will be raised by the Human Genome Project. To achieve its goal of identifying and elucidating the challenges of justice inherent in genomic research and its social applications the conference drew together in one forum members from academia, medicine, and industry with interests divergent as rate-setting for insurance, the care of newborns, and the history of ethics. The essays in this volume address a number of theoretical and practical concerns relative to the meaning of genomic research.

  4. Initial Genomics of the Human Nucleolus

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Attila; Conesa, Ana; Santoyo-Lopez, Javier; Medina, Ignacio; Montaner, David; Péterfia, Bálint; Solovei, Irina; Cremer, Thomas; Dopazo, Joaquin; Längst, Gernot

    2010-01-01

    We report for the first time the genomics of a nuclear compartment of the eukaryotic cell. 454 sequencing and microarray analysis revealed the pattern of nucleolus-associated chromatin domains (NADs) in the linear human genome and identified different gene families and certain satellite repeats as the major building blocks of NADs, which constitute about 4% of the genome. Bioinformatic evaluation showed that NAD–localized genes take part in specific biological processes, like the response to other organisms, odor perception, and tissue development. 3D FISH and immunofluorescence experiments illustrated the spatial distribution of NAD–specific chromatin within interphase nuclei and its alteration upon transcriptional changes. Altogether, our findings describe the nature of DNA sequences associated with the human nucleolus and provide insights into the function of the nucleolus in genome organization and establishment of nuclear architecture. PMID:20361057

  5. Mapping and sequencing the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  6. Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1988-01-01

    Numerous meetings have been held and a debate has developed in the biological community over the merits of mapping and sequencing the human genome. In response a committee to examine the desirability and feasibility of mapping and sequencing the human genome was formed to suggest options for implementing the project. The committee asked many questions. Should the analysis of the human genome be left entirely to the traditionally uncoordinated, but highly successful, support systems that fund the vast majority of biomedical research. Or should a more focused and coordinated additional support system be developed that is limited to encouraging and facilitating the mapping and eventual sequencing of the human genome. If so, how can this be done without distorting the broader goals of biological research that are crucial for any understanding of the data generated in such a human genome project. As the committee became better informed on the many relevant issues, the opinions of its members coalesced, producing a shared consensus of what should be done. This report reflects that consensus.

  7. Origins of the human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.D.; Cook-Deegan, R.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has become a reality. Several genome projects are now in full stride around the world, and more are likely to form in the next several years. The purpose of genome projects is to assemble data on the structure of DNA in human chromosomes and those of other organisms. A second goal is to develop new technologies to perform mapping and sequencing. There have been impressive technical advances in the past 5 years. We are on the verge of beginning pilot projects to test several approaches to sequencing long stretches of DNA, using both automation and manual methods. Ordered sets of yeast artificial chromosome and cosmid clones have been assembled to span more than 2 million base pairs of several human chromosomes, and a region of 10 million base pairs has been assembled for Caenorhabditis elegans.

  8. Comparative genome map of human and cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas-Toldo, S.; Fries, R.; Lengauer, C.

    1995-06-10

    Chromosomal homologies between individual human chromosomes and the bovine karyotype have been established by using a new approach termed Zoo-FISH. Labeled DNA libraries from flow-sorted human chromosomes were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization on cattle chromosomes. All human DNA libraries, except the Y chromosome library, hybridized to one or more cattle chromosomes, identifying and delineating 50 segments of homology, most of them corresponding to the regions of homology as identified by the previous mapping of individual conserved loci. However, Zoo-FISH refines the comparative maps constructed by molecular gene mapping of individual loci by providing information on the boundaries of conserved regions in the absence of obvious cytogenetic homologies of human and bovine chromosomes. It allows study of karyotypic evolution and opens new avenues for genomic analysis by facilitating the extrapolation of results from the human genome initiative. 50 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A genomic storm in critically injured humans

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenzhong; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Seok, Junhee; Cuschieri, Joseph; Cuenca, Alex G.; Gao, Hong; Hayden, Douglas L.; Hennessy, Laura; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Mason, Philip H.; Baker, Henry V.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; López, M. Cecilia; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Arnoldo, Brett; Xu, Weihong; Zhang, Yuping; Calvano, Steven E.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Storey, John D.; Cobb, J. Perren; Warren, H. Shaw; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2011-01-01

    Human survival from injury requires an appropriate inflammatory and immune response. We describe the circulating leukocyte transcriptome after severe trauma and burn injury, as well as in healthy subjects receiving low-dose bacterial endotoxin, and show that these severe stresses produce a global reprioritization affecting >80% of the cellular functions and pathways, a truly unexpected “genomic storm.” In severe blunt trauma, the early leukocyte genomic response is consistent with simultaneously increased expression of genes involved in the systemic inflammatory, innate immune, and compensatory antiinflammatory responses, as well as in the suppression of genes involved in adaptive immunity. Furthermore, complications like nosocomial infections and organ failure are not associated with any genomic evidence of a second hit and differ only in the magnitude and duration of this genomic reprioritization. The similarities in gene expression patterns between different injuries reveal an apparently fundamental human response to severe inflammatory stress, with genomic signatures that are surprisingly far more common than different. Based on these transcriptional data, we propose a new paradigm for the human immunological response to severe injury. PMID:22110166

  10. The Emerging Field of Human Social Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Slavich, George M.; Cole, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Although we generally experience our bodies as being biologically stable across time and situations, an emerging field of research is demonstrating that external social conditions, especially our subjective perceptions of those conditions, can influence our most basic internal biological processes—namely, the expression of our genes. This research on human social genomics has begun to identify the types of genes that are subject to social-environmental regulation, the neural and molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of social processes on gene expression, and the genetic polymorphisms that moderate individual differences in genomic sensitivity to social context. The molecular models resulting from this research provide new opportunities for understanding how social and genetic factors interact to shape complex behavioral phenotypes and susceptibility to disease. This research also sheds new light on the evolution of the human genome and challenges the fundamental belief that our molecular makeup is relatively stable and impermeable to social-environmental influence. PMID:23853742

  11. Implications of the Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kitcher, P.

    1998-11-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP), launched in 1991, aims to map and sequence the human genome by 2006. During the fifteen-year life of the project, it is projected that $3 billion in federal funds will be allocated to it. The ultimate aims of spending this money are to analyze the structure of human DNA, to identify all human genes, to recognize the functions of those genes, and to prepare for the biology and medicine of the twenty-first century. The following summary examines some of the implications of the program, concentrating on its scientific import and on the ethical and social problems that it raises. Its aim is to expose principles that might be used in applying the information which the HGP will generate. There is no attempt here to translate the principles into detailed proposals for legislation. Arguments and discussion can be found in the full report, but, like this summary, that report does not contain any legislative proposals.

  12. The Human Genome Initiative: First Steps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Alan R.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the basic biology involved in mapping chromosomes as presented at a symposium at a recent meeting of the American Chemical Association which focused on the Human Genome Initiative. Different types of gene maps and techniques used to produce gene maps are discussed. (CW)

  13. The Human Genome Project and Biology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Highlights the importance of the Human Genome Project in educating the public about genetics. Discusses four challenges that science educators must address: teaching for conceptual understanding, the nature of science, the personal and social impact of science and technology, and the principles of technology. Contains 45 references. (JRH)

  14. Attitudes towards the Human Genome Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahroudi, Julie; Shaw, Geraldine

    Attitudes concerning the Human Genome Project were reported by faculty (N=40) and students (N=66) from a liberal arts college. Positive attitudes toward the project involved privacy, insurance and health, economic purposes, reproductive purposes, genetic counseling, religion and overall opinions. Negative attitudes were expressed regarding…

  15. Evaluation of the Affymetrix CytoScan® Dx Assay for Developmental Delay

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Bryn D.; Scharf, Rebecca J.; Spear, Emily A.; Edelmann, Lisa J.; Stroustrup, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The goal of molecular cytogenetic testing for children presenting with developmental delay is to identify or exclude genetic abnormalities that are associated with cognitive, behavioral, and/or motor symptoms. Until 2010, chromosome analysis was the standard first-line genetic screening test for evaluation of patients with developmental delay when a specific syndrome was not suspected. In 2010, The American College of Medical Genetics and several other groups recommended chromosomal microarray (CMA) as the first-line test in children with developmental delays, multiple congenital anomalies, and/or autism. This test is able to detect regions of genomic imbalances at a much finer resolution than G-banded karyotyping. Until recently, no CMA testing had been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This review will focus on the use of the Affymetrix CytoScan® Dx Assay, the first CMA to receive FDA approval for the genetic evaluation of individuals with developmental delay. PMID:25350348

  16. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform. PMID:21498550

  17. [Novel bidirectional promoter from human genome].

    PubMed

    Orekhova, A S; Sverdlova, P S; Spirin, P V; Leonova, O G; Popenko, V I; Prasolov, V S; Rubtsov, P M

    2011-01-01

    In human and other mammalian genomes a number of closely linked gene pairs transcribed in opposite directions are found. According to bioinformatic analysis up to 10% of human genes are arranged in this way. In present work the fragment of human genome was cloned that separates genes localized at 2p13.1 and oriented "head-to-head", coding for hypothetical proteins with unknown functions--CCDC (Coiled Coil Domain Containing) 142 and TTC (TetraTricopeptide repeat Containing) 31. Intergenic CCDC142-TTC31 region overlaps with CpG-island and contains a number of potential binding sites for transcription factors. This fragment functions as bidirectional promoter in the system ofluciferase reporter gene expression upon transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. The vectors containing genes of two fluorescent proteins--green (EGFP) and red (DsRed2) in opposite orientations separated by the fragment of CCDC142-TTC31 intergenic region were constructed. In HEK293 cells transfected with these vectors simultaneous expression of two fluorescent proteins is observed. Truncated versions of intergenic region were obtained and their promoter activity measured. Minimal promoter fragment contains elements Inr, BRE, DPE characteristic for TATA-less promoters. Thus, from the human genome the novel bidirectional promoter was cloned that can be used for simultaneous constitutive expression of two genes in human cells. PMID:21790010

  18. Leprosy and the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Misch, Elizabeth A.; Berrington, William R.; Vary, James C.; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Despite the availability of effective treatment for several decades, leprosy remains an important medical problem in many regions of the world. Infection with Mycobacterium leprae can produce paucibacillary disease, characterized by well-formed granulomas and a Th1 T-cell response, or multibacillary disease, characterized by poorly organized cellular infiltrates and Th2 cytokines. These diametric immune responses confer states of relative resistance or susceptibility to leprosy, respectively, and have well-defined clinical manifestations. As a result, leprosy provides a unique opportunity to dissect the genetic basis of human in vivo immunity. A series of studies over the past 40 years suggests that host genes influence the risk of leprosy acquisition and the predilection for different clinical forms of the disease. However, a comprehensive, cellular, and molecular view of the genes and variants involved is still being assembled. In this article, we review several decades of human genetic studies of leprosy, including a number of recent investigations. We emphasize genetic analyses that are validated by the replication of the same phenotype in independent studies or supported by functional experiments demonstrating biological mechanisms of action for specific polymorphisms. Identifying and functionally exploring the genetic and immunological factors that underlie human susceptibility to leprosy have yielded important insights into M. leprae pathogenesis and are likely to advance our understanding of the immune response to other pathogenic mycobacteria. This knowledge may inform new treatment or vaccine strategies for leprosy or tuberculosis. PMID:21119019

  19. Genome of the human hookworm Necator americanus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yat T; Gao, Xin; Rosa, Bruce A; Abubucker, Sahar; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Martin, John; Tyagi, Rahul; Heizer, Esley; Zhang, Xu; Bhonagiri-Palsikar, Veena; Minx, Patrick; Warren, Wesley C; Wang, Qi; Zhan, Bin; Hotez, Peter J; Sternberg, Paul W; Dougall, Annette; Gaze, Soraya Torres; Mulvenna, Jason; Sotillo, Javier; Ranganathan, Shoba; Rabelo, Elida M; Wilson, Richard K; Felgner, Philip L; Bethony, Jeffrey; Hawdon, John M; Gasser, Robin B; Loukas, Alex; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2014-03-01

    The hookworm Necator americanus is the predominant soil-transmitted human parasite. Adult worms feed on blood in the small intestine, causing iron-deficiency anemia, malnutrition, growth and development stunting in children, and severe morbidity and mortality during pregnancy in women. We report sequencing and assembly of the N. americanus genome (244 Mb, 19,151 genes). Characterization of this first hookworm genome sequence identified genes orchestrating the hookworm's invasion of the human host, genes involved in blood feeding and development, and genes encoding proteins that represent new potential drug targets against hookworms. N. americanus has undergone a considerable and unique expansion of immunomodulator proteins, some of which we highlight as potential treatments against inflammatory diseases. We also used a protein microarray to demonstrate a postgenomic application of the hookworm genome sequence. This genome provides an invaluable resource to boost ongoing efforts toward fundamental and applied postgenomic research, including the development of new methods to control hookworm and human immunological diseases. PMID:24441737

  20. The efficacy of detecting variants with small effects on the Affymetrix 6.0 platform using pooled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Gajdos, Zofia K. Z.; Butler, Johannah L.; Hackett, Rachel; Guiducci, Candace; Nguyen, Thutrang T.; Wilks, Rainford; Forrester, Terrence; Henderson, Katherine D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Cooper, Richard S.; Lyon, Helen N.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; McKenzie, Colin A.; Palmer, Mark R.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide genotyping of a cohort using pools rather than individual samples has long been proposed as a cost-saving alternative for performing genome-wide association (GWA) studies. However, successful disease gene mapping using pooled genotyping has thus far been limited to detecting common variants with large effect sizes, which tend not to exist for many complex common diseases or traits. Therefore, for DNA pooling to be a viable strategy for conducting GWA studies, it is important to determine whether commonly used genome-wide SNP array platforms such as the Affymetrix 6.0 array can reliably detect common variants of small effect sizes using pooled DNA. Taking obesity and age at menarche as examples of human complex traits, we assessed the feasibility of genome-wide genotyping of pooled DNA as a single-stage design for phenotype association. By individually genotyping the top associations identified by pooling, we obtained a 14- to 16-fold enrichment of SNPs nominally associated with the phenotype, but we likely missed the top true associations. In addition, we assessed whether genotyping pooled DNA can serve as an inexpensive screen as the second stage of a multi-stage design with a large number of samples by comparing the most cost-effective 3-stage designs with 80% power to detect common variants with genotypic relative risk of 1.1, with and without pooling. Given the current state of the specific technology we employed and the associated genotyping costs, we showed through simulation that a design involving pooling would be 1.07 times more expensive than a design without pooling. Thus, while a significant amount of information exists within the data from pooled DNA, our analysis does not support genotyping pooled DNA as a means to efficiently identify common variants contributing small effects to phenotypes of interest. While our conclusions were based on the specific technology and study design we employed, the approach presented here will be useful for

  1. LINE-1 Retrotransposition Activity in Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christine R.; Collier, Pamela; Macfarlane, Catriona; Malig, Maika; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Eichler, Evan E.; Badge, Richard M.; Moran, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) sequences comprise the bulk of retrotransposition activity in the human genome; however, the abundance of highly active or ‘hot’ L1s in the human population remains largely unexplored. Here, we used a fosmid-based, paired-end DNA sequencing strategy to identify 68 full-length L1s which are differentially present among individuals but are absent from the human genome reference sequence. The majority of these L1s were highly active in a cultured cell retrotransposition assay. Genotyping 26 elements revealed that two L1s are only found in Africa and that two more are absent from the H952 subset of the Human Genome Diversity Panel. Therefore, these results suggest that ‘hot’ L1s are more abundant in the human population than previously appreciated, and that ongoing L1 retrotransposition continues to be a major source of inter-individual genetic variation. PMID:20602998

  2. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    PubMed

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world. PMID:25667090

  3. PATENTS IN GENOMICS AND HUMAN GENETICS

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Deegan, Robert; Heaney, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Genomics and human genetics are scientifically fundamental and commercially valuable. These fields grew to prominence in an era of growth in government and nonprofit research funding, and of even greater growth of privately funded research and development in biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. Patents on DNA technologies are a central feature of this story, illustrating how patent law adapts---and sometimes fails to adapt---to emerging genomic technologies. In instrumentation and for therapeutic proteins, patents have largely played their traditional role of inducing investment in engineering and product development, including expensive postdiscovery clinical research to prove safety and efficacy. Patents on methods and DNA sequences relevant to clinical genetic testing show less evidence of benefits and more evidence of problems and impediments, largely attributable to university exclusive licensing practices. Whole-genome sequencing will confront uncertainty about infringing granted patents but jurisprudence trends away from upholding the broadest and potentially most troublesome patent claims. PMID:20590431

  4. Genomic architecture of human neuroanatomical diversity.

    PubMed

    Toro, R; Poline, J-B; Huguet, G; Loth, E; Frouin, V; Banaschewski, T; Barker, G J; Bokde, A; Büchel, C; Carvalho, F M; Conrod, P; Fauth-Bühler, M; Flor, H; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Gowland, P; Heinz, A; Ittermann, B; Lawrence, C; Lemaître, H; Mann, K; Nees, F; Paus, T; Pausova, Z; Rietschel, M; Robbins, T; Smolka, M N; Ströhle, A; Schumann, G; Bourgeron, T

    2015-08-01

    Human brain anatomy is strikingly diverse and highly inheritable: genetic factors may explain up to 80% of its variability. Prior studies have tried to detect genetic variants with a large effect on neuroanatomical diversity, but those currently identified account for <5% of the variance. Here, based on our analyses of neuroimaging and whole-genome genotyping data from 1765 subjects, we show that up to 54% of this heritability is captured by large numbers of single-nucleotide polymorphisms of small-effect spread throughout the genome, especially within genes and close regulatory regions. The genetic bases of neuroanatomical diversity appear to be relatively independent of those of body size (height), but shared with those of verbal intelligence scores. The study of this genomic architecture should help us better understand brain evolution and disease. PMID:25224261

  5. Detectable Clonal Mosaicism in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic mosaicism is the presence of two or more cellular populations with distinct genotypes in an individual who developed from a single fertilized ovum. While initially observed across a spectrum of rare genetic disorders, detailed assessment of data from genome-wide association studies now reveal that detectable clonal mosaicism involving large structural alterations (> 2 Mb) can also be seen in populations of apparently healthy individuals. The first generation of descriptive studies have generated new interest in understanding the molecular basis of the affected genomic regions, percent of the cellular subpopulation involved, and developmental timing of the underlying mutational event, which could reveal new insights into the initiation, clonal expansion and phenotypic manifestations of mosaic events. Early evidence indicates detectable clonal mosaicism increases in frequency with age and could preferentially occur in males. The observed pattern of recurrent events affecting specific chromosomal regions indicates some regions are more susceptible to these events, which could reflect inter-individual differences in genomic stability. Moreover, it is also plausible that the presence of large structural events could be associated with cancer risk. The characterization of detectable genetic mosaicism reveals that there could be important dynamic changes in the human genome associated with the aging process, which could be associated with risk for common disorders, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and neurological disorders. PMID:24246702

  6. 77 FR 28888 - National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, ] Rockville,...

  7. 77 FR 61770 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genomic Medicine RFAs..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) ] Dated: October 4, 2012. David...

  8. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Scientific Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,...

  9. 78 FR 64222 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Human Genome...

  10. 76 FR 58023 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  11. An overview of the human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The human genome project is one of the most ambitious scientific projects to date, with the ultimate goal being a nucleotide sequence for all four billion bases of human DNA. In the process of determining the nucleotide sequence for each base, the location, function, and regulatory regions from the estimated 100,000 human genes will be identified. The genome project itself relies upon maps of the human genetic code derived from several different levels of resolution. Genetic linkage analysis provides a low resolution genome map. The information for genetic linkage maps is derived from the analysis of chromosome specific markers such as Sequence Tagged Sites (STSs), Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTRs) or other polymorphic (highly informative) loci in a number of different-families. Using this information the location of an unknown disease gene can be limited to a region comprised of one million base pairs of DNA or less. After this point, one must construct or have access to a physical map of the region of interest. Physical mapping involves the construction of an ordered overlapping (contiguous) set of recombinant DNA clones. These clones may be derived from a number of different vectors including cosmids, Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs), P1 derived Artificial Chromosomes (PACs), somatic cell hybrids, or Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs). The ultimate goal for physical mapping is to establish a completely overlapping (contiguous) set of clones for the entire genome. After a gene or region of interest has been localized using physical mapping the nucleotide sequence is determined. The overlap between genetic mapping, physical mapping and DNA sequencing has proven to be a powerful tool for the isolation of disease genes through positional cloning.

  12. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine. PMID:26006006

  13. The Human Microbiome Project: lessons from human genomics.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cecil M; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra; Tito, Raul Y; Foster, Morris W; Spicer, Paul G

    2012-01-01

    The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) is following in the footsteps of the Human Genome Project (HGP), which will include exciting discoveries, but also potential disappointment and resentment over the lack of medical applications. There is a wiser path for the HMP. This path includes a greater attention to rare variation, an early commitment to an ethical inclusion of indigenous communities, and a recruitment strategy in which medical benefits are de-emphasized. PMID:22112388

  14. Report on the Human Genome Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I.; Cahill, G.; Cantor, C.; Caskey, T.; Dulbecco, R.; Engelhardt, D. L.; Hood, L.; Lerman, L. S.; Mendelsohn, M. L.; Sinsheimer, R. L.; Smith, T.; Soll, D.; Stormo, G.; White, R. L.

    1987-04-01

    The report urges DOE and the Nation to commit to a large. multi-year. multidisciplinary. technological undertaking to order and sequence the human genome. This effort will first require significant innovation in general capability to manipulate DNA. major new analytical methods for ordering and sequencing. theoretical developments in computer science and mathematical biology, and great expansions in our ability to store and manipulate the information and to interface it with other large and diverse genetic databases. The actual ordering and sequencing involves the coordinated processing of some 3 billion bases from a reference human genome. Science is poised on the rudimentary edge of being able to read and understand human genes. A concerted. broadly based. scientific effort to provide new methods of sufficient power and scale should transform this activity from an inefficient one-gene-at-a-time. single laboratory effort into a coordinated. worldwide. comprehensive reading of "the book of man". The effort will be extraordinary in scope and magnitude. but so will be the benefit to biological understanding. new technology and the diagnosis and treatment of human disease.

  15. The human genome and the human control of natural evolution.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, H

    2001-10-01

    Recent advances in research on the Human Genome are provoking many critical problems in the global policy regarding the future status of human beings as well as in that of the whole life system on the earth, and consequently, these advances provoke the serious bioethical and philosophical questions. Firstly, how can we comprehend that we are going to have the complete technology to manipulate the system of the human genome and other non-human genomes? Though no science and technology can be complete, we will, I believe, take possession of an almost complete gene technology in the early stage of the next Century. Gene technology will soon fall into the hands of human beings instead of rendering in the province of God. Secondly, which gene technologies will we actually realize and utilize in the early stages of the 21st Century? Most probably, we will adopt these technologies to health care to treat some apparent bodily diseases, for instance, cancer, hemophilia, ADA deficiency, and so forth, and sooner or later we will adopt gene therapy to germ lines, which, in the long run, suggests the possibility of a future "artificial evolution" instead of the "natural evolution" of the past. Thirdly, how is the new concept of "artificial evolution" justified ethically? I believe this kind of manmade evolution is the only way for human beings to survive into the future global environment. There cannot be any serious ethical objection against the idea of artificial evolution. Fourthly, what is the background philosophy for the concept of "artificial evolution"? I will discuss the nature of modern European humanism with individual dignity and fundamental human rights which has led the philosophy of modern culture and modern society, and I will conclude by suggesting that we should abolish an essential part of modern humanism and newly devise some alternative philosophy to fit the new Millennium. PMID:15011660

  16. A Single-Array-Based Method for Detecting Copy Number Variants Using Affymetrix High Density SNP Arrays and its Application to Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Fu, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence has shown that structural variations, due to insertions, deletions, and inversions of DNA, may contribute considerably to the development of complex human diseases, such as breast cancer. High-throughput genotyping technologies, such as Affymetrix high density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, have produced large amounts of genetic data for genome-wide SNP genotype calling and copy number estimation. Meanwhile, there is a great need for accurate and efficient statistical methods to detect copy number variants. In this article, we introduce a hidden-Markov-model (HMM)-based method, referred to as the PICR-CNV, for copy number inference. The proposed method first estimates copy number abundance for each single SNP on a single array based on the raw fluorescence values, and then standardizes the estimated copy number abundance to achieve equal footing among multiple arrays. This method requires no between-array normalization, and thus, maintains data integrity and independence of samples among individual subjects. In addition to our efforts to apply new statistical technology to raw fluorescence values, the HMM has been applied to the standardized copy number abundance in order to reduce experimental noise. Through simulations, we show our refined method is able to infer copy number variants accurately. Application of the proposed method to a breast cancer dataset helps to identify genomic regions significantly associated with the disease. PMID:26279618

  17. A haplotype map of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Inherited genetic variation has a critical but as yet largely uncharacterized role in human disease. Here we report a public database of common variation in the human genome: more than one million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for which accurate and complete genotypes have been obtained in 269 DNA samples from four populations, including ten 500-kilobase regions in which essentially all information about common DNA variation has been extracted. These data document the generality of recombination hotspots, a block-like structure of linkage disequilibrium and low haplotype diversity, leading to substantial correlations of SNPs with many of their neighbours. We show how the HapMap resource can guide the design and analysis of genetic association studies, shed light on structural variation and recombination, and identify loci that may have been subject to natural selection during human evolution. PMID:16255080

  18. Privacy and the Human Genome Project.

    PubMed

    Wiesenthal, David L; Wiener, Neil I

    1996-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has raised many issues regarding the contributions of genetics to a variety of diseases and societal conditions. With genetic testing now easily conducted with lowered costs in nonmedical domains, a variety of privacy issues must be considered. Such testing will result in the loss of significant privacy rights for the individual. Society must now consider such issues as the ownership of genetic data, confidentiality rights to such information, limits placed on genetic screening, and legislation to control genetic testing and its applications. There is often a conflict between individual rights to privacy and the need for societal protection. PMID:11654975

  19. Optimizing procedures for a human genome repository

    SciTech Connect

    Nierman, W.C.

    1991-03-01

    Large numbers of clones will be generated during the Human Genome Project. As each is characterized, subsets will be identified which are useful to the scientific community at large. These subsets are most readily distributed through public repositories. The American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) is experienced in repository operation, but before this project had no history in managing clones and associated information in large batches instead of individually. This project permitted the ATCC to develop several procedures for automating and thus reducing the cost of characterizing, preserving, and maintaining information about clones.

  20. The Genome Project and human health

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, F.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The author claims that the positional cloning approach, whereby a gene is identified by its map position without making assumptions about its structure or function, has provided significant information about common inherited disorders. Genes responsible for cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and neurofibromatosis have been cloned. However, this technology has been labor intensive and extremely expensive. The Human Genome Project will provide information that will drive research for at least the next 100 years and will likely transform medicine in the 21st century into the preventive mode.

  1. Modeling the Human Genome Maintenance network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, Éder M.; Cabral, Heleno B.; Castro, Mauro A. A.; Sinigaglia, Marialva; Mombach, José C. M.; Librelotto, Giovani R.

    2010-10-01

    We present the Ontocancro Database ( www.ontocancro.org) illustrated with applications to network modeling and pathway functional analysis. The database compiles information on gene pathways involved in Human Genome Maintenance Mechanisms (GMM) whose dysfunction accounts for cancer and several genetic syndromes. Ontocancro is the most complete, manually curated information resource available providing genomics and interatomics data on 120 GMM pathways (comprising a total of 1435 genes) obtained from curated databases and the literature. It was developed to facilitate the GMM network and functional modeling for the integration of genomic, transcriptomic and interatomic data. The database’s main contribution is the Ontocancro pathways that are expanded versions of standard GMM pathways for including additional genes with evidences of functional involvement in GMM. Using these pathways we find the largest cluster of interacting proteins involving GMM and on it we project a microarray study of adenoma to identify the regions of the network that are highly altered. In the last application we present the dynamical alterations of the pathways in a study of the effect of Cadmium, a known carcinogenic substance, on prostate cells to find that it produces a strong decrease of the pathway activity.

  2. Origins of the Human Genome Project

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cook-Deegan, Robert (Affiliation: Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences)

    1993-07-01

    The human genome project was borne of technology, grew into a science bureaucracy in the United States and throughout the world, and is now being transformed into a hybrid academic and commercial enterprise. The next phase of the project promises to veer more sharply toward commercial application, harnessing both the technical prowess of molecular biology and the rapidly growing body of knowledge about DNA structure to the pursuit of practical benefits. Faith that the systematic analysis of DNA structure will prove to be a powerful research tool underlies the rationale behind the genome project. The notion that most genetic information is embedded in the sequence of CNA base pairs comprising chromosomes is a central tenet. A rough analogy is to liken an organism's genetic code to computer code. The coal of the genome project, in this parlance, is to identify and catalog 75,000 or more files (genes) in the software that directs construction of a self-modifying and self-replicating system -- a living organism.

  3. Origins of the Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, Robert

    1993-07-01

    The human genome project was borne of technology, grew into a science bureaucracy in the US and throughout the world, and is now being transformed into a hybrid academic and commercial enterprise. The next phase of the project promises to veer more sharply toward commercial application, harnessing both the technical prowess of molecular biology and the rapidly growing body of knowledge about DNA structure to the pursuit of practical benefits. Faith that the systematic analysis of DNA structure will prove to be a powerful research tool underlies the rationale behind the genome project. The notion that most genetic information is embedded in the sequence of CNA base pairs comprising chromosomes is a central tenet. A rough analogy is to liken an organism's genetic code to computer code. The coal of the genome project, in this parlance, is to identify and catalog 75,000 or more files (genes) in the software that directs construction of a self-modifying and self-replicating system -- a living organism.

  4. Neanderthal genomics and the evolution of modern humans.

    PubMed

    Noonan, James P

    2010-05-01

    Humans possess unique physical and cognitive characteristics relative to other primates. Comparative analyses of the human and chimpanzee genomes are beginning to reveal sequence changes on the human lineage that may have contributed to the evolution of human traits. However, these studies cannot identify the genetic differences that distinguish modern humans from archaic human species. Here, I will discuss efforts to obtain genomic sequence from Neanderthal, the closest known relative of modern humans. Recent studies in this nascent field have focused on developing methods to recover nuclear DNA from Neanderthal remains. The success of these early studies has inspired a Neanderthal genome project, which promises to produce a reference Neanderthal genome sequence in the near future. Technical issues, such as the level of Neanderthal sequence coverage that can realistically be obtained from a single specimen and the presence of modern human contaminating sequences, reduce the detection of authentic human-Neanderthal sequence differences but may be remedied by methodological improvements. More critical for the utility of a Neanderthal genome sequence is the evolutionary relationship of humans and Neanderthals. Current evidence suggests that the modern human and Neanderthal lineages diverged before the emergence of contemporary humans. A fraction of biologically relevant human-chimpanzee sequence differences are thus likely to have arisen and become fixed exclusively on the modern human lineage. A reconstructed Neanderthal genome sequence could be integrated into human-primate genome comparisons to help reveal the evolutionary genetic events that produced modern humans. PMID:20439435

  5. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative. 34 refs.

  6. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1988-01-01

    The structural characterization of genes and elucidation of their encoded functions have become a cornerstone of modern health research, biology and biotechnology. A genome program is an organized effort to locate and identify the functions of all the genes of an organism. Beginning with the DOE-sponsored, 1986 human genome workshop at Santa Fe, the value of broadly organized efforts supporting total genome characterization became a subject of intensive study. There is now national recognition that benefits will rapidly accrue from an effective scientific infrastructure for total genome research. In the US genome research is now receiving dedicated funds. Several other nations are implementing genome programs. Supportive infrastructure is being improved through both national and international cooperation. The Human Genome Initiative of the Department of Energy (DOE) is a focused program of Resource and Technology Development, with objectives of speeding and bringing economies to the national human genome effort. This report relates the origins and progress of the Initiative.

  7. Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Lander, E S; Linton, L M; Birren, B; Nusbaum, C; Zody, M C; Baldwin, J; Devon, K; Dewar, K; Doyle, M; FitzHugh, W; Funke, R; Gage, D; Harris, K; Heaford, A; Howland, J; Kann, L; Lehoczky, J; LeVine, R; McEwan, P; McKernan, K; Meldrim, J; Mesirov, J P; Miranda, C; Morris, W; Naylor, J; Raymond, C; Rosetti, M; Santos, R; Sheridan, A; Sougnez, C; Stange-Thomann, Y; Stojanovic, N; Subramanian, A; Wyman, D; Rogers, J; Sulston, J; Ainscough, R; Beck, S; Bentley, D; Burton, J; Clee, C; Carter, N; Coulson, A; Deadman, R; Deloukas, P; Dunham, A; Dunham, I; Durbin, R; French, L; Grafham, D; Gregory, S; Hubbard, T; Humphray, S; Hunt, A; Jones, M; Lloyd, C; McMurray, A; Matthews, L; Mercer, S; Milne, S; Mullikin, J C; Mungall, A; Plumb, R; Ross, M; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Waterston, R H; Wilson, R K; Hillier, L W; McPherson, J D; Marra, M A; Mardis, E R; Fulton, L A; Chinwalla, A T; Pepin, K H; Gish, W R; Chissoe, S L; Wendl, M C; Delehaunty, K D; Miner, T L; Delehaunty, A; Kramer, J B; Cook, L L; Fulton, R S; Johnson, D L; Minx, P J; Clifton, S W; Hawkins, T; Branscomb, E; Predki, P; Richardson, P; Wenning, S; Slezak, T; Doggett, N; Cheng, J F; Olsen, A; Lucas, S; Elkin, C; Uberbacher, E; Frazier, M; Gibbs, R A; Muzny, D M; Scherer, S E; Bouck, J B; Sodergren, E J; Worley, K C; Rives, C M; Gorrell, J H; Metzker, M L; Naylor, S L; Kucherlapati, R S; Nelson, D L; Weinstock, G M; Sakaki, Y; Fujiyama, A; Hattori, M; Yada, T; Toyoda, A; Itoh, T; Kawagoe, C; Watanabe, H; Totoki, Y; Taylor, T; Weissenbach, J; Heilig, R; Saurin, W; Artiguenave, F; Brottier, P; Bruls, T; Pelletier, E; Robert, C; Wincker, P; Smith, D R; Doucette-Stamm, L; Rubenfield, M; Weinstock, K; Lee, H M; Dubois, J; Rosenthal, A; Platzer, M; Nyakatura, G; Taudien, S; Rump, A; Yang, H; Yu, J; Wang, J; Huang, G; Gu, J; Hood, L; Rowen, L; Madan, A; Qin, S; Davis, R W; Federspiel, N A; Abola, A P; Proctor, M J; Myers, R M; Schmutz, J; Dickson, M; Grimwood, J; Cox, D R; Olson, M V; Kaul, R; Raymond, C; Shimizu, N; Kawasaki, K; Minoshima, S; Evans, G A; Athanasiou, M; Schultz, R; Roe, B A; Chen, F; Pan, H; Ramser, J; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; McCombie, W R; de la Bastide, M; Dedhia, N; Blöcker, H; Hornischer, K; Nordsiek, G; Agarwala, R; Aravind, L; Bailey, J A; Bateman, A; Batzoglou, S; Birney, E; Bork, P; Brown, D G; Burge, C B; Cerutti, L; Chen, H C; Church, D; Clamp, M; Copley, R R; Doerks, T; Eddy, S R; Eichler, E E; Furey, T S; Galagan, J; Gilbert, J G; Harmon, C; Hayashizaki, Y; Haussler, D; Hermjakob, H; Hokamp, K; Jang, W; Johnson, L S; Jones, T A; Kasif, S; Kaspryzk, A; Kennedy, S; Kent, W J; Kitts, P; Koonin, E V; Korf, I; Kulp, D; Lancet, D; Lowe, T M; McLysaght, A; Mikkelsen, T; Moran, J V; Mulder, N; Pollara, V J; Ponting, C P; Schuler, G; Schultz, J; Slater, G; Smit, A F; Stupka, E; Szustakowki, J; Thierry-Mieg, D; Thierry-Mieg, J; Wagner, L; Wallis, J; Wheeler, R; Williams, A; Wolf, Y I; Wolfe, K H; Yang, S P; Yeh, R F; Collins, F; Guyer, M S; Peterson, J; Felsenfeld, A; Wetterstrand, K A; Patrinos, A; Morgan, M J; de Jong, P; Catanese, J J; Osoegawa, K; Shizuya, H; Choi, S; Chen, Y J; Szustakowki, J

    2001-02-15

    The human genome holds an extraordinary trove of information about human development, physiology, medicine and evolution. Here we report the results of an international collaboration to produce and make freely available a draft sequence of the human genome. We also present an initial analysis of the data, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the sequence. PMID:11237011

  8. Premature termination codons in modern human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    The considerable range of genetic variation in human populations may partly reflect distinctive processes of adaptation to variable environmental conditions. However, the adaptive genomic signatures remain to be completely elucidated. This research explores candidate loci under selection at the population level by characterizing recently arisen premature termination codons (PTCs), some of which indicate a human knockout. From a total of 7595 participants from two population exome projects, 246 PTCs were found where natural selection has resulted in new alleles with a high frequency (from 1% to 96%) of derived alleles and various levels of population differentiation (FST = 0.00139–0.626). The PTC genes formed protein and regulatory networks limited to 15 biological processes or gene families, of which seven categories were previously unreported. PTC mutations have a strong tendency to be introduced into members of the same gene family, even during modern human evolution, although the exact nature of the selection is not fully known. The findings here suggest the ongoing evolutionary plasticity of modern humans at the genetic level and also partly provide insights into common human knockouts. PMID:26932450

  9. Premature termination codons in modern human genomes.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    The considerable range of genetic variation in human populations may partly reflect distinctive processes of adaptation to variable environmental conditions. However, the adaptive genomic signatures remain to be completely elucidated. This research explores candidate loci under selection at the population level by characterizing recently arisen premature termination codons (PTCs), some of which indicate a human knockout. From a total of 7595 participants from two population exome projects, 246 PTCs were found where natural selection has resulted in new alleles with a high frequency (from 1% to 96%) of derived alleles and various levels of population differentiation (FST = 0.00139-0.626). The PTC genes formed protein and regulatory networks limited to 15 biological processes or gene families, of which seven categories were previously unreported. PTC mutations have a strong tendency to be introduced into members of the same gene family, even during modern human evolution, although the exact nature of the selection is not fully known. The findings here suggest the ongoing evolutionary plasticity of modern humans at the genetic level and also partly provide insights into common human knockouts. PMID:26932450

  10. The Human Genome Project: how do we protect Australians?

    PubMed

    Stott Despoja, N

    It is the moon landing of the nineties: the ambitious Human Genome Project--identifying the up to 100,000 genes that make up human DNA and the sequences of the three billion base-pairs that comprise the human genome. However, unlike the moon landing, the effects of the genome project will have a fundamental impact on the way we see ourselves and each other. PMID:11379500

  11. Clinal distribution of human genomic diversity across the Netherlands despite archaeological evidence for genetic discontinuities in Dutch population history

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The presence of a southeast to northwest gradient across Europe in human genetic diversity is a well-established observation and has recently been confirmed by genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. This pattern is traditionally explained by major prehistoric human migration events in Palaeolithic and Neolithic times. Here, we investigate whether (similar) spatial patterns in human genomic diversity also occur on a micro-geographic scale within Europe, such as in the Netherlands, and if so, whether these patterns could also be explained by more recent demographic events, such as those that occurred in Dutch population history. Methods We newly collected data on a total of 999 Dutch individuals sampled at 54 sites across the country at 443,816 autosomal SNPs using the Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 5.0 (Affymetrix). We studied the individual genetic relationships by means of classical multidimensional scaling (MDS) using different genetic distance matrices, spatial ancestry analysis (SPA), and ADMIXTURE software. We further performed dedicated analyses to search for spatial patterns in the genomic variation and conducted simulations (SPLATCHE2) to provide a historical interpretation of the observed spatial patterns. Results We detected a subtle but clearly noticeable genomic population substructure in the Dutch population, allowing differentiation of a north-eastern, central-western, central-northern and a southern group. Furthermore, we observed a statistically significant southeast to northwest cline in the distribution of genomic diversity across the Netherlands, similar to earlier findings from across Europe. Simulation analyses indicate that this genomic gradient could similarly be caused by ancient as well as by the more recent events in Dutch history. Conclusions Considering the strong archaeological evidence for genetic discontinuity in the Netherlands, we interpret the observed clinal pattern of genomic diversity as being caused by

  12. Human Rhinovirus B and C Genomes from Rural Coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Agoti, Charles N; Kiyuka, Patience K; Kamau, Everlyn; Munywoki, Patrick K; Bett, Anne; van der Hoek, Lia; Kellam, Paul; Nokes, D James; Cotten, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Primer-independent agnostic deep sequencing was used to generate three human rhinovirus (HRV) B genomes and one HRV C genome from samples collected in a household respiratory survey in rural coastal Kenya. The study provides the first rhinovirus genomes from Kenya and will help improve the sensitivity of local molecular diagnostics. PMID:27469941

  13. Human Rhinovirus B and C Genomes from Rural Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Agoti, Charles N.; Kiyuka, Patience K.; Kamau, Everlyn; Munywoki, Patrick K.; Bett, Anne; van der Hoek, Lia; Kellam, Paul; Nokes, D. James

    2016-01-01

    Primer-independent agnostic deep sequencing was used to generate three human rhinovirus (HRV) B genomes and one HRV C genome from samples collected in a household respiratory survey in rural coastal Kenya. The study provides the first rhinovirus genomes from Kenya and will help improve the sensitivity of local molecular diagnostics. PMID:27469941

  14. Human genetics and genomics a decade after the release of the draft sequence of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in human genetics and genomics research over the past ten years since the publication of the draft sequence of the human genome in 2001. Findings emanating directly from the Human Genome Project, together with those from follow-on studies, have had an enormous impact on our understanding of the architecture and function of the human genome. Major developments have been made in cataloguing genetic variation, the International HapMap Project, and with respect to advances in genotyping technologies. These developments are vital for the emergence of genome-wide association studies in the investigation of complex diseases and traits. In parallel, the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has ushered in the 'personal genome sequencing' era for both normal and cancer genomes, and made possible large-scale genome sequencing studies such as the 1000 Genomes Project and the International Cancer Genome Consortium. The high-throughput sequencing and sequence-capture technologies are also providing new opportunities to study Mendelian disorders through exome sequencing and whole-genome sequencing. This paper reviews these major developments in human genetics and genomics over the past decade. PMID:22155605

  15. Human Genome Program Image Gallery (from genomics.energy.gov)

    DOE Data Explorer

    This collection contains approximately 240 images from the genome programs of DOE's Office of Science. The images are divided into galleries related to biofuels research, systems biology, and basic genomics. Each image has a title, a basic citation, and a credit or source. Most of the images are original graphics created by the Genome Management Information System (GMIS). GMIS images are recognizable by their credit line. Permission to use these graphics is not needed, but please credit the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Programs and provide the website http://genomics.energy.gov. Other images were provided by third parties and not created by the U.S. Department of Energy. Users must contact the person listed in the credit line before using those images. The high-resolution images can be downloaded.

  16. Major Histocompatibility Complex Genomics and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trowsdale, John; Knight, Julian C.

    2015-01-01

    Over several decades, various forms of genomic analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have been extremely successful in picking up many disease associations. This is to be expected, as the MHC region is one of the most gene-dense and polymorphic stretches of human DNA. It also encodes proteins critical to immunity, including several controlling antigen processing and presentation. Single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) imputation now permit the screening of large sample sets, a technique further facilitated by high-throughput sequencing. These methods promise to yield more precise contributions of MHC variants to disease. However, interpretation of MHC-disease associations in terms of the functions of variants has been problematic. Most studies confirm the paramount importance of class I and class II molecules, which are key to resistance to infection. Infection is likely driving the extreme variation of these genes across the human population, but this has been difficult to demonstrate. In contrast, many associations with autoimmune conditions have been shown to be specific to certain class I and class II alleles. Interestingly, conditions other than infections and autoimmunity are also associated with the MHC, including some cancers and neuropathies. These associations could be indirect, owing, for example, to the infectious history of a particular individual and selective pressures operating at the population level. PMID:23875801

  17. 78 FR 61851 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  7. Personal genomes in progress: from the Human Genome Project to the Personal Genome Project

    PubMed Central

    Lunshof (Co-first author), Jeantine E.; Bobe (Co-first author), Jason; Aach, John; Angrist, Misha; V. Thakuria, Joseph; Vorhaus, Daniel B.; R. Hoehe (Co-last author), Margret; Church (Co-last author), George M.

    2010-01-01

    The cost of a diploid human genome sequence has dropped from about $70M to $2000 since 2007- even as the standards for redundancy have increased from 7x to 40x in order to improve call rates. Coupled with the low return on investment for common single-nucleotide polymorphisms, this has caused a significant rise in interest in correlating genome sequences with comprehensive environmental and trait data (GET). The cost of electronic health records, imaging, and microbial, immunological, and behavioral data are also dropping quickly. Sharing such integrated GET datasets and their interpretations with a diversity of researchers and research subjects highlights the need for informed-consent models capable of addressing novel privacy and other issues, as well as for flexible data-sharing resources that make materials and data available with minimum restrictions on use. This article examines the Personal Genome Project's effort to develop a GET database as a public genomics resource broadly accessible to both researchers and research participants, while pursuing the highest standards in research ethics. PMID:20373666

  8. Finishing The Euchromatic Sequence Of The Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel; Pennacchio, Len

    2004-09-07

    The sequence of the human genome encodes the genetic instructions for human physiology, as well as rich information about human evolution. In 2001, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium reported a draft sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome. Since then, the international collaboration has worked to convert this draft into a genome sequence with high accuracy and nearly complete coverage. Here, we report the result of this finishing process.The current genome sequence (Build 35) contains 2.85 billion nucleotides interrupted by only 341 gaps. It covers {approx}99% of the euchromatic genome and is accurate to an error rate of {approx}1 event per 100,000 bases. Many of the remaining euchromatic gaps are associated with segmental duplications and will require focused work with new methods. The near-complete sequence, the first for a vertebrate, greatly improves the precision of biological analyses of the human genome including studies of gene number,birth and death. Notably, the human genome seems to encode only20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes. The genome sequence reported here should serve as a firm foundation for biomedical research in the decades ahead.

  9. The Human Genome Project and eugenic concerns.

    PubMed

    Garver, K L; Garver, B

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Human Genome project is the largest scientific project funded by the federal government since the Apollo Moon Project. The overall effect from this project should be of great benefit to humankind because it will provide a better understanding both of single gene defects and multifactorial or familial diseases such as diabetes, arteriosclerosis, and cancer. At first this will lead to more exact ways of screening and diagnosing genetic disease, and later it will lead, in many if not most instances, to specific genetic cures. However, in the past, in both the U.S. and German eugenic movements genetic information has been misused. Hopefully, by remembering and understanding the past injustices and inhumanity of negative eugenics, further misuse of scientific information can be avoided. PMID:8279465

  10. The Human Genome Project and eugenic concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Garver, K.L.; Garver, B. )

    1994-01-01

    The US Human Genome Project is the largest scientific project funded by the federal government since the Apollo Moon Project. The overall effect from this project should be of great benefit to humankind because it will provide a better understanding both of single gene defects and multifactorial or familial diseases such as diabetes, arteriosclerosis, and cancer. At first this will lead to more exact ways of screening and diagnosing genetic disease, and later it will lead, in many if not most instances, to specific genetic cures. However, in the past, in both the US and German eugenic movements genetic information has been misused. Hopefully, by remembering and understanding the past injustices and inhumanity of negative eugenics, further misuse of scientific information can be avoided. 142 refs.

  11. A Genomic Approach to Human Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Virginia; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion in the use of DNA-based microarrays. These techniques permit to assess RNA abundance on a genome-wide scale. Medical applications emerged in the field of cancer, with studies of both solid tumors and hematological malignancies leading to the development of tests that are now used to personalize therapeutic options. Microarrays have also been used to analyze the blood transcriptome in a wide range of diseases. In human autoimmune diseases, these studies are showing potential for identifying therapeutic targets as well as biomarkers for diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and response to treatment. More quantitative and sensitive high throughput RNA profiling methods are starting to be available and will be necessary for transcriptome analyses to become routine tests in the clinical setting. We expect this to crystallize within the coming decade, as they become part of the personalized medicine armamentarium. PMID:20192809

  12. Genome Editing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cory; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), defined by their capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into all cell types, are an integral tool for basic biological research and disease modeling. However, full use of PSCs for research and regenerative medicine requires the ability to precisely edit their DNA to correct disease-causing mutations and for functional analysis of genetic variations. Recent advances in DNA editing of human stem cells (including PSCs) have benefited from the use of designer nucleases capable of making double-strand breaks (DSBs) at specific sequences that stimulate endogenous DNA repair. The clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system has become the preferred designer nuclease for genome editing in human PSCs and other cell types. Here we describe the principles for designing a single guide RNA to uniquely target a gene of interest and describe strategies for disrupting, inserting, or replacing a specific DNA sequence in human PSCs. The improvements in efficiency and ease provided by these techniques allow individuals to precisely engineer PSCs in a way previously limited to large institutes and core facilities. PMID:27037079

  13. Genome Architecture and Its Roles in Human Copy Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Zhou, Weichen; Zhang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Besides single-nucleotide variants in the human genome, large-scale genomic variants, such as copy number variations (CNVs), are being increasingly discovered as a genetic source of human diversity and the pathogenic factors of diseases. Recent experimental findings have shed light on the links between different genome architectures and CNV mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize various genomic features and discuss their contributions to CNV formation. Genomic repeats, including both low-copy and high-copy repeats, play important roles in CNV instability, which was initially known as DNA recombination events. Furthermore, it has been found that human genomic repeats can also induce DNA replication errors and consequently result in CNV mutations. Some recent studies showed that DNA replication timing, which reflects the high-order information of genomic organization, is involved in human CNV mutations. Our review highlights that genome architecture, from DNA sequence to high-order genomic organization, is an important molecular factor in CNV mutagenesis and human genomic instability. PMID:25705150

  14. The Human Genome Project: An Imperative for International Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allende, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is the Human Genome Project which aims to decipher the totality of the human genetic information. The historical background, the objectives, international cooperation, ethical discussion, and the role of UNESCO are included. (KR)

  15. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  16. An STS-based map of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.J.; Stein, L.D.; Gerety, S.S.

    1995-12-22

    A physical map has been constructed of the human genome containing 15,086 sequence-tagged sites (STSs), with an average spacing of 199 kilobases. The project involved assembly of a radiation hybrid map of the human genome containing 5264 loci. This information was combined with the results of STS-content screening of 10,850 loci against a yeast artificial chromosome library to produce an integrated map, anchored by the radiation hybrid and genetic maps. The map provides radiation hybrid coverage of 99 percent and physical coverage of 94 percent of the human genome. The map also represents an early step in an international project to generate a transcript map of the human genome, with more than 3235 expressed sequences localized. The STSs in the map provide a scaffold for initiating large-scale sequencing of the human genome.

  17. Genomic imprinting in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Monk, David

    2015-10-01

    With the launch of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development/National Institutes of Health Human Placenta Project, the anticipation is that this often-overlooked organ will be the subject of much intense research. Compared with somatic tissues, the cells of the placenta have a unique epigenetic profile that dictates its transcription patterns, which when disturbed may be associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. One major class of genes that is dependent on strict epigenetic regulation in the placenta is subject to genomic imprinting, the parent-of-origin-dependent monoallelic gene expression. This review discusses the differences in allelic expression and epigenetic profiles of imprinted genes that are identified between different species, which reflect the continuous evolutionary adaption of this form of epigenetic regulation. These observations divulge that placenta-specific imprinted gene that is reliant on repressive histone signatures in mice are unlikely to be imprinted in humans, whereas intense methylation profiling in humans has uncovered numerous maternally methylated regions that are restricted to the placenta that are not conserved in mice. Imprinting has been proposed to be a mechanism that regulates parental resource allocation and ultimately can influence fetal growth, with the placenta being the key in this process. Furthermore, I discuss the developmental dynamics of both classic and transient placenta-specific imprinting and examine the evidence for an involvement of these genes in intrauterine growth restriction and placenta-associated complications. Finally, I focus on examples of genes that are regulated aberrantly in complicated pregnancies, emphasizing their application as pregnancy-related disease biomarkers to aid the diagnosis of at-risk pregnancies early in gestation. PMID:26428495

  18. Genomic approaches to studying human-specific developmental traits.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Lucía F; Pollard, Katherine S

    2015-09-15

    Changes in developmental regulatory programs drive both disease and phenotypic differences among species. Linking human-specific traits to alterations in development is challenging, because we have lacked the tools to assay and manipulate regulatory networks in human and primate embryonic cells. This field was transformed by the sequencing of hundreds of genomes--human and non-human--that can be compared to discover the regulatory machinery of genes involved in human development. This approach has identified thousands of human-specific genome alterations in developmental genes and their regulatory regions. With recent advances in stem cell techniques, genome engineering, and genomics, we can now test these sequences for effects on developmental gene regulation and downstream phenotypes in human cells and tissues. PMID:26395139

  19. [Comparative genomic classification of human hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kaposi-Novák, Pál

    2009-03-01

    Global transcriptome analysis has been successfully applied to characterize various human tumors, including hepatocellular carcinomas. This novel technology can facilitate early diagnosis, as well as prognostic and therapeutic diversification of cancer patients. To enhance access to the genomic information buried in archived pathology samples, we assessed RT-PCR amplification rates in paraffin-embedded tissues preserved in three different fixatives. Reliable amplification could be achieved from all paraffin-embedded specimens, when the amplicon size did not exceed 225 bp. A longer amplicon size resulted in rapid decrease of yield and reproducibility. In addition, formalin provided superior morphology and better reactivity with claudin-4 and -7 immunohistochemistry. Amplification of the initial sample is often required before transcriptome analysis of clinical specimens could be performed. We introduced a random nonamer primed T3 polymerase reaction into the conventional linear RNA amplification protocol. The modified T3T7 method generated a sense strand product ideal for synthesizing indirectly labeled cDNA templates. Microarray analysis of amplified frozen and laser-microdissected Myc and Myc/TGFalpha mouse liver tumors confirmed good reproducibility (r=0.9) of the reaction and conservation of original transcriptional patterns (r=0.78). Finally, we tested the utility of expression profiling for the classification of human HCC samples. By comparing expression data from HGF-treated c-Met conditional knock-out and control primary mouse hepatocytes, we identified 690 HGF/c-Met target genes. Functional analysis of the significant gene set implicated c-Met as key regulator of hepatocyte motility and oxidative homeostasis. Cross comparison of the c-Met-induced transcription signature with human HCC expression profiles revealed a group of tumors (27%) with potentially activated c-Met signaling (MET+). These tumors were characterized by higher vascular invasion rate

  20. Using The Affymetrix Wheat Microarray As An Oat Expression Platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in sequencing have resulted in the sequence of a large number of plant expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to entire plant genomes. Using these EST sequences, oligonucleotide microarray chips have been developed for several species including barley (Hordeum vulgare), maize (Zea mays), ric...

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    2012-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel Sequencing Technology... Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC...

  3. The Human Genome Project, and recent advances in personalized genomics.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brenda J; Nicholls, Stuart G

    2015-01-01

    The language of "personalized medicine" and "personal genomics" has now entered the common lexicon. The idea of personalized medicine is the integration of genomic risk assessment alongside other clinical investigations. Consistent with this approach, testing is delivered by health care professionals who are not medical geneticists, and where results represent risks, as opposed to clinical diagnosis of disease, to be interpreted alongside the entirety of a patient's health and medical data. In this review we consider the evidence concerning the application of such personalized genomics within the context of population screening, and potential implications that arise from this. We highlight two general approaches which illustrate potential uses of genomic information in screening. The first is a narrowly targeted approach in which genetic profiling is linked with standard population-based screening for diseases; the second is a broader targeting of variants associated with multiple single gene disorders, performed opportunistically on patients being investigated for unrelated conditions. In doing so we consider the organization and evaluation of tests and services, the challenge of interpretation with less targeted testing, professional confidence, barriers in practice, and education needs. We conclude by discussing several issues pertinent to health policy, namely: avoiding the conflation of genetics with biological determinism, resisting the "technological imperative", due consideration of the organization of screening services, the need for professional education, as well as informed decision making and public understanding. PMID:25733939

  4. The Past, Present, and Future of Human Centromere Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Aldrup-MacDonald, Megan E.; Sullivan, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    The centromere is the chromosomal locus essential for chromosome inheritance and genome stability. Human centromeres are located at repetitive alpha satellite DNA arrays that compose approximately 5% of the genome. Contiguous alpha satellite DNA sequence is absent from the assembled reference genome, limiting current understanding of centromere organization and function. Here, we review the progress in centromere genomics spanning the discovery of the sequence to its molecular characterization and the work done during the Human Genome Project era to elucidate alpha satellite structure and sequence variation. We discuss exciting recent advances in alpha satellite sequence assembly that have provided important insight into the abundance and complex organization of this sequence on human chromosomes. In light of these new findings, we offer perspectives for future studies of human centromere assembly and function. PMID:24683489

  5. Limits and patterns of cytomegalovirus genomic diversity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Renzette, Nicholas; Pokalyuk, Cornelia; Gibson, Laura; Bhattacharjee, Bornali; Schleiss, Mark R.; Hamprecht, Klaus; Yamamoto, Aparecida Y.; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M.; Britt, William J.; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Kowalik, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) exhibits surprisingly high genomic diversity during natural infection although little is known about the limits or patterns of HCMV diversity among humans. To address this deficiency, we analyzed genomic diversity among congenitally infected infants. We show that there is an upper limit to HCMV genomic diversity in these patient samples, with ∼25% of the genome being devoid of polymorphisms. These low diversity regions were distributed across 26 loci that were preferentially located in DNA-processing genes. Furthermore, by developing, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide mutation and recombination rate maps for HCMV, we show that genomic diversity is positively correlated with these two rates. In contrast, median levels of viral genomic diversity did not vary between putatively single or mixed strain infections. We also provide evidence that HCMV populations isolated from vascular compartments of hosts from different continents are genetically similar and that polymorphisms in glycoproteins and regulatory proteins are enriched in these viral populations. This analysis provides the most highly detailed map of HCMV genomic diversity in human hosts to date and informs our understanding of the distribution of HCMV genomic diversity within human hosts. PMID:26150505

  6. Minimal absent words in four human genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Sara P; Pinho, Armando J

    2011-01-01

    Minimal absent words have been computed in genomes of organisms from all domains of life. Here, we aim to contribute to the catalogue of human genomic variation by investigating the variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species, using four human genome assemblies. We compare the reference human genome GRCh37 assembly, the HuRef assembly of the genome of Craig Venter, the NA12878 assembly from cell line GM12878, and the YH assembly of the genome of a Han Chinese individual. We find the variation in number and content of minimal absent words between assemblies more significant for large and very large minimal absent words, where the biases of sequencing and assembly methodologies become more pronounced. Moreover, we find generally greater similarity between the human genome assemblies sequenced with capillary-based technologies (GRCh37 and HuRef) than between the human genome assemblies sequenced with massively parallel technologies (NA12878 and YH). Finally, as expected, we find the overall variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species to be generally smaller than the variation between species. PMID:22220210

  7. Genetic variation and the de novo assembly of human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chaisson, Mark J. P.; Wilson, Richard K.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of genetic variation and the assembly of genome sequences are both inextricably linked to advances in DNA-sequencing technology. Short-read massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our ability to discover genetic variation but is insufficient to generate high-quality genome assemblies or resolve most structural variation. Full resolution of variation is only guaranteed by complete de novo assembly of a genome. Here, we review approaches to genome assembly, the nature of gaps or missing sequences, and biases in the assembly process. We describe the challenges of generating a complete de novo genome assembly using current technologies and the impact that being able to perfectly sequence the genome would have on understanding human disease and evolution. Finally, we summarize recent technological advances that improve both contiguity and accuracy and emphasize the importance of complete de novo assembly as opposed to read mapping as the primary means to understanding the full range of human genetic variation. PMID:26442640

  8. Genomic structure of the human caldesmon gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, K; Yano, H; Hashida, T; Takeuchi, R; Takeda, O; Asada, K; Takahashi, E; Kato, I; Sobue, K

    1992-01-01

    The high molecular weight caldesmon (h-CaD) is predominantly expressed in smooth muscles, whereas the low molecular weight caldesmon (l-CaD) is widely distributed in nonmuscle tissues and cells. The changes in CaD isoform expression are closely correlated with the phenotypic modulation of smooth muscle cells. During a search for isoform diversity of human CaDs, l-CaD cDNAs were cloned from HeLa S3 cells. HeLa l-CaD I is composed of 558 amino acids, whereas 26 amino acids (residues 202-227 for HeLa l-CaD I) are deleted in HeLa l-CaD II. The short amino-terminal sequence of HeLa l-CaDs is different from that of fibroblast (WI-38) l-CaD II and human aorta h-CaD. We have also identified WI-38 l-CaD I, which contains a 26-amino acid insertion relative to WI-38 l-CaD II. To reveal the molecular events of the expressional regulation of the CaD isoforms, the genomic structure of the human CaD gene was determined. The human CaD gene is composed of 14 exons and was mapped to a single locus, 7q33-q34. The 26-amino acid insertion is encoded in exon 4 and is specifically spliced in the mRNAs for both h-CaD and l-CaDs I. Exon 3 is the exon that encodes the central repeating domain specific to h-CaD (residues 208-436) together with the common domain in all CaD (residues 73-207 for h-CaD and WI-38 l-CaDs, and residues 68-201 for HeLa l-CaDs). The regulation of h- and l-CaD expression is thought to depend on selection of the two 5' splice sites within exon 3. Thus, the change in expression between l-CaD and h-CaD might be caused by this splicing pathway. Images PMID:1465449

  9. Replication landscape of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Petryk, Nataliya; Kahli, Malik; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Jaszczyszyn, Yan; Shen, Yimin; Silvain, Maud; Thermes, Claude; Chen, Chun-Long; Hyrien, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Despite intense investigation, human replication origins and termini remain elusive. Existing data have shown strong discrepancies. Here we sequenced highly purified Okazaki fragments from two cell types and, for the first time, quantitated replication fork directionality and delineated initiation and termination zones genome-wide. Replication initiates stochastically, primarily within non-transcribed, broad (up to 150 kb) zones that often abut transcribed genes, and terminates dispersively between them. Replication fork progression is significantly co-oriented with the transcription. Initiation and termination zones are frequently contiguous, sometimes separated by regions of unidirectional replication. Initiation zones are enriched in open chromatin and enhancer marks, even when not flanked by genes, and often border ‘topologically associating domains' (TADs). Initiation zones are enriched in origin recognition complex (ORC)-binding sites and better align to origins previously mapped using bubble-trap than λ-exonuclease. This novel panorama of replication reveals how chromatin and transcription modulate the initiation process to create cell-type-specific replication programs. PMID:26751768

  10. The Human Genome Project, and recent advances in personalized genomics

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda J; Nicholls, Stuart G

    2015-01-01

    The language of “personalized medicine” and “personal genomics” has now entered the common lexicon. The idea of personalized medicine is the integration of genomic risk assessment alongside other clinical investigations. Consistent with this approach, testing is delivered by health care professionals who are not medical geneticists, and where results represent risks, as opposed to clinical diagnosis of disease, to be interpreted alongside the entirety of a patient’s health and medical data. In this review we consider the evidence concerning the application of such personalized genomics within the context of population screening, and potential implications that arise from this. We highlight two general approaches which illustrate potential uses of genomic information in screening. The first is a narrowly targeted approach in which genetic profiling is linked with standard population-based screening for diseases; the second is a broader targeting of variants associated with multiple single gene disorders, performed opportunistically on patients being investigated for unrelated conditions. In doing so we consider the organization and evaluation of tests and services, the challenge of interpretation with less targeted testing, professional confidence, barriers in practice, and education needs. We conclude by discussing several issues pertinent to health policy, namely: avoiding the conflation of genetics with biological determinism, resisting the “technological imperative”, due consideration of the organization of screening services, the need for professional education, as well as informed decision making and public understanding. PMID:25733939

  11. Genomic DNA transposition induced by human PGBD5

    PubMed Central

    Henssen, Anton G; Henaff, Elizabeth; Jiang, Eileen; Eisenberg, Amy R; Carson, Julianne R; Villasante, Camila M; Ray, Mondira; Still, Eric; Burns, Melissa; Gandara, Jorge; Feschotte, Cedric; Mason, Christopher E; Kentsis, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Transposons are mobile genetic elements that are found in nearly all organisms, including humans. Mobilization of DNA transposons by transposase enzymes can cause genomic rearrangements, but our knowledge of human genes derived from transposases is limited. In this study, we find that the protein encoded by human PGBD5, the most evolutionarily conserved transposable element-derived gene in vertebrates, can induce stereotypical cut-and-paste DNA transposition in human cells. Genomic integration activity of PGBD5 requires distinct aspartic acid residues in its transposase domain, and specific DNA sequences containing inverted terminal repeats with similarity to piggyBac transposons. DNA transposition catalyzed by PGBD5 in human cells occurs genome-wide, with precise transposon excision and preference for insertion at TTAA sites. The apparent conservation of DNA transposition activity by PGBD5 suggests that genomic remodeling contributes to its biological function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10565.001 PMID:26406119

  12. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  13. Explaining human uniqueness: genome interactions with environment, behaviour and culture

    PubMed Central

    Varki, Ajit; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2009-01-01

    What makes us human? Specialists in each discipline respond through the lens of their own expertise. In fact, ‘anthropogeny’ (explaining the origin of humans) requires a transdisciplinary approach that eschews such barriers. Here we take a genomic and genetic perspective towards molecular variation, explore systems analysis of gene expression and discuss an organ-systems approach. Rejecting any ‘genes versus environment’ dichotomy, we then consider genome interactions with environment, behaviour and culture, finally speculating that aspects of human uniqueness arose because of a primate evolutionary trend towards increasing and irreversible dependence on learned behaviours and culture — perhaps relaxing allowable thresholds for large-scale genomic diversity. PMID:18802414

  14. Gene Insertion Into Genomic Safe Harbors for Human Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Schambach, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Genomic safe harbors (GSHs) are sites in the genome able to accommodate the integration of new genetic material in a manner that ensures that the newly inserted genetic elements: (i) function predictably and (ii) do not cause alterations of the host genome posing a risk to the host cell or organism. GSHs are thus ideal sites for transgene insertion whose use can empower functional genetics studies in basic research and therapeutic applications in human gene therapy. Currently, no fully validated GSHs exist in the human genome. Here, we review our formerly proposed GSH criteria and discuss additional considerations on extending these criteria, on strategies for the identification and validation of GSHs, as well as future prospects on GSH targeting for therapeutic applications. In view of recent advances in genome biology, gene targeting technologies, and regenerative medicine, gene insertion into GSHs can potentially catalyze nearly all applications in human gene therapy. PMID:26867951

  15. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression. PMID:24789080

  16. Population genetic inference from personal genome data: impact of ancestry and admixture on human genomic variation.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Jeffrey M; Gravel, Simon; Byrnes, Jake; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Musharoff, Shaila; Bryc, Katarzyna; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Brisbin, Abra; Sheth, Vrunda; Chen, Rong; McLaughlin, Stephen F; Peckham, Heather E; Omberg, Larsson; Bormann Chung, Christina A; Stanley, Sarah; Pearlstein, Kevin; Levandowsky, Elizabeth; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Auton, Adam; Keinan, Alon; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G; Russell, Archie; Reynolds, Andy; Clark, Andrew G; Reese, Martin G; Lincoln, Stephen E; Butte, Atul J; De La Vega, Francisco M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2012-10-01

    Full sequencing of individual human genomes has greatly expanded our understanding of human genetic variation and population history. Here, we present a systematic analysis of 50 human genomes from 11 diverse global populations sequenced at high coverage. Our sample includes 12 individuals who have admixed ancestry and who have varying degrees of recent (within the last 500 years) African, Native American, and European ancestry. We found over 21 million single-nucleotide variants that contribute to a 1.75-fold range in nucleotide heterozygosity across diverse human genomes. This heterozygosity ranged from a high of one heterozygous site per kilobase in west African genomes to a low of 0.57 heterozygous sites per kilobase in segments inferred to have diploid Native American ancestry from the genomes of Mexican and Puerto Rican individuals. We show evidence of all three continental ancestries in the genomes of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and African American populations, and the genome-wide statistics are highly consistent across individuals from a population once ancestry proportions have been accounted for. Using a generalized linear model, we identified subtle variations across populations in the proportion of neutral versus deleterious variation and found that genome-wide statistics vary in admixed populations even once ancestry proportions have been factored in. We further infer that multiple periods of gene flow shaped the diversity of admixed populations in the Americas-70% of the European ancestry in today's African Americans dates back to European gene flow happening only 7-8 generations ago. PMID:23040495

  17. Population Genetic Inference from Personal Genome Data: Impact of Ancestry and Admixture on Human Genomic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Gravel, Simon; Byrnes, Jake; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Musharoff, Shaila; Bryc, Katarzyna; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D.; Brisbin, Abra; Sheth, Vrunda; Chen, Rong; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Peckham, Heather E.; Omberg, Larsson; Bormann Chung, Christina A.; Stanley, Sarah; Pearlstein, Kevin; Levandowsky, Elizabeth; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Auton, Adam; Keinan, Alon; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G.; Russell, Archie; Reynolds, Andy; Clark, Andrew G.; Reese, Martin G.; Lincoln, Stephen E.; Butte, Atul J.; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2012-01-01

    Full sequencing of individual human genomes has greatly expanded our understanding of human genetic variation and population history. Here, we present a systematic analysis of 50 human genomes from 11 diverse global populations sequenced at high coverage. Our sample includes 12 individuals who have admixed ancestry and who have varying degrees of recent (within the last 500 years) African, Native American, and European ancestry. We found over 21 million single-nucleotide variants that contribute to a 1.75-fold range in nucleotide heterozygosity across diverse human genomes. This heterozygosity ranged from a high of one heterozygous site per kilobase in west African genomes to a low of 0.57 heterozygous sites per kilobase in segments inferred to have diploid Native American ancestry from the genomes of Mexican and Puerto Rican individuals. We show evidence of all three continental ancestries in the genomes of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and African American populations, and the genome-wide statistics are highly consistent across individuals from a population once ancestry proportions have been accounted for. Using a generalized linear model, we identified subtle variations across populations in the proportion of neutral versus deleterious variation and found that genome-wide statistics vary in admixed populations even once ancestry proportions have been factored in. We further infer that multiple periods of gene flow shaped the diversity of admixed populations in the Americas—70% of the European ancestry in today’s African Americans dates back to European gene flow happening only 7–8 generations ago. PMID:23040495

  18. The Human Genome Project: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, James D.

    1990-04-01

    This article presents a short discussion of the development of the human genome program in the United States, a summary of the current status of the organization and administration of the National Institutes of Health component of the program, and some prospects for the future directions of the program and the applications of genome information.

  19. Response to 'pervasive sequence patents cover the entire human genome'.

    PubMed

    Tu, Shine; Holman, Christopher; Mossoff, Adam; Sichelman, Ted; Risch, Michael; Conteras, Jorge L; Heled, Yaniv; Dolin, Greg; Petherbridge, Lee

    2014-01-01

    A response to Pervasive sequence patents cover the entire human genome by J Rosenfeld and C Mason. Genome Med 2013, 5:27. See related Correspondence by Rosenfeld and Mason, http://genomemedicine.com/content/5/3/27 and related letter by Rosenfeld and Mason, http://genomemedicine.com/content/6/2/15. PMID:25031614

  20. Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

  1. A passion for the science of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Dunston, Georgia M.

    2012-01-01

    The complete sequencing of the human genome introduced a new knowledge base for decoding information structured in DNA sequence variation. My research is predicated on the supposition that the genome is the most sophisticated knowledge system known, as evidenced by the exquisite information it encodes on biochemical pathways and molecular processes underlying the biology of health and disease. Also, as a living legacy of human origins, migrations, adaptations, and identity, the genome communicates through the complexity of sequence variation expressed in population diversity. As a biomedical research scientist and academician, a question I am often asked is: “How is it that a black woman like you went to the University of Michigan for a PhD in Human Genetics?” As the ASCB 2012 E. E. Just Lecturer, I am honored and privileged to respond to this question in this essay on the science of the human genome and my career perspectives. PMID:23112225

  2. Higher-order Genome Organization in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Misteli, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Genomes are organized into complex higher-order structures by folding of the DNA into chromatin fibers, chromosome domains, and ultimately chromosomes. The higher-order organization of genomes is functionally important for gene regulation and control of gene expression programs. Defects in how chromatin is globally organized are relevant for physiological and pathological processes. Mutations and transcriptional misregulation of several global genome organizers are linked to human diseases and global alterations in chromatin structure are emerging as key players in maintenance of genome stability, aging, and the formation of cancer translocations. PMID:20591991

  3. Who are the Okinawans? Ancestry, genome diversity, and implications for the genetic study of human longevity from a geographically isolated population.

    PubMed

    Bendjilali, Nasrine; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; He, Qimei; Willcox, D Craig; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Donlon, Timothy A; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Suzuki, Makoto; Willcox, Bradley J

    2014-12-01

    Isolated populations have advantages for genetic studies of longevity from decreased haplotype diversity and long-range linkage disequilibrium. This permits smaller sample sizes without loss of power, among other utilities. Little is known about the genome of the Okinawans, a potential population isolate, recognized for longevity. Therefore, we assessed genetic diversity, structure, and admixture in Okinawans, and compared this with Caucasians, Chinese, Japanese, and Africans from HapMap II, genotyped on the same Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K array. Principal component analysis, haplotype coverage, and linkage disequilibrium decay revealed a distinct Okinawan genome-more homogeneity, less haplotype diversity, and longer range linkage disequilibrium. Population structure and admixture analyses utilizing 52 global reference populations from the Human Genome Diversity Cell Line Panel demonstrated that Okinawans clustered almost exclusively with East Asians. Sibling relative risk (λs) analysis revealed that siblings of Okinawan centenarians have 3.11 times (females) and 3.77 times (males) more likelihood of centenarianism. These findings suggest that Okinawans are genetically distinct and share several characteristics of a population isolate, which are prone to develop extreme phenotypes (eg, longevity) from genetic drift, natural selection, and population bottlenecks. These data support further exploration of genetic influence on longevity in the Okinawans. PMID:24444611

  4. A decade of human genome project conclusion: Scientific diffusion about our genome knowledge.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Fernanda; Góes, Andréa

    2016-05-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) was initiated in 1990 and completed in 2003. It aimed to sequence the whole human genome. Although it represented an advance in understanding the human genome and its complexity, many questions remained unanswered. Other projects were launched in order to unravel the mysteries of our genome, including the ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This review aims to analyze the evolution of scientific knowledge related to both the HGP and ENCODE projects. Data were retrieved from scientific articles published in 1990-2014, a period comprising the development and the 10 years following the HGP completion. The fact that only 20,000 genes are protein and RNA-coding is one of the most striking HGP results. A new concept about the organization of genome arose. The ENCODE project was initiated in 2003 and targeted to map the functional elements of the human genome. This project revealed that the human genome is pervasively transcribed. Therefore, it was determined that a large part of the non-protein coding regions are functional. Finally, a more sophisticated view of chromatin structure emerged. The mechanistic functioning of the genome has been redrafted, revealing a much more complex picture. Besides, a gene-centric conception of the organism has to be reviewed. A number of criticisms have emerged against the ENCODE project approaches, raising the question of whether non-conserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Thus, HGP and ENCODE projects accomplished a great map of the human genome, but the data generated still requires further in depth analysis. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:215-223, 2016. PMID:26952518

  5. Analysis of human accelerated DNA regions using archaic hominin genomes.

    PubMed

    Burbano, Hernán A; Green, Richard E; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  6. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  7. Resolving the variable genome and epigenome in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    The individual human genome and epigenome are being defined at unprecedented resolution by current advances in sequencing technologies with important implications for human disease. This review uses examples relevant to clinical practice to illustrate the functional consequences of genetic and epigenetic variation. The insights gained from genome-wide association studies are described together with current efforts to understand the role of rare variants in common disease, set in the context of recent successes in Mendelian traits through the application of whole exome sequencing. The application of functional genomics to interrogate the genome and epigenome, build up an integrated picture of the regulatory genomic landscape and inform disease association studies is discussed, together with the role of expression quantitative trait mapping and analysis of allele-specific gene expression. PMID:22443201

  8. Toward a Genome-Wide Reconstruction of Cis-Regulatory Networks in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Katharine R.; Banerjee, A. Raja; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The vast amount of recent progress made on the sequence of the human genome has allowed an unprecedented examination of cis-regulatory networks. These networks consist of functional elements such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, and insulators, and their coordinated activity is responsible for regulation of gene expression. Recent studies surveyed the entire genome, identifying novel elements and evaluating functional differences in respect to development. These investigations present the first steps towards a global regulatory map for expression in the human genome. PMID:19560550

  9. Predicting tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals are encoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the origins of multicellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate gene regulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate this code, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene-expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding-site analysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidate tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategy to microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues and identified 7187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking gene expression, the majority of which were located outside of known promoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novo predict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in 57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision in enhancer recognition ranging from 32% to 63% and a sensitivity of 47%. We used the sequence signatures identified by this approach to successfully assign tissue-specific predictions to ∼328,000 human–mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. By overlapping these genome-wide predictions with a data set of enhancers validated in vivo, in transgenic mice, we were able to confirm our results with a 28% sensitivity and 50% precision. These results indicate the power of combining complementary genomic data sets as an initial computational foray into a global view of tissue-specific gene regulation in vertebrates. PMID:17210927

  10. 78 FR 24223 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd floor Conf. Room 3146, 5635 Fishers...

  11. 76 FR 3643 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January...

  12. 75 FR 26762 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 3,...

  13. 75 FR 2148 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  14. 75 FR 52537 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  15. 3' tag digital gene expression profiling of human brain and universal reference RNA using Illumina Genome Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Massive parallel sequencing has the potential to replace microarrays as the method for transcriptome profiling. Currently there are two protocols: full-length RNA sequencing (RNA-SEQ) and 3'-tag digital gene expression (DGE). In this preliminary effort, we evaluated the 3' DGE approach using two reference RNA samples from the MicroArray Quality Control Consortium (MAQC). Results Using Brain RNA sample from multiple runs, we demonstrated that the transcript profiles from 3' DGE were highly reproducible between technical and biological replicates from libraries constructed by the same lab and even by different labs, and between two generations of Illumina's Genome Analyzers. Approximately 65% of all sequence reads mapped to mitochondrial genes, ribosomal RNAs, and canonical transcripts. The expression profiles of brain RNA and universal human reference RNA were compared which demonstrated that DGE was also highly quantitative with excellent correlation of differential expression with quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, one lane of 3' DGE sequencing, using the current sequencing chemistry and image processing software, had wider dynamic range for transcriptome profiling and was able to detect lower expressed genes which are normally below the detection threshold of microarrays. Conclusion 3' tag DGE profiling with massive parallel sequencing achieved high sensitivity and reproducibility for transcriptome profiling. Although it lacks the ability of detecting alternative splicing events compared to RNA-SEQ, it is much more affordable and clearly out-performed microarrays (Affymetrix) in detecting lower abundant transcripts. PMID:19917133

  16. Human genome project: revolutionizing biology through leveraging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Carol A.; Strausberg, Robert L.

    1996-04-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is an international project to develop genetic, physical, and sequence-based maps of the human genome. Since the inception of the HGP it has been clear that substantially improved technology would be required to meet the scientific goals, particularly in order to acquire the complete sequence of the human genome, and that these technologies coupled with the information forthcoming from the project would have a dramatic effect on the way biomedical research is performed in the future. In this paper, we discuss the state-of-the-art for genomic DNA sequencing, technological challenges that remain, and the potential technological paths that could yield substantially improved genomic sequencing technology. The impact of the technology developed from the HGP is broad-reaching and a discussion of other research and medical applications that are leveraging HGP-derived DNA analysis technologies is included. The multidisciplinary approach to the development of new technologies that has been successful for the HGP provides a paradigm for facilitating new genomic approaches toward understanding the biological role of functional elements and systems within the cell, including those encoded within genomic DNA and their molecular products.

  17. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K.; Ward, Lucas D.; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E.; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L.; Farnham, Peggy J.; Feingold, Elise A.; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C.; Gilbert, David M.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Green, Eric D.; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D.; Myers, Richard M.; Pazin, Michael J.; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease. PMID:24753594

  18. Human genome and open source: balancing ethics and business.

    PubMed

    Marturano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The Human Genome Project has been completed thanks to a massive use of computer techniques, as well as the adoption of the open-source business and research model by the scientists involved. This model won over the proprietary model and allowed a quick propagation and feedback of research results among peers. In this paper, the author will analyse some ethical and legal issues emerging by the use of such computer model in the Human Genome property rights. The author will argue that the Open Source is the best business model, as it is able to balance business and human rights perspectives. PMID:22984755

  19. The human genome browser at UCSC.

    PubMed

    Kent, W James; Sugnet, Charles W; Furey, Terrence S; Roskin, Krishna M; Pringle, Tom H; Zahler, Alan M; Haussler, David

    2002-06-01

    As vertebrate genome sequences near completion and research refocuses to their analysis, the issue of effective genome annotation display becomes critical. A mature web tool for rapid and reliable display of any requested portion of the genome at any scale, together with several dozen aligned annotation tracks, is provided at http://genome.ucsc.edu. This browser displays assembly contigs and gaps, mRNA and expressed sequence tag alignments, multiple gene predictions, cross-species homologies, single nucleotide polymorphisms, sequence-tagged sites, radiation hybrid data, transposon repeats, and more as a stack of coregistered tracks. Text and sequence-based searches provide quick and precise access to any region of specific interest. Secondary links from individual features lead to sequence details and supplementary off-site databases. One-half of the annotation tracks are computed at the University of California, Santa Cruz from publicly available sequence data; collaborators worldwide provide the rest. Users can stably add their own custom tracks to the browser for educational or research purposes. The conceptual and technical framework of the browser, its underlying MYSQL database, and overall use are described. The web site currently serves over 50,000 pages per day to over 3000 different users. PMID:12045153

  20. Genomic architecture and inheritance of human ribosomal RNA gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Stults, Dawn M.; Killen, Michael W.; Pierce, Heather H.; Pierce, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    The finishing of the Human Genome Project largely completed the detailing of human euchromatic sequences; however, the most highly repetitive regions of the genome still could not be assembled. The 12 gene clusters producing the structural RNA components of the ribosome are critically important for cellular viability, yet fall into this unassembled region of the Human Genome Project. To determine the extent of human variation in ribosomal RNA gene content (rDNA) and patterns of rDNA cluster inheritance, we have determined the physical lengths of the rDNA clusters in peripheral blood white cells of healthy human volunteers. The cluster lengths exhibit striking variability between and within human individuals, ranging from 50 kb to >6 Mb, manifest essentially complete heterozygosity, and provide each person with their own unique rDNA electrophoretic karyotype. Analysis of these rDNA fingerprints in multigenerational human families demonstrates that the rDNA clusters are subject to meiotic rearrangement at a frequency >10% per cluster, per meiosis. With this high intrinsic recombinational instability, the rDNA clusters may serve as a unique paradigm of potential human genomic plasticity. PMID:18025267

  1. Deterministic Mutation Rate Variation in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nick G.C.; Webster, Matthew T.; Ellegren, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Several studies of substitution rate variation have indicated that the local mutation rate varies over the mammalian genome. In the present study, we show significant variation in substitution rates within the noncoding part of the human genome using 4.7 Mb of human-chimpanzee pairwise comparisons. Moreover, we find a significant positive covariation of lineage-specific chimpanzee and human local substitution rates, and very similar mean substitution rates down the two lineages. The substitution rate variation is probably not caused by selection or biased gene conversion, and so we conclude that mutation rates vary deterministically across the noncoding nonrepetitive regions of the human genome. We also show that noncoding substitution rates are significantly affected by G+C base composition, partly because the base composition is not at equilibrium. PMID:12213772

  2. Complementary DNA sequencing: Expressed sequence tags and human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.D.; Kelley, J.M.; Gocayne, J.D.; Dubnick, M.; Wu, A.; Olde, B.; Moreno, R.F.; Kerlavage, A.R.; McCombie, W.R.; Venter, J.C. ); Polymeropoulos, M.H.; Hong Xiao; Merril, C.R. )

    1991-06-21

    Automated partial DNA sequencing was conducted on more than 600 randomly selected human brain complementary DNA (cDNA) clones to generate expressed sequence tags (ESTs). ESTs have applications in the discovery of new human genes, mapping of the human genome, and identification of coding regions in genomic sequences. Of the sequences generated, 337 represent new genes, including 48 with significant similarity to genes from other organisms, such as a yeast RNA polymerase II subunit; Drosophila kinesin, Notch, and Enhancer of split; and a murine tyrosine kinase receptor. Forty-six ESTs were mapped to chromosomes after amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. This fast approach to cDNA characterization will facilitate the tagging of most human genes in a few years at a fraction of the cost of complete genomic sequencing, provide new genetic markers, and serve as a resource in diverse biological research fields.

  3. From hacking the human genome to editing organs.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Takamasa; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In the recent decades, human genome engineering has been one of the major interesting research subjects, essentially because it raises new possibilities for personalized medicine and biotechnologies. With the development of engineered nucleases such as the Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), the Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and more recently the Clustered Regularly Interspaced short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), the field of human genome edition has evolved very rapidly. Every new genetic tool is broadening the scope of applications on human tissues, even before we can completely master each of these tools. In this review, we will present the recent advances regarding human genome edition tools, we will discuss the numerous implications they have in research and medicine, and we will mention the limits and concerns about such technologies. PMID:26588350

  4. From hacking the human genome to editing organs

    PubMed Central

    Tobita, Takamasa; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the recent decades, human genome engineering has been one of the major interesting research subjects, essentially because it raises new possibilities for personalized medicine and biotechnologies. With the development of engineered nucleases such as the Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), the Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and more recently the Clustered Regularly Interspaced short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), the field of human genome edition has evolved very rapidly. Every new genetic tool is broadening the scope of applications on human tissues, even before we can completely master each of these tools. In this review, we will present the recent advances regarding human genome edition tools, we will discuss the numerous implications they have in research and medicine, and we will mention the limits and concerns about such technologies PMID:26588350

  5. Learning about human population history from ancient and modern genomes.

    PubMed

    Stoneking, Mark; Krause, Johannes

    2011-09-01

    Genome-wide data, both from SNP arrays and from complete genome sequencing, are becoming increasingly abundant and are now even available from extinct hominins. These data are providing new insights into population history; in particular, when combined with model-based analytical approaches, genome-wide data allow direct testing of hypotheses about population history. For example, genome-wide data from both contemporary populations and extinct hominins strongly support a single dispersal of modern humans from Africa, followed by two archaic admixture events: one with Neanderthals somewhere outside Africa and a second with Denisovans that (so far) has only been detected in New Guinea. These new developments promise to reveal new stories about human population history, without having to resort to storytelling. PMID:21850041

  6. Primer on Molecular Genetics; DOE Human Genome Program

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  7. Unsupervised pattern discovery in human chromatin structure through genomic segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Michael M.; Buske, Orion J.; Wang, Jie; Weng, Zhiping; Bilmes, Jeff A.; Noble, William Stafford

    2012-01-01

    We applied a dynamic Bayesian network method that identifies joint patterns from multiple functional genomics experiments to ChIP-seq histone modification and transcription factor data, and DNaseI-seq and FAIRE-seq open chromatin readouts from the human cell line K562. In an unsupervised fashion, we identified patterns associated with transcription start sites, gene ends, enhancers, CTCF elements, and repressed regions. Software and genome browser tracks are at http://noble.gs.washington.edu/proj/segway/. PMID:22426492

  8. Primer on molecular genetics. DOE Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  9. Genomics of Streptococcus salivarius, a major human commensal.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Renault, Pierre; Guédon, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The salivarius group of streptococci is of particular importance for humans. This group consists of three genetically similar species, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus vestibularis and Streptococcus thermophilus. S. salivarius and S. vestibularis are commensal organisms that may occasionally cause opportunistic infections in humans, whereas S. thermophilus is a food bacterium widely used in dairy production. We developed Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and comparative genomic analysis to confirm the clear separation of these three species. These analyses also identified a subgroup of four strains, with a core genome diverging by about 10%, in terms of its nucleotide sequence, from that of S. salivarius sensu stricto. S. thermophilus species displays a low level of nucleotide variability, due to its recent emergence with the development of agriculture. By contrast, nucleotide variability is high in the other two species of the salivarius group, reflecting their long-standing association with humans. The species of the salivarius group have genome sizes ranging from the smallest (∼ 1.7 Mb for S. thermophilus) to the largest (∼ 2.3 Mb for S. salivarius) among streptococci, reflecting genome reduction linked to a narrow, nutritionally rich environment for S. thermophilus, and natural, more competitive niches for the other two species. Analyses of genomic content have indicated that the core genes of S. salivarius account for about two thirds of the genome, indicating considerable variability of gene content and differences in potential adaptive features. Furthermore, we showed that the genome of this species is exceptionally rich in genes encoding surface factors, glycosyltransferases and response regulators. Evidence of widespread genetic exchanges was obtained, probably involving a natural competence system and the presence of diverse mobile elements. However, although the S. salivarius strains studied were isolated from several human body-related sites

  10. The human genome project: Prospects and implications for clinical medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Green, E.D.; Waterston, R.H. )

    1991-10-09

    The recently initiated human genome project is a large international effort to elucidate the genetic architecture of the genomes of man and several model organisms. The initial phases of this endeavor involve the establishment of rough blueprints (maps) of the genetic landscape of these genomes, with the long-term goal of determining their precise nucleotide sequences and identifying the genes. The knowledge gained by these studies will provide a vital tool for the study of many biologic processes and will have a profound impact on clinical medicine.

  11. Clan Genomics and the Complex Architecture of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, John W.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Human diseases are caused by alleles that encompass the full range of variant types, from single-nucleotide changes to copy-number variants, and these variations span a broad frequency spectrum, from the very rare to the common. The picture emerging from analysis of whole-genome sequences, the 1000 Genomes Project pilot studies, and targeted genomic sequencing derived from very large sample sizes reveals an abundance of rare and private variants. One implication of this realization is that recent mutation may have a greater influence on disease susceptibility or protection than is conferred by variations that arose in distant ancestors. PMID:21962505

  12. A Complex Genome-MicroRNA Interplay in Human Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Santosh; Bhadra, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding regulatory RNA exist in wide spectrum of organisms ranging from prokaryote bacteria to humans. In human, a systematic search for noncoding RNA is mainly limited to the nuclear and cytosolic compartments. To investigate whether endogenous small regulatory RNA are present in cell organelles, human mitochondrial genome was also explored for prediction of precursor microRNA (pre-miRNA) and mature miRNA (miRNA) sequences. Six novel miRNA were predicted from the organelle genome by bioinformatics analysis. The structures are conserved in other five mammals including chimp, orangutan, mouse, rat, and rhesus genome. Experimentally, six human miRNA are well accumulated or deposited in human mitochondria. Three of them are expressed less prominently in Northern analysis. To ascertain their presence in human skeletal muscles, total RNA was extracted from enriched mitochondria by an immunomagnetic method. The expression of six novel pre-miRNA and miRNA was confirmed by Northern blot analysis; however, low level of remaining miRNA was found by sensitive Northern analysis. Their presence is further confirmed by real time RT-PCR. The six miRNA find their multiple targets throughout the human genome in three different types of software. The luciferase assay was used to confirm that MT-RNR2 gene was the potential target of hsa-miR-mit3 and hsa-miR-mit4. PMID:25695052

  13. SFP Genotyping from Affymetrix Arrays is Robust but Largely Detects Cis-acting Expression Regulators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent development of Affymetrix chips designed from assembled EST sequences has spawned considerable interest in identifying single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs) from transcriptome data. SFPs are valuable genetic markers that potentially offer a physical link to the structural genes themselves....

  14. Genomic signatures of diet-related shifts during human origins

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Courtney C.; Warner, Lisa R.; Fedrigo, Olivier; Wall, Christine E.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous anthropological analyses concerning the importance of diet during human evolution. Diet is thought to have had a profound influence on the human phenotype, and dietary differences have been hypothesized to contribute to the dramatic morphological changes seen in modern humans as compared with non-human primates. Here, we attempt to integrate the results of new genomic studies within this well-developed anthropological context. We then review the current evidence for adaptation related to diet, both at the level of sequence changes and gene expression. Finally, we propose some ways in which new technologies can help identify specific genomic adaptations that have resulted in metabolic and morphological differences between humans and non-human primates. PMID:21177690

  15. Beyond The Human Genome: What's Next? (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-05-06

    UC Berkeley's Daniel Rokhsar and his colleagues were instrumental in contributing the sequences for three of the human body's chromosomes in the effort to decipher the blueprint of life- the completion of the DNA sequencing of the human genome. Now he is turning to the structure and function of genes in other organisms, some of them no less important to the planet's future than the human map. Hear the latest in this lecture from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression patterns in purified, uncultured human liver cells and activated hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Andrew H.; Coll, Mar; Verhulst, Stefaan; Mannaerts, Inge; Øie, Cristina I.; Smedsrød, Bård; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Luttun, Aernout; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Collas, Philippe; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver fibrogenesis – scarring of the liver that can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer – is characterized by hepatocyte impairment, capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. To date, the molecular determinants of a healthy human liver cell phenotype remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we assess the transcriptome and the genome-wide promoter methylome specific for purified, non-cultured human hepatocytes, LSECs and HSCs, and investigate the nature of epigenetic changes accompanying transcriptional changes associated with activation of HSCs. Material and methods Gene expression profile and promoter methylome of purified, uncultured human liver cells and culture-activated HSCs were respectively determined using Affymetrix HG-U219 genechips and by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation coupled to promoter array hybridization. Histone modification patterns were assessed at the single-gene level by chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR. Results We unveil a DNA-methylation-based epigenetic relationship between hepatocytes, LSECs and HSCs despite their distinct ontogeny. We show that liver cell type-specific DNA methylation targets early developmental and differentiation-associated functions. Integrative analysis of promoter methylome and transcriptome reveals partial concordance between DNA methylation and transcriptional changes associated with human HSC activation. Further, we identify concordant histone methylation and acetylation changes in the promoter and putative novel enhancer elements of genes involved in liver fibrosis. Conclusions Our study provides the first epigenetic blueprint of three distinct freshly isolated, human hepatic cell types and of epigenetic changes elicited upon HSC activation. PMID:26353929

  17. Who Are the Okinawans? Ancestry, Genome Diversity, and Implications for the Genetic Study of Human Longevity From a Geographically Isolated Population

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Wen-Chi; He, Qimei; Willcox, D. Craig; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Donlon, Timothy A.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Suzuki, Makoto; Willcox, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated populations have advantages for genetic studies of longevity from decreased haplotype diversity and long-range linkage disequilibrium. This permits smaller sample sizes without loss of power, among other utilities. Little is known about the genome of the Okinawans, a potential population isolate, recognized for longevity. Therefore, we assessed genetic diversity, structure, and admixture in Okinawans, and compared this with Caucasians, Chinese, Japanese, and Africans from HapMap II, genotyped on the same Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K array. Principal component analysis, haplotype coverage, and linkage disequilibrium decay revealed a distinct Okinawan genome—more homogeneity, less haplotype diversity, and longer range linkage disequilibrium. Population structure and admixture analyses utilizing 52 global reference populations from the Human Genome Diversity Cell Line Panel demonstrated that Okinawans clustered almost exclusively with East Asians. Sibling relative risk (λs) analysis revealed that siblings of Okinawan centenarians have 3.11 times (females) and 3.77 times (males) more likelihood of centenarianism. These findings suggest that Okinawans are genetically distinct and share several characteristics of a population isolate, which are prone to develop extreme phenotypes (eg, longevity) from genetic drift, natural selection, and population bottlenecks. These data support further exploration of genetic influence on longevity in the Okinawans. PMID:24444611

  18. The implications of the Human Genome Project for family practice.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, L A

    1992-09-01

    The Human Genome Project is an international effort to map and sequence the human genome. The information it will generate has been referred to by some as the "new anatomy," and may play an important role in the future of medicine. However, as with any new technological advancement, the outcome of the Human Genome Project and the subsequent availability of new technology will raise a myriad of ethical, legal, and social concerns. The fear is that this technology will be applied in the clinical setting before the appropriate infrastructure is in place to deal with the issues it will raise. The family physician, far from being merely an interested observer in this process, will be responsible for the delivery of much of this technology as it becomes available. As an intermediary between the technology and the individual patient, the physician has a unique obligation to join in the thoughtful consideration and debate of these issues. PMID:1517727

  19. Genomic imprinting: mechanism and role in human pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, B.

    1994-01-01

    Most genes are expressed from two alleles, one maternal and the other paternal. The term "genomic imprinting" refers to a genetic phenomenon which produces some interesting exceptions to this rule. Genes which are subject to imprinting are molecularly marked before fertilization such that they are transcriptionally silenced at one of the parental alleles in the offspring. A growing body of evidence implicates genomic imprinting in the pathogenesis of certain human genetic diseases, inherited tumor syndromes, and sporadic tumors. This review discusses examples of imprinting, theories as to why the phenomenon exists, possible molecular mechanisms of imprinting, and our current understanding of the role of imprinting in human pathology. PMID:8129028

  20. A draft annotation and overview of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Fred A; Lemon, William J; Zhao, Wei D; Sears, Russell; Zhuo, Degen; Wang, Jian-Ping; Yang, Hee-Yung; Baer, Troy; Stredney, Don; Spitzner, Joe; Stutz, Al; Krahe, Ralf; Yuan, Bo

    2001-01-01

    Background The recent draft assembly of the human genome provides a unified basis for describing genomic structure and function. The draft is sufficiently accurate to provide useful annotation, enabling direct observations of previously inferred biological phenomena. Results We report here a functionally annotated human gene index placed directly on the genome. The index is based on the integration of public transcript, protein, and mapping information, supplemented with computational prediction. We describe numerous global features of the genome and examine the relationship of various genetic maps with the assembly. In addition, initial sequence analysis reveals highly ordered chromosomal landscapes associated with paralogous gene clusters and distinct functional compartments. Finally, these annotation data were synthesized to produce observations of gene density and number that accord well with historical estimates. Such a global approach had previously been described only for chromosomes 21 and 22, which together account for 2.2% of the genome. Conclusions We estimate that the genome contains 65,000-75,000 transcriptional units, with exon sequences comprising 4%. The creation of a comprehensive gene index requires the synthesis of all available computational and experimental evidence. PMID:11516338

  1. The genomic landscape of polymorphic human nuclear mitochondrial insertions

    PubMed Central

    Dayama, Gargi; Emery, Sarah B.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Mills, Ryan E.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of mitochondrial genetic material into the nuclear genomes of eukaryotes is a well-established phenomenon that has been previously limited to the study of static reference genomes. The recent advancement of high throughput sequencing has enabled an expanded exploration into the diversity of polymorphic nuclear mitochondrial insertions (NumtS) within human populations. We have developed an approach to discover and genotype novel Numt insertions using whole genome, paired-end sequencing data. We have applied this method to a thousand individuals in 20 populations from the 1000 Genomes Project and other datasets and identified 141 new sites of Numt insertions, extending our current knowledge of existing NumtS by almost 20%. We find that recent Numt insertions are derived from throughout the mitochondrial genome, including the D-loop, and have integration biases that differ in some respects from previous studies on older, fixed NumtS in the reference genome. We determined the complete inserted sequence for a subset of these events and have identified a number of nearly full-length mitochondrial genome insertions into nuclear chromosomes. We further define their age and origin of insertion and present an analysis of their potential impact to ongoing studies of mitochondrial heteroplasmy and disease. PMID:25348406

  2. The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Kerstin; Clark, Matthew D.; Torroja, Carlos F.; Torrance, James; Berthelot, Camille; Muffato, Matthieu; Collins, John E.; Humphray, Sean; McLaren, Karen; Matthews, Lucy; McLaren, Stuart; Sealy, Ian; Caccamo, Mario; Churcher, Carol; Scott, Carol; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Koch, Romke; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; White, Simon; Chow, William; Kilian, Britt; Quintais, Leonor T.; Guerra-Assunção, José A.; Zhou, Yi; Gu, Yong; Yen, Jennifer; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Eyre, Tina; Redmond, Seth; Banerjee, Ruby; Chi, Jianxiang; Fu, Beiyuan; Langley, Elizabeth; Maguire, Sean F.; Laird, Gavin K.; Lloyd, David; Kenyon, Emma; Donaldson, Sarah; Sehra, Harminder; Almeida-King, Jeff; Loveland, Jane; Trevanion, Stephen; Jones, Matt; Quail, Mike; Willey, Dave; Hunt, Adrienne; Burton, John; Sims, Sarah; McLay, Kirsten; Plumb, Bob; Davis, Joy; Clee, Chris; Oliver, Karen; Clark, Richard; Riddle, Clare; Eliott, David; Threadgold, Glen; Harden, Glenn; Ware, Darren; Mortimer, Beverly; Kerry, Giselle; Heath, Paul; Phillimore, Benjamin; Tracey, Alan; Corby, Nicole; Dunn, Matthew; Johnson, Christopher; Wood, Jonathan; Clark, Susan; Pelan, Sarah; Griffiths, Guy; Smith, Michelle; Glithero, Rebecca; Howden, Philip; Barker, Nicholas; Stevens, Christopher; Harley, Joanna; Holt, Karen; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Lovell, Jamieson; Beasley, Helen; Henderson, Carl; Gordon, Daria; Auger, Katherine; Wright, Deborah; Collins, Joanna; Raisen, Claire; Dyer, Lauren; Leung, Kenric; Robertson, Lauren; Ambridge, Kirsty; Leongamornlert, Daniel; McGuire, Sarah; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Griffiths, Coline; Manthravadi, Deepa; Nichol, Sarah; Barker, Gary; Whitehead, Siobhan; Kay, Michael; Brown, Jacqueline; Murnane, Clare; Gray, Emma; Humphries, Matthew; Sycamore, Neil; Barker, Darren; Saunders, David; Wallis, Justene; Babbage, Anne; Hammond, Sian; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, Maryam; Barr, Lucy; Martin, Sancha; Wray, Paul; Ellington, Andrew; Matthews, Nicholas; Ellwood, Matthew; Woodmansey, Rebecca; Clark, Graham; Cooper, James; Tromans, Anthony; Grafham, Darren; Skuce, Carl; Pandian, Richard; Andrews, Robert; Harrison, Elliot; Kimberley, Andrew; Garnett, Jane; Fosker, Nigel; Hall, Rebekah; Garner, Patrick; Kelly, Daniel; Bird, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Gehring, Ines; Berger, Andrea; Dooley, Christopher M.; Ersan-Ürün, Zübeyde; Eser, Cigdem; Geiger, Horst; Geisler, Maria; Karotki, Lena; Kirn, Anette; Konantz, Judith; Konantz, Martina; Oberländer, Martina; Rudolph-Geiger, Silke; Teucke, Mathias; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Rapp, Amanda; Widaa, Sara; Langford, Cordelia; Yang, Fengtang; Carter, Nigel P.; Harrow, Jennifer; Ning, Zemin; Herrero, Javier; Searle, Steve M. J.; Enright, Anton; Geisler, Robert; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.; Lee, Charles; Westerfield, Monte; de Jong, Pieter J.; Zon, Leonard I.; Postlethwait, John H.; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Hubbard, Tim J. P.; Crollius, Hugues Roest; Rogers, Jane; Stemple, Derek L.

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have become a popular organism for the study of vertebrate gene function1,2. The virtually transparent embryos of this species, and the ability to accelerate genetic studies by gene knockdown or overexpression, have led to the widespread use of zebrafish in the detailed investigation of vertebrate gene function and increasingly, the study of human genetic disease3–5. However, for effective modelling of human genetic disease it is important to understand the extent to which zebrafish genes and gene structures are related to orthologous human genes. To examine this, we generated a high-quality sequence assembly of the zebrafish genome, made up of an overlapping set of completely sequenced large-insert clones that were ordered and oriented using a high-resolution high-density meiotic map. Detailed automatic and manual annotation provides evidence of more than 26,000 protein-coding genes6, the largest gene set of any vertebrate so far sequenced. Comparison to the human reference genome shows that approximately 70% of human genes have at least one obvious zebrafish orthologue. In addition, the high quality of this genome assembly provides a clearer understanding of key genomic features such as a unique repeat content, a scarcity of pseudogenes, an enrichment of zebrafish-specific genes on chromosome 4 and chromosomal regions that influence sex determination. PMID:23594743

  3. The zebrafish reference genome sequence and its relationship to the human genome.

    PubMed

    Howe, Kerstin; Clark, Matthew D; Torroja, Carlos F; Torrance, James; Berthelot, Camille; Muffato, Matthieu; Collins, John E; Humphray, Sean; McLaren, Karen; Matthews, Lucy; McLaren, Stuart; Sealy, Ian; Caccamo, Mario; Churcher, Carol; Scott, Carol; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Koch, Romke; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; White, Simon; Chow, William; Kilian, Britt; Quintais, Leonor T; Guerra-Assunção, José A; Zhou, Yi; Gu, Yong; Yen, Jennifer; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Eyre, Tina; Redmond, Seth; Banerjee, Ruby; Chi, Jianxiang; Fu, Beiyuan; Langley, Elizabeth; Maguire, Sean F; Laird, Gavin K; Lloyd, David; Kenyon, Emma; Donaldson, Sarah; Sehra, Harminder; Almeida-King, Jeff; Loveland, Jane; Trevanion, Stephen; Jones, Matt; Quail, Mike; Willey, Dave; Hunt, Adrienne; Burton, John; Sims, Sarah; McLay, Kirsten; Plumb, Bob; Davis, Joy; Clee, Chris; Oliver, Karen; Clark, Richard; Riddle, Clare; Elliot, David; Eliott, David; Threadgold, Glen; Harden, Glenn; Ware, Darren; Begum, Sharmin; Mortimore, Beverley; Mortimer, Beverly; Kerry, Giselle; Heath, Paul; Phillimore, Benjamin; Tracey, Alan; Corby, Nicole; Dunn, Matthew; Johnson, Christopher; Wood, Jonathan; Clark, Susan; Pelan, Sarah; Griffiths, Guy; Smith, Michelle; Glithero, Rebecca; Howden, Philip; Barker, Nicholas; Lloyd, Christine; Stevens, Christopher; Harley, Joanna; Holt, Karen; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Lovell, Jamieson; Beasley, Helen; Henderson, Carl; Gordon, Daria; Auger, Katherine; Wright, Deborah; Collins, Joanna; Raisen, Claire; Dyer, Lauren; Leung, Kenric; Robertson, Lauren; Ambridge, Kirsty; Leongamornlert, Daniel; McGuire, Sarah; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Griffiths, Coline; Manthravadi, Deepa; Nichol, Sarah; Barker, Gary; Whitehead, Siobhan; Kay, Michael; Brown, Jacqueline; Murnane, Clare; Gray, Emma; Humphries, Matthew; Sycamore, Neil; Barker, Darren; Saunders, David; Wallis, Justene; Babbage, Anne; Hammond, Sian; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, Maryam; Barr, Lucy; Martin, Sancha; Wray, Paul; Ellington, Andrew; Matthews, Nicholas; Ellwood, Matthew; Woodmansey, Rebecca; Clark, Graham; Cooper, James D; Cooper, James; Tromans, Anthony; Grafham, Darren; Skuce, Carl; Pandian, Richard; Andrews, Robert; Harrison, Elliot; Kimberley, Andrew; Garnett, Jane; Fosker, Nigel; Hall, Rebekah; Garner, Patrick; Kelly, Daniel; Bird, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Gehring, Ines; Berger, Andrea; Dooley, Christopher M; Ersan-Ürün, Zübeyde; Eser, Cigdem; Geiger, Horst; Geisler, Maria; Karotki, Lena; Kirn, Anette; Konantz, Judith; Konantz, Martina; Oberländer, Martina; Rudolph-Geiger, Silke; Teucke, Mathias; Lanz, Christa; Raddatz, Günter; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Rapp, Amanda; Widaa, Sara; Langford, Cordelia; Yang, Fengtang; Schuster, Stephan C; Carter, Nigel P; Harrow, Jennifer; Ning, Zemin; Herrero, Javier; Searle, Steve M J; Enright, Anton; Geisler, Robert; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Lee, Charles; Westerfield, Monte; de Jong, Pieter J; Zon, Leonard I; Postlethwait, John H; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Hubbard, Tim J P; Roest Crollius, Hugues; Rogers, Jane; Stemple, Derek L

    2013-04-25

    Zebrafish have become a popular organism for the study of vertebrate gene function. The virtually transparent embryos of this species, and the ability to accelerate genetic studies by gene knockdown or overexpression, have led to the widespread use of zebrafish in the detailed investigation of vertebrate gene function and increasingly, the study of human genetic disease. However, for effective modelling of human genetic disease it is important to understand the extent to which zebrafish genes and gene structures are related to orthologous human genes. To examine this, we generated a high-quality sequence assembly of the zebrafish genome, made up of an overlapping set of completely sequenced large-insert clones that were ordered and oriented using a high-resolution high-density meiotic map. Detailed automatic and manual annotation provides evidence of more than 26,000 protein-coding genes, the largest gene set of any vertebrate so far sequenced. Comparison to the human reference genome shows that approximately 70% of human genes have at least one obvious zebrafish orthologue. In addition, the high quality of this genome assembly provides a clearer understanding of key genomic features such as a unique repeat content, a scarcity of pseudogenes, an enrichment of zebrafish-specific genes on chromosome 4 and chromosomal regions that influence sex determination. PMID:23594743

  4. Genomics and the Ark: an ecocentric perspective on human history.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Hub; Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Views of ourselves in relationship to the rest of the biosphere are changing. Theocentric and anthropocentric perspectives are giving way to more ecocentric views on the history, present, and future of humankind. Novel sciences, such as genomics, have deepened and broadened our understanding of the process of anthropogenesis, the coming into being of humans. Genomics suggests that early human history must be regarded as a complex narrative of evolving ecosystems, in which human evolution both influenced and was influenced by the evolution of companion species. During the agricultural revolution, human beings designed small-scale artificial ecosystems or evolutionary "Arks," in which networks of plants, animals, and microorganisms coevolved. Currently, our attitude towards this process seems subject to a paradoxical reversal. The boundaries of the Ark have dramatically broadened, and genomics is not only being used to increase our understanding of our ecological past, but may also help us to conserve, reconstruct, or even revivify species and ecosystems to whose degradation or (near) extinction we have contributed. This article explores the role of genomics in the elaboration of a more ecocentric view of ourselves with the help of two examples, namely the renaissance of Paleolithic diets and of Pleistocene parks. It argues that an understanding of the world in ecocentric terms requires new partnerships and mutually beneficial forms of collaboration and convergence between life sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. PMID:21532135

  5. A community assessment of privacy preserving techniques for human genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To answer the need for the rigorous protection of biomedical data, we organized the Critical Assessment of Data Privacy and Protection initiative as a community effort to evaluate privacy-preserving dissemination techniques for biomedical data. We focused on the challenge of sharing aggregate human genomic data (e.g., allele frequencies) in a way that preserves the privacy of the data donors, without undermining the utility of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or impeding their dissemination. Specifically, we designed two problems for disseminating the raw data and the analysis outcome, respectively, based on publicly available data from HapMap and from the Personal Genome Project. A total of six teams participated in the challenges. The final results were presented at a workshop of the iDASH (integrating Data for Analysis, 'anonymization,' and SHaring) National Center for Biomedical Computing. We report the results of the challenge and our findings about the current genome privacy protection techniques. PMID:25521230

  6. Genome Rearrangements in Mammalian Evolution: Lessons From Human and Mouse Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Pevzner, Pavel; Tesler, Glenn

    2003-01-01

    Although analysis of genome rearrangements was pioneered by Dobzhansky and Sturtevant 65 years ago, we still know very little about the rearrangement events that produced the existing varieties of genomic architectures. The genomic sequences of human and mouse provide evidence for a larger number of rearrangements than previously thought and shed some light on previously unknown features of mammalian evolution. In particular, they reveal that a large number of microrearrangements is required to explain the differences in draft human and mouse sequences. Here we describe a new algorithm for constructing synteny blocks, study arrangements of synteny blocks in human and mouse, derive a most parsimonious human–mouse rearrangement scenario, and provide evidence that intrachromosomal rearrangements are more frequent than interchromosomal rearrangements. Our analysis is based on the human–mouse breakpoint graph, which reveals related breakpoints and allows one to find a most parsimonious scenario. Because these graphs provide important insights into rearrangement scenarios, we introduce a new visualization tool that allows one to view breakpoint graphs superimposed with genomic dot-plots. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org.] PMID:12529304

  7. The shared genomic architecture of human nucleolar organizer regions

    PubMed Central

    Floutsakou, Ioanna; Agrawal, Saumya; Nguyen, Thong T.; Seoighe, Cathal; Ganley, Austen R.D.; McStay, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The short arms of the five acrocentric human chromosomes harbor sequences that direct the assembly and function of the nucleolus, one of the key functional domains of the nucleus, yet they are absent from the current human genome assembly. Here we describe the genomic architecture of these human nucleolar organizers. Sequences distal and proximal to ribosomal gene arrays are conserved among the acrocentric chromosomes, suggesting they are sites of frequent recombination. Although previously believed to be heterochromatic, characterization of these two flanking regions reveals that they share a complex genomic architecture similar to other euchromatic regions of the genome, but they have distinct genomic characteristics. Proximal sequences are almost entirely segmentally duplicated, similar to the regions bordering centromeres. In contrast, the distal sequence is predominantly unique to the acrocentric short arms and is dominated by a very large inverted repeat. We show that the distal element is localized to the periphery of the nucleolus, where it appears to anchor the ribosomal gene repeats. This, combined with its complex chromatin structure and transcriptional activity, suggests that this region is involved in nucleolar organization. Our results provide a platform for investigating the role of NORs in nucleolar formation and function, and open the door for determining the role of these regions in the well-known empirical association of nucleoli with pathology. PMID:23990606

  8. ENGINES: exploring single nucleotide variation in entire human genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Next generation ultra-sequencing technologies are starting to produce extensive quantities of data from entire human genome or exome sequences, and therefore new software is needed to present and analyse this vast amount of information. The 1000 Genomes project has recently released raw data for 629 complete genomes representing several human populations through their Phase I interim analysis and, although there are certain public tools available that allow exploration of these genomes, to date there is no tool that permits comprehensive population analysis of the variation catalogued by such data. Description We have developed a genetic variant site explorer able to retrieve data for Single Nucleotide Variation (SNVs), population by population, from entire genomes without compromising future scalability and agility. ENGINES (ENtire Genome INterface for Exploring SNVs) uses data from the 1000 Genomes Phase I to demonstrate its capacity to handle large amounts of genetic variation (>7.3 billion genotypes and 28 million SNVs), as well as deriving summary statistics of interest for medical and population genetics applications. The whole dataset is pre-processed and summarized into a data mart accessible through a web interface. The query system allows the combination and comparison of each available population sample, while searching by rs-number list, chromosome region, or genes of interest. Frequency and FST filters are available to further refine queries, while results can be visually compared with other large-scale Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) repositories such as HapMap or Perlegen. Conclusions ENGINES is capable of accessing large-scale variation data repositories in a fast and comprehensive manner. It allows quick browsing of whole genome variation, while providing statistical information for each variant site such as allele frequency, heterozygosity or FST values for genetic differentiation. Access to the data mart generating scripts and to

  9. Data mining and the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Abarbanel, Henry; Callan, Curtis; Dally, William; Dyson, Freeman; Hwa, Terence; Koonin, Steven; Levine, Herbert; Rothaus, Oscar; Schwitters, Roy; Stubbs, Christopher; Weinberger, Peter

    2000-01-07

    As genomics research moves from an era of data acquisition to one of both acquisition and interpretation, new methods are required for organizing and prioritizing the data. These methods would allow an initial level of data analysis to be carried out before committing resources to a particular genetic locus. This JASON study sought to delineate the main problems that must be faced in bioinformatics and to identify information technologies that can help to overcome those problems. While the current influx of data greatly exceeds what biologists have experienced in the past, other scientific disciplines and the commercial sector have been handling much larger datasets for many years. Powerful datamining techniques have been developed in other fields that, with appropriate modification, could be applied to the biological sciences.

  10. Somatic Mosaicism in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Donald; Stevens, Eric L.; Pevsner, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mosaicism refers to the occurrence of two genetically distinct populations of cells within an individual, derived from a postzygotic mutation. In contrast to inherited mutations, somatic mosaic mutations may affect only a portion of the body and are not transmitted to progeny. These mutations affect varying genomic sizes ranging from single nucleotides to entire chromosomes and have been implicated in disease, most prominently cancer. The phenotypic consequences of somatic mosaicism are dependent upon many factors including the developmental time at which the mutation occurs, the areas of the body that are affected, and the pathophysiological effect(s) of the mutation. The advent of second-generation sequencing technologies has augmented existing array-based and cytogenetic approaches for the identification of somatic mutations. We outline the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques and highlight recent insights into the role of somatic mosaicism in causing cancer, neurodegenerative, monogenic, and complex disease. PMID:25513881

  11. An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of transcription, transcription factor association, chromatin structure and histone modification. These data enabled us to assign biochemical functions for 80% of the genome, in particular outside of the well-studied protein-coding regions. Many discovered candidate regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and with expressed genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene regulation. The newly identified elements also show a statistical correspondence to sequence variants linked to human disease, and can thereby guide interpretation of this variation. Overall, the project provides new insights into the organization and regulation of our genes and genome, and is an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research. PMID:22955616

  12. An Integrated Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of transcription, transcription factor association, chromatin structure, and histone modification. These data enabled us to assign biochemical functions for 80% of the genome, in particular outside of the well-studied protein-coding regions. Many discovered candidate regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and with expressed genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene regulation. The newly identified elements also show a statistical correspondence to sequence variants linked to human disease, and can thereby guide interpretation of this variation. Overall the project provides new insights into the organization and regulation of our genes and genome, and an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research. PMID:22955616

  13. 75 FR 80509 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  13. MIR retrotransposon sequences provide insulators to the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianrong; Vicente-García, Cristina; Seruggia, Davide; Moltó, Eduardo; Fernandez-Miñán, Ana; Neto, Ana; Lee, Elbert; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Montoliu, Lluís; Lunyak, Victoria V.; Jordan, I. King

    2015-01-01

    Insulators are regulatory elements that help to organize eukaryotic chromatin via enhancer-blocking and chromatin barrier activity. Although there are several examples of transposable element (TE)-derived insulators, the contribution of TEs to human insulators has not been systematically explored. Mammalian-wide interspersed repeats (MIRs) are a conserved family of TEs that have substantial regulatory capacity and share sequence characteristics with tRNA-related insulators. We sought to evaluate whether MIRs can serve as insulators in the human genome. We applied a bioinformatic screen using genome sequence and functional genomic data from CD4+ T cells to identify a set of 1,178 predicted MIR insulators genome-wide. These predicted MIR insulators were computationally tested to serve as chromatin barriers and regulators of gene expression in CD4+ T cells. The activity of predicted MIR insulators was experimentally validated using in vitro and in vivo enhancer-blocking assays. MIR insulators are enriched around genes of the T-cell receptor pathway and reside at T-cell–specific boundaries of repressive and active chromatin. A total of 58% of the MIR insulators predicted here show evidence of T-cell–specific chromatin barrier and gene regulatory activity. MIR insulators appear to be CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) independent and show a distinct local chromatin environment with marked peaks for RNA Pol III and a number of histone modifications, suggesting that MIR insulators recruit transcriptional complexes and chromatin modifying enzymes in situ to help establish chromatin and regulatory domains in the human genome. The provisioning of insulators by MIRs across the human genome suggests a specific mechanism by which TE sequences can be used to modulate gene regulatory networks. PMID:26216945

  14. Using the Human Genome: A Case Study in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, John A.

    2002-01-01

    The working drafts of the human genome, announced in February 2001, have clearly provided a breakthrough in biochemistry and molecular biology research. The scientific data also provide an opportunity to vary a typical approach to teaching. Advanced graduate students at our university can elect to take a course in molecular genetics. The human…

  15. Clan genomics and the complex architecture of human disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human diseases (diabetes, etc.) are caused by alleles that encompass the full range of variant types, from single-nucleotide changes to copy-number variants, and these variations span a broad frequency spectrum, from the very rare to the common. The picture emerging from analysis of whole-genome seq...

  16. Head of Human Genome Project Retracts 5 Journal Articles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Karla

    1996-01-01

    Five published leukemia studies have been retracted by the director of the Human Genome Project because they were based on falsified data from a graduate student, although some of the conclusions are still supported. Inconsistencies were discovered by a peer reviewer and were also found in the student's other work. (MSE)

  17. Enhancing Biology Instruction with the Human Genome Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxeda, Rosa J.; Moore-Russo, Deborah A.

    2003-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a recent scientific milestone that has received notable attention. This article shows how a biology course is using the HGP to enhance students' experiences by providing awareness of cutting edge research, with information on new emerging career options, and with opportunities to consider ethical questions raised…

  18. The Human Genome Project: Biology, Computers, and Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutter, Mary Ann G.; Drexler, Edward; Gottesman, Kay S.; Goulding, Philip G.; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Micikas, Lynda B.; Mural, Richard J.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Zola, John

    This module, for high school teachers, is the second of two modules about the Human Genome Project (HGP) produced by the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). The first section of this module provides background information for teachers about the structure and objectives of the HGP, aspects of the science and technology that underlie the…

  19. Theories of Visual Rhetoric: Looking at the Human Genome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Considers how visuals are constructions that are products of a writer's interpretation with its own "power-laden agenda." Reviews the current approach taken by composition scholars, surveys richer interdisciplinary work on visuals, and (by using visuals connected with the Human Genome Project) models an analysis of visuals as rhetoric. (SG)

  20. Human Genome Program Report. Part 1, Overview and Progress

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  1. Human Genome Program Report. Part 2, 1996 Research Abstracts

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

  2. DOE Human Genome Program contractor-grantee workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings for the DOE Human Genome Program`s Contractor-Grantee Workshop V held in Sante Fe, New Mexico January 28, February 1, 1996. Presentations were divided into sessions entitled Sequencing; Mapping; Informatics; Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues; and Infrastructure. Reports of individual projects described herein are separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

  3. Pervasive sequence patents cover the entire human genome.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Mason, Christopher E

    2013-01-01

    The scope and eligibility of patents for genetic sequences have been debated for decades, but a critical case regarding gene patents (Association of Molecular Pathologists v. Myriad Genetics) is now reaching the US Supreme Court. Recent court rulings have supported the assertion that such patents can provide intellectual property rights on sequences as small as 15 nucleotides (15mers), but an analysis of all current US patent claims and the human genome presented here shows that 15mer sequences from all human genes match at least one other gene. The average gene matches 364 other genes as 15mers; the breast-cancer-associated gene BRCA1 has 15mers matching at least 689 other genes. Longer sequences (1,000 bp) still showed extensive cross-gene matches. Furthermore, 15mer-length claims from bovine and other animal patents could also claim as much as 84% of the genes in the human genome. In addition, when we expanded our analysis to full-length patent claims on DNA from all US patents to date, we found that 41% of the genes in the human genome have been claimed. Thus, current patents for both short and long nucleotide sequences are extraordinarily non-specific and create an uncertain, problematic liability for genomic medicine, especially in regard to targeted re-sequencing and other sequence diagnostic assays. PMID:23522065

  4. A ROAD MAP FOR EFFICIENT AND RELIABLE HUMAN GENOME EPIDEMIOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Network of investigators have begun sharing best practices, tools, and methods for analysis of associations between genetic variation and common diseases. A Network of Investigator Networks has been set up to drive the process, sponsored by the Human Genome Epidemiology Network. A workshop is planne...

  5. Human genome program report. Part 1, overview and progress

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 1 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 1 consists of the program overview and report on progress.

  6. Human genome program report. Part 2, 1996 research abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

  7. Computational prediction of human metabolic pathways from the complete human genome

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Pedro; Wagg, Jonathan; Green, Michelle L; Kaiser, Dale; Krummenacker, Markus; Karp, Peter D

    2005-01-01

    Background We present a computational pathway analysis of the human genome that assigns enzymes encoded therein to predicted metabolic pathways. Pathway assignments place genes in their larger biological context, and are a necessary first step toward quantitative modeling of metabolism. Results Our analysis assigns 2,709 human enzymes to 896 bioreactions; 622 of the enzymes are assigned roles in 135 predicted metabolic pathways. The predicted pathways closely match the known nutritional requirements of humans. This analysis identifies probable omissions in the human genome annotation in the form of 203 pathway holes (missing enzymes within the predicted pathways). We have identified putative genes to fill 25 of these holes. The predicted human metabolic map is described by a Pathway/Genome Database called HumanCyc, which is available at . We describe the generation of HumanCyc, and present an analysis of the human metabolic map. For example, we compare the predicted human metabolic pathway complement to the pathways of Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana and identify 35 pathways that are shared among all three organisms. Conclusions Our analysis elucidates a significant portion of the human metabolic map, and also indicates probable unidentified genes in the genome. HumanCyc provides a genome-based view of human nutrition that associates the essential dietary requirements of humans with a set of metabolic pathways whose existence is supported by the human genome. The database places many human genes in a pathway context, thereby facilitating analysis of gene expression, proteomics, and metabolomics datasets through a publicly available online tool called the Omics Viewer. PMID:15642094

  8. Genome sequence of the stramenopile Blastocystis, a human anaerobic parasite

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Blastocystis is a highly prevalent anaerobic eukaryotic parasite of humans and animals that is associated with various gastrointestinal and extraintestinal disorders. Epidemiological studies have identified different subtypes but no one subtype has been definitively correlated with disease. Results Here we report the 18.8 Mb genome sequence of a Blastocystis subtype 7 isolate, which is the smallest stramenopile genome sequenced to date. The genome is highly compact and contains intriguing rearrangements. Comparisons with other available stramenopile genomes (plant pathogenic oomycete and diatom genomes) revealed effector proteins potentially involved in the adaptation to the intestinal environment, which were likely acquired via horizontal gene transfer. Moreover, Blastocystis living in anaerobic conditions harbors mitochondria-like organelles. An incomplete oxidative phosphorylation chain, a partial Krebs cycle, amino acid and fatty acid metabolisms and an iron-sulfur cluster assembly are all predicted to occur in these organelles. Predicted secretory proteins possess putative activities that may alter host physiology, such as proteases, protease-inhibitors, immunophilins and glycosyltransferases. This parasite also possesses the enzymatic machinery to tolerate oxidative bursts resulting from its own metabolism or induced by the host immune system. Conclusions This study provides insights into the genome architecture of this unusual stramenopile. It also proposes candidate genes with which to study the physiopathology of this parasite and thus may lead to further investigations into Blastocystis-host interactions. PMID:21439036

  9. The GDB Human Genome Data Base anno 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Fasman, K H; Cuticchia, A J; Kingsbury, D T

    1994-01-01

    In 1991 the Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine was selected as the central repository for mapping data from the Human Genome Project, and was funded by NIH and DOE under a three year award. GDB has now finished 28 months of Federally funded operation. During this period a great deal of progress and many internal changes have taken place. In addition, many changes have also occurred in the external environment, and GDB has adapted its strategies to play an appropriate role in those changes as well. Recognizing the central role of mapping information in the genome project, it is important that GDB respond aggressively to the increasing demands of genomic researchers, as well as formulate a program of response to a number of long standing, but still unmet, needs of that community. It is even more important that GDB provide leadership in the genome informatics enterprise. Three themes described here are dominant in our future plans and represent the essence of the major changes made in the past year. They include: enhanced data acquisition, better map representation, and full integration into the collection of genomic databases. PMID:7937047

  10. Evolution and Diversity of the Human Hepatitis D Virus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Ruei; Lo, Szecheng J.

    2010-01-01

    Human hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the smallest RNA virus in genome. HDV genome is divided into a viroid-like sequence and a protein-coding sequence which could have originated from different resources and the HDV genome was eventually constituted through RNA recombination. The genome subsequently diversified through accumulation of mutations selected by interactions between the mutated RNA and proteins with host factors to successfully form the infectious virions. Therefore, we propose that the conservation of HDV nucleotide sequence is highly related with its functionality. Genome analysis of known HDV isolates shows that the C-terminal coding sequences of large delta antigen (LDAg) are the highest diversity than other regions of protein-coding sequences but they still retain biological functionality to interact with the heavy chain of clathrin can be selected and maintained. Since viruses interact with many host factors, including escaping the host immune response, how to design a program to predict RNA genome evolution is a great challenging work. PMID:20204073

  11. Motif effects in Affymetrix GeneChips seriously affect probe intensities

    PubMed Central

    Upton, Graham J. G.; Harrison, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    An Affymetrix GeneChip consists of an array of hundreds of thousands of probes (each a sequence of 25 bases) with the probe values being used to infer the extent to which genes are expressed in the biological material under investigation. In this article, we demonstrate that these probe values are also strongly influenced by their precise base sequence. We use data from >28 000 CEL files relating to 10 different Affymetrix GeneChip platforms and involving nearly 1000 experiments. Our results confirm known effects (those due to the T7-primer and the formation of G-quadruplexes) but reveal other effects. We show that there can be huge variations from one experiment to another, and that there may also be sizeable disparities between batches within an experiment and between CEL files within a batch. PMID:22904084

  12. A Catalog of Reference Genomes from the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The human microbiome refers to the community of microorganisms including prokaryotes, viruses and microbial eukaryotes that populate the human body. The National Institutes of Health launched an initiative that focuses describing the diversity of microbial species associated with health and disease. The first phase of this initiative includes the sequencing of hundreds of microbial reference genomes, coupled to metagenomic sequencing from multiple body sites. Here we present results from an initial reference genome sequencing of 178 microbial genomes. From 547,968 predicted polypeptides that correspond to the gene complement of these strains “novel” polypeptides that had both unmasked sequence length > 100 amino acids and no BLASTP match to any non-reference entry in the nr subset were defined. This analysis resulted in a set of 30,867 polypeptides, of which 29,987 (~97%) were unique. In addition, this set of microbial genomes allows for ~ 40% of random sequences from the microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract to be associated with organisms based on the match criteria used. Insights into pan-genome analysis suggest that we are still far from saturating microbial species genetic datasets. In addition, the associated metrics and standards used by the group for quality assurance are presented. PMID:20489017

  13. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  14. Normalization of Affymetrix miRNA Microarrays for the Analysis of Cancer Samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Gantier, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    microRNA (miRNA) microarray normalization is a critical step for the identification of truly differentially expressed miRNAs. This is particularly important when dealing with cancer samples that have a global miRNA decrease. In this chapter, we provide a simple step-by-step procedure that can be used to normalize Affymetrix miRNA microarrays, relying on robust normal-exponential background correction with cyclic loess normalization. PMID:25971910

  15. A comparison of statistical tests for detecting differential expression using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Blakemore, Steven J; Clark, Steven M; Ghosh, Sujoy; Stephens, Richard J; Rajagopalan, Dilip

    2006-01-01

    Signal quantification and detection of differential expression are critical steps in the analysis of Affymetrix microarray data. Many methods have been proposed in the literature for each of these steps. The goal of this paper is to evaluate several signal quantification methods (GCRMA, RSVD, VSN, MAS5, and Resolver) and statistical methods for differential expression (t test, Cyber-T, SAM, LPE, RankProducts, Resolver RatioBuild). Our particular focus is on the ability to detect differential expression via statistical tests. We have used two different datasets for our evaluation. First, we have used the HG-U133 Latin Square spike in dataset developed by Affymetrix. Second, we have used data from an in-house rat liver transcriptomics study following 30 different drug treatments generated using the Affymetrix RAE230A chip. Our overall recommendation based on this study is to use GCRMA for signal quantification. For detection of differential expression, GCRMA coupled with Cyber-T or SAM is the best approach, as measured by area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The integrated pipeline in Resolver RatioBuild combining signal quantification and detection of differential expression is an equally good alternative for detecting differentially expressed genes. For most of the differential expression algorithms we considered, the performance using MAS5 signal quantification was inferior to that of the other methods we evaluated. PMID:17233564

  16. Human genome education model project. Ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project: Education of interdisciplinary professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.O.; Lapham, E.V.

    1996-12-31

    This meeting was held June 10, 1996 at Georgetown University. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the human genome education model. Topics of discussion include the following: psychosocial issues; ethical issues for professionals; legislative issues and update; and education issues.

  17. Understanding the Human Genome Project — A Fact Sheet | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Understanding the Human Genome Project — A Fact Sheet Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... billion letters, or base pairs, in the human genome, which is the complete set of DNA in ...

  18. Lineage‐specific genomics: Frequent birth and death in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Frequent evolutionary birth and death events have created a large quantity of biologically important, lineage‐specific DNA within mammalian genomes. The birth and death of DNA sequences is so frequent that the total number of these insertions and deletions in the human population remains unknown, although there are differences between these groups, e.g. transposable elements contribute predominantly to sequence insertion. Functional turnover – where the activity of a locus is specific to one lineage, but the underlying DNA remains conserved – can also drive birth and death. However, this does not appear to be a major driver of divergent transcriptional regulation. Both sequence and functional turnover have contributed to the birth and death of thousands of functional promoters in the human and mouse genomes. These findings reveal the pervasive nature of evolutionary birth and death and suggest that lineage‐specific regions may play an important but previously underappreciated role in human biology and disease. PMID:27231054

  19. Decoding the molecular evolution of human cognition using comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Noriyoshi; Co, Marissa; Konopka, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    Identification of genetic and molecular factors responsible for the specialized cognitive abilities of humans is expected to provide important insights into the mechanisms responsible for disorders of cognition such as autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we discuss the use of comparative genomics for identifying salient genes and gene networks that may underlie cognition. We focus on the comparison of human and non-human primate brain gene expression and the utility of building gene co-expression networks for prioritizing hundreds of genes that differ in expression among the species queried. We also discuss the importance and methods for functional studies of individual genes identified. Together, this integration of comparative genomics with cellular and animal models should provide improved systems for developing effective therapeutics for disorders of cognition. PMID:25247723

  20. Ancient human genomics: the methodology behind reconstructing evolutionary pathways.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Stephanie; Klunk, Jennifer; Devault, Alison; Enk, Jacob; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2015-02-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) has radically altered approaches to human evolutionary research. Recent contributions highlight that HTS is able to reach depths of the human lineage previously thought to be impossible. In this paper, we outline the methodological advances afforded by recent developments in DNA recovery, data output, scalability, speed, and resolution of the current sequencing technology. We review and critically evaluate the 'DNA pipeline' for ancient samples: from DNA extraction, to constructing immortalized sequence libraries, to enrichment strategies (e.g., polymerase chain reaction [PCR] and hybridization capture), and finally, to bioinformatic analyses of sequence data. We argue that continued evaluations and improvements to this process are essential to ensure sequence data validity. Also, we highlight the role of contamination and authentication in ancient DNA-HTS, which is particularly relevant to ancient human genomics, since sequencing the genomes of hominins such as Homo erectus and Homo heidelbergensis may soon be within the realm of possibility. PMID:25601038

  1. Uncovering the role of genomic "dark matter" in human disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lance; Chang, Howard Y

    2012-05-01

    The human genome encodes thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Although most remain functionally uncharacterized biological "dark matter," lncRNAs have garnered considerable attention for their diverse roles in human biology, including developmental programs and tumor suppressor gene networks. As the number of lncRNAs associated with human disease grows, ongoing research efforts are focusing on their regulatory mechanisms. New technologies that enable enumeration of lncRNA interaction partners and determination of lncRNA structure are well positioned to drive deeper understanding of their functions and involvement in pathogenesis. In turn, lncRNAs may become targets for therapeutic intervention or new tools for biotechnology. PMID:22546862

  2. MMBGX: a method for estimating expression at the isoform level and detecting differential splicing using whole-transcript Affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    Turro, Ernest; Lewin, Alex; Rose, Anna; Dallman, Margaret J.; Richardson, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    Affymetrix has recently developed whole-transcript GeneChips—‘Gene’ and ‘Exon’ arrays—which interrogate exons along the length of each gene. Although each probe on these arrays is intended to hybridize perfectly to only one transcriptional target, many probes match multiple transcripts located in different parts of the genome or alternative isoforms of the same gene. Existing statistical methods for estimating expression do not take this into account and are thus prone to producing inflated estimates. We propose a method, Multi-Mapping Bayesian Gene eXpression (MMBGX), which disaggregates the signal at ‘multi-match’ probes. When applied to Gene arrays, MMBGX removes the upward bias of gene-level expression estimates. When applied to Exon arrays, it can further disaggregate the signal between alternative transcripts of the same gene, providing expression estimates of individual splice variants. We demonstrate the performance of MMBGX on simulated data and a tissue mixture data set. We then show that MMBGX can estimate the expression of alternative isoforms within one experimental condition, confirming our results by RT-PCR. Finally, we show that our method for detecting differential splicing has a lower error rate than standard exon-level approaches on a previously validated colon cancer data set. PMID:19854940

  3. Improvements to the GDB Human Genome Data Base.

    PubMed Central

    Fasman, K H; Letovsky, S I; Cottingham, R W; Kingsbury, D T

    1996-01-01

    Version 6.0 of the Human Genome Data Base introduces a number of significant improvements over previous releases of GDB. The most important of these are revised data representations for genes and genomic maps and a new curatorial model for the database. GDB 6.0 is the first major genomic database to provide read/write access directly to the scientific community, including capabilities for third-party annotation. The revised database can represent all major categories of genetic and physical maps, along with the underlying order and distance information used to construct them. The improved representation permits more sophisticated map queries to be posed and supports the graphical display of maps. In addition the new GDB has a richer model for gene information, better suited for supporting cross-references to databases describing gene function, structure, products, expression and associated phenotypes. PMID:8594601

  4. Differentiation and Genomic Instability in a Human Mammary Cell Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R.; Kale, R.; Pettengill, O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Harvest of prophylactic mastectomy specimens from an obligate heterozygote for ataxia-telangiectasia provided autologous fibroblasts as well epithelial cells (HMEC). The routine availability of these autologous cells has provided an opportunity to study cell-cell interactions in coculture and monoculture, and in 3-dimensional cultures grown in the NASA rotating bioreactor. HMEC and stromal fibroblasts grown in 2-dimensional monoculture were both observed to produce extracellular matrix. Similar matrix was encountered in 3-dimensional cultures containing HMEC. Metaphases were analyzed. For stromal fibroblasts, genomic aberrations were found in 18% of metaphase spreads. For HMEC, aberrations were greater such that a majority were found to be abnormal. The level of genomic instability determined for these noncancerous cells in 2-dimensional monoculture should be useful for generating a human cell model that can correlate the effects of differentiation in 3-dimensional coculture on the level of genomic instability.

  5. Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutter, Mary Ann G.; Drexler, Edward; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Rossiter, Belinda; Zola, John

    The human genome project started in 1989 with the collaboration of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document aims to develop an understanding among students of the human genome project and relevant issues. Topics include the science and technology of the human genome project, and the ethical and…

  6. Learning about the Human Genome. Part 2: Resources for Science Educators. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haury, David L.

    This ERIC Digest identifies how the human genome project fits into the "National Science Education Standards" and lists Human Genome Project Web sites found on the World Wide Web. It is a resource companion to "Learning about the Human Genome. Part 1: Challenge to Science Educators" (Haury 2001). The Web resources and instructional materials can…

  7. 75 FR 44800 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The... Genome Research. Date: August 18, 2010. Time: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate...

  8. Genomic organization of ATOX1, a human copper chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Po-Ching; Koeller, David M; Kaler, Stephen G

    2003-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential trace element that plays a critical role in the survival of all living organisms. Menkes disease and occipital horn syndrome (OHS) are allelic disorders of copper transport caused by defects in a X-linked gene (ATP7A) that encodes a P-type ATPase that transports copper across cellular membranes, including the trans-Golgi network. Genetic studies in yeast recently revealed a new family of cytoplasmic proteins called copper chaperones which bind copper ions and deliver them to specific cellular pathways. Biochemical studies of the human homolog of one copper chaperone, ATOX1, indicate direct interaction with the Menkes/OHS protein. Although no disease-associated mutations have been reported in ATOX1, mice with disruption of the ATOX1 locus demonstrate perinatal mortality similar to that observed in the brindled mice (Mobr), a mouse model of Menkes disease. The cDNA sequence for ATOX1 is known, and the genomic organization has not been reported. Results We determined the genomic structure of ATOX1. The gene contains 4 exons spanning a genomic distance of approximately 16 kb. The translation start codon is located in the 3' end of exon 1 and the termination codon in exon 3. We developed a PCR-based assay to amplify the coding regions and splice junctions from genomic DNA. We screened for ATOX1 mutations in two patients with classical Menkes disease phenotypes and one individual with occipital horn syndrome who had no alterations detected in ATP7A, as well as an adult female with chronic anemia, low serum copper and evidence of mild dopamine-beta-hydroxylase deficiency and no alterations in the ATOX1 coding or splice junction sequences were found. Conclusions In this study, we characterized the genomic structure of the human copper chaperone ATOX1 to facilitate screening of this gene from genomic DNA in patients whose clinical or biochemical phenotypes suggest impaired copper transport. PMID:12594858

  9. Genomic leftovers: identifying novel microsatellites, over-represented motifs and functional elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Fonville, Natalie C; Velmurugan, Karthik Raja; Tae, Hongseok; Vaksman, Zalman; McIver, Lauren J; Garner, Harold R

    2016-01-01

    The human genome is 99% complete. This study contributes to filling the 1% gap by enriching previously unknown repeat regions called microsatellites (MST). We devised a Global MST Enrichment (GME) kit to enrich and nextgen sequence 2 colorectal cell lines and 16 normal human samples to illustrate its utility in identifying contigs from reads that do not map to the genome reference. The analysis of these samples yielded 790 novel extra-referential concordant contigs that are observed in more than one sample. We searched for evidence of functional elements in the concordant contigs in two ways: (1) BLAST-ing each contig against normal RNA-Seq samples, (2) Checking for predicted functional elements using GlimmerHMM. Of the 790 concordant contigs, 37 had an exact match to at least one RNA-Seq read; 15 aligned to more than 100 RNA-Seq reads. Of the 249 concordant contigs predicted by GlimmerHMM to have functional elements, 6 had at least one exact RNA-Seq match. BLAST-ing these novel contigs against all publically available sequences confirmed that they were found in human and chimpanzee BAC and FOSMID clones sequenced as part of the original human genome project. These extra-referential contigs predominantly contained pentameric repeats, especially two motifs: AATGG and GTGGA. PMID:27278669

  10. Genomic leftovers: identifying novel microsatellites, over-represented motifs and functional elements in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Fonville, Natalie C.; Velmurugan, Karthik Raja; Tae, Hongseok; Vaksman, Zalman; McIver, Lauren J.; Garner, Harold R.

    2016-01-01

    The human genome is 99% complete. This study contributes to filling the 1% gap by enriching previously unknown repeat regions called microsatellites (MST). We devised a Global MST Enrichment (GME) kit to enrich and nextgen sequence 2 colorectal cell lines and 16 normal human samples to illustrate its utility in identifying contigs from reads that do not map to the genome reference. The analysis of these samples yielded 790 novel extra-referential concordant contigs that are observed in more than one sample. We searched for evidence of functional elements in the concordant contigs in two ways: (1) BLAST-ing each contig against normal RNA-Seq samples, (2) Checking for predicted functional elements using GlimmerHMM. Of the 790 concordant contigs, 37 had an exact match to at least one RNA-Seq read; 15 aligned to more than 100 RNA-Seq reads. Of the 249 concordant contigs predicted by GlimmerHMM to have functional elements, 6 had at least one exact RNA-Seq match. BLAST-ing these novel contigs against all publically available sequences confirmed that they were found in human and chimpanzee BAC and FOSMID clones sequenced as part of the original human genome project. These extra-referential contigs predominantly contained pentameric repeats, especially two motifs: AATGG and GTGGA. PMID:27278669

  11. The d4 gene family in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Chestkov, A.V.; Baka, I.D.; Kost, M.V.

    1996-08-15

    The d4 domain, a novel zinc finger-like structural motif, was first revealed in the rat neuro-d4 protein. Here we demonstrate that the d4 domain is conserved in evolution and that three related genes form a d4 family in the human genome. The human neuro-d4 is very similar to rat neuro-d4 at both the amino acid and the nucleotide levels. Moreover, the same splice variants have been detected among rat and human neuro-d4 transcripts. This gene has been localized on chromosome 19, and two other genes, members of the d4 family isolated by screening of the human genomic library at low stringency, have been mapped to chromosomes 11 and 14. The gene on chromosome 11 is the homolog of the ubiquitously expressed mouse gene ubi-d4/requiem, which is required for cell death after deprivation of trophic factors. A gene with a conserved d4 domain has been found in the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The conservation of d4 proteins from nematodes to vertebrates suggests that they have a general importance, but a diversity of d4 proteins expressed in vertebrate nervous systems suggests that some family members have special functions. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Targets of Balancing Selection in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hubisz, Melissa J.; Indap, Amit; Torgerson, Dara G.; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D.; Boyko, Adam R.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; White, Thomas J.; Green, Eric D.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    Balancing selection is potentially an important biological force for maintaining advantageous genetic diversity in populations, including variation that is responsible for long-term adaptation to the environment. By serving as a means to maintain genetic variation, it may be particularly relevant to maintaining phenotypic variation in natural populations. Nevertheless, its prevalence and specific targets in the human genome remain largely unknown. We have analyzed the patterns of diversity and divergence of 13,400 genes in two human populations using an unbiased single-nucleotide polymorphism data set, a genome-wide approach, and a method that incorporates demography in neutrality tests. We identified an unbiased catalog of genes with signatures of long-term balancing selection, which includes immunity genes as well as genes encoding keratins and membrane channels; the catalog also shows enrichment in functional categories involved in cellular structure. Patterns are mostly concordant in the two populations, with a small fraction of genes showing population-specific signatures of selection. Power considerations indicate that our findings represent a subset of all targets in the genome, suggesting that although balancing selection may not have an obvious impact on a large proportion of human genes, it is a key force affecting the evolution of a number of genes in humans. PMID:19713326

  13. Genomic Structure and Evolution of Multigene Families: “Flowers” on the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hie Lim; Iwase, Mineyo; Igawa, Takeshi; Nishioka, Tasuku; Kaneko, Satoko; Katsura, Yukako; Takahata, Naoyuki; Satta, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of an extensive investigation of genomic structures in the human genome, with a particular focus on relatively large repeats (>50 kb) in adjacent chromosomal regions. We named such structures “Flowers” because the pattern observed on dot plots resembles a flower. We detected a total of 291 Flowers in the human genome. They were predominantly located in euchromatic regions. Flowers are gene-rich compared to the average gene density of the genome. Genes involved in systems receiving environmental information, such as immunity and detoxification, were overrepresented in Flowers. Within a Flower, the mean number of duplication units was approximately four. The maximum and minimum identities between homologs in a Flower showed different distributions; the maximum identity was often concentrated to 100% identity, while the minimum identity was evenly distributed in the range of 78% to 100%. Using a gene conversion detection test, we found frequent and/or recent gene conversion events within the tested Flowers. Interestingly, many of those converted regions contained protein-coding genes. Computer simulation studies suggest that one role of such frequent gene conversions is the elongation of the life span of gene families in a Flower by the resurrection of pseudogenes. PMID:22779033

  14. Genomic structure and evolution of multigene families: "flowers" on the human genome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hie Lim; Iwase, Mineyo; Igawa, Takeshi; Nishioka, Tasuku; Kaneko, Satoko; Katsura, Yukako; Takahata, Naoyuki; Satta, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of an extensive investigation of genomic structures in the human genome, with a particular focus on relatively large repeats (>50 kb) in adjacent chromosomal regions. We named such structures "Flowers" because the pattern observed on dot plots resembles a flower. We detected a total of 291 Flowers in the human genome. They were predominantly located in euchromatic regions. Flowers are gene-rich compared to the average gene density of the genome. Genes involved in systems receiving environmental information, such as immunity and detoxification, were overrepresented in Flowers. Within a Flower, the mean number of duplication units was approximately four. The maximum and minimum identities between homologs in a Flower showed different distributions; the maximum identity was often concentrated to 100% identity, while the minimum identity was evenly distributed in the range of 78% to 100%. Using a gene conversion detection test, we found frequent and/or recent gene conversion events within the tested Flowers. Interestingly, many of those converted regions contained protein-coding genes. Computer simulation studies suggest that one role of such frequent gene conversions is the elongation of the life span of gene families in a Flower by the resurrection of pseudogenes. PMID:22779033

  15. Large-scale data mining pilot project in human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R.; Fidelis, R.; Slezak, T.

    1997-05-01

    This whitepaper briefly describes a new, aggressive effort in large- scale data Livermore National Labs. The implications of `large- scale` will be clarified Section. In the short term, this effort will focus on several @ssion-critical questions of Genome project. We will adapt current data mining techniques to the Genome domain, to quantify the accuracy of inference results, and lay the groundwork for a more extensive effort in large-scale data mining. A major aspect of the approach is that we will be fully-staffed data warehousing effort in the human Genome area. The long term goal is strong applications- oriented research program in large-@e data mining. The tools, skill set gained will be directly applicable to a wide spectrum of tasks involving a for large spatial and multidimensional data. This includes applications in ensuring non-proliferation, stockpile stewardship, enabling Global Ecology (Materials Database Industrial Ecology), advancing the Biosciences (Human Genome Project), and supporting data for others (Battlefield Management, Health Care).

  16. GENOME EDITING IN HUMAN CELLS USING CRISPR/CAS NUCLEASES

    PubMed Central

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar; Joung, J. Keith

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), the CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. Here we describe protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 Endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases. PMID:26423589

  17. A genome wide analysis of alternative splicing events during the osteogenic differentiation of human cartilage endplate-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jin; Wang, Honggang; Fan, Xin; Shangguan, Lei; Liu, Huan

    2016-08-01

    Low back pain is a prevalent disease, which leads to suffering and disabilities in a vast number of individuals. Degenerative disc diseases are usually the underlying causes of low back pain. However, the pathogenesis of degenerative disc diseases is highly complex and difficult to determine. Current therapies for degenerative disc diseases are various. In particular, cell-based therapies have proven to be effective and promising. Our research group has previously isolated and identified the cartilage endplate‑derived stem cells. In addition, alternative splicing is a sophisticated regulatory mechanism, which greatly increases cellular complexity and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic organisms. The present study continued to investigate alternative splicing events in osteogenic differentiation of cartilage endplate‑derived stem cells. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to detect splicing changes between the control and differentiated samples. Additionally, molecular function and pathway analysis were also performed. Following rigorous bioinformatics analysis of the data, 3,802 alternatively spliced genes were identified, and 10 of these were selected for validation by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis also revealed numerous enriched GO terms and signaling pathways. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate alternative splicing mechanisms in osteogenic differentiation of stem cells on a genome‑wide scale. The illumination of molecular mechanisms of stem cell osteogenic differentiation may assist the development novel bioengineered methods to treat degenerative disc diseases. PMID:27278552

  18. EGASP: the human ENCODE Genome Annotation Assessment Project

    PubMed Central

    Guigó, Roderic; Flicek, Paul; Abril, Josep F; Reymond, Alexandre; Lagarde, Julien; Denoeud, France; Antonarakis, Stylianos; Ashburner, Michael; Bajic, Vladimir B; Birney, Ewan; Castelo, Robert; Eyras, Eduardo; Ucla, Catherine; Gingeras, Thomas R; Harrow, Jennifer; Hubbard, Tim; Lewis, Suzanna E; Reese, Martin G

    2006-01-01

    Background We present the results of EGASP, a community experiment to assess the state-of-the-art in genome annotation within the ENCODE regions, which span 1% of the human genome sequence. The experiment had two major goals: the assessment of the accuracy of computational methods to predict protein coding genes; and the overall assessment of the completeness of the current human genome annotations as represented in the ENCODE regions. For the computational prediction assessment, eighteen groups contributed gene predictions. We evaluated these submissions against each other based on a 'reference set' of annotations generated as part of the GENCODE project. These annotations were not available to the prediction groups prior to the submission deadline, so that their predictions were blind and an external advisory committee could perform a fair assessment. Results The best methods had at least one gene transcript correctly predicted for close to 70% of the annotated genes. Nevertheless, the multiple transcript accuracy, taking into account alternative splicing, reached only approximately 40% to 50% accuracy. At the coding nucleotide level, the best programs reached an accuracy of 90% in both sensitivity and specificity. Programs relying on mRNA and protein sequences were the most accurate in reproducing the manually curated annotations. Experimental validation shows that only a very small percentage (3.2%) of the selected 221 computationally predicted exons outside of the existing annotation could be verified. Conclusion This is the first such experiment in human DNA, and we have followed the standards established in a similar experiment, GASP1, in Drosophila melanogaster. We believe the results presented here contribute to the value of ongoing large-scale annotation projects and should guide further experimental methods when being scaled up to the entire human genome sequence. PMID:16925836

  19. Unsupervised pattern discovery in human chromatin structure through genomic segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Michael M; Buske, Orion J; Wang, Jie; Weng, Zhiping; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William Stafford

    2012-05-01

    We trained Segway, a dynamic Bayesian network method, simultaneously on chromatin data from multiple experiments, including positions of histone modifications, transcription-factor binding and open chromatin, all derived from a human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line. In an unsupervised fashion, we identified patterns associated with transcription start sites, gene ends, enhancers, transcriptional regulator CTCF-binding regions and repressed regions. Software and genome browser tracks are at http://noble.gs.washington.edu/proj/segway/. PMID:22426492

  20. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Gupta, Aditya; Beck, Christine R.; Tejomurtula, Anusha; Campbell, Ian M.; Gambin, Tomasz; Simmons, Alexandra D.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Harris, R. Alan; Rogers, Jeffrey; Schwartz, David C.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100) is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs) are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases—about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV) haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual’s susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles. PMID:26641089

  1. Nutrients and the human genome: New frontiers for the next century

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, P.P. Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Hygiene Public Health, Baltimore, MD )

    1993-04-01

    Nutritional individuality in humans may be governed by genomic makeup as well as by phenotypic response to specific micronutrients. As a result of the global Human Genome Initiative, it is anticipated that by 2000, the 100,000 genes in the human genome will have been mapped. Nuclear receptors, their physiological ligands, and their target genes act in concert to influence a wide range of morphogenetic and functional elements. Consequently, genetically determined nutritional individuality could conceivably redefine nutrient requirement for diverse population groups. Incorportation of nutrition-related studies in the Human Genome Initiative may facilitate the practical application of genome data to the alleviation of human problems. 11 refs.

  2. Comprehensive nucleosome mapping of the human genome in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Druliner, Brooke R.; Vera, Daniel; Johnson, Ruth; Ruan, Xiaoyang; Apone, Lynn M.; Dimalanta, Eileen T.; Stewart, Fiona J.; Boardman, Lisa; Dennis, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Altered chromatin structure is a hallmark of cancer, and inappropriate regulation of chromatin structure may represent the origin of transformation. Important studies have mapped human nucleosome distributions genome wide, but the role of chromatin structure in cancer progression has not been addressed. We developed a MNase-Transcription Start Site Sequence Capture method (mTSS-seq) to map the nucleosome distribution at human transcription start sites genome-wide in primary human lung and colon adenocarcinoma tissue. Here, we confirm that nucleosome redistribution is an early, widespread event in lung (LAC) and colon (CRC) adenocarcinoma. These altered nucleosome architectures are consistent between LAC and CRC patient samples indicating that they may serve as important early adenocarcinoma markers. We demonstrate that the nucleosome alterations are driven by the underlying DNA sequence and potentiate transcription factor binding. We conclude that DNA-directed nucleosome redistributions are widespread early in cancer progression. We have proposed an entirely new hierarchical model for chromatin-mediated genome regulation. PMID:26735342

  3. The human genome: Some assembly required. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Human Genome Project promises to be one of the most rewarding endeavors in modern biology. The cost and the ethical and social implications, however, have made this project the source of considerable debate both in the scientific community and in the public at large. The 1994 Graduate Student Symposium addresses the scientific merits of the project, the technical issues involved in accomplishing the task, as well as the medical and social issues which stem from the wealth of knowledge which the Human Genome Project will help create. To this end, speakers were brought together who represent the diverse areas of expertise characteristic of this multidisciplinary project. The keynote speaker addresses the project`s motivations and goals in the larger context of biological and medical sciences. The first two sessions address relevant technical issues, data collection with a focus on high-throughput sequencing methods and data analysis with an emphasis on identification of coding sequences. The third session explores recent advances in the understanding of genetic diseases and possible routes to treatment. Finally, the last session addresses some of the ethical, social and legal issues which will undoubtedly arise from having a detailed knowledge of the human genome.

  4. Genome-wide signals of positive selection in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Enard, David; Messer, Philipp W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    The role of positive selection in human evolution remains controversial. On the one hand, scans for positive selection have identified hundreds of candidate loci, and the genome-wide patterns of polymorphism show signatures consistent with frequent positive selection. On the other hand, recent studies have argued that many of the candidate loci are false positives and that most genome-wide signatures of adaptation are in fact due to reduction of neutral diversity by linked deleterious mutations, known as background selection. Here we analyze human polymorphism data from the 1000 Genomes Project and detect signatures of positive selection once we correct for the effects of background selection. We show that levels of neutral polymorphism are lower near amino acid substitutions, with the strongest reduction observed specifically near functionally consequential amino acid substitutions. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions are associated with signatures of recent adaptation that should not be generated by background selection, such as unusually long and frequent haplotypes and specific distortions in the site frequency spectrum. We use forward simulations to argue that the observed signatures require a high rate of strongly adaptive substitutions near amino acid changes. We further demonstrate that the observed signatures of positive selection correlate better with the presence of regulatory sequences, as predicted by the ENCODE Project Consortium, than with the positions of amino acid substitutions. Our results suggest that adaptation was frequent in human evolution and provide support for the hypothesis of King and Wilson that adaptive divergence is primarily driven by regulatory changes. PMID:24619126

  5. Tiggers and DNA transposon fossils in the human genome.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, A F; Riggs, A D

    1996-01-01

    We report several classes of human interspersed repeats that resemble fossils of DNA transposons, elements that move by excision and reintegration in the genome, whereas previously characterized mammalian repeats all appear to have accumulated by retrotransposition, which involves an RNA intermediate. The human genome contains at least 14 families and > 100,000 degenerate copies of short (180-1200 bp) elements that have 14- to 25-bp terminal inverted repeats and are flanked by either 8 bp or TA target site duplications. We describe two ancient 2.5-kb elements with coding capacity, Tigger1 and -2, that closely resemble pogo, a DNA transposon in Drosophila, and probably were responsible for the distribution of some of the short elements. The deduced pogo and Tigger proteins are related to products of five DNA transposons found in fungi and nematodes, and more distantly, to the Tc1 and mariner transposases. They also are very similar to the major mammalian centromere protein CENP-B, suggesting that this may have a transposase origin. We further identified relatively low-copy-number mariner elements in both human and sheep DNA. These belong to two subfamilies previously identified in insect genomes, suggesting lateral transfer between diverse species. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8643651

  6. Report of the second Human Genome Diversity workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The Second Human Genome Diversity Workshop was successfully held at Penn State University from October 29--31, 1992. The Workshop was essentially organized around 7 groups, each comprising approximately 10 participants, representing the sampling issues in different regions of the world. These groups worked independently, using a common format provided by the organizers; this was adjusted as needed by the individual groups. The Workshop began with a presentation of the mandate to the participants, and of the procedures to be followed during the workshop. Dr. Feldman presented a summary of the results from the First Workshop. He and the other organizers also presented brief comments giving their perspective on the objectives of the Second Workshop. Dr. Julia Bodmer discussed the study of European genetic diversity, especially in the context of the HLA experience there, and of plans to extend such studies in the coming years. She also discussed surveys of world HLA laboratories in regard to resources related to Human Genome Diversity. Dr. Mark Weiss discussed the relevance of nonhuman primate studies for understanding how demographic processes, such as mate exchange between local groups, affected the local dispersion of genetic variation. Primate population geneticists have some relevant experience in interpreting variation at this local level, in particular, with various DNA fingerprinting methods. This experience may be relevant to the Human Genome Diversity Project, in terms of practical and statistical issues.

  7. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Standardized metadata for human pathogen/vector genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Vivien G; Emrich, Scott J; Giraldo-Calderón, Gloria I; Harb, Omar S; Newman, Ruchi M; Pickett, Brett E; Schriml, Lynn M; Stockwell, Timothy B; Stoeckert, Christian J; Sullivan, Dan E; Singh, Indresh; Ward, Doyle V; Yao, Alison; Zheng, Jie; Barrett, Tanya; Birren, Bruce; Brinkac, Lauren; Bruno, Vincent M; Caler, Elizabet; Chapman, Sinéad; Collins, Frank H; Cuomo, Christina A; Di Francesco, Valentina; Durkin, Scott; Eppinger, Mark; Feldgarden, Michael; Fraser, Claire; Fricke, W Florian; Giovanni, Maria; Henn, Matthew R; Hine, Erin; Hotopp, Julie Dunning; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Kissinger, Jessica C; Lee, Eun Mi; Mathur, Punam; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Murphy, Cheryl I; Myers, Garry; Neafsey, Daniel E; Nelson, Karen E; Nierman, William C; Puzak, Julia; Rasko, David; Roos, David S; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Silva, Joana C; Sobral, Bruno; Squires, R Burke; Stevens, Rick L; Tallon, Luke; Tettelin, Herve; Wentworth, David; White, Owen; Will, Rebecca; Wortman, Jennifer; Zhang, Yun; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing has accelerated the determination of genome sequences for thousands of human infectious disease pathogens and dozens of their vectors. The scale and scope of these data are enabling genotype-phenotype association studies to identify genetic determinants of pathogen virulence and drug/insecticide resistance, and phylogenetic studies to track the origin and spread of disease outbreaks. To maximize the utility of genomic sequences for these purposes, it is essential that metadata about the pathogen/vector isolate characteristics be collected and made available in organized, clear, and consistent formats. Here we report the development of the GSCID/BRC Project and Sample Application Standard, developed by representatives of the Genome Sequencing Centers for Infectious Diseases (GSCIDs), the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs) for Infectious Diseases, and the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), informed by interactions with numerous collaborating scientists. It includes mapping to terms from other data standards initiatives, including the Genomic Standards Consortium's minimal information (MIxS) and NCBI's BioSample/BioProjects checklists and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI). The standard includes data fields about characteristics of the organism or environmental source of the specimen, spatial-temporal information about the specimen isolation event, phenotypic characteristics of the pathogen/vector isolated, and project leadership and support. By modeling metadata fields into an ontology-based semantic framework and reusing existing ontologies and minimum information checklists, the application standard can be extended to support additional project-specific data fields and integrated with other data represented with comparable standards. The use of this metadata standard by all ongoing and future GSCID sequencing projects will provide a

  9. [ENCODE apophenia or a panglossian analysis of the human genome].

    PubMed

    Casane, Didier; Fumey, Julien; Laurenti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In September 2012, a batch of more than 30 articles presenting the results of the ENCODE (Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements) project was released. Many of these articles appeared in Nature and Science, the two most prestigious interdisciplinary scientific journals. Since that time, hundreds of other articles dedicated to the further analyses of the Encode data have been published. The time of hundreds of scientists and hundreds of millions of dollars were not invested in vain since this project had led to an apparent paradigm shift: contrary to the classical view, 80% of the human genome is not junk DNA, but is functional. This hypothesis has been criticized by evolutionary biologists, sometimes eagerly, and detailed refutations have been published in specialized journals with impact factors far below those that published the main contribution of the Encode project to our understanding of genome architecture. In 2014, the Encode consortium released a new batch of articles that neither suggested that 80% of the genome is functional nor commented on the disappearance of their 2012 scientific breakthrough. Unfortunately, by that time many biologists had accepted the idea that 80% of the genome is functional, or at least, that this idea is a valid alternative to the long held evolutionary genetic view that it is not. In order to understand the dynamics of the genome, it is necessary to re-examine the basics of evolutionary genetics because, not only are they well established, they also will allow us to avoid the pitfall of a panglossian interpretation of Encode. Actually, the architecture of the genome and its dynamics are the product of trade-offs between various evolutionary forces, and many structural features are not related to functional properties. In other words, evolution does not produce the best of all worlds, not even the best of all possible worlds, but only one possible world. PMID:26152174

  10. The genomic signature of human rhinoviruses A, B and C.

    PubMed

    Megremis, Spyridon; Demetriou, Philippos; Makrinioti, Heidi; Manoussaki, Alkistis E; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G

    2012-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses are single stranded positive sense RNA viruses that are presented in more than 50% of acute upper respiratory tract infections. Despite extensive studies on the genetic diversity of the virus, little is known about the forces driving it. In order to explain this diversity, many research groups have focused on protein sequence requirements for viable, functional and transmissible virus but have missed out an important aspect of viral evolution such as the genomic ontology of the virus. This study presents for the first time the genomic signature of 111 fully sequenced HRV strains from all three groups HRV-A, HRV-B and HRV-C. We observed an HRV genome tendency to eliminate CpG and UpA dinucleotides, coupling with over-representation of UpG and CpA. We propose a specific mechanism which describes how rapid changes in the HRV genomic sequence can take place under the strict control of conservation of the polypeptide backbone. Moreover, the distribution of the observed under- and over-represented dinucleotides along the HRV genome is presented. Distance matrice tables based on CpG and UpA odds ratios were constructed and viewed as heatmaps and distance trees. None of the suppressions can be attributed to codon usage or in RNA secondary structure requirements. Since viral recognition is dependent on RNA motifs rich in CpG and UpA, it is possible that the overall described genome evolution mechanism acts in order to protect the virus from host recognition. PMID:23028561

  11. Standardized Metadata for Human Pathogen/Vector Genomic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Vivien G.; Emrich, Scott J.; Giraldo-Calderón, Gloria I.; Harb, Omar S.; Newman, Ruchi M.; Pickett, Brett E.; Schriml, Lynn M.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Sullivan, Dan E.; Singh, Indresh; Ward, Doyle V.; Yao, Alison; Zheng, Jie; Barrett, Tanya; Birren, Bruce; Brinkac, Lauren; Bruno, Vincent M.; Caler, Elizabet; Chapman, Sinéad; Collins, Frank H.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Di Francesco, Valentina; Durkin, Scott; Eppinger, Mark; Feldgarden, Michael; Fraser, Claire; Fricke, W. Florian; Giovanni, Maria; Henn, Matthew R.; Hine, Erin; Hotopp, Julie Dunning; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Lee, Eun Mi; Mathur, Punam; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Murphy, Cheryl I.; Myers, Garry; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Nelson, Karen E.; Nierman, William C.; Puzak, Julia; Rasko, David; Roos, David S.; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Silva, Joana C.; Sobral, Bruno; Squires, R. Burke; Stevens, Rick L.; Tallon, Luke; Tettelin, Herve; Wentworth, David; White, Owen; Will, Rebecca; Wortman, Jennifer; Zhang, Yun; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing has accelerated the determination of genome sequences for thousands of human infectious disease pathogens and dozens of their vectors. The scale and scope of these data are enabling genotype-phenotype association studies to identify genetic determinants of pathogen virulence and drug/insecticide resistance, and phylogenetic studies to track the origin and spread of disease outbreaks. To maximize the utility of genomic sequences for these purposes, it is essential that metadata about the pathogen/vector isolate characteristics be collected and made available in organized, clear, and consistent formats. Here we report the development of the GSCID/BRC Project and Sample Application Standard, developed by representatives of the Genome Sequencing Centers for Infectious Diseases (GSCIDs), the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs) for Infectious Diseases, and the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), informed by interactions with numerous collaborating scientists. It includes mapping to terms from other data standards initiatives, including the Genomic Standards Consortium’s minimal information (MIxS) and NCBI’s BioSample/BioProjects checklists and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI). The standard includes data fields about characteristics of the organism or environmental source of the specimen, spatial-temporal information about the specimen isolation event, phenotypic characteristics of the pathogen/vector isolated, and project leadership and support. By modeling metadata fields into an ontology-based semantic framework and reusing existing ontologies and minimum information checklists, the application standard can be extended to support additional project-specific data fields and integrated with other data represented with comparable standards. The use of this metadata standard by all ongoing and future GSCID sequencing projects will provide a

  12. The Genomic Signature of Human Rhinoviruses A, B and C

    PubMed Central

    Megremis, Spyridon; Demetriou, Philippos; Makrinioti, Heidi; Manoussaki, Alkistis E.; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.

    2012-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses are single stranded positive sense RNA viruses that are presented in more than 50% of acute upper respiratory tract infections. Despite extensive studies on the genetic diversity of the virus, little is known about the forces driving it. In order to explain this diversity, many research groups have focused on protein sequence requirements for viable, functional and transmissible virus but have missed out an important aspect of viral evolution such as the genomic ontology of the virus. This study presents for the first time the genomic signature of 111 fully sequenced HRV strains from all three groups HRV-A, HRV-B and HRV-C. We observed an HRV genome tendency to eliminate CpG and UpA dinucleotides, coupling with over-representation of UpG and CpA. We propose a specific mechanism which describes how rapid changes in the HRV genomic sequence can take place under the strict control of conservation of the polypeptide backbone. Moreover, the distribution of the observed under- and over-represented dinucleotides along the HRV genome is presented. Distance matrice tables based on CpG and UpA odds ratios were constructed and viewed as heatmaps and distance trees. None of the suppressions can be attributed to codon usage or in RNA secondary structure requirements. Since viral recognition is dependent on RNA motifs rich in CpG and UpA, it is possible that the overall described genome evolution mechanism acts in order to protect the virus from host recognition. PMID:23028561

  13. [Genetic individuality and the universal declaration on the human genome and human rights].

    PubMed

    Siqueiros, Jesús M; Saruwatari, Garbiñe; Oliva-Sánchez, Pablo Francisco

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the epistemic and ontological relationship between science and law through the concept of individual in the Universal Declaration of the Human Genome and Human Rights. We argue for a better understanding of this relationship in order to foresee ethical and social consequences derived from Law adopting concepts with a strong scientific meaning. PMID:23520917

  14. Human and non-human primate genomes share hotspots of positive selection.

    PubMed

    Enard, David; Depaulis, Frantz; Roest Crollius, Hugues

    2010-02-01

    Among primates, genome-wide analysis of recent positive selection is currently limited to the human species because it requires extensive sampling of genotypic data from many individuals. The extent to which genes positively selected in human also present adaptive changes in other primates therefore remains unknown. This question is important because a gene that has been positively selected independently in the human and in other primate lineages may be less likely to be involved in human specific phenotypic changes such as dietary habits or cognitive abilities. To answer this question, we analysed heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genomes of single human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque individuals using a new method aiming to identify selective sweeps genome-wide. We found an unexpectedly high number of orthologous genes exhibiting signatures of a selective sweep simultaneously in several primate species, suggesting the presence of hotspots of positive selection. A similar significant excess is evident when comparing genes positively selected during recent human evolution with genes subjected to positive selection in their coding sequence in other primate lineages and identified using a different test. These findings are further supported by comparing several published human genome scans for positive selection with our findings in non-human primate genomes. We thus provide extensive evidence that the co-occurrence of positive selection in humans and in other primates at the same genetic loci can be measured with only four species, an indication that it may be a widespread phenomenon. The identification of positive selection in humans alongside other primates is a powerful tool to outline those genes that were selected uniquely during recent human evolution. PMID:20140238

  15. "Reverse Genomics" Predicts Function of Human Conserved Noncoding Elements.

    PubMed

    Marcovitz, Amir; Jia, Robin; Bejerano, Gill

    2016-05-01

    Evolutionary changes in cis-regulatory elements are thought to play a key role in morphological and physiological diversity across animals. Many conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) function as cis-regulatory elements, controlling gene expression levels in different biological contexts. However, determining specific associations between CNEs and related phenotypes is a challenging task. Here, we present a computational "reverse genomics" approach that predicts the phenotypic functions of human CNEs. We identify thousands of human CNEs that were lost in at least two independent mammalian lineages (IL-CNEs), and match their evolutionary profiles against a diverse set of phenotypes recently annotated across multiple mammalian species. We identify 2,759 compelling associations between human CNEs and a diverse set of mammalian phenotypes. We discuss multiple CNEs, including a predicted ear element near BMP7, a pelvic CNE in FBN1, a brain morphology element in UBE4B, and an aquatic adaptation forelimb CNE near EGR2, and provide a full list of our predictions. As more genomes are sequenced and more traits are annotated across species, we expect our method to facilitate the interpretation of noncoding mutations in human disease and expedite the discovery of individual CNEs that play key roles in human evolution and development. PMID:26744417

  16. Landscape of insertion polymorphisms in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Onozawa, Masahiro; Goldberg, Liat; Aplan, Peter D

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide substitutions, small (<50 bp) insertions or deletions (indels), and large (>50 bp) deletions are well-known causes of genetic variation within the human genome. We recently reported a previously unrecognized form of polymorphic insertions, termed templated sequence insertion polymorphism (TSIP), in which the inserted sequence was templated from a distant genomic region, and was inserted in the genome through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. TSIPs can be grouped into two classes based on nucleotide sequence features at the insertion junctions; class 1 TSIPs show target site duplication, polyadenylation, and preference for insertion at a 5'-TTTT/A-3' sequence, suggesting a LINE-1 based insertion mechanism, whereas class 2 TSIPs show features consistent with repair of a DNA double strand break by nonhomologous end joining. To gain a more complete picture of TSIPs throughout the human population, we evaluated whole-genome sequence from 52 individuals, and identified 171 TSIPs. Most individuals had 25-30 TSIPs, and common (present in >20% of individuals) TSIPs were found in individuals throughout the world, whereas rare TSIPs tended to cluster in specific geographic regions. The number of rare TSIPs was greater than the number of common TSIPs, suggesting that TSIP generation is an ongoing process. Intriguingly, mitochondrial sequences were a frequent template for class 2 insertions, used more commonly than any nuclear chromosome. Similar to single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels, we suspect that these TSIPs may be important for the generation of human diversity and genetic diseases, and can be useful in tracking historical migration of populations. PMID:25745018

  17. Global Genomic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus 6 Based on 724 Isolates and 190 Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Jelen, Mateja M.; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Burt, Felicity J.; Chan, Paul K. S.; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E.; Coutlée, François; Estrade, Christine; Ferenczy, Alex; Fiander, Alison; Franco, Eduardo L.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Giri, Adriana A.; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Heidrich, Kerstin; Hibbitts, Sam; Hošnjak, Lea; Luk, Tommy N. M.; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Richardson, Harriet; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y.; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L.; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Wong, Yong Wee; Židovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV6) is the major etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and has been included in both the quadrivalent and nonavalent prophylactic HPV vaccines. This study investigated the global genomic diversity of HPV6, using 724 isolates and 190 complete genomes from six continents, and the association of HPV6 genomic variants with geographical location, anatomical site of infection/disease, and gender. Initially, a 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment was sequenced from 492/530 (92.8%) HPV6-positive samples collected for this study. Among them, 130 exhibited at least one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indel, or amino acid change in the E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment and were sequenced in full. A global alignment and maximum likelihood tree of 190 complete HPV6 genomes (130 fully sequenced in this study and 60 obtained from sequence repositories) revealed two variant lineages, A and B, and five B sublineages: B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5. HPV6 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and a 960-bp representative region for whole-genome-based phylogenetic clustering within the L2 open reading frame were identified. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lineage B predominated globally. Sublineage B3 was more common in Africa and North and South America, and lineage A was more common in Asia. Sublineages B1 and B3 were associated with anogenital infections, indicating a potential lesion-specific predilection of some HPV6 sublineages. Females had higher odds for infection with sublineage B3 than males. In conclusion, a global HPV6 phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two variant lineages and five sublineages, showing some degree of ethnogeographic, gender, and/or disease predilection in their distribution. IMPORTANCE This study established the largest database of globally circulating HPV6 genomic variants and contributed a total of 130 new, complete HPV6 genome sequences to available sequence repositories. Two HPV

  18. Using probe secondary structure information to enhance Affymetrix GeneChip background estimates

    PubMed Central

    Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Fodor, Anthony A.; Gibas, Cynthia J.

    2007-01-01

    High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are a primary research tool for assessing global gene expression. Background noise on microarrays comprises a significant portion of the measured raw data. A number of statistical techniques have been developed to correct for this background noise. Here, we demonstrate that probe minimum folding energy and structure can be used to enhance a previously existing model for background noise correction. We estimate that probe secondary structure accounts for up to 3% of all variation on Affymetrix microarrays. PMID:17387043

  19. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. eds.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  20. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N G; Shea, N

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  1. Feature co-localization landscape of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Siu-Kin; Hu, Taobo; Long, Xi; Chan, Cheuk-Hin; Tsang, Shui-Ying; Xue, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Although feature co-localizations could serve as useful guide-posts to genome architecture, a comprehensive and quantitative feature co-localization map of the human genome has been lacking. Herein we show that, in contrast to the conventional bipartite division of genomic sequences into genic and inter-genic regions, pairwise co-localizations of forty-two genomic features in the twenty-two autosomes based on 50-kb to 2,000-kb sequence windows indicate a tripartite zonal architecture comprising Genic zones enriched with gene-related features and Alu-elements; Proximal zones enriched with MIR- and L2-elements, transcription-factor-binding-sites (TFBSs), and conserved-indels (CIDs); and Distal zones enriched with L1-elements. Co-localizations between single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy-number-variations (CNVs) reveal a fraction of sequence windows displaying steeply enhanced levels of SNPs, CNVs and recombination rates that point to active adaptive evolution in such pathways as immune response, sensory perceptions, and cognition. The strongest positive co-localization observed between TFBSs and CIDs suggests a regulatory role of CIDs in cooperation with TFBSs. The positive co-localizations of cancer somatic CNVs (CNVT) with all Proximal zone and most Genic zone features, in contrast to the distinctly more restricted co-localizations exhibited by germline CNVs (CNVG), reveal disparate distributions of CNVTs and CNVGs indicative of dissimilarity in their underlying mechanisms. PMID:26854351

  2. Human sperm chromatin epigenetic potential: genomics, proteomics, and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Ballescà, Josep Lluis; Oliva, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The classical idea about the function of the mammalian sperm chromatin is that it serves to transmit a highly protected and transcriptionally inactive paternal genome, largely condensed by protamines, to the next generation. In addition, recent sperm chromatin genome-wide dissection studies indicate the presence of a differential distribution of the genes and repetitive sequences in the protamine-condensed and histone-condensed sperm chromatin domains, which could be potentially involved in regulatory roles after fertilization. Interestingly, recent proteomic studies have shown that sperm chromatin contains many additional proteins, in addition to the abundant histones and protamines, with specific modifications and chromatin affinity features which are also delivered to the oocyte. Both gene and protein signatures seem to be altered in infertile patients and, as such, are consistent with the potential involvement of the sperm chromatin landscape in early embryo development. This present work reviews the available information on the composition of the human sperm chromatin and its epigenetic potential, with a particular focus on recent results derived from high-throughput genomic and proteomic studies. As a complement, we provide experimental evidence for the detection of phosphorylations and acetylations in human protamine 1 using a mass spectrometry approach. The available data indicate that the sperm chromatin is much more complex than what it was previously thought, raising the possibility that it could also serve to transmit crucial paternal epigenetic information to the embryo. PMID:25926607

  3. Isolation of Human Genomic DNA Sequences with Expanded Nucleobase Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Preeti; Maurer, Sara; Kubik, Grzegorz; Summerer, Daniel

    2016-08-10

    We report the direct isolation of user-defined DNA sequences from the human genome with programmable selectivity for both canonical and epigenetic nucleobases. This is enabled by the use of engineered transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs) as DNA major groove-binding probes in affinity enrichment. The approach provides the direct quantification of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) levels at single genomic nucleotide positions in a strand-specific manner. We demonstrate the simple, multiplexed typing of a variety of epigenetic cancer biomarker 5mC with custom TALE mixes. Compared to antibodies as the most widely used affinity probes for 5mC analysis, i.e., employed in the methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) protocol, TALEs provide superior sensitivity, resolution and technical ease. We engineer a range of size-reduced TALE repeats and establish full selectivity profiles for their binding to all five human cytosine nucleobases. These provide insights into their nucleobase recognition mechanisms and reveal the ability of TALEs to isolate genomic target sequences with selectivity for single 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and, in combination with sodium borohydride reduction, single 5-formylcytosine nucleobases. PMID:27429302

  4. Ancient human genome sequence of an extinct Palaeo-Eskimo

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Morten; Li, Yingrui; Lindgreen, Stinus; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Albrechtsen, Anders; Moltke, Ida; Metspalu, Mait; Metspalu, Ene; Kivisild, Toomas; Gupta, Ramneek; Bertalan, Marcelo; Nielsen, Kasper; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Wang, Yong; Raghavan, Maanasa; Campos, Paula F.; Kamp, Hanne Munkholm; Wilson, Andrew S.; Gledhill, Andrew; Tridico, Silvana; Bunce, Michael; Lorenzen, Eline D.; Binladen, Jonas; Guo, Xiaosen; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zhang, Hao; Li, Zhuo; Chen, Minfeng; Orlando, Ludovic; Kristiansen, Karsten; Bak, Mads; Tommerup, Niels; Bendixen, Christian; Pierre, Tracey L.; Grønnow, Bjarne; Meldgaard, Morten; Andreasen, Claus; Fedorova, Sardana A.; Osipova, Ludmila P.; Higham, Thomas F. G.; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Crawford, Michael H.; Brunak, Søren; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Villems, Richard; Nielsen, Rasmus; Krogh, Anders; Wang, Jun; Willerslev, Eske

    2013-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of an ancient human. Obtained from ∼4,000-year-old permafrost-preserved hair, the genome represents a male individual from the first known culture to settle in Greenland. Sequenced to an average depth of 20×, we recover 79% of the diploid genome, an amount close to the practical limit of current sequencing technologies. We identify 353,151 high-confidence single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 6.8% have not been reported previously. We estimate raw read contamination to be no higher than 0.8%. We use functional SNP assessment to assign possible phenotypic characteristics of the individual that belonged to a culture whose location has yielded only trace human remains. We compare the high-confidence SNPs to those of contemporary populations to find the populations most closely related to the individual. This provides evidence for a migration from Siberia into the New World some 5,500 years ago, independent of that giving rise to the modern Native Americans and Inuit. PMID:20148029

  5. Colloquium paper: footprints of nonsentient design inside the human genome.

    PubMed

    Avise, John C

    2010-05-11

    Intelligent design (ID)-the latest incarnation of religious creationism-posits that complex biological features did not accrue gradually via natural evolutionary forces but, instead, were crafted ex nihilo by a cognitive agent. Yet, many complex biological traits are gratuitously complicated, function poorly, and debilitate their bearers. Furthermore, such dysfunctional traits abound not only in the phenotypes but inside the genomes of eukaryotic species. Here, I highlight several outlandish features of the human genome that defy notions of ID by a caring cognitive agent. These range from de novo mutational glitches that collectively kill or maim countless individuals (including embryos and fetuses) to pervasive architectural flaws (including pseudogenes, parasitic mobile elements, and needlessly baroque regulatory pathways) that are endogenous in every human genome. Gross imperfection at the molecular level presents a conundrum for the traditional paradigms of natural theology as well as for recent assertions of ID, but it is consistent with the notion of nonsentient contrivance by evolutionary forces. In this important philosophical sense, the science of evolutionary genetics should rightly be viewed as an ally (not an adversary) of mainstream religions because it helps the latter to escape the profound theological enigmas posed by notions of ID. PMID:20445101

  6. Identifying and retargeting transcriptional hot spots in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joseph K; Lewis, Amanda M; Kim, Do Soon; Dyess, Timothy; Alper, Hal S

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian cell line development requires streamlined methodologies that will reduce both the cost and time to identify candidate cell lines. Improvements in site-specific genomic editing techniques can result in flexible, predictable, and robust cell line engineering. However, an outstanding question in the field is the specific site of integration. Here, we seek to identify productive loci within the human genome that will result in stable, high expression of heterologous DNA. Using an unbiased, random integration approach and a green fluorescent reporter construct, we identify ten single-integrant, recombinant human cell lines that exhibit stable, high-level expression. From these cell lines, eight unique corresponding integration loci were identified. These loci are concentrated in non-protein coding regions or intronic regions of protein coding genes. Expression mapping of the surrounding genes reveals minimal disruption of endogenous gene expression. Finally, we demonstrate that targeted de novo integration at one of the identified loci, the 12(th) exon-intron region of the GRIK1 gene on chromosome 21, results in superior expression and stability compared to the standard, illegitimate integration approach at levels approaching 4-fold. The information identified here along with recent advances in site-specific genomic editing techniques can lead to expedited cell line development. PMID:27311394

  7. Footprints of nonsentient design inside the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Intelligent design (ID)—the latest incarnation of religious creationism—posits that complex biological features did not accrue gradually via natural evolutionary forces but, instead, were crafted ex nihilo by a cognitive agent. Yet, many complex biological traits are gratuitously complicated, function poorly, and debilitate their bearers. Furthermore, such dysfunctional traits abound not only in the phenotypes but inside the genomes of eukaryotic species. Here, I highlight several outlandish features of the human genome that defy notions of ID by a caring cognitive agent. These range from de novo mutational glitches that collectively kill or maim countless individuals (including embryos and fetuses) to pervasive architectural flaws (including pseudogenes, parasitic mobile elements, and needlessly baroque regulatory pathways) that are endogenous in every human genome. Gross imperfection at the molecular level presents a conundrum for the traditional paradigms of natural theology as well as for recent assertions of ID, but it is consistent with the notion of nonsentient contrivance by evolutionary forces. In this important philosophical sense, the science of evolutionary genetics should rightly be viewed as an ally (not an adversary) of mainstream religions because it helps the latter to escape the profound theological enigmas posed by notions of ID. PMID:20445101

  8. Lineage-specific genomics: Frequent birth and death in the human genome: The human genome contains many lineage-specific elements created by both sequence and functional turnover.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert S

    2016-07-01

    Frequent evolutionary birth and death events have created a large quantity of biologically important, lineage-specific DNA within mammalian genomes. The birth and death of DNA sequences is so frequent that the total number of these insertions and deletions in the human population remains unknown, although there are differences between these groups, e.g. transposable elements contribute predominantly to sequence insertion. Functional turnover - where the activity of a locus is specific to one lineage, but the underlying DNA remains conserved - can also drive birth and death. However, this does not appear to be a major driver of divergent transcriptional regulation. Both sequence and functional turnover have contributed to the birth and death of thousands of functional promoters in the human and mouse genomes. These findings reveal the pervasive nature of evolutionary birth and death and suggest that lineage-specific regions may play an important but previously underappreciated role in human biology and disease. PMID:27231054

  9. Monochromosomal hybrids for the analysis of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Athwal, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    We have already produced monochromosomal hybrids for 2/3 of the human genome and we have generated sufficient biological materials to complete the proposed panels of hybrid cell lines. We have developed experimental procedures to identify marked chromosomes in human cell lines prior to their transfer to rodent cells. This would eliminate redundancy in the production of monochromosomal hybrids and therefore help expedite completion of the hybrid cell panels. We have also developed a highly sensitive method to identify human chromosomes in hybrid cells. Monochromosomal hybrids produced in our lab are used in a number of laboratories for experiments on gene mapping, gene isolation, chromosome fractionation and genetic analysis for complementation of cellular phenotypes such as DNA repair and regulation of cell growth. Monochromosomal hybrids cell lines are freely available to scientific community for experiments on gene mapping and analysis of the human genome. We are preparing large quantities of DNA from each hybrid cell line which will be available to the research community for various experiments.

  10. 76 FR 3917 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, TRND--RFP... Person: Rudy O. Pozzatti, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human...

  11. 78 FR 47715 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research. The meeting will be... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Human...

  12. 76 FR 29772 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; ELSI-SEP. Date: June...: Rudy O. Pozzatti, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Human...

  13. A Method for Genome Editing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cory; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great potential for regenerative medicine and currently are being used as a research tool for basic discovery and disease modeling. To evaluate the role of a single genetic variant, a system of genome editing is needed to precisely mutate any desired DNA sequence in isolation and measure its effect on phenotype when compared to the isogenic parental PSC from which it was derived. This protocol describes the general targeting schemes used by researchers to edit PSCs to knock out, knock-in, or precisely alter a single nucleotide, covering conditions for electroporation, clonal isolation, and screening of edited PSCs for the targeted mutation. These recent advances simplify the procedure for genome editing, allowing individual researchers to induce nearly any desired mutation to further study its function or to reverse a disease-causing variant for future applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:27037073

  14. Genomic Patterns of Homozygosity in Worldwide Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, Trevor J.; Absher, Devin; Feldman, Marcus W.; Myers, Richard M.; Rosenberg, Noah A.; Li, Jun Z.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide patterns of homozygosity runs and their variation across individuals provide a valuable and often untapped resource for studying human genetic diversity and evolutionary history. Using genotype data at 577,489 autosomal SNPs, we employed a likelihood-based approach to identify runs of homozygosity (ROH) in 1,839 individuals representing 64 worldwide populations, classifying them by length into three classes—short, intermediate, and long—with a model-based clustering algorithm. For each class, the number and total length of ROH per individual show considerable variation across individuals and populations. The total lengths of short and intermediate ROH per individual increase with the distance of a population from East Africa, in agreement with similar patterns previously observed for locus-wise homozygosity and linkage disequilibrium. By contrast, total lengths of long ROH show large interindividual variations that probably reflect recent inbreeding patterns, with higher values occurring more often in populations with known high frequencies of consanguineous unions. Across the genome, distributions of ROH are not uniform, and they have distinctive continental patterns. ROH frequencies across the genome are correlated with local genomic variables such as recombination rate, as well as with signals of recent positive selection. In addition, long ROH are more frequent in genomic regions harboring genes associated with autosomal-dominant diseases than in regions not implicated in Mendelian diseases. These results provide insight into the way in which homozygosity patterns are produced, and they generate baseline homozygosity patterns that can be used to aid homozygosity mapping of genes associated with recessive diseases. PMID:22883143

  15. Predicting human height by Victorian and genomic methods.

    PubMed

    Aulchenko, Yurii S; Struchalin, Maksim V; Belonogova, Nadezhda M; Axenovich, Tatiana I; Weedon, Michael N; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Kayser, Manfred; Oostra, Ben A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Borodin, Pavel M

    2009-08-01

    In the Victorian era, Sir Francis Galton showed that 'when dealing with the transmission of stature from parents to children, the average height of the two parents, ... is all we need care to know about them' (1886). One hundred and twenty-two years after Galton's work was published, 54 loci showing strong statistical evidence for association to human height were described, providing us with potential genomic means of human height prediction. In a population-based study of 5748 people, we find that a 54-loci genomic profile explained 4-6% of the sex- and age-adjusted height variance, and had limited ability to discriminate tall/short people, as characterized by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). In a family-based study of 550 people, with both parents having height measurements, we find that the Galtonian mid-parental prediction method explained 40% of the sex- and age-adjusted height variance, and showed high discriminative accuracy. We have also explored how much variance a genomic profile should explain to reach certain AUC values. For highly heritable traits such as height, we conclude that in applications in which parental phenotypic information is available (eg, medicine), the Victorian Galton's method will long stay unsurpassed, in terms of both discriminative accuracy and costs. For less heritable traits, and in situations in which parental information is not available (eg, forensics), genomic methods may provide an alternative, given that the variants determining an essential proportion of the trait's variation can be identified. PMID:19223933

  16. Predicting human height by Victorian and genomic methods

    PubMed Central

    Aulchenko, Yurii S; Struchalin, Maksim V; Belonogova, Nadezhda M; Axenovich, Tatiana I; Weedon, Michael N; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Kayser, Manfred; Oostra, Ben A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Borodin, Pavel M

    2009-01-01

    In the Victorian era, Sir Francis Galton showed that ‘when dealing with the transmission of stature from parents to children, the average height of the two parents, … is all we need care to know about them' (1886). One hundred and twenty-two years after Galton's work was published, 54 loci showing strong statistical evidence for association to human height were described, providing us with potential genomic means of human height prediction. In a population-based study of 5748 people, we find that a 54-loci genomic profile explained 4–6% of the sex- and age-adjusted height variance, and had limited ability to discriminate tall/short people, as characterized by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). In a family-based study of 550 people, with both parents having height measurements, we find that the Galtonian mid-parental prediction method explained 40% of the sex- and age-adjusted height variance, and showed high discriminative accuracy. We have also explored how much variance a genomic profile should explain to reach certain AUC values. For highly heritable traits such as height, we conclude that in applications in which parental phenotypic information is available (eg, medicine), the Victorian Galton's method will long stay unsurpassed, in terms of both discriminative accuracy and costs. For less heritable traits, and in situations in which parental information is not available (eg, forensics), genomic methods may provide an alternative, given that the variants determining an essential proportion of the trait's variation can be identified. PMID:19223933

  17. Genome wide expression analysis of the effect of the Chinese patent medicine Zilongjin tablet on four human lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xin; Xiong, Songjin; Wen, Shaoping; Gao, Song; Wang, Lei; Cao, Boyang

    2011-10-01

    Zilongjin (ZLJ) tablet, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has been approved as a new anti-tumor drug by the State Food and Drug Administration of China; however, its anti-cancer mechanisms remain elusive. The goal of this study was to investigate the underlying anti-cancer activities of ZLJ tablet in vitro. In this study, four lung cancer cell lines, A549, H446, H460 and H520, were treated with 2.2 mg/mL of ZLJ solution for 24 h at 37 °C under 5% CO(2) . RNA was isolated and a microarray experiment using the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 plus 2.0 Array was employed to differentiate the expression patterns of cancer-related genes after drug treatment. Of 483 genes in 63 functional categories and 25 different pathways that showed at least a 2-fold change of expression level in the four cancer cell lines, 170 genes were upregulated, and 313 genes were downregulated. Eleven of the 483 genes were cancer-related and belong to the three known pathways: apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The microarray data were validated by real-time RT-PCR. The results of this investigation suggest possible anti-cancer mechanisms of the ZLJ tablet, and lay a foundation to further analyse its therapeutic roles. PMID:21953710

  18. Human Genome Replication Proceeds through Four Chromatin States

    PubMed Central

    Julienne, Hanna; Zoufir, Azedine; Audit, Benjamin; Arneodo, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genomic studies have led to significant progress in understanding the epigenetically controlled interplay between chromatin structure and nuclear functions. Epigenetic modifications were shown to play a key role in transcription regulation and genome activity during development and differentiation or in response to the environment. Paradoxically, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the initiation and the maintenance of the spatio-temporal replication program in higher eukaryotes, and in particular their links to epigenetic modifications, still remain elusive. By integrative analysis of the genome-wide distributions of thirteen epigenetic marks in the human cell line K562, at the 100 kb resolution of corresponding mean replication timing (MRT) data, we identify four major groups of chromatin marks with shared features. These states have different MRT, namely from early to late replicating, replication proceeds though a transcriptionally active euchromatin state (C1), a repressive type of chromatin (C2) associated with polycomb complexes, a silent state (C3) not enriched in any available marks, and a gene poor HP1-associated heterochromatin state (C4). When mapping these chromatin states inside the megabase-sized U-domains (U-shaped MRT profile) covering about 50% of the human genome, we reveal that the associated replication fork polarity gradient corresponds to a directional path across the four chromatin states, from C1 at U-domains borders followed by C2, C3 and C4 at centers. Analysis of the other genome half is consistent with early and late replication loci occurring in separate compartments, the former correspond to gene-rich, high-GC domains of intermingled chromatin states C1 and C2, whereas the latter correspond to gene-poor, low-GC domains of alternating chromatin states C3 and C4 or long C4 domains. This new segmentation sheds a new light on the epigenetic regulation of the spatio-temporal replication program in human and provides a

  19. Nearly finished genomes produced using gel microdroplet culturing reveal substantial intraspecies genomic diversity within the human microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimons, Michael S.; Novotny, Mark; Lo, Chien-Chi; Dichosa, Armand E.K.; Yee-Greenbaum, Joyclyn L.; Snook, Jeremy P.; Gu, Wei; Chertkov, Olga; Davenport, Karen W.; McMurry, Kim; Reitenga, Krista G.; Daughton, Ashlynn R.; He, Jian; Johnson, Shannon L.; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Wills, Patti L.; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Chain, Patrick S.; Detter, John C.; Lasken, Roger S.; Han, Cliff S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of microbial genomic diversity remains unexplored. This is largely due to our inability to culture most microorganisms in isolation, which is a prerequisite for traditional genome sequencing. Single-cell sequencing has allowed researchers to circumvent this limitation. DNA is amplified directly from a single cell using the whole-genome amplification technique of multiple displacement amplification (MDA). However, MDA from a single chromosome copy suffers from amplification bias and a large loss of specificity from even very small amounts of DNA contamination, which makes assembling a genome difficult and completely finishing a genome impossible except in extraordinary circumstances. Gel microdrop cultivation allows culturing of a diverse microbial community and provides hundreds to thousands of genetically identical cells as input for an MDA reaction. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by comparing sequencing results of gel microdroplets and single cells following MDA. Bias is reduced in the MDA reaction and genome sequencing, and assembly is greatly improved when using gel microdroplets. We acquired multiple near-complete genomes for two bacterial species from human oral and stool microbiome samples. A significant amount of genome diversity, including single nucleotide polymorphisms and genome recombination, is discovered. Gel microdroplets offer a powerful and high-throughput technology for assembling whole genomes from complex samples and for probing the pan-genome of naturally occurring populations. PMID:23493677

  20. The Human Genome Diversity (HGD) Project. Summary document

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    In 1991 a group of human geneticists and molecular biologists proposed to the scientific community that a world wide survey be undertaken of variation in the human genome. To aid their considerations, the committee therefore decided to hold a small series of international workshops to explore the major scientific issues involved. The intention was to define a framework for the project which could provide a basis for much wider and more detailed discussion and planning--it was recognized that the successful implementation of the proposed project, which has come to be known as the Human Genome Diversity (HGD) Project, would not only involve scientists but also various national and international non-scientific groups all of which should contribute to the project`s development. The international HGD workshop held in Sardinia in September 1993 was the last in the initial series of planning workshops. As such it not only explored new ground but also pulled together into a more coherent form much of the formal and informal discussion that had taken place in the preceding two years. This report presents the deliberations of the Sardinia workshop within a consideration of the overall development of the HGD Project to date.

  1. Rates of genomic divergence in humans, chimpanzees and their lice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin P.; Allen, Julie M.; Olds, Brett P.; Mugisha, Lawrence; Reed, David L.; Paige, Ken N.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    The rate of DNA mutation and divergence is highly variable across the tree of life. However, the reasons underlying this variation are not well understood. Comparing the rates of genetic changes between hosts and parasite lineages that diverged at the same time is one way to begin to understand differences in genetic mutation and substitution rates. Such studies have indicated that the rate of genetic divergence in parasites is often faster than that of their hosts when comparing single genes. However, the variation in this relative rate of molecular evolution across different genes in the genome is unknown. We compared the rate of DNA sequence divergence between humans, chimpanzees and their ectoparasitic lice for 1534 protein-coding genes across their genomes. The rate of DNA substitution in these orthologous genes was on average 14 times faster for lice than for humans and chimpanzees. In addition, these rates were positively correlated across genes. Because this correlation only occurred for substitutions that changed the amino acid, this pattern is probably produced by similar functional constraints across the same genes in humans, chimpanzees and their ectoparasites. PMID:24403325

  2. First ancient mitochondrial human genome from a prepastoralist southern African.

    PubMed

    Morris, Alan G; Heinze, Anja; Chan, Eva K F; Smith, Andrew B; Hayes, Vanessa M

    2014-10-01

    The oldest contemporary human mitochondrial lineages arose in Africa. The earliest divergent extant maternal offshoot, namely haplogroup L0d, is represented by click-speaking forager peoples of southern Africa. Broadly defined as Khoesan, contemporary Khoesan are today largely restricted to the semidesert regions of Namibia and Botswana, whereas archeological, historical, and genetic evidence promotes a once broader southerly dispersal of click-speaking peoples including southward migrating pastoralists and indigenous marine-foragers. No genetic data have been recovered from the indigenous peoples that once sustained life along the southern coastal waters of Africa prepastoral arrival. In this study we generate a complete mitochondrial genome from a 2,330-year-old male skeleton, confirmed through osteological and archeological analysis as practicing a marine-based forager existence. The ancient mtDNA represents a new L0d2c lineage (L0d2c1c) that is today, unlike its Khoe-language based sister-clades (L0d2c1a and L0d2c1b) most closely related to contemporary indigenous San-speakers (specifically Ju). Providing the first genomic evidence that prepastoral Southern African marine foragers carried the earliest diverged maternal modern human lineages, this study emphasizes the significance of Southern African archeological remains in defining early modern human origins. PMID:25212860

  3. First Ancient Mitochondrial Human Genome from a Prepastoralist Southern African

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew B.; Hayes, Vanessa M.

    2014-01-01

    The oldest contemporary human mitochondrial lineages arose in Africa. The earliest divergent extant maternal offshoot, namely haplogroup L0d, is represented by click-speaking forager peoples of southern Africa. Broadly defined as Khoesan, contemporary Khoesan are today largely restricted to the semidesert regions of Namibia and Botswana, whereas archeological, historical, and genetic evidence promotes a once broader southerly dispersal of click-speaking peoples including southward migrating pastoralists and indigenous marine-foragers. No genetic data have been recovered from the indigenous peoples that once sustained life along the southern coastal waters of Africa prepastoral arrival. In this study we generate a complete mitochondrial genome from a 2,330-year-old male skeleton, confirmed through osteological and archeological analysis as practicing a marine-based forager existence. The ancient mtDNA represents a new L0d2c lineage (L0d2c1c) that is today, unlike its Khoe-language based sister-clades (L0d2c1a and L0d2c1b) most closely related to contemporary indigenous San-speakers (specifically Ju). Providing the first genomic evidence that prepastoral Southern African marine foragers carried the earliest diverged maternal modern human lineages, this study emphasizes the significance of Southern African archeological remains in defining early modern human origins. PMID:25212860

  4. Integrated genome-wide analysis of genomic changes and gene regulation in human adrenocortical tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Wang, Yonghong; Patel, Dhaval; Liu-Chittenden, Yi; Jain, Meenu; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S.; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the pathogenesis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and whether there is progression from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma, we performed genome-wide gene expression, gene methylation, microRNA expression and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis in human adrenocortical tissue (normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC) samples. A pairwise comparison of normal, adrenocortical adenomas and ACC gene expression profiles with more than four-fold expression differences and an adjusted P-value < 0.05 revealed no major differences in normal versus adrenocortical adenoma whereas there are 808 and 1085, respectively, dysregulated genes between ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma and ACC versus normal. The majority of the dysregulated genes in ACC were downregulated. By integrating the CGH, gene methylation and expression profiles of potential miRNAs with the gene expression of dysregulated genes, we found that there are higher alterations in ACC versus normal compared to ACC versus adrenocortical adenoma. Importantly, we identified several novel molecular pathways that are associated with dysregulated genes and further experimentally validated that oncostatin m signaling induces caspase 3 dependent apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation. Finally, we propose that there is higher number of genomic changes from normal-to-adenoma-to-carcinoma and identified oncostatin m signaling as a plausible druggable pathway for therapeutics. PMID:26446994

  5. Genomic Landscape of Human Papillomavirus–Associated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rusan, Maria; Li, Yvonne Y.; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent next-generation sequencing studies have generated a comprehensive overview of the genomic landscape of Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers. This review summarizes these findings to provide insight into the tumor biology of these cancers and potential therapeutic opportunities for HPV-driven malignancies. In addition to the tumorigenic properties of the HPV oncoproteins, integration of HPV DNA into the host genome is suggested to be a driver of the neoplastic process. Integration may confer a growth and survival advantage via enhanced expression of viral oncoproteins, alteration of critical cellular genes, and changes in global promoter methylation and transcription. Alteration of cellular genes may lead to loss of function of tumor suppressor genes, enhanced oncogene expression, loss of function of DNA repair genes, or other vital cellular functions. Recurrent integrations in RAD51B, NR4A2, and TP63, leading to aberrant forms of these proteins, are observed in both HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and cervical carcinoma. Additional genomic alterations, independent of integration events, include recurrent PIK3CA mutations (and aberrations in other members of the PI3K pathway), alterations in receptor tyrosine kinases (primarily FGFR2 and FGFR3 in HPV-positive HNSCC, and ERBB2 in cervical squamous cell carcinoma), and genes in pathways related to squamous cell differentiation and immune responses. A number of the alterations identified are potentially targetable, which may lead to advances in the treatment of HPV-associated cancers. PMID:25779941

  6. Reflections on ancestral haplotypes: medical genomics, evolution, and human individuality.

    PubMed

    Steele, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), once labelled the "sphinx of immunology" by Jan Klein, provides powerful challenges to evolutionary thinking. This essay highlights the main discoveries that established the block ancestral haplotype structure of the MHC and the wider genome, focusing on the work by the Perth (Australia) group, led by Roger Dawkins, and the Boston group, led by Chester Alper and Edmond Yunis. Their achievements have been overlooked in the rush to sequence the first and subsequent drafts of the human genome. In Caucasoids, where most of the detailed work has been done, about 70% of all known allelic MHC diversity can be accounted for by 30 or so ancestral haplotypes (AHs), or conserved sequences of many mega-bases, and their recombinants. The block haplotype structure of the genome, as shown for the MHC (and other genetic regions), is a story that needs to be understood in its own right, particularly given the promotion of the "HapMap" project and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis, which has been wrongly touted as the only way to pinpoint those genes that are important in genetic disorders or other desired (qualitative) characteristics. PMID:25544323

  7. Genomic organization of the human skeletal muscle sodium channel gene

    SciTech Connect

    George, A.L. Jr.; Iyer, G.S.; Kleinfield, R.; Kallen, R.G.; Barchi, R.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Voltage-dependent sodium channels are essential for normal membrane excitability and contractility in adult skeletal muscle. The gene encoding the principal sodium channel [alpha]-subunit isoform in human skeletal muscle (SCN4A) has recently been shown to harbor point mutations in certain hereditary forms of periodic paralysis. The authors have carried out an analysis of the detailed structure of this gene including delination of intron-exon boundaries by genomic DNA cloning and sequence analysis. The complete coding region of SCN4A is found in 32.5 kb of genomic DNA and consists of 24 exons (54 to >2.2 kb) and 23 introns (97 bp-4.85 kb). The exon organization of the gene shows no relationship to the predicted functional domains of the channel protein and splice junctions interrupt many of the transmembrane segments. The genomic organization of sodium channels may have been partially conserved during evolution as evidenced by the observation that 10 of the 24 splice junctions in SCN4A are positioned in homologous locations in a putative sodium channel gene in Drosophila (para). The information presented here should be extremely useful both for further identifying sodium channel mutations and for gaining a better understanding of sodium channel evolution. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Genomic signature induced by pregnancy in the human breast.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Gabriela A; Heulings, Rebecca; Mailo, Daniel A; Russo, Patricia A; Sheriff, Fathima; Russo, Irma H; Moral, Raquel; Russo, Jose

    2006-02-01

    We have postulated that the lifetime protective effect of an early pregnancy against breast cancer is due to the complete differentiation of the mammary gland characterized by a specific genomic signature imprinted by the physiological process of pregnancy. For demonstrating this hypothesis we compared the genomic profile of the epithelium and the stroma of normal breast tissues from reduction mammoplasties performed in postmenopausal parous and nulliparous women. The epithelium and the stroma were separately dissected using laser capture microdissection (LCM) and the RNA of each compartment and each sample was isolated, amplified using PCR methodology, and hybridized to cDNA glass-microarrays containing 40,000 human cDNA features. The separation of the epithelial compartment from the interlobular stroma of Lob 1 using LCM allowed us to determine that the epithelial component contained 4,828 genes that were equally expressed in both nulliparous and parous women. There were 73 known genes that included immune-modulation-, DNA repair-, programmed cell death-, chromatin remodeling- and transcription-related genes, whereas in the breast of nulliparous women there were 20 different known genes that were upregulated. Our data provide evidence that breast tissues of postmenopausal parous women express in both the epithelial and the stromal compartments numerous genes that differ significantly from those present in breast tissues of post-menopausal nulliparous women, which could be important contributors to the genomic signature induced by an early full term pregnancy. PMID:16391795

  9. Novel definition files for human GeneChips based on GeneAnnot

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Francesco; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Coppe, Alessandro; Sirota, Alexandra; Safran, Marilyn; Shmoish, Michael; Ferrari, Sergio; Lancet, Doron; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Bicciato, Silvio

    2007-01-01

    Background Improvements in genome sequence annotation revealed discrepancies in the original probeset/gene assignment in Affymetrix microarray and the existence of differences between annotations and effective alignments of probes and transcription products. In the current generation of Affymetrix human GeneChips, most probesets include probes matching transcripts from more than one gene and probes which do not match any transcribed sequence. Results We developed a novel set of custom Chip Definition Files (CDF) and the corresponding Bioconductor libraries for Affymetrix human GeneChips, based on the information contained in the GeneAnnot database. GeneAnnot-based CDFs are composed of unique custom-probesets, including only probes matching a single gene. Conclusion GeneAnnot-based custom CDFs solve the problem of a reliable reconstruction of expression levels and eliminate the existence of more than one probeset per gene, which often leads to discordant expression signals for the same transcript when gene differential expression is the focus of the analysis. GeneAnnot CDFs are freely distributed and fully compliant with Affymetrix standards and all available software for gene expression analysis. The CDF libraries are available from , along with supplementary information (CDF libraries, installation guidelines and R code, CDF statistics, and analysis results). PMID:18005434

  10. Documenting genomics: Applying archival theory to preserving the records of the Human Genome Project

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The Human Genome Archive Project (HGAP) aimed to preserve the documentary heritage of the UK's contribution to the Human Genome Project (HGP) by using archival theory to develop a suitable methodology for capturing the results of modern, collaborative science. After assessing past projects and different archival theories, the HGAP used an approach based on the theory of documentation strategy to try to capture the records of a scientific project that had an influence beyond the purely scientific sphere. The HGAP was an archival survey that ran for two years. It led to ninety scientists being contacted and has, so far, led to six collections being deposited in the Wellcome Library, with additional collections being deposited in other UK repositories. In applying documentation strategy the HGAP was attempting to move away from traditional archival approaches to science, which have generally focused on retired Nobel Prize winners. It has been partially successful in this aim, having managed to secure collections from people who are not ‘big names’, but who made an important contribution to the HGP. However, the attempt to redress the gender imbalance in scientific collections and to improve record-keeping in scientific organisations has continued to be difficult to achieve. PMID:26388555

  11. Documenting genomics: Applying archival theory to preserving the records of the Human Genome Project.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The Human Genome Archive Project (HGAP) aimed to preserve the documentary heritage of the UK's contribution to the Human Genome Project (HGP) by using archival theory to develop a suitable methodology for capturing the results of modern, collaborative science. After assessing past projects and different archival theories, the HGAP used an approach based on the theory of documentation strategy to try to capture the records of a scientific project that had an influence beyond the purely scientific sphere. The HGAP was an archival survey that ran for two years. It led to ninety scientists being contacted and has, so far, led to six collections being deposited in the Wellcome Library, with additional collections being deposited in other UK repositories. In applying documentation strategy the HGAP was attempting to move away from traditional archival approaches to science, which have generally focused on retired Nobel Prize winners. It has been partially successful in this aim, having managed to secure collections from people who are not 'big names', but who made an important contribution to the HGP. However, the attempt to redress the gender imbalance in scientific collections and to improve record-keeping in scientific organisations has continued to be difficult to achieve. PMID:26388555

  12. 78 FR 66752 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Federal Register on September 16, 2013, 78 FR 26905. The October 15, 2013 meeting has been moved to... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  13. 78 FR 65342 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... the Federal Register on September 11, 2013, 78 FR 55752. The October 17, 2013 meeting has been changed... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  14. 76 FR 65738 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  15. 76 FR 71581 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  16. 77 FR 67385 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... Register on October 4, 2012, 77 FR 60706. Due to Hurricane Sandy, this meeting has been moved from October... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Human Genome Research...

  17. Monochromosomal hybrids for the analysis of the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Athwal, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    In this research project the authors proposed to develop rodent/human hybrid cell lines each containing a single different human chromosome. The human chromosomes will be marked with Ecogpt and stably maintained by selection in the hybrid cells. The experimental approach to produce the proposed cell lines involve the following: they will first transfer a cloned selectable marker, Ecogpt (an E. coli gene for xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase: XGPRT) to normal diploid human cells using a retroviral vector. The transferred gene will integrate at random into multiple sites in the recipient cell genome. Clonal cell lines from independent transgenotes will each carry the selectable marker integrated into a different site and perhaps a different chromosome. The chromosome carrying the selectable marker will then be transferred further to mouse cells by microcell fusion. In addition they also use directed integration of Ecogpt into the chromosome present in rodent cells, otherwise not marked with a selectable marker. This allows them to complete the bank of proposed cell line. The human chromosome, since it will be marked with a selectable marker, can be transferred to any other cell line of interest for complementation analysis. Clones of each cell line, containing varying size segments of the same chromosome produced by selection for the retention or loss of the selectable marker following x-irradiation or by metaphase chromosome transfer method will facilitate physical mapping and determination of gene order on a chromosome. 1 fig.

  18. Genome-wide analyses of human perisylvian cerebral cortical patterning

    PubMed Central

    Abrahams, B. S.; Tentler, D.; Perederiy, J. V.; Oldham, M. C.; Coppola, G.; Geschwind, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the well established role of the frontal and posterior perisylvian cortices in many facets of human-cognitive specializations, including language, little is known about the developmental patterning of these regions in the human brain. We performed a genome-wide analysis of human cerebral patterning during midgestation, a critical epoch in cortical regionalization. A total of 345 genes were identified as differentially expressed between superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the remaining cerebral cortex. Gene ontology categories representing transcription factors were enriched in STG, whereas cell-adhesion and extracellular matrix molecules were enriched in the other cortical regions. Quantitative RT-PCR or in situ hybridization was performed to validate differential expression in a subset of 32 genes, most of which were confirmed. LIM domain-binding 1 (LDB1), which we show to be enriched in the STG, is a recently identified interactor of LIM domain only 4 (LMO4), a gene known to be involved in the asymmetric pattering of the perisylvian region in the developing human brain. Protocadherin 17 (PCDH17), a neuronal cell adhesion molecule, was highly enriched in focal regions of the human prefrontal cortex. Contactin associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2), in which mutations are known to cause autism, epilepsy, and language delay, showed a remarkable pattern of anterior-enriched cortical expression in human that was not observed in mouse or rat. These data highlight the importance of expression analysis of human brain and the utility of cross-species comparisons of gene expression. Genes identified here provide a foundation for understanding molecular aspects of human-cognitive specializations and the disorders that disrupt them. PMID:17978184

  19. How is the Human Genome Project doing, and what have we learned so far?

    PubMed Central

    Guyer, M S; Collins, F S

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the accomplishments of the initial phase of the Human Genome Project, with particular attention to the progress made toward achieving the defined goals for constructing genetic and physical maps of the human genome and determining the sequence of human DNA, identifying the complete set of human genes, and analyzing the need for adequate policies for using the information about human genetics in ways that maximize the benefits for individuals and society. PMID:7479895

  20. A model of binding on DNA microarrays: understanding the combined effect of probe synthesis failure, cross-hybridization, DNA fragmentation and other experimental details of affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays are used both for research and for diagnostics. In research, Affymetrix arrays are commonly used for genome wide association studies, resequencing, and for gene expression analysis. These arrays provide large amounts of data. This data is analyzed using statistical methods that quite often discard a large portion of the information. Most of the information that is lost comes from probes that systematically fail across chips and from batch effects. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive model for hybridization that predicts probe intensities for Affymetrix arrays and that could provide a basis for improved microarray analysis and probe development. The first part of the model calculates probe binding affinities to all the possible targets in the hybridization solution using the Langmuir isotherm. In the second part of the model we integrate details that are specific to each experiment and contribute to the differences between hybridization in solution and on the microarray. These details include fragmentation, wash stringency, temperature, salt concentration, and scanner settings. Furthermore, the model fits probe synthesis efficiency and target concentration parameters directly to the data. All the parameters used in the model have a well-established physical origin. Results For the 302 chips that were analyzed the mean correlation between expected and observed probe intensities was 0.701 with a range of 0.88 to 0.55. All available chips were included in the analysis regardless of the data quality. Our results show that batch effects arise from differences in probe synthesis, scanner settings, wash strength, and target fragmentation. We also show that probe synthesis efficiencies for different nucleotides are not uniform. Conclusions To date this is the most complete model for binding on microarrays. This is the first model that includes both probe synthesis efficiency and hybridization kinetics/cross-hybridization. These

  1. Retrovirus-like promoters in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Feuchter, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    Several families of repetitive sequences related to integrated retroviruses have been identified in the human genome. The largest of these families, the RTVL-H family, has close to 1,000 members, in addition to several hundred solitary long terminal repeats (LTRs). The similarity of these LTRs in structure and organization to the LTRs of proviruses suggest that they may act as transcriptional regulators of gene expression. To test this hypothesis, the author initially examined the ability of different RTVL-H LTRs to drive expression of the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a variety of human and murine cell lines. These studies revealed that RTVL-H LTRs are heterogeneous in their ability to regulate the expression of linked genes. Although all of five LTRs tested could promote expression of the CAT gene, their relative promoter activities as well as range of activities varied widely. RTVL-H LTRs were also shown to contain sequences that could increase transcription from the human [beta]-globin promoter and be influenced by SV40 enhancer sequences. The results of additional studies suggested that RTVL-H LTRs may have the ability to influence the expression of unrelated cellular genes. Taken together, these results suggest a general evolutionary role for RTVL-H LTRs in the regulation of gene expression and raise the possibility that activation or rearrangements involving these sequences may alter the normal regulation of cellular genes and thus contribute to human disease.

  2. Human genome and philosophy: what ethical challenge will human genome studies bring to the medical practices in the 21st century?

    PubMed

    Renzong, Q

    2001-12-01

    A human being or person cannot be reduced to a set of human genes, or human genome. Genetic essentialism is wrong, because as a person the entity should have self-conscious and social interaction capacity which is grown in an interpersonal relationship. Genetic determinism is wrong too, the relationship between a gene and a trait is not a linear model of causation, but rather a non-linear one. Human genome is a complexity system and functions in a complexity system of human body and a complexity of systems of natural/social environment. Genetic determinism also caused the issue of how much responsibility an agent should take for her/his action, and how much degrees of freedom will a human being have. Human genome research caused several conceptual issues. Can we call a gene 'good' or 'bad', 'superior' of 'inferior'? Is a boy who is detected to have the gene of Huntington's chorea or Alzheimer disease a patient? What should the term 'eugenics' mean? What do the terms such as 'gene therapy', 'treatment' and 'enhancement' and 'human cloning' mean etc.? The research of human genome and its application caused and will cause ethical issues. Can human genome research and its application be used for eugenics, or only for the treatment and prevention of diseases? Must the principle of informed consent/choice be insisted in human genome research and its application? How to protecting gene privacy and combating the discrimination on the basis of genes? How to promote the quality between persons, harmony between ethnic groups and peace between countries? How to establish a fair, just, equal and equitable relationship between developing and developed countries in regarding to human genome research and its application? PMID:11803809

  3. [Human dignity as a key notion in the UNESCO declaration on the human genome].

    PubMed

    Andorno, R

    2001-01-01

    The notion of human dignity plays an increasing role in the bioethical discussion. The UNESCO Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights is the best example of this phenomenon. This instrument is the first important step to establish international standards with regard to the ethical and legal problems raised by genetic advances. Nevertheless, the major work is still pending. First, because the concept of dignity requires a better characterization with reference to the new bioethical dilemmas. Second, because the principles enunciated at the international level should be concretized locally through well-crafted national law. PMID:11582659

  4. Genetical genomic determinants of alcohol consumption in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Tabakoff, Boris; Saba, Laura; Printz, Morton; Flodman, Pam; Hodgkinson, Colin; Goldman, David; Koob, George; Richardson, Heather N; Kechris, Katerina; Bell, Richard L; Hübner, Norbert; Heinig, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Mangion, Jonathan; Legault, Lucie; Dongier, Maurice; Conigrave, Katherine M; Whitfield, John B; Saunders, John; Grant, Bridget; Hoffman, Paula L

    2009-01-01

    Background We have used a genetical genomic approach, in conjunction with phenotypic analysis of alcohol consumption, to identify candidate genes that predispose to varying levels of alcohol intake by HXB/BXH recombinant inbred rat strains. In addition, in two populations of humans, we assessed genetic polymorphisms associated with alcohol consumption using a custom genotyping array for 1,350 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our goal was to ascertain whether our approach, which relies on statistical and informatics techniques, and non-human animal models of alcohol drinking behavior, could inform interpretation of genetic association studies with human populations. Results In the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI) rats, correlation analysis of brain gene expression levels with alcohol consumption in a two-bottle choice paradigm, and filtering based on behavioral and gene expression quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses, generated a list of candidate genes. A literature-based, functional analysis of the interactions of the products of these candidate genes defined pathways linked to presynaptic GABA release, activation of dopamine neurons, and postsynaptic GABA receptor trafficking, in brain regions including the hypothalamus, ventral tegmentum and amygdala. The analysis also implicated energy metabolism and caloric intake control as potential influences on alcohol consumption by the recombinant inbred rats. In the human populations, polymorphisms in genes associated with GABA synthesis and GABA receptors, as well as genes related to dopaminergic transmission, were associated with alcohol consumption. Conclusion Our results emphasize the importance of the signaling pathways identified using the non-human animal models, rather than single gene products, in identifying factors responsible for complex traits such as alcohol consumption. The results suggest cross-species similarities in pathways that influence predisposition to consume alcohol by rats and humans

  5. Genome-wide map of regulatory interactions in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Nastaran; Phanstiel, Douglas H; He, Chao; Grubert, Fabian; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Kasowski, Maya; Zhang, Michael Q; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that interactions between regulatory genomic elements play an important role in regulating gene expression. We generated a genome-wide interaction map of regulatory elements in human cells (ENCODE tier 1 cells, K562, GM12878) using Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) experiments targeting six broadly distributed factors. Bound regions covered 80% of DNase I hypersensitive sites including 99.7% of TSS and 98% of enhancers. Correlating this map with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data sets revealed cohesin, CTCF, and ZNF143 as key components of three-dimensional chromatin structure and revealed how the distal chromatin state affects gene transcription. Comparison of interactions between cell types revealed that enhancer-promoter interactions were highly cell-type-specific. Construction and comparison of distal and proximal regulatory networks revealed stark differences in structure and biological function. Proximal binding events are enriched at genes with housekeeping functions, while distal binding events interact with genes involved in dynamic biological processes including response to stimulus. This study reveals new mechanistic and functional insights into regulatory region organization in the nucleus. PMID:25228660

  6. Genome-wide map of regulatory interactions in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Nastaran; Phanstiel, Douglas H.; He, Chao; Grubert, Fabian; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Kasowski, Maya; Zhang, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that interactions between regulatory genomic elements play an important role in regulating gene expression. We generated a genome-wide interaction map of regulatory elements in human cells (ENCODE tier 1 cells, K562, GM12878) using Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) experiments targeting six broadly distributed factors. Bound regions covered 80% of DNase I hypersensitive sites including 99.7% of TSS and 98% of enhancers. Correlating this map with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data sets revealed cohesin, CTCF, and ZNF143 as key components of three-dimensional chromatin structure and revealed how the distal chromatin state affects gene transcription. Comparison of interactions between cell types revealed that enhancer–promoter interactions were highly cell-type-specific. Construction and comparison of distal and proximal regulatory networks revealed stark differences in structure and biological function. Proximal binding events are enriched at genes with housekeeping functions, while distal binding events interact with genes involved in dynamic biological processes including response to stimulus. This study reveals new mechanistic and functional insights into regulatory region organization in the nucleus. PMID:25228660

  7. Non-CG Methylation in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    He, Yupeng; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is a chemical modification that occurs predominantly on CG dinucleotides in mammalian genomes. However, recent studies have revealed that non-CG methylation (mCH) is abundant and nonrandomly distributed in the genomes of pluripotent cells and brain cells, and is present at lower levels in many other human cells and tissues. Surprisingly, mCH in pluripotent cells is distinct from that in brain cells in terms of sequence specificity and association with transcription, indicating the existence of different mCH pathways. In addition, several recent studies have begun to reveal the biological significance of mCH in diverse cellular processes. In reprogrammed somatic cells, mCH marks megabase-scale regions that have failed to revert to the pluripotent epigenetic state. In myocytes, promoter mCH accumulation is associated with the transcriptional response to environmental factors. In brain cells, mCH accumulates during the establishment of neural circuits and is associated with Rett syndrome. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of mCH and its possible functional consequences in different biological contexts. PMID:26077819

  8. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Emily R; Cusanovich, Darren A; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10-7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  9. Genomic targets of the human c-Myc protein

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Paula C.; Frank, Scott R.; Wang, Luquan; Schroeder, Marianne; Liu, Suxing; Greene, Jonathan; Cocito, Andrea; Amati, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    The transcription factor Myc is induced by mitogenic signals and regulates downstream cellular responses. If overexpressed, Myc promotes malignant transformation. Myc modulates expression of diverse genes in experimental systems, but few are proven direct targets. Here, we present a large-scale screen for genomic Myc-binding sites in live human cells. We used bioinformatics to select consensus DNA elements (CACGTG or E-boxes) situated in the 5′ regulatory region of genes and measured Myc binding to those sequences in vivo by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation. Strikingly, most promoter-associated E-boxes showed selective recovery with Myc, unlike non-E-box promoters or E-boxes in bulk genomic DNA. Promoter E-boxes were distributed in two groups bound by Myc at distinct frequencies. The high-affinity group included an estimated 11% of all cellular loci, was highly conserved among different cells, and was bound independently of Myc expression levels. Overexpressed Myc associated at increased frequency with low-affinity targets and, at extreme levels, also with other sequences, suggesting that some binding was not sequence-specific. The strongest DNA-sequence parameter defining high-affinity targets was the location of E-boxes within CpG islands, correlating with an open, preacetylated state of chromatin. Myc further enhanced histone acetylation, with or without accompanying induction of mRNA expression. Our findings point to a high regulatory and biological diversity among Myc-target genes. PMID:12695333

  10. CREME: Cis-Regulatory Module Explorer for the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Sharan, R; Ovcharenko, I; Ben-Hur, A

    2004-02-11

    The binding of transcription factors to specific regulatory sequence elements is a primary mechanism for controlling gene transcription. Eukaryotic genes are often regulated by several transcription factors, whose binding sites are tightly clustered and form cis-regulatory modules. In this paper we present a web-server, CREME, for identifying and visualizing cis-regulatory modules in the promoter regions of a given set of potentially co-regulated genes. CREME relies on a database of putative transcription factor binding sites that have been annotated across the human genome using a library of position weight matrices and evolutionary conservation with the mouse and rat genomes. A search algorithm is applied to this dataset to identify combinations of transcription factors whose binding sites tend to co-occur in close proximity in the promoter regions of the input gene set. The identified cis-regulatory modules are statistically scored and significant combinations are reported and graphically visualized. Our web-server is available at http://creme.dcode.org/.

  11. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Cusanovich, Darren A.; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10−7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  12. GENCODE: The reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project

    PubMed Central

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L.; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers. PMID:22955987

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of Human Metapneumovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob; Park, Kwang Sook; Kwak, Eun Jung; Moon, Kwang Mee; Lee, Chang Kyu; Bae, Joon-Yong; Park, Man-Seong; Song, Ki-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) has been described as an important etiologic agent of upper and lower respiratory tract infections, especially in young children and the elderly. Most of school-aged children might be introduced to HMPVs, and exacerbation with other viral or bacterial super-infection is common. However, our understanding of the molecular evolution of HMPVs remains limited. To address the comprehensive evolutionary dynamics of HMPVs, we report a genome-wide analysis of the eight genes (N, P, M, F, M2, SH, G, and L) using 103 complete genome sequences. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that the eight genes from one HMPV strain grouped into the same genetic group among the five distinct lineages (A1, A2a, A2b, B1, and B2). A few exceptions of phylogenetic incongruence might suggest past recombination events, and we detected possible recombination breakpoints in the F, SH, and G coding regions. The five genetic lineages of HMPVs shared quite remote common ancestors ranging more than 220 to 470 years of age with the most recent origins for the A2b sublineage. Purifying selection was common, but most protein genes except the F and M2-2 coding regions also appeared to experience episodic diversifying selection. Taken together, these suggest that the five lineages of HMPVs maintain their individual evolutionary dynamics and that recombination and selection forces might work on shaping the genetic diversity of HMPVs. PMID:27046055

  14. GENCODE: the reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project.

    PubMed

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J

    2012-09-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers. PMID:22955987

  15. Evolution of genetic and genomic features unique to the human lineage

    PubMed Central

    O’Bleness, Majesta; Searles, Veronica; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal; Sikela, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Given the unprecedented tools now available for rapidly comparing genomes, the identification and study of genetic and genomic changes unique to our species has accelerated, and we are entering a golden age of human evolutionary genomics. Here we provide an overview of these efforts, highlighting important recent discoveries, examples of the different types of human-specific genomic and genetic changes identified, and salient trends such as the localization of evolutionary adaptive changes to complex loci that are highly enriched for disease associations. Lastly, we discuss the remaining challenges, such as the incomplete nature of current genome sequence assemblies, and difficulties in linking human-specific genomic changes to human-specific phenotypic traits. PMID:23154808

  16. A high-resolution radiation hybrid map of the human genome draft sequence.

    PubMed

    Olivier, M; Aggarwal, A; Allen, J; Almendras, A A; Bajorek, E S; Beasley, E M; Brady, S D; Bushard, J M; Bustos, V I; Chu, A; Chung, T R; De Witte, A; Denys, M E; Dominguez, R; Fang, N Y; Foster, B D; Freudenberg, R W; Hadley, D; Hamilton, L R; Jeffrey, T J; Kelly, L; Lazzeroni, L; Levy, M R; Lewis, S C; Liu, X; Lopez, F J; Louie, B; Marquis, J P; Martinez, R A; Matsuura, M K; Misherghi, N S; Norton, J A; Olshen, A; Perkins, S M; Perou, A J; Piercy, C; Piercy, M; Qin, F; Reif, T; Sheppard, K; Shokoohi, V; Smick, G A; Sun, W L; Stewart, E A; Fernando, J; Tejeda; Tran, N M; Trejo, T; Vo, N T; Yan, S C; Zierten, D L; Zhao, S; Sachidanandam, R; Trask, B J; Myers, R M; Cox, D R

    2001-02-16

    We have constructed a physical map of the human genome by using a panel of 90 whole-genome radiation hybrids (the TNG panel) in conjunction with 40,322 sequence-tagged sites (STSs) derived from random genomic sequences as well as expressed sequences. Of 36,678 STSs on the TNG radiation hybrid map, only 3604 (9.8%) were absent from the unassembled draft sequence of the human genome. Of 20,030 STSs ordered on the TNG map as well as the assembled human genome draft sequence and the Celera assembled human genome sequence, 36% of the STSs had a discrepant order between the working draft sequence and the Celera sequence. The TNG map order was identical to one of the two sequence orders in 60% of these discrepant cases. PMID:11181994

  17. The evolution of lineage-specific clusters of single nucleotide substitutions in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Wang, Jianrong; Elango, Navin; Yi, Soojin V

    2013-10-01

    Genomic regions harboring large numbers of human-specific single nucleotide substitutions are of significant interest since they are potential genomic foci underlying the evolution of human-specific traits as well as human adaptive evolution. Previous studies aimed to identify such regions either used pre-defined genomic locations such as coding sequences and conserved genomic elements or employed sliding window methods. Such approaches may miss clusters of substitutions occurring in regions other than those pre-defined locations, or not be able to distinguish human-specific clusters of substitutions from regions of generally high substitution rates. Here, we conduct a 'maximal segment' analysis to scan the whole human genome to identify clusters of human-specific substitutions that occurred since the divergence of the human and the chimpanzee genomes. This method can identify species-specific clusters of substitutions while not relying on pre-defined regions. We thus identify thousands of clusters of human-specific single nucleotide substitutions. The evolution of such clusters is driven by a combination of several different evolutionary processes including increased regional mutation rate, recombination-associated processes, and positive selection. These newly identified regions of human-specific substitution clusters include large numbers of previously identified human accelerated regions, and exhibit significant enrichments of genes involved in several developmental processes. Our study provides a useful tool to study the evolution of the human genome. PMID:23770436

  18. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  19. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  20. Genomic imprinting and the evolutionary psychology of human kinship

    PubMed Central

    Haig, David

    2011-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is predicted to influence behaviors that affect individuals to whom an actor has different degrees of matrilineal and patrilineal kinship (asymmetric kin). Effects of imprinted genes are not predicted in interactions with nonrelatives or with individuals who are equally related to the actor's maternally and paternally derived genes (unless a gene also has pleiotropic effects on fitness of asymmetric kin). Long-term mating bonds are common in most human populations, but dissolution of marriage has always affected a significant proportion of mated pairs. Children born in a new union are asymmetric kin of children born in a previous union. Therefore, the innate dispositions of children toward parents and sibs are expected to be sensitive to cues of marital stability, and these dispositions may be subject to effects of imprinted genes. PMID:21690414

  1. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  2. Rearranged mitochondrial genomes are present in human oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Chen; Prosser, R.; Simonetti, S.

    1995-08-01

    Using quantitative PCR, we have determined that a human oocyte contains {approximately}100,000 mitochondrial genomes (mtDNAs). We have also found that some oocytes harbor measurable levels (up to 0.1%) of the so-called common deletion, an mtDNA molecule containing a 4,977-bp rearrangement that is present in high amounts in many patients with {open_quotes}sporadic{close_quotes} Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) and progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO). This is the first demonstration that rearranged mtDNAs are present in human oocytes, and it provides experimental support for the supposition that pathogenic deletions associated with the ontogeny of sporadic KSS and PEO can be transmitted in the female germ line, from mother to child. The relevance of these findings to the accumulation of extremely low levels of deleted mtDNAs in both somatic and germ-line tissues during normal human aging is also discussed. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. In-silico human genomics with GeneCards

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the bioinformatics, systems biology, genomics and medical communities have enjoyed a synergistic relationship with the GeneCards database of human genes (http://www.genecards.org). This human gene compendium was created to help to introduce order into the increasing chaos of information flow. As a consequence of viewing details and deep links related to specific genes, users have often requested enhanced capabilities, such that, over time, GeneCards has blossomed into a suite of tools (including GeneDecks, GeneALaCart, GeneLoc, GeneNote and GeneAnnot) for a variety of analyses of both single human genes and sets thereof. In this paper, we focus on inhouse and external research activities which have been enabled, enhanced, complemented and, in some cases, motivated by GeneCards. In turn, such interactions have often inspired and propelled improvements in GeneCards. We describe here the evolution and architecture of this project, including examples of synergistic applications in diverse areas such as synthetic lethality in cancer, the annotation of genetic variations in disease, omics integration in a systems biology approach to kidney disease, and bioinformatics tools. PMID:22155609

  4. Targeting human papillomavirus genome replication for antiviral drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, Jacques; Melendy, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are a major human health problem; they are the cause of recurrent benign warts and of several cancers of the anogenital tract and head and neck region. Although there are two prophylactic HPV vaccines that could, if used universally, prevent as many as two-thirds of HPV-induced cancers, as well as several cytotoxic and immunomodulatory agents for localized treatment of infections, there are currently no HPV antiviral drugs in our arsenal of therapeutic agents. This review examines the status of past and ongoing research into the development of HPV antivirals, focused primarily upon approaches targeting the replication of the viral genome. The only HPV enzyme, E1, is a DNA helicase that interfaces with the cellular DNA replication machinery to replicate the HPV genome. To date, searches for small molecule inhibitors of E1 for use as antivirals have met with limited success. The lack of other viral enzymes has meant that the search for antivirals has shifted to a large degree to the modulation of protein–protein interactions. There has been some success in identifying small molecule inhibitors targeting interactions between HPV proteins but with activity against a small subset of viral types only. As noted in this review, it is thought that targeting E1 interactions with cellular replication proteins may provide inhibitors with broader activity against multiple HPV types. Herein, we outline the steps in HPV DNA replication and discuss those that appear to provide the most advantageous targets for the development of anti-HPV therapeutics. PMID:23615820

  5. Genome-Wide Prediction and Analysis of 3D-Domain Swapped Proteins in the Human Genome from Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Atul Kumar; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    3D-domain swapping is one of the mechanisms of protein oligomerization and the proteins exhibiting this phenomenon have many biological functions. These proteins, which undergo domain swapping, have acquired much attention owing to their involvement in human diseases, such as conformational diseases, amyloidosis, serpinopathies, proteionopathies etc. Early realisation of proteins in the whole human genome that retain tendency to domain swap will enable many aspects of disease control management. Predictive models were developed by using machine learning approaches with an average accuracy of 78% (85.6% of sensitivity, 87.5% of specificity and an MCC value of 0.72) to predict putative domain swapping in protein sequences. These models were applied to many complete genomes with special emphasis on the human genome. Nearly 44% of the protein sequences in the human genome were predicted positive for domain swapping. Enrichment analysis was performed on the positively predicted sequences from human genome for their domain distribution, disease association and functional importance based on Gene Ontology (GO). Enrichment analysis was also performed to infer a better understanding of the functional importance of these sequences. Finally, we developed hinge region prediction, in the given putative domain swapped sequence, by using important physicochemical properties of amino acids. PMID:27467780

  6. Complete genome sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, strain Cuniculi A: the loss of infectivity to humans is associated with genome decay.

    PubMed

    Šmajs, David; Zobaníková, Marie; Strouhal, Michal; Čejková, Darina; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Pospíšilová, Petra; Norris, Steven J; Albert, Tom; Qin, Xiang; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Buhay, Christian; Muzny, Donna M; Chen, Lei; Gibbs, Richard A; Weinstock, George M

    2011-01-01

    Treponema paraluiscuniculi is the causative agent of rabbit venereal spirochetosis. It is not infectious to humans, although its genome structure is very closely related to other pathogenic Treponema species including Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis. In this study, the genome sequence of Treponema paraluiscuniculi, strain Cuniculi A, was determined by a combination of several high-throughput sequencing strategies. Whereas the overall size (1,133,390 bp), arrangement, and gene content of the Cuniculi A genome closely resembled those of the T. pallidum genome, the T. paraluiscuniculi genome contained a markedly higher number of pseudogenes and gene fragments (51). In addition to pseudogenes, 33 divergent genes were also found in the T. paraluiscuniculi genome. A set of 32 (out of 84) affected genes encoded proteins of known or predicted function in the Nichols genome. These proteins included virulence factors, gene regulators and components of DNA repair and recombination. The majority (52 or 61.9%) of the Cuniculi A pseudogenes and divergent genes were of unknown function. Our results indicate that T. paraluiscuniculi has evolved from a T. pallidum-like ancestor and adapted to a specialized host-associated niche (rabbits) during loss of infectivity to humans. The genes that are inactivated or altered in T. paraluiscuniculi are candidates for virulence factors important in the infectivity and pathogenesis of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:21655244

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Genetically Distinct Human Isolates of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Caitlin; Patel, Khushali; Petrosyan, Varduhi; Morrison, Clay; Varghese, Viju; Chu, Randy A.; Baig, Aymen; Thompson, Erika J.; Chase, Michael; Hu, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    β-Hemolytic group C and group G streptococci (GCS-GGS; Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis) emerged as human pathogens in the late 1970s. We report here the draft genome sequences of four genetically distinct human strains of GCS-GGS isolated between the 1960s and 1980s. Comparative analysis of these genomes may provide a deeper understanding of GCS-GGS genome and virulence evolution. PMID:26430051

  8. Exons, Introns and Talking Genes: The Sience Behind the Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.

    1993-01-01

    This book presents in simple terms the basis of molecular genetics and how it is used to obtain an understanding of the human genome. The author's central focus is the transistion of genetics from statistics to experimental manipulations, and he offers analogies that help readers visualize the genome, thereby avoiding conventional scientific presentations. He illustrates how genetics is used in scientific laboratories, in courtrooms, and in hospitals. Little is presented about the complex social and ethical issues raised by the Human Genome project.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium ulcerans Strain 04-3911, Isolated from Humans

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Marcus V. C.; Benevides, Leandro J.; Mariano, Diego C. B.; Veras, Adooney A. O.; Sá, Pablo H. C.; Rocha, Flávia S.; Vilas Boas, Priscilla C. B.; Soares, Siomar C.; Barbosa, Maria S.; Guiso, Nicole; Badell, Edgar; Carneiro, Adriana R.; Azevedo, Vasco; Ramos, Rommel T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is a pathogenic bacterium infecting wild and domesticated animals; some infection cases in humans have increased throughout the world. The current study describes the draft genome of strain 04-3911, isolated from humans. The draft genome has 2,492,680 bp, 2,143 coding sequences, 12 rRNA genes, and 50 tRNA genes. PMID:27034486

  10. 77 FR 55853 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Register on January 19, 2012, 77 FR 2735. The agenda has changed for September 10. Closed session... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Amended Notice of... Genome Research, September 10, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to September 11, 2012, 5 p.m., National Institutes...

  11. Understanding the Human Genome Project: Using Stations to Provide a Comprehensive Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Julio G.

    2005-01-01

    A lesson was designed for lower division general education, non-major biology lecture-only course that included the historical and scientific context, some of the skills used to study the human genome, results, conclusions and ethical consideration. Students learn to examine and compare the published Human Genome maps, and employ the strategies…

  12. 77 FR 27471 - National Human Genome Research Institute Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute Amended Notice of... Genome Research, May 21, 2012, 8:30 a.m. to May 22, 2012, 5:00 p.m., National Institutes of Health,...

  13. Inferring Selective Constraint from Population Genomic Data Suggests Recent Regulatory Turnover in the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Schrider, Daniel R; Kern, Andrew D

    2015-12-01

    The comparative genomics revolution of the past decade has enabled the discovery of functional elements in the human genome via sequence comparison. While that is so, an important class of elements, those specific to humans, is entirely missed by searching for sequence conservation across species. Here we present an analysis based on variation data among human genomes that utilizes a supervised machine learning approach for the identification of human-specific purifying selection in the genome. Using only allele frequency information from the complete low-coverage 1000 Genomes Project data set in conjunction with a support vector machine trained from known functional and nonfunctional portions of the genome, we are able to accurately identify portions of the genome constrained by purifying selection. Our method identifies previously known human-specific gains or losses of function and uncovers many novel candidates. Candidate targets for gain and loss of function along the human lineage include numerous putative regulatory regions of genes essential for normal development of the central nervous system, including a significant enrichment of gain of function events near neurotransmitter receptor genes. These results are consistent with regulatory turnover being a key mechanism in the evolution of human-specific characteristics of brain development. Finally, we show that the majority of the genome is unconstrained by natural selection currently, in agreement with what has been estimated from phylogenetic methods but in sharp contrast to estimates based on transcriptomics or other high-throughput functional methods. PMID:26590212

  14. Inferring Selective Constraint from Population Genomic Data Suggests Recent Regulatory Turnover in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schrider, Daniel R.; Kern, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    The comparative genomics revolution of the past decade has enabled the discovery of functional elements in the human genome via sequence comparison. While that is so, an important class of elements, those specific to humans, is entirely missed by searching for sequence conservation across species. Here we present an analysis based on variation data among human genomes that utilizes a supervised machine learning approach for the identification of human-specific purifying selection in the genome. Using only allele frequency information from the complete low-coverage 1000 Genomes Project data set in conjunction with a support vector machine trained from known functional and nonfunctional portions of the genome, we are able to accurately identify portions of the genome constrained by purifying selection. Our method identifies previously known human-specific gains or losses of function and uncovers many novel candidates. Candidate targets for gain and loss of function along the human lineage include numerous putative regulatory regions of genes essential for normal development of the central nervous system, including a significant enrichment of gain of function events near neurotransmitter receptor genes. These results are consistent with regulatory turnover being a key mechanism in the evolution of human-specific characteristics of brain development. Finally, we show that the majority of the genome is unconstrained by natural selection currently, in agreement with what has been estimated from phylogenetic methods but in sharp contrast to estimates based on transcriptomics or other high-throughput functional methods. PMID:26590212

  15. The Effect of Human Genome Annotation Complexity on RNA-Seq Gene Expression Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Po-Yen; Phan, John H.; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has brought human genomic research to an unprecedented era. RNA-Seq is a branch of NGS that can be used to quantify gene expression and depends on accurate annotation of the human genome (i.e., the definition of genes and all of their variants or isoforms). Multiple annotations of the human genome exist with varying complexity. However, it is not clear how the choice of genome annotation influences RNA-Seq gene expression quantification. We assess the effect of different genome annotations in terms of (1) mapping quality, (2) quantification variation, (3) quantification accuracy (i.e., by comparing to qRT-PCR data), and (4) the concordance of detecting differentially expressed genes. External validation with qRT-PCR suggests that more complex genome annotations result in higher quantification variation.

  16. Physical organization of subgroup B human adenovirus genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Tibbetts, C

    1977-01-01

    Cleavage sites of nine bacterial restriction endonucleases were mapped in the DNA of adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) and Ad7, representative serotypes of the "weakly oncogenic" subgroup B human adenoviruses. Of 94 sites mapped, 82 were common to both serotypes, in accord with the high overall sequence homology of DNA among members of the same subgroups. Of the sites in Ad3 and Ad7 DNA, fewer than 20% corresponded to mapped restriction sites in the DNA of Ad2 or Ad5. The latter serotypes represent the "nononcogenic" subgroup C, having only 10 to 20% overall sequence homology with the DNA of subgroup B adenoviruses. Hybridization mapping of viral mRNA from Ad7-infected cells resulted in a complex physical map that was nearly identical to the map of early and late gene clusters in Ad2 DNA. Thus the DNA sequences of human adenoviruses of subgroups B and C have significantly diverged in the course of viral evolution, but the complex organization of the adenovirus genome has been rigidly conserved. Images PMID:916027

  17. Identification and characterization of essential genes in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Hughes, Nicholas W.; Krupczak, Kevin M.; Post, Yorick; Wei, Jenny J.; Lander, Eric S.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genetic analysis of lethal phenotypes has elucidated the molecular underpinnings of many biological processes. Using the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, we constructed a genome-wide single-guide RNA (sgRNA) library to screen for genes required for proliferation and survival in a human cancer cell line. Our screen revealed the set of cell-essential genes, which was validated by an orthogonal gene-trap-based screen and comparison with yeast gene knockouts. This set is enriched for genes that encode components of fundamental pathways, are expressed at high levels, and contain few inactivating polymorphisms in the human population. We also uncovered a large group of uncharacterized genes involved in RNA processing, a number of whose products localize to the nucleolus. Lastly, screens in additional cell lines showed a high degree of overlap in gene essentiality, but also revealed differences specific to each cell line and cancer type that reflect the developmental origin, oncogenic drivers, paralogous gene expression pattern, and chromosomal structure of each line. These results demonstrate the power of CRISPR-based screens and suggest a general strategy for identifying liabilities in cancer cells. PMID:26472758

  18. Comprehensive genomic characterization defines human glioblastoma genes and core pathways.

    PubMed

    2008-10-23

    Human cancer cells typically harbour multiple chromosomal aberrations, nucleotide substitutions and epigenetic modifications that drive malignant transformation. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) pilot project aims to assess the value of large-scale multi-dimensional analysis of these molecular characteristics in human cancer and to provide the data rapidly to the research community. Here we report the interim integrative analysis of DNA copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation aberrations in 206 glioblastomas--the most common type of adult brain cancer--and nucleotide sequence aberrations in 91 of the 206 glioblastomas. This analysis provides new insights into the roles of ERBB2, NF1 and TP53, uncovers frequent mutations of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase regulatory subunit gene PIK3R1, and provides a network view of the pathways altered in the development of glioblastoma. Furthermore, integration of mutation, DNA methylation and clinical treatment data reveals a link between MGMT promoter methylation and a hypermutator phenotype consequent to mismatch repair deficiency in treated glioblastomas, an observation with potential clinical implications. Together, these findings establish the feasibility and power of TCGA, demonstrating that it can rapidly expand knowledge of the molecular basis of cancer. PMID:18772890

  19. Identification and characterization of essential genes in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Hughes, Nicholas W; Krupczak, Kevin M; Post, Yorick; Wei, Jenny J; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2015-11-27

    Large-scale genetic analysis of lethal phenotypes has elucidated the molecular underpinnings of many biological processes. Using the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, we constructed a genome-wide single-guide RNA library to screen for genes required for proliferation and survival in a human cancer cell line. Our screen revealed the set of cell-essential genes, which was validated with an orthogonal gene-trap-based screen and comparison with yeast gene knockouts. This set is enriched for genes that encode components of fundamental pathways, are expressed at high levels, and contain few inactivating polymorphisms in the human population. We also uncovered a large group of uncharacterized genes involved in RNA processing, a number of whose products localize to the nucleolus. Last, screens in additional cell lines showed a high degree of overlap in gene essentiality but also revealed differences specific to each cell line and cancer type that reflect the developmental origin, oncogenic drivers, paralogous gene expression pattern, and chromosomal structure of each line. These results demonstrate the power of CRISPR-based screens and suggest a general strategy for identifying liabilities in cancer cells. PMID:26472758

  20. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human epidermal melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haltaufderhyde, Kirk D.; Oancea, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Because human epidermal melanocytes (HEMs) provide critical protection against skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging, a genome-wide perspective of gene expression in these cells is vital to understanding human skin physiology. In this study we performed high throughput sequencing of HEMs to obtain a complete data set of transcript sizes, abundances, and splicing. As expected, we found that melanocyte specific genes that function in pigmentation were among the highest expressed genes. We analyzed receptor, ion channel and transcription factor gene families to get a better understanding of the cell signalling pathways used by melanocytes. We also performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of lightly versus darkly pigmented HEMs and found 16 genes differentially expressed in the two pigmentation phenotypes; of those, only one putative melanosomal transporter (SLC45A2) has known function in pigmentation. In addition, we found 166 genes with splice isoforms expressed exclusively in one pigmentation phenotype, 17 of which are genes involved in signal transduction. Our melanocyte transcriptome study provides a comprehensive view and may help identify novel pigmentation genes and potential pharmacological targets. PMID:25451175

  1. Targeted Genome Editing in Human Repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Genovese, Pietro; Tomaso, Tiziano Di; Firrito, Claudia; Calabria, Andrea; Moi, Davide; Mazzieri, Roberta; Bonini, Chiara; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Gentner, Bernhard; Montini, Eugenio; Lombardo, Angelo; Naldini, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Targeted genome editing by artificial nucleases has brought the goal of site-specific transgene integration and gene correction within the reach of gene therapy. However, its application to long-term repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) has remained elusive. Here we show that poor permissiveness to gene transfer and limited proficiency of the homology directed DNA repair pathway constrain gene targeting in human HSCs. By tailoring delivery platforms and culture conditions we overcame these barriers and provide stringent evidence of targeted integration in human HSCs by long-term multilineage repopulation of transplanted mice. We demonstrate the therapeutic potential of our strategy by targeting a corrective cDNA into the IL2RG gene of HSCs from healthy donors and a subject with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID-X1). Gene edited HSCs sustained normal hematopoiesis and gave rise to functional lymphoid cells that possess a selective growth advantage over those carrying disruptive IL2RG mutations. These results open new avenues for treating SCID-X1 and other diseases. PMID:24870228

  2. Comparison of whole genome sequences from human and non-human Escherichia coli O26 strains

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Keri N.; Clawson, Michael L.; Strockbine, Nancy A.; Mandrell, Robert E.; Johnson, Roger; Ziebell, Kim; Zhao, Shaohua; Fratamico, Pina M.; Stones, Robert; Allard, Marc W.; Bono, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26 is the second leading E. coli serogroup responsible for human illness outbreaks behind E. coli O157:H7. Recent outbreaks have been linked to emerging pathogenic O26:H11 strains harboring stx2 only. Cattle have been recognized as an important reservoir of O26 strains harboring stx1; however the reservoir of these emerging stx2 strains is unknown. The objective of this study was to identify nucleotide polymorphisms in human and cattle-derived strains in order to compare differences in polymorphism derived genotypes and virulence gene profiles between the two host species. Whole genome sequencing was performed on 182 epidemiologically unrelated O26 strains, including 109 human-derived strains and 73 non-human-derived strains. A panel of 289 O26 strains (241 STEC and 48 non-STEC) was subsequently genotyped using a set of 283 polymorphisms identified by whole genome sequencing, resulting in 64 unique genotypes. Phylogenetic analyses identified seven clusters within the O26 strains. The seven clusters did not distinguish between isolates originating from humans or cattle; however, clusters did correspond with particular virulence gene profiles. Human and non-human-derived strains harboring stx1 clustered separately from strains harboring stx2, strains harboring eae, and non-STEC strains. Strains harboring stx2 were more closely related to non-STEC strains and strains harboring eae than to strains harboring stx1. The finding of human and cattle-derived strains with the same polymorphism derived genotypes and similar virulence gene profiles, provides evidence that similar strains are found in cattle and humans and transmission between the two species may occur. PMID:25815275

  3. Genomic Copy Number Variations in the Genomes of Leukocytes Predict Prostate Cancer Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Zhiguang; Martin, Amantha; Nelson, Joel B.; Tseng, George C.; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of prostate cancer clinical courses remains elusive. In this study, we performed whole genome copy number analysis on leukocytes of 273 prostate cancer patients using Affymetrix SNP6.0 chip. Copy number variations (CNV) were found across all chromosomes of the human genome. An average of 152 CNV fragments per genome was identified in the leukocytes from prostate cancer patients. The size distributions of CNV in the genome of leukocytes were highly correlative with prostate cancer aggressiveness. A prostate cancer outcome prediction model was developed based on large size ratio of CNV from the leukocyte genomes. This prediction model generated an average prediction rate of 75.2%, with sensitivity of 77.3% and specificity of 69.0% for prostate cancer recurrence. When combined with Nomogram and the status of fusion transcripts, the average prediction rate was improved to 82.5% with sensitivity of 84.8% and specificity of 78.2%. In addition, the leukocyte prediction model was 62.6% accurate in predicting short prostate specific antigen doubling time. When combined with Gleason’s grade, Nomogram and the status of fusion transcripts, the prediction model generated a correct prediction rate of 77.5% with 73.7% sensitivity and 80.1% specificity. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that CNVs in leukocyte genomes are predictive of clinical outcomes of a human malignancy. PMID:26295840

  4. The Affymetrix DMET Plus Platform Reveals Unique Distribution of ADME-Related Variants in Ethnic Arabs

    PubMed Central

    Wakil, Salma M.; Nguyen, Cao; Muiya, Nzioka P.; Andres, Editha; Lykowska-Tarnowska, Agnieszka; Baz, Batoul; Meyer, Brian F.; Morahan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus Premier Pack has been designed to genotype 1936 gene variants thought to be essential for screening patients in personalized drug therapy. These variants include the cytochrome P450s (CYP450s), the key metabolizing enzymes, many other enzymes involved in phase I and phase II pharmacokinetic reactions, and signaling mediators associated with variability in clinical response to numerous drugs not only among individuals, but also between ethnic populations. Materials and Methods. We genotyped 600 Saudi individuals for 1936 variants on the DMET platform to evaluate their clinical potential in personalized medicine in ethnic Arabs. Results. Approximately 49% each of the 437 CYP450 variants, 56% of the 581 transporters, 56% of 419 transferases, 48% of the 104 dehydrogenases, and 58% of the remaining 390 variants were detected. Several variants, such as rs3740071, rs6193, rs258751, rs6199, rs11568421, and rs8187797, exhibited significantly either higher or lower minor allele frequencies (MAFs) than those in other ethnic groups. Discussion. The present study revealed some unique distribution trends for several variants in Arabs, which displayed partly inverse allelic prevalence compared to other ethnic populations. The results point therefore to the need to verify and ascertain the prevalence of a variant as a prerequisite for engaging it in clinical routine screening in personalized medicine in any given population. PMID:25802476

  5. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Christopher A.; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo; Ferreira, Márcia Eliana da Silva; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; León-Narváez, Henry; Longo, Larissa V. G.; Ma, Li-Jun; Malavazi, Iran; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Morais, Flavia V.; Pereira, Maristela; Rodríguez-Brito, Sabrina; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salem-Izacc, Silvia M.; Sykes, Sean M.; Teixeira, Marcus Melo; Vallejo, Milene C.; Walter, Maria Emília Machado Telles; Yandava, Chandri; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zucker, Jeremy; Felipe, Maria Sueli; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Haas, Brian J.; McEwen, Juan G.; Nino-Vega, Gustavo; Puccia, Rosana; San-Blas, Gioconda; Soares, Celia Maria de Almeida; Birren, Bruce W.; Cuomo, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18) and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01). These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic species of

  6. Microsatellite Interruptions Stabilize Primate Genomes and Exist as Population-Specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms within Individual Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ananda, Guruprasad; Hile, Suzanne E.; Breski, Amanda; Wang, Yanli; Kelkar, Yogeshwar; Makova, Kateryna D.; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Interruptions of microsatellite sequences impact genome evolution and can alter disease manifestation. However, human polymorphism levels at interrupted microsatellites (iMSs) are not known at a genome-wide scale, and the pathways for gaining interruptions are poorly understood. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase-1 variant call set, we interrogated mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats up to 10 units in length. We detected ∼26,000–40,000 iMSs within each of four human population groups (African, European, East Asian, and American). We identified population-specific iMSs within exonic regions, and discovered that known disease-associated iMSs contain alleles present at differing frequencies among the populations. By analyzing longer microsatellites in primate genomes, we demonstrate that single interruptions result in a genome-wide average two- to six-fold reduction in microsatellite mutability, as compared with perfect microsatellites. Centrally located interruptions lowered mutability dramatically, by two to three orders of magnitude. Using a biochemical approach, we tested directly whether the mutability of a specific iMS is lower because of decreased DNA polymerase strand slippage errors. Modeling the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene sequence, we observed that a single base substitution interruption reduced strand slippage error rates five- to 50-fold, relative to a perfect repeat, during synthesis by DNA polymerases α, β, or η. Computationally, we demonstrate that iMSs arise primarily by base substitution mutations within individual human genomes. Our biochemical survey of human DNA polymerase α, β, δ, κ, and η error rates within certain microsatellites suggests that interruptions are created most frequently by low fidelity polymerases. Our combined computational and biochemical results demonstrate that iMSs are abundant in human genomes and are sources of population-specific genetic variation that may affect genome stability. The

  7. The evolution and functional impact of human deletion variants shared with archaic hominin genomes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Lung; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Karakoc, Emre; Ajay, Jerry; Gokcumen, Omer

    2015-04-01

    Allele sharing between modern and archaic hominin genomes has been variously interpreted to have originated from ancestral genetic structure or through non-African introgression from archaic hominins. However, evolution of polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes has yet to be studied. We identified 427 polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, approximately 87% of which originated before the Human-Neandertal divergence (ancient) and only approximately 9% of which have been introgressed from Neandertals (introgressed). Recurrence, incomplete lineage sorting between human and chimp lineages, and hominid-specific insertions constitute the remaining approximately 4% of allele sharing between humans and archaic hominins. We observed that ancient deletions correspond to more than 13% of all common (>5% allele frequency) deletion variation among modern humans. Our analyses indicate that the genomic landscapes of both ancient and introgressed deletion variants were primarily shaped by purifying selection, eliminating large and exonic variants. We found 17 exonic deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, including those leading to three fusion transcripts. The affected genes are involved in metabolism of external and internal compounds, growth and sperm formation, as well as susceptibility to psoriasis and Crohn's disease. Our analyses suggest that these "exonic" deletion variants have evolved through different adaptive forces, including balancing and population-specific positive selection. Our findings reveal that genomic structural variants that are shared between humans and archaic hominin genomes are common among modern humans and can influence biomedically and evolutionarily important phenotypes. PMID:25556237

  8. Genetic and statistical study of HIV integration in the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, Inês J.; Gonçalves, Juliana; Moreira, Elsa; Mexia, João T.; Rueff, José; Brás, Aldina

    2013-10-01

    Integration of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA into human genome is essential for HIV-induced disease. The human genome is organized into chromosomes and within these we can define the chromosomal fragile sites. Our aim is to contribute to help clarifying the integration sites preferences of HIV1 and HIV2 in fragile or non-fragile regions. Here we apply statistical techniques, namely non-parametric tests and analysis of variance for analyzing two sets of data of HIV1 and HIV2 integrations in the human genome. The results show that the integrations occur significantly with more intensity in the non-fragile regions of the human genome and that the HIV1 in particular has the major contribution to this fact. This study could have implications in human disease.

  9. Extensive sequencing of seven human genomes to characterize benchmark reference materials.

    PubMed

    Zook, Justin M; Catoe, David; McDaniel, Jennifer; Vang, Lindsay; Spies, Noah; Sidow, Arend; Weng, Ziming; Liu, Yuling; Mason, Christopher E; Alexander, Noah; Henaff, Elizabeth; McIntyre, Alexa B R; Chandramohan, Dhruva; Chen, Feng; Jaeger, Erich; Moshrefi, Ali; Pham, Khoa; Stedman, William; Liang, Tiffany; Saghbini, Michael; Dzakula, Zeljko; Hastie, Alex; Cao, Han; Deikus, Gintaras; Schadt, Eric; Sebra, Robert; Bashir, Ali; Truty, Rebecca M; Chang, Christopher C; Gulbahce, Natali; Zhao, Keyan; Ghosh, Srinka; Hyland, Fiona; Fu, Yutao; Chaisson, Mark; Xiao, Chunlin; Trow, Jonathan; Sherry, Stephen T; Zaranek, Alexander W; Ball, Madeleine; Bobe, Jason; Estep, Preston; Church, George M; Marks, Patrick; Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou, Sofia; Zheng, Grace X Y; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Ordonez, Heather S; Mudivarti, Patrice A; Giorda, Kristina; Sheng, Ying; Rypdal, Karoline Bjarnesdatter; Salit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The Genome in a Bottle Consortium, hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is creating reference materials and data for human genome sequencing, as well as methods for genome comparison and benchmarking. Here, we describe a large, diverse set of sequencing data for seven human genomes; five are current or candidate NIST Reference Materials. The pilot genome, NA12878, has been released as NIST RM 8398. We also describe data from two Personal Genome Project trios, one of Ashkenazim Jewish ancestry and one of Chinese ancestry. The data come from 12 technologies: BioNano Genomics, Complete Genomics paired-end and LFR, Ion Proton exome, Oxford Nanopore, Pacific Biosciences, SOLiD, 10X Genomics GemCode WGS, and Illumina exome and WGS paired-end, mate-pair, and synthetic long reads. Cell lines, DNA, and data from these individuals are publicly available. Therefore, we expect these data to be useful for revealing novel information about the human genome and improving sequencing technologies, SNP, indel, and structural variant calling, and de novo assembly. PMID:27271295

  10. Extensive sequencing of seven human genomes to characterize benchmark reference materials

    PubMed Central

    Zook, Justin M.; Catoe, David; McDaniel, Jennifer; Vang, Lindsay; Spies, Noah; Sidow, Arend; Weng, Ziming; Liu, Yuling; Mason, Christopher E.; Alexander, Noah; Henaff, Elizabeth; McIntyre, Alexa B.R.; Chandramohan, Dhruva; Chen, Feng; Jaeger, Erich; Moshrefi, Ali; Pham, Khoa; Stedman, William; Liang, Tiffany; Saghbini, Michael; Dzakula, Zeljko; Hastie, Alex; Cao, Han; Deikus, Gintaras; Schadt, Eric; Sebra, Robert; Bashir, Ali; Truty, Rebecca M.; Chang, Christopher C.; Gulbahce, Natali; Zhao, Keyan; Ghosh, Srinka; Hyland, Fiona; Fu, Yutao; Chaisson, Mark; Xiao, Chunlin; Trow, Jonathan; Sherry, Stephen T.; Zaranek, Alexander W.; Ball, Madeleine; Bobe, Jason; Estep, Preston; Church, George M.; Marks, Patrick; Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou, Sofia; Zheng, Grace X.Y.; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Ordonez, Heather S.; Mudivarti, Patrice A.; Giorda, Kristina; Sheng, Ying; Rypdal, Karoline Bjarnesdatter; Salit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The Genome in a Bottle Consortium, hosted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is creating reference materials and data for human genome sequencing, as well as methods for genome comparison and benchmarking. Here, we describe a large, diverse set of sequencing data for seven human genomes; five are current or candidate NIST Reference Materials. The pilot genome, NA12878, has been released as NIST RM 8398. We also describe data from two Personal Genome Project trios, one of Ashkenazim Jewish ancestry and one of Chinese ancestry. The data come from 12 technologies: BioNano Genomics, Complete Genomics paired-end and LFR, Ion Proton exome, Oxford Nanopore, Pacific Biosciences, SOLiD, 10X Genomics GemCode WGS, and Illumina exome and WGS paired-end, mate-pair, and synthetic long reads. Cell lines, DNA, and data from these individuals are publicly available. Therefore, we expect these data to be useful for revealing novel information about the human genome and improving sequencing technologies, SNP, indel, and structural variant calling, and de novo assembly. PMID:27271295

  11. Regulation of human genome expression and RNA splicing by human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Gauson, Elaine J; Windle, Brad; Donaldson, Mary M; Caffarel, Maria M; Dornan, Edward S; Coleman, Nicholas; Herzyk, Pawel; Henderson, Scott C; Wang, Xu; Morgan, Iain M

    2014-11-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is causative in human cancer. The E2 protein regulates transcription from and replication of the viral genome; the role of E2 in regulating the host genome has been less well studied. We have expressed HPV16 E2 (E2) stably in U2OS cells; these cells tolerate E2 expression well and gene expression analysis identified 74 genes showing differential expression specific to E2. Analysis of published gene expression data sets during cervical cancer progression identified 20 of the genes as being altered in a similar direction as the E2 specific genes. In addition, E2 altered the splicing of many genes implicated in cancer and cell motility. The E2 expressing cells showed no alteration in cell growth but were altered in cell motility, consistent with the E2 induced altered splicing predicted to affect this cellular function. The results present a model system for investigating E2 regulation of the host genome. PMID:25129434

  12. Sequence Analysis and Characterization of Active Human Alu Subfamilies Based on the 1000 Genomes Pilot Project

    PubMed Central

    Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Hotard, Ashley B.; Ranck, Megan C.; Fontenot, Catherine C.; Storer, Jessica; Stewart, Chip; Marth, Gabor T.; Batzer, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the 1000 Genomes Consortium is to characterize human genome structural variation (SV), including forms of copy number variations such as deletions, duplications, and insertions. Mobile element insertions, particularly Alu elements, are major contributors to genomic SV among humans. During the pilot phase of the project we experimentally validated 645 (611 intergenic and 34 exon targeted) polymorphic “young” Alu insertion events, absent from the human reference genome. Here, we report high resolution sequencing of 343 (322 unique) recent Alu insertion events, along with their respective target site duplications, precise genomic breakpoint coordinates, subfamily assignment, percent divergence, and estimated A-rich tail lengths. All the sequenced Alu loci were derived from the AluY lineage with no evidence of retrotransposition activity involving older Alu families (e.g., AluJ and AluS). AluYa5 is currently the most active Alu subfamily in the human lineage, followed by AluYb8, and many others including three newly identified subfamilies we have termed AluYb7a3, AluYb8b1, and AluYa4a1. This report provides the structural details of 322 unique Alu variants from individual human genomes collectively adding about 100 kb of genomic variation. Many Alu subfamilies are currently active in human populations, including a surprising level of AluY retrotransposition. Human Alu subfamilies exhibit continuous evolution with potential drivers sprouting new Alu lineages. PMID:26319576

  13. Accurate whole genome sequencing and haplotyping from10-20 human cells

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brock A.; Kermani, Bahram G.; Sparks, Andrew B.; Alferov, Oleg; Hong, Peter; Alexeev, Andrei; Jiang, Yuan; Dahl, Fredrik; Tang, Y. Tom; Haas, Juergen; Robasky, Kimberly; Zaranek, Alexander Wait; Lee, Je-Hyuk; Ball, Madeleine Price; Peterson, Joseph E.; Perazich, Helena; Yeung, George; Liu, Jia; Chen, Linsu; Kennemer, Michael I.; Pothuraju, Kaliprasad; Konvicka, Karel; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, Mike; Pant, Krishna P.; Ebert, Jessica C.; Nilsen, Geoffrey B.; Baccash, Jonathan; Halpern, Aaron L.; Church, George M.; Drmanac, Radoje

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in whole genome sequencing have brought the vision of personal genomics and genomic medicine closer to reality. However, current methods lack clinical accuracy and the ability to describe the context (haplotypes) in which genome variants co-occur in a cost-effective manner. Here we describe a low-cost DNA sequencing and haplotyping process, Long Fragment Read (LFR) technology, similar to sequencing long single DNA molecules without cloning or separation of metaphase chromosomes. In this study, ten LFR libraries were made using only ~100 pg of human DNA per sample. Up to 97% of the heterozygous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were assembled into long haplotype contigs. Removal of false positive SNVs not phased by multiple LFR haplotypes resulted in a final genome error rate of 1 in 10 Mb. Cost-effective and accurate genome sequencing and haplotyping from 10-20 human cells, as demonstrated here, will enable comprehensive genetic studies and diverse clinical applications. PMID:22785314

  14. Sequencing of the smallest Apicomplexan genome from the human pathogen Babesia microti†

    PubMed Central

    Cornillot, Emmanuel; Hadj-Kaddour, Kamel; Dassouli, Amina; Noel, Benjamin; Ranwez, Vincent; Vacherie, Benoît; Augagneur, Yoann; Brès, Virginie; Duclos, Aurelie; Randazzo, Sylvie; Carcy, Bernard; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Delbecq, Stéphane; Moubri-Ménage, Karina; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Usmani-Brown, Sahar; Bringaud, Frédéric; Wincker, Patrick; Vivarès, Christian P.; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Schetters, Theo P.; Krause, Peter J.; Gorenflot, André; Berry, Vincent; Barbe, Valérie; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2012-01-01

    We have sequenced the genome of the emerging human pathogen Babesia microti and compared it with that of other protozoa. B. microti has the smallest nuclear genome among all Apicomplexan parasites sequenced to date with three chromosomes encoding ∼3500 polypeptides, several of which are species specific. Genome-wide phylogenetic analyses indicate that B. microti is significantly distant from all species of Babesidae and Theileridae and defines a new clade in the phylum Apicomplexa. Furthermore, unlike all other Apicomplexa, its mitochondrial genome is circular. Genome-scale reconstruction of functional networks revealed that B. microti has the minimal metabolic requirement for intraerythrocytic protozoan parasitism. B. microti multigene families differ from those of other protozoa in both the copy number and organization. Two lateral transfer events with significant metabolic implications occurred during the evolution of this parasite. The genomic sequencing of B. microti identified several targets suitable for the development of diagnostic assays and novel therapies for human babesiosis. PMID:22833609

  15. Diversity through duplication: whole-genome sequencing reveals novel gene retrocopies in the human population.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Sandra R; Salvador-Palomeque, Carmen; Faulkner, Geoffrey J

    2014-05-01

    Gene retrocopies are generated by reverse transcription and genomic integration of mRNA. As such, retrocopies present an important exception to the central dogma of molecular biology, and have substantially impacted the functional landscape of the metazoan genome. While an estimated 8,000-17,000 retrocopies exist in the human genome reference sequence, the extent of variation between individuals in terms of retrocopy content has remained largely unexplored. Three recent studies by Abyzov et al., Ewing et al. and Schrider et al. have exploited 1,000 Genomes Project Consortium data, as well as other sources of whole-genome sequencing data, to uncover novel gene retrocopies. Here, we compare the methods and results of these three studies, highlight the impact of retrocopies in human diversity and genome evolution, and speculate on the potential for somatic gene retrocopies to impact cancer etiology and genetic diversity among individual neurons in the mammalian brain. PMID:24615986

  16. The lawful uses of knowledge from the Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Grad, F.P.

    1994-04-15

    Part I of this study deals with the right to know or not to know personal genetic information, and examines available legal protections of the right of privacy and the adverse effect of the disclosure of genetic information both on employment and insurance interests and on self esteem and protection of personal integrity. The study examines the rationale for the legal protection of privacy as the protection of a public interest. It examines the very limited protections currently available for privacy interests, including genetic privacy interests, and concludes that there is a need for broader, more far-reaching legal protections. The second part of the study is based on the assumption that as major a project as the Human Genome Project, spending billions of dollars on science which is health related, will indeed be applied for preventive and therapeutic public health purposes, as it has been in the past. It also addresses the recurring fear that public health initiatives in the genetic area must evolve a new eugenic agenda, that we must not repeat the miserable discriminatory experiences of the past.

  17. How rapidly does the human mitochondrial genome evolve?

    PubMed Central

    Howell, N.; Kubacka, I.; Mackey, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an empirical nucleotide-sequencing approach indicate that the evolution of the human mitochondrial noncoding D-loop is both more rapid and more complex than is revealed by standard phylogenetic approaches. The nucleotide sequence of the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome was determined for 45 members of a large matrilineal Leber hereditary optic neuropathy pedigree. Two germ-line mutations have arisen in members of one branch of the family, thereby leading to triplasmic descendants with three mitochondrial genotypes. Segregation toward the homoplasmic state can occur within a single generation in some of these descendants, a result that suggests rapid fixation of mitochondrial mutations as a result of developmental bottlenecking. However, slow segregation was observed in other offspring, and therefore no single or simple pattern of segregation can be generalized from the available data. Evidence for rare mtDNA recombination within the D-loop was obtained for one family member. In addition to these germ-line mutations, a somatic mutation was found in the D-loop of one family member. When this genealogical approach was applied to the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial coding regions, the results again indicated a very rapid rate of evolution. PMID:8751850

  18. How rapidly does the human mitochondrial genome evolve?

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, N.; Kubacka, I.; Mackey, D.A. |

    1996-09-01

    The results of an empirical nucleotide-sequencing approach indicate that the evolution of the human mitochondrial noncoding D-loop is both more rapid and more complex than is revealed by standard phylogenetic approaches. The nucleotide sequence of the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome was determined for 45 members of a large matrilineal Leber hereditary optic neuropathy pedigree. Two germ-line mutations have arisen in members of one branch of the family, thereby leading to triplasmic descendants with three mitochondrial genotypes. Segregation toward the homoplasmic state can occur within a single generation in some of these descendants, a result that suggests rapid fixation of mitochondrial mutations as a result of developmental bottlenecking. However, slow segregation was observed in other offspring, and therefore no single or simple pattern of segregation can be generalized from the available data. Evidence for rare mtDNA recombination within the D-loop was obtained for one family member. In addition to these germ-line mutations, a somatic mutation was found in the D-loop of one family member. When this genealogical approach was applied to the nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial coding regions, the results again indicated a very rapid rate of evolution. 44 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A functional genomic perspective on human well-being

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, Barbara L.; Grewen, Karen M.; Coffey, Kimberly A.; Algoe, Sara B.; Firestine, Ann M.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Cole, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    To identify molecular mechanisms underlying the prospective health advantages associated with psychological well-being, we analyzed leukocyte basal gene expression profiles in 80 healthy adults who were assessed for hedonic and eudaimonic well-being, as well as potentially confounded negative psychological and behavioral factors. Hedonic and eudaimonic well-being showed similar affective correlates but highly divergent transcriptome profiles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from people with high levels of hedonic well-being showed up-regulated expression of a stress-related conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) involving increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in antibody synthesis and type I IFN response. In contrast, high levels of eudaimonic well-being were associated with CTRA down-regulation. Promoter-based bioinformatics implicated distinct patterns of transcription factor activity in structuring the observed differences in gene expression associated with eudaimonic well-being (reduced NF-κB and AP-1 signaling and increased IRF and STAT signaling). Transcript origin analysis identified monocytes, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and B lymphocytes as primary cellular mediators of these dynamics. The finding that hedonic and eudaimonic well-being engage distinct gene regulatory programs despite their similar effects on total well-being and depressive symptoms implies that the human genome may be more sensitive to qualitative variations in well-being than are our conscious affective experiences. PMID:23898182

  20. Sequence, genomic structure, and chromosomal assignment of human DOC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Albertsen, H.M.; Williams, B.; Smith, S.A.

    1996-04-15

    DOC-2 is a human gene originally identified as a 767-bp cDNA fragment isolated from normal ovarian epithelial cells by differential display against ovarian carcinoma cells. We have now determined the complete cDNA sequence of the 3.2-kb DOC-2 transcript and localized the gene to chromosome 5. A 12.5-kb genomic fragment at the 5{prime}-end of DOC-2 has also been sequenced, revealing the intron-exon structure of the first eight exons (788 bases) of the DOC-2 gene. Translation of the DOC-2 cDNA predicts a hydrophobic protein of 770 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 82.5 kDa. Comparison of the DNA and amino acid sequences of DOC-2 to publicly accessible sequence data-bases revealed 83% identity to p96, a murine-responsive phosphoprotein. In addition, about 45% identity was observed between the first 140 N-terminal residues of DOC-2 and the Caenorhabditas elegans M110.5 and Drosophila melanoaster Dab genes. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  1. A functional genomic perspective on human well-being.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L; Grewen, Karen M; Coffey, Kimberly A; Algoe, Sara B; Firestine, Ann M; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; Cole, Steven W

    2013-08-13

    To identify molecular mechanisms underlying the prospective health advantages associated with psychological well-being, we analyzed leukocyte basal gene expression profiles in 80 healthy adults who were assessed for hedonic and eudaimonic well-being, as well as potentially confounded negative psychological and behavioral factors. Hedonic and eudaimonic well-being showed similar affective correlates but highly divergent transcriptome profiles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from people with high levels of hedonic well-being showed up-regulated expression of a stress-related conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) involving increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in antibody synthesis and type I IFN response. In contrast, high levels of eudaimonic well-being were associated with CTRA down-regulation. Promoter-based bioinformatics implicated distinct patterns of transcription factor activity in structuring the observed differences in gene expression associated with eudaimonic well-being (reduced NF-κB and AP-1 signaling and increased IRF and STAT signaling). Transcript origin analysis identified monocytes, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and B lymphocytes as primary cellular mediators of these dynamics. The finding that hedonic and eudaimonic well-being engage distinct gene regulatory programs despite their similar effects on total well-being and depressive symptoms implies that the human genome may be more sensitive to qualitative variations in well-being than are our conscious affective experiences. PMID:23898182

  2. Correlations between isochores and chromosomal bands in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, S.; Della Valle, G. ); De Sario, A.; Bernardi, G. ); Wiegant, J.; Raap, A.K. )

    1993-11-15

    The human genome is made up of long DNA segments, the isochores, which are compositionally homogeneous and can be subdivided into a small number of families characterized by different G+C levels. Chromosome in situ suppression hybridization (in which excess unlabeled human DNA is added to suppress hybridization of repeated sequences present in the probe, enabling enhanced observation of single-copy sequences) of DNA fractions characterized by an increasing G+C level was carried out to determine the distribution of [open quotes]single-copy[close quotes] sequences corresponding to isochore families L1 + L2, H1, H2, and H3 on metaphase chromosomes. This produced a banding pattern progressing from a relatively diffuse staining to an R-banding, to a T-banding. More specifically, the results showed that (i) T-bands are formed by the G+C-richest isochores of the H3 family and by part of the G+C-rich isochores of the H1 and H2 families (with a predominance of the latter); (ii) R[prime]-bands (namely, R-bands exclusive of T-bands) are formed to almost equal extents by G+C-rich isochores of the H1 families (with a minor contribution of the H2 and H3 families) and by G+C-poor isochores of the L1 + L2 families; (iii) G-bands essentially consist of G+C-poor isochores from the L1 + L2 families, with a minor contribution of isochores from the H1 family. These results not only clarify the correlations between DNA base composition and chromosomal bands but also provide information on the distribution of genes in chromosomes, gene concentration increasing with the G+C levels of isochores.

  3. Genomics into Healthcare: The 5th Pan Arab Human Genetics Conference and 2013 Golden Helix Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Fortina, Paolo; AlKhaja, Najib; Al Ali, Mahmoud Taleb; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak; Nair, Pratibha; Innocenti, Federico; Patrinos, George P.; Kricka, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    The joint 5th Pan Arab Human Genetics conference and 2013 Golden Helix Symposium, “Genomics into Healthcare” was coorganized by the Center for Arab Genomic Studies (http://www.cags.org.ae) in collaboration with the Golden Helix Foundation (http://www.goldenhelix.org) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates from 17 to 19 November, 2013. The meeting was attended by over 900 participants, doctors and biomedical students from over 50 countries and was organized into a series of nine themed sessions that covered cancer genomics and epigenetics, genomic and epigenetic studies, genomics of blood and metabolic disorders, cytogenetic diagnosis and molecular profiling, next-generation sequencing, consanguinity and hereditary diseases, clinical genomics, clinical applications of pharmacogenomics, and genomics in public health. PMID:24526565

  4. Structural variation of the human genome: mechanisms, assays, and role in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Claudia M B; Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R

    2011-02-01

    Genomic disorders are defined as diseases caused by rearrangements of the genome incited by a genomic architecture that conveys instability. Y-chromosome related dysfunctions such as male infertility are frequently associated with gross DNA rearrangements resulting from its peculiar genomic architecture. The Y-chromosome has evolved into a highly specialized chromosome to perform male functions, mainly spermatogenesis. Direct and inverted repeats, some of them palindromes with highly identical nucleotide sequences that can form DNA cruciform structures, characterize the genomic structure of the Y-chromosome long arm. Some particular Y chromosome genomic deletions can cause spermatogenic failure likely because of removal of one or more transcriptional units with a potential role in spermatogenesis. We describe mechanisms underlying the formation of human genomic rearrangements on autosomes and review Y-chromosome deletions associated with male infertility. PMID:21210740

  5. Inverted genomic segments and complex triplication rearrangements are mediated by inverted repeats in the human genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified complex genomic rearrangements consisting of intermixed duplications and triplications of genomic segments at the MECP2 and PLP1 loci. These complex rearrangements were characterized by a triplicated segment embedded within a duplication in 11 unrelated subjects. Notably, only two brea...

  6. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome

    PubMed Central

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of “domestication” of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci. PMID:25853282

  7. Whole genome analysis of Klebsiella pneumoniae T2-1-1 from human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Xin-Yue

    2016-03-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae T2-1-1 was isolated from the human tongue debris and subjected to whole genome sequencing on HiSeq platform and annotated on RAST. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession JAQL00000000. PMID:26981378

  8. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome.

    PubMed

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of "domestication" of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci. PMID:25853282

  9. Segmenting the human genome based on states of neutral genetic divergence.

    PubMed

    Kuruppumullage Don, Prabhani; Ananda, Guruprasad; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Makova, Kateryna D

    2013-09-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that divergence levels generated by different mutation types vary and covary across the human genome. To improve our still-incomplete understanding of the mechanistic basis of this phenomenon, we analyze several mutation types simultaneously, anchoring their variation to specific regions of the genome. Using hidden Markov models on insertion, deletion, nucleotide substitution, and microsatellite divergence estimates inferred from human-orangutan alignments of neutrally evolving genomic sequences, we segment the human genome into regions corresponding to different divergence states--each uniquely characterized by specific combinations of divergence levels. We then parsed the mutagenic contributions of various biochemical processes associating divergence states with a broad range of genomic landscape features. We find that high divergence states inhabit guanine- and cytosine (GC)-rich, highly recombining subtelomeric regions; low divergence states cover inner parts of autosomes; chromosome X forms its own state with lowest divergence; and a state of elevated microsatellite mutability is interspersed across the genome. These general trends are mirrored in human diversity data from the 1000 Genomes Project, and departures from them highlight the evolutionary history of primate chromosomes. We also find that genes and noncoding functional marks [annotations from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE)] are concentrated in high divergence states. Our results provide a powerful tool for biomedical data analysis: segmentations can be used to screen personal genome variants--including those associated with cancer and other diseases--and to improve computational predictions of noncoding functional elements. PMID:23959903

  10. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  11. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  12. Gene Expression Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of 16,000 Barley Genes Reveals a Complex Pattern of Genome-wide Transcriptional Regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcript abundance data from cRNA hybridizations to Affymetrix microarrays can be used for simultaneous marker development and genome-wide eQTL (expression Quantitative Trait Loci) analysis of crops. We have shown that it is easily possible to use the information from Affymetrix expression arrays ...

  13. Heteroplasmy in the Mitochondrial Genomes of Human Lice and Ticks Revealed by High Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haoyu; Barker, Stephen C.; Burger, Thomas D.; Raoult, Didier; Shao, Renfu

    2013-01-01

    The typical mitochondrial (mt) genomes of bilateral animals consist of 37 genes on a single circular chromosome. The mt genomes of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus, and the human head louse, Pediculus capitis, however, are extensively fragmented and contain 20 minichromosomes, with one to three genes on each minichromosome. Heteroplasmy, i.e. nucleotide polymorphisms in the mt genome within individuals, has been shown to be significantly higher in the mt cox1 gene of human lice than in humans and other animals that have the typical mt genomes. To understand whether the extent of heteroplasmy in human lice is associated with mt genome fragmentation, we sequenced the entire coding regions of all of the mt minichromosomes of six human body lice and six human head lice from Ethiopia, China and France with an Illumina HiSeq platform. For comparison, we also sequenced the entire coding regions of the mt genomes of seven species of ticks, which have the typical mitochondrial genome organization of bilateral animals. We found that the level of heteroplasmy varies significantly both among the human lice and among the ticks. The human lice from Ethiopia have significantly higher level of heteroplasmy than those from China and France (Pt<0.05). The tick, Amblyomma cajennense, has significantly higher level of heteroplasmy than other ticks (Pt<0.05). Our results indicate that heteroplasmy level can be substantially variable within a species and among closely related species, and does not appear to be determined by single factors such as genome fragmentation. PMID:24058467

  14. Heteroplasmy in the mitochondrial genomes of human lice and ticks revealed by high throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haoyu; Barker, Stephen C; Burger, Thomas D; Raoult, Didier; Shao, Renfu

    2013-01-01

    The typical mitochondrial (mt) genomes of bilateral animals consist of 37 genes on a single circular chromosome. The mt genomes of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus, and the human head louse, Pediculus capitis, however, are extensively fragmented and contain 20 minichromosomes, with one to three genes on each minichromosome. Heteroplasmy, i.e. nucleotide polymorphisms in the mt genome within individuals, has been shown to be significantly higher in the mt cox1 gene of human lice than in humans and other animals that have the typical mt genomes. To understand whether the extent of heteroplasmy in human lice is associated with mt genome fragmentation, we sequenced the entire coding regions of all of the mt minichromosomes of six human body lice and six human head lice from Ethiopia, China and France with an Illumina HiSeq platform. For comparison, we also sequenced the entire coding regions of the mt genomes of seven species of ticks, which have the typical mitochondrial genome organization of bilateral animals. We found that the level of heteroplasmy varies significantly both among the human lice and among the ticks. The human lice from Ethiopia have significantly higher level of heteroplasmy than those from China and France (Pt<0.05). The tick, Amblyomma cajennense, has significantly higher level of heteroplasmy than other ticks (Pt<0.05). Our results indicate that heteroplasmy level can be substantially variable within a species and among closely related species, and does not appear to be determined by single factors such as genome fragmentation. PMID:24058467

  15. Gene Expression and Genetic Variation in Human Atria

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Honghuang; Dolmatova, Elena V.; Morley, Michael P.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; McManus, David D.; Magnani, Jared W.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Hakonarson, Hakon; del Monte, Federica; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The human left and right atria have different susceptibilities to develop atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the molecular events related to structural and functional changes that enhance AF susceptibility are still poorly understood. Objective To characterize gene expression and genetic variation in human atria. Methods We studied the gene expression profiles and genetic variations in 53 left atrial and 52 right atrial tissue samples collected from the Myocardial Applied Genomics Network (MAGNet) repository. The tissues were collected from heart failure patients undergoing transplantation and from unused organ donor hearts with normal ventricular function. Gene expression was profiled using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133A Array. Genetic variation was profiled using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results We found that 109 genes were differentially expressed between left and right atrial tissues. A total of 187 and 259 significant cis-associations between transcript levels and genetic variants were identified in left and right atrial tissues, respectively. We also found that a SNP at a known AF locus, rs3740293, was associated with the expression of MYOZ1 in both left and right atrial tissues. Conclusion We found a distinct transcriptional profile between the right and left atrium, and extensive cis-associations between atrial transcripts and common genetic variants. Our results implicate MYOZ1 as the causative gene at the chromosome 10q22 locus for AF. PMID:24177373

  16. Fulfilling the Promise of a Sequenced Human Genome – Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Eric

    2009-05-27

    Eric Green, scientific director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), gives the opening keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM on May 27, 2009. Part 1 of 2

  17. Fulfilling the Promise of a Sequenced Human Genome – Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Eric

    2009-05-27

    Eric Green, scientific director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), gives the opening keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM on May 27, 2009. Part 2 of 2

  18. Human Genome Teacher Networking Project, Final Report, April 1, 1992 - March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Debra

    1999-10-01

    Project to provide education regarding ethical legal and social implications of Human Genome Project to high school science teachers through two consecutive summer workshops, in class activities, and peer teaching workshops.

  19. Understanding the Human Genome Project — A Fact Sheet | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Human Genome Project spurred a revolution in biotechnology innovation around the world and played a key ... the U.S. the global leader in the new biotechnology sector. In April 2003, researchers successfully completed the ...

  20. A semantic analysis of the annotations of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Purvesh; Done, Bogdan; Rao, Archana; Done, Arina; Draghici, Sorin

    2005-08-15

    The correct interpretation of any biological experiment depends in an essential way on the accuracy and consistency of the existing annotation databases. Such databases are ubiquitous and used by all life scientists in most experiments. However, it is well known that such databases are incomplete and many annotations may also be incorrect. In this paper we describe a technique that can be used to analyze the semantic content of such annotation databases. Our approach is able to extract implicit semantic relationships between genes and functions. This ability allows us to discover novel functions for known genes. This approach is able to identify missing and inaccurate annotations in existing annotation databases, and thus help improve their accuracy. We used our technique to analyze the current annotations of the human genome. From this body of annotations, we were able to predict 212 additional gene-function assignments. A subsequent literature search found that 138 of these gene-functions assignments are supported by existing peer-reviewed papers. An additional 23 assignments have been confirmed in the meantime by the addition of the respective annotations in later releases of the Gene Ontology database. Overall, the 161 confirmed assignments represent 75.95% of the proposed gene-function assignments. Only one of our predictions (0.4%) was contradicted by the existing literature. We could not find any relevant articles for 50 of our predictions (23.58%). The method is independent of the organism and can be used to analyze and improve the quality of the data of any public or private annotation database. PMID:15955782

  1. Atlas of Cryptic Genetic Relatedness Among 1000 Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Larisa; Qiu, Shuhao; Dutta, Rajib; Fedorov, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    A novel computational method for detecting identical-by-descent (IBD) chromosomal segments between sequenced genomes is presented. It utilizes the distribution patterns of very rare genetic variants (vrGVs), which have minor allele frequencies <0.2%. Contrary to the existing probabilistic approaches our method is rather deterministic, because it considers a group of very rare events which cannot happen together only by chance. This method has been applied for exhaustive computational search of shared IBD segments among 1,092 sequenced individuals from 14 populations. It demonstrated that clusters of vrGVs are unique and powerful markers of genetic relatedness, that uncover IBD chromosomal segments between and within populations, irrespective of whether divergence was recent or occurred hundreds-to-thousands of years ago. We found that several IBD segments are shared by practically any possible pair of individuals belonging to the same population. Moreover, shared short IBD segments (median size 183 kb) were found in 10% of inter-continental human pairs, each comprising of a person from sub-Saharan Africa and a person from Southern Europe. The shortest shared IBD segments (median size 54 kb) were found in 0.42% of inter-continental pairs composed of individuals from Chinese/Japanese populations and Africans from Kenya and Nigeria. Knowledge of inheritance of IBD segments is important in clinical case–control and cohort studies, since unknown distant familial relationships could compromise interpretation of collected data. Clusters of vrGVs should be useful markers for familial relationship and common multifactorial disorders. PMID:26907499

  2. Atlas of Cryptic Genetic Relatedness Among 1000 Human Genomes.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Larisa; Qiu, Shuhao; Dutta, Rajib; Fedorov, Alexei

    2016-03-01

    A novel computational method for detecting identical-by-descent (IBD) chromosomal segments between sequenced genomes is presented. It utilizes the distribution patterns of very rare genetic variants (vrGVs), which have minor allele frequencies <0.2%. Contrary to the existing probabilistic approaches our method is rather deterministic, because it considers a group of very rare events which cannot happen together only by chance. This method has been applied for exhaustive computational search of shared IBD segments among 1,092 sequenced individuals from 14 populations. It demonstrated that clusters of vrGVs are unique and powerful markers of genetic relatedness, that uncover IBD chromosomal segments between and within populations, irrespective of whether divergence was recent or occurred hundreds-to-thousands of years ago. We found that several IBD segments are shared by practically any possible pair of individuals belonging to the same population. Moreover, shared short IBD segments (median size 183 kb) were found in 10% of inter-continental human pairs, each comprising of a person from sub-Saharan Africa and a person from Southern Europe. The shortest shared IBD segments (median size 54 kb) were found in 0.42% of inter-continental pairs composed of individuals from Chinese/Japanese populations and Africans from Kenya and Nigeria. Knowledge of inheritance of IBD segments is important in clinical case-control and cohort studies, since unknown distant familial relationships could compromise interpretation of collected data. Clusters of vrGVs should be useful markers for familial relationship and common multifactorial disorders. PMID:26907499

  3. Infrequency of cytomegalovirus genome in coronary arteriopathy of human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Kandolf, R.; Kendall, T. J.; Thieszen, S. L.; Wilson, J. E.; Radio, S. J.; Costanzo, M. R.; Winters, G. L.; Miller, L. L.; McManus, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    In heart transplantation, long-term engraftment success is severely limited by the rapid development of obliterative disease of the coronary arteries. Data from various groups have been suggestive of a pathogenetic role of herpesviruses, particularly human cytomegalovirus, in accelerated allograft coronary artery disease; however, results are not yet conclusive. This study examines the hypothesis that human cytomegalovirus infection of allograft tissues is related pathogenetically and directly to accelerated coronary artery disease. Using in situ DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction, we examined particular coronary artery segments from 41 human heart allografts (ranging from 4 days to greater than 4 years after transplantation; mean, 457 days) and 22 donor age- and gender-comparable, coronary site-matched trauma victims for presence of human cytomegalovirus DNA. Human cytomegalovirus genome was detected in 8 of 41 (19.5%) allografts and in 1 of 22 (4.5%) control hearts. This difference in positivity was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). In the human cytomegalovirus-positive hearts, viral genome was localized to perivascular myocardium or coronary artery media or adventitia. Human cytomegalovirus genome was not detected in arterial intima of any allograft or control heart, although human cytomegalovirus genome was readily identified within intima of small pulmonary arteries from lung tissue with human cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. By statistical analyses, the presence of human cytomegalovirus genome was not associated with the nature or digitized extent of transplant arteriopathy, evidence of rejection, allograft recipient or donor serological data suggestive of human cytomegalovirus infection, duration of allograft implantation, or causes of death or retransplantation. Thus, our data indicate a low frequency of detectable human cytomegalovirus genome in accelerated coronary artery disease and do not support a direct role for human cytomegalovirus

  4. Evaluating the Influence of Quality Control Decisions and Software Algorithms on SNP Calling for the Affymetrix 6.0 SNP Array Platform

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Mariza; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Bamlet, William R.; Matsumoto, Martha E.; Maharjan, Sooraj; Slager, Susan L.; Vachon, Celine M.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to evaluate the influence of quality control (QC) decisions using two genotype calling algorithms, CRLMM and Birdseed, designed for the Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0. Methods Various QC options were tried using the two algorithms and comparisons were made on subject and call rate and on association results using two data sets. Results For Birdseed, we recommend using the contrast QC instead of QC call rate for sample QC. For CRLMM, we recommend using the signal-to-noise rate ≥4 for sample QC and a posterior probability of 90% for genotype accuracy. For both algorithms, we recommend calling the genotype separately for each plate, and dropping SNPs with a lower call rate (<95%) before evaluating samples with lower call rates. To investigate whether the genotype calls from the two algorithms impacted the genome-wide association results, we performed association analysis using data from the GENOA cohort; we observed that the number of significant SNPs were similar using either CRLMM or Birdseed. Conclusions Using our suggested workflow both algorithms performed similarly; however, fewer samples were removed and CRLMM took half the time to run our 854 study samples (4.2 h) compared to Birdseed (8.4 h). PMID:21734406

  5. Identification of human-specific AluS elements through comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae; Kim, Yun-Ji; Mun, Seyoung; Kim, Heui-Soo; Han, Kyudong

    2015-01-25

    Mobile elements are responsible for ~45% of the human genome. Among them is the Alu element, accounting for 10% of the human genome (>1.1million copies). Several studies of Alu elements have reported that they are frequently involved in human genetic diseases and genomic rearrangements. In this study, we investigated the AluS subfamily, which is a relatively old Alu subfamily and has the highest copy number in primate genomes. Previously, a set of 263 human-specific AluS insertions was identified in the human genome. To validate these, we compared each of the human-specific AluS loci with its pre-insertion site in other primate genomes, including chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan. We obtained 24 putative human-specific AluS candidates via the in silico analysis and manual inspection, and then tried to verify them using PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Through the PCR product sequencing, we were able to detect two instances of near-parallel Alu insertions in nearby sites that led to computational false negatives. Finally, we computationally and experimentally verified 23 human-specific AluS elements. We reported three alternative Alu insertion events, which are accompanied by filler DNA and/or Alu retrotransposition mediated-deletion. Bisulfite sequencing was carried out to examine DNA methylation levels of human-specific AluS elements. The results showed that fixed AluS elements are hypermethylated compared with polymorphic elements, indicating a possible relation between DNA methylation and Alu fixation in the human genome. PMID:25447892

  6. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  7. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Based Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kime, Cody; Mandegar, Mohammad A; Srivastava, Deepak; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R; Rand, Tim A

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPS cells) are rapidly emerging as a powerful tool for biomedical discovery. The advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS cells) with human embryonic stem (hES)-cell-like properties has led to hPS cells with disease-specific genetic backgrounds for in vitro disease modeling and drug discovery as well as mechanistic and developmental studies. To fully realize this potential, it will be necessary to modify the genome of hPS cells with precision and flexibility. Pioneering experiments utilizing site-specific double-strand break (DSB)-mediated genome engineering tools, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), have paved the way to genome engineering in previously recalcitrant systems such as hPS cells. However, these methods are technically cumbersome and require significant expertise, which has limited adoption. A major recent advance involving the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) endonuclease has dramatically simplified the effort required for genome engineering and will likely be adopted widely as the most rapid and flexible system for genome editing in hPS cells. In this unit, we describe commonly practiced methods for CRISPR endonuclease genomic editing of hPS cells into cell lines containing genomes altered by insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis or insertion of recombinant genomic DNA. PMID:26724721

  8. Recombination-Dependent Oligomerization of Human Papillomavirus Genomes upon Transient DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Orav, Marit; Henno, Liisi; Isok-Paas, Helen; Geimanen, Jelizaveta; Ustav, Mart

    2013-01-01

    We describe the extensive and progressive oligomerization of human papillomavirus (HPV) genomes after transfection into the U2OS cell line. The HPV genomic oligomers are extrachromosomal concatemeric molecules containing the viral genome in a head-to-tail orientation. The process of oligomerization does not depend on the topology of the input DNA, and it does not require any other viral factors besides replication proteins E1 and E2. We provide evidence that oligomerization of the HPV18 and HPV11 genomes involves homologous recombination. We also demonstrate oligomerization of the HPV18 and HPV11 genomes in SiHa, HeLa, and C-33 A cell lines and provide examples of oligomeric HPV genomes in clinical samples obtained from HPV-infected patients. PMID:23986589

  9. Utilization of the human louse genome to study insecticide resistance and innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J. Marshall; Yoon, Kyong Sup; Kim, Ju Hyeon; Lee, Si Hyeock; Pittendrigh, Barry R.

    2015-01-01

    Since sequencing the human body louse genome, substantial advances have occurred in the utilization of the information gathered from louse genomes and transcriptomes. Comparatively, the body louse genome contains far fewer genes involved in environmental response, such as xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune response. Additionally, the body louse maintains a primary bacterial endosymbiont, Candidatus Riesia pediculicola, and a number of bacterial pathogens that it vectors, which have genomes that are also reduced in size. Thus, human louse genomes offer unique information and tools for use in advancing our understanding of coevolution among vectors, endosymbionts and pathogens. In this review, we summarize the current literature on the extent of pediculicide resistance, the availability of new pediculicides and information establishing this organism as an efficient model to study how xenobiotic metabolism, which is involved in insecticide resistance, is induced and how insects modify their innate immune response upon bacterial challenge resulting in enhanced vector competence. PMID:25987230

  10. Genomic insights into the emerging human pathogen Mycobacterium massiliense.

    PubMed

    Tettelin, Hervé; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Daugherty, Sean C; Hine, Erin; Riley, David R; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Sengamalay, Naomi; Shefchek, Kent; Su, Qi; Tallon, Luke J; Conville, Patricia; Olivier, Kenneth N; Holland, Steven M; Fraser, Claire M; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium massiliense (Mycobacterium abscessus group) is an emerging pathogen causing pulmonary disease and skin and soft tissue infections. We report the genome sequence of the type strain CCUG 48898. PMID:22965080

  11. A genomics-based classification of human lung tumors.

    PubMed

    2013-10-30

    We characterized genome alterations in 1255 clinically annotated lung tumors of all histological subgroups to identify genetically defined and clinically relevant subtypes. More than 55% of all cases had at least one oncogenic genome alteration potentially amenable to specific therapeutic intervention, including several personalized treatment approaches that are already in clinical evaluation. Marked differences in the pattern of genomic alterations existed between and within histological subtypes, thus challenging the original histomorphological diagnosis. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed many of these reassigned subtypes. The reassignment eliminated almost all cases of large cell carcinomas, some of which had therapeutically relevant alterations. Prospective testing of our genomics-based diagnostic algorithm in 5145 lung cancer patients enabled a genome-based diagnosis in 3863 (75%) patients, confirmed the feasibility of rational reassignments of large cell lung cancer, and led to improvement in overall survival in patients with EGFR-mutant or ALK-rearranged cancers. Thus, our findings provide support for broad implementation of genome-based diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:24174329

  12. A Genomics-Based Classification of Human Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We characterized genome alterations in 1255 clinically annotated lung tumors of all histological subgroups to identify genetically defined and clinically relevant subtypes. More than 55% of all cases had at least one oncogenic genome alteration potentially amenable to specific therapeutic intervention, including several personalized treatment approaches that are already in clinical evaluation. Marked differences in the pattern of genomic alterations existed between and within histological subtypes, thus challenging the original histomorphological diagnosis. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed many of these reassigned subtypes. The reassignment eliminated almost all cases of large cell carcinomas, some of which had therapeutically relevant alterations. Prospective testing of our genomics-based diagnostic algorithm in 5145 lung cancer patients enabled a genome-based diagnosis in 3863 (75%) patients, confirmed the feasibility of rational reassignments of large cell lung cancer, and led to improvement in overall survival in patients with EGFR-mutant or ALK-rearranged cancers. Thus, our findings provide support for broad implementation of genome-based diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:24174329

  13. Genome sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Malcolm J.; Hall, Neil; Fung, Eula; White, Owen; Berriman, Matthew; Hyman, Richard W.; Carlton, Jane M.; Pain, Arnab; Nelson, Karen E.; Bowman, Sharen; Paulsen, Ian T.; James, Keith; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Rutherford, Kim; Salzberg, Steven L.; Craig, Alister; Kyes, Sue; Chan, Man-Suen; Nene, Vishvanath; Shallom, Shamira J.; Suh, Bernard; Peterson, Jeremy; Angiuoli, Sam; Pertea, Mihaela; Allen, Jonathan; Selengut, Jeremy; Haft, Daniel; Mather, Michael W.; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Martin, David M. A.; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Fraunholz, Martin J.; Roos, David S.; Ralph, Stuart A.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Cummings, Leda M.; Subramanian, G. Mani; Mungall, Chris; Venter, J. Craig; Carucci, Daniel J.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Newbold, Chris; Davis, Ronald W.; Fraser, Claire M.; Barrell, Bart

    2013-01-01

    The parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for hundreds of millions of cases of malaria, and kills more than one million African children annually. Here we report an analysis of the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. The 23-megabase nuclear genome consists of 14 chromosomes, encodes about 5,300 genes, and is the most (A + T)-rich genome sequenced to date. Genes involved in antigenic variation are concentrated in the subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes. Compared to the genomes of free-living eukaryotic microbes, the genome of this intracellular parasite encodes fewer enzymes and transporters, but a large proportion of genes are devoted to immune evasion and host–parasite interactions. Many nuclear-encoded proteins are targeted to the apicoplast, an organelle involved in fatty-acid and isoprenoid metabolism. The genome sequence provides the foundation for future studies of this organism, and is being exploited in the search for new drugs and vaccines to fight malaria. PMID:12368864

  14. The spotted gar genome illuminates vertebrate evolution and facilitates human-teleost comparisons.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Ingo; Gehrke, Andrew R; Smith, Jeramiah J; Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Manousaki, Tereza; Pasquier, Jeremy; Amores, Angel; Desvignes, Thomas; Batzel, Peter; Catchen, Julian; Berlin, Aaron M; Campbell, Michael S; Barrell, Daniel; Martin, Kyle J; Mulley, John F; Ravi, Vydianathan; Lee, Alison P; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Chalopin, Domitille; Fan, Shaohua; Wcisel, Dustin; Cañestro, Cristian; Sydes, Jason; Beaudry, Felix E G; Sun, Yi; Hertel, Jana; Beam, Michael J; Fasold, Mario; Ishiyama, Mikio; Johnson, Jeremy; Kehr, Steffi; Lara, Marcia; Letaw, John H; Litman, Gary W; Litman, Ronda T; Mikami, Masato; Ota, Tatsuya; Saha, Nil Ratan; Williams, Louise; Stadler, Peter F; Wang, Han; Taylor, John S; Fontenot, Quenton; Ferrara, Allyse; Searle, Stephen M J; Aken, Bronwen; Yandell, Mark; Schneider, Igor; Yoder, Jeffrey A; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Meyer, Axel; Amemiya, Chris T; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Holland, Peter W H; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien; Shubin, Neil H; Di Palma, Federica; Alföldi, Jessica; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Postlethwait, John H

    2016-04-01

    To connect human biology to fish biomedical models, we sequenced the genome of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), whose lineage diverged from teleosts before teleost genome duplication (TGD). The slowly evolving gar genome has conserved in content and size many entire chromosomes from bony vertebrate ancestors. Gar bridges teleosts to tetrapods by illuminating the evolution of immunity, mineralization and development (mediated, for example, by Hox, ParaHox and microRNA genes). Numerous conserved noncoding elements (CNEs; often cis regulatory) undetectable in direct human-teleost comparisons become apparent using gar: functional studies uncovered conserved roles for such cryptic CNEs, facilitating annotation of sequences identified in human genome-wide association studies. Transcriptomic analyses showed that the sums of expression domains and expression levels for duplicated teleost genes often approximate the patterns and levels of expression for gar genes, consistent with subfunctionalization. The gar genome provides a resource for understanding evolution after genome duplication, the origin of vertebrate genomes and the function of human regulatory sequences. PMID:26950095

  15. A decade of the human genome sequence--how does the medicinal chemist benefit?

    PubMed

    Brunschweiger, Andreas; Hall, Jonathan

    2012-02-01

    Many have claimed that the sequencing of the human genome has failed to deliver the promised new era of drug discovery and development. Here, we argue that in fact, the availability of the human genome sequence and the genomics technologies that resulted from those research efforts have had a major impact on drug discovery. Medicinal chemists are actively using the data gleaned from structural genomics projects over the past decade to design more selective and more effective drug candidates. For example, large superfamilies of related enzymes, such as the kinome, proteome, proteasome, transportome, identified because of the sequencing of the human genome represent a huge number of potential drug targets. Ten years on, we're able to design multitarget drugs where the selectivity for a certain subgroup of receptors can lead to increased efficacy rather than the side effects traditionally associated with "off-targets". New trends and discoveries in biomedical research are notoriously slow to show their value, and this is also true for genomics technologies. However, the examples we've selected show that these are firmly set in the drug-discovery process, and without the human genome sequence, a number of current clinical candidates and promising drug leads would not have been possible. PMID:22170741

  16. Estimation of Synteny Conservation and Genome Compaction Between Pufferfish (Fugu) and Human

    PubMed Central

    McLysaght, Aoife; Enright, Anton J.; Skrabanek, Lucy

    2000-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the amount of gene order and synteny conservation between two species gives insights to the extent and mechanisms of divergence. The vertebrate Fugu rubripes (pufferfish) has a small genome with little repetitive sequence which makes it attractive as a model genome. Genome compaction and synteny conservation between human and Fugu were studied using data from public databases.Methods: Intron length and map positions of human and Fugu orthologues were compared to analyse relative genome compaction and synteny conservation respectivley. The divergence of these two genomes by genome rearrangement was simulated and the results were compared to the real data.Results: Analysis of 199 introns in 22 orthologous genes showed an eight-fold average size reduction in Fugu, consistent with the ratio of total genome sizes. There was no consistent pattern relating the size reduction in individual introns or genes to gene base composition in either species. For genes that are neighbours in Fugu (genes from the same cosmid or GenBank entry), 40–50% have conserved synteny with a human chromosome. This figure may be underestimated by as much as two-fold, due to problems caused by incomplete human genome sequence data and the existence of dispersed gene families. Some genes that are neighbours in Fugu have human orthologues that are several megabases and tens of genes apart. This is probably caused by small inversions or other intrachromosomal rearrangements.Conclusions: Comparison of observed data to computer simulations suggests that 4000–16 000 chromosomal rearrangements have occured since Fugu and human shared a common ancestor, implying a faster rate of rearrangement than seen in human/mouse comparisons. PMID:10797599

  17. Toward a Functional Annotation of the Human Genome Using Artificial Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-ki; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Youn-Jae; Kim, Jiwon; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Jeonglim; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a novel, high-throughput approach to collecting randomly perturbed gene-expression profiles from the human genome.A human 293 cell library that stably expresses randomly chosen zinc-finger transcription factors was constructed, and the expression profile of each cell line was obtained using cDNA microarray technology.Gene expression profiles from a total of 132 cell lines were collected and analyzed by (1) a simple clustering method based on expression-profile similarity, and (2) the shortest-path analysis method.These analyses identified a number of gene groups, and further investigation revealed that the genes that were grouped together had close biological relationships.The artificial transcription factor-based random genome perturbation method thus provides a novel functional genomic tool for annotation and classification of genes in the human genome and those of many other organisms. PMID:14656973

  18. Identifying the genomic determinants of aging and longevity in human population studies: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio; Slagboom, P Eline

    2013-04-01

    Human lifespan variation is mainly determined by environmental factors, whereas the genetic contribution is 25-30% and expected to be polygenic. Two complementary fields go hand in hand in order to unravel the mechanisms of biological aging: genomic and biomarker research. Explorative and candidate gene studies of the human genome by genetic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic approaches have resulted in the identification of a limited number of interesting positive linkage regions, genes, and pathways that contribute to lifespan variation. The possibilities to further exploit these findings are rapidly increasing through the use of novel technologies, such as next-generation sequencing. Genomic research is progressively being integrated with biomarker studies on aging, including the application of (noninvasive) deep phenotyping and omics data - generated using novel technologies - in a wealth of studies in human populations. Hence, these studies may assist in obtaining a more holistic perspective on the role of the genome in aging and lifespan regulation. PMID:23423909

  19. Deorphanizing the human transmembrane genome: A landscape of uncharacterized membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has fueled the last decade of work to functionally characterize genome content. An important subset of genes encodes membrane proteins, which are the targets of many drugs. They reside in lipid bilayers, restricting their endogenous activity to a relatively specialized biochemical environment. Without a reference phenotype, the application of systematic screens to profile candidate membrane proteins is not immediately possible. Bioinformatics has begun to show its effectiveness in focusing the functional characterization of orphan proteins of a particular functional class, such as channels or receptors. Here we discuss integration of experimental and bioinformatics approaches for characterizing the orphan membrane proteome. By analyzing the human genome, a landscape reference for the human transmembrane genome is provided. PMID:24241348

  20. Long-Range Autocorrelations of CpG Islands in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Koester, Benjamin; Rea, Thomas J.; Templeton, Alan R.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Sing, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we use a statistical estimator developed in astrophysics to study the distribution and organization of features of the human genome. Using the human reference sequence we quantify the global distribution of CpG islands (CGI) in each chromosome and demonstrate that the organization of the CGI across a chromosome is non-random, exhibits surprisingly long range correlations (10 Mb) and varies significantly among chromosomes. These correlations of CGI summarize functional properties of the genome that are not captured when considering variation in any particular separate (and local) feature. The demonstration of the proposed methods to quantify the organization of CGI in the human genome forms the basis of future studies. The most illuminating of these will assess the potential impact on phenotypic variation of inter-individual variation in the organization of the functional features of the genome within and among chromosomes, and among individuals for particular chromosomes. PMID:22253817

  1. Discovery and Characterization of Chromatin States for Systematic Annotation of the Human Genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Jason; Kellis, Manolis

    A plethora of epigenetic modifications have been described in the human genome and shown to play diverse roles in gene regulation, cellular differentiation and the onset of disease. Although individual modifications have been linked to the activity levels of various genetic functional elements, their combinatorial patterns are still unresolved and their potential for systematic de novo genome annotation remains untapped. Here, we use a multivariate Hidden Markov Model to reveal chromatin states in human T cells, based on recurrent and spatially coherent combinations of chromatin marks.We define 51 distinct chromatin states, including promoter-associated, transcription-associated, active intergenic, largescale repressed and repeat-associated states. Each chromatin state shows specific enrichments in functional annotations, sequence motifs and specific experimentally observed characteristics, suggesting distinct biological roles. This approach provides a complementary functional annotation of the human genome that reveals the genome-wide locations of diverse classes of epigenetic function.

  2. A Human-Curated Annotation of the Candida albicans Genome

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Burkhard R; van het Hoog, Marco; d'Enfert, Christophe; Martchenko, Mikhail; Dungan, Jan; Kuo, Alan; Inglis, Diane O; Uhl, M. Andrew; Hogues, Hervé; Berriman, Matthew; Lorenz, Michael; Levitin, Anastasia; Oberholzer, Ursula; Bachewich, Catherine; Harcus, Doreen; Marcil, Anne; Dignard, Daniel; Iouk, Tatiana; Zito, Rosa; Frangeul, Lionel; Tekaia, Fredj; Rutherford, Kim; Wang, Edwin; Munro, Carol A; Bates, Steve; Gow, Neil A; Hoyer, Lois L; Köhler, Gerwald; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Newport, George; Znaidi, Sadri; Raymond, Martine; Turcotte, Bernard; Sherlock, Gavin; Costanzo, Maria; Ihmels, Jan; Berman, Judith; Sanglard, Dominique; Agabian, Nina; Mitchell, Aaron P; Johnson, Alexander D; Whiteway, Malcolm; Nantel, André

    2005-01-01

    Recent sequencing and assembly of the genome for the fungal pathogen Candida albicans used simple automated procedures for the identification of putative genes. We have reviewed the entire assembly, both by hand and with additional bioinformatic resources, to accurately map and describe 6,354 genes and to identify 246 genes whose original database entries contained sequencing errors (or possibly mutations) that affect their reading frame. Comparison with other fungal genomes permitted the identification of numerous fungus-specific genes that might be targeted for antifungal therapy. We also observed that, compared to other fungi, the protein-coding sequences in the C. albicans genome are especially rich in short sequence repeats. Finally, our improved annotation permitted a detailed analysis of several multigene families, and comparative genomic studies showed that C. albicans has a far greater catabolic range, encoding respiratory Complex 1, several novel oxidoreductases and ketone body degrading enzymes, malonyl-CoA and enoyl-CoA carriers, several novel amino acid degrading enzymes, a variety of secreted catabolic lipases and proteases, and numerous transporters to assimilate the resulting nutrients. The results of these efforts will ensure that the Candida research community has uniform and comprehensive genomic information for medical research as well as for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:16103911

  3. Large-scale analysis of antisense transcription in wheat using the Affymetrix GeneChip Wheat Genome Array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are transcripts of the opposite DNA strand to the sense-strand either at the same locus (cis-encoded) or a different locus (trans-encoded). They can affect gene expression at multiple stages including transcription, RNA processing and transport, and translation....

  4. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  5. A new five-year plan for the U. S. human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, F. ); Galas, D. )

    1993-10-01

    Progress toward achieving the first set of goals for the genome project appears to be on schedule or, in some instances, even ahead of schedule. Furthermore, technological improvements that could not have been anticipated in 1990 have in some areas changed the scope of the project and allowed more ambitious approaches. Earlier this year, it was therefore decided to update and extend the initial goals to address the scope of genome research beyond the completion of the original 5-year plan. A major purpose of revising the plan is to inform and provide a new guide to all participants in the genome project about the project's goal. To obtain the advice needed to develop the extended goals, NIH and DOE held a series of meetings with a large number of scientists and other interested scholars and representatives of the public, including many who previously had not been direct participants in the genome project. Reports of all these meetings are available from the Office of Communications of the National Center for Human Genome Research (NCHGR) and the Human Genome Management Information System of DOE. Finally, a group of representative advisors from MIH and DOE drafted a set of new, extended goals for presentation to the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research of NIH and the Health and Environmental Research Advisory Committee of DOE.

  6. Mapping and annotating obesity-related genes in pig and human genomes.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fontanesi, Luca; Piovesan, Damiano; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Obesity is a major health problem in both developed and emerging countries. Obesity is a complex disease whose etiology involves genetic factors in strong interplay with environmental determinants and lifestyle. The discovery of genetic factors and biological pathways underlying human obesity is hampered by the difficulty in controlling the genetic background of human cohorts. Animal models are then necessary to further dissect the genetics of obesity. Pig has emerged as one of the most attractive models, because of the similarity with humans in the mechanisms regulating the fat deposition. Results. We collected the genes related to obesity in humans and to fat deposition traits in pig. We localized them on both human and pig genomes, building a map useful to interpret comparative studies on obesity. We characterized the collected genes structurally and functionally with BAR+ and mapped them on KEGG pathways and on STRING protein interaction network. Conclusions. The collected set consists of 361 obesity related genes in human and pig genomes. All genes were mapped on the human genome, and 54 could not be localized on the pig genome (release 2012). Only for 3 human genes there is no counterpart in pig, confirming that this animal is a good model for human obesity studies. Obesity related genes are mostly involved in regulation and signaling processes/pathways and relevant connection emerges between obesity-related genes and diseases such as cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:23855670

  7. The Evolution and Functional Impact of Human Deletion Variants Shared with Archaic Hominin Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Lung; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Karakoc, Emre; Ajay, Jerry; Gokcumen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Allele sharing between modern and archaic hominin genomes has been variously interpreted to have originated from ancestral genetic structure or through non-African introgression from archaic hominins. However, evolution of polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes has yet to be studied. We identified 427 polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, approximately 87% of which originated before the Human–Neandertal divergence (ancient) and only approximately 9% of which have been introgressed from Neandertals (introgressed). Recurrence, incomplete lineage sorting between human and chimp lineages, and hominid-specific insertions constitute the remaining approximately 4% of allele sharing between humans and archaic hominins. We observed that ancient deletions correspond to more than 13% of all common (>5% allele frequency) deletion variation among modern humans. Our analyses indicate that the genomic landscapes of both ancient and introgressed deletion variants were primarily shaped by purifying selection, eliminating large and exonic variants. We found 17 exonic deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, including those leading to three fusion transcripts. The affected genes are involved in metabolism of external and internal compounds, growth and sperm formation, as well as susceptibility to psoriasis and Crohn’s disease. Our analyses suggest that these “exonic” deletion variants have evolved through different adaptive forces, including balancing and population-specific positive selection. Our findings reveal that genomic structural variants that are shared between humans and archaic hominin genomes are common among modern humans and can influence biomedically and evolutionarily important phenotypes. PMID:25556237

  8. Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human

    SciTech Connect

    Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-07-04

    We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

  9. Genomic diversity of human papillomavirus genotype 53 in an ethnogeographically closed cohort of white European women.

    PubMed

    Kocjan, Bostjan J; Seme, Katja; Mocilnik, Tina; Jancar, Nina; Vrtacnik-Bokal, Eda; Poljak, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype 53 is classified taxonomically in alpha HPV genus-species 6, together with HPV-30, HPV-56, and HPV-66 and is considered to be one of three "probable high-risk" HPV genotypes. Recent worldwide comparison of 44 isolates of HPV-53 showed the existence of nine long control region (LCR) genomic variants, which formed a phylogenetic tree with two deep dichotomic branches. In order to investigate further the genomic diversity of HPV-53, a total of 94 isolates of HPV-53 obtained from an ethnogeographically closed cohort of 70 white European women was analyzed. The identification and characterization of HPV-53 genomic variants was based on analysis of three different HPV genomic regions: LCR, E6 and E7. A higher genomic diversity of HPV-53 was identified in the ethnogeographically closed cohort of white European women than has been reported previously on isolates collected worldwide. Altogether, 19 HPV-53 genomic variants, composed of 13 LCR, 13 E6, and 5 E7 genomic variants, were identified. Eleven out of 13 LCR, all E6, and four out of five E7 genomic variants were described for the first time. The present study confirmed dichotomic phylogeny of HPV-53 described previously and, in addition, showed for the first time that after a dichotomic split, both groups of HPV-53 genomic variants formed star-like phylogenetic clusters. In women with persistent HPV-53 infection, HPV-53 genomic variants remained unchanged for up to 51 months. In rare cases, infection with multiple HPV-53 genomic variants is possible. Taking into account the results of this and previous studies, at least 26 different HPV-53 genomic variants exist today. PMID:17311338

  10. Starr: Simple Tiling ARRay analysis of Affymetrix ChIP-chip data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with DNA microarrays (ChIP-chip) is an assay used for investigating DNA-protein-binding or post-translational chromatin/histone modifications. As with all high-throughput technologies, it requires thorough bioinformatic processing of the data for which there is no standard yet. The primary goal is to reliably identify and localize genomic regions that bind a specific protein. Further investigation compares binding profiles of functionally related proteins, or binding profiles of the same proteins in different genetic backgrounds or experimental conditions. Ultimately, the goal is to gain a mechanistic understanding of the effects of DNA binding events on gene expression. Results We present a free, open-source R/Bioconductor package Starr that facilitates comparative analysis of ChIP-chip data across experiments and across different microarray platforms. The package provides functions for data import, quality assessment, data visualization and exploration. Starr includes high-level analysis tools such as the alignment of ChIP signals along annotated features, correlation analysis of ChIP signals with complementary genomic data, peak-finding and comparative display of multiple clusters of binding profiles. It uses standard Bioconductor classes for maximum compatibility with other software. Moreover, Starr automatically updates microarray probe annotation files by a highly efficient remapping of microarray probe sequences to an arbitrary genome. Conclusion Starr is an R package that covers the complete ChIP-chip workflow from data processing to binding pattern detection. It focuses on the high-level data analysis, e.g., it provides methods for the integration and combined statistical analysis of binding profiles and complementary functional genomics data. Starr enables systematic assessment of binding behaviour for groups of genes that are alingned along arbitrary genomic features. PMID:20398407

  11. The Human Genome Project: Information access, management, and regulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

    1996-08-31

    The Human Genome Project is a large, internationally coordinated effort in biological research directed at creating a detailed map of human DNA. This report describes the access of information, management, and regulation of the project. The project led to the development of an instructional module titled The Human Genome Project: Biology, Computers, and Privacy, designed for use in high school biology classes. The module consists of print materials and both Macintosh and Windows versions of related computer software-Appendix A contains a copy of the print materials and discs containing the two versions of the software.

  12. Human insulin genome sequence map, biochemical structure of insulin for recombinant DNA insulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mungantiwar, Ashish A

    2003-08-01

    Insulin is a essential molecule for type I diabetes that is marketed by very few companies. It is the first molecule, which was made by recombinant technology; but the commercialization process is very difficult. Knowledge about biochemical structure of insulin and human insulin genome sequence map is pivotal to large scale manufacturing of recombinant DNA Insulin. This paper reviews human insulin genome sequence map, the amino acid sequence of porcine insulin, crystal structure of porcine insulin, insulin monomer, aggregation surfaces of insulin, conformational variation in the insulin monomer, insulin X-ray structures for recombinant DNA technology in the synthesis of human insulin in Escherichia coli. PMID:12769691

  13. Genomic determinants of somatic copy number alterations across human cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanping; Xu, Hongen; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2016-03-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) play an important role in carcinogenesis. However, the impact of genomic architecture on the global patterns of SCNAs in cancer genomes remains elusive. In this work, we conducted multiple linear regression (MLR) analyses of the pooled SCNA data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Pan-Cancer project. We performed MLR analyses for 11 individual cancer types and three different kinds of SCNAs-amplifications and deletions, telomere-bound and interstitial SCNAs and local SCNAs. Our MLR model explains >30% of the pooled SCNA breakpoint variation, with the explanatory power ranging from 13 to 32% for different cancer types and SCNA types. In addition to confirming previously identified features [e.g. long interspersed element-1 (L1) and short interspersed nuclear elements], we also identified several novel informative features, including distance to telomere, distance to centromere and low-complexity repeats. The results of the MLR analyses were additionally confirmed on an independent SCNA data set obtained from the catalogue of somatic mutations in cancer database. Using a rare-event logistic regression model and an extremely randomized tree classifier, we revealed that genomic features are informative for defining common SCNA breakpoint hotspots. Our findings shed light on the molecular mechanisms of SCNA generation in cancer. PMID:26732428

  14. 1000 Genomes Selection Browser 1.0: a genome browser dedicated to signatures of natural selection in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Pybus, Marc; Dall'Olio, Giovanni M; Luisi, Pierre; Uzkudun, Manu; Carreño-Torres, Angel; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Laayouni, Hafid; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Engelken, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Searching for Darwinian selection in natural populations has been the focus of a multitude of studies over the last decades. Here we present the 1000 Genomes Selection Browser 1.0 (http://hsb.upf.edu) as a resource for signatures of recent natural selection in modern humans. We have implemented and applied a large number of neutrality tests as well as summary statistics informative for the action of selection such as Tajima's D, CLR, Fay and Wu's H, Fu and Li's F* and D*, XPEHH, ΔiHH, iHS, F(ST), ΔDAF and XPCLR among others to low coverage sequencing data from the 1000 genomes project (Phase 1; release April 2012). We have implemented a publicly available genome-wide browser to communicate the results from three different populations of West African, Northern European and East Asian ancestry (YRI, CEU, CHB). Information is provided in UCSC-style format to facilitate the integration with the rich UCSC browser tracks and an access page is provided with instructions and for convenient visualization. We believe that this expandable resource will facilitate the interpretation of signals of selection on different temporal, geographical and genomic scales. PMID:24275494

  15. The Human Genome Initiative: Implications for the Comprehensive School Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Delores C. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Human Genome Initiative (HGI) constructs common resources for studying human genetics. Early identification of people at risk for genetic disorders allows for early education and counseling. HGI research will create inexpensive, reliable genetic tests and diagnoses to help teachers and school staff assess, compare, and channel students. (SM)

  16. Genome Sequence of Parascardovia denticolens IPLA 20019, Isolated from Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Bottacini, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco; Margolles, Abelardo

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the draft genome of Parascardovia denticolens IPLA 20019, isolated from human milk. This species, usually isolated from caries lesions, is taxonomically related to the genus Bifidobacterium. The genetic information of IPLA 20019 enhances our understanding of the adaptation of this P. denticolens strain from human breast milk. PMID:22887674

  17. Human genome libraries. Final progress report, February 1, 1994--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this program is to use a novel technology of chromosome microdissection and microcloning to construct chromosome region-specific libraries as resources for various human genome program studies. Region specific libraries have been constructed for the entire human chromosomes 2 and 18.

  18. Recent Advances in Understanding the Role of Nutrition in Human Genome Evolution12

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Kaixiong; Gu, Zhenglong

    2011-01-01

    Dietary transitions in human history have been suggested to play important roles in the evolution of mankind. Genetic variations caused by adaptation to diet during human evolution could have important health consequences in current society. The advance of sequencing technologies and the rapid accumulation of genome information provide an unprecedented opportunity to comprehensively characterize genetic variations in human populations and unravel the genetic basis of human evolution. Series of selection detection methods, based on various theoretical models and exploiting different aspects of selection signatures, have been developed. Their applications at the species and population levels have respectively led to the identification of human specific selection events that distinguish human from nonhuman primates and local adaptation events that contribute to human diversity. Scrutiny of candidate genes has revealed paradigms of adaptations to specific nutritional components and genome-wide selection scans have verified the prevalence of diet-related selection events and provided many more candidates awaiting further investigation. Understanding the role of diet in human evolution is fundamental for the development of evidence-based, genome-informed nutritional practices in the era of personal genomics. PMID:22332091

  19. High-level organization of isochores into gigantic superstructures in the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpena, P.; Oliver, J. L.; Hackenberg, M.; Coronado, A. V.; Barturen, G.; Bernaola-Galván, P.

    2011-03-01

    Human DNA shows a complex structure with compositional features at many scales; the isochores—long DNA segments (~105 bp) of relatively homogeneous guanine-cytosine (G + C) content—are the largest well-documented and well-analyzed compositional structures. However, we report here on the existence of a high-level compositional organization of isochores in the human genome. By using a segmentation algorithm incorporating the long-range correlations existing in human DNA, we find that every chromosome is composed of a few huge segments (~ 107 bp) of relatively homogeneous G + C content, which become the largest compositional organization of the genome. Finally, we show evidence of the biological relevance of these superstructures, pointing to a large-scale functional organization of the human genome.

  20. Genome sequencing of chimpanzee malaria parasites reveals possible pathways of adaptation to human hosts.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas D; Rayner, Julian C; Böhme, Ulrike; Pain, Arnab; Spottiswoode, Natasha; Sanders, Mandy; Quail, Michael; Ollomo, Benjamin; Renaud, François; Thomas, Alan W; Prugnolle, Franck; Conway, David J; Newbold, Chris; Berriman, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum causes most human malaria deaths, having prehistorically evolved from parasites of African Great Apes. Here we explore the genomic basis of P. falciparum adaptation to human hosts by fully sequencing the genome of the closely related chimpanzee parasite species P. reichenowi, and obtaining partial sequence data from a more distantly related chimpanzee parasite (P. gaboni). The close relationship between P. reichenowi and P. falciparum is emphasized by almost complete conservation of genomic synteny, but against this strikingly conserved background we observe major differences at loci involved in erythrocyte invasion. The organization of most virulence-associated multigene families, including the hypervariable var genes, is broadly conserved, but P. falciparum has a smaller subset of rif and stevor genes whose products are expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface. Genome-wide analysis identifies other loci under recent positive selection, but a limited number of changes at the host-parasite interface may have mediated host switching. PMID:25203297

  1. Differential DNA mismatch repair underlies mutation rate variation across the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has revealed considerable variation in somatic mutation rates across the human genome, with mutation rates elevated in heterochromatic late replicating regions and reduced in early replicating euchromatin1-5. Multiple mechanisms have been suggested to underlie this2,6-10, but the actual cause is unknown. Here we identify variable DNA mismatch repair (MMR) as the basis of this variation. Analysing ~17 million single nucleotide variants from the genomes of 652 tumours, we show that regional autosomal mutation rates at megabase resolution are largely stable across cancer types, with differences related to changes in replication timing and gene expression. However, mutations arising after the inactivation of MMR are no longer enriched in early replicating euchromatin relative to late replicating heterochromatin. Thus, differential DNA repair and not differential mutation supply is the primary cause of the large-scale regional mutation rate variation across the human genome. PMID:25707793

  2. Genome sequencing of chimpanzee malaria parasites reveals possible pathways of adaptation to human hosts

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Thomas D.; Rayner, Julian C.; Böhme, Ulrike; Pain, Arnab; Spottiswoode, Natasha; Sanders, Mandy; Quail, Michael; Ollomo, Benjamin; Renaud, François; Thomas, Alan W.; Prugnolle, Franck; Conway, David J.; Newbold, Chris; Berriman, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum causes most human malaria deaths, having prehistorically evolved from parasites of African Great Apes. Here we explore the genomic basis of P. falciparum adaptation to human hosts by fully sequencing the genome of the closely related chimpanzee parasite species P. reichenowi, and obtaining partial sequence data from a more distantly related chimpanzee parasite (P. gaboni). The close relationship between P. reichenowi and P. falciparum is emphasized by almost complete conservation of genomic synteny, but against this strikingly conserved background we observe major differences at loci involved in erythrocyte invasion. The organization of most virulence-associated multigene families, including the hypervariable var genes, is broadly conserved, but P. falciparum has a smaller subset of rif and stevor genes whose products are expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface. Genome-wide analysis identifies other loci under recent positive selection, but a limited number of changes at the host–parasite interface may have mediated host switching. PMID:25203297

  3. Genome Integrity in Aging: Human Syndromes, Mouse Models, and Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Wilbert P; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Pothof, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Human syndromes and mouse mutants that exhibit accelerated but bona fide aging in multiple organs and tissues have been invaluable for the identification of nine denominators of aging: telomere attrition, genome instability, epigenetic alterations, mitochondrial dysfunction, deregulated nutrient sensing, altered intercellular communication, loss of proteostasis, cellular senescence and adult stem cell exhaustion. However, whether and how these instigators of aging interrelate or whether they have one root cause is currently largely unknown. Rare human progeroid syndromes and corresponding mouse mutants with resolved genetic defects highlight the dominant importance of genome maintenance for aging. A second class of aging-related disorders reveals a cross connection with metabolism. As genome maintenance and metabolism are closely interconnected, they may constitute the main underlying biology of aging. This review focuses on the role of genome stability in aging, its crosstalk with metabolism, and options for nutritional and/or pharmaceutical interventions that delay age-related pathology. PMID:26514200

  4. Complete genome sequence of Macrococcus caseolyticus strain JCSCS5402, [corrected] reflecting the ancestral genome of the human-pathogenic staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Baba, Tadashi; Kuwahara-Arai, Kyoko; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Ito, Teruyo; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2009-02-01

    We isolated the methicillin-resistant Macrococcus caseolyticus strain JCSC5402 from animal meat in a supermarket and determined its whole-genome nucleotide sequence. This is the first report on the genome analysis of a macrococcal species that is evolutionarily closely related to the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis. The essential biological pathways of M. caseolyticus are similar to those of staphylococci. However, the species has a small chromosome (2.1 MB) and lacks many sugar and amino acid metabolism pathways and a plethora of virulence genes that are present in S. aureus. On the other hand, M. caseolyticus possesses a series of oxidative phosphorylation machineries that are closely related to those in the family Bacillaceae. We also discovered a probable primordial form of a Macrococcus methicillin resistance gene complex, mecIRAm, on one of the eight plasmids harbored by the M. caseolyticus strain. This is the first finding of a plasmid-encoding methicillin resistance gene. Macrococcus is considered to reflect the genome of ancestral bacteria before the speciation of staphylococcal species and may be closely associated with the origin of the methicillin resistance gene complex of the notorious human pathogen methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:19074389

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Macrococcus caseolyticus Strain JSCS5402, Reflecting the Ancestral Genome of the Human-Pathogenic Staphylococci▿

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Tadashi; Kuwahara-Arai, Kyoko; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Ito, Teruyo; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    We isolated the methicillin-resistant Macrococcus caseolyticus strain JCSC5402 from animal meat in a supermarket and determined its whole-genome nucleotide sequence. This is the first report on the genome analysis of a macrococcal species that is evolutionarily closely related to the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis. The essential biological pathways of M. caseolyticus are similar to those of staphylococci. However, the species has a small chromosome (2.1 MB) and lacks many sugar and amino acid metabolism pathways and a plethora of virulence genes that are present in S. aureus. On the other hand, M. caseolyticus possesses a series of oxidative phosphorylation machineries that are closely related to those in the family Bacillaceae. We also discovered a probable primordial form of a Macrococcus methicillin resistance gene complex, mecIRAm, on one of the eight plasmids harbored by the M. caseolyticus strain. This is the first finding of a plasmid-encoding methicillin resistance gene. Macrococcus is considered to reflect the genome of ancestral bacteria before the speciation of staphylococcal species and may be closely associated with the origin of the methicillin resistance gene complex of the notorious human pathogen methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:19074389

  6. FR-like EBNA1 binding repeats in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    D'Herouel, Aymeric Fouquier; Birgersdotter, Anna; Werner, Maria

    2010-09-30

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is widely spread in the human population. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is a transcription factor that activates viral genes and is necessary for viral replication and partitioning, which binds the EBV genome cooperatively. We identify similar EBNA1 repeat binding sites in the human genome using a nearest-neighbor positional weight matrix. Previously experimentally verified EBNA1 sites in the human genome are successfully recovered by our approach. Most importantly, 40 novel regions are identified in the human genome, constituted of tandemly repeated binding sites for EBNA1. Genes located in the vicinity of these regions are presented as possible targets for EBNA1-mediated regulation. Among these, four are discussed in more detail: IQCB1, IMPG1, IRF2BP2 and TPO. Incorporating the cooperative actions of EBNA1 is essential when identifying regulatory regions in the human genome and we believe the findings presented here are highly valuable for the understanding of EBV-induced phenotypic changes.

  7. Constructing genomic maps of positive selection in humans: Where do we go from here?

    PubMed Central

    Akey, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Identifying targets of positive selection in humans has, until recently, been frustratingly slow, relying on the analysis of individual candidate genes. Genomics, however, has provided the necessary resources to systematically interrogate the entire genome for signatures of natural selection. To date, 21 genome-wide scans for recent or ongoing positive selection have been performed in humans. A key challenge is to begin synthesizing these newly constructed maps of positive selection into a coherent narrative of human evolutionary history and derive a deeper mechanistic understanding of how natural populations evolve. Here, I chronicle the recent history of the burgeoning field of human population genomics, critically assess genome-wide scans for positive selection in humans, identify important gaps in knowledge, and discuss both short- and long-term strategies for traversing the path from the low-resolution, incomplete, and error-prone maps of selection today to the ultimate goal of a detailed molecular, mechanistic, phenotypic, and population genetics characterization of adaptive alleles. PMID:19411596

  8. Identification, Recovery, and Refinement of Hitherto Undescribed Population-Level Genomes from the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Laczny, Cedric C.; Muller, Emilie E. L.; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Herold, Malte; Lebrun, Laura A.; Hogan, Angela; May, Patrick; de Beaufort, Carine; Wilmes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Linking taxonomic identity and functional potential at the population-level is important for the study of mixed microbial communities and is greatly facilitated by the availability of microbial reference genomes. While the culture-independent recovery of population-level genomes from environmental samples using the binning of metagenomic data has expanded available reference genome catalogs, several microbial lineages remain underrepresented. Here, we present two reference-independent approaches for the identification, recovery, and refinement of hitherto undescribed population-level genomes. The first approach is aimed at genome recovery of varied taxa and involves multi-sample automated binning using CANOPY CLUSTERING complemented by visualization and human-augmented binning using VIZBIN post hoc. The second approach is particularly well-suited for the study of specific taxa and employs VIZBIN de novo. Using these approaches, we reconstructed a total of six population-level genomes of distinct and divergent representatives of the Alphaproteobacteria class, the Mollicutes class, the Clostridiales order, and the Melainabacteria class from human gastrointestinal tract-derived metagenomic data. Our results demonstrate that, while automated binning approaches provide great potential for large-scale studies of mixed microbial communities, these approaches should be complemented with informative visualizations because expert-driven inspection and refinements are critical for the recovery of high-quality population-level genomes. PMID:27445992

  9. The Core and Accessory Genomes of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Implications for Human Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi Ho; Karuturi, R. Krishna M.; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Tuanyok, Apichai; Chua, Hui Hoon; Ong, Catherine; Paramalingam, Sivalingam Suppiah; Tan, Gladys; Tang, Lynn; Lau, Gary; Ooi, Eng Eong; Woods, Donald; Feil, Edward; Peacock, Sharon J.; Tan, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Natural isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp), the causative agent of melioidosis, can exhibit significant ecological flexibility that is likely reflective of a dynamic genome. Using whole-genome Bp microarrays, we examined patterns of gene presence and absence across 94 South East Asian strains isolated from a variety of clinical, environmental, or animal sources. 86% of the Bp K96243 reference genome was common to all the strains representing the Bp “core genome”, comprising genes largely involved in essential functions (eg amino acid metabolism, protein translation). In contrast, 14% of the K96243 genome was variably present across the isolates. This Bp accessory genome encompassed multiple genomic islands (GIs), paralogous genes, and insertions/deletions, including three distinct lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-related gene clusters. Strikingly, strains recovered from cases of human melioidosis clustered on a tree based on accessory gene content, and were significantly more likely to harbor certain GIs compared to animal and environmental isolates. Consistent with the inference that the GIs may contribute to pathogenesis, experimental mutation of BPSS2053, a GI gene, reduced microbial adherence to human epithelial cells. Our results suggest that the Bp accessory genome is likely to play an important role in microbial adaptation and virulence. PMID:18927621

  10. Gnome View: A tool for visual representation of human genome data

    SciTech Connect

    Pelkey, J.E.; Thomas, G.S.; Thurman, D.A.; Lortz, V.B.; Douthart, R.J.

    1993-02-01

    GnomeView is a tool for exploring data generated by the Human Gemone Project. GnomeView provides both graphical and textural styles of data presentation: employs an intuitive window-based graphical query interface: and integrates its underlying genome databases in such a way that the user can navigate smoothly across databases and between different levels of data. This paper describes GnomeView and discusses how it addresses various genome informatics issues.

  11. [Culpability and the problem of the human genome. Between being and having to be].

    PubMed

    Donna, Edgardo

    2011-01-01

    In a liberal-democratic system, there is no possibility of a criminal liability charge without a minimum of freedom. Nevertheless, since a long time ago and, nowadays, with the advancement of science in the human genome, understanding it as a closed system--farm theory--is intended to demonstrate that the genome is a destination, thus criminal liability will be void, giving rise to security measures. PMID:22977957

  12. Evolutionary changes in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the human genome from 9000 years BP until modern times.

    PubMed

    Spigelman, Mark; Donoghue, Helen D; Abdeen, Ziad; Ereqat, Suheir; Sarie, Issa; Greenblatt, Charles L; Pap, Ildikó; Szikossy, Ildikó; Hershkovitz, Israel; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila; Matheson, Carney

    2015-06-01

    The demonstration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in ancient skeletons gives researchers an insight into its evolution. Findings of the last two decades sketched the biological relationships between the various species of tubercle bacilli, the time scale involved, their possible origin and dispersal. This paper includes the available evidence and on-going research. In the submerged Eastern Mediterranean Neolithic village of Atlit Yam (9000 BP), a human lineage of M. tuberculosis, defined by the TbD1 deletion in its genome, was demonstrated. An infected infant at the site provides an example of active tuberculosis in a human with a naïve immune system. Over 4000 years later tuberculosis was found in Jericho. Urbanization increases population density encouraging M. tuberculosis/human co-evolution. As susceptible humans die of tuberculosis, survivors develop genetic resistance to disease. Thus in 18th century Hungarian mummies from Vác, 65% were positive for tuberculosis yet a 95-year-old woman had clearly survived a childhood Ghon lesion. Whole genome studies are in progress, to detect changes over the millennia both in bacterial virulence and also host susceptibility/resistance genes that determine the NRAMP protein and Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIRs). This paper surveys present evidence and includes initial findings. PMID:25771203

  13. Two ancient human genomes reveal Polynesian ancestry among the indigenous Botocudos of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Lao, Oscar; Schroeder, Hannes; Rasmussen, Morten; Raghavan, Maanasa; Moltke, Ida; Campos, Paula F; Sagredo, Francisca Santana; Rasmussen, Simon; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Albrechtsen, Anders; Allentoft, Morten E; Johnson, Philip L F; Li, Mingkun; Reis, Silvia; Bernardo, Danilo V; DeGiorgio, Michael; Duggan, Ana T; Bastos, Murilo; Wang, Yong; Stenderup, Jesper; Moreno-Mayar, J Victor; Brunak, Søren; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Hodges, Emily; Hannon, Gregory J; Orlando, Ludovic; Price, T Douglas; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Nielsen, Rasmus; Heinemeier, Jan; Olsen, Jesper; Rodrigues-Carvalho, Claudia; Lahr, Marta Mirazón; Neves, Walter A; Kayser, Manfred; Higham, Thomas; Stoneking, Mark; Pena, Sergio D J; Willerslev, Eske

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the peopling of the Americas remains an important and challenging question. Here, we present (14)C dates, and morphological, isotopic and genomic sequence data from two human skulls from the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, part of one of the indigenous groups known as 'Botocudos'. We find that their genomic ancestry is Polynesian, with no detectable Native American component. Radiocarbon analysis of the skulls shows that the individuals had died prior to the beginning of the 19th century. Our findings could either represent genomic evidence of Polynesians reaching South America during their Pacific expansion, or European-mediated transport. PMID:25455029

  14. Genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis attenuated vaccine strain A16R used for human in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiankai; Qi, Xinpeng; Zhu, Li; Wang, Dongshu; Gao, Zhiqi; Deng, Haijun; Wu, Weili; Hu, Tao; Chen, Chen; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Hengliang

    2015-09-20

    An attenuated Bacillus anthracis vaccine strain for human use, A16R, was obtained in China after ultraviolet radiation treatment and continuous subculture of the wild-type strain A16. A16R can synthesize the exotoxin, but without a capsule. We sequenced and annotated the A16R genome to encourage the use of this strain. The genome sequencing of the wild-type strain A16 is underway and the genomic comparison between the two strains will help to illustrate the attenuating mechanism of the A16R vaccine strain. PMID:26116813

  15. Study of Modern Human Evolution via Comparative Analysis with the Neanderthal Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Musaddeque

    2013-01-01

    Many other human species appeared in evolution in the last 6 million years that have not been able to survive to modern times and are broadly known as archaic humans, as opposed to the extant modern humans. It has always been considered fascinating to compare the modern human genome with that of archaic humans to identify modern human-specific sequence variants and figure out those that made modern humans different from their predecessors or cousin species. Neanderthals are the latest humans to become extinct, and many factors made them the best representatives of archaic humans. Even though a number of comparisons have been made sporadically between Neanderthals and modern humans, mostly following a candidate gene approach, the major breakthrough took place with the sequencing of the Neanderthal genome. The initial genome-wide comparison, based on the first draft of the Neanderthal genome, has generated some interesting inferences regarding variations in functional elements that are not shared by the two species and the debated admixture question. However, there are certain other genetic elements that were not included or included at a smaller scale in those studies, and they should be compared comprehensively to better understand the molecular make-up of modern humans and their phenotypic characteristics. Besides briefly discussing the important outcomes of the comparative analyses made so far between modern humans and Neanderthals, we propose that future comparative studies may include retrotransposons, pseudogenes, and conserved non-coding regions, all of which might have played significant roles during the evolution of modern humans. PMID:24465235

  16. HPMCD: the database of human microbial communities from metagenomic datasets and microbial reference genomes.

    PubMed

    Forster, Samuel C; Browne, Hilary P; Kumar, Nitin; Hunt, Martin; Denise, Hubert; Mitchell, Alex; Finn, Robert D; Lawley, Trevor D

    2016-01-01

    The Human Pan-Microbe Communities (HPMC) database (http://www.hpmcd.org/) provides a manually curated, searchable, metagenomic resource to facilitate investigation of human gastrointestinal microbiota. Over the past decade, the application of metagenome sequencing to elucidate the microbial composition and functional capacity present in the human microbiome has revolutionized many concepts in our basic biology. When sufficient high quality reference genomes are available, whole genome metagenomic sequencing can provide direct biological insights and high-resolution classification. The HPMC database provides species level, standardized phylogenetic classification of over 1800 human gastrointestinal metagenomic samples. This is achieved by combining a manually curated list of bacterial genomes from human faecal samples with over 21000 additional reference genomes representing bacteria, viruses, archaea and fungi with manually curated species classification and enhanced sample metadata annotation. A user-friendly, web-based interface provides the ability to search for (i) microbial groups associated with health or disease state, (ii) health or disease states and community structure associated with a microbial group, (iii) the enrichment of a microbial gene or sequence and (iv) enrichment of a functional annotation. The HPMC database enables detailed analysis of human microbial communities and supports research from basic microbiology and immunology to therapeutic development in human health and disease. PMID:26578596

  17. Using populations of human and microbial genomes for organism detection in metagenomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Sasha K.; Gardner, Shea N.; Marti, Jose Manuel; Slezak, Tom R.; Gokhale, Maya B.; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2015-04-29

    Identifying causative disease agents in human patients from shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) presents a powerful tool to apply when other targeted diagnostics fail. Numerous technical challenges remain, however, before SMS can move beyond the role of research tool. Accurately separating the known and unknown organism content remains difficult, particularly when SMS is applied as a last resort. The true amount of human DNA that remains in a sample after screening against the human reference genome and filtering nonbiological components left from library preparation has previously been underreported. In this study, we create the most comprehensive collection of microbial and reference-free human genetic variation available in a database optimized for efficient metagenomic search by extracting sequences from GenBank and the 1000 Genomes Project. The results reveal new human sequences found in individual Human Microbiome Project (HMP) samples. Individual samples contain up to 95% human sequence, and 4% of the individual HMP samples contain 10% or more human reads. In conclusion, left unidentified, human reads can complicate and slow down further analysis and lead to inaccurately labeled microbial taxa and ultimately lead to privacy concerns as more human genome data is collected.

  18. Using populations of human and microbial genomes for organism detection in metagenomes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ames, Sasha K.; Gardner, Shea N.; Marti, Jose Manuel; Slezak, Tom R.; Gokhale, Maya B.; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2015-04-29

    Identifying causative disease agents in human patients from shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) presents a powerful tool to apply when other targeted diagnostics fail. Numerous technical challenges remain, however, before SMS can move beyond the role of research tool. Accurately separating the known and unknown organism content remains difficult, particularly when SMS is applied as a last resort. The true amount of human DNA that remains in a sample after screening against the human reference genome and filtering nonbiological components left from library preparation has previously been underreported. In this study, we create the most comprehensive collection of microbial and reference-freemore » human genetic variation available in a database optimized for efficient metagenomic search by extracting sequences from GenBank and the 1000 Genomes Project. The results reveal new human sequences found in individual Human Microbiome Project (HMP) samples. Individual samples contain up to 95% human sequence, and 4% of the individual HMP samples contain 10% or more human reads. In conclusion, left unidentified, human reads can complicate and slow down further analysis and lead to inaccurately labeled microbial taxa and ultimately lead to privacy concerns as more human genome data is collected.« less

  19. Using populations of human and microbial genomes for organism detection in metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Sasha K.; Gardner, Shea N.; Marti, Jose Manuel; Slezak, Tom R.; Gokhale, Maya B.; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying causative disease agents in human patients from shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) presents a powerful tool to apply when other targeted diagnostics fail. Numerous technical challenges remain, however, before SMS can move beyond the role of research tool. Accurately separating the known and unknown organism content remains difficult, particularly when SMS is applied as a last resort. The true amount of human DNA that remains in a sample after screening against the human reference genome and filtering nonbiological components left from library preparation has previously been underreported. In this study, we create the most comprehensive collection of microbial and reference-free human genetic variation available in a database optimized for efficient metagenomic search by extracting sequences from GenBank and the 1000 Genomes Project. The results reveal new human sequences found in individual Human Microbiome Project (HMP) samples. Individual samples contain up to 95% human sequence, and 4% of the individual HMP samples contain 10% or more human reads. Left unidentified, human reads can complicate and slow down further analysis and lead to inaccurately labeled microbial taxa and ultimately lead to privacy concerns as more human genome data is collected. PMID:25926546

  20. Using populations of human and microbial genomes for organism detection in metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Ames, Sasha K; Gardner, Shea N; Marti, Jose Manuel; Slezak, Tom R; Gokhale, Maya B; Allen, Jonathan E

    2015-07-01

    Identifying causative disease agents in human patients from shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) presents a powerful tool to apply when other targeted diagnostics fail. Numerous technical challenges remain, however, before SMS can move beyond the role of research tool. Accurately separating the known and unknown organism content remains difficult, particularly when SMS is applied as a last resort. The true amount of human DNA that remains in a sample after screening against the human reference genome and filtering nonbiological components left from library preparation has previously been underreported. In this study, we create the most comprehensive collection of microbial and reference-free human genetic variation available in a database optimized for efficient metagenomic search by extracting sequences from GenBank and the 1000 Genomes Project. The results reveal new human sequences found in individual Human Microbiome Project (HMP) samples. Individual samples contain up to 95% human sequence, and 4% of the individual HMP samples contain 10% or more human reads. Left unidentified, human reads can complicate and slow down further analysis and lead to inaccurately labeled microbial taxa and ultimately lead to privacy concerns as more human genome data is collected. PMID:25926546