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Sample records for aflatoxin m1 afm1

  1. Aflatoxin M1 Concentration in Various Dairy Products: Evidence for Biologically Reduced Amount of AFM1 in Yoghurt

    PubMed Central

    RAHIMIRAD, Amir; MAALEKINEJAD, Hassan; OSTADI, Araz; YEGANEH, Samal; FAHIMI, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a carcinogenic substance is found in milk and dairy products. The effect of season and type of dairy products on AFMi level in northern Iran was investigated in this study. Methods Three hundred samples (each season 75 samples) including raw and pasteurized milk, yoghurt, cheese, and cream samples were collected from three distinct milk producing farms. The samples were subjected to chemical and solid phase extractions and were analyzed by using HPLC technique. Recovery percentages, limit of detection and limit of quantification values were determined. Results Seventy percent and 98% were the minimum and maximum recoveries for cheese and raw milk, respectively and 0.021 and 0.063 ppb were the limit of detection and limit of quantification values for AFM1. We found that in autumn and winter the highest level (0.121 ppb) of AFM1 in cheese and cream samples and failed to detect any AFM1 in spring samples. Interestingly, our data showed that the yoghurt samples had the lowest level of AFM1 in all seasons. Conclusion There are significant differences between the AFM1 levels in dairy products in various seasons and also various types of products, suggesting spring and summer yoghurt samples as the safest products from AFM1 level point of view. PMID:25927044

  2. Determination of the aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) from milk by direct analysis in real time - mass spectrometry (DART-MS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certain fungi that grow on crops can produce aflatoxins, which are highly carcinogenic. One of these, aflatoxin B1 can be metabolized by mammals to aflatoxin M1, a form that retains potent carcinogenicity and which can be excreted into milk. Direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization coupled to ...

  3. Assessment of AflatoxinM1 Contamination in UHT Flavored Milk Samples in Karaj, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mashak, Zohreh; Jafari Sohi, Hadi; Heshmati, Ali; Mozaffari Nejad, Amir Sasan

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to detect the presence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in 30 UHT flavored milk samples in Karaj, Alborz province, Iran. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was applied to analyze AFM1 in the samples. The results showed that aflatoxin M1 was detected in all the UHT flavored milk samples, the AFM1 concentration ranged from 0.015 to 0.14 µg/L. Also, 10 samples (33.3%) were contaminated with more than 0.05 µg/L of European Union regulations for aflatoxin M1. Wherease, according to the proposed Iranian national standard and FDA (0.5 µg/L), none of the samples has not been contaminated more than the maximum AFM1 concentrations threshold. This is the first report discovering the fact that UHT flavored milk is an important contributor to the dietary intake of AFM1 in Iran. PMID:27980575

  4. Aflatoxin M1 in human breast milk in southeastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kılıç Altun, Serap; Gürbüz, Semra; Ayağ, Emin

    2016-12-28

    This study was performed to determine aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in human breast milk samples collected in Şanlıurfa, located in Southeastern region of Turkey, and to investigate a possible correlation between AFM1 occurrence (frequency and levels) and sampling seasons. Human breast milk samples collected in December 2014 and in June 2015 from a total of 74 nursing women, both outpatient and inpatient volunteers in hospitals located in Şanlıurfa, Turkey, were analyzed using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the presence of AFM1. AFM1 was detected in 66 (89.2%) out of 74 samples at an average concentration of 19.0 ± 13.0 ng/l (min.-max., 9.6-80 ng/l). There was a statistically significant difference between December and June concerning AFM1 levels (p < 0.05). Further detailed studies will be needed to determine the main sources of aflatoxins in food, to establish protection strategies against maternal and infant exposure to these mycotoxins.

  5. Incidence of aflatoxin M1 in human and animal milk in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Omar, Sharaf S

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the presence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in animal milk. In addition, exposure of infants to aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) and lactating mothers to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) was examined using AFM1 in breast milk as a biomarker for exposure to AFB1. In total, 100 samples of fresh animal milk and fermented milk (buttermilk) and 80 samples of human breast milk were collected during the period 2011-2012. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for the analysis of milk samples. AFM1 was detected in all animal fresh and fermented milk samples. The concentrations of AFM1 in 70 samples of fresh and fermented milk were higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the European Union and the United States of 50 ng/kg. In human milk samples the average concentration of AFM1 was higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the European Union and the United States of 25 ng/kg. Logistic regression analysis failed to show a correlation between AFM1 and type and amount of dairy consumption, vegetables, fruits, and meat. However, an association between AFM1 and cereal consumption was detected. This study is the first to report on the occurrence of AFM1 in milk consumed by the Jordanian population.

  6. Exposure of Infants to Aflatoxin M1 from Mother's Breast Milk in Ilam, Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farajollah; Abdi, Soghra; Davodian, Elaham; Haghani, Karimeh; Bakhtiyari, Salar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Aflatoxins as a highly toxic group of mycotoxins are present in the environment and foodstuff. These have been reported to cause serious health problems in humans. Since aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) is excreted into breast milk, investigating the exposure of infants to AFM1 is of special concern. Methods In the present study, breast milk samples were collected from 85 lactating mothers in Ilam province, Iran, and the levels of AFM1 were analyzed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based technique. AFM1 was detected in breast milk of all lactating women. The mean contamination level was 5.91 ± 2.031 ng/L, ranging from 2 ng/L to 10 ng/L. Results Multiple regression analysis indicated no significant associations of consumption of milk and dairy products, meat, fish, legumes, grain products, fruits, and nuts with the concentration of AFM1 in breast milk. Furthermore, no significant association was observed between AFM1 concentration and anthropometric data of infants. Conclusion In western parts of Iran, lactating mothers and their infants could be at risk of aflatoxin B1 and AFM1 exposure, respectively. Therefore, in Iran, the evaluation of AFM1 in human breast milk as a biomarker for postnatal exposure of infants to this carcinogen requires more attention in different regions and various seasons. PMID:26929911

  7. Aflatoxin binders II: reduction of aflatoxin M1 in milk by sequestering agents of cows consuming aflatoxin in feed.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Duarte E; Hagler, Winston M; Blackwelder, John T; Eve, Julie A; Hopkins, Brinton A; Anderson, Kevin L; Jones, Frank T; Whitlow, Lon W

    2004-02-01

    Sequestering agents bind dietary aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and reduce absorption from an animal's gastrointestinal tract. As a result, they protect an animal from the toxic effects of AFB1 and reduce transfer of the metabolite, aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), into milk. Three experiments, using late-lactation Holstein cows fed AFB1-contaminated feed, were conducted to evaluate several potential sequestering agents for their abilities to prevent or reduce the transmission of AFM1 into milk. Six agents previously tested in our laboratory for AFB1 binding in vitro were evaluated in these experiments. These were: SA-20, an activated carbon (AC-A); Astra-Ben-20, a sodium bentonite (AB-20); MTB-100, an esterified glucomannan (MTB-100); Red Crown, a calcium bentonite (RC); Flow Guard, a sodium bentonite (FG); and Mycrosorb, a sodium bentonite (MS). Five of the six sequestering agents significantly (P < 0.01) reduced AFM1 contamination of milk (AB-20, 61%; FG, 65%; MS, 50%; MTB-100, 59%; and RC, 31%); whereas, AC-A, activated carbon, had no effect on AFM1 transmission at 0.25% of feed. By the first milking (1 day after cows consumed contaminated feed), AFM1 appeared in milk, then reached maximum levels after three days, and was absent from milk within four days after AFB1 was removed from the feed. Sodium bentonites at 1.2% of feed showed good potential as AFB1 binders; MTB-100, a yeast cell wall product, was equally effective at 0.05% in feed. Potential AFB1 binding agents should be evaluated experimentally to demonstrate efficacy. Our data show that sequestering agents can reduce AFM1 in milk of cows fed AFB1-contaminated feed.

  8. Aflatoxin M1 in buffalo and cow milk in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kara, Recep; Ince, Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Potential hazardous human exposure to aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) via consumption of milk and milk products has been demonstrated by many researchers. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of this mycotoxin in buffalo and cow milk samples in the city of Afyonkarahisar, Turkey. For this purpose, 126 buffalo and 124 cow milk samples were collected from dairy farms in Afyonkarahisar province. AFM1 levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection. Although AFM1 was not detected in cow milk samples, AFM1 was found above the limit of detection (<0.008-0.032 µg/L) in 27% (34 out of 126) of the buffalo milk samples. The results of this study indicated the importance of continuous surveillance of commonly consumed milk or milk product samples for AFM1 contamination in Turkey.

  9. Development of an Electrochemical Biosensor for the Detection of Aflatoxin M1 in Milk

    PubMed Central

    Paniel, Nathalie; Radoi, Antonio; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of ultratrace amounts of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in food products. The sensor was based on a competitive immunoassay using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a tag. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with antibody (anti-AFM1) were used to separate the bound and unbound fractions. The samples containing AFM1 were incubated with a fixed amount of antibody and tracer [AFM1 linked to HRP (conjugate)] until the system reached equilibrium. Competition occurs between the antigen (AFM1) and the conjugate for the antibody. Then, the mixture was deposited on the surface of screen-printed carbon electrodes, and the mediator [5-methylphenazinium methyl sulphate (MPMS)] was added. The enzymatic response was measured amperometrically. A standard range (0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 ppb) of AFM1-contaminated milk from the ELISA kit was used to obtain a standard curve for AFM1. To test the detection sensitivity of our sensor, samples of commercial milk were supplemented at 0.01, 0.025, 0.05 or 0.1 ppb with AFM1. Our immunosensor has a low detection limit (0.01 ppb), which is under the recommended level of AFM1 [0.05 μg L-1 (ppb)], and has good reproducibility. PMID:22163418

  10. Determination of aflatoxin M1 levels in Iranian white and cream cheese.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Aziz A; Jafari, Tina; Fallah, Ali; Rahnama, Mohammad

    2009-08-01

    A screening survey on the occurrence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) was accomplished on 210 cheese samples composed of white cheese (116 samples) and cream cheese (94 samples) purchased from popular markets in central part of Iran (Esfahan and Yazd provinces). The quantitative analysis of AFM1 levels in the samples was performed by using the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Aflatoxin M1 at measurable level (50 ng/kg) was detected in 161 (76.6%) samples, consisting of 93 (80.1%) white and 68 (72.3%) cream cheese samples. The concentration of AFM1 in the samples ranged from 52.1 to 785.4 ng/kg. Comparing to legal regulation (250 ng/kg) accepted by some of the countries, 24.2% of the samples exceeded the accepted limit. Among these, the AFM1 levels in 28.4% of white and 19.1% of cream cheese samples were not in accordance with the safety limit. The results indicated that contamination of the samples with AFM1 in such a level appear to be a potential hazard for public health. This paper represents the data of the first survey on the occurrence of AFM1 in cheeses consumed in central part of Iran.

  11. Enhanced spectrofluorimetric determination of aflatoxin M1 in liquid milk after magnetic solid phase extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Mahdi; Taherimaslak, Zohreh; Rashidi, Somayeh

    2014-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method using magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) followed by spectrofluorimetric detection has been developed for separation and determination of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in liquid milk. The method is based on the extraction of AFM1 on the modified magnetic nanoparticles (MMNPs) and subsequent derivatization of extracted AFM1 to AFM1 hemi-acetal derivative (AFM2a) by reaction with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) for spectrofluorimetric detection. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated by 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-1-propantiol (TMSPT) and modified with 2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (AMT) were used as adsorbent in MSPE procedure. Influential parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions the calibration curve for AFM1 determination showed good linearity in the range 0.030-10.0 μg L-1 (R2 = 0.9991). The repeatability and reproducibility (RSD%) for 0.050 μg L-1 of AFM1 were 4.5% and 5.3%, respectively and limit of detection limit (S/N = 3) was estimated to be 0.010 μg L-1. The developed method was successfully applied for extraction of AFM1 from spiked liquid milk and natural contaminated liquid milk. The good spiked recoveries ranging from 91.6% to 96.1% were obtained. The results demonstrated that the developed method is simple, inexpensive, accurate and remarkably free from interference effects.

  12. Seasonal patterns of aflatoxin M1 contamination in commercial pasteurised milk from different areas in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suriyasathaporn, Witaya; Nakprasert, Watinee

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) levels were determined in pasteurised milk from five commercial trademarks produced in different areas in Thailand. One hundred and twenty milk samples were collected from local markets in Chiang Mai province, Thailand, to evaluate AFM1 concentrations using immunoaffinity columns and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The overall median AFM1 level was 0.023 µg L(-1) ranging from 0.004 to 0.293 µg L(-1). All trademarks had average AFM1 concentrations lower than 0.05 µg L(-1), with those in Trademarks 3 to 5 being higher than Trademarks 1 and 2 (P < 0.01). All trademarks had different seasonal patterns of AFM1, even though operating in the same area. However, only Trademark 3 showed significant differences of AFM1 levels between seasons. The results suggested that farm management factors, rather than environment factors, were likely to be the main cause of AFM1 contamination in dairy products.

  13. An ultra-sensitive monoclonal antibody-based fluorescent microsphere immunochromatographic test strip assay for detecting aflatoxin M1 in milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid lateral flow fluorescent microspheres immunochromatography test strip (FMs-ICTS) has been developed for the detection of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) residues in milk. For this purpose, an ultra-sensitive anti-AFM1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1D3 was prepared and identified. The IC50 value of the MA...

  14. A qPCR aptasensor for sensitive detection of aflatoxin M1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaodong; Wen, Fang; Zheng, Nan; Li, Songli; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-08-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), one of the most toxic mycotoxins, imposes serious health hazards. AFM1 had previously been classified as a group 2B carcinogen [1] and has been classified as a group 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) of the World Health Organization (WHO) [2]. Determination of AFM1 thus plays an important role for quality control of food safety. In this work, a sensitive and reliable aptasensor was developed for the detection of AFM1. The immobilization of aptamer through a strong interaction with biotin-streptavidin was used as a molecular recognition element, and its complementary ssDNA was employed as the template for a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) amplification. Under optimized assay conditions, a linear relationship (ranging from 1.0 × 10(-4) to 1.0 μg L(-1)) was achieved with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 0.03 ng L(-1). In addition, the aptasensor developed here exhibits high selectivity for AFM1 over other mycotoxins and small effects from cross-reaction with structural analogs. The method proposed here has been successfully applied to quantitative determination of AFM1 in infant rice cereal and infant milk powder samples. Results demonstrated that the current approach is potentially useful for food safety analysis, and it could be extended to a large number of targets.

  15. Aflatoxin M1 Levels in Raw Milk, Pasteurised Milk and Infant Formula

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Sharaf S.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of contamination of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk samples collected from the Jordanian market was investigated by using the competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. A total of 175 samples were collected during 2014-2015. All tested samples were contaminated with various levels of AFM1 ranging from 9.71 to 288.68 ng/kg. The concentration of AFM1 in 66% of fresh milk samples was higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the European Union (50 ng/kg) and 23% higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the US (500 ng/kg). Percentages of contaminated raw cow, sheep, goat and camel milk exceeding the European tolerance limit were 60, 85, 75 and 0%, respectively. Of AFM1 contaminated pasteurised cow milk samples, 12% exceeded the European tolerance limit with a range of contamination between 14.60 and 216.78 ng/kg. For infant formula samples, the average concentration of AFM1 was 120.26 ng/kg (range from 16.55 to 288.68 ng/kg), the concentration of AFM1 in 85% of infant formula samples was higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the European Union and the US (25 ng/kg). PMID:27853711

  16. Aflatoxin M1 Levels in Raw Milk, Pasteurised Milk and Infant Formula.

    PubMed

    Omar, Sharaf S

    2016-06-03

    The incidence of contamination of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk samples collected from the Jordanian market was investigated by using the competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. A total of 175 samples were collected during 2014-2015. All tested samples were contaminated with various levels of AFM1 ranging from 9.71 to 288.68 ng/kg. The concentration of AFM1 in 66% of fresh milk samples was higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the European Union (50 ng/kg) and 23% higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the US (500 ng/kg). Percentages of contaminated raw cow, sheep, goat and camel milk exceeding the European tolerance limit were 60, 85, 75 and 0%, respectively. Of AFM1 contaminated pasteurised cow milk samples, 12% exceeded the European tolerance limit with a range of contamination between 14.60 and 216.78 ng/kg. For infant formula samples, the average concentration of AFM1 was 120.26 ng/kg (range from 16.55 to 288.68 ng/kg), the concentration of AFM1 in 85% of infant formula samples was higher than the maximum tolerance limit accepted by the European Union and the US (25 ng/kg).

  17. The aflatoxin M1 crisis in the Serbian dairy sector: the year after.

    PubMed

    Miocinovic, Jelena; Keskic, Tanja; Miloradovic, Zorana; Kos, Andrea; Tomasevic, Igor; Pudja, Predrag

    2017-03-01

    During the last 3 years, high aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) concentrations in milk and dairy products occurred in Serbia. It resulted in periodical change of the official regulations regarding maximum levels (MLs) of AFM1 as set by the Serbian Government. The aim of this study was to compare the occurrence of AFM1 in raw milk and dairy products during 2015 and also to determine whether there were some differences in AFM1 level among seasons. The AFM1 level exceeded the European Union ML in 29.3% of raw milk and 4.2% of milk product samples. The highest level of AFM1 in raw milk was found during the autumn season, while during the rest of the 2015, it was significantly lower. Although the improvement of dairy products safety was evident in 2015 when compared to 2013 and 2014, the cause of high concentrations in raw milk remained unresolved yet. This study indicates that dairy plants introduced control measures and refused reception of too high contaminated raw milk.

  18. Occurrence of aflatoxin M1 in urines from rural and urban adult cohorts in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nurshad; Hossain, Khaled; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Rahman, Mashiur; Mohanto, Nayan Chandra; Alim, Abdul; Degen, Gisela H

    2016-07-01

    Aflatoxins are important mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, moulds which contaminate mainly grains and nuts, especially in hot and humid climate. Presence of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), the most toxic one and a potent hepatocarcinogen, has been reported in food and feed in Bangladesh and raised concerns about mycotoxin exposure in the population. Biomonitoring provides the best approach to assess human exposure from various sources and by all routes. Part of the ingested AFB1 is converted in the body to aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a metabolite that has served as biomarker of AFB1 exposure, as it is excreted in urine, and thus enables non-invasive sampling, a relevant aspect in field studies. This investigation measured the AFM1 concentration in urines collected from adult residents of a rural (n = 52) and an urban (n = 43) area in the Rajshahi district of Bangladesh. The urinary levels of AFM1 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. AFM1 was detected in 46 % of all urine samples at a range of 31-348 pg/mL. The median and mean concentration of AFM1 in urine was 61 and 80 ± 60 pg/mL, respectively. A significant difference (p < 0.05) was found at the mean level of AFM1 between the rural (99 ± 71 pg/mL) and urban (54 ± 15 pg/mL) cohort. Urinary AFM1 levels did not show significant correlations with food frequency data or age, gender and body mass index of the participants. Among them, the highest mean AFM1 level (101 ± 71 pg/mL) was observed in the 50-60 years age group. In conclusion, detection frequency and urinary AFM1 levels in the Bangladeshi adults support concerns regarding their dietary exposure to AFB1. These first data warrant further biomarker-based studies in children and in cohorts of other parts of the country.

  19. Determination of aflatoxin M1 in breast milk as a biomarker of maternal and infant exposure in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Gonzalo J; Sánchez, Marlib Paloma

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to aflatoxins, and especially to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), causes hepatocellular carcinoma with prevalence 16-32 times higher in developing compared with developed countries. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) is a monohydroxylated metabolite from AFB1 that is secreted in milk and which can be used as a biomarker of AFB1 exposure. This study aimed to determine AFM1 levels in human breast milk using immunoaffinity column clean-up with HPLC and fluorescence detection. Breast milk samples were obtained from 50 nursing mothers. Volunteers filled in a questionnaire giving their consent to analyse their samples as well as details of their socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data. The possible dietary sources of aflatoxins were assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. A total of 90% of the samples tested positive for AFM1, with a mean of 5.2 ng l(-1) and a range of 0.9-18.5 ng l(-1). The study demonstrated a high frequency of exposure of mothers and neonates to AFB1 and AFM1 in Colombia, and it points out the need to regulate and monitor continuously the presence of aflatoxins in human foods. Further research is needed in order to determine the presence of other mycotoxins in foods and in human samples as well as to devise protection strategies in a country where mycotoxins in human foods are commonly found.

  20. The Hotspot for (Global) One Health in Primary Food Production: Aflatoxin M1 in Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Frazzoli, Chiara; Gherardi, Paola; Saxena, Navneet; Belluzzi, Giancarlo; Mantovani, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    One Health involves the multifaceted environment-animal-human web: nevertheless, the role of toxicological issues has yet to be fully explored in this context. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) contamination of feeds is a risk for the health of several farm animals, including fishes; milk is the only food of animal origin where a significant feed-food carry over may occur. The main AFB1-related compound present in milk is the hydroxy-metabolite aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). Besides contamination of raw milk, AFM1 is of concern for the whole dairy chain; AFM1 may also contaminate the milk of several other ruminants used for milk/dairy production. In a One Health perspective, milk represents a sentinel matrix for AFB1 vulnerability of the agro-food system, that is crucial in a phase when food/nutritional security becomes a global issue and climatic changes may affect agricultural productions. In the global setting, food chain exposure to long-term toxicants, such as AFM1, is a growing concern for economically developing countries, whereas global trade and climatic change makes AFM1 an emerging hot issue in economically developed countries as well. We critically review the state of the art on AFM1 risk assessment and risk management using two scenarios as case studies: a European Union country where the health system aims at ensuring a high-level protection of food chain (Italy) and the world's largest (and economically developing) producer of dairy products by volume (India). The case studies are used to provide building blocks for a global One Health framework.

  1. The Hotspot for (Global) One Health in Primary Food Production: Aflatoxin M1 in Dairy Products

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoli, Chiara; Gherardi, Paola; Saxena, Navneet; Belluzzi, Giancarlo; Mantovani, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    One Health involves the multifaceted environment-animal-human web: nevertheless, the role of toxicological issues has yet to be fully explored in this context. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) contamination of feeds is a risk for the health of several farm animals, including fishes; milk is the only food of animal origin where a significant feed-food carry over may occur. The main AFB1-related compound present in milk is the hydroxy-metabolite aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). Besides contamination of raw milk, AFM1 is of concern for the whole dairy chain; AFM1 may also contaminate the milk of several other ruminants used for milk/dairy production. In a One Health perspective, milk represents a sentinel matrix for AFB1 vulnerability of the agro-food system, that is crucial in a phase when food/nutritional security becomes a global issue and climatic changes may affect agricultural productions. In the global setting, food chain exposure to long-term toxicants, such as AFM1, is a growing concern for economically developing countries, whereas global trade and climatic change makes AFM1 an emerging hot issue in economically developed countries as well. We critically review the state of the art on AFM1 risk assessment and risk management using two scenarios as case studies: a European Union country where the health system aims at ensuring a high-level protection of food chain (Italy) and the world’s largest (and economically developing) producer of dairy products by volume (India). The case studies are used to provide building blocks for a global One Health framework. PMID:28210616

  2. Determination of Aflatoxin M1 and Heavy Metals in Infant Formula Milk Brands Available in Pakistani Markets

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saeed; Shahzad, Muhammad Arif; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Ismail, Amir; Hameed, Aneela; Ismail, Tariq; Riaz, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) after its bioconversion from aflatoxin B1 in animal liver becomes the part of milk while heavy metals get entry into milk and milk products during handling in the supply chain. Aflatoxin M1 and heavy metals being toxic compounds are needed to be monitored continuously to avoid any ailments among consumers of foods contaminated with such toxicants. Thirteen commercially available infant formula milk (IFM) brands available in Pakistani markets were analyzed for the quantitative determination of AFM1 and heavy metals through ELISA and atomic absorption spectrophotometer, respectively. AFM1 was found positive in 53.84% samples while 30.76% samples were found exceeding the maximum EU limit i.e. 0.025 μg/kg for AFM1 in IFM. Heavy metals lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) were found below the detection limits in any of the sample, whereas the concentrations of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) and nickel (Ni) ranged between 45.40-97.10, 29.72-113.50 and <0.001-50.90 μg/kg, respectively. The concentration of Fe in all the tested brands was found in normal ranges while the concentrations of Zn and Ni were found exceeding the standard norms. Elevated levels of AFM1, Zn and Ni in some of the tested IFM brands indicated that a diet completely based on these IFM brands might pose sever health implications in the most vulnerable community i.e., infants. PMID:28316474

  3. Aflatoxin M1 in raw milk in Qazvin Province, Iran: a seasonal study.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Aziz A; Barani, Afshin; Nasiri, Zeinab

    2015-01-01

    Occurrence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) was determined in 254 samples of raw milk obtained from dairy cow farms of Qazvin Province, Iran. Aflatoxin M1 analysis was carried out by using the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique for screening and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection for confirmatory purposes. The limit of detection and quantification of the confirmatory method were 0.003 and 0.01 µg/l, respectively. Aflatoxin M1 was detected in 204 analysed samples (80.3%), ranging from 0.011 to 0.321 μg/l, and 144 samples (56.7%) had levels above the Iranian national standard limit of 0.050 μg/l. Considering the seasonal variability, the occurrence and levels of AFM1 in samples obtained in winter were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those obtained in summer. The results of this survey indicate the usefulness of a monitoring programme to supervise food safety for consumers.

  4. Determination of Aflatoxin M1 and Chloramphenicol in Milk Based on Background Fluorescence Quenching Immunochromatographic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoxia; Tian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Lihua; Li, Jiutong

    2017-01-01

    Harsh demanding has been exposed on the concentration of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) and chloramphenicol (CAP) in milk. In this study, we developed a new method based on background fluorescence quenching immunochromatographic assay (bFQICA) to detect AFM1 and CAP in milk. The detection limit for AFM1 was 0.0009 ng/mL, while that for the CAP was 0.0008 ng/mL. The assay variability was determined with 3 AFM1 standards (i.e., 0.25 ng/mL, 0.5 ng/mL, and 1.0 ng/mL), and the actual detection value was 0.2497, 0.5329, and 1.0941, respectively. For the assay variability of 3 CAP standards (i.e., 0.10 ng/mL, 0.30 ng/mL, and 0.50 ng/mL), the actual detection value was 0.0996, 0.3096, and 0.4905, respectively. The recovery rate of AFM1 was 99.7%–101.7%, while that for CAP was 95.3%–97.6%. For the test stability, AFM1 and CAP showed satisfactory test stability even at month 5. Compared with the sensitivity of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method, no statistical difference was noticed in results of the bFQICA. Our method is convenient for the detection of AFM1 and CAP in milk with a test duration of about 8 minutes. Additionally, an internal WiFi facility is provided in the system allowing for quick connection and storage in the intelligent cell phone. PMID:28367449

  5. Direct and ultrasensitive optofluidic-based immunosensing assay of aflatoxin M1 in dairy products using organic solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xuening; Zhu, Anna; Wang, Hongliang; Wu, Jun; Zhou, Liping; Long, Feng

    2016-10-12

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a highly toxic secondary metabolite, is present in a wide range of dairy products. In this study, we designed a simple, low-cost, reusable, and easy-to-operate immunosensing method for ultrasensitive detection of AFM1 in dairy products by using a portable evanescent wave-based optofluidic biosensing platform (EOBP). The developed method provides the minimum detection limit of 5 ng/L, which is below the most restrictive standard imposed by the current regulations for AFM1 in dairy products. The effect of several organic solvents, such as methanol, acetone, and acetonitrile, on the binding reaction of antibody-antigen in heterogeneous and homogeneous solutions was evaluated. Although the effect of organic solvents on the homogeneous binding reaction between antibody and antigen is more significant than that of heterogeneous binding reaction between antibody in solution and antigen immobilized onto the sensor surface, the fluorescence signal detected by EOBP is linearly dependent on AFM1 concentration. Therefore, AFM1 can be directly quantified even if the samples contain a certain organic solvent concentration. The robustness and stability of AFM1-ovalbumin conjugate allow the regeneration of modified biosensor surface for more than 200 times, thereby achieving a cost-effective and reliable AFM1 determination. The proposed method provides a rapid, ultrasensitive, and reliable AFM1 determination in dairy products without complicated sample pretreatment process.

  6. Aflatoxin M1 cytotoxicity against human intestinal Caco-2 cells is enhanced in the presence of other mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y N; Wang, J Q; Li, S L; Zhang, Y D; Zheng, N

    2016-10-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a class 2B human carcinogen, is the only mycotoxin with established maximum residue limits (MRLs) in milk. Toxicological data for other mycotoxins in baby food, containing cereals and milk, either in isolation or in combination with AFM1, are sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of AFM1, ochratoxin A (OTA), zearalenone (ZEA), and α-zearalenol (α-ZOL), individually and in combinations, in human Caco-2 cells. The tetrazolium salt (MTT) assay demonstrated that (i) OTA and AFM1 had similar cytotoxicity, which was higher than that of ZEA and α-ZOL, after a 72 h exposure; and (ii) the quaternary combination had the highest cytotoxicity, followed by tertiary and binary combinations and individual mycotoxins. Isobologram analysis indicated that the presence of OTA, ZEA, and/or α-ZOL with AFM1 led to additive and synergistic cytotoxicity in most combinations. The cytotoxicity of OTA was similar to that of AFM1, suggesting that OTA in food poses a health risk to consumers. Furthermore, AFM1 cytotoxicity increased dramatically in the presence of OTA, ZEA, and/or α-ZOL (p < 0.01), indicating that the established MRLs for AFM1 should be re-evaluated considering its frequent co-occurrence with other mycotoxins in baby food which contains milk and cereals.

  7. Occurrence of aflatoxin M1 in conventional and organic milk offered for sale in Italy.

    PubMed

    Armorini, Sara; Altafini, Alberto; Zaghini, Anna; Roncada, Paola

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, 58 samples of milk were analyzed for the presence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The samples were purchased during the period April-May 2013 in a random manner from local stores (supermarkets, small retail shops, small groceries, and specialized suppliers) located in the surrounding of Bologna (Italy). The commercial samples of milk were either organic (n = 22) or conventional (n = 36); fresh milk samples and UHT milk samples, whole milk samples, and partially skim milk samples were present in both the two considered categories. For the quantification of AFM1 in milk, the extraction-purification technique based on the use of immunoaffinity columns was adopted and analyses were performed using HPLC-FD. AFM1 was detected in 35 samples, 11 from organic production and 24 from conventional production. No statistically (P > 0.05) significant differences were observed in the concentration of AFM1 in the two categories of product. The levels of contamination found in the positive samples ranged between 0.009 and 0.026 ng mL(-1). No sample exceeded the limit defined at community level for AFM1 in milk (0.05 μg kg(-1)). This demonstrates the effectiveness of the checks before the placing on the market of these food products. Thus, the "aflatoxins" problem that characterized the summer of 2012 does not seem to have had effect on the contamination level of the considered milk samples.

  8. Occurrence of aflatoxin M1 in human milk samples in Vojvodina, Serbia: Estimation of average daily intake by babies.

    PubMed

    Radonić, Jelena R; Kocić Tanackov, Sunčica D; Mihajlović, Ivana J; Grujić, Zorica S; Vojinović Miloradov, Mirjana B; Škrinjar, Marija M; Turk Sekulić, Maja M

    2017-01-02

    The objectives of the study were to determine the aflatoxin M1 content in human milk samples in Vojvodina, Serbia, and to assess the risk of infants' exposure to aflatoxins food contamination. The growth of Aspergillus flavus and production of aflatoxin B1 in corn samples resulted in higher concentrations of AFM1 in milk and dairy products in 2013, indicating higher concentrations of AFM1 in human milk samples in 2013 and 2014 in Serbia. A total number of 60 samples of human milk (colostrum and breast milk collected 4-8 months after delivery) were analyzed for the presence of AFM1 using the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay method. The estimated daily intake of AFM1 through breastfeeding was calculated for the colostrum samples using an average intake of 60 mL/kg body weight (b.w.)/day on the third day of lactation. All breast milk collected 4-8 months after delivery and 36.4% of colostrum samples were contaminated with AFM1. The greatest percentage of contaminated colostrum (85%) and all samples of breast milk collected 4-8 months after delivery had AFM1 concentration above maximum allowable concentration according to the Regulation on health safety of dietetic products. The mean daily intake of AFM1 in colostrum was 2.65 ng/kg bw/day. Results of our study indicate the high risk of infants' exposure, who are at the early stage of development and vulnerable to toxic contaminants.

  9. The transfer of aflatoxin M1 in milk of ewes fed diet naturally contaminated by aflatoxins and effect of inclusion of dried yeast culture in the diet.

    PubMed

    Battacone, G; Nudda, A; Palomba, M; Mazzette, A; Pulina, G

    2009-10-01

    An experiment was carried out to investigate 1) the transfer of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) into the milk of dairy ewes fed diets naturally contaminated with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1); 2) the effect of the addition of dried yeast culture in the diet on this transfer; and 3) the alteration of enzymatic activities in the liver of ewes fed diets contaminated with AFB1. Twenty-four Sarda dairy ewes were divided in 4 groups and fed a concentrate mix containing 4 amounts of wheat meal naturally contaminated with aflatoxins. The diet of the control group had no wheat meal, whereas that of treated groups had low, medium, or high amounts of contaminated wheat, which corresponded to 1.13, 2.30, and 5.03 microg of AFB1/kg of feed, respectively. The experiment lasted 14 d. On d 8 to 14 from the beginning of the trial, 12 g/d of a commercial dried yeast product (DYP) of Kluyveromyces lactis was added to the diet of each ewe. The AFM1 concentration in individual milk samples and the blood serum metabolites were measured periodically. The presence of AFM1 was first detected in milk on d 1 of administration, and then its concentration increased and approached a steady-state condition on d 3 simultaneously in all treated groups. The AFM1 in milk at the steady-state condition, which was linearly related to the AFB1 intake, was 39.72, 50.38, and 79.29 ng/L in the low-aflatoxin, medium-aflatoxin, and high-aflatoxin groups, respectively. The AFM1 concentration in milk of the high-aflatoxin group was approximately 1.5-fold greater than the European Commission maximum tolerance level (50 ng/kg). The addition of DYP to the diet did not affect the AFM1 concentration in milk. After the withdrawal of the contaminated concentrate mix, the AFM1 mean concentrations decreased quickly and were no longer detected after 3 d in all treated groups. Daily milk yield and composition did not differ because of aflatoxin treatment. Blood serum parameters (creatinine, glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic

  10. Detection of aflatoxin M1 in milk, cheese and sour cream samples from Costa Rica using enzyme-assisted extraction and HPLC.

    PubMed

    Chavarría, Guadalupe; Granados-Chinchilla, Fabio; Alfaro-Cascante, Margarita; Molina, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic fungal metabolites, which can be found in feed. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) is excreted into milk when ruminants ingest aflatoxin B1 contaminated feedstuffs. Due to its carcinogenic potential, contamination of milk and dairy products with AFM1 may pose a risk for consumers. Hence, it is considered a public health concern. In this survey, the level of AFM1 contamination of dairy products marketed in Costa Rica was determined by enzyme-assisted extraction, immunoaffinity clean-up and high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a fluorescent detector (HPLC-FLD) in fluid milk (n = 70), fresh cheese (n = 70) and sour cream (n = 70) collected at local convenience stores and supermarkets. AFM1 concentrations in milk and fresh cheese ranged from 19 to 629 ng/L and from 31 to 276 ng/L, with mean values of 136 ng/L and 74 ng/L, respectively, whereas none of the sour cream samples analysed tested positive for this aflatoxin. In 30 milk samples, and 10 cheese samples, AFM1 concentrations surpassed threshold concentrations as established by the European Commission. Thus, sour cream and - to a lesser extent - cheese manufacturing seems to reduce the amount of AFM1 present in milk, possibly due to fraction redistribution or microbiological degradation. The survey results reveal improper quality control procedures in the Costa Rican dairy industry. Therefore, a surveillance programme for dairy products in our country is recommended.

  11. Aflatoxin B1 and M1 Degradation by Lac2 from Pleurotus pulmonarius and Redox Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Loi, Martina; Fanelli, Francesca; Zucca, Paolo; Liuzzi, Vania C.; Quintieri, Laura; Cimmarusti, Maria T.; Monaci, Linda; Haidukowski, Miriam; Logrieco, Antonio F.; Sanjust, Enrico; Mulè, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Laccases (LCs) are multicopper oxidases that find application as versatile biocatalysts for the green bioremediation of environmental pollutants and xenobiotics. In this study we elucidate the degrading activity of Lac2 pure enzyme form Pleurotus pulmonarius towards aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and M1 (AFM1). LC enzyme was purified using three chromatographic steps and identified as Lac2 through zymogram and LC-MS/MS. The degradation assays were performed in vitro at 25 °C for 72 h in buffer solution. AFB1 degradation by Lac2 direct oxidation was 23%. Toxin degradation was also investigated in the presence of three redox mediators, (2,2′-azino-bis-[3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid]) (ABTS) and two naturally-occurring phenols, acetosyringone (AS) and syringaldehyde (SA). The direct effect of the enzyme and the mediated action of Lac2 with redox mediators univocally proved the correlation between Lac2 activity and aflatoxins degradation. The degradation of AFB1 was enhanced by the addition of all mediators at 10 mM, with AS being the most effective (90% of degradation). AFM1 was completely degraded by Lac2 with all mediators at 10 mM. The novelty of this study relies on the identification of a pure enzyme as capable of degrading AFB1 and, for the first time, AFM1, and on the evidence that the mechanism of an effective degradation occurs via the mediation of natural phenolic compounds. These results opened new perspective for Lac2 application in the food and feed supply chains as a biotransforming agent of AFB1 and AFM1. PMID:27563923

  12. Aflatoxin M1 and ochratoxin A in raw bulk milk from French dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Boudra, H; Barnouin, J; Dragacci, S; Morgavi, D P

    2007-07-01

    Mycotoxins in milk are a public health concern and have to be regularly monitored. A survey on the presence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) and ochratoxin A (OTA) in raw bulk milk was conducted in 2003 in the northwest of France, the main French milk-producing basin. Randomly selected farms (n = 132) were characterized by a diet based on corn silage and containing a large proportion of on-farm produced cereals, feeding sources that are frequently contaminated by mycotoxins. Farms were surveyed twice in winter and in summer. At each sampling time, a trained surveyor completed a questionnaire recording farm management procedures and production traits. The AFM1 was found in 3 out of 264 samples but at levels (26 ng/L or less) that are below the European legislation limit of 50 ng/L. Traces of AFM1 (less than 8 ng/L) were also found in 6 other samples. The OTA was detected in 3 samples also at low levels, 5 to 8 ng/L. Farms that tested positive to the presence of mycotoxins, 12 in total including 6 farms that had traces of AFM1, differed from negative farms by a more extensive use of total mixed rations, 58 vs. 27%. In addition, the positive farms tended to have lower milk yields. Although the incidence of milk contamination with AFM1 and OTA at the farm level was low during the period studied, production and management data from the surveyed farms suggest a link between feeding management practices and mycotoxin contamination.

  13. Assessment of Aflatoxin M1 and Heavy Metal Levels in Mothers Breast Milk in Famagusta, Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Kunter, İmge; Hürer, Nazife; Gülcan, Hayrettin Ozan; Öztürk, Barış; Doğan, İrfan; Şahin, Gönül

    2017-01-01

    Breast milk contributes towards optimal nutrition for infants. However, studies showed that it can also contain different toxins and heavy metals, which reduce its health benefits. The aim of this study is to determine the level of contaminants such as aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), Pb, Cd, As, and Hg in breast milk samples from Famagusta, Cyprus. Correlations between moldy food consumption, smoking habits of the mothers, and contaminant levels in breast milk were also investigated. Breast milk samples from 50 lactating mothers in rural and urban areas of Famagusta District were analyzed for AFM1 by ELISA. Eighty percent of them were found to be contaminated with AFM1 with the mean measurement of 7.84 ± 1.72 ng/l. Socio-demographic status, moldy food consumption habits, and smoking status do not have any effect on the AFM1 levels observed in breast milk. Heavy metal levels in breast milk were examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the mean measurements were1.19 ± 1.53 ppm for Pb, 0.73 ± 0.58 ppm for As, 0 ± 0.20 ppm for Hg, and 0.45 ± 0.23 ppm for Cd. This study indicates that the levels of these contaminants in breast milk samples obtained in Famagusta District are well within the acceptable levels. However, the presence of AFM1 and heavy metals still may pose risks for infant health.

  14. Exposure Assessment of Infants to Aflatoxin M1 through Consumption of Breast Milk and Infant Powdered Milk in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Angélica T.; Takabayashi-Yamashita, Cássia R.; Ono, Elisabete Y. S.; Bagatin, Artur K.; Rigobello, Fabiana F.; Kawamura, Osamu; Hirooka, Elisa Y.; Itano, Eiko N.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) is an important biomarker that can be used to evaluate aflatoxin exposure in both humans and animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exposure degree of infants to AFM1 through consumption of breast milk and infant powdered milk in Brazil. For this purpose, the estimated daily intake (EDI) for infants was calculated based on the AFM1 levels analyzed in 94 breast milk (BM) samples collected in Southern Brazil, and 16 infant powdered milk (IPM) samples commonly commercialized in Brazil. AFM1 was detected in 5.3% (n = 5) and 43.8% (n = 7) of BM and IPM samples, with mean levels of 0.003 ng/g and 0.011 ng/g, respectively. All the IPM samples showed AFM1 levels lower than those established by the Brazilian guidelines (5 ng/g), and in most of the samples (81.25%) levels were below the maximum limit tolerated by the European Commission (0.025 ng/g). The EDI of AFM1 for infants aged zero to 12 months old showed values from 0.018 to 0.069 ng/kg body weight/day for BM, and 0.078 to 0.306 ng/kg body weight/day for IPM. Hazard index (HI) values for BM and IPM were less than one, except for IPM intended for infants up to one month. In conclusion, the exposure of infants to AFM1 was low, but continuous monitoring of mycotoxin levels is essential to minimize infant health risk. PMID:27589799

  15. Long range surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of aflatoxin M1 in milk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Dostálek, Jakub; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2009-03-15

    A novel biosensor for the highly sensitive detection of aflatoxin M(1) (AFM(1)) in milk was developed. This biosensor is based on surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) which was advanced through the excitation of long range surface plasmons (LRSPs). In SPFS, the binding of fluorophore-labeled molecules to the sensor surface is probed with surface plasmons (SPs) and the emitted fluorescence light is detected. This approach takes advantages of the enhanced intensity of electromagnetic field occurring upon the resonant excitation of SPs which directly increases the fluorescence signal. For the detection of AFM(1), LRSP-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy was combined with an inhibition immunoassay in which a derivative of AFM(1) was immobilized on the sensor surface and antibodies against AFM(1) were used as recognition elements. The developed biosensor allowed for the detection of AFM(1) in milk within 53min at concentrations as low as 0.6pgmL(-1). The achieved limit of detection was about two orders of magnitude lower than the maximum AFM(1) residue level in milk stipulated by the European Commission legislation.

  16. Identification of aflatoxin M1-N7-guanine in liver and urine of tree shrews and rats following administration of aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Egner, Patricia A; Yu, Xiang; Johnson, Jesse K; Nathasingh, Christopher K; Groopman, John D; Kensler, Thomas W; Roebuck, Bill D

    2003-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) and concurrent infection with hepatitis B lead to a multiplicative risk of developing liver cancer. This chemical-viral interaction can be recapitulated in the tree shrew (Tupia belangeri chinensis). As an initial characterization of this model, the metabolism of AFB(1) in tree shrews has been examined and compared to a sensitive bioassay species, the rat. Utilizing LC/MS/MS, an unreported product, aflatoxin M(1)-N(7)-guanine (AFM(1)-N(7)-guanine), was detected in urine and hepatic DNA samples 24 h after administration of 400 microg/kg AFB(1). In hepatic DNA isolated from tree shrews, AFM(1)-N(7)-guanine was the predominant adduct, 0.74 +/- 0.14 pmol/mg DNA, as compared to 0.37 +/- 0.07 pmol/mg DNA of AFB(1)-N(7)-guanine. Conversely, in rat liver, 6.56 +/- 2.41 pmol/mg DNA of AFB(1)-N(7)-guanine and 0.42 +/- 0.13 pmol/mg DNA of AFM(1)-N(7)-guanine were detected. Rats excreted 1.00 +/- 0.21 pmol AFB(1)-N(7)-guanine/mg creatinine and 0.29 +/- 0.10 pmol AFM(1)-N(7)-guanine/mg creatinine as compared to 0.60 +/- 0.12 pmol AFB(1)-N(7)-guanine/mg creatinine and 0.69 +/- 0.16 pmol AFM(1)-N(7)-guanine/mg creatinine excreted by the tree shrew. Furthermore, tree shrew urine contained 40 times more of the hydroxylated metabolite, AFM(1), than was excreted by rats. In vitro experiments confirmed this difference in oxidative metabolism. Hepatic microsomes isolated from tree shrews failed to produce aflatoxin Q(1) or aflatoxin P(1) but formed a significantly greater amount of AFM(1) than rat microsomes. Bioassays indicated that the tree shrew was considerably more resistant than the rat to AFB(1) hepatocarcinogenesis, which may reflect the significant differences in metabolic profiles of the two species.

  17. Effects on aflatoxin M1 residues in milk by addition of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate to aflatoxin-contaminated diets of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R B; Phillips, T D; Ellis, J A; Kubena, L F; Huff, W E; Petersen, H D

    1991-09-01

    Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS), an anticaking agent for agricultural feeds, was added to aflatoxin (AF)-contaminated diets of 3 lactating dairy cows and evaluated for its potential to reduce aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) residues in milk. During phase I, cows were fed alternating diets that consisted of 200 micrograms of AF/kg of feed for 7 days, 0.5% HSCAS plus 200 micrograms of AF/kg of feed for 7 days, and feed with the HSCAS removed for a final 7 days. The AFM1 milk concentrations from the intervals with HSCAS added to diets were compared with those times when HSCAS was absent. The presence of 0.5% HSCAS in feed containing 200 micrograms of AF/kg reduced AFM1 secretion into the milk by an average of 0.44 micrograms/L (from pretreatment of 1.85 micrograms/L to 1.41 micrograms/L with HSCAS, a 24% reduction). Following a 10-day period of noncontaminated feed consumption and no AFM1 residues in the milk, phase II of the study was begun. The same experimental design as phase I was used, but the dosages of HSCAS and AF were changed to 1.0% and 100 micrograms/kg of feed, respectively. The addition of 1.0% HSCAS in feed containing 100 micrograms of AF/kg decreased AFM1 content in the milk by an average of 0.40 micrograms/L (from a pretreatment of 0.91 micrograms/L to 0.51 micrograms/L when HSCAS was present, a 44% reduction). These findings suggest that HSCAS, a high-affinity sorbent compound for AF in vitro, is capable of reducing the secretion of AFM1 into milk.

  18. Carry-Over of Aflatoxin B1 to Aflatoxin M1 in High Yielding Israeli Cows in Mid- and Late-Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Britzi, Malka; Friedman, Shmulik; Miron, Joshua; Solomon, Ran; Cuneah, Olga; Shimshoni, Jakob A.; Soback, Stefan; Ashkenazi, Rina; Armer, Sima; Shlosberg, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The potent hepatotoxin and carcinogen aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a common mycotoxin contaminant of grains used in animal feeds. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) is the major metabolite of AFB1 in mammals, being partially excreted into milk, and is a possible human carcinogen. The maximum permitted concentration of AFM1 in cows’ milk is 0.05 μg/kg in Israel and the European Union. Since milk yield and the carry-over of AFB1 in the feed to AFM1 in the milk are highly correlated, it was considered important to determine the AFM1 carry-over in Israeli-Holstein dairy cows, distinguished by world record high milk production. Twelve such cows were used to determine AFM1 carry-over following daily oral administration of feed containing ~86 μg AFB1 for 7 days. The mean carry-over rate at steady-state (Days 3–7) was 5.8% and 2.5% in mid-lactation and late-lactation groups, respectively. The carry-over appears to increase exponentially with milk yield and could be described by the equation: carry-over% = 0.5154 e0.0521 × milk yield, with r2 = 0.6224. If these data truly reflect the carry-over in the national Israeli dairy herd, the maximum level of AFB1 in feed should not exceed 1.4 μg/kg, a value 3.6 times lower than the maximum residue level currently applied in Israel. PMID:23325299

  19. Development and validation of a sensitive monoclonal antibody-based indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the determination of the aflatoxin M1 levels in milk.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dapeng; Yang, Bijia; Pan, Yuanhu; Wang, Yulian; Chen, Dongmei; Liu, Zhenli; Yang, Wenxiang; Tao, Yanfei; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-04-01

    A sensitive monoclonal antibody (mAb) against aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) was generated to quickly monitor the AFM1 residues in milk. Then, a mAb-based indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA) was established that utilizes simple sample preparation and clean-up methods. The obtained 3D8 mAb, which is an IgG1 isotype mAb, displayed an IC50 value of 64.75 ng L(-1) for AFM1 and did not exhibit measurable cross-reactivity with other aflatoxins and antibiotics. The decision limit (CCα, α = 1%), detection capability (CCβ, β = 5%), and LOQ value for the AFM1 matrix calibration method were 24 ng L(-1), 27.5 ng L(-1), and 35 ng L(-1) in the milk matrices, respectively. The AFM1 recovery ranged from 85.3% to 107.6%. The CVs were less than 13.8%. A positive correlation (r > 0.99) was observed between the ic-ELISA and HPLC-MS/MS results. This ic-ELISA would be a useful tool for screening the AFM1 residues in milk.

  20. Optimization of a lateral flow immunoassay for the ultrasensitive detection of aflatoxin M1 in milk.

    PubMed

    Anfossi, Laura; Baggiani, Claudio; Giovannoli, Cristina; Biagioli, Flavia; D'Arco, Gilda; Giraudi, Gianfranco

    2013-04-15

    A high sensitive immunoassay-based lateral flow device for semi-quantitatively determine aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk was developed. Investigation and optimization of the competitor design and of the gold-labelling strategy allowed the attainment of the ultra-sensitive assessment of AFM1 contamination at nanograms per litre level (LOD 20 ng L(-1), IC50 99 ng L(-1)), as requested by European regulations. A one order of magnitude detectability enhancement in comparison to previously reported gold colloid immunochromatographic assays for this toxin was obtained. Direct detection of the target toxin in milk could be obtained by acquiring images of the strips and correlating intensities of the coloured lines with analyte concentrations. The one-step assay can be completed in 17 min, including a very simple and rapid sample preparation, which allowed the application of the assay to milk samples which differ in fat and protein contents. Although imprecise (mean RSD about 30%), the method proved to be accurate and sensitive enough to allow the correct attribution of sample as compliant or non-compliant according to EU legislation in force. Agreeing results to those of a reference ELISA were obtained on 40 milk samples by matrix-matched calibration in pasteurized milk.

  1. Electrochemical immunochip sensor for aflatoxin M1 detection.

    PubMed

    Parker, Charlie O; Lanyon, Yvonne H; Manning, Mary; Arrigan, Damien W M; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2009-07-01

    An investigation into the fabrication, electrochemical characterization, and development of a microelectrode array (MEA) immunosensor for aflatoxin M(1) is presented in this paper. Gold MEAs (consisting of 35 microsquare electrodes with 20 microm x 20 microm dimensions and edge-to-edge spacing of 200 microm) together with on-chip reference and counter electrodes were fabricated using standard photolithographic methods. The MEAs were then characterized by cyclic voltammetry, and the behavior of the on-chip electrodes were evaluated. The microarray sensors were assessed for their applicability to the development of an immunosensor for the analysis of aflatoxin M(1) directly in milk samples. Following the sensor surface silanization, antibodies were immobilized by cross-linking with 1,4-phenylene diisothiocyanate (PDITC). Surface characterization was conducted by electrochemistry, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay format was developed on the microarray electrode surface using the 3,3,5',5'-tetramethylbenzidine dihyrochloride (TMB)/H(2)O(2) electrochemical detection scheme with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as the enzyme label. The performance of the assay and the microarray sensor were characterized in pure buffer conditions before applying to the milk samples. With the use of this approach, the detection limit for aflatoxin M(1) in milk was estimated to be 8 ng L(-1), with a dynamic detection range of 10-100 ng L(-1), which meets present legislative limits of 50 ng L(-1). The milk interference with the sensor surface was also found to be minimal. These devices show high potential for development of a range of new applications which have previously only been detected using elaborate instrumentation.

  2. Modulation of macrophage activity by aflatoxins B1 and B2 and their metabolites aflatoxins M1 and M2.

    PubMed

    Bianco, G; Russo, R; Marzocco, S; Velotto, S; Autore, G; Severino, L

    2012-05-01

    Aflatoxins are natural contaminants frequently found both in food and feed. Many of them exert immunomodulatory properties in mammals; therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate immune-effects of AFB1, AFB2, AFM1 and AFM2, alone and differently combined, in J774A.1 murine macrophages. MTT assay showed that AFB1, alone and combined with AFB2, possess antiproliferative activity only at the highest concentration; such effect was not shown by their hydroxylated metabolites, AFM1 and AFM2, respectively. However, the immunotoxic effects of the aflatoxins evaluated in the current study may be due to the inhibition of production of active oxygen metabolites such as NO. Cytofluorimetric assay in macrophages exposed to aflatoxins (10-100 μM) revealed that their cytoxicity is not related to apoptotic pathways. Nevertheless, a significant increase of the S phase cell population accompanied by a decrease in G0/G1 phase cell population was observed after AFB1 treatment. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggest that aflatoxins could compromise the macrophages functions; in particular, co-exposure to AFB1, AFB2, AFM1 and AFM2 may exert interactions which can significantly affect immunoreactivity.

  3. Short communication: investigation of aflatoxin M1 levels in infant follow-on milks and infant formulas sold in the markets of Ankara, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Er, B; Demirhan, B; Yentür, G

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxins are fungal toxins known to be carcinogenic and are classified as food contaminants. This study was performed to investigate aflatoxin (AF) M1 levels in baby foods sold in Ankara (Turkey) and to evaluate the obtained results according to the Turkish Food Codex (TFC). For this purpose, a total of 84 baby food samples (50 follow-on milks and 34 infant formulas) were obtained from different markets in Ankara and the presence of AFM1 in the samples was analyzed by ELISA. In 32 (38.1%) of 84 infant food samples, the presence of AFM1 was detected in concentrations ranging between 0.0055 and 0.0201 µg/kg. The mean level (± standard error) of AFM1 was found to be 0.0089 ± 0.0006 µg/kg in positive infant follow-on milks. Aflatoxin M1 was detected in only 1 infant formula sample (2.94%) at a concentration of 0.0061 µg/kg. The extrapolated levels of AFB1 contamination in feedstuffs were calculated based on levels of AFM1 in baby food samples. The data estimating AFB1 contamination in dairy cattle feedstuff indicate that contamination may range from 0.3410 to 1.2580 µg/kg, with the mean level (± standard error) being 0.5499 ± 0.0385 µg/kg, which is lower than the level set by the TFC and European Union regulations (5 µg/kg). According to the obtained results, the levels of AFM1 in analyzed samples were within the allowed limit (0.025 µg/kg) set in the TFC. Low levels of AFM1 in infant follow-on milks and infant formula samples obtained during the study do not pose a health risk to infants.

  4. Behavior of sup 14 C aflatoxin M1 during camembert cheese making

    SciTech Connect

    Fremy, J.M.; Roiland, J.C.; Gaymard, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Camembert cheeses are made from raw milk spiked with aflatoxin M1. Three aflatoxin M1 levels (7.5 micrograms/L, 3 micrograms/L, and 0.3 micrograms/L) are used. In curds 35.6, 47.1, and 57.7% of aflatoxin M1, respectively, are recovered, and in wheys 64.4, 52.9, and 42.3%, respectively, are recovered. During the first 15 days of storage, the aflatoxin M1 content of different cheeses decreases 25, 55, and 75%, respectively. A similar experiment is made with milk contaminated with {sup 14}C labeled aflatoxin M1. The same results are obtained, except for the behavior of aflatoxin M1 in cheese; the same 14C activity is recovered during storage for 30 days.

  5. Presence of aflatoxin M1 in commercial ultra-high-temperature-treated milk.

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, J L; Domínguez, L; Gómez-Lucía, E; Garayzabal, J F; García, J A; Suárez, G

    1988-01-01

    Forty-seven samples of commercial ultra-high-temperature-treated milk from a dairy facility in the northwest part of Spain were analyzed for the presence of aflatoxin M1. A total of 14 samples (29.8%) were positive for aflatoxin M1 (4 in May, 3 in November, 3 in December, 1 in January, 1 in April, 1 in July, and 1 in August), 29 (61.7%) were negative, and 4 (8.5%) were doubtful, i.e., they showed trace quantities of aflatoxin M1. The range of aflatoxin M1 content was 0.02 to 0.1 ng/ml. PMID:3137868

  6. Effects of Milk Yield, Feed Composition, and Feed Contamination with Aflatoxin B1 on the Aflatoxin M1 Concentration in Dairy Cows’ Milk Investigated Using Monte Carlo Simulation Modelling

    PubMed Central

    van der Fels-Klerx, H. J.; Camenzuli, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of aflatoxin M1 (AfM1) in dairy cows’ milk, given predefined scenarios for milk production, compound feed (CF) contamination with aflatoxin B1 (AfB1), and inclusion rates of ingredients, using Monte Carlo simulation modelling. The model simulated a typical dairy farm in the Netherlands. Six different scenarios were considered, based on two lactation and three CF composition scenarios. AfB1 contamination of the CF was based on results from the Dutch national monitoring programme for AfB1 in feed materials from 2000 until 2010. Monitoring data from feed materials used in CF production for dairy cattle in the Netherlands were used. Additionally, AfB1 contamination data from an incident in maize in 2013 were used. In each scenario, five different transfer equations of AfB1 from feed to AfM1 in the milk were used, and 1000 iterations were run for each scenario. The results showed that under these six scenarios, the weekly farm concentration of AfM1 in milk was above the EC threshold in less than 1% of the iterations, with all five transfer equations considered. However, this increased substantially in weeks when concentrations from the contaminated maize batch were included, and up to 28.5% of the iterations exceeded the EC threshold. It was also observed that an increase in the milk production had a minimal effect on the exceedance of the AfM1 threshold due to an apparent dilution effect. Feeding regimes, including the composition of CF and feeding roughages of dairy cows, should be carefully considered based on the potential AfM1 contamination of the farm’s milk. PMID:27735836

  7. An effective self-control strategy for the reduction of aflatoxin M1 content in milk and to decrease the exposure of consumers.

    PubMed

    Kerekes, Kata; Bonilauri, Paolo; Serraino, Andrea; Giacometti, Federica; Piva, Silvia; Zambrini, Vittorio; Canever, Alessandra; Farkas, Zsuzsa; Ambrus, Árpád

    2016-12-01

    The study reports the results of testing the sensitivity of an early warning sampling plan for detecting milk batches with high aflatoxin AFM1 concentration. The effectiveness of the method was investigated by the analysis of 9017 milk samples collected in Italian milk processing plants that applied control plans with different action limits (AL). For those milk processing plants where 30 ng kg(-1) AL has been applied, the AFM1 contamination was significantly lower at or above the 95th percentile of the milk samples when compared with plants that used 40 ng kg(-1) AL. The results show that the control plan can be used effectively for early warning of occurrence of high AFM1 contamination of milk and to carry out pro-active measures to limit the level of contamination. Estimation of dietary exposure was also carried out, based on the aflatoxin M1 content of the milk samples and on Italian food consumption data. Estimated Daily Intakes (EDI) and Hazard Indices (HI) were calculated for different age groups of the population. HIs show that no adverse effects are expected for the adult population, but in the case of children under age three, the approximate HI values were considerably higher. This underlines the importance of the careful monitoring and control of aflatoxin M1 in milk and dairy products.

  8. A portable fluorometer for the rapid screening of M1 aflatoxin in milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucci, C.; Mignani, A. G.; Dall'Asta, C.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.; Marchelli, R.; Pela, R.

    2006-04-01

    A compact fluorometric sensor equipped with a LED source and a high sensitivity PMT detector has been implemented for the selective detection of native fluorescence of aflatoxin AFM1 in liquid solutions. This compact and easy-to-handle device is addressed to the rapid monitoring of AFM1 in milk, enabling the detection of concentrations up to the legal limit, which is 50 ppt. The system is suitable for preliminary screening at the earlier stages of the industrial process, and makes it possible to discard contaminated milk stocks before their inclusion in the production chain.

  9. Sensitive and rapid detection of aflatoxin M1 in milk utilizing enhanced SPR and p(HEMA) brushes.

    PubMed

    Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Dubiak-Szepietowska, Monika; Vorobii, Mariia; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Dostálek, Jakub; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-15

    The rapid and sensitive detection of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor is reported. This low molecular weight mycotoxin is analyzed using an indirect competitive immunoassay that is amplified by secondary antibodies conjugated with Au nanoparticles. In order to prevent fouling on the sensor surface by the constituents present in analyzed milk samples, an interface with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) p(HEMA) brush was employed. The study presents a comparison of performance characteristics of p(HEMA)-based sensor with a regularly used polyethylene glycol-based architecture relying on mixed thiol self-assembled monolayer. Both sensors are characterized in terms of surface mass density of immobilized AFM1 conjugate as well as affinity bound primary and secondary antibodies. The efficiency of the amplification strategy based on Au nanoparticle is discussed. The biosensor allowed for highly sensitive detection of AFM1 in milk with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 18pgmL(-1) with the analysis time of 55min.

  10. Highly Efficient Intramolecular Electrochemiluminescence Energy Transfer for Ultrasensitive Bioanalysis of Aflatoxin M1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Li; Zhao, Min; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Ya-Qin; Yuan, Ruo

    2017-02-03

    The intermolecular electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) between luminol and Ru(bpy)3(2+) was studied extensively to achieve the sensitive bioanalysis owing to the perfect spectral overlap of the donor and acceptor, but it still suffers from the challenging issue of low energy-transfer efficiency. The intramolecular ECL-RET towards the novel ECL compound containing the donor of luminol and the acceptor of Ru(bpy)2 (mcpbpy)(2+) (Lum-Ru) was designed and investigated. With the high-efficient ECL-RET in one molecule, the highly intense ECL signal of Lum-Ru was obtained owing to the short path of energy transmission and less energy loss between luminol and Ru(bpy)2 (mcpbpy)(2+) . Lum-Ru was further applied to construct a signal-off electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor for ultrasensitive detection of a harsh carcinogen of Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). This sensing platform also provides a significant boost for the trace detection of other biomolecules in clinical analysis.

  11. Reduction in the urinary aflatoxin M1 biomarker as an early indicator of the efficacy of dietary interventions to reduce exposure to aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Nicole J; Kumi, Justice; Johnson, Natalie M; Dotse, Eunice; Marroquin-Cardona, Alicia; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Jolly, Pauline E; Ankrah, Nii-Ayi; Phillips, Timothy D

    2013-08-01

    Aflatoxin B1 is a persistent public health issue in Ghana. Assessment of AFB1 intervention efficacy is currently dependent on long-term biomarkers. This study was designed to determine whether daily AFM1 biomarker levels could be utilized as an early detection method for intervention efficacy. Participants were treated with a refined calcium montmorillonite clay (UPSN) or a placebo (calcium carbonate) in a crossover study. Urine samples were assessed for AFM1 levels daily. UPSN treatment reduced AFM1 biomarkers by 55% compared to the placebo. This is the first study to show that daily urinary AFM1 levels can be used as a biomarker of internal aflatoxin B1 exposure in short-term intervention trials to determine efficacy.

  12. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determination of aflatoxin M1 based on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasova, M. K.; Ivanova, N. V.; Godjevargova, T. I.

    2017-02-01

    A sensitive enzyme immunoassay with magnetic nanoparticles (Method A) for the quantitative determination of aflatoxin M1 in milk was developed. This immunoassay was based on the immobilization of monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs-NH2). It was observed that for each mg of the MNPs, 25 µg of antibody was immobilized. Both aflatoxin M1 in the sample and aflatoxin M1-BSA-peroxidase conjugate competed for the immobilized antibody. The proposed Method A was compared with other method (B). The Method B was based on the immobilization of aflatoxin M1-BSA conjugate on the MNPs-NH2, which competed with the aflatoxin M1 in the sample for binding to the added mAb. The binding of mAb to the aflatoxin M1-BSA-MNPs-NH2 was detected using a target secondary IgG-peroxidase antibody. The analytical characteristics of the two methods were compared. Real milk samples were investigated for present of aflatoxin M1. Two methods were based on the use of MNPs as a solid support for covalently immunoreagents immobilization. A comfortable separation of bound and free fraction of the tracer can be performed only through a simple collection of the MNPs by a permanent magnet. The application of MNPs helps to eliminate non-specific binding and to retain higher activity of bound biomolecules. The development of a MNPs-based ELISA for determination of aflatoxin M1 has a great potential to supersede the traditional ELISA for aflatoxin M1 diagnosis.

  13. On the occurrence of aflatoxin M1 in milk and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Prandini, A; Tansini, G; Sigolo, S; Filippi, L; Laporta, M; Piva, G

    2009-05-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic fungal metabolites found in foods and feeds. When ruminants eat AFB(1)-feedstuffs, they metabolise the toxin and excrete AFM(1) in milk. To control AFM(1) in foods it is necessary to reduce AFB(1) contamination of feeds for dairy cattle by preventing fungal growth and AFB(1) formation in agricultural commodities intended for animal use. Corn and corn-based products are one of the most contaminated feedstuffs; therefore risk factor analysis of AFB(1) contamination in corn is necessary to evaluate risk of AFM(1) contamination in milk and milk products. During the corn silage production, the aflatoxins production is mostly influenced by: harvest time; fertilization; irrigation; pest control; silage moisture; and storage practices. Due to the lower moisture at harvest and to the conservation methods, the corn grain is mostly exposed to the contamination by Aspergillus species. Therefore, it is necessary to reduce the probability of this contaminant through choice of: hybrids; seeding time and density; suitable ploughing and fertirrigation; and chemical or biological control. Grains harvested with the lowest possible moisture and conservation moisture close to or less than 14% are necessary to reduce contamination risks, as is maintaining mass to homogeneous moisture. Kernel mechanical damage, grain cleaning practices and conservation temperature are also factors which need to be carefully controlled.

  14. Aflatoxin M1 in Cow’s Milk: Method Validation for Milk Sampled in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bellio, Alberto; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Gramaglia, Monica; Loria, Andrea; Nucera, Daniele; Gallina, Silvia; Gili, Marilena; Decastelli, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are mycotoxins produced by some species of Aspergillus. In dairy cows, ingested AFB1 is metabolized into carcinogenic AFM1 which is eliminated through milk, thus posing a risk for consumer health. Here we describe the set, validation, and application of screening (ELISA) and confirmatory (HPLC) tests carried out on milk samples collected through official control of mycotoxin levels in northern Italy over a three-year period (2012–2014). The limit of detection (LOD) was set at 5 ppt (ng/kg) and 2 ppt for ELISA and HPLC, respectively, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 10 ppt for confirmatory HPLC. A total of 1668 milk samples were analyzed: ELISA identified 36 (2.2%) positive milk samples that were subsequently confirmed by HPLC. The level of AFM1 in the positive samples ranged between 18 ± 2 and 208 ± 27 ppt. Of the total samples, only eight (0.5%) were found non-compliant with the EU regulatory limit (50 ppt; range 74 ± 10 to 208 ± 27 ppt). Use of ELISA and HPLC tests in series allows for high-volume analysis of samples, thus saving time and money while guaranteeing high analytical precision and accuracy. PMID:26927175

  15. Occurrence of aflatoxins M(1) and M(2) in milk commercialized in Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Garrido, N S; Iha, M H; Santos Ortolani, M R; Duarte Fávaro, R M

    2003-01-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic metabolites found in foods and feeds. When ruminants eat foodstuffs containing aflatoxins B(1) and B(2), these toxins are metabolized and excreted as aflatoxin M(1) and M(2) in milk. The aim was to determine the incidence of these aflatoxins in commercial milk collected from supermarkets in Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil, and consisting of 60 ultrahigh temperature (UHT) milk samples and 79 pasteurized milk samples. The milk samples were analysed according to method 986.16 of AOAC International. None of the milk samples analysed were contaminated with aflatoxin M(2), and aflatoxin M(1) was detected in 29 (20.9%) of samples in the range 50-240 ng l(-1). The results show that despite a high occurrence of aflatoxin M(1) in commercial pasteurized and UHT milk sold in Ribeirão Preto in 1999 and 2000, the contamination level of these toxins could not be considered a serious public health problem according to MERCOSUR Technical Regulations. However, levels in 20.9% of the milk samples exceeded the concentration of 50 ng l(-1) permitted by the European Union. Although it is not necessary to continue monitoring the incidence and levels of aflatoxins M(1) and M(2) in milk samples, surveillance could be appropriate.

  16. Optical fiber fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting AFM1 in milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Cucci, C.; Ciaccheri, L.; Dall'Asta, C.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.; Marchelli, R.

    2008-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy carried out by means of optical fibers was used for the rapid screening of M1 aflatoxin in milk, enabling the detection of concentrations up to the legal limit, which is 50 ppt. A compact fluorometric device equipped with a LED source, a miniaturized spectrometer, and optical fibers for illumination/detection of the measuring micro-cell was tested for measuring threshold values of AFM1 in pre-treated milk samples. Multivariate processing of the spectral data made it possible to obtain a preliminary screening at the earlier stages of the industrial process, as well as to discard contaminated milk stocks before their inclusion in the production chain.

  17. Analysis of industry-generated data. Part 1: a baseline for the development of a tool to assist the milk industry in designing sampling plans for controlling aflatoxin M1 in milk.

    PubMed

    Trevisani, Marcello; Farkas, Zsuzsa; Serraino, Andrea; Zambrini, Angelo Vittorio; Pizzamiglio, Valentina; Giacometti, Federica; Ámbrus, Arpád

    2014-01-01

    The presence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk was assessed in Italy in the framework of designing a monitoring plan actuated by the milk industry in the period 2005-10. Overall, 21,969 samples were taken from tankers collecting milk from 690 dairy farms. The milk samples were representative of the consignments of co-mingled milk received from multiple (two to six) farms. Systematic, biweekly sampling of consignments involved each of the 121 districts (70 in the North, 17 in the Central and 34 in the South regions of Italy). AFM1 concentration was measured using an enzyme-linked immunoassay method (validated within the range of 5-100 ng kg(-1)) whereas an HPLC method was used for the quantification of levels in the samples that had concentrations higher than 100 ng kg(-1). Process control charts using data collected in three processing plants illustrate, as an example, the seasonal variation of the contamination. The mean concentration of AFM1 was in the range between 11 and 19 ng kg(-1). The 90th and 99th percentile values were 19-34 and 41-91 ng kg(-1), respectively, and values as high as 280 ng kg(-1) were reached in 2008. The number of non-compliant consignments (those with an AFM1 concentration above the statutory limit of 50 ng kg(-1)) varied between 0.3% and 3.1% per year, with peaks in September, after the maize harvest season. The variability between different regions was not significant. The results show that controlling the aflatoxins in feed at farm level was inadequate, consequently screening of raw milk prior to processing was needed. The evaluation of the AFM1 contamination level observed during a long-term period can provide useful data for defining the frequency of sampling.

  18. Asymmetric Mach-Zehnder Interferometer Based Biosensors for Aflatoxin M1 Detection.

    PubMed

    Chalyan, Tatevik; Guider, Romain; Pasquardini, Laura; Zanetti, Manuela; Falke, Floris; Schreuder, Erik; Heideman, Rene G; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-06

    In this work, we present a study of Aflatoxin M1 detection by photonic biosensors based on Si₃N₄ Asymmetric Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (aMZI) functionalized with antibodies fragments (Fab'). We measured a best volumetric sensitivity of 10⁴ rad/RIU, leading to a Limit of Detection below 5 × 10(-7) RIU. On sensors functionalized with Fab', we performed specific and non-specific sensing measurements at various toxin concentrations. Reproducibility of the measurements and re-usability of the sensor were also investigated.

  19. Rapid and automated analysis of aflatoxin M1 in milk and dairy products by online solid phase extraction coupled to ultra-high-pressure-liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campone, Luca; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Celano, Rita; Pagano, Imma; Russo, Mariateresa; Rastrelli, Luca

    2016-01-08

    This study reports a fast and automated analytical procedure for the analysis of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk and dairy products. The method is based on the simultaneous protein precipitation and AFM1 extraction, by salt-induced liquid-liquid extraction (SI-LLE), followed by an online solid-phase extraction (online SPE) coupled to ultra-high-pressure-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis to the automatic pre-concentration, clean up and sensitive and selective determination of AFM1. The main parameters affecting the extraction efficiency and accuracy of the analytical method were studied in detail. In the optimal conditions, acetonitrile and NaCl were used as extraction/denaturant solvent and salting-out agent in SI-LLE, respectively. After centrifugation, the organic phase (acetonitrile) was diluted with water (1:9 v/v) and purified (1mL) by online C18 cartridge coupled with an UHPLC column. Finally, selected reaction monitoring (SRM) acquisition mode was applied to the detection of AFM1. Validation studies were carried out on different dairy products (whole and skimmed cow milk, yogurt, goat milk, and powder infant formula), providing method quantification limits about 25 times lower than AFM1 maximum levels permitted by EU regulation 1881/2006 in milk and dairy products for direct human consumption. Recoveries (86-102%) and repeatability (RSD<3, n=6) meet the performance criteria required by EU regulation N. 401/2006 for the determination of the levels of mycotoxins in foodstuffs. Moreover, no matrix effects were observed in the different milk and dairy products studied. The proposed method improves the performance of AFM1 analysis in milk samples as AFM1 determination is performed with a degree of accuracy higher than the conventional methods. Other advantages are the reduction of sample preparation procedure, time and cost of the analysis, enabling high sample throughput that meet the current concerns of food safety and the public

  20. Binding of aflatoxin M1 to different protein fractions in ovine and caprine milk.

    PubMed

    Barbiroli, A; Bonomi, F; Benedetti, S; Mannino, S; Monti, L; Cattaneo, T; Iametti, S

    2007-02-01

    The affinity of aflatoxin M1 toward the main milk protein fractions in ewe and goat milk was investigated by using an ELISA. This study took into account the possible effects of common dairy processes such as ultrafiltration, acidic or rennet curding, and production of ricotta from acidic or rennet whey. Treatments that allowed the separation of casein from whey proteins under conditions that do not alter the physical or chemical status of the proteins (such as ultracentrifugation) were used as a reference. None of the treatments used in typical dairy processes caused significant release of the toxin, in spite of the relevant changes they induced in the interactions among proteins. Only the combined heat and acidic treatment used for production of ricotta cheese altered the structure of whey proteins to the point where they lost their ability to bind the toxin. This study also showed that, regardless of the physical state of the sample, a commercial electronic nose device, in combination with appropriate statistical tools, was able to discriminate among different levels of sample contamination.

  1. Production of M-/GM-group aflatoxins catalyzed by the OrdA enzyme in aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Kimiko; Chihaya, Naomi; Hatabayashi, Hidemi; Kito, Masako; Hoshino, Sachiko; Zeng, Hongmei; Cai, Jingjing; Nakajima, Hiromitsu

    2012-09-01

    Aspergillus parasiticus produces the minor aflatoxins M(1) (AFM(1)), M(2) (AFM(2)), GM(1) (AFGM(1)), and GM(2) (AFGM(2)), as well as the major aflatoxins B(1) (AFB(1)), B(2) (AFB(2)), G(1) (AFG(1)), and G(2) (AFG(2)). Feeding of A. parasiticus with aspertoxin (12c-hydroxyOMST) caused AFM(1) and AFGM(1), and cell-free experiments using the microsomal fraction of A. parasiticus and aspertoxin caused production of AFM(1), indicating that aspertoxin is a precursor of AFM(1) and AFGM(1). Feeding of the same fungus with O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST) caused AFM(1) and AFGM(1) together with AFB(1) and AFG(1); feeding with dihydroOMST (DHOMST) caused AFM(2) and AFGM(2) together with AFB(2) and AFG(2). Incubation of either the microsomal fraction or OrdA enzyme-expressing yeast with OMST caused production of aspertoxin together with AFM(1) and AFB(1). These results demonstrated that the OrdA enzyme catalyzes both 12c-hydroxylation reaction from OMST to aspertoxin and the successive reaction from aspertoxin to AFM(1). In contrast, feeding of the fungus with AFB(1) did not produce any AFM(1), demonstrating that M-/GM-aflatoxins are not produced from B-/G-aflatoxins. Furthermore, AFM(1) together with AFB(1) and AFG(1) was also produced from 11-hydroxyOMST (HOMST) in feeding experiment of A. parasiticus, whereas no aflatoxins were produced when used the ordA deletion mutant. These results demonstrated that OrdA enzyme can also catalyze 12c-hydroxylation of HOMST to produce 11-hydroxyaspertoxin, which serves as a precursor for the production of AFM(1) and AFGM(1). The same pathway may work for the production of AFM(2) and AFGM(2) from DHOMST and dihydroHOMST through the formation of dihydroaspertoxin and dihydro-11-hydroxyaspertoxin, respectively.

  2. Higher Levels of Aflatoxin M1 Contamination and Poorer Composition of Milk Supplied by Informal Milk Marketing Chains in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Naveed; Tipu, Muhammad Yasin; Ishaq, Muhammad; Cowling, Ann; McGill, David; Warriach, Hassan Mahmood; Wynn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to observe the seasonal variation in aflatoxin M1 and nutritional quality of milk along informal marketing chains. Milk samples (485) were collected from three different chains over a period of one year. The average concentrations of aflatoxin M1 during the autumn and monsoon seasons (2.60 and 2.59 ppb) were found to be significantly higher (standard error of the difference, SED = 0.21: p = 0.003) than in the summer (1.93 ppb). The percentage of added water in milk was significantly lower (SED = 1.54: p < 0.001) in summer (18.59%) than in the monsoon season (26.39%). There was a significantly different (SED = 2.38: p < 0.001) mean percentage of water added by farmers (6.23%), small collectors (14.97%), large collectors (27.96%) and retailers (34.52%). This was reflected in changes in milk quality along the marketing chain. There was no difference (p = 0.178) in concentration of aflatoxin M1 in milk collected from the farmers (2.12 ppb), small collectors (2.23 ppb), large collectors (2.36 ppb) and retailers (2.58 ppb). The high levels of contamination found in this study, which exceed the standards set by European Union (0.05 ppb) and USFDA (0.5 ppb), demand radical intervention by regulatory authorities and mass awareness of the consequences for consumer health and safety. PMID:27929386

  3. Higher Levels of Aflatoxin M1 Contamination and Poorer Composition of Milk Supplied by Informal Milk Marketing Chains in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Naveed; Tipu, Muhammad Yasin; Ishaq, Muhammad; Cowling, Ann; McGill, David; Warriach, Hassan Mahmood; Wynn, Peter

    2016-12-05

    The present study was conducted to observe the seasonal variation in aflatoxin M1 and nutritional quality of milk along informal marketing chains. Milk samples (485) were collected from three different chains over a period of one year. The average concentrations of aflatoxin M1 during the autumn and monsoon seasons (2.60 and 2.59 ppb) were found to be significantly higher (standard error of the difference, SED = 0.21: p = 0.003) than in the summer (1.93 ppb). The percentage of added water in milk was significantly lower (SED = 1.54: p < 0.001) in summer (18.59%) than in the monsoon season (26.39%). There was a significantly different (SED = 2.38: p < 0.001) mean percentage of water added by farmers (6.23%), small collectors (14.97%), large collectors (27.96%) and retailers (34.52%). This was reflected in changes in milk quality along the marketing chain. There was no difference (p = 0.178) in concentration of aflatoxin M1 in milk collected from the farmers (2.12 ppb), small collectors (2.23 ppb), large collectors (2.36 ppb) and retailers (2.58 ppb). The high levels of contamination found in this study, which exceed the standards set by European Union (0.05 ppb) and USFDA (0.5 ppb), demand radical intervention by regulatory authorities and mass awareness of the consequences for consumer health and safety.

  4. Application of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with vortex-assisted hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles based solid-phase extraction for determination of aflatoxin M1 in milk samples by sensitive micelle enhanced spectrofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Taherimaslak, Zohreh; Allahyari, Mehdi; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Manafi, Mohammad Hanif

    2015-03-01

    An efficient, simple and fast low-density solvent based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (LDS-DLLME) followed by vortex-assisted dispersive solid phase extraction (VA-D-SPE) has been developed as a new approach for extraction and preconcentration of aflatoxin M1 in milk samples prior to its micelle enhanced spectrofluorimetic determination. In this LDS-DLLME coupled VA-D-SPE method, milk samples were first treated with methanol/water (80:20, v/v) after removing the fat layer. This solvent was directly used as the dispersing solvent in DLLME along with using 1-heptanol (as a low-density solvent with respect to water) as the extracting solvent. In VA-D-SPE approach, hydrophobic oleic acid modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles were used to retrieve the analyte from the DLLME step. It is considerably that the target of VA-D-SPE was 1-heptanol rather than the aflatoxin M1 directly. The main parameters affecting the efficiency of LDS-DLLME and VA-D-SPE procedures and signal enhancement of aflatoxin M1 were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the method was linear in the range from 0.02 to 200 µg L(-1) with the correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9989 and detection limit of 13 ng L(-1). The intra-day precision was 2.9 and 4.3% and the inter-day precision was 2.1 and 3.3% for concentration of 2 and 50 µg L(-1) respectively. The developed method was applied for extraction and preconcentration of AFM1 in three commercially available milk samples and the results were compared with the official AOAC method.

  5. Aflatoxin M₁ in breast milk of nursing Sudanese mothers.

    PubMed

    Elzupir, Amin O; Abas, Abdel Rouf A; Fadul, M Hemmat; Modwi, Abueliz K; Ali, Nima M I; Jadian, Afaf F F; Ahmed, Nuha Abd A; Adam, Smah Y A; Ahmed, Nousiba A M; Khairy, Arwa A A; Khalil, Eltahir A G

    2012-05-01

    The presence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in the breast milk of nursing Sudanese mothers was investigated using AOAC official method 980.21 as the extraction method and HPLC with fluorescence detector for separation and detection. Following informed consent, 94 breast milk samples of mothers were collected, and 51 samples were found to be positive for AFM1, with an average concentration of 0.401 ± 0.525 ng g(-1) and a maximum level of 2.561 ng g(-1). The volunteers completed a questionnaire concerning their dietary preferences. The data collected suggest that peanut butter, vegetable oils and rice are the main sources responsible for the AFM1 burden in breast milk. The toxin levels are alarmingly high, and indicate that Sudanese infants are exposed to high levels of AFM1. A wide range of harmful effects, and consequently health problems, can be expected due AFM1 toxicity.

  6. Aflatoxin

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in the following foods: Peanuts and peanut butter Tree nuts such as pecans Corn Wheat Oil ... foods that may contain aflatoxin. Peanuts and peanut butter are some of the most rigorously tested products ...

  7. Calcium montmorillonite clay in dairy feed reduces aflatoxin concentrations in milk without interfering with milk quality, composition or yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if a calcium montmorillonite clay (Novasil Plus, NSP), can significantly reduce aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) concentrations in milk without affecting dry matter intake (DMI), milk yield, milk composition, vitamin A, or riboflavin concentrations. The study was designed us...

  8. An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, M1 and M2 in traditional Chinese medicines.

    PubMed

    Han, Zheng; Zheng, Yunliang; Luan, Lianjun; Cai, Zengxuan; Ren, Yiping; Wu, Yongjiang

    2010-04-07

    An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous determination of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, M1 and M2 in traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) was developed. The approach was characterized in details and a special focus was placed on the recovery rates of isolation procedure in different TCM matrices, i.e. rhizomes and roots, seeds, flowers, grasses and leaves. For this purpose, [(13)C(17)]-aflatoxinB1 was employed as the internal standard and a reliable solid phase extraction-based clean-up method was developed. The observed recovery rates of the six aflatoxins ranged from 85.6% to 117.6% in different matrices. Then, the established method was successfully applied to the determination of the six aflatoxins in various TCMs. For 30 commercial samples analyzed, 16 were contaminated with aflatoxins. The mean levels (incidence) of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 in positive samples were 1.40 (68.8%), 1.27 (50.0%), 0.50 (43.8%) and 0.94 (43.8%) microg kg(-1), respectively. Interestingly, aflatoxin M1 was detected in two samples with the maximal content of 0.70 microg kg(-1). No sample was contaminated with aflatoxin M2. Meanwhile, a possible association between the contamination levels and the selected herbs was clarified in the present study.

  9. Modelling uncertainty estimation for the determination of aflatoxin M(1) in milk by visual and densitometric thin-layer chromatography with immunoaffinity column clean-up.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, K L; Gonçalves, G A A; Lopes, A L; Santos, E A; Vargas, E A; Magalhães, W F

    2012-01-01

    The uncertainty of aflatoxin M(1) concentration in milk, determined by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with visual and densitometric quantification of the fluorescence intensities of the spots, was estimated using the cause-and-effect approach proposed by ISO GUM (Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement) following its main four steps. The sources of uncertainties due to volume measurements, visual and densitometric TLC calibration curve, allowed range for recovery variation and intermediary precision to be taken into account in the uncertainty budget. For volume measurements the sources of uncertainties due to calibration, resolution, laboratory temperature variation and repeatability were considered. For the quantification by visual readings of the intensity of the aflatoxin M(1) in the TLC the uncertainty arising from resolution calibration curves was modelled based on the intervals of concentrations between pairs of the calibration standard solutions. The uncertainty of the densitometric TLC quantification arising from the calibration curve was obtained by weighted least square (WLS) regression. Finally, the repeatability uncertainty of the densitometric peak areas or of the visual readings for the test sample solutions was considered. For the test samples with aflatoxin M(1) concentration between 0.02 and 0.5 µg l(-1), the relative expanded uncertainties, with approximately 95% of coverage probability, obtained for visual TLC readings were between 60% and 130% of the values predicted by the Horwitz model. For the densitometric TLC determination they were about 20% lower. The main sources of uncertainties in both visual and densitometric TLC quantification were the intermediary precision, calibration curve and recovery. The main source of uncertainty in the calibration curve in the visual TLC analysis was due to the resolution of the visual readings, whereas in the densitometric analysis it was due to the peak areas of test sample solutions

  10. Multiresidue method for simultaneous analysis of aflatoxin M1, avermectins, organophosphate pesticides and milbemycin in milk by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dos Anjos, Marianna Ramos; Castro, Izabela Miranda de; Souza, Maria de Lourdes Mendes de; de Lima, Virgínia Verônica; de Aquino-Neto, Francisco Radler

    2016-06-01

    A method developed for the simultaneous analysis of aflatoxin M1, abamectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, ivermectin, moxidectin, acephate, azinphos-ethyl, azinphos-methyl, diazinon, methamidophos, methidathion, mevinphos, pirimiphos-ethyl and pirimiphos-methyl in whole raw milk, based on the QuEChERS method for extraction and clean-up, with detection and quantification by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) is described. The method was validated according to parameters of the Analytical Quality Assurance Manual from the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture and Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, and proved suitable for analysis of these analytes within the proposed working range, with recovery values between 77% and 110%, a standard deviation lower than 20%, limits of detection between 0.05 and 0.99 µg l(-)(1), and limits of quantification between 0.15 and 1.98 µg l(-1). Samples from animals treated with abamectin, doramectin, ivermectin and diazinon were analysed by the validated method. Residues of aflatoxin M1 were also found in field samples at levels below the established maximum residue limit.

  11. Joint IDF-IUPAC-IAEA(FAO) interlaboratory validation for determining aflatoxin M1 in milk by using immunoaffinity clean-up before thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Grosso, F; Fremy, J M; Bevis, S; Dragacci, S

    2004-04-01

    A collaborative study was conducted under the auspices of the International Dairy Federation (IDF), the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a collaborative Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) body fully to validate a method combining immunoaffinity clean-up to thin-layer chromatography for the determination of aflatoxin M(1) in milk. Work was done in order to afford those laboratories not equipped with high-performance liquid chromatography, mainly from developing countries, with a simplified but fully validated method as an alternative to the European validated immunoaffinity-high performance liquid chromatography method published as an EN ISO Standard 14501, February 1999. The validation study was carried out on samples of aflatoxin M(1)-contaminated milk and milk powder at levels close to the tolerable level of 0.5 microg l(-1) as recommended by the Codex Alimentarius and to the regulatory level of 0.05 microg l(-1) as laid down by the European Commission. Fourteen laboratories representing 11 countries participated in the trial. The relative standard deviations for repeatability and reproducibility based on raw data were in the range 27-48 and 35-54%, respectively. The recovery rate varied from 32 to 120%. The mishandling of two crucial steps of the protocol such as matrix sample reconstitution and extract evaporation could explain the wide variation of the recovery rate. For this reason, data were then corrected for recovery. Consequently, the relative standard deviations for repeatability and reproducibility were recalculated after correction for recovery and were in the range 26-54 and 34-53%, respectively. The method will be published as a standard ISO/DIS 14674--IDF 190.

  12. Flow-based impedimetric immunosensor for aflatoxin analysis in milk products.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, Lizy; Bacher, Gautam; Bhand, Sunil

    2014-10-01

    Label-free detection technique based on impedance was investigated for aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) and aflatoxin M2 (AFM2) analysis in milk products. The impedance change resulting from antigen-antibody interaction was studied using a two-electrode setup made up of silver (Ag) wire. Processed milk such as drinking yogurt and flavored milk samples were analyzed in a flow-based setup. Two microflow pumps were used to construct the flow system where analytes (AFM1 and AFM2) were injected and impedance was measured using functionalized Ag wire electrodes. The flow system was optimized by adjusting both inlet and outlet flows to maintain the reaction volume optimum for impedance measurements. Using Bode plot, the matrix effect was investigated for detection of AFM1 and AFM2 in various matrices. Good recoveries were obtained even at low-AFM1 concentrations in the range of 1-100 pg/mL. The influence of AFM2 on the detection of AFM1 was also investigated. The proposed method provides good scope for online monitoring of such hazardous toxins in milk products.

  13. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  14. Potential preventive role of lactic acid bacteria against aflatoxin M₁ immunotoxicity and genotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah-Abbès, Jalila; Abbès, Samir; Jebali, Rania; Haous, Zohra; Oueslati, Ridha

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) is a mycotoxin produced by numerous Aspergillus species in pre- or post-harvest cereals and milk. Exposure to AFM1 imparts potent economic losses in the livestock industry. Toxicologically, it also causes severe immune system problems. The aims of this study were to evaluate a new AFM1-binding/degrading microorganism for biologic detoxification, to examine its ability to degrade AFM1 in liquid medium, and to evaluate its potential for in vivo preventative effects against AFM1-induced immunotoxicity and genotoxicity in mice. Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 (LP) isolated from Tunisian artisanal butter was found to display significant binding ability to AFM1 in PBS (93%) within 24 h of incubation. Further, the LP was able to tolerate gastric acidity, bile salts, and adhere efficiently to Caco-3 cells in vitro. The in vivo study used Balb/c mice that received either vehicle (control), LP only (at 1 × 10(9)CFU/L, ∼1 mg/kg bw), AFM1 (100 mg/kg bw), or AFM1 + LP daily for 15 days (by gavage); two other groups received a single dose of colchicine (4 mg/kg) or mitomycin C (1 mg/kg) as positive controls for induction of micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations, respectively. The results showed that, compared to in control mice, AFM1 treatment led to significantly decreased body weight gains, and caused cytotoxic/genotoxic effects as indicated by increases in frequencies of polychromatic erythrocytes, as well as those with micronucleation (PCEMN) and chromosomal aberrations, among bone marrow cells. The concurrent administration of LP with AFM1 strongly reduced the adverse effects of AFM1 on each parameter. Mice receiving AFM1 + LP co-treatment displayed no significant differences in the assayed parameters as compared to the control mice. By itself, the bacteria caused no adverse effects. Based on the data, it is concluded that the test bacteria could potentially be beneficial in the detoxification of AFM1-contaminated foods and feeds

  15. Comparative in vitro and ex-vivo myelotoxicity of aflatoxins B1 and M1 on haematopoietic progenitors (BFU-E, CFU-E, and CFU-GM): species-related susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Roda, E; Coccini, T; Acerbi, D; Castoldi, A F; Manzo, L

    2010-02-01

    Haemato- and myelotoxicity are adverse effects caused by mycotoxins. Due to the relevance of aflatoxins to human health, the present study, employing CFU-GM-, BFU-E- and CFU-E-clonogenic assays, aimed at (i) comparing, in vitro, the sensitivity of human vs. murine haematopoietic progenitors to AFB1 and AFM1 (0.001-50microg/ml), (ii) assessing whether a single AFB1 in vivo treatment (0.3-3mg/kgb.w.) alters the ability of murine bone marrow cells to form myeloid and erythroid colonies, and (iii) comparing the in vitro with the in vitro ex-vivo data. We demonstrated (i) species-related sensitivity to AFB1, showing higher susceptibility of human myeloid and erythroid progenitors (IC(50) values: about 4 times lower in human than in murine cells), (ii) higher sensitivity of CFU-GM and BFU-E colonies, both more markedly affected, particularly by AFB1 (IC(50): 2.45+/-1.08 and 1.82+/-0.8microM for humans, and 11.08+/-2.92 and 1.81+/-0.20microM for mice, respectively), than the mature CFU-E (AFB1 IC(50): 12.58+/-5.4 and 40.27+/-6.05microM), irrespectively of animal species, (iii) regarding AFM1, a species- and lineage-related susceptibility similar to that observed for AFB1 and (iv) lack of effects after AFB1 in vivo treatment on the proliferation of haematopoietic colonies.

  16. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  17. An Ultrasensitive Electrochemiluminescent Immunoassay for Aflatoxin M1 in Milk, Based on Extraction by Magnetic Graphene and Detection by Antibody-Labeled CdTe Quantumn Dots-Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ning; Zhou, Jing; Xiong, Ping; Hu, Futao; Cao, Yuting; Li, Tianhua; Jiang, Qianli

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescent immunoassay (ECLIA) for aflatoxins M1 (ATM1) in milk using magnetic Fe3O4-graphene oxides (Fe-GO) as the absorbent and antibody-labeled cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) as the signal tag is presented. Firstly, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were immobilized on GO to fabricate the magnetic nanocomposites, which were used as absorbent to ATM1. Secondly, aflatoxin M1 antibody (primary antibody, ATM1 Ab1), was attached to the surface of the CdTe QDs-carbon nanotubes nanocomposite to form the signal tag (ATM1 Ab1/CdTe-CNT). The above materials were characterized. The optimal experimental conditions were obtained. Thirdly, Fe-GO was employed for extraction of ATM1 in milk. Results indicated that it can adsorb ATM1 efficiently and selectively within a large extent of pH from 3.0 to 8.0. Adsorption processes reached 95% of the equilibrium within 10 min. Lastly, the ATM1 with a serial of concentrations absorbed on Fe-GO was conjugated with ATM1 Ab1/CdTe-CNT signal tag based on sandwich immunoassay. The immunocomplex can emit a strong ECL signal whose intensity depended linearly on the logarithm of ATM1 concentration from 1.0 to 1.0 × 105 pg/mL, with the detection limit (LOD) of 0.3 pg/mL (S/N = 3). The method was more sensitive for ATM1 detection compared to the ELISA method. Finally, ten samples of milk were tested based on the immunoassay. The method is fast and requires very little sample preparation, which was suitable for high-throughput screening of mycotoxins in food. PMID:23628784

  18. Automated hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of aflatoxin M₁ in milk.

    PubMed

    Huang, Siming; Hu, Du; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Fang; Jiang, Ruifen; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2015-10-16

    An automated hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the extraction and determination of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in milk samples. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, such as the extraction phase, matrix conditions, extraction time and temperature, were investigated. Under the optimal conditions (ratio of water to milk, 4:1; extraction time, 50 min; extraction temperature, 50°C; extraction phase, 50 mg L(-1) anti-AFM1 antibody in PBS buffer solution; volume of HCl solution, 250 μL; agitation speed, 250 rpm), the matrix-matched calibration curve for AFM1 determination showed good linearity in the range of 0.25-5 μg kg(-1). The enrichment factor (EF) reached 48, and the limits of detection and quantification were 0.06 and 0.21 μg kg(-1), respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for the extraction of AFM1 from spiked milk samples, with recoveries from 61.0% to 106.7%. The method was highly specific to AFM1 analysis, and the results demonstrated that the method can be automated, inexpensive, and free from interference.

  19. [Determination of aflatoxins in cheeses].

    PubMed

    Bartos, J; Matyás, Z

    1979-03-01

    To investigate cheeses for the presence of aflatoxins we chose the very sensitive method of Tuinstra and Bronsgeest (1975) used for the determination of aflatoxin M1 in milk. The method was slightly modified and the presence of aflatoxins was determined in 54 samples of different cheeses. Aflatoxin M1 was found out in 24% of the investigated samples. Most of positive samples were found among the soft cheeses (53.8 3/4), then in processed cheeses (13.6%) and in hard cheeses (12.5%). Aflatoxin M1 was not found in the group of mouldy cheeses and Olomouc cake cheeses, which were investigated in a smaller range. Positive findings did not exceed concentrations of 10 ng per kg, i.e. they did not even reach the value of permissible concentration as proposed in the Czech Socialist Republic for foods (5 microgram per kg).

  20. [Aflatoxins--health risk factors].

    PubMed

    Miliţă, Nicoleta Manuela; Mihăescu, Gr; Chifiriuc, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by a group of strains, mainly Aspergillus and Penicillium species. These mycotoxins are bifurano-coumarin derivatives group with four major products B1, B2, G1 and G2 according to blue or green fluorescence emitted in ultraviolet light and according to chromatographic separation. After metabolism of aflatoxin B1 and B2 in the mammalian body, result two metabolites M1 and M2 as hydroxylated derivatives of the parent compound. Aflatoxins have high carcinogenic potential, the most powerful carcinogens in different species of animals and humans. International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified aflatoxin B1 in Group I carcinogens. The target organ for aflatoxins is the liver. In chronic poisoning, aflatoxin is a risk to health, for a long term causing cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma), and in acute intoxications aflatoxin is lethal. This work purpose to discuss aflatoxins issue: the synthesis, absorption and elimination of aflatoxins, the toxicity mechanisms, and measures to limit the content of aflatoxins in food

  1. Evaluation of the efficacy, acceptability and palatability of calcium montmorillonite clay used to reduce aflatoxin B1 dietary exposure in a crossover study in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Awuor, Abigael O; Yard, Ellen; Daniel, Johnni H; Martin, Collen; Bii, Christine; Romoser, Amelia; Oyugi, Elvis; Elmore, Sarah; Amwayi, Samwel; Vulule, John; Zitomer, Nicholas C; Rybak, Michael E; Phillips, Timothy D; Montgomery, Joel M; Lewis, Lauren S

    2017-01-01

    Acute aflatoxin exposure can cause death and disease (aflatoxicosis) in humans. Aflatoxicosis fatality rates have been documented to be as high as 40% in Kenya. The inclusion in the diet of calcium silicate 100 (ACCS100), a calcium montmorillonite clay, may reduce aflatoxin bioavailability, thus potentially decreasing the risk of aflatoxicosis. We investigated the efficacy, acceptability and palatability of ACCS100 in a population in Kenya with recurring aflatoxicosis outbreaks. Healthy adult participants were enrolled in this double-blinded, crossover clinical trial in 2014. Following informed consent, participants (n = 50) were randomised to receive either ACCS100 (3 g day(-1)) or placebo (3 g day(-1)) for 7 days. Treatments were switched following a 5-day washout period. Urine samples were collected daily and assessed for urinary aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). Blood samples were collected at the beginning and end of the trial and assessed for aflatoxin B1-lysine adducts from serum albumin (AFB1-lys). AFM1 concentrations in urine were significantly reduced while taking ACCS100 compared with calcium carbonate placebo (β = 0.49, 95% confidence limit = 0.32-0.75). The 20-day interval included both the placebo and ACCS100 treatments as well as a washout period. There were no statistically significant differences in reported taste, aftertaste, appearance, colour or texture by treatment. There were no statistically significant differences in self-reported adverse events by treatment. Most participants would be willing to take ACCS100 (98%) and give it to their children (98%). ACCS100 was effective, acceptable and palatable. More work is needed to test ACCS100 among vulnerable populations and to determine if it remains effective at the levels of aflatoxin exposure that induce aflatoxicosis.

  2. [The aflatoxins and liver cancer in Guangxi, China].

    PubMed

    Yu, S Z

    1992-05-01

    The AFB1 intake and the AFM1 excretion of 81 households in 10 villages, Guanxi were investigated using the ELISA method. The results showed that there was positive correlation between PLC mortality and AFB1 intake from corn and peanut oil, but not from rice. The results of stepwise regression showed that main factors were AFB1 intake of males, AFM1 excretion of females and consumption of corn. The results showed that aflatoxins were correlated with mortality rates of liver cancer. Further investigation needs to be carried out in case-control and cohort studies.

  3. Production and characterization of aflatoxin B2a antiserum.

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, P K; Lau, H P; Pestka, J J; Chu, F S

    1981-01-01

    The specificity and sensitivity of antiserum elicited from rabbits against aflatoxin B2a-bovine serum albumin conjugates were characterized with a radioimmunoassay (RIA) and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Aflatoxin B1 was first converted to aflatoxin B2a and then conjugated to bovine serum albumin and horseradish peroxidase by a reductive alkylation method. The antiserum was developed in New Zealand white rabbits by multiple-site injection with the aflatoxin B2a-bovine serum albumin conjugate. Antibody titers were determined by both RIA and ELISA. Competitive RIAs with various aflatoxin analogs indicated that the antiserum was most reactive with aflatoxin B1 and slightly cross-reactive with aflatoxins B2a, B2, and M1. Competitive ELISAs showed the antiserum to be equally specific for aflatoxins B2a and B12 and less reactive with aflatoxins B2 and M1. The relative sensitivities of RIA and ELISA for aflatoxin B1 quantitation were 100 and 10 pg per assay, respectively. PMID:7235694

  4. Aflatoxin biosynthesis: current frontiers.

    PubMed

    Roze, Ludmila V; Hong, Sung-Yong; Linz, John E

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are among the principal mycotoxins that contaminate economically important food and feed crops. Aflatoxin B1 is the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known and is also an immunosuppressant. Occurrence of aflatoxins in crops has vast economic and human health impacts worldwide. Thus, the study of aflatoxin biosynthesis has become a focal point in attempts to reduce human exposure to aflatoxins. This review highlights recent advances in the field of aflatoxin biosynthesis and explores the functional connection between aflatoxin biosynthesis, endomembrane trafficking, and response to oxidative stress. Dissection of the regulatory mechanisms involves a complete comprehension of the aflatoxin biosynthetic process and the dynamic network of transcription factors that orchestrates coordinated expression of the target genes. Despite advancements in the field, development of a safe and effective multifaceted approach to solve the aflatoxin food contamination problem is still required.

  5. Effects of calcium montmorillonite clay and aflatoxin exposure on dry matter intake, milk production, and milk composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifteen primiparous crossbred dairy cows that were 114 ± 14 d in milk and weighed 533 ± 56 kg were used in a replicated 5×5 Latin square to test the efficacy of NovaSil Plus (NSP) for the reduction of aflatoxin (AF) metabolite (AFM1) in milk and the effect of NSP on milk composition. Cows were hous...

  6. Detection and detoxification of aflatoxins: prevention of aflatoxicosis and aflatoxin residues with hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate.

    PubMed

    Phillips, T D; Clement, B A; Kubena, L F; Harvey, R B

    1990-01-01

    Our recent findings demonstrate that HSCAS can prevent aflatoxicosis in chickens and swine and significantly decreases the level of aflatoxin M1 residues in the milk of lactating dairy cattle. The basic mechanism for this action appears to involve sequestration of aflatoxin in the gastrointestinal tract and chemisorption (i.e., tight binding) to HSCAS which results in a reduction in aflatoxin bioavailability. Research is in progress to elucidate the specificity of HSCAS action and to construct a series of selective chemisorbents for mycotoxin control in livestock and poultry.

  7. Potential of lactic acid bacteria in aflatoxin risk mitigation.

    PubMed

    Ahlberg, Sara H; Joutsjoki, Vesa; Korhonen, Hannu J

    2015-08-17

    Aflatoxins (AF) are ubiquitous mycotoxins contaminating food and feed. Consumption of contaminated food and feed can cause a severe health risk to humans and animals. A novel biological method could reduce the health risks of aflatoxins through inhibiting mold growth and binding aflatoxins. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in fermented food production. LAB are known to inhibit mold growth and, to some extent, to bind aflatoxins in different matrices. Reduced mold growth and aflatoxin production may be caused by competition for nutrients between bacterial cells and fungi. Most likely, binding of aflatoxins depends on environmental conditions and is strain-specific. Killed bacteria cells possess consistently better binding abilities for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) than viable cells. Lactobacilli especially are relatively well studied and provide noticeable possibilities in binding of aflatoxin B1 and M1 in food. It seems that binding is reversible and that bound aflatoxins are released later on (Haskard et al., 2001; Peltonen et al., 2001). This literature review suggests that novel biological methods, such as lactic acid bacteria, show potential in mitigating toxic effects of aflatoxins in food and feed.

  8. Effects of clay after an aflatoxin challenge on aflatoxin clearance, milk production, and metabolism of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Sulzberger, S A; Melnichenko, S; Cardoso, F C

    2017-03-01

    Oral supplementation of clay to dairy cattle has been reported to reduce toxicity of aflatoxin (AF) in contaminated feed. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 3 concentrations of dietary clay supplementation in response to an AF challenge. Ten multiparous rumen-cannulated Holstein cows [body weight (mean ± SD) = 669 ± 20 kg and 146 ± 69 d in milk], were assigned to 1 of 5 treatments in a randomized replicated 5 × 5 Latin square design balanced to measure carryover effects. Periods (21 d) were divided in an adaptation phase (d 1 to 14) and a measurement phase (d 15 to 21). From d 15 to 17, cows received an AF challenge. The challenge consisted of 100 μg of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)/kg of dietary dry matter intake (DMI). The material was fitted into 10-mL gelatin capsules and administered into the rumen through a rumen-cannula based on the average DMI obtained on d 12 to 14. Treatments were no clay plus an AF challenge (POS); 3 different concentrations of clay (0.5, 1, or 2% of dietary DMI) plus an AF challenge; and a control consisting of no clay and no AF challenge (C). Statistical analysis was performed using the MIXED procedure of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). Two contrasts, CONT1 (POS vs. C) and CONT2 (POS vs. the average of 0.5, 1, and 2% clay), were compared along with the linear and quadratic treatment effects (POS, 0.5%, 1%, 2%). Cows supplemented with clay had lower AF excretion in milk as aflatoxin M1 (AFM1; 0.5% = 20.83 μg/d, 1% = 22.82 μg/d, and 2% = 16.51 μg/d) and AF transfer from rumen fluid to milk (AFM1; 0.5% = 1.01%, 1% = 0.98%, and 2% = 0.74%) compared with cows in POS (AFM1 = 27.81 μg/d and AF transfer = 1.37%, CONT2). Similarly, concentrations of AFM1 in milk (0.5% = 0.35 μg/kg, 1% = 0.30 μg/kg, 2% = 0.25 μg/kg), AFB1 in feces (0.5% = 1.79 μg/g, 1% = 1.52 μg/kg, 2% = 1.48 μg/kg), and AFB1 in rumen fluid (0.5% = 0.05 μg/kg, 1% = 0.02 μg/kg, 2% = 0.02 μg/kg) were reduced in cows fed clay compared with POS

  9. Multiclonal plastic antibodies for selective aflatoxin extraction from food samples.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Engin; Yılmaz, Erkut; Uzun, Lokman; Say, Rıdvan; Denizli, Adil

    2017-04-15

    Herein, we focused on developing a new generation of monolithic columns for extracting aflatoxin from real food samples by combining the superior features of molecularly imprinted polymers and cryogels. To accomplish this, we designed multiclonal plastic antibodies through simultaneous imprinting of aflatoxin subtypes B1, B2, G1, and G2. We applied Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and spectrofluorimetry to characterize the materials, and conducted selectivity studies using ochratoxin A and aflatoxin M1 (a metabolite of aflatoxin B1), as well as other aflatoxins, under competitive conditions. We determined optimal aflatoxin extraction conditions in terms of concentration, flow rate, temperature, and embedded particle amount as up to 25ng/mL for each species, 0.43mL/min, 7.0, 30°C, and 200mg, respectively. These multiclonal plastic antibodies showed imprinting efficiencies against ochratoxin A and aflatoxin M1 of 1.84 and 26.39, respectively, even under competitive conditions. Finally, we tested reusability, repeatability, reproducibility, and robustness of columns throughout inter- and intra-column variation studies.

  10. Fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered UC-aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, T.; Hsieh, D.P.

    1985-05-01

    A detailed fractionation of radioactivity in the milk of goats administered UC-aflatoxin B1 at low doses was performed. The milk collected in the first 24 h following dosing contained radioactivity equivalent to 0.45-1.1% of the dose given. The radioactivity in each sample was partitioned into 4 fractions: ether, protein, dichloromethane, and water-alcohol. Over 80% of the radioactivity was detected in the dichloromethane fraction, of which over 95% was attributable to aflatoxin M1. No aflatoxin B1 or other known aflatoxin metabolites were detected in any fraction. The results indicate that the major metabolite of aflatoxin B1 in goat milk is aflatoxin M1 and that other metabolites, including conjugates, are of minor significance.

  11. Metabolism of aflatoxin B1 by normal human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Van Vleet, T R; Klein, P J; Coulombe, R A

    2001-08-10

    Aflatoxin B, (AFB1) is a potent hepatocarcinogen in animal models and a suspected carcinogen in humans. High concentrations of AFB, have been found in respirable grain dusts, and may therefore be a risk factor for human lung cancer in certain occupations. To study the potential for AFB, activation in human lung, cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-mediated activation and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated detoxification of AFB1 were examined in cultured normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. Cells were exposed to 0. 15 microM or 1.5 microM AFB, for 48 h and media was collected for metabolite analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). At 0. 15 microM, AFB1 was metabolized only to the detoxified metabolite aflatoxin Q1 (AFQ1). At 1.5 microM AFB1, both aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), and AFQ1 were produced. Cells pretreated with 50 degrees M 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), a CYP 1A inducer, for 72 h prior to 0.15 microM AFB1, produced the activated AFB1 8,9-epoxide (AFBO). Similarly, microsomes prepared from 3MC-pretreated cells formed AFBO, but microsomes from noninduced cells did not. While AFB1-DNA adducts were not detected at low AFB1 concentrations in untreated NHBE, 3MC induction caused the production of AFB1-DNA adducts at 0.015 and 0.15 microM AFB1. Western immunoblots showed that the primary CYP isoforms responsible for AFB1 activation in the liver, 1A and 3A4, to be constitutively expressed in NHBE cells. Expression of CYP 1A was significantly increased in 3MC-pretreated cells, while CYP 3A4 expression increased slightly, but not to the extent of the 1A isoforms. The principal AFBO detoxifying enzyme, glutathione S-transferase (GST), was constitutively expressed in NHBE cells, and was increased approximately twofold by 3MC pretreatment. Cytosolic fractions from neither control nor 3MC-induced NHBE had measurable AFBO conjugating activity, indicating that these cells may lack AFB1-relevant GST activity. From these data, it appears that NHBE cells activate

  12. Aflatoxin metabolism in humans: detection of metabolites and nucleic acid adducts in urine by affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Groopman, J.D.; Donahue, P.R.; Zhu, J.Q.; Chen, J.S.; Wogan, G.N.

    1985-10-01

    A high-affinity IgM monoclonal antibody specific for aflatoxins was covalently bound to Sepharose 4B and used as a preparative column to isolate aflatoxin derivatives from the urine of people and experimental animals who had been exposed to the carcinogen environmentally or under laboratory conditions. Aflatoxin levels were quantified by radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography after elution from the affinity column. In studies on rats injected with ( UC)aflatoxin B1, the authors identified the major aflatoxin-DNA adduct, 2,3-dihydro-2-(N7-guanyl)-3-hydroxy-aflatoxin B1 (AFB1-N7-Gua), and the oxidative metabolites M1 and P1 as the major aflatoxin species present in the urine. When this methodology was applied to human urine samples obtained from people from the Guangxi Province of China exposed to aflatoxin B1 through dietary contamination, the aflatoxin metabolites detected were also AFB1-N7-Gua and aflatoxins M1 and P1. Therefore, affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody represents a useful and rapid technique with which to isolate this carcinogen and its metabolites in biochemical epidemiology and for subsequent quantitative measurements, providing exposure information that can be used for risk assessment.

  13. Aflatoxin variability in pistachios.

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, N E; Rodriguez, S B

    1996-01-01

    Pistachio fruit components, including hulls (mesocarps and epicarps), seed coats (testas), and kernels (seeds), all contribute to variable aflatoxin content in pistachios. Fresh pistachio kernels were individually inoculated with Aspergillus flavus and incubated 7 or 10 days. Hulled, shelled kernels were either left intact or wounded prior to inoculation. Wounded kernels, with or without the seed coat, were readily colonized by A. flavus and after 10 days of incubation contained 37 times more aflatoxin than similarly treated unwounded kernels. The aflatoxin levels in the individual wounded pistachios were highly variable. Neither fungal colonization nor aflatoxin was detected in intact kernels without seed coats. Intact kernels with seed coats had limited fungal colonization and low aflatoxin concentrations compared with their wounded counterparts. Despite substantial fungal colonization of wounded hulls, aflatoxin was not detected in hulls. Aflatoxin levels were significantly lower in wounded kernels with hulls than in kernels of hulled pistachios. Both the seed coat and a water-soluble extract of hulls suppressed aflatoxin production by A. flavus. PMID:8919781

  14. Ameliorating Effects of Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 on Growth Performance, Antioxidant Functions, and Aflatoxin Residues in Ducks Fed Diets Contaminated with Aflatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liyuan; Ma, Qiugang; Ma, Shanshan; Zhang, Jianyun; Jia, Ru; Ji, Cheng; Zhao, Lihong

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 isolated from fish gut is very effective in detoxifying aflatoxins in feed and feed ingredients. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of B. subtilis ANSB060 on growth performance, body antioxidant functions, and aflatoxin residues in ducks fed moldy maize naturally contaminated with aflatoxins. A total of 1500 18-d-old male Cherry Valley ducks with similar body weight were randomly assigned to five treatments with six replicates of 50 ducks per repeat. The experiment design consisted of five dietary treatments labeled as C0 (basal diet containing 60% normal maize), M0 (basal diet containing 60% moldy maize contaminated with aflatoxins substituted for normal maize), M500, M1000, and M2000 (M0 +500, 1000 or 2000 g/t aflatoxin biodegradation preparation mainly consisted of B. subtilis ANSB060). The results showed that ducks fed 22.44 ± 2.46 μg/kg of AFB1 (M0) exhibited a decreasing tendency in average daily gain (ADG) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity in serum, and T-SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in the liver significantly decreased along with the appearance of AFB1 and AFM1 compared with those in Group C0. The supplementation of B. subtilis ANSB060 into aflatoxin-contaminated diets increased the ADG of ducks (p > 0.05), significantly improved antioxidant enzyme activities, and reduced aflatoxin accumulation in duck liver. In conclusion, Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 in diets showed an ameliorating effect to duck aflatoxicosis and may be a promising feed additive. PMID:28025501

  15. Influences of Climate on Aflatoxin Producing Fungi and Aflatoxin Contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are potent mycotoxins that cause developmental and immune system suppression, cancer, and death. As a result of regulations intended to reduce human exposure, crop contamination with aflatoxins causes significant economic loss for producers, marketers, and processors of diverse susceptibl...

  16. Metabolism of aflatoxins: key enzymes and interindividual as well as interspecies differences.

    PubMed

    Dohnal, Vlastimil; Wu, Qinghua; Kuča, Kamil

    2014-09-01

    Aflatoxins are potent hepatocarcinogen in animal models and suspected carcinogen in humans. The most important aflatoxin in terms of toxic potency and occurrence is aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). In this review, we mainly summarized the key metabolizing enzymes of AFB1 in animals and humans. Moreover, the interindividual and the interspecies differences in AFB1 metabolism are highly concerned. In human liver, CYP3A4 plays an important role in biotransforming AFB1 to the toxic product AFB1-8,9-epoxide. In human lung, CYP2A13 has a significant activity in metabolizing AFB1 to AFB1-8,9-epoxide and AFM1-8,9-epoxide. The epoxide of AFB1-8,9-epoxide could conjugate with glutathione to reduce the toxicity by glutathione-S-transferase (GST). In poultry species, CYP2A6, CYP3A37, CYP1A5, and CYP1A1 are responsible for bioactivation of AFB1. There are interindividual variations in the rate of activation of aflatoxins in various species, and there are also differences between children and adults. The age and living regions are important factors affecting resistance of species to AFB1. The rate of AFB1-8,9-epoxide formation and its conjugation with glutathione are key parameters in interspecies and interindividual differences in sensitivity to the toxic effect of AFB1. This review provides an important information for key metabolizing enzymes and the global metabolism of aflatoxins in different species.

  17. BOREAS AFM-1 NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ Aircraft Flux data Over the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Timothy L.; Baldocchi, Dennis; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Gunter, Laureen; Dumas, Ed; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set contains measurements from the Airborne Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-1 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration/Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (NOAA/ATDD) Long-EZ Aircraft collected during the 1994 Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) at the southern study area (SSA). These measurements were made from various instruments mounted on the aircraft. The data that were collected include aircraft altitude, wind direction, wind speed, air temperature, potential temperature, water mixing ratio, U and V components of wind velocity, static pressure, surface radiative temperature, downwelling and upwelling total radiation, downwelling and upwelling longwave radiation, net radiation, downwelling and upwelling photosynthectically active radiation (PAR), greenness index, CO2 concentration, O3 concentration, and CH4 concentration. There are also various columns that indicate the standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, and trend of some of these data. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ aircraft flux data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. Aflatoxin M₁ in raw, UHT milk and dairy products in Sicily (Italy).

    PubMed

    Santini, Antonello; Raiola, Assunta; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Giangrosso, Giuseppe; Macaluso, Andrea; Bognanno, Matteo; Galvano, Fabio; Ritieni, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    A survey on 73 milk samples from different animal breeds and 24 dairy products samples from Sicily, Italy, was carried out for the presence of aflatoxin M₁ (AFM1) by LC-fluorescence detection after immunoaffinity cleanup. AFM1 was detected in 48% and 42% of the milk and dairy samples at concentration ranges between <5.0-16.0 and <5.0-18.0 ng L⁻¹, respectively. Within the raw milk samples, 92% had an AFM1 content below 5.0 ng L⁻¹, in 7% of the cases it was in the range 5.0-10.0 ng L⁻¹ and 1% was contaminated between 10.0 and 20.0 ng L⁻¹. For the dairy products, ultra-high-temperature treated (UHT) milk, milk cream and cheese, the incidence was 42%, of which 83% contained less than 5.0 ng L⁻¹ and 17% contained 10.0-20.0 ng L⁻¹ AFM1. The levels of contamination found justify continuous monitoring for public health and to reduce consumer exposure.

  19. Aflatoxins and safe storage

    PubMed Central

    Villers, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post-harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb) before vs. after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice, and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field vs. after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post-harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide, or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described. PMID:24782846

  20. Aflatoxins and safe storage.

    PubMed

    Villers, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post-harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb) before vs. after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice, and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field vs. after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post-harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide, or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described.

  1. Production of Aflatoxin on Rice

    PubMed Central

    Shotwell, Odette L.; Hesseltine, C. W.; Stubblefield, R. D.; Sorenson, W. G.

    1966-01-01

    A method has been developed for the production of aflatoxin by growing Aspergillus flavus strain NRRL 2999 on the solid substrate rice. Optimal yields, more than 1 mg of aflatoxin B1 per g of starting material, were obtained in 5 days at 28 C. A crude product containing aflatoxins was isolated by chloroform extraction and precipitation with hexane from concentrated solutions. The crude product consisted of 50% aflatoxin in the following ratio: B1-B2-G1-G2, 100:0.15:0.22:0.02. Aflatoxin B1 was separated from almost all the impurities and from the other aflatoxins by chromatography on silica gel with 1% ethyl alcohol in chloroform. Analytically pure aflatoxin B1 was recrystallized from chloroform-hexane mixtures. Images Fig. 1 PMID:5970829

  2. Aflatoxin decomposition in various soils

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J.S.

    1986-08-01

    The persistence of aflatoxin in the soil environment could potentially result in a number of adverse environmental consequences. To determine the persistence of aflatoxin in soil, /sup 14/C-labeled aflatoxin B1, was added to silt loam, sandy loam, and silty clay loam soils and the subsequent release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was determined. After 120 days of incubation, 8.1% of the original aflatoxin added to the silt loam soil was released as CO/sub 2/. Aflatoxin decomposition in the sandy loam soil proceeded more quickly than the other two soils for the first 20 days of incubation. After this time, the decomposition rate declined and by the end of the study, 4.9% of the aflatoxin was released as CO/sub 2/. Aflatoxin decomposition proceeded most slowly in the silty clay loam soil. Only 1.4% of aflatoxin added to the soil was released as CO/sub 2/ after 120 days incubation. To determine whether aflatoxin was bound to the silty clay loam soil, aflatoxin B1 was added to this soil and incubated for 20 days. The soil was periodically extracted and the aflatoxin species present were determined using thin layer chromatographic (TLC) procedures. After one day of incubation, the degradation products, aflatoxins B2 and G2, were observed. It was also found that much of the aflatoxin extracted from the soil was not mobile with the TLC solvent system used. This indicated that a conjugate may have formed and thus may be responsible for the lack of aflatoxin decomposition.

  3. Fluorometric assay for aflatoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, A.G.

    1984-11-01

    The method that is now widely adopted by the government laboratories for the assay of individual aflatoxin components (B/sub 1/, B/sub 2/, G/sub 1/, and G/sub 2/) utilizes a TLC technique. The extraction and clean-up steps of this technique were further researched but the method is still time consuming. It is, therefore, very important to develop a rapid and accurate assay technique for aflatoxins. The current research proposes a technique which utilizes a Turner Fluorometer.

  4. Prevention of maternal and developmental toxicity in rats via dietary inclusion of common aflatoxin sorbents: potential for hidden risks.

    PubMed

    Mayura, K; Abdel-Wahhab, M A; McKenzie, K S; Sarr, A B; Edwards, J F; Naguib, K; Phillips, T D

    1998-02-01

    controls. Importantly, clinoptilolite (plus AfB1) resulted in severe maternal liver lesions (more severe than AfB1 alone), suggesting that this zeolite may interact with dietary components that modulate aflatoxicosis. In metabolism studies, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, maintained on diets containing 0.5% (w/w) HSCAS or clinoptilolite, were dosed orally with 2.0 mg AfB1/kg body wt. The concentration of the major urinary metabolite (AfM1) was considerably decreased in the presence of HSCAS. These results suggest that the mechanism of protection of AfB1-induced maternal and developmental toxicities in the rat may involve adsorption and reduction of AfB1 bioavailability in vivo. Importantly, this study demonstrates the potential for significant hidden risks associated with the inclusion of nonselective aflatoxin binders in feeds. Aflatoxin sorbents should be rigorously tested individually and thoroughly characterized in vivo, paying particular attention to their effectiveness and safety in sensitive animal models and their potential for deleterious interactions.

  5. The metabolism of aflatoxin B1 by hepatocytes isolated from rats following the in vivo administration of some xenobiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, S.A.; Neal, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    Isolated rat hepatocytes, an intact cellular system capable of performing phase I and phase II metabolism, have been used to investigate metabolism of aflatoxin B1. These cells were found to metabolise (/sup 14/C)aflatoxin B1 to aflatoxins M1 and Q1, and to radiolabelled polar material, presumably conjugates, as analysed by h.p.l.c., t.l.c. and radioactive determination. In vivo administration of the mixed function oxidase inducers, phenobarbitone and 3-methylcholanthrene, resulted in enhanced hepatocyte phase I (microsomal) metabolism of aflatoxin B1. In contrast to metabolism of AFB1 by in vitro subcellular systems increased production of polar material (conjugated metabolites) derived from (/sup 14/C)aflatoxin B1 was also detected in hepatocytes isolated from these pretreated animals. Formation of aflatoxin Q1 by isolated hepatocytes appeared to be mediated by cytochrome P450-linked enzymes whereas cytochrome P448-linked enzymes were apparently involved in aflatoxin M1 production. Chronic feeding of aflatoxin B1 to rats enhanced hepatocyte production of conjugated material only and did not elevate cellular cytochrome P450 levels, thus suggesting that aflatoxin B1 is not an inducer of its own primary metabolism.

  6. Analysis of industry-generated data. Part 2: Risk-based sampling plan for efficient self-control of aflatoxin M₁ contamination in raw milk.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Zsuzsa; Trevisani, Marcello; Horváth, Zsuzsanna; Serraino, Andrea; Szabó, István J; Kerekes, Kata; Szeitzné-Szabó, Mária; Ambrus, Arpád

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin M₁ (AFM1) contamination in 21,969 milk samples taken in Italy during 2005-08 and 2010 provided the basis for designing an early warning self-control plan. Additionally, 4148 AFM1 data points from the mycotoxin crisis (2003-04) represented the worst case. No parametric function provided a good fit for the skewed and scattered AFM1 concentrations. The acceptable reference values, reflecting the combined uncertainty of AFM1 measured in consignments consisting of milk from one to six farms, ranged from 40 to 16.7 ng kg(-1), respectively. Asymmetric control charts with these reference values, 40 and 50 ng kg(-1) warning and action limits are recommended to assess immediately the distribution of AFM1 concentration in incoming consignments. The moving window method, presented as a worked example including 5 days with five samples/day, enabled verification of compliance of production with the legal limit in 98% of the consignments at a 94% probability level. The sampling plan developed assumes consecutive analyses of samples taken from individual farms, which makes early detection of contamination possible and also immediate corrective actions if the AFM1 concentration in a consignment exceeds the reference value. In the latter case different control plans with increased sampling frequency should be applied depending on the level and frequency of contamination. As aflatoxin B₁ increases in feed at about the same time, therefore a coordinated sampling programme performed by the milk processing plants operating in a confined geographic area is more effective and economical then the individual ones. The applicability of the sample size calculation based on binomial theorem and the fast response rate resulting from the recommended sampling plan were verified by taking 1000-10,000 random samples with replacement from the experimental databases representing the normal, moderately and highly contaminated periods. The efficiency of the control plan could be

  7. Novel Aflatoxin-Degrading Enzyme from Bacillus shackletonii L7

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Eisa Ahmed, Mohamed Farah; Sangare, Lancine; Zhao, Yueju; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Wang, Yan; Yang, Hongping; Liu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Food and feed contamination by aflatoxin (AF)B1 has adverse economic and health consequences. AFB1 degradation by microorganisms or microbial enzymes provides a promising preventive measure. To this end, the present study tested 43 bacterial isolates collected from maize, rice, and soil samples for AFB1-reducing activity. The higher activity was detected in isolate L7, which was identified as Bacillus shackletonii. L7 reduced AFB1, AFB2, and AFM1 levels by 92.1%, 84.1%, and 90.4%, respectively, after 72 h at 37 °C. The L7 culture supernatant degraded more AFB1 than viable cells and cell extracts; and the degradation activity was reduced from 77.9% to 15.3% in the presence of proteinase K and sodium dodecyl sulphate. A thermostable enzyme purified from the boiled supernatant was designated as Bacillus aflatoxin-degrading enzyme (BADE). An overall 9.55-fold purification of BADE with a recovery of 39.92% and an activity of 3.85 × 103 U·mg−1 was obtained using chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose. BADE had an estimated molecular mass of 22 kDa and exhibited the highest activity at 70 °C and pH 8.0, which was enhanced by Cu2+ and inhibited by Zn2+, Mn2+, Mg2+, and Li+. BADE is the major protein involved in AFB1 detoxification. This is the first report of a BADE isolated from B. shackletonii, which has potential applications in the detoxification of aflatoxins during food and feed processing. PMID:28098812

  8. 7 CFR 983.4 - Aflatoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aflatoxin. 983.4 Section 983.4 Agriculture Regulations... NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.4 Aflatoxin. Aflatoxin is one of a group of mycotoxins produced by the molds Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Aflatoxins are naturally occurring...

  9. 7 CFR 983.4 - Aflatoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aflatoxin. 983.4 Section 983.4 Agriculture Regulations... NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.4 Aflatoxin. Aflatoxin is one of a group of mycotoxins produced by the molds Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Aflatoxins are naturally occurring...

  10. 7 CFR 983.4 - Aflatoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aflatoxin. 983.4 Section 983.4 Agriculture Regulations... NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.4 Aflatoxin. Aflatoxin is one of a group of mycotoxins produced by the molds Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Aflatoxins are naturally occurring...

  11. Aflatoxins, hydroxylated metabolites, and aflatoxicol from breast muscle of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Zaragoza, M; Carvajal-Moreno, M; Méndez-Ramírez, I; Chilpa-Galván, N C; Avila-González, E; Flores-Ortiz, C M

    2014-12-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are toxic fungal secondary metabolites that are pathological to animals and humans. This study identified and quantified AF (AFB(1), AFB(2), AFG(1), AFG(2)) and their hydroxylated metabolites (AFM(1), AFM(2), AFP(1)) and aflatoxicol (AFL) from laying hen breast muscles. Aflatoxins pass from cereal feed to the laying hen tissues, causing economic losses, and from there to humans. To detect the passage of AF from feed to hen breast muscle tissues, an experiment that included 25 Hy-Line W36 121-wk-old hens was performed for 8 d. Hens in individual cages were distributed into 3 groups: a control group, with feed free of AFB(1), and 2 experimental groups, with feed spiked with 2 AFB(1) dosages: 30 µg·kg(-1) (low) or 500 µg·kg(-1) (high). The daily feed consumption per hen was recorded and afterward hens were euthanized and breast muscles were collected, weighed, and dried individually. Aflatoxins were extracted by 2 chemical methods and quantified by HPLC. Both methods were validated by lineality (calibration curves), recovery percentage (>80%), limit of detection, and limit of quantification. The AF (µg·kg(-1)) averages recovered in control breast muscles were as follows: AFB(1) (18); AFG(1), AFM(2), and AFL (0); AFG(2) (1.3); AFM(1) (52), and AFP1 (79). Hens fed with feed spiked with 30 µg·kg(-1) of AFB(1) had AFG(1) (16); AFG(2) (72); AFM(1) (0); AFM(2) (18); AFP(1) (145); and AFL (5 µg·kg(-1)). Hens with feed spiked with 500 µg·kg(-1) of AFB(1) had AFG(1) (512); AFG(2) (7); AFM(1) (4,775); AFM(2) (0); AFP(1) (661); and AFL (21 µg·kg(-1)). The best AF extraction method was Qian and Yang's method, modified by adding additional AF from both Supelclean LC18 SPE columns; its limit of detection (0.5 ng·mL(-1)) was lower compared with that of Koeltzow and Tanner, which was 1 ng·mL(-1).

  12. Present and future directions of translational research on aflatoxin and hepatocellular carcinoma. A review.

    PubMed

    Wogan, Gerald N; Kensler, Thomas W; Groopman, John D

    2012-01-01

    animals indicating the carcinogenicity of naturally occurring mixtures of aflatoxins, aflatoxin B(1), G(1) and M(1). Aflatoxin biomarkers have also been used to show that primary prevention to reduce aflatoxin exposure can be achieved by low-technology approaches at the subsistence farm level in sub-Saharan Africa. Also, in residents of Qidong, China, oral dosing with chlorophyllin, a chlorophyll derivative, prior to each meal led to significant reduction in aflatoxin-DNA biomarker excretion, supporting the feasibility of preventive measures to reduce HCC risk in populations experiencing unavoidable aflatoxin exposure. The systematic, comprehensive approach used to create the total aflatoxin database justifies optimism for potential success of preventive interventions to ameliorate cancer risk attributable to aflatoxin exposure. This strategy could serve as a template for the development, validation and application of molecular and biochemical markers for other carcinogens and cancers as well as other chronic diseases resulting from environmental exposures.

  13. Stability of aflatoxins in solution.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Gonzalo J; Cepeda, Sandra M; Martos, Perry A

    2012-01-01

    The stability of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 was studied in solutions containing different concentrations of water, acetonitrile, and/or methanol, and in autosampler vials treated with nitric acid or silanized. When stored at room temperature (20 degrees C) for 24 h, aflatoxins G1 and G2 were stable only in solutions containing 100% organic solvent, whereas aflatoxins B1 and B2 were stable in solutions of methanol-water and acetonitrile-water at greater than 60 and 40% organic content, respectively. At 5 degrees C, aflatoxins G1 and G2 showed a significant decrease in concentration only when kept in less than 20% aqueous organic solvent. Significant loss of aflatoxins was realized in standard, commercially available amber type I borosilicate autosampler vials, but chemical etching of the vials with nitric acid or with silanization prevented aflatoxin degradation. These results indicate that aflatoxins are unstable in aqueous solutions and that this instability can be counteracted by the presence of at least 20% organic solvent and keeping the solutions at 5 degrees C or by the use of treated vials.

  14. Influences of climate on aflatoxin producing fungi and aflatoxin contamination.

    PubMed

    Cotty, Peter J; Jaime-Garcia, Ramon

    2007-10-20

    Aflatoxins are potent mycotoxins that cause developmental and immune system suppression, cancer, and death. As a result of regulations intended to reduce human exposure, crop contamination with aflatoxins causes significant economic loss for producers, marketers, and processors of diverse susceptible crops. Aflatoxin contamination occurs when specific fungi in the genus Aspergillus infect crops. Many industries frequently affected by aflatoxin contamination know from experience and anecdote that fluctuations in climate impact the extent of contamination. Climate influences contamination, in part, by direct effects on the causative fungi. As climate shifts, so do the complex communities of aflatoxin-producing fungi. This includes changes in the quantity of aflatoxin-producers in the environment and alterations to fungal community structure. Fluctuations in climate also influence predisposition of hosts to contamination by altering crop development and by affecting insects that create wounds on which aflatoxin-producers proliferate. Aflatoxin contamination is prevalent both in warm humid climates and in irrigated hot deserts. In temperate regions, contamination may be severe during drought. The contamination process is frequently broken down into two phases with the first phase occurring on the developing crop and the second phase affecting the crop after maturation. Rain and temperature influence the phases differently with dry, hot conditions favoring the first and warm, wet conditions favoring the second. Contamination varies with climate both temporally and spatially. Geostatistics and multiple regression analyses have shed light on influences of weather on contamination. Geostatistical analyses have been used to identify recurrent contamination patterns and to match these with environmental variables. In the process environmental conditions with the greatest impact on contamination are identified. Likewise, multiple regression analyses allow ranking of

  15. Development of Methods for Determination of Aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijuan; Chen, Min; Ying, Yibin

    2016-12-09

    Aflatoxins can cause damage to the health of humans and animals. Several institutions around the world have established regulations to limit the levels of aflatoxins in food, and numerous analytical methods have been extensively developed for aflatoxin determination. This review covers the currently used analytical methods for the determination of aflatoxins in different food matrices, which includes sampling and sample preparation, sample pretreatment methods including extraction methods and purification methods of aflatoxin extracts, separation and determination methods. Validation for analysis of aflatoxins and safety considerations and precautions when doing the experiments are also discussed.

  16. Exposure measurement of aflatoxins and aflatoxin metabolites in human body fluids. A short review.

    PubMed

    Leong, Yin-Hui; Latiff, Aishah A; Ahmad, Nurul Izzah; Rosma, Ahmad

    2012-05-01

    Aflatoxins are highly toxic secondary fungal metabolites mainly produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. Human exposure to aflatoxins may result directly from ingestion of contaminated foods, or indirectly from consumption of foods from animals previously exposed to aflatoxins in feeds. This paper focuses on exposure measurement of aflatoxins and aflatoxin metabolites in various human body fluids. Research on different metabolites present in blood, urine, breast milk, and other human fluids or tissues including their detection techniques is reviewed. The association between dietary intake of aflatoxins and biomarker measurement is also highlighted. Finally, aspects related to the differences between aflatoxin determination in food versus the biomarker approach are discussed.

  17. Cytotoxicity of aflatoxin on red blood corpuscles

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, R.J.; Raval, P.J. )

    1991-09-01

    The exact mechanism of aflatoxin action is not clearly understood. In the present investigation the authors report morphological aberrations and increased rate of hemolysis caused by aflatoxins in vitro.

  18. Aflatoxin in Tunisian aleppo pine nuts.

    PubMed

    Boutrif, E; Jemmali, M; Pohland, A E; Campbell, A D

    1977-05-01

    Twenty-six of 50 Aleppo pine nuts samples collected throughout Tunisia showed relatively high levels of contamination by aflatoxin. Some samples contained as much as 2000 ppb aflatoxin B1, and very few contained less than 100 ppb. Total aflatoxins as high as 7550 ppb were found. A traditional pudding, widely consumed in Tunisia, which was prepared from contaminated nuts still contained more than 80% of the aflatoxin originally present in the nuts.

  19. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.50 Aflatoxin regulations. The committee shall establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such aflatoxin sampling, analysis, and inspection...

  20. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.150 Aflatoxin regulations. (a) Maximum level. No handler shall ship for domestic human consumption, pistachios that exceed an aflatoxin level of 15...

  1. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.50 Aflatoxin regulations. The committee shall establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such aflatoxin sampling, analysis, and inspection...

  2. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.50 Aflatoxin regulations. The committee shall establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such aflatoxin sampling, analysis, and inspection...

  3. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.150 Aflatoxin regulations. (a) Maximum level. No handler shall ship for domestic human consumption, pistachios that exceed an aflatoxin level of 15...

  4. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.150 Aflatoxin regulations. (a) Maximum level. No handler shall ship for domestic human consumption, pistachios that exceed an aflatoxin level of 15...

  5. Aspergillus flavus: The Major Producer of Aflatoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is an opportunistic pathogen of crops. It is important because it produces aflatoxin as a secondary metabolite in the seeds of a number of crops both before and after harvest. Aflatoxin is a potent carcinogen that is highly regulated in most countries. In the field, aflatoxin i...

  6. Aflatoxin B1 Degradation by a Pseudomonas Strain

    PubMed Central

    Sangare, Lancine; Zhao, Yueju; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Chang, Jinghua; Li, Jinhan; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), one of the most potent naturally occurring mutagens and carcinogens, causes significant threats to the food industry and animal production. In this study, 25 bacteria isolates were collected from grain kernels and soils displaying AFB1 reduction activity. Based on its degradation effectiveness, isolate N17-1 was selected for further characterization and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa N17-1 could degrade AFB1, AFB2 and AFM1 by 82.8%, 46.8% and 31.9% after incubation in Nutrient Broth (NB) medium at 37 °C for 72 h, respectively. The culture supernatant of isolate N17-1 degraded AFB1 effectively, whereas the viable cells and intra cell extracts were far less effective. Factors influencing AFB1 degradation by the culture supernatant were investigated. Maximum degradation was observed at 55 °C. Ions Mn2+ and Cu2+ were activators for AFB1 degradation, however, ions Mg2+, Li+, Zn2+, Se2+, Fe3+ were strong inhibitors. Treatments with proteinase K and proteinase K plus SDS significantly reduced the degradation activity of the culture supernatant. No degradation products were observed based on preliminary LC-QTOF/MS analysis, indicating AFB1 was metabolized to degradation products with chemical properties different from that of AFB1. The results indicated that the degradation of AFB1 by P. aeruginosa N17-1 was enzymatic and could have a great potential in industrial applications. This is the first report indicating that the isolate of P. aeruginosa possesses the ability to degrade aflatoxin. PMID:25341538

  7. Inhibition of aflatoxin formation by some spices.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, S S; El-Shayeb, N M

    1980-01-01

    The effects of black pepper, cinnamon, peppermint, cumin, ginger and clove on growth and aflatoxin formation of Aspergillus flavus were studied in rice powdercorn steep (RC) medium. The effects of the first five spices were judged to be inhibition of aflatoxin formation rather than of mycelial growth. Clove completely inhibited both mycelial growth and aflatoxin formation at a concentration above 0.1%. No aflatoxin was produced when cumin and mint levels of 5% and 10% were used. Black pepper and ginger levels of 10% decreased aflatoxin formation by 100%. Higher concentrations of cinnamon, mint, cumin and ginger stimulated mycelial growth.

  8. Zearalenone, deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 and their metabolites in pig urine as biomarkers for mycotoxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Thieu, N Q; Pettersson, H

    2009-06-01

    Methods to determine zearalenone (ZEA), deoxynivalenol (DON), aflatoxins (AF) and their metabolites in pig urine were developed as biomarkers for pig exposure to the mycotoxins in feed. Urine samples were incubated with β-glucuronidase to cleave conjugates, extracted and cleaned-up with solid phase and immunoaffinity columns, followed by HPLC with UV and fluorescence detection. Good recoveries (83-130%), low variation (2-10%), and low detection limits (0.3-9.9 ng/ml) were obtained. The results of controlled AFB1 feeding trials found no difference in urine concentrations of AFB1 or AFM1 from pigs fed three different levels (127, 227, 327 µg/kg) of AFB1 in diets. The excretion of AFB1 and AFM1 in urine was on average 30% of the oral dose and the ratio AFB1 to AFM1 was around 23%. The analysis of 15 Vietnamese pig urine samples indicate a relatively high exposure of ZEA, DON and AF, which were found as toxin or metabolites in 47, 73, and 80% of the urine samples, respectively.

  9. Aflatoxigenic Fungi and Aflatoxins in Portuguese Almonds

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, P.; Venâncio, A.; Lima, N.

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination of nuts is an increasing concern to the consumer's health. Portugal is a big producer of almonds, but there is no scientific knowledge on the safety of those nuts, in terms of mycotoxins. The aim of this paper was to study the incidence of aflatoxigenic fungi and aflatoxin contamination of 21 samples of Portuguese almonds, and its evolution throughout the various stages of production. All fungi belonging to Aspergillus section Flavi were identified and tested for their aflatoxigenic ability. Almond samples were tested for aflatoxin contamination by HPLC-fluorescence. In total, 352 fungi belonging to Aspergillus section Flavi were isolated from Portuguese almonds: 127 were identified as A. flavus (of which 28% produced aflatoxins B), 196 as typical or atypical A. parasiticus (all producing aflatoxins B and G), and 29 as A. tamarii (all nonaflatoxigenic). Aflatoxins were detected in only one sample at 4.97 μg/kg. PMID:22666128

  10. Aflatoxins in black tea in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pouretedal, Zohreh; Mazaheri, Mansooreh

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are highly toxic, and carcinogenic secondary fungal metabolites and have been detected in various food commodities. In this regard, 40 black tea samples including domestic and imported black tea were analysed for aflatoxin contamination by high-performance liquid chromatography using a post-column derivatisation procedure (Kobra cell) with fluorescence detection. Samples were randomly collected in 2010 from Tehran markets. The results revealed that 30 among 40 samples were contaminated with aflatoxins (27.5% of the total). Mean AFB1 content was 10.0 ng/g and mean of aflatoxin total was 12.07 ng/g for the 11 contaminated samples.

  11. 7 CFR 983.4 - Aflatoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... molds Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Aflatoxins are naturally occurring compounds produced by molds, which can be spread in improperly processed and stored nuts, dried fruits and grains....

  12. 7 CFR 983.4 - Aflatoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... molds Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Aflatoxins are naturally occurring compounds produced by molds, which can be spread in improperly processed and stored nuts, dried fruits and grains....

  13. Manual sorting to eliminate aflatoxin from peanuts.

    PubMed

    Galvez, F C F; Francisco, M L D L; Villarino, B J; Lustre, A O; Resurreccion, A V A

    2003-10-01

    A manual sorting procedure was developed to eliminate aflatoxin contamination from peanuts. The efficiency of the sorting process in eliminating aflatoxin-contaminated kernels from lots of raw peanuts was verified. The blanching of 20 kg of peanuts at 140 degrees C for 25 min in preheated roasters facilitated the manual sorting of aflatoxin-contaminated kernels after deskinning. The manual sorting of raw materials with initially high aflatoxin contents (300 ppb) resulted in aflatoxin-free peanuts (i.e., peanuts in which no aflatoxin was detected). Verification procedures showed that the sorted sound peanuts contained no aflatoxin or contained low levels (<15 ppb) of aflatoxin. The results obtained confirmed that the sorting process was effective in separating contaminated peanuts whether or nor contamination was extensive. At the commercial level, when roasters were not preheated, the dry blanching of 50 kg of peanuts for 45 to 55 min facilitated the proper deskinning and subsequent manual sorting of aflatoxin-contaminated peanut kernels from sound kernels.

  14. Determination of aflatoxins in nuts of Tabriz confectionaries by ELISA and HPLC methods

    PubMed Central

    siahi Shadbad, mohammad reza; Ansarin, masoud; Tahavori, Ali; Ghaderi, Faranak; Nemati, Mahboob

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Aflatoxins (AFs) are a group of mycotoxins and secondary metabolites of various species of Aspergillus. There are various forms of aflatoxins including B1, B2, G1, G2, M1 and M2 types. Aflatoxins cause important health problems and have high potential effect on liver cancer. Therefore, numerous investigations have been conducted during last three decades. The aim of this work is to determine the contamination levels of nuts used by the confectionaries in Tabriz. Method: A total of 142 samples including 35 almond , 26 walnut, 4 seeds of apricot, 6 sunflower seeds kernel, 6 sesame seed, 6 peanuts , 32 pistachio,13 hazelnuts and 14 cashews samples were collected from Tabriz confectionaries. The ELISA method was employed for the screening of total aflatoxins. Result: In 13 cases (28.1% of pistachios, 5.1% of walnuts and 7.1% of cashews) contamination rate of higher than 15 ppb were observed. The HPLC method was applied for the confirmation of ELISA results. Aflatoxin B1 was the highest detected AFs. Conclusion: The overall results of the tested samples indicated that the rate of contamination of pistachios is higher than the other tested samples. PMID:24312781

  15. Rapid on-site sensing aflatoxin B1 in food and feed via a chromatographic time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaowei; Tang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Du; Zhang, Qi; Li, Peiwu; Ding, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 poses grave threats to food and feed safety due to its strong carcinogenesis and toxicity, thus requiring ultrasensitive rapid on-site determination. Herein, a portable immunosensor based on chromatographic time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay was developed for sensitive and on-site determination of aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples. Chromatographic time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay offered a magnified positive signal and low signal-to-noise ratio in time-resolved mode due to the absence of noise interference caused by excitation light sources. Compared with the immunosensing performance in previous studies, this platform demonstrated a wider dynamic range of 0.2-60 μg/kg, lower limit of detection from 0.06 to 0.12 µg/kg, and considerable recovery from 80.5% to 116.7% for different food and feed sample matrices. It was found to be little cross-reactivity with other aflatoxins (B2, G1, G2, and M1). In the case of determination of aflatoxin B1 in peanuts, corn, soy sauce, vegetable oil, and mouse feed, excellent agreement was found when compared with aflatoxin B1 determination via the conversational high-performance liquid chromatography method. The chromatographic time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay affords a powerful alternative for rapid on-site determination of aflatoxin B1 and holds a promise for food safety in consideration of practical food safety and environmental monitoring.

  16. Separation of aflatoxins from filter cake

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, I.; Chriswell, C.D.

    1982-02-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography using silianized porous silica microspheres is used to clean up an environmental sample prior to aflatoxin analysis. B/sub 1/ and B/sub 2/ aflatoxins were found in an anaerobic digestor filter cake sample at concentrations of 1 ppb.

  17. Aflatoxins, hepatocellular carcinoma and public health.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Arvin; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-03-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide, primarily affecting populations in the developing countries. Aflatoxin, a food contaminant produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, is a known human carcinogen that has been shown to be a causative agent in the pathogenesis of HCC. Aflatoxin can affect a wide range of food commodities including corns, oilseeds, spices, and tree nuts as well as milk, meat, and dried fruit. Many factors affect the growth of Aspergillus fungi and the level of aflatoxin contamination in food. Drought stress is one of the factors that increase susceptibility of plants to Aspergillus and thus aflatoxin contamination. A recent drought is thought to be responsible for finding of trace amounts of aflatoxin in some of the corn harvested in the United States. Although it's too soon to know whether aflatoxin will be a significant problem, since United States is the world's largest corn producer and exporter, this has raised alarm bells. Strict regulations and testing of finished foods and feeds in the United States should prevent a major health scare, and prevent human exposure to deleterious levels of aflatoxin. Unfortunately, such regulations and testing are not in place in many countries. The purpose of this editorial is to summarize the current knowledge on association of aflatoxin and HCC, encourage future research and draw attention to this global public health issue.

  18. Aflatoxins in Iran: Nature, Hazards and Carcinogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Khoshpey, B; Farhud, DD; Zaini, F

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have shown that mycotoxin contamination of agricultural products is a challenge for individual’s health especially in developing countries. Improper production and storage of foods, prepare conditions for aflatoxin production in crops, especially rice, wheat, pistachio, walnut, almond, etc which are the main sources of foods for people. Feeding livestock by contaminated bread is another way of human exposure to mycotoxins, especially aflatoxin and because of expensive methods for detecting and analyzing aflatoxin in laboratory; it is not measured in foods. This manuscript is a review of some Iranian and nonIranian reports about aflatoxin, its exposure ways, its adverse effect on human health and nutrition, as well as methods for reducing its exposure. Based on studies on foods, aflatoxin exposure is high in Iran. Since livestock feeding by contaminated bread is one of the potential ways for milk contamination, we should control and reduce aflatoxin contamination by improving production process, storage condition and livestock feeding as soon as possible. Pistachio is one of the most important exporting products of Iran and to maintain Iran’s position in exporting of this product, specific regulations on lowering its contamination with aflatoxin should be considered seriously. Finally, effective controlling of all food and feedstuffs which are vulnerable to aflatoxin contamination is necessary to prevent its effects. PMID:23113099

  19. Clinical implications of food contaminated by aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Hendrickse, R G

    1991-01-01

    Aflatoxins have been incriminated, mainly on circumstantial evidence, in hepatocellular carcinoma, acute hepatic failure and Reye's syndrome, but other possible effects of continuous or intermittent dietary exposure to aflatoxins, which occurs widely in the tropics, have received little study. Over the past 10 years evidence has steadily accumulated that incriminates aflatoxins in the aetiology of kwashiorkor, a widespread and serious disorder of children in the tropics, previously believed to be caused by protein deficiency. Investigation of human breast milk, undertaken initially to elucidate the pathogenesis of kwashiorkor in breastfed infants, has revealed widespread and serious exposure to aflatoxins from this source. Extension of these studies to pregnant women, in turn, revealed widespread and serious prenatal aflatoxin exposure. In laboratory and farm animals, such exposure has serious implications for immune and hepatic functions, and is detrimental to growth and development. Recent analysis of heroin samples show that heroin addicts may also be exposed to these toxins. These findings show that human exposure to aflatoxins may begin prenatally, persist during breastfeeding, and continue into adult life. It is postulated that aflatoxins (i) play a role in the aetiology of kwashiorkor, (ii) increase neonatal susceptibility to infection and jaundice, (iii) increase childhood susceptibility to infections and malignant disease, (iv) compromise immune responses to prophylactic immunisations and (v) may play a role in the pathogenesis of diseases in heroin addicts. There are indications also that acute, fatal aflatoxin poisoning which masquerades as 'hepatitis' may occur more frequently than is currently appreciated.

  20. Food Safety Legislation Regarding Of Aflatoxins Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketney, Otto

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of the European Union (EU) is to reduce certain contaminants in foodstuffs to acceptable levels. The occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in food was considered to be one of the most important issues of global food security to protect the health of humans and animals, over 100 nations have established maximum tolerable levels for aflatoxin in food. Although EU legislation covers many aspects of food safety was not legally establish an integrated framework that could effectively combat and cover all sectors of the food chain. Monitoring and reporting levels of aflatoxins after controls are essential actions that assist to identify potential risks to human health. The review process for aflatoxin regulations is a complex activity involving many factors and stakeholders.

  1. Aflatoxins in various food from Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Hacıbekiroğlu, I; Kolak, U

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports the total aflatoxin and aflatoxin B1 levels in 62 food samples from Istanbul, Turkey. The total aflatoxin content in dried American cucumber, squash, tomato, okra and saffron samples was found to be 1.7 μg/kg. AFB1 levels in five dried vegetables (red bell pepper, American cucumber, squash, tomato and okra), two tea (linden and jasmine flower) and three spice samples (cardamom, galangal and saffron) were 1 μg/kg. Of the tested samples, 76% exceeded legal limits of total aflatoxin. The highest levels were determined in chestnut (232.9 μg/kg), nutmeg (206.1 μg/kg) and sumac (182.5 μg/kg). These findings confirm the existing knowledge that food should be regularly and effectively controlled.

  2. Aflatoxins as a cause of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kew, Michael C

    2013-09-01

    Aflatoxins, metabolites of the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, are frequent contaminants of a number of staple foods, particularly maize and ground nuts, in subsistence farming communities in tropical and sub-tropical climates in sub-Saharan Africa, Eastern Asia and parts of South America. Contamination of foods occurs during growth and as a result of storage in deficient or inappropriate facilities. These toxins pose serious public health hazards, including the causation of hepatocellular carcinoma by aflatoxin B1. Exposure begins in utero and is life-long. The innocuous parent molecule of the fungus is converted by members of the cytochrome p450 family into mutagenic and carcinogenic intermediates. Aflatoxin-B1 is converted into aflatoxin B1-8,9 exo-epoxide, which is in turn converted into 8,9-dihydroxy-8-(N7) guanyl-9-hydroxy aflatoxin B1 adduct. This adduct is metabolized into aflatoxin B1 formaminopyrimidine adduct. These adducts are mutagenic and carcinogenic. In addition, an arginine to serine mutation at codon 249 of the p53 tumor suppressor gene is produced, abrogating the function of the tumor suppressor gene, and contributing to hepatocarcinogenesis. Aflatoxin B1 acts synergistically with hepatitis B virus in causing hepatocellular carcinoma. A number of interactions between the two carcinogens may be responsible for this action, including integration of hepatitis B virus x gene and its consequences, as well as interference with nucleotide excision repair, activation of p21waf1/cip1, generation of DNA mutations, and altered methylation of genes. But much remains to be learnt about the precise pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for aflatoxin B1-induced hepatocellular carcinoma as well as the interaction between the toxin and hepatitis B virus in causing the tumor.

  3. Aflatoxin Control in Maize by Trametes versicolor

    PubMed Central

    Scarpari, Marzia; Bello, Cristiano; Pietricola, Chiara; Zaccaria, Marco; Bertocchi, Luigi; Angelucci, Alessandra; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Scala, Valeria; Parroni, Alessia; Fabbri, Anna A.; Reverberi, Massimo; Zjalic, Slaven; Fanelli, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a well-known ubiquitous fungus able to contaminate both in pre- and postharvest period different feed and food commodities. During their growth, these fungi can synthesise aflatoxins, secondary metabolites highly hazardous for animal and human health. The requirement of products with low impact on the environment and on human health, able to control aflatoxin production, has increased. In this work the effect of the basidiomycete Trametes versicolor on the aflatoxin production by A. flavus both in vitro and in maize, was investigated. The goal was to propose an environmental loyal tool for a significant control of aflatoxin production, in order to obtain feedstuffs and feed with a high standard of quality and safety to enhance the wellbeing of dairy cows. The presence of T. versicolor, grown on sugar beet pulp, inhibited the production of aflatoxin B1 in maize by A. flavus. Furthermore, treatment of contaminated maize with culture filtrates of T. versicolor containing ligninolytic enzymes, showed a significant reduction of the content of aflatoxin B1. PMID:25525683

  4. Inhibition of Aflatoxin Production by Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Susan B.; Mahoney, Noreen E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of 12 surfactants on aflatoxin production, growth, and conidial germination by the fungus Aspergillus flavus is reported. Five nonionic surfactants, Triton X-100, Tergitol NP-7, Tergitol NP-10, polyoxyethylene (POE) 10 lauryl ether, and Latron AG-98, reduced aflatoxin production by 96 to 99% at 1% (wt/vol). Colony growth was restricted by the five nonionic surfactants at this concentration. Aflatoxin production was inhibited 31 to 53% by lower concentrations of Triton X-100 (0.001 to 0.0001%) at which colony growth was not affected. Triton X-301, a POE-derived anionic surfactant, had an effect on colony growth and aflatoxin production similar to that of the five POE-derived nonionic surfactants. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), an anionic surfactant, and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, a cationic surfactant, suppressed conidial germination at 1% (wt/vol). SDS had no effect on aflatoxin production or colony growth at 0.001%. The degree of aflatoxin inhibition by a surfactant appears to be a function of the length of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic chains of POE-derived surfactants. Images PMID:16349144

  5. The Cognitive Side of M1

    PubMed Central

    Tomasino, Barbara; Gremese, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The primary motor cortex (M1) is traditionally implicated in voluntary movement control. In order to test the hypothesis that there is a functional topography of M1 activation in studies where it has been implicated in higher cognitive tasks we performed activation-likelihood-estimation (ALE) meta-analyses of functional neuroimaging experiments reporting M1 activation in relation to six cognitive functional categories for which there was a sufficient number of studies to include, namely motor imagery, working memory, mental rotation, social/emotion/empathy, language, and auditory processing. The six categories activated different sub-sectors of M1, either bilaterally or lateralized to one hemisphere. Notably, the activations found in the M1 of the left or right hemisphere detected in our study were unlikely due to button presses. In fact, all contrasts were selected in order to eliminate M1 activation due to activity related to the finger button press. In addition, we identified the M1 sub-region of Area 4a commonly activated by 4/6 categories, namely motor imagery and working memory, emotion/empathy, and language. Overall, our findings lend support to the idea that there is a functional topography of M1 activation in studies where it has been found activated in higher cognitive tasks and that the left Area 4a can be involved in a number of cognitive processes, likely as a product of implicit mental simulation processing. PMID:27378891

  6. Aflatoxins and heavy metals in animal feed in Iran.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, M H; Pakfetrat, S

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of aflatoxin (aflatoxin B1, aflatoxin B2, aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2)) and heavy metal (Pb, Cd, As and Hg) contamination was determined in 40 industrially produced animal feed samples which were collected from the southwest of Iran. The results indicated that 75% of samples were contaminated by four aflatoxins and the level of AFB1 and sum of aflatoxins were higher than the permissible maximum levels in Iran (5 and 20 µg kg(-1), respectively) in all feed samples. A positive correlation was found between four types of aflatoxins in all the tested samples (p < 0.01) and the positive correlation between AFG1 and AFG2 was significant (r(2) = 0.708). All feed samples had lead concentrations lower than the maximum EU limit, while 5%, 17% and 42.5% of feed samples had As, Cd and Hg concentrations higher than the maximum limits, respectively.

  7. 7 CFR 996.11 - Negative aflatoxin content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.11 Negative aflatoxin content. Negative aflatoxin content means 15 parts per billion (ppb) or less for peanuts that...

  8. 7 CFR 996.11 - Negative aflatoxin content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.11 Negative aflatoxin content. Negative aflatoxin content means 15 parts per billion (ppb) or less for peanuts that...

  9. 7 CFR 996.11 - Negative aflatoxin content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.11 Negative aflatoxin content. Negative aflatoxin content means 15 parts per billion (ppb) or less for peanuts that...

  10. 7 CFR 996.11 - Negative aflatoxin content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.11 Negative aflatoxin content. Negative aflatoxin content means 15 parts per billion (ppb) or less for peanuts that...

  11. 7 CFR 996.11 - Negative aflatoxin content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.11 Negative aflatoxin content. Negative aflatoxin content means 15 parts per billion (ppb) or less for peanuts that...

  12. Quantitative correlation of aflatoxin biomarker with dietary intake of aflatoxin in Tanzanian children.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Michael N; Kimanya, Martin E; Shirima, Candida P; Wild, Christopher P; Gong, Yun Yun

    2014-08-01

    The association between aflatoxin intake from maize-based weaning food and aflatoxin albumin adducts (AF-alb) was investigated in 148 Tanzanian children aged between 12 and 22 months, at 2 visits 6 months apart. At the first visit (storage season) there was a significant correlation at the individual level between AF-alb (geometric mean 43.2 pg/mg albumin) and aflatoxin intake (geometric mean 81.7 ng/kg b.w./d) through maize-based weaning food (r = 0.51, p < 0.01). Overall, this correlation was r = 0.43 (p < 0.01). The AF-alb level in weaning-age children in Tanzania closely reflects aflatoxin intake from maize in weaning food. Exposure levels suggest children may be at risk from aflatoxin associated health effects.

  13. Occurrence of aflatoxins in oilseeds providing cocoa-butter substitutes.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, S J

    1982-05-01

    Four oilseeds providing cocoa-butter substitutes--shea, pentadecima, illipe, and salseed--when tested as substrates for aflatoxin production by two strains of Aspergillus parasiticus, gave varying levels of aflatoxin. Aflatoxins were found at low levels occurring naturally in moldy shea-nuts, but none of 21 commercial shea-nut samples contained greater than 20 micrograms of aflatoxin B1 per kg.

  14. Isoscalar [ital M]1 strength in lead

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, R.; Choi, S. ); Laszewski, R.M.; Dale, D.S. )

    1993-09-01

    Highly polarized tagged photons were used to measure the distribution of [ital M]1 transition strength in [sup 206]Pb at excitations between 5.5 and 6.9 MeV. The total [ital M]1 strength found in this energy range is consistent with that reported in [sup 208]Pb. For the isoscalar state at 5.8 MeV in [sup 206]Pb, [ital B]([ital M]1[up arrow])=(0.72[plus minus]0.15)[mu][sub [ital N

  15. 7 CFR 983.5 - Aflatoxin inspection certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aflatoxin inspection certificate. 983.5 Section 983.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.5 Aflatoxin inspection certificate. Aflatoxin...

  16. 7 CFR 983.5 - Aflatoxin inspection certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aflatoxin inspection certificate. 983.5 Section 983.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.5 Aflatoxin inspection certificate. Aflatoxin...

  17. 7 CFR 983.5 - Aflatoxin inspection certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aflatoxin inspection certificate. 983.5 Section 983.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.5 Aflatoxin inspection certificate. Aflatoxin...

  18. Challenges facing the biological control strategy for eliminating aflatoxin contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Competition with Aspergillus flavus isolates incapable of aflatoxin production is currently the most widely used biocontrol method for reducing aflatoxin contamination of in maize and cottonseed where aflatoxin contamination is a persistent problem for human and animal health. The method involves sp...

  19. Single Aflatoxin Contaminated Corn Kernel Analysis with Fluorescence Hyperspectral Image

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, among others. Aflatoxin contaminated corn is toxic to domestic animals when ingested in feed and is a known carcinogen associated with liver and lung cancer in humans. Consequently, aflatoxin leve...

  20. Developing resistance to aflatoxin in maize and cottonseed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At this time, no “magic bullet” for solving the aflatoxin contamination problem in maize and cottonseed has been identified, so several strategies must be utilized simultaneously to ensure a healthy crop, free of aflatoxins. The most widely explored strategy for the control of aflatoxin contaminatio...

  1. Giant M1 resonance in Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Laszewski, R.M.; Rullhusen, P.; Hoblit, S.D.; LeBrun, S.F.

    1985-02-11

    Highly polarized tagged photons were used to measure the distribution of M1 transition strength in /sup 206/Pb at excitations between 6.7 and 8.1 MeV. The observed B(up-arrowM1) of about 19..mu../sub 0//sup 2/ can account for most of the isovector M1 strength that is expected in the Pb nucleus. This result in /sup 206/Pb is compared with the current experimental situation in /sup 208/Pb. The discrepancy between predicted and observed M1 strengths in /sup 208/Pb can probably be attributed to local fragmentation of the strength into states that are too weak to have yet all been identified.

  2. Determination of mycophenolic acid, penicillic acid, patulin, sterigmatocystin, and aflatoxins in cheese.

    PubMed

    Siriwardana, M G; Lafont, P

    1979-07-01

    A method has been developed for detection of aflatoxins, mycophenolic acid, patulin, penicillic acid, and sterigmatocystin in cheese. It is based on selective extraction with a mixture of equal volumes of 5% sodium chloride, methanol, and aceton, precipitation of caseins at -25 C, defatting with hexane, and removal of extraneous matter by transfer of mycotoxins to chloroform and ethyl acetate. The extract is purified further by column chromatography. Mycotoxins are quantitated on thin layer chromatograms by fluorescence comparisons. Mycophenolic acid, patulin, and penicillic acid are visualized with diethylamine. The limits of detection in cheese are about 20 micrograms/kg for mycophenolic acid, patulin, and sterigmatocystin, 30 microgram/kg for pencillic acid, and 1 microgram/kg for aflatoxins B1 and M1.

  3. Determinants of formation of aflatoxin-albumin adducts: a seven-township study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Sun, C-A; Wu, D-M; Wang, L-Y; Chen, C-J; You, S-L; Santella, R M

    2002-01-01

    Dietary exposure to aflatoxins is one of the major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma. Individual susceptibility to aflatoxin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis may be modulated by both genetic and environmental factors affecting metabolism. A cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate determinants of the formation of aflatoxin covalently bound to albumin (AFB1-albumin adducts). A total of 474 subjects who were free of liver cancer and cirrhosis and were initially selected as controls for previous case–control studies of aflatoxin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in Taiwan, were employed in this study. Aflatoxin-albumin adducts were determined by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies to hepatitis C virus by enzyme immunoassay, as well as genotypes of glutathione S-transferase M1-1 and T1-1 by polymerase chain reaction. The detection rate of AFB1-albumin adducts was significantly higher in males (42.5%) than in females (21.6%) (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio=2.6, 95% confidence interval=1.4–5.0). The formation of detectable albumin adducts was moderately higher in hepatitis B surface antigen carriers (42.8%) than in non-carriers (36.6%) (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio=1.4, 95% confidence interval=1.0–2.1). In addition, the detection rate of AFB1-albumin adducts tended to increase with the increasing number of null genotypes of glutathione S-transferase M1-1 and glutathione S-transferase T1-1. In conclusion, this cross-sectional study has assessed the relative contributions of environmental exposure and host susceptibility factors in the formation of AFB1-albumin adducts in a well characterised Chinese adult population. This study further emphasises the necessity to reduce aflatoxin exposure in people living in an area endemic for chronic hepatitis B virus infection. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 966–970. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600584 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12434285

  4. Aflatoxin B1 in common Egyptian foods.

    PubMed

    Selim, M I; Popendorf, W; Ibrahim, M S; el Sharkawy, S; el Kashory, E S

    1996-01-01

    Samples of common Egyptian foods (17 nuts and seeds, 10 spices, 31 herbs and medicinal plants, 12 dried vegetables, and 28 cereal grains) were collected from markets in Cairo and Giza. A portion of each sample was extracted with chloroform, and the concentrated extract was cleaned by passing through a silica gel column. Aflatoxin B1 was determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection. The highest prevalence of aflatoxin B1 was in nuts and seeds (82%), followed by spices (40%), herbs and medicinal plants (29%), dried vegetables (25%), and cereal grains (21%). The highest mean concentration of aflatoxin B1 was in herb and medicinal plants (49 ppb), followed by cereals (36 ppb), spices (25 ppb), nuts and seeds (24 ppb), and dried vegetables (20 ppb). Among nuts and seeds, the prevalence of aflatoxin B1 was highest (100%) in watermelon seeds, inshell peanuts, and unshelled peanuts. The lowest prevalence and concentrations were in hommos (garbanzo beans). The highest concentrations of aflatoxin B1 were detected in foods that had no potential for field contamination but required drying during processing and storage, such as pomegranate peel, watermelon seeds, and molokhia.

  5. Fungal and aflatoxin contamination of medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, I; Varsavsky, E; Vedoya, G; Haidukowski, M; Frade, H; Chiale, C

    1998-06-01

    Since the consumption of aromatic and medicinal herbs has been increasing in the last years, the Argentinian Health Authorities are concerned to control the quality and security of them. Fungal and aflatoxin contamination are two parameters to be taken into account, to ensure the harmlessness of the phytomedicinal products. In 81 different samples, grouped in end products (EP), raw material (RM) and at harvest (SH), fungal flora (enumeration and identification) as well as naturalAspergillus flavus and aflatoxin occurrence were investigated. In all samples fungal counts fulfilled the international general recommendation limits (maximum 10(5) cfu/g). Predominant flora was made up by xerophilic species ofAspergillus(100%), byPeniciIlium (< 50%) and in less percentage byFusarium (5.6%). Among the Aspergilli, A.flavus was present in all the three groups of samples. Using a TLC method, 47% of A. flavus isolates were toxinogenic, producing aflatoxin B1 and B2. In herbs, 4.7% of RM samples were naturally contaminated with aflatoxins B1 and B2. Considering the carcinogenic activity of aflatoxins it is essential to regulate them in the raw material (vegetal drug).

  6. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Workman, Alan D.; Carey, Ryan M.; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L.; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6–12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  7. Coconut as a Medium for the Experimental Production of Aflatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Arseculeratne, S. N.; De Silva, L. M.; Wijesundera, S.; Bandunatha, C. H. S. R.

    1969-01-01

    Fresh, grated coconut has been found to be an excellent medium for aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus. Under optimal conditions, yields of 8 mg of total aflatoxin per g of substrate were obtained. Continuous agitation of the growth medium under moist conditions at 24 C produced highest yields. Aflatoxin was assayed both biologically and chromatographically. The aflatoxin content of cultures varied biphasically with the duration of incubation. It is suggested that this pattern could result from the sequential operation of factors promoting aflatoxin formation on the one hand and a detoxifying mechanism on the other. Images PMID:5803632

  8. Transformation of adsorbed aflatoxin B1 on smectite at elevated temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins cause liver damage and suppress immunity. Smectites can be used to reduce the bioavailability of aflatoxins through adsorption. To further reduce the toxicity of aflatoxins and to eliminate the treatments of aflatoxin-loaded smectites, degrading the adsorbed aflatoxin to nontoxic or less ...

  9. Aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in maize of Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Iram, Wajiha; Anjum, Tehmina; Abbas, Mateen; Khan, Abdul Muqeet

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin and ochratoxin levels were determined in maize samples collected from store houses of 15 districts belonging to three agro-ecological zones of Punjab, Pakistan. Toxins were extracted by Aflaochra immunoaffinity columns and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mean moisture content of maize kernels was recorded above the safe storage level of 15%. Results indicated that aflatoxin B1 and B2 contamination was found in 97.3% and 78.9% of the collected samples, respectively. Aflatoxin G1, aflatoxin G2 and ochratoxin A were not detected in any sample. Among positive samples, 77.3% contained aflatoxin B1 and 28% aflatoxin B2, exceeding the legal limits as set by the European Union (EU) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). It was concluded that a significant number of samples contained aflatoxin B1 and B2 above the legal limits.

  10. Classification of corn kernels contaminated with aflatoxins using fluorescence and reflectance hyperspectral image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by certain fungal species of the Aspergillus genus. Aflatoxin contamination remains a problem in agricultural products due to its toxic and carcinogenic properties. Conventional chemical methods for aflatoxin detection are time-consuming and destructive....

  11. Aflatoxin levels in raw and processed hazelnuts in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baltaci, C; Ilyasoğlu, H; Cavrar, S

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxin levels in hazelnut samples obtained from exporter companies were monitored over a 3-year period. A total of 3188 samples of raw and processed hazelnuts were analysed using an HPLC method. The total aflatoxin content of the contaminated samples was in the range of 0.02-78.98 µg kg(-1) for hazelnut kernels, 0.07-43.59 µg kg(-1) for roasted hazelnut kernels, 0.02-39.17 µg kg(-1) for roasted sliced hazelnut kernels, and 0.02-11.20 µg kg(-1) for hazelnut purees, respectively, showing that the variations of aflatoxin contamination were very high. The results of aflatoxin analysis revealed that the aflatoxin contamination in the hazelnut samples was at a tolerable level. A total of 3147 samples were contaminated with aflatoxins, although below the legal limits. However, the aflatoxin contents of 41 samples exceeded the legal limits. Therefore, aflatoxin contents of hazelnuts should be monitored regularly to minimise the risk of aflatoxin hazard, and pre- and post-harvest strategies should be developed to prevent aflatoxin formation.

  12. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  13. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  14. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  15. Aflatoxin B1 Induces Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autophagy and Extracellular Trap Formation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    An, Yanan; Shi, Xiaochen; Tang, Xudong; Wang, Yang; Shen, Fengge; Zhang, Qiaoli; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Mingguo; Liu, Mingyuan; Yu, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxins are a group of highly toxic mycotoxins with high carcinogenicity that are commonly found in foods. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most toxic member of the aflatoxin family. A recent study reported that AFB1 can induce autophagy, but whether AFB1 can induce extracellular traps (ETs) and the relationships among innate immune responses, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and autophagy and the ETs induced by AFB1 remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that AFB1 induced a complete autophagic process in macrophages (MΦ) (THP-1 cells and RAW264.7 cells). In addition, AFB1 induced the generation of MΦ ETs (METs) in a dose-dependent manner. In particular, the formation of METs significantly reduced the AFB1 content. Further analysis using specific inhibitors showed that the inhibition of either autophagy or ROS prevented MET formation caused by AFB1, indicating that autophagy and ROS were required for AFB1-induced MET formation. The inhibition of ROS prevented autophagy, indicating that ROS generation occurred upstream of AFB1-induced autophagy. Taken together, these data suggest that AFB1 induces ROS-mediated autophagy and ETs formation and an M1 phenotype in MΦ. PMID:28280716

  16. Banana peel: an effective biosorbent for aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Shar, Zahid Hussain; Fletcher, Mary T; Sumbal, Gul Amer; Sherazi, Syed Tufail Hussain; Giles, Cindy; Bhanger, Muhammad Iqbal; Nizamani, Shafi Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    This work reports the application of banana peel as a novel bioadsorbent for in vitro removal of five mycotoxins (aflatoxins (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, AFG2) and ochratoxin A). The effect of operational parameters including initial pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were studied in batch adsorption experiments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and point of zero charge (pHpzc) analysis were used to characterise the adsorbent material. Aflatoxins' adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 15 min, with highest adsorption at alkaline pH (6-8), while ochratoxin has not shown any significant adsorption due to surface charge repulsion. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by Langmuir, Freundlich and Hill isotherms. The Langmuir isotherm was found to be the best fitted model for aflatoxins, and the maximum monolayer coverage (Q0) was determined to be 8.4, 9.5, 0.4 and 1.1 ng mg(-1) for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2 respectively. Thermodynamic parameters including changes in free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) were determined for the four aflatoxins. Free energy change and enthalpy change demonstrated that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous. Adsorption and desorption study at different pH further demonstrated that the sorption of toxins was strong enough to sustain pH changes that would be experienced in the gastrointestinal tract. This study suggests that biosorption of aflatoxins by dried banana peel may be an effective low-cost decontamination method for incorporation in animal feed diets.

  17. Theoretical characterization of aflatoxins and their phototoxic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, Rita C.; Eriksson, Leif A.

    2006-05-01

    Key molecular properties are calculated for the 8 most common aflatoxins at the B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) level. Special attention is given the possibility of aflatoxins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is concluded that the excited triplet states of the aflatoxins have properties that make them very potent ROS generators, in addition to direct photoinduced addition reactions. The elevated toxicity of aflatoxin B1 is discussed in terms of its lower ionization potential, and the coincidence of higher lying triplet states with dominant low-lying singlet excitations, which enables rapid intersystem crossing and decay along the triplet channel to the T 1 state.

  18. PCR detection of aflatoxin producing fungi and its limitations.

    PubMed

    Levin, Robert E

    2012-05-01

    Unlike bacterial toxins that are primarily peptides and are therefore encoded by a single gene, fungal toxins such as the aflatoxins are multi-ring structures and therefore require a sequence of structural genes for their biological synthesis. There is therefore no specific PCR for any one of the four biologically produced aflatoxins. Unfortunately, the structural genes presently in use for PCR detection of aflatoxin producing fungi are also involved in the synthesis of other fungal toxins such as sterigmatocystin by Aspergillus versicolor and Aspergillus nidulans and therefore lack absolute specificity for aflatoxin producing fungi (Table 1). In addition, the genomic presence of several structural genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis does not guarantee the production of aflatoxin by all isolates of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. The most widely used DNA target regions for discriminating Aspergillus species are those of the rDNA complex, mainly the internal transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) and the variable regions in the 5'-end of the 28S rRNA gene. Since these sequence regions are unrelated to the structural genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis there successful amplification can be used for species identification but do not confirm aflatoxin production. This review therefore presents the various approaches and limitations in the use of the PCR in attempting to detect aflatoxin producing fungi.

  19. Aflatoxin contamination of commercial cottonseed in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Garcia, Ramon; Cotty, Peter J

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT Aflatoxins are toxic fungal metabolites produced by several members of Aspergillus section Flavi. U.S. federal regulations limit the use of aflatoxin-contaminated cottonseed. Cottonseed with aflatoxin content of 20 ng/g or higher may not enter the profitable dairy market. Between 4,472 and 9,949 truckloads of cottonseed from 31 to 35 gins in South Texas were analyzed for aflatoxin content each year from 1997 to 2001 upon receipt at the Valley Co-op Oil Mill in Harlingen, TX. The highest levels of contamination occurred in 1999, with an average aflatoxin content of 112 ng/g and 66% of the cottonseed truckloads exceeding 20 ng/g. Years 1997 and 2000 had the lowest aflatoxin levels, averaging 24 ng/g, with the lowest incidence (16%) of the truckloads exceeding 20 ng/g in 1997. In general, aflatoxin contamination increased as the ginning season progressed. Rainfall after boll opening correlated highly with aflatoxin content, with rainfall in July explaining over 50% of the observed variability in aflatoxin content. South Texas was divided into four regions: Rio Grande Valley, Coastal Bend, Upper Coast, and Winter Garden. Geostatistical analyses revealed recurrent patterns of high and low contamination. The greatest contamination occurred from the central Coastal Bend region through the southern Upper Coast region. The Rio Grande Valley region experienced the least contamination during the study period.

  20. Regulatory considerations of aflatoxin contamination of food in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-de-Peña, Doralinda; Peña-Cabriales, Juan José

    2005-01-01

    Aflatoxins are potent mutagenic and carcinogenic compounds produced by some strains of Aspergillus flavus, A. nomius, and A. parasiticus that are commonly present in the environment. Human populations, particularly those whose basic diet includes grains, are in risk to exposure to aflatoxins. It is thus necessary to monitor and control the contamination of food and feed by aflatoxins in both domestic and international trade. As large amounts of corn are imported into Mexico from the United States, this paper stresses the need to develop legislation and enforce standards to ensure trade of corn with the minimal amount of aflatoxin.

  1. Effect of pressure cooking on aflatoxin B1 in rice.

    PubMed

    Park, Je Won; Kim, Young-Bae

    2006-03-22

    The effect of pressure cooking on aflatoxin residues in polished rice was conducted to determine reduction of aflatoxin and mutagenic potentials. Three rice lots consisting of naturally contaminated, A. parasiticus-infested, and aflatoxin-spiked rice were steamed by ordinary and pressure cookers after they were washed with water. They were chemically analyzed for aflatoxins using a silica solid phase extraction tube and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence detection (FD), and the presence of aflatoxin residues was confirmed using HPLC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry (MS). An in vitro mutagenicity test with Salmonella typhimurium TA100 was employed to verify the results based on chemical analyses. The aflatoxin loss (78-88%) was notable after pressure cooking, and the reduction of aflatoxin-induced mutagenic potential (68-78%) was in good agreement with the HPLC results. It can be concluded that Koreans are safe from the aflatoxin-related risk if a pressure cooker is employed for cooking rice. The average Korean daily intake of aflatoxin through the consumption of staple rice would fall to 0.15 ng/kg bw/day, which would not exceed the established tolerable daily intake (0.40 ng/kg bw/day).

  2. Use of Cold Atmospheric Plasma to Detoxify Hazelnuts from Aflatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Ilenia; Spadaro, Davide; Prelle, Ambra; Vallauri, Dario; Cavallero, Maria Chiara; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins, produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, can contaminate different foodstuffs, such as nuts. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma has the potential to be used for mycotoxin detoxification. In this study, the operating parameters of cold atmospheric pressure plasma were optimized to reduce the presence of aflatoxins on dehulled hazelnuts. First, the effect of different gases was tested (N2, 0.1% O2 and 1% O2, 21% O2), then power (400, 700, 1000, 1150 W) and exposure time (1, 2, 4, and 12 min) were optimized. In preliminary tests on aflatoxin standard solutions, this method allowed to obtain a complete detoxification using a high power for a few minutes. On hazelnuts, in similar conditions (1000 W, 12 min), a reduction in the concentration of total aflatoxins and AFB1 of over 70% was obtained. Aflatoxins B1 and G1 were more sensitive to plasma treatments compared to aflatoxins B2 and G2, respectively. Under plasma treatment, aflatoxin B1 was more sensitive compared to aflatoxin G1. At the highest power, and for the longest time, the maximum temperature increment was 28.9 °C. Cold atmospheric plasma has the potential to be a promising method for aflatoxin detoxification on food, because it is effective and it could help to maintain the organoleptic characteristics. PMID:27128939

  3. A facile method for the fabrication of magnetic molecularly imprinted stir-bars: A practical example with aflatoxins in baby foods.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Bao, Mónica; Regal, Patricia; Barreiro, Rocío; Fente, Cristina A; Cepeda, Alberto

    2016-11-04

    A fast and facile method for the fabrication of magnetic molecularly imprinted stir-bars (MMIP-SB) has been developed, using a combination of imprinting technology and magnetite. Magnetite was prepared in the laboratory from the raw and embedded into molecularly imprinted polymers through a process of bulk polymerization. This novel design was applied to the analysis of aflatoxins, one of the most important groups of mycotoxins in terms of occurrence and toxicity. In the context of food safety, molecularly imprinted polymers are a promising tool to achieve selective and accessible methods of extraction for different residues and contaminants. Considering the toxicity of aflatoxins, a dummy template was preferred for the synthesis of the imprinted polymers. A rapid and affordable extraction method for isolating five different aflatoxins that may be present in food was developed. The MMIP-SB was used as a conventional stir-bar and combined with high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for the determination of aflatoxin M1 in milk powder (infant formulas) and aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 in cereal-based baby foods. The results showed an average recovery of 60%, 43, 40, 44 and 39%, respectively, and RSD below 10%. These in-house prepared stir-bars featured good stirring and extraction performance, and recognition abilities, offering a good alternative to more complicated.

  4. 14nm M1 triple patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiao; Ghosh, Pradiptya; Abercrombie, David; LaCour, Pat; Kanodia, Suniti

    2012-03-01

    With 20nm production becoming a reality, research has started to focus on the technology needs for 14nm. The LELE double patterning used in 20nm production will not be able to resolve M1 for 14nm. Main competing enabling technologies for the 14nm M1 are SADP, EUV, and LELELE (referred as LE3 thereafter) triple patterning. SADP has a number of concerns of 1. density, as a layout geometry needs to stay complete as a whole, and can not be broken; 2. the complexity in SADP mask generation and debug feedback to designers; 3. the subtraction nature of the trim mask further complicates OPC and yield. While EUV does not share those concerns, it faces significant challenges on the manufacturing equipment side. Of the SADP concerns, LE3 only shares that of complexity involved in mask generation and intuitive debug feedback mechanism. It does not require a layout geometry to stay as a whole, and it benefits from the affinity to LELE which is being deployed for 20nm production. From a process point of view, this benefit from affinity to LELE is tremendous due to the data and knowledge that have been collected and will be coming from the LELE deployment. In this paper, we first recount the computational complexity of the 3-colorability problem which is an integral part of a LE3 solution. We then describe graph characteristics that can be exploited such that 3-colorability is equivalent under divide-and-conquer. Also outlined are heuristics, which are generally applied in solving computationally intractable problems, for the 3-colorability problem, and the importance in choosing appropriate worst-case exponential runtime algorithms. This paper concludes with a discussion on the new hierarchical problem that faces 3-colorability but not 2-colorability and proposals for non-3-colorability feedback mechanism.

  5. Fungal Biodeterioration, Aflatoxin Contamination, and Nutrient Value of "Suya Spices".

    PubMed

    Jonathan, Segun Gbolagade; Adeniyi, Mary Adejoke; Asemoloye, Michael Dare

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to analyze the nutrient values, examine the biodeteriorating fungi biota, and analyze the mycotoxin contents of "Suya spices." Fungi with highest percentage occurrence on all the samples are Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus ochraceus, Fusarium sp., Rhizopus stolonifer, yeast, and Trichoderma koningii. Nutrient composition of the samples is significantly different statistically (P < 0.05) with high protein (9.53% to 13.17%), fiber (9.27 to 13.17%), carbohydrate (46.27% to 50.90%), and ash (8.47% to 9.70%) contents but low moisture (9.03% to 9.47%) and fat (9.77% to 13.53%) contents. Aflatoxin analysis of the samples revealed that they all contain aflatoxin in varying amount but no detectible aflatoxin content in the control. 59.54% of the detected aflatoxin is aflatoxin B1 with highest recorded in Agbowo, Mokola, and Sango samples (i.e., 28.03, 22.44, and 13.8 μg/kg, resp.). 4.78% of the aflatoxin is aflatoxin B2 which is only found in Sango and Mokola samples (3.59 and 2.6 μg/kg, resp.). 32.76% of aflatoxin is aflatoxin G1 with the highest found in Agbowo and Mokola samples (i.e., 18.63 and 10.41 μg/kg, resp.). 2.93% of the aflatoxin is aflatoxin G2 which is only detected in Sango and Agbowo samples (i.e., 1.19 and 2.65 μg/kg, resp.).

  6. Production of aflatoxin byAspergillus parasiticus and its control.

    PubMed

    Emara, H A

    1997-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the production of aflatoxin byAspergillus parasiticus and to find out the possible ways to control it. Of 40 food samples collected from Abha region, Saudi Arabia, only 25% were contaminated with aflatoxins. Oil-rich commodities had the highly contaminated commodities by fungi and aflatoxins while spices were free from aflatoxins.Bacillus megatertum andB cereus were suitable for microbiological assay of aflatoxins. Czapek's-Dox medium was found a suitable medium for isolation of fungi from food samples. The optimal pH for the growth ofA. parasiticus and its productivity of aflatoxin B1 was found at 6.0, while the best incubation conditions were found at 30°C for 10 days. D-glucose was the best carbon source for fungal growth, as well as aflatoxin production. Corn steep liquor, yeast extract and peptone were the best nitrogen sources for both fungal growth and toxin production (NH4)2HPO4 (1.55 gL(-1)) and NaNO2 (1.6 gL(-1)) reduced fungal growth and toxin production with 37.7% and 85%, respectively. Of ten amino acids tested, asparagine was the best for aflatoxin B1 production. Zn(2+) and Co(2+) supported significantly both fungal growth, as well as, aflatoxin B1 production at the different tested concentrations. Zn(2+) was effective when added toA. parasiticus growth medium at the first two days of the culture age. The other tested metal ions expressed variable effects depending on the type of ion and its concentration. Water activity (aw) was an important factor controlling the growth ofA. parasiticus and toxin production. The minimum aw for the fungal growth was 0.8 on both coffee beans and rice grains, while aw of 0.70 caused complete inhibition for the growth and aflatoxin B1 production. H2O2 is a potent inhibitor for growth ofA. parasiticus and its productivity of toxins. NaHCO3 and C6H5COONa converted aflatoxin B1 to water-soluble form which returned to aflatoxin B1 by acidity. Black pepper, ciliated heath

  7. Aflatoxin production and oxidative stress in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The colonization of crops by Aspergillus flavus results in the production of aflatoxins. Aflatoxin production is also exacerbated by abiotic stresses in the field. Here, we investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which accumulate in plant tissues in response to drought and heat stres...

  8. Aflatoxin Accumulation in BT and non-BT Maize Testcrosses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation of aflatoxin, which is produced by the fungus, Aspergillus flavus Link: Fries, in maize is a chronic problem in the southeastern United States. Its presence in grain greatly reduces its value and marketability. Aflatoxin accumulation is frequently associated with high temperatures...

  9. Aflatoxins B and g contamination and aflatoxigenic fungi in nutmeg.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kiyoshi; Tomita, Tsuneyoshi; Ohzu, Yuji; Takai, Mitsuhiro; Ose, Ayaka; Kotsuka, Akiko; Ikeda, Naoko; Sakata, Junko; Kumeda, Yuko; Nakamura, Nobuya; Ichinoe, Masakatsu

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the distribution of aflatoxigenic fungi in 25 imported Indonesian nutmeg samples contaminated with aflatoxins Bs or Bs and Gs. The incidence of aflatoxigenic fungi in the samples contaminated with high levels of aflatoxin was significantly higher than that in the samples with low levels of the toxins(r=0.752). The aflatoxin production of isolates from the samples in cultures of YES broth was examined by means of TLC and HPLC analyses. The ability of isolates to produce aflatoxins did not necessarily correlate with the contamination levels of aflatoxin in the samples. We isolated aflatoxins B and G-producing fungi from 3 samples contaminated with the high levels of aflatoxins B and G. The aflatoxigenic isolates were identified as Aspergillus nomius and A. bombycis based on morphological characters, growth rates at 37°C and 42°C and also molecular-genetic methods. Our results indicate that these two species are mainly responsible for aflatoxin G contamination in nutmeg products.

  10. Sexual Reproduction in Aflatoxin-Producing Aspergillus nomius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are fungal secondary metabolites that exhibit carcinogenic, hepatotoxic and immunosuppressive properties. Aspergillus nomius is a potent producer of aflatoxins and was formerly considered to be strictly asexual in reproduction. In this research, mating-type genes MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 were ...

  11. Effect of supplementation of fermented milk drink containing probiotic Lactobacillus casei Shirota on the concentrations of aflatoxin biomarkers among employees of Universiti Putra Malaysia: a randomised, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Mohd Redzwan, Sabran; Abd Mutalib, Mohd Sokhini; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Ahmad, Zuraini; Kang, Min-Su; Abdul Rahman, Nurul 'Aqilah; Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Elham; Jamaluddin, Rosita

    2016-01-14

    Human exposure to aflatoxin is through the diet, and probiotics are able to bind aflatoxin and prevent its absorption in the small intestine. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a fermented milk drink containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) (probiotic drink) to prevent aflatoxin absorption and reduce serum aflatoxin B1-lysine adduct (AFB1-lys) and urinary aflatoxin M1 concentrations. The present study was a randomised, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled study with two 4-week intervention phases. In all, seventy-one subjects recruited from the screening stage were divided into two groups--the Yellow group and the Blue group. In the 1st phase, one group received probiotic drinks twice a day and the other group received placebo drinks. Blood and urine samples were collected at baseline, 2nd and 4th week of the intervention. After a 2-week wash-out period, the treatments were switched between the groups, and blood and urine samples were collected at the 6th, 8th and 10th week (2nd phase) of the intervention. No significant differences in aflatoxin biomarker concentrations were observed during the intervention. A within-group analysis was further carried out. Aflatoxin biomarker concentrations were not significantly different in the Yellow group. Nevertheless, ANOVA for repeated measurements indicated that AFB1-lys concentrations were significantly different (P=0·035) with the probiotic intervention in the Blue group. The 2nd week AFB1-lys concentrations (5·14 (SD 2·15) pg/mg albumin (ALB)) were significantly reduced (P=0·048) compared with the baseline (6·24 (SD 3·42) pg/mg ALB). Besides, the 4th week AFB1-lys concentrations were significantly lower (P<0·05) with probiotic supplementation than with the placebo. Based on these findings, a longer intervention study is warranted to investigate the effects of continuous LcS consumption to prevent dietary aflatoxin exposure.

  12. Degradation of Aflatoxins by Means of Laccases from Trametes versicolor: An In Silico Insight

    PubMed Central

    Dellafiora, Luca; Galaverna, Gianni; Reverberi, Massimo; Dall’Asta, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of fungi that contaminate food and feed, and are involved in a series of foodborne illnesses and disorders in humans and animals. The mitigation of mycotoxin content via enzymatic degradation is a strategy to ensure safer food and feed, and to address the forthcoming issues in view of the global trade and sustainability. Nevertheless, the search for active enzymes is still challenging and time-consuming. The in silico analysis may strongly support the research by providing the evidence-based hierarchization of enzymes for a rational design of more effective experimental trials. The present work dealt with the degradation of aflatoxin B1 and M1 by laccase enzymes from Trametes versicolor. The enzymes–substrate interaction for various enzyme isoforms was investigated through 3D molecular modeling techniques. Structural differences among the isoforms have been pinpointed, which may cause different patterns of interaction between aflatoxin B1 and M1. The possible formation of different products of degradation can be argued accordingly. Moreover, the laccase gamma isoform was identified as the most suitable for protein engineering aimed at ameliorating the substrate specificity. Overall, 3D modeling proved to be an effective analytical tool to assess the enzyme–substrate interaction and provided a solid foothold for supporting the search of degrading enzyme at the early stage. PMID:28045427

  13. Occurrence of aflatoxins in human foodstuffs in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Loetter, L.H.; Kroehm, H.J.

    1988-02-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic metabolites of Aspergillus spp and have been reported as contaminants in a number of foodstuffs, namely corn, rice, peanuts, and cereals. In the Republic of South Africa, aflatoxin levels in human foodstuffs are limited to a maximum of 10 ..mu..g/kg for the total and 5 ..mu..g/kg for aflatoxin B/sub 1/. During 1985 and 1986, samples of sorghum beer, sorghum cereal, peanuts, peanut butter and maize meal were purchased from supermarkets in Johannesburg and analyzed for aflatoxins. A total of 414 samples were analyzed during the survey. In 1985, roughly a third of the samples were contaminated with aflatoxins, with no levels in excess of the legal limit. In 1986 the percentage of contaminated samples rose significantly, but the levels of contamination remained low, with only one sample exceeding the legal maximum.

  14. Patulin & ergosterol: new quality parameters together with aflatoxins in hazelnuts.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Raci; Otağ, Mustafa; Kadakal, Çetin

    2014-05-01

    Hazelnuts of three different categories, mouldy, hidden mould and sound (undamaged), were investigated for their contents of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2), patulin, and ergosterol. Samples were obtained from five hazelnut processing plants located in a major hazelnut producing area in the Black Sea region in Turkey. All aflatoxins, patulin and ergosterol were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Sound hazelnuts were contaminated with trace or zero amounts of aflatoxins, patulin and ergosterol, so they posed no risk for the consumer when national and/or international regulatory limits were considered. Mouldy and hidden mould hazelnuts were contaminated with high (246-510ppb; 141-422ppb) aflatoxin levels, respectively. Aflatoxin B1 content was significantly correlated with the patulin and ergosterol contents in mouldy and hidden mould hazelnuts. However, there was no significant correlation between patulin and ergosterol contents of mouldy and hidden mould hazelnuts.

  15. Value Added Processing of Aflatoxin Contaminated Peanut Meal: Aflatoxin Sequestration During Protein Extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of a bentonite clay, Astra-Ben 20A (AB20A), to sequester aflatoxin from contaminated (~110 ppb) peanut meal during protein extraction was studied. Aqueous peanut meal dispersions (10% w/w) were prepared varying pH, temperature, enzymatic hydrolysis conditions, and concentrations of AB2...

  16. Protective Effects of Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 on Serum Biochemistry, Histopathological Changes and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities of Broilers Fed Moldy Peanut Meal Naturally Contaminated with Aflatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yu; Zhao, Lihong; Ji, Cheng; Li, Xiaoying; Jia, Ru; Xi, Lin; Zhang, Jianyun; Ma, Qiugang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of aflatoxins and evaluate the effectiveness of Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 in detoxifying aflatoxicosis in broilers. A total of 360 one-week-old male broilers (Ross 308) were assigned to six dietary treatments for five weeks. The treatment diets were: C0 (basal diet); C1.0 (C0 + 1.0 g B. subtilis ANSB060/kg diet); M0 (basal diet formulated with moldy peanut meal); M0.5, M1.0 and M2.0 (M0 + 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g B. subtilis ANSB060/kg diet, respectively). The contents of aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 and G2 in the diets formulated with moldy peanut meal were 70.7 ± 1.3, 11.0 ± 1.5, 6.5 ± 0.8 and 2.0 ± 0.3 µg/kg, respectively. The results showed that aflatoxins increased (p < 0.05) serum aspartate transaminase activity, decreased (p < 0.05) serum glutathione peroxidase activity, and enhanced (p < 0.05) malondialdehyde contents in both the serum and liver. Aflatoxins also caused gross and histological changes in liver tissues, such as bile duct epithelium hyperplasia, vacuolar degeneration and lymphocyte infiltration. The supplementation of ANSB060 reduced aflatoxin levels in the duodenum and counteracted the negative effects of aflatoxins, leading to the conclusion that ANSB060 has a protective effect against aflatoxicosis and this protection is dose-related. PMID:26308053

  17. Protective Effects of Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 on Serum Biochemistry, Histopathological Changes and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities of Broilers Fed Moldy Peanut Meal Naturally Contaminated with Aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu; Zhao, Lihong; Ji, Cheng; Li, Xiaoying; Jia, Ru; Xi, Lin; Zhang, Jianyun; Ma, Qiugang

    2015-08-21

    The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of aflatoxins and evaluate the effectiveness of Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 in detoxifying aflatoxicosis in broilers. A total of 360 one-week-old male broilers (Ross 308) were assigned to six dietary treatments for five weeks. The treatment diets were: C0 (basal diet); C1.0 (C0 + 1.0 g B. subtilis ANSB060/kg diet); M0 (basal diet formulated with moldy peanut meal); M0.5, M1.0 and M2.0 (M0 + 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g B. subtilis ANSB060/kg diet, respectively). The contents of aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 and G2 in the diets formulated with moldy peanut meal were 70.7 ± 1.3, 11.0 ± 1.5, 6.5 ± 0.8 and 2.0 ± 0.3 µg/kg, respectively. The results showed that aflatoxins increased (p < 0.05) serum aspartate transaminase activity, decreased (p < 0.05) serum glutathione peroxidase activity, and enhanced (p < 0.05) malondialdehyde contents in both the serum and liver. Aflatoxins also caused gross and histological changes in liver tissues, such as bile duct epithelium hyperplasia, vacuolar degeneration and lymphocyte infiltration. The supplementation of ANSB060 reduced aflatoxin levels in the duodenum and counteracted the negative effects of aflatoxins, leading to the conclusion that ANSB060 has a protective effect against aflatoxicosis and this protection is dose-related.

  18. Photophysics and photochemistry of aflatoxins B1 and B2.

    PubMed

    Netto-Ferreira, J C; Heyne, B; Scaiano, J C

    2011-10-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by fungi of the genus Aspergillus, which is widely spread in the tropics and subtropics. To date, aflatoxin phototoxicity has been recognized, but the mechanism responsible for this phototoxicity has not been fully characterized. In the present paper, nanosecond laser flash photolysis studies allowed us to elucidate the photochemical processes undergone by two mycotoxins, namely aflatoxin B(1) and B(2), upon UV irradiation. In brief, photolysis (308 nm) of the aflatoxins leads to intersystem crossing, giving rise to their triplet excited state. The triplet state can readily be quenched by indole and hydroquinone, and also by molecular oxygen yielding singlet oxygen (singlet oxygen quantum yields of 0.51 and 0.59 were found for aflatoxin B(1) and B(2), respectively). In addition, our data indicate the ability of the two aflatoxins to photoionize upon 248 nm excitation. The photoionization quantum yield for aflatoxin B(1) and B(2) have been estimated to be 0.11 and 0.29, respectively.

  19. Quantitative Scrutinization of Aflatoxins in Different Spices from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kashif, Aiza; Kanwal, Kinza; Khan, Abdul Muqeet; Abbas, Mateen

    2016-01-01

    The current research work aimed to access the contamination level of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in the household spices that are widely consumed in huge amounts. 200 different spice samples, 100 packed and 100 unpacked, were analyzed for the aflatoxins profile by HPLC with an incidence of 61.5% contamination out of which 53.66% samples exceed the EU limit. The results disclosed that the unpacked samples are more contaminated as compared to the packed samples except for white cumin seeds. Among packed and unpacked samples of spices, the maximum value of aflatoxins was detected in fennel, that is, 27.93 μg/kg and 67.04 μg/kg, respectively. The lowest concentration of aflatoxin was detected in cinnamon in packed form (0.79 μg/kg) and in the unpacked samples of white cumin seeds which is 1.75 μg/kg. Caraway seeds and coriander in its unpacked form showed positive results whereas black pepper (packed and unpacked) was found free from aflatoxins. This is the first report on the occurrence of aflatoxins in packed and unpacked samples of spices from Pakistan. To ensure safe consumption of spices, there should be constant monitoring of aflatoxin and more studies need to be executed with the intention of preventing mycotoxin accretion in this commodity. PMID:27781067

  20. Survey of aflatoxins in Kashkineh: A traditional Iranian food

    PubMed Central

    Mardani, M; Rezapour, S; Rezapour, P

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus that can contaminate human and animal foods, including corn, wheat, rice, peanuts, and many other crops resulting in the illness or death of human and animal consumers. The aim of this study was to detect aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, G2 and total aflatoxin in Kashkineh, a traditional Iranian food. Materials and Methods This survey was conducted to detect aflatoxins on 41 samples of Kashkineh. The samples were randomly collected from traditional bazaars and supermarkets of Khorramabad city of Iran. The presence and quantity of aflatoxins was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results The average concentrations of AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, and AFG2 in all samples and in a mixed sample of all samples were not detectable (ND). The only sample that showed aflatoxin contamination was sample number 29 of which the AFB1 concentration was 0.64 ng/g. Conclusion Although some people believe Kashkineh is carcinogenic due to toxins, this study showed kashkineh is not contaminated with aflatoxins. PMID:22347598

  1. Chemical inactivation of aflatoxins in peanut protein ingredients.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, K R

    1992-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination of peanuts has posed a threat to the peanut industry in utilizing peanuts as a source of a low-cost protein ingredient for food and feed. Although the best approach to containing the aflatoxin problem in peanuts is prevention, it appears that chemical inactivation of aflatoxin in contaminated raw material provides the best means to salvaging the contaminated material. Several chemical reagents have been investigated for their efficacy in destroying aflatoxins present in raw peanuts and defatted peanut meal. Using certain oxidizing agents such as NaOCl, H2O2, and benzoyl peroxide; bases such as ammonia, methylamine, and calcium hydroxide; and aldehydes such as formaldehyde, contaminated raw peanuts or defatted peanut meal have been demonstrated to yield peanut meals, protein isolates, and concentrates having trace amounts or nondetectable levels of aflatoxins. Processing conditions for inactivating aflatoxins using these chemicals were investigated. The chemical treatments had little effect on the physiochemical properties of the detoxified protein product. The advantages and disadvantages of using these chemicals for inactivation of aflatoxins are discussed.

  2. Occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in natural products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Guilherme; Altoé, Aline F.; Gomes, Tatiana C. B.; Leal, Alexandre S.; Morais, Vanessa A. D.; Oliveira, Marize S.; Ferreira, Marli B.; Gomes, Mateus B.; Paschoal, Fabiano N.; von S. Souza, Rafael; Silva, Daniela A.; Cruz Madeira, Jovita E. G.

    2012-01-01

    The media claims for the consumption of natural resource-based food have gradually increased in both developing and developed countries. The interest in the safety of these products is partially due to the possible presence of toxigenic fungi acting as mycotoxin producers, such as aflatoxins produced during the secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. Aflatoxins, mainly aflatoxin B1, are directly associated with liver cancer in human beings. This paper is aimed at evaluating the presence of aflatoxin B1 in a few vegetable drugs, dried plant extracts and industrialized products traded in 2010 in the city of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The method used for the quantification of aflatoxin B1 was based on extraction through acetone:water (85:15), immunoaffinity column purification followed by separation and detection in high efficiency liquid chromatography. Under the conditions of analysis, the Limits of Detection and Quantification were 0.6 µg kg-1 and 1.0 µg kg-1 respectively. The complete sets of analyses were carried out in duplicate. Aflatoxin B1 was noticed in a single sample (< 1.0 µg kg-1). The results revealed low aflatoxin B1 contamination in the products under analysis. However, it is required to establish a broad monitoring program in order to obtain additional data and check up on the actual extension of contamination. PMID:24031973

  3. Effects of Zinc Chelators on Aflatoxin Production in Aspergillus parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Josephine; Day, Devin M.; Linz, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc concentrations strongly influence aflatoxin accumulation in laboratory media and in food and feed crops. The presence of zinc stimulates aflatoxin production, and the absence of zinc impedes toxin production. Initial studies that suggested a link between zinc and aflatoxin biosynthesis were presented in the 1970s. In the present study, we utilized two zinc chelators, N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethane-1,2-diamine (TPEN) and 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid (DMPS) to explore the effect of zinc limitation on aflatoxin synthesis in Aspergillus parasiticus. TPEN but not DMPS decreased aflatoxin biosynthesis up to six-fold depending on whether A. parasiticus was grown on rich or minimal medium. Although we observed significant inhibition of aflatoxin production by TPEN, no detectable changes were observed in expression levels of the aflatoxin pathway gene ver-1 and the zinc binuclear cluster transcription factor, AflR. Treatment of growing A. parasiticus solid culture with a fluorescent zinc probe demonstrated an increase in intracellular zinc levels assessed by increases in fluorescent intensity of cultures treated with TPEN compared to controls. These data suggest that TPEN binds to cytoplasmic zinc therefore limiting fungal access to zinc. To investigate the efficacy of TPEN on food and feed crops, we found that TPEN effectively decreases aflatoxin accumulation on peanut medium but not in a sunflower seeds-derived medium. From an application perspective, these data provide the basis for biological differences that exist in the efficacy of different zinc chelators in various food and feed crops frequently contaminated by aflatoxin. PMID:27271668

  4. Development of a microwave-assisted-extraction-based method for the determination of aflatoxins B1, G1, B2, and G2 in grains and grain products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Zhang, Hong

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the use of microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) as a pretreatment technique for the determination of aflatoxins B(1), G(1), B(2), and G(2) in grains and grain products. The optimal operation parameters, including extraction solvent, temperature, and time, were identified to be acetonitrile as the extraction solvent at 80 °C with 15 min of MAE. The extracts were cleaned up using solid-phase extraction followed by derivatization with trifluoroacetic acid and were determined by liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection. A Sep-Pak cartridge was chosen over Oasis HLB and Bond Elut cartridges. By the use of aflatoxin M(1) as an internal standard, relative recoveries of the aflatoxins ranged from 90.7 to 105.7 % for corn and from 88.1 to 103.4 % for wheat, with relative standard deviations between 2.5 and 8.7 %. A total of 36 samples from local markets were analyzed, and aflatoxin B(1) was found to be the predominant toxin, with concentrations ranging from 0.42 to 3.41 μg/kg.

  5. Nanoparticle-based immunosensors and immunoassays for aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Niessner, Reinhard; Tang, Dianping; Knopp, Dietmar

    2016-03-17

    Aflatoxins are naturally existing mycotoxins produced mainly by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, present in a wide range of food and feed products. Because of their extremely high toxicity and carcinogenicity, strict control of maximum residue levels of aflatoxins in foodstuff is set by many countries. In daily routine, different chromatographic methods are used almost exclusively. As supplement, in several companies enzyme immunoassay-based sample testing as primary screening is performed. Recently, nanomaterials such as noble metal nanoparticles, magnetic particles, carbon nanomaterials, quantum dots, and silica nanomaterials are increasingly utilized for aflatoxin determination to improve the sensitivity and simplify the detection. They are employed either as supports for the immobilization of biomolecules or as electroactive or optical labels for signal transduction and amplification. Several nanoparticle-based electrochemical, piezoelectric, optical, and immunodipstick assays for aflatoxins have been developed. In this review, we summarize these recent advances and illustrate novel concepts and promising applications in the field of food safety.

  6. Phytochemicals reduce aflatoxin-induced toxicity in chicken embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins (AF) are toxic metabolites produced by molds, Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasicitus, which frequently contaminate chicken feed ingredients. Ingestion of AF-contaminated feed by chickens leads to deleterious effects, including decreased chicken performance and reduced egg producti...

  7. Aflatoxin in detannin coffee and tea and its destruction.

    PubMed

    Hasan, H A H

    2002-05-01

    The aflatoxins produced byAspergillus parasiticus var. globosus IMI 12090 in detannin-caffeinated coffee and black tea were five times more concentrated than in regular coffee and tea. The activity of caffeine and tannin on the fungus growth and aflatoxin production in liquid broth was tested at three levels: viz. 0.1, 0.3, and 0.6%. Tannin and caffeine induced 95% inhibition in aflatoxins at 0.3% and 0.6%, respectively. The antiaflatoxigenic properties of regular coffee and tea appear to be due to tannin, followed by caffeine. The roasting of contaminated coffee beans at 200 degrees C for 20 min is effective in the destruction of aflatoxins.

  8. Experimental aflatoxin production in home-made yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Blanco, J L; Domínguez, L; Gómez-Lucía, E; Garayzábal, J F; Goyache, J; Suárez, G

    1988-04-01

    Fungal growth and aflatoxin production by an aflatoxigenic strain during the manufacture of yoghurt are described. This completes previous studies which show that yoghurt may be a good substrate for aflatoxin production. Two factors were of special interest: (a) the temperature of the elaboration process (45 degrees C) and (b) the effect of lactic bacteria. Either during the elaboration of yoghurt or during its cooling from 45 degrees C to 4 degrees C, the necessary conditions required to start fungal growth are given; these are adequate enough for the synthesis of small quantities of aflatoxins. However our results do not clearly show that lactic bacteria have an influence on fungal growth and aflatoxin production.

  9. Sexual reproduction in aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus nomius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual reproduction was examined in the aflatoxin-producing fungus Aspergillus nomius. Crosses between sexually compatible strains resulted in the formation of multiple nonostiolate ascocarps within stromata, which places the teleomorph in the genus Petromyces. Ascocarp and ascospore morphology in...

  10. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Aflatoxin B 1 from Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research describes the development of a Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) method to recover aflatoxin B1 from fortified soil. The effects of temperature, pressure, modifier (identity and percentage), and extraction type were assessed. Using the optimized SFE conditions, ...

  11. Nitrogen fertilizer influence on aflatoxin contamination of corn in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Tubajika, K M; Mascagni, H J; Damann, K E; Russin, J S

    1999-12-01

    Studies were conducted in 1997 and 1998 on a Gigger silt loam at the Macon Ridge Research Station at Winnsboro, LA, to determine the influence of nitrogen (N) rate, timing, and starter nitrogen fertilizer on aflatoxin contamination in corn. Fertilizer N (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 lb of N/acre), two timings (at planting and six-leaf stage), and starter N fertilizer (a control and 10 lb of N/acre applied in furrow) were evaluated. Application of starter, N rates, and the interaction of starter with N timing and N rates significantly affected aflatoxin levels. Rates of 50-250 lb of N/acre were 34-43% lower in aflatoxin contamination than plots receiving no N. The application of 10 lb of N/acre starter reduced the aflatoxin levels by 20% compared to the no-starter control.

  12. Effects of Aflatoxin on Germination and Growth of Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Crisan, Eli V.

    1973-01-01

    The relative susceptibility of 30 cultivars of lettuce to inhibition by aflatoxin was studied. Seed germination was not inhibited by concentrations as high as 1,000 μg/ml in cultivar Imperial 44 or by 100 μg/ml in the remaining cultivars. Hypocotyl elongation was inhibited by 46 to 68% at a concentration of 100 μg of aflatoxin per ml. Seedlings exposed to aflatoxin did not become chlorotic. The similarity between the morphological reaction of plants to coumarin and aflatoxin suggests a common mode of action, but further studies of the physiological basis for the inhibitory reactions induced by these compounds will be necessary before such conclusions will be valid. PMID:4698861

  13. Sensitivity of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyck, P.J.; Tobback, P.; Feys, M.; Van De Voorde, H.

    1982-06-01

    Aflatoxin B/sub 1/ in a 5-..mu..g/ml water solution was sensitive to ionizing radiation. Inactivation was assayed by the Ames microsome mutagenicity test and confirmed by thin-layer chromatography. Destruction of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ had already begun at 2.5 kilograys (kGy; 1 kGy = 0.1 Mrad), but a dose exceeding 10 kGy was necessary for total destruction.

  14. Aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin contamination of pistachio nuts in orchards.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, N F; Buchanan, J R; Fortlage, R J

    1976-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus and A. versicolor were both shown to be weak pathogens of developing pistachio fruits, producing aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin, respectively. Aflatoxin concentrations approached those reported in cereal and legume seeds. Fungus lesions on the first hulls were followed by invasion of seeds despite the sclerified shell. Infections and mycotoxins present before harvest would presumably lead to further build-up after harvest if drying was slow or storage was under high humidity. PMID:823868

  15. Aflatoxins and food pathogens: impact of biologically active aflatoxins and their control strategies.

    PubMed

    Umesha, Sharanaiah; Manukumar, Honnayakanahalli Marichenne Gowda; Chandrasekhar, Bhadvelu; Shivakumara, Prahlad; Shiva Kumar, Jayanna; Raghava, Sri; Avinash, Prakasha; Shirin, Marahel; Bharathi, Tumkur R; Rajini, Sollepura B; Nandhini, Murali; Vinaya Rani, Govinda Gowda; Shobha, Mohankumar; Prakash, Harishchandra S

    2016-11-18

    Globally disease outbreaks as a result of the consumption of contaminated food and feedstuffs are a regular primary problem. The foremost elements contributing to contamination are microorganisms, particularly fungi, which produce low-molecular weight secondary metabolites, with demonstrated toxic properties that are referred to as mycotoxins. Aflatoxins contaminate agricultural commodities and may cause sickness or fatality in humans and animals. Moreover, poor conditions of storage and a deficiency in regulatory measures in food quality control aggravate the main issue. For that reason, mycotoxin-related illness of nutrition represents a major health hazard for local populations. Government policies should make regulations aiming to avoid the entry of aflatoxins into food stuffs. For consumer safety, control and management strategies should be developed and implemented by regulatory authorities. There is the need for attention from farmers, scientists, government and collaborative minds throughout the country to ensure aflatoxin-free food. The present review is informative not only for health-conscious consumers, but also for relevant authorities with respect to paving the way for future research aiming to fill the existing gaps in our knowledge with regard to mycotoxins and food security. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Calcium montmorillonite clay reduces AFB1 and FB1 biomarkers in rats exposed to single and co-exposures of aflatoxin and fumonisin

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Nicole J.; Xue, Kathy S.; Lin, Shuhan; Marroquin-Cardona, Alicia; Brown, Kristal A.; Elmore, Sarah E.; Tang, Lili; Romoser, Amelia; Gelderblom, Wentzel C. A.; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) and fumonisins (FBs) can co-contaminate foodstuffs and have been associated with hepatocellular and esophageal carcinomas in humans at high risk for exposure. One strategy to reduce exposure (and toxicity) from contaminated foodstuffs is the dietary inclusion of a montmorillonite clay (UPSN) that binds AFs and FBs in the GI tract. In this study, the binding capacity of UPSN was evaluated for AFB1, FB1 and a combination thereof in Fischer-344 rats. Rats were pre-treated with different dietary levels of UPSN (0.25 or 2%) for 1 week. Rats were gavaged with a single dose of either 0.125 mg AFB1 or 25 mg FB1/kg b.w. and a combination thereof in the presence and absence of an aqueous solution of UPSN. The kinetics of mycotoxin excretion were monitored by analyzing serum AFB1-albumin, urinary AF (AFM1), and FB1 biomarkers over a period of 72 hr. UPSN decreased AFM1 excretion by 88-97%, indicating highly effective binding. FB1 excretion was reduced, to a lesser extent, ranging between 45 to 85%. When in combination, both AFB1 and FB1 binding occurred, but capacity was decreased by almost half. In the absence of UPSN, the combined AFB1 and FB1 treatment decreased the urinary biomarkers by 67 and 45% respectively, but increased levels of AFB1-albumin, presumably by modulating its cytochrome metabolism. UPSN significantly reduced bioavailability of both AFB1 and FB1 when in combination; suggesting that it can be utilized to reduce levels below their respective thresholds for affecting adverse biological effects. PMID:24193864

  17. 26 CFR 1.167(m)-1 - Class lives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Class lives. 1.167(m)-1 Section 1.167(m)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(m)-1 Class lives. (a) For rules regarding the election to use the class life system authorized by section 167(m),...

  18. 26 CFR 1.167(m)-1 - Class lives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Class lives. 1.167(m)-1 Section 1.167(m)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(m)-1 Class lives. (a) For rules regarding the election to use the class life system authorized by section 167(m),...

  19. 26 CFR 1.167(m)-1 - Class lives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Class lives. 1.167(m)-1 Section 1.167(m)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(m)-1 Class lives. (a) For rules regarding the election to use the class life system authorized by section 167(m),...

  20. 26 CFR 1.167(m)-1 - Class lives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Class lives. 1.167(m)-1 Section 1.167(m)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(m)-1 Class lives. (a) For rules regarding the election to use the class life system authorized by section 167(m),...

  1. 26 CFR 1.167(m)-1 - Class lives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Class lives. 1.167(m)-1 Section 1.167(m)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Itemized Deductions for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(m)-1 Class lives. (a) For rules regarding the election to use the class life system authorized by section 167(m),...

  2. 26 CFR 31.3402(m)-1 - Withholding allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Withholding allowances. 31.3402(m)-1 Section 31.3402(m)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT... Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(m)-1 Withholding allowances. (a) General rule. An employee...

  3. Effects of Aflatoxin on Seeding Growth and Ultrastructure in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Crisan, Eli V.

    1973-01-01

    Nineteen plants belonging to 11 species of the cruciferae were studied to determine the effects of aflatoxin B1 on seed germination and seedling development. Germination was not inhibited in any test organism at a concentration of 100 μg of aflatoxin per ml of agar substrate. Inhibition of elongation of the hypocotyls and roots in the species studied varied from 29 to 93% and from 22 to 91% in the respective tissues. Lepidium sativum was the most susceptible plant studied and exhibited the maximal inhibitory response noted above at concentrations of 8 μg of aflatoxin per ml. The ultrastructure of Lepidium root cells treated with crystalline aflatoxin B1 exhibited morphological changes characteristic of those found in aflatoxin-treated animal cells. In addition to changes in the cytoplasmic organelles, numerous ring-shaped nucleoli with prominent nucleolar caps were produced. The effect of aflatoxin on plant cells is compared with similar effects induced by actinomycin D. Seed germination and seedling development is discussed in relation to the effects of both compounds on deoxyribonucleic acid-dependent ribonucleic acid biosynthesis. Images PMID:4767301

  4. Use of Selected Essential Oils to Control Aflatoxin Contaminated Stored Cashew and Detection of Aflatoxin Biosynthesis Gene

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Aziz, Abeer R. M.; Mahmoud, Mohamed A.; Al-Othman, Monira R.; Al-Gahtani, Munirah F.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus spp. associated with cashew from the regions of Riyadh, Dammam, and Abha were isolated and three different culture media were used to qualitatively measure aflatoxin production by Aspergillus via UV light (365 nm), which was expressed as positive or negative. The obtained data showed that six isolates of A. flavus and four isolates of A. parasiticus were positive for aflatoxin production, while all isolates of A. niger were negative. Five commercially essential oils (thyme, garlic, cinnamon, mint, and rosemary) were tested to determine their influence on growth and aflatoxin production in A. flavus and A. parasiticus by performing high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the tested essential oils caused highly significant inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production in A. flavus and A. parasiticus. The extent of the inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production was dependent on the type and concentration of essential oils applied. The results indicate that cinnamon and thyme oils show strong antimicrobial potential. PCR was used with four sets of primer pairs for nor-1, omt-1, ver-1, and aflR genes, enclosed in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway. The interpretation of the results revealed that PCR is a rapid and sensitive method. PMID:25705718

  5. Use of selected essential oils to control aflatoxin contaminated stored cashew and detection of aflatoxin biosynthesis gene.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Aziz, Abeer R M; Mahmoud, Mohamed A; Al-Othman, Monira R; Al-Gahtani, Munirah F

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus spp. associated with cashew from the regions of Riyadh, Dammam, and Abha were isolated and three different culture media were used to qualitatively measure aflatoxin production by Aspergillus via UV light (365 nm), which was expressed as positive or negative. The obtained data showed that six isolates of A. flavus and four isolates of A. parasiticus were positive for aflatoxin production, while all isolates of A. niger were negative. Five commercially essential oils (thyme, garlic, cinnamon, mint, and rosemary) were tested to determine their influence on growth and aflatoxin production in A. flavus and A. parasiticus by performing high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the tested essential oils caused highly significant inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production in A. flavus and A. parasiticus. The extent of the inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production was dependent on the type and concentration of essential oils applied. The results indicate that cinnamon and thyme oils show strong antimicrobial potential. PCR was used with four sets of primer pairs for nor-1, omt-1, ver-1, and aflR genes, enclosed in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway. The interpretation of the results revealed that PCR is a rapid and sensitive method.

  6. Penetration of aflatoxins through isolated human epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.T.; Kemppainen, B.W.; Norred, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) could penetrate through isolated human epidermis (stratum corneum plus viable epidermis). ( UC)AFB1 (7.5-9.3 micrograms) was applied to the stratum corneum of epidermal disks mounted in Teflon diffusion cells. ( UC)AFB1 penetrated chemically unaltered through the isolated epidermis. Chloroform-extractable radioactivity accounted for 82.5 +/- 3.7% of the total penetrating radioactivity in the receptor fluid of the diffusion cells. The rate of penetration was very slow when experiments were conducted under nonoccluded conditions, but was approximately 40 times greater under conditions of occlusion. Penetration after 46 h was less than 0.05% and 3.41% of the applied dose under nonoccluded and occluded conditions, respectively. Total recovery expressed as a percentage of the applied radioactivity was 98.6 +/- 6.4%.

  7. 7 CFR 93.14 - Fees for aflatoxin analysis and fees for testing of other mycotoxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fees for aflatoxin analysis and fees for testing of... Nuts, Corn and Other Oilseeds § 93.14 Fees for aflatoxin analysis and fees for testing of other mycotoxins. (a) The fee charged for any laboratory analysis for aflatoxins and other mycotoxins shall...

  8. 7 CFR 93.14 - Fees for aflatoxin analysis and fees for testing of other mycotoxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fees for aflatoxin analysis and fees for testing of... Nuts, Corn and Other Oilseeds § 93.14 Fees for aflatoxin analysis and fees for testing of other mycotoxins. (a) The fee charged for any laboratory analysis for aflatoxins and other mycotoxins shall...

  9. Ear Rot, Aflatoxin Accumulation, and Fungal Biomass in Maize after Inoculation with Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin, a toxin produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus Link:Fries, occurs naturally in maize (Zea mays L.). Aflatoxin is a potent human carcinogen and is toxic to livestock, pets, and wildlife. When contaminated with aflatoxin, the value of maize grain is markedly reduced. Eight germplasm l...

  10. Aflatoxin contamination of groundnut and maize in Zambia: observed and potential concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize and groundnut, important staples in Zambia, are susceptible to aflatoxin-producing fungi. Aflatoxins are potent human carcinogens also associated with stunting and immunosuppression. Although health and economic burdens of aflatoxins are well known, patterns of contamination in maize and grou...

  11. Understanding Nonaflatoxigenicity of Aspergillus sojae: A Windfall of Aflatoxin Biosynthesis Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus section Flavi includes aflatoxin-producing and nonproducing fungi. A. sojae is unable to produce aflatoxins and is generally recognized as safe for food fermentation. However, because of its taxonomical relatedness to aflatoxin-producing A. parasiticus and A. flavus, it is necessary to...

  12. Degeneration of aflatoxin gene cluster in Aspergillus flavus from Africa and North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is the primary causal agent of food and feed contamination with the toxic fungal metabolites aflatoxins. Aflatoxin-producing potential of A. flavus is known to vary among isolates. The genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis are clustered together and the order of genes within th...

  13. Susceptibility to aflatoxin contamination among maize landraces from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Beltran, Alejandro; Guerrero-Herrera, Manuel D J; Ortega-Corona, Alejandro; Vidal-Martinez, Victor A; Cotty, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    Maize, the critical staple food for billions of people, was domesticated in Mexico about 9,000 YBP. Today, a great array of maize landraces (MLRs) across rural Mexico is harbored in a living library that has been passed among generations since before the establishment of the modern state. MLRs have been selected over hundreds of generations by ethnic groups for adaptation to diverse environmental settings. The genetic diversity of MLRs in Mexico is an outstanding resource for development of maize cultivars with beneficial traits. Maize is frequently contaminated with aflatoxins by Aspergillus flavus, and resistance to accumulation of these potent carcinogens has been sought for over three decades. However, MLRs from Mexico have not been evaluated as potential sources of resistance. Variation in susceptibility to both A. flavus reproduction and aflatoxin contamination was evaluated on viable maize kernels in laboratory experiments that included 74 MLR accessions collected from 2006 to 2008 in the central west and northwest regions of Mexico. Resistant and susceptible MLR accessions were detected in both regions. The most resistant accessions accumulated over 99 % less aflatoxin B1 than did the commercial hybrid control Pioneer P33B50. Accessions supporting lower aflatoxin accumulation also supported reduced A. flavus sporulation. Sporulation on the MLRs was positively correlated with aflatoxin accumulation (R = 0.5336, P < 0.0001), suggesting that resistance to fungal reproduction is associated with MLR aflatoxin resistance. Results of the current study indicate that MLRs from Mexico are potentially important sources of aflatoxin resistance that may contribute to the breeding of commercially acceptable and safe maize hybrids and/or open pollinated cultivars for human and animal consumption.

  14. Relationship between Meloidogyne arenaria and Aflatoxin Contamination in Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Timper, P.; Wilson, D. M.; Holbrook, C. C.; Maw, B. W.

    2004-01-01

    Damaged and developing kernels of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) are susceptible to colonization by fungi in the Aspergillus flavus group which, under certain conditions, produces aflatoxins prior to harvest. Our objective was to determine whether infection of peanut roots and pods by Meloidogyne arenaria increases aflatoxin contamination of the kernels when peanut is subjected to drought stress. The experiment was a completely randomized 2-x-2 factorial with 6 replicates/treatment. The treatment factors were nematodes (plus and minus M. arenaria) and fungus (plus and minus A. flavus inoculum). The experiment was conducted in 2001 and 2002 in microplots under an automatic rain-out shelter. In treatments where A. flavus inoculum was added, aflatoxin concentrations were high (> 1,000 ppb) and not affected by nematode infection; in treatments without added fungal inoculum, aflatoxin concentrations were greater (P ≤ 0.05) in kernels from nematode-infected plants (1,190 ppb) than in kernels from uninfected plants (79 ppb). There was also an increase in aflatoxin contamination of kernels with increasing pod galling (r² = 0.83 in 2001, r² = 0.43 in 2002; P ≤ 0.04). Colonization of kernels by A. flavus increased with increasing pod galling (r² = 0.18; P = 0.04) in 2001 but not in 2002. Root-knot nematodes may have a greater role in enhancing aflatoxin contamination of peanut when conditions are not optimal for growth and aflatoxin production by fungi in the A. flavus group. PMID:19262803

  15. Aflatoxin exposure during the first 1000 days of life in rural South Asia assessed by aflatoxin B₁-lysine albumin biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Groopman, John D; Egner, Patricia A; Schulze, Kerry J; Wu, Lee S-F; Merrill, Rebecca; Mehra, Sucheta; Shamim, Abu A; Ali, Hasmot; Shaikh, Saijuddin; Gernand, Alison; Khatry, Subarna K; LeClerq, Steven C; West, Keith P; Christian, Parul

    2014-12-01

    Aflatoxin B1 is a potent carcinogen, occurring from mold growth that contaminates staple grains in hot, humid environments. In this investigation, aflatoxin B1-lysine albumin biomarkers were measured by mass spectrometry in rural South Asian women, during the first and third trimester of pregnancy, and their children at birth and at two years of age. These subjects participated in randomized community trials of antenatal micronutrient supplementation in Sarlahi District, southern Nepal and Gaibandha District in northwestern Bangladesh. Findings from the Nepal samples demonstrated exposure to aflatoxin, with 94% detectable samples ranging from 0.45 to 2939.30 pg aflatoxin B1-lysine/mg albumin during pregnancy. In the Bangladesh samples the range was 1.56 to 63.22 pg aflatoxin B1-lysine/mg albumin in the first trimester, 3.37 to 72.8 pg aflatoxin B1-lysine/mg albumin in the third trimester, 4.62 to 76.69 pg aflatoxin B1-lysine/mg albumin at birth and 3.88 to 81.44 pg aflatoxin B1-lysine/mg albumin at age two years. Aflatoxin B1-lysine adducts in cord blood samples demonstrated that the fetus had the capacity to convert aflatoxin into toxicologically active compounds and the detection in the same 2-year-old children illustrates exposure over the first 1000 days of life.

  16. Occurrence of aflatoxins in mahua (Madhuca indica Gmel.) seeds: synergistic effect of plant extracts on inhibition of Aspergillus flavus growth and aflatoxin production.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, O P; Chandra, Harish; Behl, H M

    2009-04-01

    Occurrence of aflatoxin in Madhuca indica Gmel. seeds was determined by competitive ELISA. Eighty percent of mahua seed samples were found to be contaminated with aflatoxin. Total aflatoxin content ranged from 115.35 to 400.54ppb whereas the concentration of AFB(1) was in the range of 86.43 to 382.45ppb. Mahua oil was extracted by cold press expeller and analysed for contamination of aflatoxin in both the oil and cake samples. Total aflatoxin and aflatoxin B(1) were 220.66 and 201.57ppb in oil as compared to that in cake samples where it was 87.55 and 74.35ppb, respectively. Various individual and combined plant extracts were evaluated for their efficacy against growth of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin production in vitro. Combination of botanicals were found to be more effective in controlling fungal growth and aflatoxin production than individual extracts. Results of the present study suggests that synergistic effect of plant extracts can be used for control of fungal growth and aflatoxin production. These natural plant products may successfully replace synthetic chemicals and provide an alternative method to protect mahua as well as other agricultural commodities of nutritional significance from toxigenic fungi such as A. flavus and aflatoxin production.

  17. The potential effects of Zataria multiflora Boiss essential oil on growth, aflatoxin production and transcription of aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway genes of toxigenic Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed

    Yahyaraeyat, R; Khosravi, A R; Shahbazzadeh, D; Khalaj, V

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the effects of Zataria multiflora (Z. multiflora) essential oil (EO) on growth, aflatoxin production and transcription of aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway genes. Total RNAs of Aspergillus parasiticus (A.parasiticus) ATCC56775 grown in yeast extract sucrose (YES) broth medium treated with Z. multiflora EO were subjected to reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Specific primers of nor-1, ver-1, omt-A and aflR genes were used. In parallel mycelial dry weight of samples were measured and all the media were assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) for aflatoxinB1 (AFB1), aflatoxinB2 (AFB2), aflatoxinG1 (AFG1), aflatoxinG2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin total (AFTotal) production. The results showed that mycelial dry weight and aflatoxin production reduce in the presence of Z. multiflora EO (100 ppm) on day 5 of growth. It was found that the expression of nor-1, ver-1, omt-A and aflR genes was correlated with the ability of fungus to produce aflatoxins on day 5 in YES medium. RT-PCR showed that in the presence of Z.multiflora EO (100 ppm) nor-1, ver-1 and omtA genes expression was reduced. It seems that toxin production inhibitory effects of Z. multiflora EO on day 5 may be at the transcription level and this herb may cause reduction in aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway genes activity.

  18. Giant M1 resonance in /sup 140/Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Laszewski, R.M.; Rullhusen, P.; Hoblit, S.D.; LeBrun, S.F.

    1986-11-01

    Highly polarized tagged photons were used to measure the distribution of M1 transition strength in /sup 140/Ce at excitations between 6.7 and 8.7 MeV. A strength of summationgGAMMA/sub 0//sup 2/(M1)/GAMMA = 11.2/sub -3.1/ /sup +4.5/ eV corresponding to a B(M1up-arrow) of about 7.5..mu../sub 0//sup 2/ was observed centered at an excitation of 7.95 MeV. This distribution of M1 strength can account for the giant magnetic dipole resonance predicted in /sup 140/Ce.

  19. Aflatoxin: A 50-Year Odyssey of Mechanistic and Translational Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Kensler, Thomas W.; Roebuck, Bill D.; Wogan, Gerald N.; Groopman, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Since their discovery 50 years ago, the aflatoxins have become recognized as ubiquitous contaminants of the human food supply throughout the economically developing world. The adverse toxicological consequences of these compounds in populations are quite varied because of a wide range of exposures leading to acute effects, including rapid death, and chronic outcomes such as hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, emerging studies describe a variety of general adverse health effects associated with aflatoxin, such as impaired growth in children. Aflatoxin exposures have also been demonstrated to multiplicatively increase the risk of liver cancer in people chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) illustrating the deleterious impact that even low toxin levels in the diet can pose for human health. The public health impact of aflatoxin exposure is pervasive. Aflatoxin biomarkers of internal and biologically effective doses have been integral to the establishment of the etiologic role of this toxin in human disease through better estimates of exposure, expanded knowledge of the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, and as tools for implementing and evaluating preventive interventions. PMID:20881231

  20. Ageratum conyzoides essential oil as aflatoxin suppressor of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Juliana H C; Gonçalez, Edlayne; Galleti, Silvia R; Facanali, Roseane; Marques, Márcia O M; Felício, Joana D

    2010-01-31

    Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) is a highly toxic and carcinogenic metabolite produced by Aspergillus species on food and agricultural commodities. Inhibitory effects of essential oil of Ageratum conyzoides, on the mycelial growth and aflatoxin B(1) production by Aspergillus flavus were studied. Cultures were incubated in yeast extract-sucrose (YES) broth for days at 25 degrees C at the following different concentrations of the essential oil (from 0.0 to 30mug/mL). The essential oil inhibited fungal growth to different extents depending on the concentration, and completely inhibited aflatoxin production at concentrations above 0.10microg/mL. The analysis of the oil by GC/MS showed that its main components are precocene II (46.35%), precocene I (42.78%), cumarine (5.01%) and Trans-caryophyllene (3.02%). Comparison by transmission electron microscopy of the fungal cells, control and those incubated with different concentrations of essential oil, showed ultra-structural changes which were concentration dependent of the essential oil of A. conyzoides. Such ultra-structural changes were more evident in the endomembrane system, affecting mainly the mitochondria. Degradation was also observed in both surrounding fibrils. The ability to inhibit aflatoxin production as a new biological activity of A.conyzoides L. indicates that it may be considered as a useful tool for a better understanding of the complex pathway of aflatoxin biosynthesis.

  1. Aflatoxin synthesis in corn fields in Guanajuato, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bucio-Villalobos, C M; Guzmán-de-Peña, D; Peña-Cabriales, J J

    2001-06-01

    Aflatoxin contamination of corn is an important problem internationally, particularly in tropical and subtropical conditions that favor infection and synthesis by Aspergillus. Environmental conditions (drought) and agronomic practices i.e. N fertilization have been reported as favorable to aflatoxin synthesis in the field. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the contamination of corn commonly observed in stored conditions in this important corn producing region of Mexico known as "El Bajio" is related to infection by Aspergillus under field conditions. Results using three corn hybrids of recognized susceptibility to infection showed that corn ears artificially inoculated in the field with a toxigenic strain of Aspergillus parasiticus presented a low content of aflatoxin ranging from 13.6 to 24.7 microg Kg(-1). No significant differences were observed between the hybrids tested. Similarly, N fertilization practices, 260 Kg N ha(-1), applied at sowing did not have an effect on the extent of the contamination observed of 6.2 and 19.3 mg of aflatoxin kg(-1) in natural infected and inoculated samples with A. parasiticus NRRL 2999, respectively. Our data suggest that the cases of aflatoxin contamination of corn in this part of Mexico are not related to infection occurring during the crops growing period but most probably to poor storage conditions of corn.

  2. Inactivation of aflatoxin B1 by using the synergistic effect of hydrogen peroxide and gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, U.D.; Govindarajan, P.; Dave, P.J. )

    1989-02-01

    Inactivation of aflatoxin B1 was studied by using gamma radiation and hydrogen peroxide. A 100-krad dose of gamma radiation was sufficient to inactivate 50 micrograms of aflatoxin B1 in the presence of 5% hydrogen peroxide, and 400 krad was required for total degradation of 100 micrograms of aflatoxin in the same system. Degradation of aflatoxin B1 was confirmed by high-pressure liquid chromatographic and thin-layer chromatographic analysis. Ames microsomal mutagenicity test showed loss of aflatoxin activity. This method of detoxification also reduces the toxin levels effectively in artificially contaminated groundnuts.

  3. Immobilization of anti-aflatoxin B1 antibody by UV polymerization of aniline and aflatoxin B1 detection via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dinçkaya, Erhan; Kinik, Özer; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal; Altuğ, Çağri; Akkoca, Aylin

    2012-12-01

    In the study, we investigated the practicality of the UV polymerization of aniline for anti-aflatoxin B1 antibody immobilization, and utilization of the resulting biosensor in the impedimetric determination of aflatoxin B1. The anti-aflatoxin B 1 antibody was physically immobilized on gold electrodes by UV polymerization of aniline at a fixed wavelength. The biosensor was based on specific interaction anti-aflatoxin B1 - aflatoxin B1 recognition and investigation of this recognition event by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A calibration curve was obtained in a linear detection range 1-20 ng/mL aflatoxin B1. Finally, the biosensor was applied to analysis of a real food sample.

  4. Simple method for screening aflatoxin-producing molds by UV photography.

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, K; Ando, Y; Ito, M; Terakado, N

    1987-01-01

    UV absorption by aflatoxins was monitored in GY agar medium by UV photography. In the UV photographs, aflatoxin-producing molds were identified as gray or black colonies, whereas aflatoxin-nonproducing molds appeared as white colonies. By cellophane transplantation experiments and silica gel thin-layer chromatography, the products absorbing UV light substantially were found to be mainly aflatoxins B1 and G1 excreted from the mold mycelium into the agar medium. UV absorption did not occur when the agar medium contained aflatoxin-noninducible carbon sources instead of glucose. Various inhibitors of aflatoxin production, such as dichlorovos and dimethyl sulfoxide, also decreased the intensity of UV absorption. These results indicate that this technique can be used as a simple, safe, and rapid method of screening aflatoxin-producing molds. Images PMID:3105453

  5. Evaluation of particulate air samplers for airborne aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Silas, J.C.; Harrison, M.A.; Carpenter, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Five air samplers (Millipore, all-glass impinger, centrifugal, Andersen, and absorbent cotton) were evaluated for their ability to collect airborne grain particles contaminated with aflatoxin B1. Corn dust containing 100 micrograms aflatoxin B1/g was aerosolized within a containment system. Each device sampled 100 I air, thus exchanging the air in the chamber two times. Aflatoxin B1 was extracted from all sampling matrices and was detected and quantitated with thin-layer chromatography and scanning fluorodensitometry. The highest efficiency was obtained with the Millipore sampler, while the efficiencies of the centrifugal and the cotton samplers were almost identical. Efficiency of an Andersen was less, with no toxin recovered from an all-glass impinger. Measurement of particle size was accomplished with the Andersen sampler.

  6. High Aflatoxin Production on a Chemically Defined Medium 1

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, T. V.; Viswanathan, L.; Venkitasubramanian, T. A.

    1971-01-01

    Aspergillus parasiticus ATCC 15517 produced 28 to 30 mg of aflatoxin per 100 ml of a medium containing sucrose, asparagine, and salts in stationary and shaken cultures. In the absence of asparagine in the medium, the toxin yields fell drastically, and the thin-layer chromatograms of the chloroform extracts of the cultures indicated the total absence of aflatoxin G1 and the presence of new intense blue and green fluorescent bands having RF values lower than aflatoxins. Initial pH was critical and had to be around 4.5 for good growth and high toxin production on this medium. Optimum concentrations of KH2PO4 and MgSO4·7H2O in the medium were much lower than those normally used in fungal growth media. PMID:5119206

  7. Malonate as a precursor in the biosynthesis of aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S R; Prasanna, H R; Viswanathan, L; Venkitasurbramanian, T A

    1975-06-01

    Incorporation of [I-14C]acetate and [2-14C]malonate into aflatoxins by resting mycelia of Aspergillus parasiticus resuspended in different buffers was studied. A decrease in pH from 5-8 to 2-8, as well as addition of EDTA, markedly stimulated the incorporation of malonate but the effect on acetate incorporation was less pronounced. Mycelia took up comparatively more acetate than malonate, but more malonate (4-3%) entering mycelia was incorporated into aflatoxins than was acetate (1-6%). Furthermore, the addition of unlabelled acetate reduced the incorporation of label from [I-14C]acetate by 75% but from [2-14C]malonate by only 25%. These results suggest that malonate is an intermediate in aflatoxin synthesis and that is can be incorporated without prior conversion to acetate.

  8. A mini review on aflatoxin exposure in Malaysia: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Redzwan, Sabran; Jamaluddin, Rosita; Abd-Mutalib, Mohd Sokhini; Ahmad, Zuraini

    2013-11-13

    This mini review article described the exposure of aflatoxin in Malaysia, including its presence in the foodstuffs and the detection of aflatoxin biomarkers in human biological samples. Historically, the exposure of aflatoxin in Malaysia can be dated in 1960s where an outbreak of disease in pig farms caused severe liver damage to the animals. Later, an aflatoxicosis case in Perak in 1988 was reported and caused death to 13 children, as up to 3 mg of aflatoxin was present in a single serving of contaminated noodles. Since then, extensive research on aflatoxin has been conducted in Malaysia. The food commodities such as peanuts, cereals, spices, and their products are the main commodities commonly found to be contaminated with aflatoxin. Surprisingly, some of the contaminated foods had levels greater than the permissible limit adopted by the Malaysian Food Regulation 1985. Besides, exposure assessment through the measurement of aflatoxin biomarkers in human biological samples is still in its infancy stage. Nevertheless, some studies had reported the presence of these biomarkers. In fact, it is postulated that Malaysians are moderately exposed to aflatoxin compared to those high risk populations, where aflatoxin contamination in the diets is prevalent. Since the ingestion of aflatoxin could be the integral to the development of liver cancer, the incidence of cancer attributable by dietary aflatoxin exposure in Malaysia has also been reported and published in the literatures. Regardless of these findings, the more important task is to monitor and control humans from being exposed to aflatoxin. The enforcement of law is insufficient to minimize human exposure to aflatoxin. Preventive strategies include agricultural, dietary, and clinical measures should be implemented. With the current research on aflatoxin in Malaysia, a global networking for research collaboration is needed to expand the knowledge and disseminate the information to the global scientific community.

  9. Relationships between in vivo and in vitro aflatoxin production: reliable prediction of fungal ability to contaminate maize with aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Probst, Claudia; Cotty, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Aflatoxins are highly carcinogenic mycotoxins frequently produced by Aspergillus flavus. Contamination of maize with aflatoxins imposes both economic and health burdens in many regions. Identification of the most important etiologic agents of contamination is complicated by mixed infections and varying aflatoxin-producing potential of fungal species and individuals. In order to know the potential importance of an isolate to cause a contamination event, the ability of the isolate to produce aflatoxins on the living host must be determined. Aflatoxin production in vitro (synthetic and natural media) was contrasted with in vivo (viable maize kernels) in order to determine ability of in vitro techniques to predict the relative importance of causal agents to maize contamination events. Several media types and fermentation techniques (aerated, non-aerated, fermentation volume) were compared. There was no correlation between aflatoxin production in viable maize and production in any of the tested liquid fermentation media using any of the fermentation techniques. Isolates that produced aflatoxins on viable maize frequently failed to produce detectable (limit of detection=1ppb) aflatoxin concentrations in synthetic media. Aflatoxin production on autoclaved maize kernels was highly correlated with production on viable maize kernels. The results have important implications for researchers seeking to either identify causal agents of contamination events or characterize atoxigenic isolates for biological control.

  10. Single aflatoxin contaminated corn kernel analysis with fluorescence hyperspectral image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Ononye, Ambrose; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2010-04-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, among others. Aflatoxin contaminated corn is toxic to domestic animals when ingested in feed and is a known carcinogen associated with liver and lung cancer in humans. Consequently, aflatoxin levels in food and feed are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, allowing 20 ppb (parts per billion) limits in food and 100 ppb in feed for interstate commerce. Currently, aflatoxin detection and quantification methods are based on analytical tests including thin-layer chromatography (TCL) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These analytical tests require the destruction of samples, and are costly and time consuming. Thus, the ability to detect aflatoxin in a rapid, nondestructive way is crucial to the grain industry, particularly to corn industry. Hyperspectral imaging technology offers a non-invasive approach toward screening for food safety inspection and quality control based on its spectral signature. The focus of this paper is to classify aflatoxin contaminated single corn kernels using fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. Field inoculated corn kernels were used in the study. Contaminated and control kernels under long wavelength ultraviolet excitation were imaged using a visible near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral camera. The imaged kernels were chemically analyzed to provide reference information for image analysis. This paper describes a procedure to process corn kernels located in different images for statistical training and classification. Two classification algorithms, Maximum Likelihood and Binary Encoding, were used to classify each corn kernel into "control" or "contaminated" through pixel classification. The Binary Encoding approach had a slightly better performance with accuracy equals to 87% or 88% when 20 ppb or 100 ppb was used as classification threshold, respectively.

  11. Distribution of M1 transitions in /sup 208/Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Laszewski, R.M.; Alarcon, R.; Dale, D.S.; Hoblit, S.D.

    1988-10-10

    The distribution of M1 strength in /sup 208/Pb has been measured between 5.8 and 7.4 MeV with highly polarized tagged photons. ..sigma..GAMMA/sup 2//sub 0/(M/sup 1/)/GAMMA = 14.6 +- /sup +1.5//sub -1.3/ eV corresponding to ..sigma..B(M1up-arrow) = 10.7 +- /sup +1.1//sub -0.9/..mu../sup 2//sub N/ was found, and can fully account for the much discussed ''missing'' M1 in /sup 208/Pb. When the present result is combined with known 1/sup 1/ transitions above neutron threshold, an M1 giant resonance emerges at 7.3 MeV, 1 MeV wide, with ..sigma..B(M1up-arrow)approx. =15.6..mu../sup 2//sub N/. Smaller 1/sup +/ resonances are also seen in both 5.85 and 6.24 MeV. The total M1 strength below 6.4 MeV amounts to ..sigma..B(M) = (1.9/sup +0.7//sub -0.4/)..mu../sup 2//sub N/.

  12. Aflatoxin detection in whole corn kernels using hyperspectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasent, David; Chen, Xue-Wen

    2004-03-01

    Hyperspectral (HS) data for the inspection of whole corn kernels for aflatoxin is considered. The high-dimensionality of HS data requires feature extraction or selection for good classifier generalization. For fast and inexpensive data collection, only several features (λ responses) can be used. These are obtained by feature selection from the full HS response. A new high dimensionality branch and bound (HDBB) feature selection algorithm is used; it is found to be optimum, fast and very efficient. Initial results indicate that HS data is very promising for aflatoxin detection in whole kernel corn.

  13. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) identifies candidate gene signatures in response to aflatoxin producing fungus Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic metabolites and potent carcinogen produced from asexual fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. Aflatoxins can contaminate cottonseed under conducive preharvest and postharvest conditions. U.S. federal regulations restrict the use of aflatoxin contaminated cottonseed at >20...

  14. Develop Efficient Leak Proof M1 Abrams Plenum Seal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-07

    SBIR report, M1 Abrams, plenum seal, turbine blade wear, FOD leakage, turbine failure, air cleaner plenum box, seal design, efficient leak proof seal...premature and excessive turbine blade wear. This in turn leads to a reduced time interval between turbine rebuilds and an estimated $3-$4 million in...Comparison – As drawn vs. actual installation ........................................... 9 Figure 5: Assembly model of M1 Turbine and related components

  15. Diverse Effects on M1 Signaling and Adverse Effect Liability within a Series of M1 Ago-PAMs.

    PubMed

    Rook, Jerri M; Abe, Masahito; Cho, Hyekyung P; Nance, Kellie D; Luscombe, Vincent B; Adams, Jeffrey J; Dickerson, Jonathan W; Remke, Daniel H; Garcia-Barrantes, Pedro M; Engers, Darren W; Engers, Julie L; Chang, Sichen; Foster, Jarrett J; Blobaum, Anna L; Niswender, Colleen M; Jones, Carrie K; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W

    2017-01-10

    Both historical clinical and recent preclinical data suggest that the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is an exciting target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and the cognitive and negative symptom clusters in schizophrenia; however, early drug discovery efforts targeting the orthosteric binding site have failed to afford selective M1 activation. Efforts then shifted to focus on selective activation of M1 via either allosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). While M1 PAMs have robust efficacy in rodent models, some chemotypes can induce cholinergic adverse effects (AEs) that could limit their clinical utility. Here, we report studies aimed at understanding the subtle structural and pharmacological nuances that differentiate efficacy from adverse effect liability within an indole-based series of M1 ago-PAMs. Our data demonstrate that closely related M1 PAMs can display striking differences in their in vivo activities, especially their propensities to induce adverse effects. We report the discovery of a novel PAM in this series that is devoid of observable adverse effect liability. Interestingly, the molecular pharmacology profile of this novel PAM is similar to that of a representative M1 PAM that induces severe AEs. For instance, both compounds are potent ago-PAMs that demonstrate significant interaction with the orthosteric site (either bitopic or negative cooperativity). However, there are subtle differences in efficacies of the compounds at potentiating M1 responses, agonist potencies, and abilities to induce receptor internalization. While these differences may contribute to the differential in vivo profiles of these compounds, the in vitro differences are relatively subtle and highlight the complexities of allosteric modulators and the need to focus on in vivo phenotypic screening to identify safe and effective M1 PAMs.

  16. Aflatoxin regulations and global pistachio trade: insights from social network analysis.

    PubMed

    Bui-Klimke, Travis R; Guclu, Hasan; Kensler, Thomas W; Yuan, Jian-Min; Wu, Felicia

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxins, carcinogenic toxins produced by Aspergillus fungi, contaminate maize, peanuts, and tree nuts in many regions of the world. Pistachios are the main source of human dietary aflatoxins from tree nuts worldwide. Over 120 countries have regulations for maximum allowable aflatoxin levels in food commodities. We developed social network models to analyze the association between nations' aflatoxin regulations and global trade patterns of pistachios from 1996-2010. The main pistachio producing countries are Iran and the United States (US), which together contribute to nearly 75% of the total global pistachio market. Over this time period, during which many nations developed or changed their aflatoxin regulations in pistachios, global pistachio trade patterns changed; with the US increasingly exporting to countries with stricter aflatoxin standards. The US pistachio crop has had consistently lower levels of aflatoxin than the Iranian crop over this same time period. As similar trading patterns have also been documented in maize, public health may be affected if countries without aflatoxin regulations, or with more relaxed regulations, continually import crops with higher aflatoxin contamination. Unlike the previous studies on maize, this analysis includes a dynamic element, examining how trade patterns change over time with introduction or adjustment of aflatoxin regulations.

  17. Correlation of aflatoxin contamination with zinc content of chicken feed

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, F.T.; Hagler, W.M. Jr.; Hamilton, P.B.

    1984-03-01

    Feed samples from chicken houses in five commercial chicken operations were analyzed for Zn, Mn, Fe, Cu, Cd, and aflatoxin content. Mean aflatoxin content of these samples was 14 ppb (14 ng/g) as opposed to 1.2 ppb in samples taken when the feed was made. Aflatoxin content of the feed samples correlated significantly with Zn content but not with Mn, Fe, or Cu, all of which correlated significantly with Zn. Zn content of unamended feed (<20 ppm (20 ..mu..g/g) is normally supplemented with a mineral premix containing Zn, Mn, Fe, and Cu to meet the nutrient requirements of chickens (40 ppm of Zn). The mean zinc concentration of the feed samples (117 ppm) was about threefold greater than the nutrient requirement and ranged from 58 to 162 ppm in individual samples. These field survey results parallel earlier reports of augmented production of aflatoxin in monocultures of aflatoxigenic fungi in corn and other ingredients supplemented with Zn. These results suggest that stricter control of Zn levels during manufacture could reduce aflatoxing contamination of feed consumed by chickens.

  18. Aflatoxins ingestion and canine mammary tumors: There is an association?

    PubMed

    Frehse, M S; Martins, M I M; Ono, E Y S; Bracarense, A P F R L; Bissoqui, L Y; Teixeira, E M K; Santos, N J R; Freire, R L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of mycotoxins on dogs feed and to explore the potential association between mycotoxins exposure and the chance of mamary tumors in a case-control study. The study included 256 female dogs from a hospital population, 85 with mammary tumors (case group) and 171 without mammary tumors (control group). An epidemiological questionnaire was applied to both groups, and the data were analyzed by the EpiInfo statistical package. For the study, 168 samples of the feed offered to dogs were analyzed for the presence of aflatoxins, fumonisins and zearalenone by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mycotoxins were found in 79 samples (100%) in the case group and 87/89 (97.8%) in the control group. Mycotoxins were detected in all types of feed, regardless feed quality. Level of aflatoxin B1 (p = 0.0356, OR = 2.74, 95%, CI 1.13 to 6.60), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) (p = 0.00007, OR = 4.60, 95%, CI = 2.16 to 9.79), and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) (p = 0.0133, OR = 9.91, 95%, CI 1.21 to 81.15) were statistically higher in case of mammary cancer. In contrast, neutering was a protective factor for mammary cancer (p = 0.0004, OR = 0.32, 95%, CI = 0.17 to 0.60).

  19. Use of Probiotics to Control Aflatoxin Production in Peanut Grains

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Juliana Fonseca Moreira; Peluzio, Joenes Mucci; Prado, Guilherme; Madeira, Jovita Eugênia Gazzinelli Cruz; Silva, Marize Oliveira; de Morais, Paula Benevides; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Pimenta, Raphael Sanzio; Nicoli, Jacques Robert

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii, S. cerevisiae UFMG 905, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20) were evaluated as biological control agents to reduce aflatoxin and spore production by Aspergillus parasiticus IMI 242695 in peanut. Suspensions containing the probiotics alone or in combinations were tested by sprinkling on the grains followed by incubation for seven days at 25°C. All probiotic microorganisms, in live and inactivated forms, significantly reduced A. parasiticus sporulation, but the best results were obtained with live cells. The presence of probiotics also altered the color of A. parasiticus colonies but not the spore morphology. Reduction in aflatoxin production of 72.8 and 65.8% was observed for S. boulardii and S. cerevisiae, respectively, when inoculated alone. When inoculated in pairs, all probiotic combinations reduced significantly aflatoxin production, and the best reduction was obtained with S. boulardii plus L. delbrueckii (96.1%) followed by S. boulardii plus S. cerevisiae and L. delbrueckii plus S. cerevisiae (71.1 and 66.7%, resp.). All probiotics remained viable in high numbers on the grains even after 300 days. The results of the present study suggest a different use of probiotics as an alternative treatment to prevent aflatoxin production in peanut grains. PMID:26221629

  20. RNAi control of aflatoxins in peanut plants, a multifactorial system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA-interference (RNAi)-mediated control of aflatoxin contamination in peanut plants is a multifactorial and hyper variable system. The use of RNAi biotechnology to silence single genes in plants has inherently high-variability among transgenic events. Also the level of expression of small interfe...

  1. Aflatoxin resistance in maize: what have we learned lately?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination of maize grain is a huge economic and health problem, causing death and increased disease burden in much of the developing world and income loss in the developed world. Despite the gravity of the problem, deployable solutions are still being sought. In the past 15 years, much...

  2. Two distinct O-methyltransferases in aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, K; Ando, Y; Hashimoto, J; Hamasaki, T

    1989-01-01

    The substances belonging to the sterigmatocystin group bear a close structural relationship to aflatoxins. When demethylsterigmatocystin (DMST) was fed to Aspergillus parasiticus NIAH-26, which endogenously produces neither aflatoxins nor precursors in YES medium, aflatoxins B1 and G1 were produced. When dihydrodemethylsterigmatocystin (DHDMST) was fed to this mutant, aflatoxins B2 and G2 were produced. Results of the cell-free experiment with S-adenosyl-[methyl-3H]methionine showed that first the C-6-OH groups of DMST and DHDMST are methylated to produce sterigmatocystin and dihydrosterigmatocystin (O-methyltransferase I) and then the C-7-OH groups are methylated to produce O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST) and dihydro-O-methylsterigmatocystin (DHOMST) (O-methyltransferase II). However, no methyltransferase activity was observed when either OMST, DHOMST, 5,6-dimethoxysterigmatocystin, 5-methoxysterigmatocystin, or sterigmatin was incubated with the cell extract. Treatment of the cell extract with N-ethylmaleimide inhibited O-methyltransferase I activity but not that of O-methyltransferase II. Furthermore, these O-methyltransferases were different in their protein molecules and were involved in both the reactions from DMST to OMST and DHDMST to DHOMST. The reactions described in this paper were not observed when the same mold had been cultured in YEP medium. Images PMID:2802602

  3. 7 CFR 983.5 - Aflatoxin inspection certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aflatoxin inspection certificate. 983.5 Section 983.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  4. 7 CFR 983.5 - Aflatoxin inspection certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aflatoxin inspection certificate. 983.5 Section 983.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  5. HypC, the anthrone oxidase involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on gene disruption and enzyme activity, hypC, an open reading frame in the pksA (aflC)/nor-1 (aflD) intergenic region in the aflatoxin biosynthesis cluster, encodes a 17 kDa oxidase that catalyzes the conversion of norsolorinic acid anthrone to norsolorinic acid....

  6. Use of Probiotics to Control Aflatoxin Production in Peanut Grains.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Juliana Fonseca Moreira; Peluzio, Joenes Mucci; Prado, Guilherme; Madeira, Jovita Eugênia Gazzinelli Cruz; Silva, Marize Oliveira; de Morais, Paula Benevides; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Pimenta, Raphael Sanzio; Nicoli, Jacques Robert

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii, S. cerevisiae UFMG 905, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20) were evaluated as biological control agents to reduce aflatoxin and spore production by Aspergillus parasiticus IMI 242695 in peanut. Suspensions containing the probiotics alone or in combinations were tested by sprinkling on the grains followed by incubation for seven days at 25°C. All probiotic microorganisms, in live and inactivated forms, significantly reduced A. parasiticus sporulation, but the best results were obtained with live cells. The presence of probiotics also altered the color of A. parasiticus colonies but not the spore morphology. Reduction in aflatoxin production of 72.8 and 65.8% was observed for S. boulardii and S. cerevisiae, respectively, when inoculated alone. When inoculated in pairs, all probiotic combinations reduced significantly aflatoxin production, and the best reduction was obtained with S. boulardii plus L. delbrueckii (96.1%) followed by S. boulardii plus S. cerevisiae and L. delbrueckii plus S. cerevisiae (71.1 and 66.7%, resp.). All probiotics remained viable in high numbers on the grains even after 300 days. The results of the present study suggest a different use of probiotics as an alternative treatment to prevent aflatoxin production in peanut grains.

  7. Molecular markers and strategies to control aflatoxin in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods of isolation of molecular markers and software developed in ARS for finding the most informative markers will be presented. Also, two different approaches being used at the NPRL to reduce aflatoxin in peanut will be discussed. One is the development of phytoalexin-detoxification enzyme inh...

  8. Single corn kernel aflatoxin B1 extraction and analysis method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are highly carcinogenic compounds produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus. Aspergillus flavus is a phytopathogenic fungus that commonly infects crops such as cotton, peanuts, and maize. The goal was to design an effective sample preparation method and analysis for the extraction of afla...

  9. Extracts of Agave americana inhibit aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxigenic fungi invade crops prior to harvest as well as during storage and produce harmful, even carcinogenic toxins such as aflatoxins. Since consumers demand safe commodities, and due to enhanced public awareness of the dangers of many synthetic fungicides, the importance of investigating alterna...

  10. Selectivity of oxomemazine for the M1 muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Woo, C W; Kim, J G

    1994-12-01

    The binding characteristics of pirenzepine and oxomemazine to muscarinic receptor were studied to evaluate the selectivity of oxomemazine for the muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat cerebral microsomes. Equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of (-)-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate([3H]QNB) determined from saturation isotherms was 64 pM. Analysis of the pirenzepine inhibition curve of [3H]QNB binding to cerebral microsome indicated the presence of two receptor subtypes with high (Ki = 16 nM, M1 receptor) and low (Ki = 400 nM, M3 receptor) affinity for pirenzepine. Oxomemazine also identified two receptor subtypes with about 20-fold difference in the affinity for high (Ki = 84 nM, OH receptor) and low (Ki = 1.65 microM, OL receptor) affinity sites. The percentage populations of M1 and M3 receptors to the total receptors were 61:39, and those of OH and OL receptors 39:61, respectively. Both pirenzepine and oxomemazine increased the KD value for [3H]QNB without affecting the binding site concentrations and Hill coefficient for the [3H]QNB binding. Oxomemazine had a 10-fold higher affinity at M1 receptors than at M3 receptors, and pirenzepine a 8-fold higher affinity at OH receptors than at OL receptors. Analysis of the shallow competition binding curves of oxomemazine for M1 receptors and pirenzepine for OL receptors yielded that 69% of M1 receptors were of OH receptors and the remaining 31% of OL receptors, and that 29% of OL receptors were of M1 receptors and 71% of M3 receptors. However, M3 for oxomemazine and OH for pirenzepine were composed of a uniform population. These results suggest that oxomemazine could be classified as a selective drug for M1 receptors and also demonstrate that rat cerebral microsomes contain three different subtypes of M1, M3 and the other site which is different from M1, M2 and M3 receptors.

  11. Use of isotope-labeled aflatoxins for LC-MS/MS stable isotope dilution analysis of foods.

    PubMed

    Cervino, Christian; Asam, Stefan; Knopp, Dietmar; Rychlik, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard

    2008-03-26

    Aflatoxins are a group of very carcinogenic mycotoxins that can be found on a wide range of food commodities including nuts, cereals, and spices. In this study, the first LC-MS/MS stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) for the determination of aflatoxins in foods was developed. The development of this method was enabled by easily accessible isotope-labeled (deuterated) aflatoxins B2 and G2, which were synthesized by catalytic deuteration of aflatoxin B1 and G1, purified, and well-characterized by NMR and MS. All four aflatoxins of interest (B1, B2, G1, and G2) were quantified in food samples by using these two labeled internal standards. The response factors (RF) of the linear calibrations were revealed to be matrix independent for labeled aflatoxin B2/aflatoxin B2 and labeled aflatoxin G2/aflatoxin G2. For labeled aflatoxin B 2/aflatoxin B 1 and labeled aflatoxin B2/aflatoxin G1 matrix-matched calibration was performed for the model matrices almonds and wheat flour, showing significant differences of the RFs. Limits of detection (LOD) were determined by applying a statistical approach in the presence of the two model matrices, yielding 0.31 microg/kg (aflatoxin B1), 0.09 microg/kg (aflatoxin B2), 0.38 microg/kg (aflatoxin G1), and 0.32 microg/kg (aflatoxin G2) for almonds (similar LODs were obtained for wheat flour). Recovery rates were between 90 and 105% for all analytes. Coefficients of variation (CV) of 12% (aflatoxin B1), 3.6% (aflatoxin B2), 14% (aflatoxin G1), and 4.8% (aflatoxin G2) were obtained from interassay studies. For further validation, a NIST standard reference food sample was analyzed for aflatoxins B1 and B2. The method was successfully applied to determine trace levels of aflatoxins in diverse food matrices such as peanuts, nuts, grains, and spices. Aflatoxin contents in these samples ranged from about 0.5 to 6 microg/kg.

  12. Analysis of cocoa products for ochratoxin A and aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Anne-Marie; Scott, Peter M; Tague, Brett

    2013-08-01

    Eighty-five samples of cocoa products sampled in Canada were analysed for ochratoxin A (OTA) and aflatoxins in 2011-2012. Inclusion of the aflatoxins in this survey required additional method development. Chocolate was extracted with methanol-water plus NaCl, while for cocoa two successive extractions with methanol and methanol-water were made. Extracts were cleaned on an AflaOchra immunoaffinity column (IAC). Determination was by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detection of the aflatoxins was with a post-column photochemical reactor and of OTA by fluorescence detection. Mean limits of quantification (LOQ) of chocolate and cocoa powders were 0.16 ng/g (OTA) and 0.07 ng/g (aflatoxin B1), respectively. Survey results showed that the incidences of OTA above the LOQ in natural cocoa were 15/15 (mean 1.17 ng/g), 20/21 for alkalized cocoa (mean 1.06 ng/g), 9/9 for baking chocolate (mean 0.49 ng/g), 20/20 for dark chocolate (mean 0.39 ng/g), 7/10 for milk chocolate (mean 0.19 ng/g), 5/5 for cocoa liquor (mean 0.43 ng/g), and 0/5 for cocoa butter. These results confirm our previous work with OTA. In the same samples, incidences of aflatoxin B1 above the LOQ were 14/15 for natural cocoa (mean 0.86 ng/g), 20/21 for alkalized cocoa (mean 0.37 ng/g), 7/9 for baking chocolate (mean 0.22 ng/g), 16/20 for dark chocolate (mean 0.19 ng/g), 7/10 for milk chocolate (mean 0.09 ng/g), 4/5 for cocoa liquor (mean 0.43 ng/g), and 0/5 for cocoa butter. Both aflatoxins and OTA were confirmed by HPLC-MS/MS when OTA or aflatoxin levels found were above 2 ng/g in cocoa.

  13. Genomic Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni Strain M1

    PubMed Central

    Friis, Carsten; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Javed, Muhammad A.; Snipen, Lars; Lagesen, Karin; Hallin, Peter F.; Newell, Diane G.; Toszeghy, Monique; Ridley, Anne; Manning, Georgina; Ussery, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni strain M1 (laboratory designation 99/308) is a rarely documented case of direct transmission of C. jejuni from chicken to a person, resulting in enteritis. We have sequenced the genome of C. jejuni strain M1, and compared this to 12 other C. jejuni sequenced genomes currently publicly available. Compared to these, M1 is closest to strain 81116. Based on the 13 genome sequences, we have identified the C. jejuni pan-genome, as well as the core genome, the auxiliary genes, and genes unique between strains M1 and 81116. The pan-genome contains 2,427 gene families, whilst the core genome comprised 1,295 gene families, or about two-thirds of the gene content of the average of the sequenced C. jejuni genomes. Various comparison and visualization tools were applied to the 13 C. jejuni genome sequences, including a species pan- and core genome plot, a BLAST Matrix and a BLAST Atlas. Trees based on 16S rRNA sequences and on the total gene families in each genome are presented. The findings are discussed in the background of the proven virulence potential of M1. PMID:20865039

  14. Anatomy of a Discovery: M1 and M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles Dudley

    2015-01-01

    M1 and M2 macrophage-type responses kill or repair in vivo. The unique ability of macrophages to make these polar opposite type of responses provides primary host protection and maintains tissue homeostasis throughout the animal kingdom. In humans and other higher animals, M1 and M2-type macrophage responses also initiate and direct T cells/adaptive immunity to provide additional protection such as Th1 (cytotoxic) or Th2 (antibody-mediated) type responses. Hence, macrophages were renamed M1 and M2 to indicate the central role of macrophages/innate immunity in immune systems. These findings indicate that the long held notion that adaptive immunity controls innate immunity was backward: a sea change in understanding how immune responses occur. The clinical impact of M1/kill and M2/repair responses is immense playing pivotal roles in curing (or causing) many diseases including infections, cancer, autoimmunity, and atherosclerosis. How M1/M2 came to be is an interesting story that, like life, involved Direction, Determination, Discouragement, and Discovery. PMID:25999950

  15. Influence of extracellular zinc on M1 microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Youichirou; Aratake, Takaaki; Shimizu, Shogo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kumiko; Tsuda, Masayuki; Yawata, Toshio; Ueba, Tetuya; Saito, Motoaki

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular zinc, which is released from hippocampal neurons in response to brain ischaemia, triggers morphological changes in microglia. Under ischaemic conditions, microglia exhibit two opposite activation states (M1 and M2 activation), which may be further regulated by the microenvironment. We examined the role of extracellular zinc on M1 activation of microglia. Pre-treatment of microglia with 30–60 μM ZnCl2 resulted in dose-dependent increases in interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) secretion when M1 activation was induced by lipopolysaccharide administration. In contrast, the cell-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, the radical scavenger Trolox, and the P2X7 receptor antagonist A438079 suppressed the effects of zinc pre-treatment on microglia. Furthermore, endogenous zinc release was induced by cerebral ischaemia–reperfusion, resulting in increased expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and the microglial M1 surface marker CD16/32, without hippocampal neuronal cell loss, in addition to impairments in object recognition memory. However, these effects were suppressed by the zinc chelator CaEDTA. These findings suggest that extracellular zinc may prime microglia to enhance production of pro-inflammatory cytokines via P2X7 receptor activation followed by reactive oxygen species generation in response to stimuli that trigger M1 activation, and that these inflammatory processes may result in deficits in object recognition memory. PMID:28240322

  16. Aflatoxin, Aspergillus, Maize, and the Relevance to Alternative Fuels (or Aflatoxin: What is It, Can We Get Rid of It, and Should the Ethanol Industry Care?)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contamination of agricultural commodities by Aspergillus flavus and its subsequent production of aflatoxin is a well known problem. The resulting aflatoxin contamination if undetected results in fatal health issues for both man and animals. To prevent these effects regulatory limits on aflatox...

  17. How Peroxisomes Affect Aflatoxin Biosynthesis in Aspergillus Flavus

    PubMed Central

    Reverberi, Massimo; Punelli, Marta; Smith, Carrie A.; Zjalic, Slaven; Scarpari, Marzia; Scala, Valeria; Cardinali, Giorgia; Aspite, Nicaela; Pinzari, Flavia; Payne, Gary A.; Fabbri, Anna A.; Fanelli, Corrado

    2012-01-01

    In filamentous fungi, peroxisomes are crucial for the primary metabolism and play a pivotal role in the formation of some secondary metabolites. Further, peroxisomes are important site for fatty acids β-oxidation, the formation of reactive oxygen species and for their scavenging through a complex of antioxidant activities. Oxidative stress is involved in different metabolic events in all organisms and it occurs during oxidative processes within the cell, including peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids. In Aspergillus flavus, an unbalance towards an hyper-oxidant status into the cell is a prerequisite for the onset of aflatoxin biosynthesis. In our preliminary results, the use of bezafibrate, inducer of both peroxisomal β-oxidation and peroxisome proliferation in mammals, significantly enhanced the expression of pex11 and foxA and stimulated aflatoxin synthesis in A. flavus. This suggests the existence of a correlation among peroxisome proliferation, fatty acids β-oxidation and aflatoxin biosynthesis. To investigate this correlation, A. flavus was transformed with a vector containing P33, a gene from Cymbidium ringspot virus able to induce peroxisome proliferation, under the control of the promoter of the Cu,Zn-sod gene of A. flavus. This transcriptional control closely relates the onset of the antioxidant response to ROS increase, with the proliferation of peroxisomes in A. flavus. The AfP33 transformant strain show an up-regulation of lipid metabolism and an higher content of both intracellular ROS and some oxylipins. The combined presence of a higher amount of substrates (fatty acids-derived), an hyper-oxidant cell environment and of hormone-like signals (oxylipins) enhances the synthesis of aflatoxins in the AfP33 strain. The results obtained demonstrated a close link between peroxisome metabolism and aflatoxin synthesis. PMID:23094106

  18. SOCS3 Deficiency Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Hongwei; Holdbrooks, Andrew T.; Liu, Yudong; Reynolds, Stephanie L.; Yanagisawa, Lora L.; Benveniste, Etty N.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages participate in both the amplification of inflammation at the time of injury, and downregulation of the inflammatory response to avoid excess tissue damage. These divergent functions of macrophages are dictated by their microenvironment, especially cytokines, which promote a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes. The M1 proinflammatory phenotype is induced by LPS, IFN-γ and GM-CSF, and IL-4, IL-13 and M-CSF induce anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Suppressors Of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) proteins function as feedback inhibitors of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway, and can terminate innate and adaptive immune responses. In this study, we have evaluated the influence of SOCS3 on macrophage polarization and function. Macrophages obtained from LysMCre-SOCS3fl/fl mice, which lack SOCS3 in myeloid lineage cells, exhibit enhanced and prolonged activation of JAK/STAT pathway compared to macrophages from SOCS3fl/fl mice. Furthermore, SOCS3-deficient macrophages have higher levels of the M1 genes IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, IL-23 and iNOS, due to enhanced transcriptional activation and chromatin modifications. SOCS3-deficient M1 macrophages also have a stronger capacity to induce Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation than M1 macrophages from SOCS3fl/fl mice. Lastly, LPS-induced sepsis is exacerbated in LysMCre-SOCS3fl/fl mice, and is associated with enhanced STAT1/3 activation and increased plasma levels of M1 cytokines/chemokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL3, CCL4 and CXCL11. These findings collectively indicate that SOCS3 is involved in repressing the M1 proinflammatory phenotype, thereby deactivating inflammatory responses in macrophages. PMID:22925925

  19. Identification of resistance to aflatoxin accumulation and yield potential in maize hybrids in the Southeast Regional Aflatoxin Trials (SERAT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins pose a serious health hazard to humans and livestock, requiring significant economic cost in identifying and disposing of contaminated grain. Since 2003, a multi-environmental trial of public breeding maize (Zea mays L.) hybrids across multiple programs in the southeastern United States h...

  20. Quantitative Determination of Aflatoxin by High Performance Liquid Chromatography in Wheat Silos in Golestan Province, North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    NAMJOO, Mohadeseh; SALAMAT, Faezeh; RAJABLI, Niloofar; HAJIHOSEEINI, Reza; NIKNEJAD, Farhad; KOHSAR, Faramarz; JOSHAGHANI, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aflatoxins are the most common mycotoxins that contaminate crops. They are produced by fungi such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Wheat (Tricitumaestivum) is one of the most important staple foods used in Iran, and the environmental conditions in the north of Iran are favorable to fungal growth. This study was designed in order to determine the aflatoxin concentration in wheat samples from silos in Golestan Province north of Iran. Methods: Samples were collected from three silos of Golestan province. First, aflatoxins were isolated using immunoaffinity chromatography. Then the aflatoxin concentrations were determined by High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and fluorescence detector. Results: Ten out of 34 samples (29.4% of samples) were contaminated by aflatoxins.No concentration was found above permitted aflatoxin levels in Iran (15 ng/g). In one sample (2.9%), aflatoxin B1 was seen over the permissible limits in Iran. The highest level found in samples for total aflatoxin, aflatoxin B1, aflatoxin B2, aflatoxin G1 and aflatoxin G2 were 7.08 ng/g, 6.91 ng/g, 0.29 ng/g, 1.37 ng/g and 0.23 ng/g, respectively. No correlation was found between humidity levels in wheat samples contained aflatoxin and wheat samples without aflatoxin. Conclusion: Despite the total aflatoxins determined in samples were below the permissible limits in Iran, the 29% aflatoxin contamination rate can negatively affect health factors and it should not be neglected. So, it is predictable that if the storage duration of samples increases, the aflatoxin contamination levels will increase. PMID:27516997

  1. Dillapiol and Apiol as specific inhibitors of the biosynthesis of aflatoxin G1 in Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Rezaee, Mohammad-Bagher; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2007-09-01

    Dillapiol was isolated from the essential oil of dill as a specific inhibitor of aflatoxin G1 production. It inhibited aflatoxin G1 production by Aspergillus parasiticus with an IC50 value of 0.15 microM without inhibiting aflatoxin B1 production or fungal growth. Apiol and myristicin, congeners of dillapiol, showed similar activity with IC50 values of 0.24 and 3.5 microM, respectively.

  2. 26 CFR 31.3402(m)-1 - Withholding allowances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(m)-1 Withholding allowances. (a) General rule. An employee may... employee must first use these items ((1) through (13) of this paragraph (b)) to eliminate any payment of... is entitled in accordance with the tables and instructions on Form W-4. (f) Special rules—(1)...

  3. Deep Transcriptomic Profiling of M1 Macrophages Lacking Trpc3

    PubMed Central

    Kumarasamy, Sivarajan; Solanki, Sumeet; Atolagbe, Oluwatomisin T.; Joe, Bina; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Vazquez, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    In previous studies using mice with macrophage-specific loss of TRPC3 we found a significant, selective effect of TRPC3 on the biology of M1, or inflammatory macrophages. Whereas activation of some components of the unfolded protein response and the pro-apoptotic mediators CamkII and Stat1 was impaired in Trpc3-deficient M1 cells, gathering insight about other molecular signatures within macrophages that might be affected by Trpc3 expression requires an alternative approach. In the present study we conducted RNA-seq analysis to interrogate the transcriptome of M1 macrophages derived from mice with macrophage-specific loss of TRPC3 and their littermate controls. We identified 160 significantly differentially expressed genes between the two groups, of which 62 were upregulated and 98 downregulated in control vs. Trpc3-deficient M1 macrophages. Gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment in processes associated to cellular movement and lipid signaling, whereas the enriched Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways included networks for calcium signaling and cell adhesion molecules, among others. This is the first deep transcriptomic analysis of macrophages in the context of Trpc3 deficiency and the data presented constitutes a unique resource to further explore functions of TRPC3 in macrophage biology. PMID:28051144

  4. Concerning the Integral dx/x[superscript m] (1+x)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, William; Huber, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Consider the integral dx/x[superscript m] (1+x). In the "CRC Standard Mathematical Tables," this integral can require repeated integral evaluations. Enter this integral into your favourite computer algebra system, and the results may be unrecognizable. In this article, we seek to provide a simpler evaluation for integrals of this form. We state up…

  5. Antidepressant therapies inhibit inflammation and microglial M1-polarization.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Hans O; Feuerbach, Dominik

    2016-07-01

    Macrophages and their counterparts in the central nervous system, the microglia, detect and subsequently clear microbial pathogens and injured tissue. These phagocytic cells alter and adapt their phenotype depending on their prime activity, i.e., whether they participate in acute defence against pathogenic organisms ('M1'-phenotype) or in clearing damaged tissues and performing repair activities ('M2'-phenotype). Stimulation of pattern recognition receptors by viruses (vaccines), bacterial membrane components (e.g., LPS), alcohol, or long-chain saturated fatty acids promotes M1-polarization. Vaccine or LPS administration to healthy human subjects can result in sickness symptoms and low mood. Alcohol abuse and abdominal obesity are recognized as risk factors for depression. In the M1-polarized form, microglia and macrophages generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen radicals to eradicate microbial pathogens. Inadvertently, also tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) may become oxidized. This is an irreversible reaction that generates neopterin, a recognized biomarker for depression. BH4 is a critical cofactor for the synthesis of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin, and its loss could explain some of the symptoms of depression. Based on these aspects, the suppression of M1-polarization would limit the inadvertent catabolism of BH4. In the current review, we evaluate the evidence that antidepressant treatments (monoamine reuptake inhibitors, PDE4 inhibitors, lithium, valproate, agomelatine, tianeptine, electroconvulsive shock, and vagus nerve stimulation) inhibit LPS-induced microglia/macrophage M1-polarization. Consequently, we propose that supplementation with BH4 could limit the reduction in central monoamine synthesis and might represent an effective treatment for depressed mood.

  6. Automated Aflatoxin Analysis Using Inline Reusable Immunoaffinity Column Cleanup and LC-Fluorescence Detection.

    PubMed

    Rhemrev, Ria; Pazdanska, Monika; Marley, Elaine; Biselli, Scarlett; Staiger, Simone

    2015-01-01

    A novel reusable immunoaffinity cartridge containing monoclonal antibodies to aflatoxins coupled to a pressure resistant polymer has been developed. The cartridge is used in conjunction with a handling system inline to LC with fluorescence detection to provide fully automated aflatoxin analysis for routine monitoring of a variety of food matrixes. The handling system selects an immunoaffinity cartridge from a tray and automatically applies the sample extract. The cartridge is washed, then aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 are eluted and transferred inline to the LC system for quantitative analysis using fluorescence detection with postcolumn derivatization using a KOBRA® cell. Each immunoaffinity cartridge can be used up to 15 times without loss in performance, offering increased sample throughput and reduced costs compared to conventional manual sample preparation and cleanup. The system was validated in two independent laboratories using samples of peanuts and maize spiked at 2, 8, and 40 μg/kg total aflatoxins, and paprika, nutmeg, and dried figs spiked at 5, 20, and 100 μg/kg total aflatoxins. Recoveries exceeded 80% for both aflatoxin B1 and total aflatoxins. The between-day repeatability ranged from 2.1 to 9.6% for aflatoxin B1 for the six levels and five matrixes. Satisfactory Z-scores were obtained with this automated system when used for participation in proficiency testing (FAPAS®) for samples of chilli powder and hazelnut paste containing aflatoxins.

  7. Aflatoxin contamination in foods and foodstuffs in Tokyo: 1986-1990.

    PubMed

    Tabata, S; Kamimura, H; Ibe, A; Hashimoto, H; Iida, M; Tamura, Y; Nishima, T

    1993-01-01

    Aflatoxins were determined in 3054 samples of foods or foodstuffs, including cereals, nuts, beans, spices, dairy products, dry fruits, and edible oil. Samples were collected in Tokyo from 1986 to 1990. Aflatoxins were found in rice products, adlay, corn, crude sugar, peanut products, pistachio nuts, brazil nuts, sesame products, butter beans, white pepper, red pepper, paprika, nutmeg, and mixed spices. The highest incidence of aflatoxin contamination was observed in nutmeg (80%), and the highest level of aflatoxin B1 was observed in pistachio nuts (1382 ppb).

  8. Effect of aluminosilicates and bentonite on aflatoxin-induced developmental toxicity in rat.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahhab, M A; Nada, S A; Amra, H A

    1999-01-01

    Numerous studies have established that aflatoxin is a potent developmental toxin in animals. Previous research has demonstrated that a phyllosilicate clay, hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS or Novasil), tightly binds and immobilizes aflatoxins in the gastrointestinal tract of animals and markedly reduces the bioavailability and toxicity of aflatoxin. Our objective in this study was to utilize the pregnant rat as an in vivo model to compare the potential of HSCAS and bentonite to prevent the developmental toxicity of aflatoxin. Aluminosilicates (HSCAS) and bentonite were added to the diet at a level of 0.5% (w/w) and fed to the pregnant rat throughout pregnancy (i.e. days 0-20). Test animals were fed an aflatoxin-contaminated diet (2.5 mg kg(-1) diet) with or without sorbents during gestation days 6-15. Evaluations of toxicity were performed on day 20. These included maternal (mortality, body weights, feed intake and litter weights), developmental (embryonic resorptions and fetal body weights) and biochemical (ALT, AST and AP) evaluations. Sorbents alone were not toxic and aflatoxin alone resulted in significant maternal and developmental toxicity. Animals treated with phyllosilicate (plus aflatoxin) were comparable to controls following evaluations for resorptions, live fetuses and fetal body weights, as well as biochemical parameters. While bentonite plus aflatoxin resulted in significant reduction in fetal body weight, none of the fetuses from HSCAS or bentonite plus aflatoxin-treated groups had any gross, internal soft tissue or major skeletal malformations.

  9. Dietary Factors and Hepatoma in Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdneri). I. Aflatoxins in Vegetable Protein Feedstuffs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinnhuber, R.O.; Wales, J.H.; Ayers, J.L.; Engebrecht, R.H.; Amend, D.F.

    1968-01-01

    Aflatoxins (toxic metabolites of the mold Aspergillus flavus) were present in a commercial trout ration causing hepatoma in rainbow trout. Cottonseed meal and solvent extracts of cottonseed meal and of rations containing cottonseed meal and peanut meal were found by chemical assay and confirmed by duckling assay to contain aflatoxins. Diets containing these materials and a purified test diet to which aflatoxins had been added produced microscopic tumors in 6 months and gross lesions of hepatocarcinoma in 9 months. Similar diets without aflatoxin were negative.

  10. Distribution of aflatoxins in product and by-products during glucose production from contaminated corn.

    PubMed

    Aly, Soher E

    2002-10-01

    Aflatoxins are known to be hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic. A positive correlation has been established between the consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated foods and the increased incidence of liver cancer worldwide. A survey of Egyptian corn and corn-based products and by-products shows that the majority of the samples had higher limits of aflatoxin. We have conducted experiments to determine the fate and distribution of aflatoxin during wet-milling process fractions and investigate the aflatoxin destruction during starch conversion to glucose syrup. The present results showed that about half of the aflatoxin content (48.1%) in the infected corn grain was found to be lost in steep liquor, depending upon the aflatoxin type, arranged in the order G1 > G2 > B1 > B2. After wet-milling aflatoxins were distributed into starch, gluten, fiber, and germ. Gluten, fiber, and germ were the most highly contaminated fractions. The loss of aflatoxin during process of starches reached 54.4% in steep water and water process. Although the gluten fraction represents only 9.6% of corn, the higher percentage (25.3%) of aflatoxin was found in this fraction, the fiber and germ account for nearly 29% of the milled corn and contain 11.6% of the aflatoxin. On the other hand, 8.7% of the total aflatoxins in start corn was found in starch fraction which accounts 61% of the milled corn. Aflatoxins G1 and G2 were found lost in higher concentrations compared to the aflatoxin B1 and B2. A higher percentage of AfG1 (86.35%) and AfG2 (78.36%) and a lower percentage of AfB1 (16.3%) and AfB2 (14.7%) were found in starch fraction. The conversion percent of contaminated starch was 89.5% compared with control starch. It can be concluded that aflatoxins were destroyed during starch conversion. Consequently, glucose syrup produced from contaminated starch was found aflatoxin-free.

  11. Effects of various acids and salts on growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus NRRL 3145.

    PubMed

    Uraih, N; Chipley, J R

    1976-01-01

    The effects of sodium chloride, sodium acetate, benzoic acid, sodium benzoate, malonic acid, and sodium malonate on growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus were investigated in synthetic media. Sodium chloride at concentrations equivalent to or greater than 12 g/100 ml inhibited growth and aflatoxin production, while at 8 g or less/100 ml, growth and aflatoxin production were stimulated. At 2 g or less/100 ml, sodium acetate also stimulated growth and aflatoxin production, but reduction occurred with 4 g or more/100 ml. Malonic acid at 10, 20, 40, and 50 mM reduced growth and aflatoxin production (over 50%) while sodium malonate at similar concentrations but different pH values had the opposite effect. Benzoic acid (pH 3.9) and sodium benzoate (pH 5.0) at 0.4 g/100 ml completely inhibited growth and aflatoxin production. Examination of the effect of initial pH indicated that the extent of inhibitory action of malonic acid and sodium acetate was a function of initial pH. The inhibitory action of benzoic acid and sodium benzoate appeared to be a function of undissociated benzoic acid molecules. Aflatoxin reduction was usually accompanied by an unidentified orange pigment, while aflatoxin stimulation was accompanied by unidentified blue and green fluorescent spots but with lower Rf values that aflatoxins B1, G1, B2, and G2 standards.

  12. Correlation between aflatoxin contamination and various USDA grade categories of shelled almonds.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Thomas B; Slate, Andy; Birmingham, Tim; Adams, Julie; Jacobs, Merle; Gray, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The California almond industry is interested in determining if there is a correlation between aflatoxin contamination and almonds classified into various U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) grades. A 12 000 g sample was taken from each of 50 lots of shelled almonds. The almonds in each sample were then partitioned into five USDA grades: high quality (HQ), insect damage (ID), mold damage (MOD), mechanical damage (MED), and other defects (OD). Across all 50 samples, kernels in the HQ grade accounted for 83.7% of the kernel mass and 3.2% of the aflatoxin mass. Conversely, kernels in the remaining four damage grades (ID, MOD, MED, and OD) accounted for 16.3% of the kernel mass and 96.8% of the aflatoxin mass. ID kernels had the highest risk for aflatoxin contamination. Almonds in the ID grade accounted for 76.3% of the total aflatoxin mass and 7.2% of the kernel mass. Regression equations were developed to predict the aflatoxin concentration in each 12 000 g sample by measuring the aflatoxin mass in one or more of the four damage grades. Regression equations demonstrated that aflatoxin mass only in the insect damaged kernels was also an effective way to predict the aflatoxin concentration in each 12 000 g sample.

  13. Sampling hazelnuts for aflatoxin: uncertainty associated with sampling, sample preparation, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozay, Guner; Seyhan, Ferda; Yilmaz, Aysun; Whitaker, Thomas B; Slate, Andrew B; Giesbrecht, Francis

    2006-01-01

    The variability associated with the aflatoxin test procedure used to estimate aflatoxin levels in bulk shipments of hazelnuts was investigated. Sixteen 10 kg samples of shelled hazelnuts were taken from each of 20 lots that were suspected of aflatoxin contamination. The total variance associated with testing shelled hazelnuts was estimated and partitioned into sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variance components. Each variance component increased as aflatoxin concentration (either B1 or total) increased. With the use of regression analysis, mathematical expressions were developed to model the relationship between aflatoxin concentration and the total, sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variances. The expressions for these relationships were used to estimate the variance for any sample size, subsample size, and number of analyses for a specific aflatoxin concentration. The sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variances associated with estimating aflatoxin in a hazelnut lot at a total aflatoxin level of 10 ng/g and using a 10 kg sample, a 50 g subsample, dry comminution with a Robot Coupe mill, and a high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical method are 174.40, 0.74, and 0.27, respectively. The sampling, sample preparation, and analytical steps of the aflatoxin test procedure accounted for 99.4, 0.4, and 0.2% of the total variability, respectively.

  14. Handling and aflatoxin contamination of white maize in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Mora, M; Lacey, J

    1997-01-01

    Projects funded by International Development Research Centre (IDRC) of Canada and the European Commission have enabled the examination of more than 3000 samples of maize collected from all regions of Costa Rica at different stages, from the growing crop through storage to final sale, and at different water contents. Contamination with Aspergillus flavus was frequent and about 80% of samples contained more than 20 ng aflatoxins g(-1) grain. Average contamination with aflatoxins in the Brunca Region was > 274 ng g(-1) while that in other regions was < 70 ng g(-1). Except in Brunca region, where it averaged 376 ng g(-1), contamination of grain from commercial sources was slightly less than of that from farms (< or = 15 ng g(-1)). It appeared that samples kept on the cob after harvest contained almost no aflatoxin while shelled samples were frequently highly contaminated. Experiments were therefore done in Brunca and Huetar Atlantic Regions, utilising 34 experimental maize crops to study in detail the development of A. flavus and aflatoxin from before harvest, through postharvest treatment before drying and through storage for six months. A. flavus was isolated more frequently from maize shelled immediately after harvest than from that kept on the cob until it could be dried, and from more samples from the Brunca Region than from the Huetar Atlantic Region. Samples harvested with > or = 18% water content often contains > 70% of grains infected with A. flavus but sometimes there were few grains infected. As found in the initial survey, more aflatoxin contamination developed in shelled maize than in that handled on the cob during the period from harvesting to drying, especially if the delay was more than 5 days, and more in Brunca than in Huetar. Shelled grain contained 400-800 ng aflatoxin g(-1) in Brunca but < 100 ng g(-1) in Huetar while grain kept on the cob contained < 30 ng g(-1), even with > 18% water content. Incidence of Fusarium spp. exceeded 50% except where A

  15. Effects of Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 on growth performance, meat quality and aflatoxin residues in broilers fed moldy peanut meal naturally contaminated with aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu; Zhao, Lihong; Ma, Qiugang; Li, Xiaoying; Shi, Huiqin; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Jianyun; Ji, Cheng

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the toxic effects of aflatoxins and the efficacy of Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 for the amelioration of aflatoxicosis in broiler chickens. Six replicates of ten broilers each were assigned to one of seven dietary treatments, which were labeled C0 (basal diet); M0 (basal diet containing moldy peanut meal); C500 and C1000 (C0+500 or 1000 g/t aflatoxin biodegradation preparations, composed mainly of ANSB060); and M500, M1000 and M2000 (M0+500, 1000 or 2000 g/t aflatoxin biodegradation preparations). The concentrations of aflatoxin B₁, B₂, G₁ and G₂ in the moldy diets (M0, M500, M100 and M2000) fluctuated around 70.7±1.3, 11.0±1.5, 6.5±0.8 and 2.0±0.3 μg/kg, respectively. The results showed that the M0 diet caused a significant decrease in average daily weight gain and increased feed requirements, with a gain ratio increasing from d 8 to 42, deterioration in meat quality and aflatoxin residues in broilers' livers as compared with the C0 diet. The addition of ANSB060 to the aflatoxin-contaminated diets offset these negative effects, leading to the conclusion that ANSB060 has a protective effect on growth performance and meat quality while reducing the amount of aflatoxin residues in the livers of broilers fed naturally moldy peanut meal.

  16. Isolation of methyl syringate as a specific aflatoxin production inhibitor from the essential oil of Betula alba and aflatoxin production inhibitory activities of its related compounds.

    PubMed

    Jermnak, Usuma; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sugiyama, Yasumasa; Tsuyuki, Rie; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2012-02-15

    Methyl syringate was isolated from the essential oil of Betula alba as an aflatoxin production inhibitor. It inhibited aflatoxin production of Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus with IC(50) values of 0.9 and 0.8 mM, respectively, without significantly inhibiting fungal growth. Methyl syringate reduced mRNA levels of genes (aflR, pksA, and omtB) [corrected] encoding proteins required for aflatoxin biosynthesis. Methyl gallate, methyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, and methyl 3-O-methylgallate inhibited both aflatoxin production and fungal growth of A. parasiticus and A. flavus. However, their acids and syringic acid did not inhibit aflatoxin production and growth of A. parasiticus significantly, although gallic acid inhibited aflatoxin production of A. flavus with selectivity. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of methyl syringate was much weaker than that of gallic acid. These results showed that methyl syringate has a unique inhibitory activity toward aflatoxin production with a different mode of action from that of gallic acid.

  17. Mirror therapy activates outside of cerebellum and ipsilateral M1.

    PubMed

    Shinoura, Nobusada; Suzuki, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yasuko; Yamada, Ryozi; Tabei, Yusuke; Saito, Kuniaki; Yagi, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Mirror therapy is effective in the rehabilitation of patients with hemiparesis, but its mechanism is not clear. In this study, a patient with brain tumor (patient 1) who underwent mirror therapy after surgery and showed drastic recovery of hand paresis, a patient with visual memory disturbance (patient 2), and five normal volunteers performed tasks related to mirror therapy in fMRI study. In patient 1 and all normal volunteers, right and left hand clenching with looking at a mirror (eye open) activated outside of cerebellum, while right and left hands clenching with eye closed activated inside of cerebellum. In patient 2, mirror therapy did not activate outside of cerebellum. In patient 1, and 3 out of 5 normal volunteers, the area of right (affected) M1 activated by right and left hands clenching with eye open was more than that by right and left hands clenching with eye closed, and that right M1 was activated by right hand clenching with eye open. In conclusion, mirror therapy facilitate the paresis of patients by activating ipsilateral M1 and outside of cerebellum, which is possibly related to visual memory function.

  18. Flux-driven algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2016-07-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produces a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius r = Rw at the wall of the trap. The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from, spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This paper explains with analytic theory the new algebraic damping due to particle transport by both mobility and diffusion. As electrons are swept around the "cat's eye" orbits of the resonant wave-particle interaction, they form a dipole (m = 1) density distribution. From this distribution, the electric field component perpendicular to the core displacement produces E × B-drift of the core back to the axis, that is, damps the m = 1 mode. The parallel component produces drift in the azimuthal direction, that is, causes a shift in the mode frequency.

  19. Flux-driven algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with pure electron plasmas in a Malmberg-Penning trap have observed the algebraic damping of m = 1 diocotron modes. Transport due to small field asymmetries produce a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the plasma core, and the mode damping begins when the halo reaches the resonant radius rres, where f = mfE × B (rres) . The damping rate is proportional to the flux of halo particles through the resonant layer. The damping is related to, but distinct from spatial Landau damping, in which a linear wave-particle resonance produces exponential damping. This poster explains with analytic theory and simulations the new algebraic damping due to both mobility and diffusive fluxes. As electrons are swept around the ``cat's eye'' orbits of resonant wave-particle interaction, they form a dipole (m = 1) density distribution, and the electric field from this distribution produces an E × B drift of the core back to the axis, i.e. damps the m = 1 mode. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1414570.

  20. Determination of aflatoxin risk components for in-shell Brazil nuts.

    PubMed

    Vargas, E A; dos Santos, E A; Whitaker, T B; Slate, A B

    2011-09-01

    A study was conducted on the risk from aflatoxins associated with the kernels and shells of Brazil nuts. Samples were collected from processing plants in Amazonia, Brazil. A total of 54 test samples (40 kg) were taken from 13 in-shell Brazil nut lots ready for market. Each in-shell sample was shelled and the kernels and shells were sorted in five fractions: good kernels, rotten kernels, good shells with kernel residue, good shells without kernel residue, and rotten shells, and analysed for aflatoxins. The kernel:shell ratio mass (w/w) was 50.2/49.8%. The Brazil nut shell was found to be contaminated with aflatoxin. Rotten nuts were found to be a high-risk fraction for aflatoxin in in-shell Brazil nut lots. Rotten nuts contributed only 4.2% of the sample mass (kg), but contributed 76.6% of the total aflatoxin mass (µg) in the in-shell test sample. The highest correlations were found between the aflatoxin concentration in in-shell Brazil nuts samples and the aflatoxin concentration in all defective fractions (R(2)=0.97). The aflatoxin mass of all defective fractions (R(2)=0.90) as well as that of the rotten nut (R(2)=0.88) were also strongly correlated with the aflatoxin concentration of the in-shell test samples. Process factors of 0.17, 0.16 and 0.24 were respectively calculated to estimate the aflatoxin concentration in the good kernels (edible) and good nuts by measuring the aflatoxin concentration in the in-shell test sample and in all kernels, respectively.

  1. Fungal Biodeterioration, Aflatoxin Contamination, and Nutrient Value of “Suya Spices”

    PubMed Central

    Jonathan, Segun Gbolagade; Adeniyi, Mary Adejoke; Asemoloye, Michael Dare

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to analyze the nutrient values, examine the biodeteriorating fungi biota, and analyze the mycotoxin contents of “Suya spices.” Fungi with highest percentage occurrence on all the samples are Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus ochraceus, Fusarium sp., Rhizopus stolonifer, yeast, and Trichoderma koningii. Nutrient composition of the samples is significantly different statistically (P < 0.05) with high protein (9.53% to 13.17%), fiber (9.27 to 13.17%), carbohydrate (46.27% to 50.90%), and ash (8.47% to 9.70%) contents but low moisture (9.03% to 9.47%) and fat (9.77% to 13.53%) contents. Aflatoxin analysis of the samples revealed that they all contain aflatoxin in varying amount but no detectible aflatoxin content in the control. 59.54% of the detected aflatoxin is aflatoxin B1 with highest recorded in Agbowo, Mokola, and Sango samples (i.e., 28.03, 22.44, and 13.8 μg/kg, resp.). 4.78% of the aflatoxin is aflatoxin B2 which is only found in Sango and Mokola samples (3.59 and 2.6 μg/kg, resp.). 32.76% of aflatoxin is aflatoxin G1 with the highest found in Agbowo and Mokola samples (i.e., 18.63 and 10.41 μg/kg, resp.). 2.93% of the aflatoxin is aflatoxin G2 which is only detected in Sango and Agbowo samples (i.e., 1.19 and 2.65 μg/kg, resp.). PMID:27092289

  2. Reduction of Aflatoxins in Apricot Kernels by Electronic and Manual Color Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Zivoli, Rosanna; Gambacorta, Lucia; Piemontese, Luca; Solfrizzo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of color sorting on reducing aflatoxin levels in shelled apricot kernels was assessed. Naturally-contaminated kernels were submitted to an electronic optical sorter or blanched, peeled, and manually sorted to visually identify and sort discolored kernels (dark and spotted) from healthy ones. The samples obtained from the two sorting approaches were ground, homogenized, and analysed by HPLC-FLD for their aflatoxin content. A mass balance approach was used to measure the distribution of aflatoxins in the collected fractions. Aflatoxin B1 and B2 were identified and quantitated in all collected fractions at levels ranging from 1.7 to 22,451.5 µg/kg of AFB1 + AFB2, whereas AFG1 and AFG2 were not detected. Excellent results were obtained by manual sorting of peeled kernels since the removal of discolored kernels (2.6%–19.9% of total peeled kernels) removed 97.3%–99.5% of total aflatoxins. The combination of peeling and visual/manual separation of discolored kernels is a feasible strategy to remove 97%–99% of aflatoxins accumulated in naturally-contaminated samples. Electronic optical sorter gave highly variable results since the amount of AFB1 + AFB2 measured in rejected fractions (15%–18% of total kernels) ranged from 13% to 59% of total aflatoxins. An improved immunoaffinity-based HPLC-FLD method having low limits of detection for the four aflatoxins (0.01–0.05 µg/kg) was developed and used to monitor the occurrence of aflatoxins in 47 commercial products containing apricot kernels and/or almonds commercialized in Italy. Low aflatoxin levels were found in 38% of the tested samples and ranged from 0.06 to 1.50 μg/kg for AFB1 and from 0.06 to 1.79 μg/kg for total aflatoxins. PMID:26797635

  3. Reduction of Aflatoxins in Apricot Kernels by Electronic and Manual Color Sorting.

    PubMed

    Zivoli, Rosanna; Gambacorta, Lucia; Piemontese, Luca; Solfrizzo, Michele

    2016-01-19

    The efficacy of color sorting on reducing aflatoxin levels in shelled apricot kernels was assessed. Naturally-contaminated kernels were submitted to an electronic optical sorter or blanched, peeled, and manually sorted to visually identify and sort discolored kernels (dark and spotted) from healthy ones. The samples obtained from the two sorting approaches were ground, homogenized, and analysed by HPLC-FLD for their aflatoxin content. A mass balance approach was used to measure the distribution of aflatoxins in the collected fractions. Aflatoxin B₁ and B₂ were identified and quantitated in all collected fractions at levels ranging from 1.7 to 22,451.5 µg/kg of AFB₁ + AFB₂, whereas AFG₁ and AFG₂ were not detected. Excellent results were obtained by manual sorting of peeled kernels since the removal of discolored kernels (2.6%-19.9% of total peeled kernels) removed 97.3%-99.5% of total aflatoxins. The combination of peeling and visual/manual separation of discolored kernels is a feasible strategy to remove 97%-99% of aflatoxins accumulated in naturally-contaminated samples. Electronic optical sorter gave highly variable results since the amount of AFB₁ + AFB₂ measured in rejected fractions (15%-18% of total kernels) ranged from 13% to 59% of total aflatoxins. An improved immunoaffinity-based HPLC-FLD method having low limits of detection for the four aflatoxins (0.01-0.05 µg/kg) was developed and used to monitor the occurrence of aflatoxins in 47 commercial products containing apricot kernels and/or almonds commercialized in Italy. Low aflatoxin levels were found in 38% of the tested samples and ranged from 0.06 to 1.50 μg/kg for AFB₁ and from 0.06 to 1.79 μg/kg for total aflatoxins.

  4. Sampling almonds for aflatoxin, part I: estimation of uncertainty associated with sampling, sample preparation, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Thomas B; Slate, Andrew B; Jacobs, Merle; Hurley, J Michael; Adams, Julie G; Giesbrecht, Francis G

    2006-01-01

    Domestic and international regulatory limits have been established for aflatoxin in almonds and other tree nuts. It is difficult to obtain an accurate and precise estimate of the true aflatoxin concentration in a bulk lot because of the uncertainty associated with the sampling, sample preparation, and analytical steps of the aflatoxin test procedure. To evaluate the performance of aflatoxin sampling plans, the uncertainty associated with sampling lots of shelled almonds for aflatoxin was investigated. Twenty lots of shelled almonds were sampled for aflatoxin contamination. The total variance associated with measuring B1 and total aflatoxins in bulk almond lots was estimated and partitioned into sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variance components. All variances were found to increase with an increase in aflatoxin concentration (both B1 and total). By using regression analysis, mathematical expressions were developed to predict the relationship between each variance component (total, sampling, sample preparation, and analysis variances) and aflatoxin concentration. Variance estimates were the same for B1 and total aflatoxins. The mathematical relationships can be used to estimate each variance for a given sample size, subsample size, and number of analyses other than that measured in the study. When a lot with total aflatoxins at 15 ng/g was tested by using a 10 kg sample, a vertical cutter mixer type of mill, a 100 g subsample, and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, the sampling, sample preparation, analytical, and total variances (coefficient of variation, CV) were 394.7 (CV, 132.4%), 14.7 (CV, 25.5%), 0.8 (CV, 6.1%), and 410.2 (CV, 135.0%), respectively. The percentages of the total variance associated with sampling, sample preparation, and analytical steps were 96.2, 3.6, and 0.2, respectively.

  5. Uncommon occurrence ratios of aflatoxin B1, B 2, G 1, and G 2 in maize and groundnuts from Malawi.

    PubMed

    Matumba, Limbikani; Sulyok, Michael; Njoroge, Samuel M C; Njumbe Ediage, Emmanuel; Van Poucke, Christof; De Saeger, Sarah; Krska, Rudolf

    2015-02-01

    We report an unusual aflatoxin profile in maize and groundnuts from Malawi, with aflatoxin G1 found routinely at equal or even higher levels than aflatoxin B1. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) ratio in a contaminated sample is generally greater than 50% of total aflatoxin (sum of aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, and G2). In Malawi, the aflatoxin occurrence ratios were determined by examining LC-MS/MS and HPLC fluorescence detection (FLD) data of 156 naturally contaminated raw maize and 80 groundnut samples collected in 2011 and 2012. Results showed that natural aflatoxin occurrence ratio differed. In 47% of the samples, the concentration of AFG1 was higher than that of AFB1. The mean concentration percentages of AFB1/AFB2/AFG1/AFG2 in reference to total aflatoxins were found to be 47:5:43:5%, respectively. The AFG1 and AFB1 50/50 trend was observed in maize and groundnuts and was consistent for samples collected in both years. If the AFB1 measurement was used to check compliance of total aflatoxin regulatory limit set at 10, 20, 100, and 200 μg/kg with an assumption that AFB1≥50% of the total aflatoxin content, 8, 13, 24, and 26% false negative rates would have occurred respectively. It is therefore important for legislation to consider total aflatoxins rather than AFB1 alone.

  6. Fluorescence imaging spectroscopy (FIS) for comparing spectra from corn ears naturally and artificially infected with aflatoxin producing fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to address the aflatoxin problem in grain, the current study assessed the spectral differences of aflatoxin production in kernels from a cornfield inoculated with spores from two different strains of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus. Aflatoxin production in corn from the same field due to n...

  7. Diversity of aflatoxin-producing fungi and their impact on food safety in sub-Saharan Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crops frequently contaminated by aflatoxins are important sources of revenue and daily nourishment in many portions of sub-Saharan Africa. In recent years, reports have associated aflatoxins with diminished human health and export opportunities in many African Nations. Aflatoxins are highly carcinog...

  8. Sampling hazelnuts for aflatoxin: Effects of sample size and accetp/reject limit on reducing risk of misclassifying lots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About 100 countries have established regulatory limits for aflatoxin in food and feeds. Because these limits vary widely among regulating countries, the Codex Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants (CCFAC) began work in 2004 to harmonize aflatoxin limits and sampling plans for aflatoxin in alm...

  9. Aflatoxin levels and exposure assessment of Spanish infant cereals.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Raquel; Navarro-Blasco, Iñigo

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2) are immunosuppressant, mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic agents with a widespread presence in foodstuffs. Since human exposure to aflatoxins occurs primarily by contaminated food intake, and given the greater susceptibility of infants to their adverse effects, the quantification of these mycotoxins in infant food based on cereals is of relevance. Aflatoxin levels were determined in 91 Spanish infant cereals classified in terms of non- and organically produced and several types from 10 different manufacturers, using a extraction procedure followed by inmunoaffinity column clean-up step and HPLC with fluorescence detection (FLD) and post-column derivatisation (Kobra Cell system). Daily aflatoxin intake was also assessed. Preliminary analysis showed a valuable incidence of detected infant cereal samples at an upper concentration level than the detection limit for total aflatoxin (66%), corresponding to a 46, 40, 34 and 11% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. Lower aflatoxin values (median, Q1, Q3) in conventional infant cereal (n = 74, AFB1: aflatoxin levels. Gluten-free and cereals with dehydrated fruits had an intermediate level and milk- or honey-based cereals and multi-cereals contained the lowest levels. With the exception of the non-compliant cocoa-based organic formulation

  10. Aflatoxin Regulations in a Network of Global Maize Trade

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia; Guclu, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, food supplies often contain unavoidable contaminants, many of which adversely affect health and hence are subject to regulations of maximum tolerable levels in food. These regulations differ from nation to nation, and may affect patterns of food trade. We soughtto determine whether there is an association between nations' food safety regulations and global food trade patterns, with implications for public health and policymaking. We developed a network model of maize trade around the world. From maize import/export data for 217 nations from 2000–2009, we calculated basic statistics on volumes of trade; then examined how regulations of aflatoxin, a common contaminant of maize, are similar or different between pairs of nations engaging in significant amounts of maize trade. Globally, market segregation appears to occur among clusters of nations. The United States is at the center of one cluster; European countries make up another cluster with hardly any maize trade with the US; and Argentina, Brazil, and China export maize all over the world. Pairs of nations trading large amounts of maize have very similar aflatoxin regulations: nations with strict standards tend to trade maize with each other, while nations with more relaxed standards tend to trade maize with each other. Rarely among the top pairs of maize-trading nations do total aflatoxin standards (standards based on the sum of the levels of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2) differ by more than 5 µg/kg. These results suggest that, globally, separate maize trading communities emerge; and nations tend to trade with other nations that have very similar food safety standards. PMID:23049773

  11. Aflatoxin regulations in a network of global maize trade.

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Guclu, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, food supplies often contain unavoidable contaminants, many of which adversely affect health and hence are subject to regulations of maximum tolerable levels in food. These regulations differ from nation to nation, and may affect patterns of food trade. We soughtto determine whether there is an association between nations' food safety regulations and global food trade patterns, with implications for public health and policymaking. We developed a network model of maize trade around the world. From maize import/export data for 217 nations from 2000-2009, we calculated basic statistics on volumes of trade; then examined how regulations of aflatoxin, a common contaminant of maize, are similar or different between pairs of nations engaging in significant amounts of maize trade. Globally, market segregation appears to occur among clusters of nations. The United States is at the center of one cluster; European countries make up another cluster with hardly any maize trade with the US; and Argentina, Brazil, and China export maize all over the world. Pairs of nations trading large amounts of maize have very similar aflatoxin regulations: nations with strict standards tend to trade maize with each other, while nations with more relaxed standards tend to trade maize with each other. Rarely among the top pairs of maize-trading nations do total aflatoxin standards (standards based on the sum of the levels of aflatoxins B(1), B(2), G(1), and G(2)) differ by more than 5 µg/kg. These results suggest that, globally, separate maize trading communities emerge; and nations tend to trade with other nations that have very similar food safety standards.

  12. Aflatoxins in Rice Artificially Contaminated with Aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus flavus under Natural Storage in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Satoshi; Doi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Masahiko; Mitoh, Yoshihiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Ikeda, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    Aflatoxin (AFT) contamination is frequent in foods grown in tropical regions, including rice. Although AFTs are generally not found in temperate-region foods, global warming has affected typical temperate-region climates, potentially permitting the contamination of foods with AFT-producing Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus). Here we investigated the AFT production in rice during storage under natural climate conditions in Japan. We examined AFTs in brown rice and rough rice artificially contaminated with A. flavus for 1 year in Japan, and we subjected AFTs in white rice to the same treatment in airtight containers and examined the samples in warm and cold seasons, simulating the storage of white rice in general households. In the brown rice, AFTs increased after 2 months (March) and peaked after 9 months (October). The AFT contamination in the rough rice was minimal. After the polishing and cooking of the brown rice, AFTs were undetectable. In the white rice stored in airtight containers, AFTs increased after 1 month (August) and peaked after 2 months (September). Minimal AFTs were detected in the cold season. Thus, AFT contamination in rice may occur in temperate regions following A. flavus contamination. The storage of rice as rough rice could provide be useful for avoiding AFT contamination.

  13. Aflatoxin B₁ and aflatoxins in ground red chilli pepper after drying.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Ali; Bindak, Recep; Erkmen, Osman

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 180 red chilli pepper (RCP) berry samples were obtained from two different croplands of Gaziantep and Kahramanmaraş (Turkey) in August, September and October. RCP berry samples were dried under sunlight and grinded. Ground red chilli pepper (GRCP) samples were analysed for aflatoxins (AFs, sum of B1, B2, G1 and G2) and AFB1 contamination. According to the results, in 49 of 180 samples, AFB1 and in 37 samples, AFs were higher than legal limits. The lowest amounts of AFs and AFB1 were obtained in August and the highest amounts in October. χ(2) analysis showed that there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between cities among 3 months according to number of samples with AFs and AFB1 above legal limits. According to the Duncan multiple-range test, there was no significant difference between all months. Strict measures are necessary to produce high-quality GRCP. RCP berry must be treated to reduce moulds before production of GRCP.

  14. Metabolism of aflatoxin B-1 in cotton bolls

    SciTech Connect

    Mellon, J.E.; Lee, L.S. )

    1989-04-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungus capable of producing the potent carcinogen aflatoxin (AFB-1) when it infects developing cotton seed. Although high levels of toxin can readily be isolated from internal tissues of infected seeds, very low toxin levels are observed in the fiber-linter matrix. In order to test the hypothesis that constituents associated with the lint of the host plant are metabolizing aflatoxin, {sup 14}C-AFB-1 was introduced into cotton bolls (30 days postanthesis). Other sets of bolls received inoculations of toxigenic or nontoxigenic strains of A. flavus plus exogenous {sup 14}C-AFB-1. In addition to the exogenously applied {sup 14}C-AFB-1, at least two new labelled metabolites were recovered from the test bolls. One of these metabolites was very polar and remained on the origin of the thin layer analysis system. Test bolls which received both A. flavus and AFB-1 produced significantly lower levels of this polar metabolite. Results indicated that some constituent(s) associated with cotton fiber may metabolize fungal-produced aflatoxin, rather than inhibit its formation.

  15. Pulmonary interstitial fibrosis with evidence of aflatoxin B1 in lung tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorackova, I.; Pichova, V.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis, two in agricultural workers and one in a textile worker, are reported. In lung samples of all three patients the presence of aflatoxin B1 was demonstrated by radioimmunoassay (RIA). A possible occupational risk of aflatoxin exposure via the respiratory tract is suggested.

  16. Integrated process for ammonia inactivation of aflatoxin-contaminated corn and ethanol fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bothast, R.J.; Nofsinger, G.W.; Lagoda, A.A.; Black, L.T.

    1982-04-01

    A process is described for converting aflatoxin-contaminated corn to ethanol via combining ammonia inactivation with the liquefaction step of the ethanol fermentation process. Better ethanol yields were obtained when ammonia was added during liquefaction than when no ammonia was added. Aflatoxin B/sub 1/ levels were reduced 80 to 85% by the process.

  17. Oral administration of piperine for the control of aflatoxin intoxication in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gagini, Thalita B.; Silva, Robson E.; Castro, Isabela S.; Soares, Breno A.; Lima, Marco E.F.; Brito, Marilene F.; Mazur, Carlos; Direito, Glória M.; Danelli, Maria das Graças M.

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins that have important toxic effects on human and animal health, even if consumed at low doses. The oral administration of piperine (1.12 mg/kg) during 23 days in rats seemingly interfered with the toxicity of aflatoxins, decreasing hepatic injuries and the leukocyte depletion in experimentally intoxicated animals. PMID:24031502

  18. Conversion of 11-hydroxy-O-methylsterigmatocystin to aflatoxin G1 in Aspergillus parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In aflatoxin biosynthesis, aflatoxins G1 (AFG1) and B1 (AFB1) are independently produced from a common precursor, O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST). Recently, 11-hydroxy-O-methylsterigmatocystin (HOMST) was identified as a later precursor involved in the conversion of OMST to AFB1. However, the invo...

  19. Maize Aflatoxin Accumulation Segregates with Early Maturing Selections from an S2 Breeding Cross Population

    PubMed Central

    Henry, W. Brien

    2013-01-01

    Maize breeders continue to seek new sources of aflatoxin resistance, but most lines identified as resistance sources are late maturing. The vast difference in flowering time makes it hard to cross these lines with proprietary commercial lines that mature much earlier and often subjects the reproductive phase of these resistant lines to the hottest and driest portion of the summer, making silking, pollination and grain fill challenging. Two hundred crosses from the GEM Project were screened for aflatoxin accumulation at Mississippi State in 2008, and a subset of these lines were screened again in 2009. The breeding cross UR13085:S99g99u was identified as a potential source of aflatoxin resistance, and maturity-based selections were made from an S2 breeding population from this same germplasm source: UR13085:S99g99u-B-B. The earliest maturing selections performed poorly for aflatoxin accumulation, but later maturing selections were identified with favorable levels of aflatoxin accumulation. These selections, while designated as “late” within this study, matured earlier than most aflatoxin resistant lines presently available to breeders. Two selections from this study, designated S5_L7 and S5_L8, are potential sources of aflatoxin resistance and will be advanced for line development and additional aflatoxin screening over more site years and environments. PMID:23322131

  20. Process Development for Spray Drying a Value-Added Extract from Aflatoxin Contaminated Peanut Meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut meal, the primary byproduct of commercial oil crushing operations, is an excellent source of protein though aflatoxin contamination often limits applications for this material. Naturally aflatoxin contaminated (59 ppb) peanut meal dispersions were adjusted to pH 2.1 or pH 9.1, with or without...

  1. Incidence and Level of Aflatoxins Contamination in Medicinal Plants in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Deuk; Yu, In Sil; Jung, Kweon

    2014-01-01

    During 2011~2013, a total of 729 samples for 19 types of medicinal plant were collected from Seoulyekryungsi in Seoul, Korea, and investigated for the presence of aflatoxins. The samples were analyzed using immunoaffinity column cleanup and high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a fluorescence detector after post-column derivatization. Aflatoxins were found in 124 out of the 729 analyzed samples: 65 containing aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 24 with aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), 15 with aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), and 20 samples with aflatoxin G2 (AFG2). The ranges for positive samples were 0.1~404.7 µg/kg for AFB1, 0.1~10.0 µg/kg for AFB2, 0.1~635.3 µg/kg for AFG1, 0.1~182.5 µg/kg for AFG2, and 0.1~1,043.9 µg/kg for total aflatoxins. Most of the medicinal plant samples (721, 98.9%) were below legal limits, but 8 samples exceeded the legal limits of 10 and 15 µg/kg established by the Korean standard for AFB1 and total aflatoxins (the sum of AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2), respectively. PMID:25606005

  2. Analysis of genetic and aflatoxin diversity among Aspergillus flavus strains isolated from sorghum seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 34 A. flavus isolates were recovered from sorghum seeds sampled across five states in India. Our study included (1) species confirmation through PCR assay, (2) an aflatoxin cluster genotype assay using developed multiplex PCR, (3) quantification of total aflatoxin concentrations by the iC...

  3. Transport via xylem and accumulation of aflatoxin in seeds of groundnut plant.

    PubMed

    Snigdha, M; Hariprasad, P; Venkateswaran, G

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination in groundnut seeds in the absence of any aflatoxigenic fungi leads to a hypothesis that aflatoxins are present naturally in soil and is transferred to seeds through uptake by roots. A survey was conducted on the natural occurrence of aflatoxins in agricultural soils, among nine main groundnut-growing regions of Karnataka state, India. All 71 soil samples collected in this survey were contaminated with aflatoxins esp. AFB1. An in vitro xylem sap experiment proved the ability of groundnut plant roots to absorb AFB1, and transport to aerial plant parts via the xylem. Hydroponics experiment also proved the uptake of AFB1 by the roots and their translocation to shoot. Uptake was affected by the initial concentration of toxin and pH of the medium. Among the 14 varieties screened, GPBD4 and MLT.K.107 (III) recorded highest and least AFB1 uptake, respectively. The above results were validated using a greenhouse experiment. Here, the aflatoxin absorbed by root gradually transferred to shoot that was later found in seeds towards the end of experiment. Thus, the groundnut seeds can also get contaminated with aflatoxin by direct uptake of aflatoxin through conducting tissue in addition to fungal infection. The present study revealed the novel mode of aflatoxin contamination in groundnut seeds without fungal infection.

  4. Aflatoxin production by entomopathogenic isolates of Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Drummond, J; Pinnock, D E

    1990-05-01

    Fourteen isolates of Aspergillus parasiticus and 2 isolates of Aspergillus flavus isolated from the mealybug Saccharicoccus sacchari were analyzed for production of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in liquid culture over a 20-day period. Twelve Aspergillus isolates including 11 A. parasiticus and 1 A. flavus produced aflatoxins which were extracted from both the mycelium and culture filtrate. Aflatoxin production was detected at day 3 and was detected continually for up to day 20. Aflatoxin B1 production was greatest between 7 and 10 days and significantly higher quantities were produced by A. flavus compared to A. parasiticus. Aflatoxin production was not a stable trait in 1 A. parasiticus isolate passaged 50 times on agar. In addition to loss of aflatoxin production, an associated loss in sporulation ability was also observed in this passaged isolate, although it did maintain pathogenicity against S. sacchari. An aflatoxin B1 concentration of 0.16 micrograms/mealybug (14.2 micrograms/g wet wt) was detected within the tissues of infected mealybugs 7 days after inoculation. In conclusion, the ability of Aspergillus isolates to produce aflatoxins was not essential to the entomopathogenic activity of this fungus against its host S. sacchari.

  5. The potential role of oxidative stress in Aspergillus flavus survivability and aflatoxin biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination of food and feed occurs due to growth of Aspergillus flavus. This poses a serious health risk because of aflatoxin’s toxic and carcinogenic properties which negatively impact human and livestock health. Colonization and subsequent aflatoxin production by A. flavus is typicall...

  6. Aflatoxin production and environmental oxidative stress in Aspergillus flavus: Implications forhost resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contamination of maize kernel tissues with aflatoxin is of major concern in global food production, particularly in developing countries. Resistance to aflatoxin is negatively influenced by environmental stress, namely drought stress. Given that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to accumul...

  7. NsdC and NsdD affect Aspergillus flavus morphogenesis and aflatoxin production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcription factors NsdC and NsdD have been shown to be necessary for sexual development in Aspergillus nidulans. Herein we examine the role of these proteins in development and aflatoxin production of the agriculturally important, aflatoxin-producing fungus, Aspergillus flavus. We found tha...

  8. Combining genomic approaches to understand genetic control of aflatoxin contamination in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination in peanut is more prevalent under rainfed conditions making produce unfit for human and animal consumption, affecting the international trade adversely. Although the losses in yield and quality due to aflatoxin contamination is higher than realized, there are limited resistan...

  9. Atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus endemic to Italy for biocontrol of aflatoxins in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective biological control of aflatoxin­producing Aspergillus flavus with atoxigenic members of that species requires suitable A. flavus well adapted to and resident in target agroecosystems. Eighteen atoxigenic isolates of A. flavus endemic in Italy were compared for ability to reduce aflatoxin c...

  10. Sexuality generates diversity in the aflatoxin gene cluster: evidence on a global scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The worldwide costs associated with aflatoxin monitoring and crop losses are in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Aflatoxins also account for considerable health risks, even in countries where food contamination is regulated. Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus are the most common agents of af...

  11. Introduction to the Toxin Reviews Special Issue "Aspergillus, Aflatoxin, Cyclopiazonic Acid, and Biological Control"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue of Toxin Reviews, “Aspergillus, Aflatoxin, CPA and Biological Control of Aflatoxin", is different from previous publications because it focuses on solving the problem of mycotoxin contamination through the use of biological control strains of Aspergillus, which is applicable to th...

  12. Non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates reduce aflatoxins, cyclopiazonic acid and fumonisin in corn (maize)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus strains vary widely in their production of aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). A total of 500 Aspergillus strains isolated from a variety of sources showed 16.4% were negative for both aflatoxin and CPA, 41.3% were positive for both mycotoxins, 13.0% were positive only fo...

  13. Biological control of aflatoxin is effective and economical in Mississippi field trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination of corn is a major grain quality issue and can be a major economic limiting factor to Mississippi corn farmers. Biological control products based on aflatoxin non-producing strains of Aspergillus flavus are commercially available to prevent the contamination of corn with afl...

  14. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for reducing Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus in corn poses significant health risks for both humans and livestock. Corn growers suffer huge economic losses due to increased aflatoxin accumulation in grain especially under drought and higher temperature stress conditions. Exploitation of host plant resi...

  15. Association between aflatoxin contamination and N2 fixation in peanut under drought conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traits related to nitrogen fixation may be used as indirect selection criteria for aflatoxin resistance in peanut. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between N2 fixation traits and aflatoxin contamination in peanut under different drought conditions. Eleven peanut genotypes we...

  16. Association between surrogate traits of drought tolerance and aflatoxin contamination in peanut cultivars under terminal drought

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Terminal drought induces pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination (PAC). Drought resistance traits are promising as indirect selection tools for improving resistance to PAC. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of terminal drought on Aspergillus invasion and aflatoxin contamination ...

  17. Simple, rapid, and inexpensive cleanup method for quantitation of aflatoxins in important agricultural products by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Victor S

    2007-03-21

    A chemical cleanup procedure for low-level quantitative determination of aflatoxins in major economically important agricultural commodities using HPLC has been developed. Aflatoxins were extracted from a ground sample with MeOH/H2O (80:20, v/v), and after a cleanup step on a minicolumn packed with Florisil, aflatoxins were quantified by HPLC equipped with a C18 column, a photochemical reactor, and a fluorescence detector. Water/MeOH (63:37, v/v) served as the mobile phase. Recoveries of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 from peanuts spiked at 5, 1.7, 5, and 1.7 ng/g were 89.5+/-2.2, 94.7+/-2.5, 90.4+/-1.0, and 98.2+/-1.1, respectively (mean+/-SD, %, n=3). Similar recoveries, precision, and accuracy were achieved for corn, brown and white rice, cottonseed, almonds, Brazil nuts, pistachios, walnuts, and hazelnuts. The quantitation limits for aflatoxins in peanuts were 50 pg/g for aflatoxin B1 and 17 pg/g for aflatoxin B2. The minimal cost of the minicolumn allows for substantial savings compared with available commercial aflatoxin cleanup devices.

  18. Assessment of Adoption Gaps in Management of Aflatoxin Contamination of Groundnut ("Arachis Hypogaea" L.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, G. D. S.; Popat, M. N.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major impediments for diversification of groundnut ("Arachis Hypogaea" L.) as food crop is aflatoxin contamination. The study was conducted with an objective to assess the adoption gaps in aflatoxin management practices of groundnut (AMPG) and the farmer's characteristics influencing these gaps. The study used an expost-facto…

  19. Efficacy of water dispersible formulations of biocontrol strains of Aspergillus flavus for aflatoxin management in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field experiments were conducted in 2011 and 2012 to evaluate the efficacy of water dispersible granule (WDG) formulations of biocontrol strains of Aspergillus flavus in controlling aflatoxin contamination of corn. In 2011, when aflatoxin was present at very high levels, no WDG treatment provided s...

  20. 75 FR 43045 - Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Modification of the Aflatoxin Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... shipped for domestic human consumption while maintaining sufficient aflatoxin controls. It is expected to... order's rules and regulations for pistachios to be shipped for domestic human consumption, while... pistachios to be sampled and tested for aflatoxin prior to being shipped for domestic human...

  1. Screening a strain of Aspergillus niger and optimization of fermentation conditions for degradation of aflatoxin B₁.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xue, Beibei; Li, Mengmeng; Mu, Yang; Chen, Zhihui; Li, Jianping; Shan, Anshan

    2014-11-13

    Aflatoxin B₁, a type of highly toxic mycotoxin produced by some species belonging to the Aspergillus genus, such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, is widely distributed in feed matrices. Here, coumarin was used as the sole carbon source to screen microorganism strains that were isolated from types of feed ingredients. Only one isolate (ND-1) was able to degrade aflatoxin B₁ after screening. ND-1 isolate, identified as a strain of Aspergillus niger using phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 18S rDNA, could remove 26.3% of aflatoxin B₁ after 48 h of fermentation in nutrient broth (NB). Optimization of fermentation conditions for aflatoxin B₁ degradation by selected Aspergillus niger was also performed. These results showed that 58.2% of aflatoxin B₁ was degraded after 24 h of culture under the optimal fermentation conditions. The aflatoxin B₁ degradation activity of Aspergillus niger supernatant was significantly stronger than cells and cell extracts. Furthermore, effects of temperature, heat treatment, pH, and metal ions on aflatoxin B₁ degradation by the supernatant were examined. Results indicated that aflatoxin B₁ degradation of Aspergillus niger is enzymatic and this process occurs in the extracellular environment.

  2. RNA interference reduces aflatoxin accumulation by Aspergillus flavus in peanut seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are among the most powerful carcinogens in nature. They are produced by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus Link and other Aspergillus species. Aflatoxins accumulate in many crops, including rice, wheat, oats, pecans, pistachios, soybean, cassava, almonds, peanuts, beans, corn and cot...

  3. Regulation of the aflatoxin-like toxin dothistromin by AflJ

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biosynthesis by Aspergillus parasiticus of aflatoxin, one of the most potent known naturally occurring carcinogens, requires the activity of two regulatory proteins, AflR and AflJ, which are encoded by divergently transcribed genes within the aflatoxin gene cluster. Although the Zn2Cys6 transcriptio...

  4. Development of narrow-band fluorescence index for the detection of aflatoxin contaminated corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin is produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus when the fungus invades developing corn kernels. Because of its potent toxicity, the levels of aflatoxin are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, allowing 20 ppb (parts per billion) limits in food, and feed intended for...

  5. Using Genome-Wide Associations to Identify Metabolic Pathways Involved in Maize Aflatoxin Accumulation Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin is a potent carcinogen that can contaminate grain infected with the fungus Aspergillus flavus. However, resistance to aflatoxin accumulation in maize is a complex trait with low heritability. Here, two complementary analyses were performed to better understand the mechanisms involved. T...

  6. Genome wide association mapping of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin accumulation resistance in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of maize with aflatoxin, produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus, has severe health and economic consequences. Efforts to reduce aflatoxin accumulation in maize have focused on identifying and selecting germplasm with natural host resistance factors, and several maize lines with sign...

  7. Evaluating the skill of seasonal weather forecasts in predicting aflatoxin contamination of groundnut in Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brak, B.; Challinor, A.

    2011-12-01

    Aflatoxins, a group of toxic secondary metabolites produced by some strains of a number of species within Aspergillus section Flavi, contaminate a range of crops grown at latitudes between 40N° and 40S° of the equator. Digestion of food products derived from aflatoxin-contaminated crops may result in acute and chronic health problems in human beings. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa in particular have seen large percentages of the human population exposed to aflatoxin. A recent study showed that over 98% of subjects in West Africa tested positive for aflatoxin biomarkers. According to other research, every year 250,000 people die from hepato-cellular carcinoma related causes due to aflatoxin ingestion in parts of West Africa. Strict aflatoxin levels set by importing countries in accordance with the WTO Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) also impair the value of agricultural trade. Over the last thirty years this has led to a reduction of African exports of groundnut by 19% despite the consumption of groundnut derived food products going up by 209%. The occurrence of aflatoxin on crops is strongly influenced by weather. Empirical studies in the US have shown that pre-harvest, aflatoxin contamination of groundnuts is induced by conditions of drought stress in combination with soil temperatures between 25°C and 31°C. Post-harvest, aflatoxin production of stored, Aspergillus-contaminated groundnuts is exacerbated in conditions where relative humidity is above 83%. The GLAM crop model was extended to include a soil temperature subroutine and subroutines containing pre- and post-harvest aflatoxin algorithms. The algorithms used to estimate aflatoxin contamination indices are based on findings from multiple empirical studies and the pre-harvest aflatoxin model has been validated for Australian conditions. Hence, there was sufficient scope to use GLAM with these algorithms to answer the foremost research question: Is the

  8. Effect of dietary acids on the formation of aflatoxin B2a as a means to detoxify aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Rushing, Blake R; Selim, Mustafa I

    2016-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a class 1 carcinogen and a common food contaminant worldwide with widely uncontrolled human exposure. The ability of organic acids to transform AFB1 into a known detoxified form, aflatoxin B2a (AFB2a), was investigated using high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI/TOF/MS). The identity of the transformation product was confirmed by accurate mass measurement, chromatographic separation from other aflatoxins, H(1)-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Of the weak acids tested, citric acid was found to be the most effective for AFB2a formation. At room temperature, 1 M citric acid was able to convert > 97% of AFB1 to AFB2a over 96 h of treatment. Up to 98% transformation was achieved by boiling AFB1 in the presence of citric acid for 20 min. AFB1 hydration after ingestion was explored by spiking AFB1 into simulated gastric fluid containing citric acid. Under these conditions, > 71% of AFB1 was hydrated to AFB2a and did not show any reversion to the parent compound after being transferred to a neutral solution. These results provide a basis for a practical and effective method for detoxification of AFB1 in contaminated foods.

  9. Aflatoxins: A Global Concern for Food Safety, Human Health and Their Management

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Mahato, Dipendra K.; Kamle, Madhu; Mohanta, Tapan K.; Kang, Sang G.

    2017-01-01

    The aflatoxin producing fungi, Aspergillus spp., are widely spread in nature and have severely contaminated food supplies of humans and animals, resulting in health hazards and even death. Therefore, there is great demand for aflatoxins research to develop suitable methods for their quantification, precise detection and control to ensure the safety of consumers’ health. Here, the chemistry and biosynthesis process of the mycotoxins is discussed in brief along with their occurrence, and the health hazards to humans and livestock. This review focuses on resources, production, detection and control measures of aflatoxins to ensure food and feed safety. The review is informative for health-conscious consumers and research experts in the fields. Furthermore, providing knowledge on aflatoxins toxicity will help in ensure food safety and meet the future demands of the increasing population by decreasing the incidence of outbreaks due to aflatoxins. PMID:28144235

  10. Aflatoxin-induced biochemical changes in liver of mice and its mitigation by black tea extract.

    PubMed

    Jha, Anamika; Shah, Komal; Verma, Ramtej J

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxin belongs to the class of naturally occurring mycotoxins, food contaminants having potent carcinogenicity. We have evaluated the ameliorative role of black tea extract on aflatoxin-induced biochemical changes in the liver of albino male mice. Adult male mice were orally administered with 750 and 1500 pg of aflatoxin in 0.2 mL olive oil/kg b.w./day for 30 days. Oral administration of aflatoxin caused, as compared with controls, significant, dose-dependent reduction in DNA, RNA, protein and glycogen contents; however, cholesterol content and phsphorylase activity were significantly increased. Black tea is one of the most potent antioxidants containing numerous bioactive phytonurtients having therapeutic applications. Aflatoxin-induced changes in the liver of mice were significantly ameliorated on co-treatment of black tea extract (2% infusion in water).

  11. Survey of aflatoxin concentrations in wild bird seed purchased in Texas.

    PubMed

    Henke, S E; Gallardo, V C; Martinez, B; Balley, R

    2001-10-01

    The use of backyard feeders to attract avian wildlife is a common practice throughout the United States. However, feeding wildlife may create a problem due to aflatoxin, a harmful fungal metabolite, which can affect wildlife that are fed contaminated grain. Our study was initiated to determine if songbirds were being exposed to aflatoxin-contaminated feed throughout Texas. Bags of wild bird seed (n = 142) were purchased from grain cooperatives, grocery stores, and pet shops located in the panhandle, central, south, east, and west regions of Texas during spring and summer 1999. Aflatoxin concentrations in bird seed ranged from non-detectable to 2,780 micrograms/kg. Overall, 17% of samples had aflatoxin concentrations greater than 100 micrograms/kg, of which 83% contained corn as an ingredient. Retail establishment effects were noted in the southern and western regions of Texas, with average concentrations of aflatoxin greater from bags of bird seed purchased from grain cooperatives, followed by pet shops, then grocery stores. Regional differences in aflatoxin levels were not apparent from bags of seed purchased at pet shops: however, regional differences were noted in aflatoxin levels from seeds obtained at grocery stores and grain cooperatives. Average aflatoxin concentration from seed purchased at grocery stores was greatest in the panhandle region, followed by the remaining regions. Within grain cooperatives, the panhandle, south, and west regions of Texas exhibited higher levels of aflatoxin-contaminated bird seed than cooperatives within the east and central regions of Texas. Granivorous songbirds in Texas are exposed to aflatoxins at backyard feeders, which may be a significant morbidity and mortality factor.

  12. Pectocin M1 (PcaM1) Inhibits Escherichia coli Cell Growth and Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis through Periplasmic Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chérier, Dimitri; Giacomucci, Sean; Patin, Delphine; Bouhss, Ahmed; Touzé, Thierry; Blanot, Didier; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Barreteau, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Colicins are bacterial toxins produced by some Escherichia coli strains. They exhibit either enzymatic or pore-forming activity towards a very limited number of bacterial species, due to the high specificity of their reception and translocation systems. Yet, we succeeded in making the colicin M homologue from Pectobacterium carotovorum, pectocin M1 (PcaM1), capable of inhibiting E. coli cell growth by bypassing these reception and translocation steps. This goal was achieved through periplasmic expression of this pectocin. Indeed, when appropriately addressed to the periplasm of E. coli, this pectocin could exert its deleterious effects, i.e., the enzymatic degradation of the peptidoglycan lipid II precursor, which resulted in the arrest of the biosynthesis of this essential cell wall polymer, dramatic morphological changes and, ultimately, cell lysis. This result leads to the conclusion that colicin M and its various orthologues constitute powerful antibacterial molecules able to kill any kind of bacterium, once they can reach their lipid II target. They thus have to be seriously considered as promising alternatives to antibiotics. PMID:27740593

  13. Pectocin M1 (PcaM1) Inhibits Escherichia coli Cell Growth and Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis through Periplasmic Expression.

    PubMed

    Chérier, Dimitri; Giacomucci, Sean; Patin, Delphine; Bouhss, Ahmed; Touzé, Thierry; Blanot, Didier; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Barreteau, Hélène

    2016-10-08

    Colicins are bacterial toxins produced by some Escherichia coli strains. They exhibit either enzymatic or pore-forming activity towards a very limited number of bacterial species, due to the high specificity of their reception and translocation systems. Yet, we succeeded in making the colicin M homologue from Pectobacterium carotovorum, pectocin M1 (PcaM1), capable of inhibiting E. coli cell growth by bypassing these reception and translocation steps. This goal was achieved through periplasmic expression of this pectocin. Indeed, when appropriately addressed to the periplasm of E. coli, this pectocin could exert its deleterious effects, i.e., the enzymatic degradation of the peptidoglycan lipid II precursor, which resulted in the arrest of the biosynthesis of this essential cell wall polymer, dramatic morphological changes and, ultimately, cell lysis. This result leads to the conclusion that colicin M and its various orthologues constitute powerful antibacterial molecules able to kill any kind of bacterium, once they can reach their lipid II target. They thus have to be seriously considered as promising alternatives to antibiotics.

  14. Integrated optic sensor for measuring aflatoxin-B1 in corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarski, Anthony A.; Busch, James R.; Brody, R. S.; Ridgway, Richard W.; Altman, Wolf P.; Golden, C.

    1996-03-01

    An integrated optic refractometer device was developed to perform a rapid one-step, homogeneous immunoassay. The device measures refractive index changes at the surface of a planar, singlemode, ion-exchange waveguide using difference interferometry. Anti-aflatoxin- B1 antibodies were attached to the waveguide surface to provide a bioselective coating for detecting and quantifying the aflatoxin-B1 antigen level in a sample. The detection limit of this small antigen must be determined using a competitive assay format. To determine feasibility of the competitive assay, we determined the biosensor response to a larger molecular weight competing antigen, namely HRP-labeled aflatoxin-B1. This labeled antigen will compete with unlabeled aflatoxin for binding sites on the sensor surface. Increased sample aflatoxin levels will result in a decreased time-dependent phase change of the helium-neon laser light beam. Phase change data were determined for various concentration levels of HRP-labeled aflatoxin- B1 antigen. The assay measurements were made over a 5-minute time period. Results indicated that a competitive assay is feasible. Future assay efforts should be able to demonstrate measurement of aflatoxin-B levels found in contaminated corn samples.

  15. Autoxidated linolenic acid inhibits aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus via oxylipin species.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shijuan; Liang, Yating; Zhang, Jindan; Chen, Zhuang; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus species are among the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds in nature. Although it has been known for a long time that seeds with high oil content are more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination, the role of fatty acids in aflatoxin biosynthesis remains controversial. Here we demonstrate in A. flavus that both the saturated stearic acid (C18:0) and the polyunsaturated linolenic acid (C18:3) promoted aflatoxin production, while C18:3, but not C18:0, inhibited aflatoxin biosynthesis after exposure to air for several hours. Further experiments showed that autoxidated C18:3 promoted mycelial growth, sporulation, and kojic acid production, but inhibited the expression of genes in the AF biosynthetic gene cluster. Mass spectrometry analyses of autoxidated C18:3 fractions that were able to inhibit aflatoxin biosynthesis led to the identification of multiple oxylipin species. These results may help to clarify the role of fatty acids in aflatoxin biosynthesis, and may explain why controversial results have been obtained for fatty acids in the past.

  16. The case for aflatoxins in the causal chain of gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Foerster, Claudia; Koshiol, Jill; Guerrero, Ariel R; Kogan, Marcelo J; Ferreccio, Catterina

    2016-01-01

    Chronic aflatoxin exposure has long been related to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recently, its association with gallbladder cancer (GBC) was postulated. Here we present the data supporting this hypothesis in Chile, the country with the highest GBC mortality worldwide with age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) of 10.3 in women and 5.04 in men. The highest GBC rates occur in Southern Chile (ASMR=18), characterized by: high Amerindian ancestry, associated with high bile acid synthesis and gallstones; high poverty and high cereal agriculture, both associated with aflatoxin exposure. Aflatoxins have been detected in imported and locally grown foods items. We estimated population dietary exposure ranging from 0.25 to 35.0 ng/kg-body weight/day. The only report on human exposure in Chile found significantly more aflatoxin biomarkers in GBC than in controls (Odds Ratio=13.0). The hypothesis of aflatoxin-GBC causal link in the Chilean population is supported by: genetically-determined rapid cholesterol excretion and high gallstones prevalence (49.4%); low prevalence of HCC (ASMR=4.9) and low HBV infection (0.15%) the main co-factor of aflatoxins in HCC risk. If the association between aflatoxins and GBC were confirmed, public health interventions based on food regulation could have a substantial public health impact.

  17. Global risk assessment of aflatoxins in maize and peanuts: are regulatory standards adequately protective?

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Stacy, Shaina L; Kensler, Thomas W

    2013-09-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America.

  18. Detoxification of Aflatoxin-Contaminated Maize by Neutral Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water.

    PubMed

    Jardon-Xicotencatl, Samantha; Díaz-Torres, Roberto; Marroquín-Cardona, Alicia; Villarreal-Barajas, Tania; Méndez-Albores, Abraham

    2015-10-23

    Aflatoxins, a group of extremely toxic mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius, can occur as natural contaminants of certain agricultural commodities, particularly maize. These toxins have been shown to be hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic and cause severe human and animal diseases. The effectiveness of neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water (NEW) on aflatoxin detoxification was investigated in HepG2 cells using several validation methodologies such as the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, the induction of lipid peroxidation, the oxidative damage by means of glutathione modulation, the Ames test and the alkaline Comet assay. Our results showed that, after the aflatoxin-contaminated maize containing 360 ng/g was soaked in NEW (60 mg/L available chlorine, pH 7.01) during 15 min at room temperature, the aflatoxin content did not decrease as confirmed by the immunoaffinity column and ultra performance liquid chromatography methods. Aflatoxin fluorescence strength of detoxified samples was similar to untreated samples. However, aflatoxin-associated cytotoxicity and OPEN ACCESS Toxins 2015, 7 4295 genotoxicity effects were markedly reduced upon treatment. According to these results, NEW can be effectively used to detoxify aflatoxin-contaminated maize.

  19. Characterization of small RNA populations in non-transgenic and aflatoxin-reducing-transformed peanut.

    PubMed

    Power, Imana L; Dang, Phat M; Sobolev, Victor S; Orner, Valerie A; Powell, Joseph L; Lamb, Marshall C; Arias, Renee S

    2017-04-01

    Aflatoxin contamination is a major constraint in food production worldwide. In peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), these toxic and carcinogenic aflatoxins are mainly produced by Aspergillus flavus Link and A. parasiticus Speare. The use of RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising method to reduce or prevent the accumulation of aflatoxin in peanut seed. In this study, we performed high-throughput sequencing of small RNA populations in a control line and in two transformed peanut lines that expressed an inverted repeat targeting five genes involved in the aflatoxin-biosynthesis pathway and that showed up to 100% less aflatoxin B1 than the controls. The objective was to determine the putative involvement of the small RNA populations in aflatoxin reduction. In total, 41 known microRNA (miRNA) families and many novel miRNAs were identified. Among those, 89 known and 10 novel miRNAs were differentially expressed in the transformed lines. We furthermore found two small interfering RNAs derived from the inverted repeat, and 39 sRNAs that mapped without mismatches to the genome of A. flavus and were present only in the transformed lines. This information will increase our understanding of the effectiveness of RNAi and enable the possible improvement of the RNAi technology for the control of aflatoxins.

  20. Sequence breakpoints in the aflatoxin biosynthesis gene cluster and flanking regions in nonaflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates.

    PubMed

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Horn, Bruce W; Dorner, Joe W

    2005-11-01

    Aspergillus flavus populations are genetically diverse. Isolates that produce either, neither, or both aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) are present in the field. We investigated defects in the aflatoxin gene cluster in 38 nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates collected from southern United States. PCR assays using aflatoxin-gene-specific primers grouped these isolates into eight (A-H) deletion patterns. Patterns C, E, G, and H, which contain 40 kb deletions, were examined for their sequence breakpoints. Pattern C has one breakpoint in the cypA 3' untranslated region (UTR) and another in the verA coding region. Pattern E has a breakpoint in the amdA coding region and another in the ver1 5'UTR. Pattern G contains a deletion identical to the one found in pattern C and has another deletion that extends from the cypA coding region to one end of the chromosome as suggested by the presence of telomeric sequence repeats, CCCTAATGTTGA. Pattern H has a deletion of the entire aflatoxin gene cluster from the hexA coding region in the sugar utilization gene cluster to the telomeric region. Thus, deletions in the aflatoxin gene cluster among A. flavus isolates are not rare, and the patterns appear to be diverse. Genetic drift may be a driving force that is responsible for the loss of the entire aflatoxin gene cluster in nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates when aflatoxins have lost their adaptive value in nature.

  1. Production of Aflatoxin on Wheat and Oats: Measurement with a Recording Densitometer

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, R. D.; Shotwell, O. L.; Hesseltine, C. W.; Smith, M. L.; Hall, H. H.

    1967-01-01

    A method has been developed for the production of aflatoxin by growing Aspergillus flavus NRRL 3145 on solid substrate wheat. Optimal yields of 900 μg of aflatoxin G1 and 900 μg of aflatoxin B1 per g of substrate were obtained in 4 to 5 days at 28 C. A study of aflatoxin production on hulls and groats of oats and on whole oats by A. flavus strains NRRL 2999, NRRL 3000, and NRRL 3145 revealed that aflatoxin was produced on all three substrates, although production was very slight on hulls. Strain NRRL 3145 grown on solid substrate groats produced the largest amounts of aflatoxin: 580 μg of B1 and 450 μg of G1 per g of substrate. A densitometric method for reading thin-layer chromatographic plates is described; this is more objective and more accurate than the visual methods previously used for the determination of all four aflatoxins. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6031432

  2. Inhibitory Activities of Alkyl Syringates and Related Compounds on Aflatoxin Production

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Iimura, Kurin; Kimura, Taichi; Yamamoto, Toshiyoshi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of aflatoxin production of aflatoxigenic fungi are useful for preventing aflatoxin contamination in crops. As methyl syringate weakly inhibits aflatoxin production, aflatoxin production inhibitory activities of additional alkyl syringates with alkyl chains from ethyl to octyl were examined. Inhibitory activity toward aflatoxin production of Aspergillus flavus became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains on the esters became longer. Pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, and octyl syringates showed strong activity at 0.05 mM. Heptyl and octyl parabens, and octyl gallate also inhibited aflatoxin production as strongly as octyl syringate. Alkyl parabens and alkyl gallates inhibit the complex II activity of the mitochondrial respiration chain; thus, whether alkyl syringates inhibit complex II activity was examined. Inhibitory activities of alkyl syringates toward complex II also became stronger as the length of the alkyl chains increased. The complex II inhibitory activity of octyl syringate was comparable to that of octyl paraben and octyl gallate. These results suggest that alkyl syringates, alkyl parabens, and alkyl gallates, including commonly used food additives, are useful for aflatoxin control. PMID:27338472

  3. Susceptibility of strawberries, blackberries, and cherries to Aspergillus mold growth and aflatoxin production.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, G C; Eadie, T; Dashek, W V

    1982-05-01

    The susceptibility of blackberries, cherries, and strawberries to Aspergillus growth and aflatoxin production has been examined. Three aflatoxigenic isolates of Aspergillus, A. flavus ATCC 15548 and NRRL 3251 as well as A. parasiticus NRRL 2999, were cultured on homogenates of the fruits for 14 days at 28 +/- 2 degrees C. Percent mycelial growth and spore infestation were determined each day with a calibrated grid. At day 14 each culture was frozen at -5 degrees C until aflatoxins were extracted with methylene chloride and water. Aflatoxins were separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) with benzene-methanol-acetic acid (90 + 5 + 5). This extraction and solvent system provided satisfactory separations of the aflatoxins and was free of background interference on the TLC plates. Although all fruits served as substrates for both Aspergillus growth and aflatoxin production, cherries appeared to be a more favorable substrate than did blackberries, and the latter was more favorable than strawberries. Whereas A. flavus produced both B1 and G1 on all substrates, it yielded B2 and G2 only on cherries. Although A. parasiticus NRRL 2999 synthesized B1, B2, G1, and G2 on both blackberries and cherries, no aflatoxins were detected on strawberries. In contrast, A. flavus NRRL 3251 failed to produce detectable levels of aflatoxin on any substrate. All substrates supported both mycelial growth and subsequent sporulation with cherries greater than blackberries greater than strawberries.

  4. Assessment of Aflatoxin and Fumonisin Contamination of Maize in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mutiga, S K; Hoffmann, V; Harvey, J W; Milgroom, M G; Nelson, R J

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a survey of aflatoxin and fumonisin in maize in western Kenya. In a regional survey of aflatoxin conducted in 2009 across three agroecological zones within three administrative regions, milled maize samples were collected from 985 patrons of 26 hammer mills. Aflatoxin contamination was detected in 49% of samples and was above the regulatory (10 ppb) in 15% of the samples overall; 65% of samples from a drought-prone area were over the limit. In a detailed survey in Bungoma County, we investigated aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination in four popular maize varieties at harvest and after 2 and 4 months of storage. We collected whole-grain samples from farmers' storage sheds and milled samples from patrons of local mills. Mean aflatoxin contamination was identical for storage sheds and mills at 2.3 ppb. In all, 41% of the samples from mills had detectable aflatoxin, with 4% over the regulatory limit, whereas 87% had detectable fumonisin, with 50% over the regulatory limit (1 ppm). Mean contamination levels did not change during storage. Maize varieties differed in fumonisin contamination, with the most popular varieties vulnerable to both mycotoxins and weevils, which are potential factors in exacerbating mycotoxin contamination. Mycotoxin surveillance is important not just in areas known previously for aflatoxin contamination and acute poisoning but also is needed in all maize-producing regions.

  5. Global Risk Assessment of Aflatoxins in Maize and Peanuts: Are Regulatory Standards Adequately Protective?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America. PMID:23761295

  6. Biotechnological advances for combating Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin contamination in crops.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar-Mathur, Pooja; Sunkara, Sowmini; Bhatnagar-Panwar, Madhurima; Waliyar, Farid; Sharma, Kiran Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, teratogenic and immunosuppressive byproducts of Aspergillus spp. that contaminate a wide range of crops such as maize, peanut, and cotton. Aflatoxin not only affects crop production but renders the produce unfit for consumption and harmful to human and livestock health, with stringent threshold limits of acceptability. In many crops, breeding for resistance is not a reliable option because of the limited availability of genotypes with durable resistance to Aspergillus. Understanding the fungal/crop/environment interactions involved in aflatoxin contamination is therefore essential in designing measures for its prevention and control. For a sustainable solution to aflatoxin contamination, research must be focused on identifying and improving knowledge of host-plant resistance factors to aflatoxin accumulation. Current advances in genetic transformation, proteomics, RNAi technology, and marker-assisted selection offer great potential in minimizing pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination in cultivated crop species. Moreover, developing effective phenotyping strategies for transgenic as well as precision breeding of resistance genes into commercial varieties is critical. While appropriate storage practices can generally minimize post-harvest aflatoxin contamination in crops, the use of biotechnology to interrupt the probability of pre-harvest infection and contamination has the potential to provide sustainable solution.

  7. Determination of aflatoxins in by-products of industrial processing of cocoa beans.

    PubMed

    Copetti, Marina V; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Pereira, José Luiz; Lemes, Daniel P; Nakano, Felipe; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2012-01-01

    This study has examined the occurrence of aflatoxins in 168 samples of different fractions obtained during the processing of cocoa in manufacturing plants (shell, nibs, mass, butter, cake and powder) using an optimised methodology for cocoa by-products. The method validation was based on selectivity, linearity, limit of detection and recovery. The method was shown to be adequate for use in quantifying the contamination of cocoa by aflatoxins B(1), B(2), G(1) and G(2). Furthermore, the method was easier to use than other methods available in the literature. For aflatoxin extraction from cocoa samples, a methanol-water solution was used, and then immunoaffinity columns were employed for clean-up before the determination by high-performance liquid chromatography. A survey demonstrated a widespread occurrence of aflatoxins in cocoa by-products, although in general the levels of aflatoxins present in the fractions from industrial processing of cocoa were low. A maximum aflatoxin contamination of 13.3 ng g(-1) was found in a nib sample. The lowest contamination levels were found in cocoa butter. Continued monitoring of aflatoxins in cocoa by-products is nevertheless necessary because these toxins have a high toxicity to humans and cocoa is widely consumed by children through cocoa-containing products, like candies.

  8. Biosorption of B-aflatoxins Using Biomasses Obtained from Formosa Firethorn [Pyracantha koidzumii (Hayata) Rehder].

    PubMed

    Ramales-Valderrama, Rosa Adriana; Vázquez-Durán, Alma; Méndez-Albores, Abraham

    2016-07-13

    Mycotoxin adsorption onto biomaterials is considered as a promising alternative for decontamination without harmful chemicals. In this research, the adsorption of B-aflatoxins (AFB₁ and AFB₂) using Pyracantha koidzumii biomasses (leaves, berries and the mixture of leaves/berries) from aqueous solutions was explored. The biosorbent was used at 0.5% (w/v) in samples spiked with 100 ng/mL of B-aflatoxin standards and incubated at 40 °C for up to 24 h. A standard biosorption methodology was employed and aflatoxins were quantified by an immunoaffinity column and UPLC methodologies. The biosorbent-aflatoxin interaction mechanism was investigated from a combination of zeta potential (ζ), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The highest aflatoxin uptakes were 86% and 82% at 6 h using leaves and the mixture of leaves/berries biomasses, respectively. A moderate biosorption of 46% was attained when using berries biomass. From kinetic studies, the biosorption process is described using the first order adsorption model. Evidence from FTIR spectra suggests the participation of hydroxyl, amine, carboxyl, amide, phosphate and ketone groups in the biosorption and the mechanism was proposed to be dominated by the electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged functional groups and the positively charged aflatoxin molecules. Biosorption by P. koidzumii biomasses has been demonstrated to be an alternative to conventional systems for B-aflatoxins removal.

  9. Detoxification of Aflatoxin-Contaminated Maize by Neutral Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water

    PubMed Central

    Jardon-Xicotencatl, Samantha; Díaz-Torres, Roberto; Marroquín-Cardona, Alicia; Villarreal-Barajas, Tania; Méndez-Albores, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins, a group of extremely toxic mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius, can occur as natural contaminants of certain agricultural commodities, particularly maize. These toxins have been shown to be hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic and cause severe human and animal diseases. The effectiveness of neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water (NEW) on aflatoxin detoxification was investigated in HepG2 cells using several validation methodologies such as the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, the induction of lipid peroxidation, the oxidative damage by means of glutathione modulation, the Ames test and the alkaline Comet assay. Our results showed that, after the aflatoxin-contaminated maize containing 360 ng/g was soaked in NEW (60 mg/L available chlorine, pH 7.01) during 15 min at room temperature, the aflatoxin content did not decrease as confirmed by the immunoaffinity column and ultra performance liquid chromatography methods. Aflatoxin fluorescence strength of detoxified samples was similar to untreated samples. However, aflatoxin-associated cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects were markedly reduced upon treatment. According to these results, NEW can be effectively used to detoxify aflatoxin-contaminated maize. PMID:26512692

  10. Occupational exposure to Aspergillus and aflatoxins among food-grain workers in India

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Abida; Ali, Sana; Shahid, Mohd; Bhargava, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aflatoxins are a metabolite of Aspergillus molds and are widespread in the natural environment. Workers who handle food grains are at increased risk of exposure to aflatoxins and subsequently certain respiratory conditions. In India, more than half of the employed population is engaged in some type of agricultural work, yet little known about the respiratory problems as a result of exposure to aflatoxins among workers who handle food grains in India. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the risk of occupational exposure to aflatoxins in food-grain workers compared to workers who are not occupationally exposed to food grains. Methods: Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum samples from 46 food-grain workers and 44 non-food-grain workers were analyzed for the presence of aflatoxins. Microscopy and culture of BAL samples were performed to detect Aspergillus species. Results: Aflatoxins were detected in 32.6% of the food-grain workers and 9.1% of non food grain workers (P<0.01). A significant difference was also found in BAL culture for Aspergillus (P<0.01) between the two groups. About 47.8% of the food-grain workers and 11.4% of non-food-grain workers had chronic respiratory symptoms. Conclusion: Occupational exposure to aflatoxins in food-grain workers was found to be associated with the increased presence of respiratory symptoms. PMID:25000106

  11. Biosorption of B-aflatoxins Using Biomasses Obtained from Formosa Firethorn [Pyracantha koidzumii (Hayata) Rehder

    PubMed Central

    Ramales-Valderrama, Rosa Adriana; Vázquez-Durán, Alma; Méndez-Albores, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Mycotoxin adsorption onto biomaterials is considered as a promising alternative for decontamination without harmful chemicals. In this research, the adsorption of B-aflatoxins (AFB1 and AFB2) using Pyracantha koidzumii biomasses (leaves, berries and the mixture of leaves/berries) from aqueous solutions was explored. The biosorbent was used at 0.5% (w/v) in samples spiked with 100 ng/mL of B-aflatoxin standards and incubated at 40 °C for up to 24 h. A standard biosorption methodology was employed and aflatoxins were quantified by an immunoaffinity column and UPLC methodologies. The biosorbent-aflatoxin interaction mechanism was investigated from a combination of zeta potential (ζ), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The highest aflatoxin uptakes were 86% and 82% at 6 h using leaves and the mixture of leaves/berries biomasses, respectively. A moderate biosorption of 46% was attained when using berries biomass. From kinetic studies, the biosorption process is described using the first order adsorption model. Evidence from FTIR spectra suggests the participation of hydroxyl, amine, carboxyl, amide, phosphate and ketone groups in the biosorption and the mechanism was proposed to be dominated by the electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged functional groups and the positively charged aflatoxin molecules. Biosorption by P. koidzumii biomasses has been demonstrated to be an alternative to conventional systems for B-aflatoxins removal. PMID:27420096

  12. Interventions targeting child undernutrition in developing countries may be undermined by dietary exposure to aflatoxin.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sinead; Gong, Yun Yun; Routledge, Michael

    2017-06-13

    Child undernutrition, a form of malnutrition, is a major public health burden in developing countries. Supplementation interventions targeting the major micronutrient deficiencies have only reduced the burden of child undernutrition to a certain extent, indicating that there are other underlying determinants that need to be addressed. Aflatoxin exposure, which is also highly prevalent in developing countries, may be considered an aggravating factor for child undernutrition. Increasing evidence suggests that aflatoxin exposure can occur in any stage of life, including in utero through a trans-placental pathway and in early childhood (through contaminated weaning food and family food). Early life exposure to aflatoxin is associated with adverse effects on low birth weight, stunting, immune suppression, and the liver function damage. The mechanisms underlying impaired growth and aflatoxin exposure are still unclear but intestinal function damage, reduced immune function, and alteration in the insulin-like growth factor axis caused by the liver damage are the suggested hypotheses. Given the fact that both aflatoxin and child undernutrition are common in sub-Saharan Africa, effective interventions aimed at reducing undernutrition cannot be satisfactorily achieved until the interactive relationship between aflatoxin and child undernutrition is clearly understood, and an aflatoxin mitigation strategy takes effect in those vulnerable mothers and children.

  13. Boric acid: a potential chemoprotective agent against aflatoxin b1 toxicity in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Geyikoglu, Fatime

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 is the most potent pulmonary and hepatic carcinogen. Since the eradication of Aflatoxin B1 contamination in agricultural products has been difficult, the use of natural or synthetic free radical scavengers could be a potential chemopreventive strategy. Boric acid is the major component of industry and its antioxidant role has recently been reported. The present study assessed, for the first time, the effectiveness of boric acid following exposure to Aflatoxin B1 on human whole blood cultures. The biochemical characterizations of glutathione and some enzymes have been carried out in erythrocytes. Alterations in malondialdehyde level were determined as an index of oxidative stress. The sister-chromatid exchange and micronucleus tests were performed to assess DNA damages in lymphocytes. Aflatoxin B1 treatment significantly reduced the activities of antioxidants by increasing malondialdehyde level (30.53 and 51.43%) of blood, whereas, the boric acid led to an increased resistance of DNA to oxidative damage induced by Aflatoxin B1 in comparison with control values (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the support of boric acid was especially useful in Aflatoxin-toxicated blood. Thus the risk on tissue targeting of Aflatoxin B1 could be reduced ensuring early recovery from its toxicity. PMID:20431944

  14. Thermoelectric waste heat recovery from an M1 Abrams tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, C. David; Thomas, Peter M.; Baldasaro, Nicholas G.; Mantini, Michael J.; Venkatasubramanian, Rama; Barton, Michael D.; Cardine, Christopher V.; Walker, Grayson W.

    2012-06-01

    The addition of advanced sensors, targeting systems and electronic countermeasures to military vehicles has created a strategic need for additional electric power. By incorporating a thermoelectric (TE) waste heat recovery system to convert available exhaust heat to electricity, increased electric power needs can be met without reducing the energy efficiency of the vehicle. This approach allows existing vehicles to be upgraded without requiring a complete re-design of the engine and powertrain to support the integration of advanced electronic sensors and systems that keep the performance at the state of the art level. RTI has partnered with General Dynamics Land Systems and Creare, Inc. under an Army Research Lab program to develop a thermoelectric exhaust waste heat recovery system for the M1 Abrams tank. We have designed a reduced-scale system that was retrofitted to the tank and generated 80W of electric power on the vehicle operating on a test track by capturing a portion of the exhaust heat from the Honeywell/Lycoming AGT-1500 gas turbine engine.

  15. Stability of aflatoxin B-1 and ochratoxin A in brewing.

    PubMed

    Chu, F S; Chang, C C; Ashoor, S H; Prentice, N

    1975-03-01

    The stability of aflatoxin B-1 and ochratoxin A in brewing was investigated by adding the purified toxins to the raw materials at 1 and 10 mug/g levels during mashing in a conventional micro-brewing process. The results indicate that both toxins are stable to heat and are insensitive to cooker mash treatment. Both mycotoxins were partially removed in the mashing and brewing processes. About 14 to 18% and 27 to 28% of the added toxins were found in the final beers brewed from starting materials containing 1 and 10 mug, respectively, of either toxin per g. The possible route of transmission of mycotoxins into beer is discussed.

  16. Potential economic losses to the US corn industry from aflatoxin contamination.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Nicole J; Bowers, Erin; Hurburgh, Charles; Wu, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Mycotoxins, toxins produced by fungi that colonise food crops, can pose a heavy economic burden to the US corn industry. In terms of economic burden, aflatoxins are the most problematic mycotoxins in US agriculture. Estimates of their market impacts are important in determining the benefits of implementing mitigation strategies within the US corn industry, and the value of strategies to mitigate mycotoxin problems. Additionally, climate change may cause increases in aflatoxin contamination in corn, greatly affecting the economy of the US Midwest and all sectors in the United States and worldwide that rely upon its corn production. We propose two separate models for estimating the potential market loss to the corn industry from aflatoxin contamination, in the case of potential near-future climate scenarios (based on aflatoxin levels in Midwest corn in warm summers in the last decade). One model uses the probability of acceptance based on operating characteristic (OC) curves for aflatoxin sampling and testing, while the other employs partial equilibrium economic analysis, assuming no Type 1 or Type 2 errors, to estimate losses due to proportions of lots above the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) aflatoxin action levels. We estimate that aflatoxin contamination could cause losses to the corn industry ranging from US$52.1 million to US$1.68 billion annually in the United States, if climate change causes more regular aflatoxin contamination in the Corn Belt as was experienced in years such as 2012. The wide range represents the natural variability in aflatoxin contamination from year to year in US corn, with higher losses representative of warmer years.

  17. Population structure and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus Sect. Flavi from maize in Nigeria and Ghana.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Haidukowski, Miriam; Stea, Gaetano; Epifani, Filomena; Bandyopadhyay, Ranajit; Leslie, John F; Logrieco, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    Aflatoxins are highly toxic carcinogens that contaminate crops worldwide. Previous studies conducted in Nigeria and Ghana found high concentrations of aflatoxins in pre- and post-harvest maize. However, little information is available on the population structure of Aspergillus Sect. Flavi in West Africa. We determined the incidence of Aspergillus Sect. Flavi and the level of aflatoxin contamination in 91 maize samples from farms and markets in Nigeria and Ghana. Aspergillus spp. were recovered from 61/91 maize samples and aflatoxins B1 and/or B2 occurred in 36/91 samples. Three samples from the farms also contained aflatoxin G1 and/or G2. Farm samples were more highly contaminated than were samples from the market, in terms of both the percentage of the samples contaminated and the level of mycotoxin contamination. One-hundred-and-thirty-five strains representative of the 1163 strains collected were identified by using a multilocus sequence analysis of portions of the genes encoding calmodulin, β-tubulin and actin, and evaluated for aflatoxin production. Of the 135 strains, there were 110 - Aspergillus flavus, 20 - Aspergillus tamarii, 2 - Aspergillus wentii, 2 - Aspergillus flavofurcatus, and 1 - Aspergillus parvisclerotigenus. Twenty-five of the A. flavus strains and the A. parvisclerotigenus strain were the only strains that produced aflatoxins. The higher contamination of the farm than the market samples suggests that the aflatoxin exposure of rural farmers is even higher than previously estimated based on reported contamination of market samples. The relative infrequency of the A. flavus SBG strains, producing small sclerotia and high levels of both aflatoxins (B and G), suggests that long-term chronic exposure to this mycotoxin are a much higher health risk in West Africa than is the acute toxicity due to very highly contaminated maize in east Africa.

  18. Potential economic losses to the USA corn industry from aflatoxin contamination

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, N.J.; Bowers, E.; Hurburgh, C.; Wu, F.

    2016-01-01

    Mycotoxins, toxins produced by fungi that colonize food crops, can pose a heavy economic burden to the United States corn industry. In terms of economic burden, aflatoxins are the most problematic mycotoxins in US agriculture. Estimates of their market impacts are important in determining the benefits of implementing mitigation strategies within the US corn industry, and the value of strategies to mitigate mycotoxin problems. Additionally, climate change may cause increases in aflatoxin contamination in corn, greatly affecting the economy of the US Midwest and all sectors in the US and worldwide that rely upon its corn production. We propose two separate models for estimating the potential market loss to the corn industry from aflatoxin contamination, in the case of potential near-future climate scenarios (based on aflatoxin levels in Midwest corn in warm summers in the last decade). One model uses probability of acceptance based on operating characteristic (OC) curves for aflatoxin sampling and testing, while the other employs partial equilibrium economic analysis, assuming no Type 1 or Type 2 errors, to estimate losses due to proportions of lots above the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) aflatoxin action levels. We estimate that aflatoxin contamination could cause losses to the corn industry ranging from $52.1 million to $1.68 billion annually in the United States, if climate change causes more regular aflatoxin contamination in the Corn Belt as was experienced in years such as 2012. The wide range represents the natural variability in aflatoxin contamination from year to year in US corn, with higher losses representative of warmer years. PMID:26807606

  19. [Adsorption of aflatoxin on montmorillonite modified by low-molecular-weight humic acids].

    PubMed

    Yao, Jia-Jia; Kang, Fu-Xing; Gao, Yan-Zheng

    2012-03-01

    The adsorption of a typical biogenic toxin aflatoxin B1 on montmorillonite modified by low-molecular-weight humic acids (M(r) < 3 500) was investigated. The montmorillonite rapidly adsorbed the aflatoxin B1 until amounting to the maximal capacity, and then the adsorbed aflatoxin B1 slowly released into solution and reached the sorption equilibrium state after 12 h. The sorption isotherm of aflatoxin B1 by montmorillonite could be well described by Langmiur model, while the sorption isotherm by humic acid-modified montmorillonite was well fitted by using the Freundlich model. The modification of the montmorillonite with humic acids obviously enhanced its adsorption capacity for aflatoxin B1, and the amounts of aflatoxin adsorbed by modified montmorillonite were obviously higher than those by montmorillonite. The sorption enhancement by humic acid modification was attributed to (1) the enlarged adsorption sites which owed to the surface collapse of crystal layers induced by organic acids, and (2) the binding of aflatoxin with the humic acid sorbed on mineral surface. In addition, the adsorption amounts of aflatoxin by montmorillonite and modified montmorillonite increased with the increase of pH values in solution, and more significant enhancement was observed for the latter than the former, which attributed to the release of humic acids from the modified montmorillonite with the high pH values in solution. This indicates that increasing the pH values resulted in the enhanced hydrophilic property and the release of the organic acids presented in modified montmorillonite, and more sorption sites were available for aflatoxin on the modified montmorillonite. Results of this work would strengthen our understanding of the behavior and fate of biological contaminants in the environment.

  20. Assessment of hot peppers for aflatoxin and mold proliferation during storage.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Qumer; Amjad, Muhammad; Asi, Muhammad Rafique; Ariño, Agustin

    2011-05-01

    Aflatoxin contamination and mold proliferation in three hot pepper hybrids (Sky Red, Maha, and Wonder King) were studied during 5 months of storage at three temperatures (20, 25, and 30°C) and under different packaging conditions (low-density polyethylene bags and jute bags). The presence of aflatoxins in hot pepper samples was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with a UV-Vis detector. Sampling for analysis of aflatoxins, total mold counts, and Aspergillus counts was carried out at 0, 50, 100, and 150 days of storage. Hot peppers packed in jute bags were more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination than those packed in polyethylene bags; aflatoxin concentrations were 75% higher in peppers stored in jute bags. The effect of storage temperature resulted in aflatoxin concentrations that were 61% higher in hot peppers stored at 25 and 30°C than in those stored at 20°C. Of the three pepper hybrids, Wonder King was more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination, with a maximum of 1.50 μg/kg when packed in jute bags and stored at 25°C for 150 days. However, no sample exceeded the maximum permitted level for total aflatoxins in spices established by European Union regulations (10 μg/kg). Total mold counts and Aspergillus counts increased with storage duration, but all counts were significantly lower in peppers stored in polyethylene bags. A gradual increase in temperature during prolonged storage of hot peppers in combination with aeration may be the main reasons for increases in fungal biomass and Aspergillus proliferation with the subsequent aflatoxin production.

  1. Determination of Aflatoxin B1 in Smokeless Tobacco Products by Use of UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zitomer, Nicholas; Rybak, Michael E; Li, Zhong; Walters, Matthew J; Holman, Matthew R

    2015-10-21

    This work developed a UHPLC-MS/MS method for the detection and quantitation of aflatoxins in smokeless tobacco products, which was then used to determine aflatoxin B1 concentrations in 32 smokeless tobacco products commercially available in the United States. Smokeless tobacco products were dried, milled, and amended with (13)C17-labeled internal standards, extracted in water/methanol solution in the presence of a surfactant, isolated through use of immunoaffinity column chromatography, and reconstituted in mobile phase prior to UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. The method was capable of baseline separation of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in a 2.5 min run by use of a fused core C18 column and a water/methanol gradient. MS/MS transition (m/z) 313.3 → 241.2 was used for aflatoxin B1 quantitation, with 313.3 → 285.1 used for confirmation. The limit of detection (LOD) for aflatoxin B1 was 0.007 parts per billion (ppb). Method imprecision for aflatoxin B1 (expressed as coefficient of variation) ranged from 5.5 to 9.4%. Spike recoveries were 105-111%. Aflatoxin B1 concentrations in the smokeless tobacco products analyzed ranged from Aflatoxin B1 was most frequently detected in dry snuffs and chews, whereas all moist snuff products tested were below LOD. The amounts of aflatoxin B1 detected were low relative to the 20 ppb regulatory limit established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for foods and feeds.

  2. [Applications of molecular biology techniques for the control of aflatoxin contamination].

    PubMed

    Sanchis, V

    1993-02-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by species of Aspergillus flavus group. These toxins have received increased attention from the food industry and the general public because they shown a high toxicity against humans and animal. Different methods are applying to control the aflatoxin contamination. But these conventional methods do not seem to resolve the problem. So, new methods using techniques in biotechnology are now being developed: a) Inhibit the biosynthetic and secretory process responsible for aflatoxin contamination. b) Using biocompetitive agents that replace aflatoxigenic strains with non aflatoxigenic strains in the field. c) Using genetic engineering techniques to incorporate antifungal genes into specific plant species.

  3. Aflatoxin contamination in soybeans: role of proteinase inhibitors, zinc availability, and seed coat integrity.

    PubMed Central

    Stössel, P

    1986-01-01

    Soybean trypsin inhibitors are thought to ward off pathogens. Studies with aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, frequent soybean contaminants, revealed that trypsin inhibitors do not affect the growth of these fungi and aflatoxin production. Further, the availability of zinc, an essential mineral for aflatoxin synthesis that was thought to explain increased aflatoxin accumulation in cooked compared with raw soybeans, was shown to decrease upon cooking. Seed coat integrity, ensuring limited access and a low moisture content, is responsible for the slow colonization of the seed by A. flavus. Images PMID:3089160

  4. Use of gamma irradiation to prevent aflatoxin B 1 production in smoked dried fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbadu, G. H.

    Smoked dried fish bought from the Nigerian market was inoculated with spores of barAspergillus flavus (U.I. 81) and irradiated with doses of 0.625, 1.25, 2.50 and 5.00 KGy gamma irradiation. The effect of aflatoxin B 1 production on subsequent incubation for 8 days as stationary cultures was measured. The amount of aflatoxin B 1 produced was found to decrease with increased gamma irradiation dose levels. While the non-irradiated control produced significantly (at 1% level) greater amounts of aflatoxin B 1 as compared to the treated cultures.

  5. Carryover of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ in contaminated substrate corn into Nigerian native beer

    SciTech Connect

    Okoye, Z.S.C.

    1986-10-01

    Aflatoxins, the toxic secondary metabolites of Aspergillus flavus and Asp. parasiticus, constitute a serious food contamination problem in Nigeria and have been detected in the blood of healthy rural blood donors and primary liver cancer patients from the Guinea savannah region where traditionally brewed cereal beer is popular. A recent survey of traditional breweries in the Jos metropolis has shown a high incidence of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ contamination of their products. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficiency of the traditional brewing in destroying aflatoxins in mould-infected substrate grains.

  6. Aflatoxin contamination of red chili pepper from Bolivia and Peru, countries with high gallbladder cancer incidence rates.

    PubMed

    Asai, Takao; Tsuchiya, Yasuo; Okano, Kiyoshi; Piscoya, Alejandro; Nishi, Carlos Yoshito; Ikoma, Toshikazu; Oyama, Tomizo; Ikegami, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    Chilean red chili peppers contaminated with aflatoxins were reported in a previous study. If the development of gallbladder cancer (GBC) in Chile is associated with a high level of consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated red chili peppers, such peppers from other countries having a high GBC incidence rate may also be contaminated with aflatoxins. We aimed to determine whether this might be the case for red chili peppers from Bolivia and Peru. A total of 7 samples (3 from Bolivia, 4 from Peru) and 3 controls (2 from China, 1 from Japan) were evaluated. Aflatoxins were extracted with acetonitrile:water (9:1, v/v) and eluted through an immuno-affinity column. The concentrations of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and then the detected aflatoxins were identified using HPLC-mass spectrometry. In some but not all of the samples from Bolivia and Peru, aflatoxin B1 or aflatoxins B1 and B2 were detected. In particular, aflatoxin B1 or total aflatoxin concentrations in a Bolivian samples were above the maximum levels for aflatoxins in spices proposed by the European Commission. Red chili peppers from Bolivia and Peru consumed by populations having high GBC incidence rates would appear to be contaminated with aflatoxins. These data suggest the possibility that a high level of consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated red chili peppers is related to the development of GBC, and the association between the two should be confirmed by a case-control study.

  7. Aflatoxin contamination of pearl millet during field and storage conditions with reference to stage of grain maturation and insect damage.

    PubMed

    Raghavender, C R; Reddy, B N; Shobharani, G

    2007-12-01

    Aflatoxin contamination in five varieties of pearl millet (ICMH-451, ICMP-50I, ICTP-8203, WCC-75 and ICMV-155) was studied from field and storage conditions in three districts of Andhra Pradesh State, India and the inter-relationships between various parameters such as stage of grain maturation in the field and insect pest infestation in storage in relation to aflatoxin production were evaluated. Aflatoxin contamination was more frequent in the seed samples collected from the fields during rainy season than winter season. All major aflatoxins were isolated from one or the other varieties of pearl millet, whereas aflatoxin G2 was not commonly observed in the seed samples collected during winter. Among all the varieties tested, ICMH-451 was vulnerable to aflatoxin contamination whereas ICMV-155 was the least susceptible variety. The higher amount of aflatoxins was observed in the matured seed samples followed by pre-matured and milky stage. Among all the toxins reported in the field, aflatoxin B1 was found in higher concentration (185 (μg/kg) followed by B2 (105 μg/kg). The four major types of aflatoxins with higher levels (35, 40, 140, 190 μg/kg of G1, G2, B2, B1 were reported in the rainy season seed samples after six months of storage, whereas aflatoxin G1 was not observed in any variety of stored seed sample from winter. Statistical analysis revealed that the aflatoxin incidence in relation to different parameters studied was significantly different for each factor. The relationship between aflatoxin contamination and insect damaged-grain clearly indicated that the seed samples with 16-40% of insect damage contained higher amounts of aflatoxins (758 μg/kg).

  8. Ameliorating Effects of Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 on Growth Performance, Antioxidant Functions, and Aflatoxin Residues in Ducks Fed Diets Contaminated with Aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyuan; Ma, Qiugang; Ma, Shanshan; Zhang, Jianyun; Jia, Ru; Ji, Cheng; Zhao, Lihong

    2016-12-22

    Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 isolated from fish gut is very effective in detoxifying aflatoxins in feed and feed ingredients. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of B. subtilis ANSB060 on growth performance, body antioxidant functions, and aflatoxin residues in ducks fed moldy maize naturally contaminated with aflatoxins. A total of 1500 18-d-old male Cherry Valley ducks with similar body weight were randomly assigned to five treatments with six replicates of 50 ducks per repeat. The experiment design consisted of five dietary treatments labeled as C0 (basal diet containing 60% normal maize), M0 (basal diet containing 60% moldy maize contaminated with aflatoxins substituted for normal maize), M500, M1000, and M2000 (M0 +500, 1000 or 2000 g/t aflatoxin biodegradation preparation mainly consisted of B. subtilis ANSB060). The results showed that ducks fed 22.44 ± 2.46 μg/kg of AFB₁ (M0) exhibited a decreasing tendency in average daily gain (ADG) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity in serum, and T-SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in the liver significantly decreased along with the appearance of AFB₁ and AFM₁ compared with those in Group C0. The supplementation of B. subtilis ANSB060 into aflatoxin-contaminated diets increased the ADG of ducks (p > 0.05), significantly improved antioxidant enzyme activities, and reduced aflatoxin accumulation in duck liver. In conclusion, Bacillus subtilis ANSB060 in diets showed an ameliorating effect to duck aflatoxicosis and may be a promising feed additive.

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Cinnamaldehyde, Citral, and Eugenol on Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Gene Expression and Aflatoxin B1 Biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dandan; Xing, Fuguo; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Limin; Hua, Huijuan; Zhou, Lu; Zhao, Yueju; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    In order to reveal the inhibitory effects of cinnamaldehyde, citral, and eugenol on aflatoxin biosynthesis, the expression levels of 5 key aflatoxin biosynthetic genes were evaluated by real-time PCR. Aspergillus flavus growth and AFB1 production were completely inhibited by 0.80 mmol/L of cinnamaldehyde and 2.80 mmol/L of citral. However, at lower concentration, cinnamaldehyde (0.40 mmol/L), eugenol (0.80 mmol/L), and citral (0.56 mmol/L) significantly reduced AFB1 production with inhibition rate of 68.9%, 95.4%, and 41.8%, respectively, while no effect on fungal growth. Real-time PCR showed that the expressions of aflR, aflT, aflD, aflM, and aflP were down-regulated by cinnamaldehyde (0.40 mmol/L), eugenol (0.80 mmol/L), and citral (0.56 mmol/L). In the presence of cinnamaldehyde, AflM was highly down-regulated (average of 5963 folds), followed by aflP, aflR, aflD, and aflT with the average folds of 55, 18, 6.5, and 5.8, respectively. With 0.80 mmol/L of eugenol, aflP was highly down-regulated (average of 2061-folds), followed by aflM, aflR, aflD, and aflT with average of 138-, 15-, 5.2-, and 4.8-folds reduction, respectively. With 0.56 mmol/L of citral, aflT was completely inhibited, followed by aflM, aflP, aflR, and aflD with average of 257-, 29-, 3.5-, and 2.5-folds reduction, respectively. These results suggest that the reduction in AFB1 production by cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, and citral at low concentration may be due to the down-regulations of the transcription level of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes. Cinnamaldehyde and eugenol may be employed successfully as a good candidate in controlling of toxigenic fungi and subsequently contamination with aflatoxins in practice.

  10. Further evidence supporting the concurrent influence of aflatoxin and manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, J.S.; Llewellyn, G.C.

    1987-04-01

    Trace elements, including manganese may afford protection from deleterious effects of aflatoxin. Young male Fischer rats received ip injections of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 1 mg/kg, 2 mg/kg or 4 mg/kg. Control groups received DMSO ip or no injection. All animals were intubated with 3 microCi of (/sup 54/Mn)-MnCl/sub 2/ 12 hr post-injection. Sacrifice occurred 72 hr after gavage of the radiolabel. All tested levels of AFB1 affected the loss of total body radioactivity. This response was observed within 12 hr when toxin-treated groups excreted almost 4 times more counts than controls. From 12-36 hr following radiolabel administration, AFB1 appeared to enhance excretion; by 72 hr, toxin-treated animals (especially those receiving higher doses) appeared to conserve the metal. Aflatoxicosis manifested itself through reduced body weight gain. The data provide support evidence that Mn and AFB1 biointeract.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of lowering the aflatoxin tolerance level.

    PubMed

    Dichter, C R; Weinstein, M C

    1984-06-01

    The cost-effectiveness of adopting aflatoxin tolerance levels of 15, 10 and 5 ppb for peanuts and peanut products was assessed. Estimates of the annual cost to manufacturers of monitoring and controlling peanut aflatoxin levels at the current 20-ppb action level, and estimates of the projected increase in costs of establishing lower tolerances were elicited from producers by questionnaire. Exposures to peanut products were derived from the HANES I survey and from peanut production statistics. The risk of liver cancer at each tolerance level was estimated using both epidemiological and extrapolated experimental data assuming that exposure would be reduced in direct proportion to the decrease in the tolerance. It was found that the 15-ppb tolerance would cost $60,000 per cancer death averted (range $20,000-$1,700,000) and is therefore relatively cost-effective. The marginal costs per life saved for both the 10-ppb and 5-ppb levels were found to be $1.7 million (range $0.6 million-$11.4 million) and $1.6 million (range +0.6 million-$31.1 million), respectively. Conclusions on the optimal regulatory approach should be guided by comparisons of these figures with corresponding cost-effectiveness ratios for alternative regulatory uses of national resources in the interests of public health.

  12. Aflatoxin B1 binding to sorbents in bovine ruminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Spotti, M; Fracchiolla, M L; Arioli, F; Caloni, F; Pompa, G

    2005-08-01

    A recent approach to the problem of contamination of agricultural products by aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) is to add non-nutritional adsorbents to animal diets in order to sequester ingested aflatoxins. We conducted in vitro experiments to develop a rapid and cheap model using ruminal fluid to assess the ability of sorbent materials to bind AFB(1). Seven sorbents (hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate; clinoptilolite; zeolite; two types of bentonite; sepiolite; and PHIL 75), commonly added to bovine diets were incubated in water and ruminal fluid in the presence of AFB(1). Hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate, sepiolite and one of the bentonites bound 100% of the AFB(1) in the presence of both ruminal fluid and water; clinoptilolite bound about 80% of AFB(1) in both liquids; whereas the affinities for the mycotoxin of zeolite (50%) and the other sample of bentonite (60%) in water seem to be increased by about 40% in ruminal fluid incubations. PHIL 75 had the poorest binding ability: about 30% in water and 45% in ruminal fluid. In view of the differences in toxin binding in water and ruminal fluid, it is preferable to use the ruminal fluid model for the in vitro pre-screening of sorbent materials potentially useful as adjuvants to ruminant feeds.

  13. Aflatoxins in hazelnuts and dried figs: Occurrence and exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Kabak, Bulent

    2016-11-15

    A total of 300 samples of hazelnuts and dried fig were analysed for the incidence of any aflatoxins (AFs). High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) method was used to quantify the amounts of AFs. The limit of quantification varied from 0.21 to 0.30μgkg(-1). No AFs were detected in shells of the hazelnuts, while six raw hazelnut kernel samples (12%) and five roasted hazelnut kernel samples (8.3%) contained AFs ranging from 0.09 to 11.3μgkg(-1) and from 0.17 to 11.2μgkg(-1), respectively. Sixteen dried fig samples (12.3%) contained AFs ranging from 0.1 to 28.2μgkg(-1) and a mean value of 3.8μgkg(-1). Three hazelnuts and six dried fig samples exceeded the European maximum limits (MLs) of 5 and 2μgkg(-1) for aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), respectively. The contribution of hazelnuts to AFs exposure is higher than that of dried figs.

  14. Detection of aflatoxin-contaminated grain by three granivorous bird species.

    PubMed

    Perez, M; Henke, S E; Fedynich, A M

    2001-04-01

    Supplemental feeding of game species and the use of backyard feeders to attract avian wildlife are common practices throughout the United States. However, these activities may expose wildlife to aflatoxins. We tested the hypothesis that wild birds would avoid consuming aflatoxin-contaminated feed. Individual northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus), white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica), and green jays (Cyanocorax yncas) were presented with feeders that had four compartments, which contained milo that was contaminated with aflatoxin levels of 0, 100, 500, and 1,000 microg/kg, respectively. Feed remaining was weighed at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hr after the initiation of the trial. White-winged doves and northern bobwhites did not avoid contaminated feed. However, green jays selected against aflatoxin-tainted grain. Because white-winged doves and northern bobwhites did not avoid contaminated feed, the risk of exposure to this potentially hazardous toxin exists for these species.

  15. Evaluation of ELISA screening test for detecting aflatoxin in biogenic dust samples

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    Aflatoxin is a carcinogenic chemical that is sometimes produced when agricultural commodities are infested by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. Parasiticus. Aflatoxin has been found to be present in air samples taken around persons handling materials likely to be contaminated. The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of using an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) test kit that was developed to screen for aflatoxin in bulk agricultural commodities, to an air sample. Samples were taken from two environments likely to be contaminated with aflatoxin, a dairy farm feed mixing operation and a peanut bagging operation. The dust collected from these environments was considered to be biogenic, in that it originated primarily from biological materials.

  16. Blocking aflatoxins in corn by using non-toxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are over 500 previously reported mycotoxins. However, only a few have been identified as important for food safety, including aflatoxins, fumonisins, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), trichothecenes, zearalenone, ochratoxins, and patulin. Mycotoxins contaminate plant materials, causing acute and ch...

  17. Aflatoxins in Food Products in Iran: a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Mahdavi Omran, Saeid; Soleymani, Abbas; Taghizadeh Armaki, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Context Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by certain toxigenic fungi and the most of them are aflatoxins, fumonisins, trichothecenes, ochratoxin A, patulin, and zearalenone. Evidence Acquisition In consideration of the consumption of certain farm products for animal feed and the prevalence of toxigenic fungi and mycotoxins in food, the present study was performed to evaluate this situation in Iran with a review of the literature using search engines. All published articles were selected using Iran Medex, Magiran, PubMed NCBI, and Google Scholar. Results Aflatoxins have been found in many food products in Iran. Conclusions It is necessary to detect aflatoxins in foods and food products as early as possible, before they enter human or animal bodies. There is a high consumption of milk and dairy products in Iran, and the proper management of animal foods can help to decrease the aflatoxins in milk. PMID:27679702

  18. A rapid, sensitive and economic method for the detection, quantification and confirmation of aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Majerus, P; Zakaria, Z

    1992-10-01

    A rapid, sensitive and economic method for the detection, quantification and confirmation of aflatoxins is described. Aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2, are extracted by methanol/water (85 + 15) and partitioned into methylene dichloride. The methylene dichloride solution is cleaned up on a polypropylene column, filled with 0.5 g silica gel 60. The aflatoxins are eluted with chloroform-acetone (90:10) and are detected using bidirectional thin-layer chromatography (TLC) with aluminium silica gel foil. The mean recovery of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in corn samples was 73, 78, 80, and 64%, respectively; the limit of detection was 0.5 micrograms/kg. The results can also be confirmed by derivative formation using trifluoroacetic acid on the TLC plate. The method has been applied to a wide range of foods with good results.

  19. [Aflatoxins in food: tests of decontamination of peanut cakes by ionizing treatment].

    PubMed

    Diop, Y M; Ndiaye, B; Diouf, A; Fall, M; Thiam, A; Ciss, M; Hasselmann, C; Ba, D

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of ionising treatment for decontaminating peanut cakes was tested. The influence of cakes water content and the effect of ionisation dose rate were studied. The results obtained after a reverse phase liquid chromatographic determination of B1, B2, G1 and G2 aflatoxins have revealed an important contamination of the peanut cakes (up to 1000 ppb of total aflatoxin's contents). After ionising treatment at 25 kGy, the aflatoxins degradation in peanut cake's was less important in dried samples (about 5-10% at 0.55 water activity: aw) than in the humid ones (40-60% degradation at 0.95 water activity). At this dose, any indicative difference of the degradation rate of aflatoxins, with regard to the ionising process was observed. The efficacy of ionising treatment for decontaminating peanut cakes could probably be improved, however the economic interest of such process as alternative of the treatment with ammonia is questionable.

  20. Effects of Trace Metals on the Production of Aflatoxins by Aspergillus parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Paul B.; Simpson, Marion E.; Trucksess, Mary W.

    1975-01-01

    Certain metals added as salts to a defined basal culture medium influenced the level of aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus in the low microgramsper-milliliter range of the added metal. In many cases no change or a relatively small change in mat weight and final pH of the medium accompanied this effect. With zinc at added levels of 0 to 10 μg/ml in the medium, aflatoxin increased 30-to 1,000-fold with increasing of zinc, whereas mat weight increased less than threefold. At 25 μg of added zinc per ml, aflatoxin decreased, but mat weight did not. At an added level of 25 μg or less of the metal per ml, salts of iron, manganese, copper, cadmium, trivalent chromium, silver, and mercury partly or completely inhibited aflatoxin production, without influencing mat weight. PMID:238471

  1. Aflatoxin Production of Species and Strains of the Aspergillus flavus Group Isolated from Field Crops

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, H. W.; Boller, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Peanuts, cottonseed, rice, and sorghum from Texas were sampled over a 3-year period. To insure adequate isolation of alfatoxin-producing species of fungi, low-quality lots were sampled at a rate greater than their respective proportional representation. Aflatoxins were found each year in peanut and cottonseed and were found in 2 of 3 years in rice and sorghum. Aflatoxins were detected in all four crops. The Aspergillus flavus group was much more prevalent in peanut and rice than in cottonseed and sorghum. Of the isolates of the A. flavus group, 96% from peanuts, 79% from cottonseed, 49% from sorghum, and 35% from rice produced aflatoxins. The average toxin production of isolates from rice was much less than that from peanuts, cottonseed, or sorghum. More than 90% of all isolates of the A. flavus group were identified as the species A. flavus. A. parasiticus was isolated from all four crops. Only A. parasiticus produced aflatoxin G. PMID:4197766

  2. Natural occurrence of aflatoxins in peanuts and peanut butter from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mupunga, I; Lebelo, S L; Mngqawa, P; Rheeder, J P; Katerere, D R

    2014-10-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi that may contaminate food and pose a health risk, especially in developing countries, where there is a lack of food security and quality is subsumed by food insufficiency. Aflatoxins are the most toxic known mycotoxins and are a significant risk factor for liver and kidney cancer, teratogenicity, undernutrition, and micronutrient malabsorption in both humans and animals. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent of fungal and aflatoxin contamination in peanuts and peanut butter being sold in both the formal and informal markets in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Eighteen peanut samples and 11 peanut butter samples were purchased from retail shops and the informal market. Fungal contamination was determined using standard mycology culture methods, while aflatoxin contamination was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection. Four of the six peanut samples tested for fungal contamination were infected with Aspergillus flavus/parasiticus, ranging from 3 to 20% of the kernels examined, while 27% (3 of 11) of the peanut butter samples were infected with A. flavus/parasiticus. Ninety-one percent (10 of 11) of the peanut butter samples were contaminated with aflatoxins (mean, 75.66 ng/g, and range, 6.1 to 247 ng/g), and aflatoxin B1 was the most prevalent (mean, 51.0 ng/g, and range, 3.7 to 191 ng/g). Three of the 18 peanut samples were contaminated with aflatoxins (range, 6.6 to 622 ng/g). The commercial peanut butter samples had very high aflatoxin levels, and manufacturers should be sensitized to the detrimental effects of aflatoxins and measures to reduce contamination.

  3. Reduction of aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus in interaction with Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Verheecke, C; Liboz, T; Anson, P; Diaz, R; Mathieu, F

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate aflatoxin gene expression during Streptomyces-Aspergillus interaction. Aflatoxins are carcinogenic compounds produced mainly by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. A previous study has shown that Streptomyces-A. flavus interaction can reduce aflatoxin content in vitro. Here, we first validated this same effect in the interaction with A. parasiticus. Moreover, we showed that growth reduction and aflatoxin content were correlated in A. parasiticus but not in A. flavus. Secondly, we investigated the mechanisms of action by reverse-transcriptase quantitative PCR. As microbial interaction can lead to variations in expression of household genes, the most stable [act1, βtub (and cox5 for A. parasiticus)] were chosen using geNorm software. To shed light on the mechanisms involved, we studied during the interaction the expression of five genes (aflD, aflM, aflP, aflR and aflS). Overall, the results of aflatoxin gene expression showed that Streptomyces repressed gene expression to a greater level in A. parasiticus than in A. flavus. Expression of aflR and aflS was generally repressed in both Aspergillus species. Expression of aflM was repressed and was correlated with aflatoxin B1 content. The results suggest that aflM expression could be a potential aflatoxin indicator in Streptomyces species interactions. Therefore, we demonstrate that Streptomyces can reduce aflatoxin production by both Aspergillus species and that this effect can be correlated with the repression of aflM expression.

  4. Household dietary exposure to aflatoxins from maize and maize products in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kilonzo, Robert M; Imungi, Jasper K; Muiru, William M; Lamuka, Peter O; Njage, Patrick M Kamau

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxicosis has repeatedly affected Kenyans, particularly in the eastern region, due to consumption of contaminated maize. However, save for the cases of acute toxicity, the levels of sub-lethal exposure have not been adequately assessed. It is believed that this type of exposure does exist even during the seasons when acute toxicity does not occur. This study, therefore, was designed to assess the exposure of households to aflatoxins through consumption of maize and maize products. Twenty samples each of maize kernels, muthokoi and maize meal were randomly sampled from households in Kibwezi District of Makueni County in Eastern Kenya and analysed for aflatoxin contamination. The samples were quantitatively analysed for aflatoxin contamination using HPLC. The uncertainty and variability in dietary exposure was quantitatively modelled in Ms Excel using Monte Carlo simulation in @Risk software. Aflatoxins were found in 45% of maize kernels at between 18 and 480 μg kg⁻¹, 20% of muthokoi at between 12 and 123 μg kg⁻¹, and 35% of maize meal at between 6 and 30 μg kg⁻¹. The mean dietary exposure to aflatoxin in maize kernels was 292 ± 1567 ng kg⁻¹ body weight day⁻¹, while the mean dietary exposure to aflatoxin in maize meal and muthokoi were 59 ± 62 and 27 ± 154 ng kg⁻¹ body weight day⁻¹ respectively. The results showed that the amount and frequency of consumption of the three foods is the more important contributing factor than the mean aflatoxin concentration levels, to the risk of dietary exposure to aflatoxins.

  5. Real-time PCR assays for detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing molds in foods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alicia; Rodríguez, Mar; Luque, M Isabel; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2012-08-01

    Aflatoxins are among the most toxic mycotoxins. Early detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing species is crucial to improve food safety. In the present work, two protocols of real-time PCR (qPCR) based on SYBR Green and TaqMan were developed, and their sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Primers and probes were designed from the o-methyltransferase gene (omt-1) involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Fifty-three mold strains representing aflatoxin producers and non-producers of different species, usually reported in food products, were used as references. All strains were tested for aflatoxins production by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The functionality of the proposed qPCR method was demonstrated by the strong linear relationship of the standard curves constructed with the omt-1 gene copy number and Ct values for the different aflatoxin producers tested. The ability of the qPCR protocols to quantify aflatoxin-producing molds was evaluated in different artificially inoculated foods. A good linear correlation was obtained over the range 4 to 1 log cfu/g per reaction for all qPCR assays in the different food matrices (peanuts, spices and dry-fermented sausages). The detection limit in all inoculated foods ranged from 1 to 2 log cfu/g for SYBR Green and TaqMan assays. No significant effect was observed due to the different equipment, operator, and qPCR methodology used in the tests of repeatability and reproducibility for different foods. The proposed methods quantified with high efficiency the fungal load in foods. These qPCR protocols are proposed for use to quantify aflatoxin-producing molds in food products.

  6. Chlorophyllin intervention reduces aflatoxin-DNA adducts in individuals at high risk for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Egner, P A; Wang, J B; Zhu, Y R; Zhang, B C; Wu, Y; Zhang, Q N; Qian, G S; Kuang, S Y; Gange, S J; Jacobson, L P; Helzlsouer, K J; Bailey, G S; Groopman, J D; Kensler, T W

    2001-12-04

    Residents of Qidong, People's Republic of China, are at high risk for development of hepatocellular carcinoma, in part from consumption of foods contaminated with aflatoxins. Chlorophyllin, a mixture of semisynthetic, water-soluble derivatives of chlorophyll that is used as a food colorant and over-the-counter medicine, has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of aflatoxin hepatocarcinogenesis in animal models by blocking carcinogen bioavailability. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled chemoprevention trial, we tested whether chlorophyllin could alter the disposition of aflatoxin. One hundred and eighty healthy adults from Qidong were randomly assigned to ingest 100 mg of chlorophyllin or a placebo three times a day for 4 months. The primary endpoint was modulation of levels of aflatoxin-N(7)-guanine adducts in urine samples collected 3 months into the intervention measured by using sequential immunoaffinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. This aflatoxin-DNA adduct excretion product serves as a biomarker of the biologically effective dose of aflatoxin, and elevated levels are associated with increased risk of liver cancer. Adherence to the study protocol was outstanding, and no adverse events were reported. Aflatoxin-N(7)-guanine could be detected in 105 of 169 available samples. Chlorophyllin consumption at each meal led to an overall 55% reduction (P = 0.036) in median urinary levels of this aflatoxin biomarker compared with those taking placebo. Thus, prophylactic interventions with chlorophyllin or supplementation of diets with foods rich in chlorophylls may represent practical means to prevent the development of hepatocellular carcinoma or other environmentally induced cancers.

  7. Sampling hazelnuts for aflatoxin: effect of sample size and accept/reject limit on reducing the risk of misclassifying lots.

    PubMed

    Ozay, Guner; Seyhan, Ferda; Yilmaz, Aysun; Whitaker, Thomas B; Slate, Andrew B; Giesbrecht, Francis G

    2007-01-01

    About 100 countries have established regulatory limits for aflatoxin in food and feeds. Because these limits vary widely among regulating countries, the Codex Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants began work in 2004 to harmonize aflatoxin limits and sampling plans for aflatoxin in almonds, pistachios, hazelnuts, and Brazil nuts. Studies were developed to measure the uncertainty and distribution among replicated sample aflatoxin test results taken from aflatoxin-contaminated treenut lots. The uncertainty and distribution information is used to develop a model that can evaluate the performance (risk of misclassifying lots) of aflatoxin sampling plan designs for treenuts. Once the performance of aflatoxin sampling plans can be predicted, they can be designed to reduce the risks of misclassifying lots traded in either the domestic or export markets. A method was developed to evaluate the performance of sampling plans designed to detect aflatoxin in hazelnuts lots. Twenty hazelnut lots with varying levels of contamination were sampled according to an experimental protocol where 16 test samples were taken from each lot. The observed aflatoxin distribution among the 16 aflatoxin sample test results was compared to lognormal, compound gamma, and negative binomial distributions. The negative binomial distribution was selected to model aflatoxin distribution among sample test results because it gave acceptable fits to observed distributions among sample test results taken from a wide range of lot concentrations. Using the negative binomial distribution, computer models were developed to calculate operating characteristic curves for specific aflatoxin sampling plan designs. The effect of sample size and accept/reject limits on the chances of rejecting good lots (sellers' risk) and accepting bad lots (buyers' risk) was demonstrated for various sampling plan designs.

  8. Identification of Aspergillus species in Central Europe able to produce G-type aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Baranyi, Nikolett; Despot, Daniela Jakšić; Palágyi, Andrea; Kiss, Noémi; Kocsubé, Sándor; Szekeres, András; Kecskeméti, Anita; Bencsik, Ottó; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Klarić, Maja Šegvić; Varga, János

    2015-09-01

    The occurrence of potential aflatoxin producing fungi was examined in various agricultural products and indoor air in Central European countries including Hungary, Serbia and Croatia. For species identification, both morphological and sequence based methods were applied. Aspergillus flavus was detected in several samples including maize, cheese, nuts, spices and indoor air, and several isolates were able to produce aflatoxins. Besides, three other species of Aspergillus section Flavi, A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus were also isolated from cheese, maize and indoor air, respectively. This is the first report on the occurrence of A. nomius and A. pseudonomius in Central Europe. All A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus isolates were able to produce aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2. The A. nomius isolate came from cheese produced very high amounts of aflatoxins (above 1 mg ml⁻¹). All A. nomius, A. pseudonomius and A. parasiticus isolates produced much higher amounts of aflatoxin G1 then aflatoxin B1. Further studies are in progress to examine the occurrence of producers of these highly carcinogenic mycotoxins in agricultural products and indoor air in Central Europe.

  9. Natural co-occurrence of ochratoxin A, ochratoxin B and aflatoxins in Sicilian red wines.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Vita; Avellone, Giuseppe; Pitonzo, Rosa; Capocchiano, Valentina Giusi; Mazza, Alessia; Cicero, Nicola; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The natural occurrence of ochratoxin A, ochratoxin B, aflatoxin B1, aflatoxin B2, aflatoxin G1 and aflatoxin G2 (OTA, OTB, AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, AFG2) in red wines was investigated by HPLC/FLD after immunoaffinity column clean-up in 57 market samples produced in Sicily (Italy). The results showed a very low incidence of these mycotoxins in analysed samples, confirming the high degree of quality and safety of Sicilian red wines. The results indicated 71.9% and 64.9% positive samples for OTA and OTB respectively, with an average level of 0.13 μg l(-1), well below the European maximum permitted levels (MLs). The aflatoxin most frequently detected in the samples was AFG1, present in 57.9% of samples, while the other aflatoxins were rarely present. Recovery experiments were carried out on eight mycotoxin-free red wines spiked with OTA, OTB, AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2 at two different levels. The limits of detection (LODs) in wines were 0.02 µg l(-1) for OTA, 0.04 µg l(-1) for OTB, 0.03 µg l(-1) for AFG1, AFG2 and AFB2, and 0.05 µg l(-1) for AFB1. A good correlation was found, with good performances in term of precision for the method.

  10. Effect of sodium bentonite on the performance and blood variables of broiler chickens intoxicated with aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Santurio, J M; Mallmann, C A; Rosa, A P; Appel, G; Heer, A; Dageförde, S; Böttcher, M

    1999-03-01

    1. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of natural sodium bentonite (NaB) in the prevention of toxic effects of aflatoxins. Five hundred and twenty-eight 1-d-old Ross male broiler chickens were housed in pens (22 chickens per pen) for 42 d. There were 3 inclusion rates of NaB (0, 2.5, and 5 g/kg) and 2 of aflatoxins (0 and 3 mg/kg food). Each treatment had 4 replicates of 22 chickens. 2. All chickens treated with aflatoxin and without bentonite were adversely affected. NaB treatment at 5.0 g/kg improved body weights at 42 d of age by 31.3%, increased food intake by 23.8% and improved productive efficiency by 40.1%. Weights of liver, heart, pancreas and crop and biochemical variables were not affected by dietary NaB. However, serum phosphorous concentration was reduced by 30% compared with chickens that received aflatoxin. 3. NaB caused no adverse effects on chickens that did not receive aflatoxin. 4. It is concluded that NaB at pH 7.9 partially neutralises the effects of aflatoxins on broiler chickens when included at 5.0 g/kg in the diet.

  11. Toxicity of aflatoxin B1 towards the vitamin D receptor (VDR).

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Paola; Santini, Antonello; Fattore, Luigi; Novellino, Ettore; Ritieni, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    This research describes an unexpected toxicity of the aflatoxin B1 towards the vitamin D receptors. Rickets is a childhood disease, and calcium deficiency is the aetiological cause in Africa, being primarily associated with nutritional problems; in this research the contribution of aflatoxin B1 exposure during the early months of life is an interesting factor to deepen in order to prevent liver damages or the development of rickets. The results show that the expression of vitamin D receptor in osteosarcoma cell line SAOS-2 is significantly down-modulated by exposure to aflatoxin B1. This seems to suggest that Aflatoxin B1, toxic towards the vitamin D receptor, interferes with the actions of the vitamin D on calcium binding gene expression in the kidney and intestine. Experimental data indicate a 58% and 86% decrease if the cells are exposed to 5 ng/mL and 50 ng/mL of aflatoxin B1, respectively. These results seem to indicate that natural occurrence of the aflatoxin B1 and allelic variant of vitamin D receptor on (F allele) increase the risk of developing rickets of African children.

  12. Key roles of vitamins A, C, and E in aflatoxin B1-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alpsoy, Lokman; Yalvac, Mehmet Emir

    2011-01-01

    Aflatoxins (Aspergillus flavus toxins) are one of the natural toxic molecules which are produced by a group of fungi called Aspergillus. Foods and drinks contaminated with aflatoxins cause global health and environmental problems. Today in many developing countries, these toxins are leading cause of some liver cancers and serious gastrointestinal problems. Aflatoxins, which are well known to be mutagenic, carcinogenic, hepatotoxic, and immunosuppressive, exert inhibitory effects on biological processes including DNA synthesis, DNA-dependent RNA synthesis, DNA repair, and protein synthesis. Aflatoxins B(1) (AFB(1)) is the most widespread oxidative agent of the aflatoxins. Numerous diverse compounds and extracts have been reported to reduce the aflatoxins induced oxidative stress in the body. Most of these inhibitors including phenylpropanoids, terpenoids, alkaloids, and vitamins are originally derived from plants. Among these, being essential biomolecules, vitamins are used as coenzymes in very significant biological reactions. They also function as nonenzymatic antioxidative agents protecting the cells from oxidative stress-induced toxicity and transformation. This chapter reviews the mechanism of AFB(1)-induced oxidative stress and focuses on the protective effects of vitamins A, C, and E on reducing this stress.

  13. Aflatoxins in Turkish dried figs intended for export to the European Union.

    PubMed

    Senyuva, H Z; Gilbert, J; Ulken, U

    2007-04-01

    Dried figs for export from Turkey from crop years 2003 through 2006 were tested for aflatoxin B1 and total aflatoxins. For export to the European Union, consignments of 0.5 to 10 tonnes of dried figs were sampled according to European Commission regulations, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine concentrations of aflatoxins Bl, B2, G1, and G2. For each consignment of dried figs, a 30-kg sample (comprising 100 subsamples) was divided into three 10-kg subsamples, which were separately blended and analyzed with HPLC. This monitoring effort was conducted for figs from 2003, 2004, 2005, and up to June 2006, for a total of 10,396 30-kg samples (28,489 analyses). The incidence of contamination with aflatoxin B1 at higher than 2 ng/g was on average 0.6, 2.0, 4.0, and 2.4% for 2003, 2004, 2005, and up to June 2006, respectively, whereas contamination with total aflatoxins at higher than 4 ng/g was 2.6, 3.0, 5.1, and 2.7%. There was significant variability in contamination between replicate 1-kg samples, indicating small numbers of individual contaminated figs were probably responsible. There were also substantial differences in the relative proportions of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 among samples, suggesting different contributing fungal sources.

  14. Aflatoxin-free transgenic maize using host-induced gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Thakare, Dhiraj; Zhang, Jianwei; Wing, Rod A.; Cotty, Peter J.; Schmidt, Monica A.

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxins, toxic secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species, are a universal agricultural economic problem and a critical health issue. Despite decades of control efforts, aflatoxin contamination is responsible for a global loss of millions of tons of crops each year. We show that host-induced gene silencing is an effective method for eliminating this toxin in transgenic maize. We transformed maize plants with a kernel-specific RNA interference (RNAi) gene cassette targeting the aflC gene, which encodes an enzyme in the Aspergillus aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway. After pathogen infection, aflatoxin could not be detected in kernels from these RNAi transgenic maize plants, while toxin loads reached thousands of parts per billion in nontransgenic control kernels. A comparison of transcripts in developing aflatoxin-free transgenic kernels with those from nontransgenic kernels showed no significant differences between these two groups. These results demonstrate that small interfering RNA molecules can be used to silence aflatoxin biosynthesis in maize, providing an attractive and precise engineering strategy that could also be extended to other crops to improve food security. PMID:28345051

  15. Static Hot Air and Infrared Rays Roasting are Efficient Methods for Aflatoxin Decontamination on Hazelnuts

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Ilenia; Dal Bello, Barbara; Zeppa, Giuseppe; Spadaro, Davide; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxins are a group of secondary metabolites produced by members of Aspergillus Section Flavi that are dangerous to humans and animals. Nuts can be potentially contaminated with aflatoxins, often over the legal threshold. Food processes, including roasting, may have different effects on mycotoxins, and high temperatures have proven to be very effective in the reduction of mycotoxins. In this work, two different roasting methods—traditional static hot air roasting and infra-red rays roasting—were applied and compared for the detoxification of hazelnuts from Italy and Turkey. At the temperature of 140 °C for 40 min of exposure, detoxification was effective for both roasting techniques. Residual aflatoxins after infra-red rays treatments were lower compared to static hot air roasting. On Italian hazelnuts, residual aflatoxins were lower than 5%, while for Turkish hazelnuts they were lower than 15% after 40 min of exposure to an infra-red rays roaster. After roasting, the perisperm was detached from the nuts and analyzed for aflatoxin contents. Residual aflatoxins in the perisperm ranged from 80% up to 100%. After roasting, the lipid profile and the nutritional quality of hazelnuts were not affected. Fatty acid methyl esters analyses showed a similar composition for Italian and Turkish hazelnuts. PMID:28230792

  16. Application of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) as desiccants to dry maize and reduce aflatoxin contamination.

    PubMed

    Mbuge, Duncan O; Negrini, Renata; Nyakundi, Livine O; Kuate, Serge P; Bandyopadhyay, Ranajit; Muiru, William M; Torto, Baldwyn; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-08-01

    The ability of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) in drying maize and controlling aflatoxin contamination was studied under different temperatures, drying times and SAP-to-maize ratios. Temperature and drying time showed significant influence on the aflatoxin formation. SAP-to-maize ratios between 1:1 and 1:5 showed little or no aflatoxin contamination after drying to the optimal moisture content (MC) of 13 %, while for ratios 1:10 and 1:20, aflatoxin contamination was not well controlled due to the overall higher MC and drying time, which made these ratios unsuitable for the drying process. Results clearly show that temperature, frequency of SAP change, drying time and SAP-to-maize ratio influenced the drying rate and aflatoxin contamination. Furthermore, it was shown that SAP had good potential for grain drying and can be used iteratively, which can make this system an optimal solution to reduce aflatoxin contamination in maize, particular for developing countries and resource-lacking areas.

  17. Antifungal Activity and Aflatoxin Degradation of Bifidobacterium Bifidum and Lactobacillus Fermentum Against Toxigenic Aspergillus Parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    Ghazvini, Roshanak Daie; Kouhsari, Ebrahim; Zibafar, Ensieh; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal; Amini, Abolfazl; Niknejad, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Food and feedstuff contamination with aflatoxins (AFTs) is a serious health problem for humans and animals, especially in developing countries. The present study evaluated antifungal activities of two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) against growth and aflatoxin production of toxigenic Aspergillus parasiticus. The mycelial growth inhibition rate of A. parasiticus PTCC 5286 was investigated in the presence of Bifidobacterium bifidum PTCC 1644 and Lactobacillus fermentum PTCC 1744 by the pour plate method. After seven days incubation in yeast extract sucrose broth at 30°C, the mycelial mass was weighed after drying. The inhibitory activity of LAB metabolites against aflatoxin production by A. parasiticus was evaluated using HPLC method. B. bifidum and L. fermentum significantly reduced aflatoxin production and growth rate of A. parasiticus in comparison with the controls (p≤0.05). LAB reduced total aflatoxins and B1, B2, G1 and G2 fractions by more than 99%. Moreover, LAB metabolites reduced the level of standard AFB1, B2, G1 and G2 from 88.8% to 99.8% (p≤0.05). Based on these findings, B. bifidum and L. fermentum are recommended as suitable biocontrol agents against the growth and aflatoxin production by aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species. PMID:28077976

  18. Automatic detection of aflatoxin contaminated corn kernels using dual-band imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ononye, Ambrose E.; Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2009-05-01

    Aflatoxin is a mycotoxin predominantly produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasitiucus fungi that grow naturally in corn, peanuts and in a wide variety of other grain products. Corn, like other grains is used as food for human and feed for animal consumption. It is known that aflatoxin is carcinogenic; therefore, ingestion of corn infected with the toxin can lead to very serious health problems such as liver damage if the level of the contamination is high. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has strict guidelines for permissible levels in the grain products for both humans and animals. The conventional approach used to determine these contamination levels is one of the destructive and invasive methods that require corn kernels to be ground and then chemically analyzed. Unfortunately, each of the analytical methods can take several hours depending on the quantity, to yield a result. The development of high spectral and spatial resolution imaging sensors has created an opportunity for hyperspectral image analysis to be employed for aflatoxin detection. However, this brings about a high dimensionality problem as a setback. In this paper, we propose a technique that automatically detects aflatoxin contaminated corn kernels by using dual-band imagery. The method exploits the fluorescence emission spectra from corn kernels captured under 365 nm ultra-violet light excitation. Our approach could lead to a non-destructive and non-invasive way of quantifying the levels of aflatoxin contamination. The preliminary results shown here, demonstrate the potential of our technique for aflatoxin detection.

  19. Impact of aflatoxin B1 on the pharmacokinetic disposition of enrofloxacin in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, Starling; Srinivasa Rao, G; Malik, Jitendra K

    2015-09-01

    The potential impact of subchronic exposure of aflatoxin B1 was investigated on the pharmacokinetic disposition of enrofloxacin in broiler chickens. Broiler chickens given either normal or aflatoxin B1 (750μg/kg diet) supplemented diet for 6 weeks received a single oral dose of enrofloxacin (10mg/kg body wt). Blood samples were drawn from the brachial vein at predetermined time intervals after drug administration. Enrofloxacin plasma concentrations analyzed by RP-HPLC were significantly lower in aflatoxin B1-exposed broiler chickens at 0.167, 0.5 and 1.0h after drug administration. In aflatoxin B1-exposed broiler chickens, the absorption rate constant (ka) of enrofloxacin (0.20±0.05h(-1)) was significantly decreased as compared to the unexposed birds (0.98±0.31h(-1)). The values of [Formula: see text] , tmax and AUC0-∞ of enrofloxacin were nonsignificantly increased by 17%, 26% and 17% in aflatoxin-exposed broiler chickens, respectively. Subchronic aflatoxin B1 exposure markedly decreased the initial absorption of enrofloxacin without significantly influencing other pharmacokinetic parameters in broiler chickens.

  20. Determination of Aflatoxins in Peanut Products in the Northeast Region of São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Carlos A. F.; Gonçalves, Natália B.; Rosim, Roice E.; Fernandes, Andrezza M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine aflatoxin levels in peanut products traded in the Northeast region of São Paulo, Brazil. To this end, 240 samples of peanut products traded in the cities of Araras, Leme, Pirassununga and Porto Ferreira were collected from June 2006 to May 2007. The samples were analyzed for aflatoxins (AF) B1, B2, G1 and G2 by high performance liquid chromatography. Results showed 44.2% samples positive for AF at levels of 0.5 to 103.8 μg·kg−1. Nine of the positive samples (3.7% of the analysed samples) had total aflatoxin concentrations (B1+B2+G1+G2) higher than the limit established by Brazilian regulations (20 μg·kg−1). Based on the above data, the probable mean daily intake (PDIM) of aflatoxins from peanut products in the Northeast region of São Paulo was estimated to be 0.23 ng kg b.w. day−1. Although this PDIM value was relatively low, results indicate that aflatoxin contamination of peanut products may be a public health concern in Brazil, when considering the potential exposure of highly susceptible consumers. For example, it should be emphasized that children are potentially exposed to aflatoxins, since they consume large quantities of peanut candies, and these products had the highest number of samples positive for AFB1. PMID:19333440

  1. Effect of climate change on Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin B1 production.

    PubMed

    Medina, Angel; Rodriguez, Alicia; Magan, Naresh

    2014-01-01

    This review considers the available information on the potential impact of key environmental factors and their interactions on the molecular ecology, growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus in vitro and in maize grain. The recent studies which have been carried out to examine the impact of water activity × temperature on aflatoxin biosynthesis and phenotypic aflatoxin production are examined. These have shown that there is a direct relationship between the relative expression of key regulatory and structural genes under different environmental conditions which correlate directly with aflatoxin B1 production. A model has been developed to integrate the relative expression of 10 biosynthetic genes in the pathway, growth and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production which was validated under elevated temperature and water stress conditions. The effect of interacting conditions of aw × temperature × elevated CO2 (2 × and 3 × existing levels) are detailed for the first time. This suggests that while such interacting environmental conditions have little effect on growth they do have a significant impact on aflatoxin biosynthetic gene expression (structural aflD and regulatory aflR genes) and can significantly stimulate the production of AFB1. While the individual factors alone have an impact, it is the combined effect of these three abiotic factors which have an impact on mycotoxin production. This approach provides data which is necessary to help predict the real impacts of climate change on mycotoxigenic fungi.

  2. Static Hot Air and Infrared Rays Roasting are Efficient Methods for Aflatoxin Decontamination on Hazelnuts.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Ilenia; Dal Bello, Barbara; Zeppa, Giuseppe; Spadaro, Davide; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2017-02-21

    Aflatoxins are a group of secondary metabolites produced by members of Aspergillus Section Flavi that are dangerous to humans and animals. Nuts can be potentially contaminated with aflatoxins, often over the legal threshold. Food processes, including roasting, may have different effects on mycotoxins, and high temperatures have proven to be very effective in the reduction of mycotoxins. In this work, two different roasting methods-traditional static hot air roasting and infra-red rays roasting-were applied and compared for the detoxification of hazelnuts from Italy and Turkey. At the temperature of 140 °C for 40 min of exposure, detoxification was effective for both roasting techniques. Residual aflatoxins after infra-red rays treatments were lower compared to static hot air roasting. On Italian hazelnuts, residual aflatoxins were lower than 5%, while for Turkish hazelnuts they were lower than 15% after 40 min of exposure to an infra-red rays roaster. After roasting, the perisperm was detached from the nuts and analyzed for aflatoxin contents. Residual aflatoxins in the perisperm ranged from 80% up to 100%. After roasting, the lipid profile and the nutritional quality of hazelnuts were not affected. Fatty acid methyl esters analyses showed a similar composition for Italian and Turkish hazelnuts.

  3. Ameliorative effects of black tea extract on aflatoxin-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Anamika; Verma, R J

    2005-01-01

    We have evaluated the ameliorative effect of black tea extract on aflatoxin-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice. Adult male albino mice were orally administered with 25 and 50 microg of aflatoxin in 0.2 ml olive oil/animal/day for 30 days. Results revealed dose-dependent and significantly (p<0.05) higher lipid peroxidation in the liver of aflatoxin-treated mice than that of vehicle control. As compared with vehicle control, the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants such as glutathione and ascorbic acid, as well as the enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase were significantly (p<0.05) lowered in the liver of aflatoxin-treated mice. Oral administration of two percent aqueous black tea extract along with aflatoxin for 30 days (groups 6 and 7) caused significant (p<0.05) amelioration in aflatoxin-induced lipid peroxidation by increasing significantly (p<0.05) the activities of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase) and contents of non-enzymatic (glutathione and ascorbic acid) antioxidants in the liver of mice as compared with those given aflatoxin alone (groups 4 and 5). Thus, oral administration of black tea along with aflatoxin significantly (p<0.05) ameliorates aflatoxin-induced lipid peroxidation in the liver of mice.

  4. A comparative study of the effect of aflatoxin B1 and actinomycin D on HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Harley, E. H.; Rees, K. R.; Cohen, A.

    1969-01-01

    1. The cytotoxic effects of aflatoxin B1 on HeLa cells were examined and effects of short exposures of the cells to the toxin were found to be reversible. 2. Aflatoxin B1 inhibited the synthesis of both ribosomal and heterodisperse RNA. It is proposed that the toxin's mechanism of action on ribosomal RNA synthesis is related to its inhibitory effect on the maturation of the 45s-ribosomal-RNA precursor. 3. Protein synthesis is inhibited to a greater extent by aflatoxin B1 than by actinomycin D. In contrast with actinomycin D, aflatoxin B1 was shown to disaggregate polyribosomes directly. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:4897460

  5. Stability of Aflatoxin B1 and Ochratoxin A in Brewing

    PubMed Central

    Chu, F. S.; Chang, C. C.; Ashoor, Samy H.; Prentice, N.

    1975-01-01

    The stability of aflatoxin B1 and ochratoxin A in brewing was investigated by adding the purified toxins to the raw materials at 1 and 10 μg/g levels during mashing in a conventional micro-brewing process. The results indicate that both toxins are stable to heat and are insensitive to cooker mash treatment. Both mycotoxins were partially removed in the mashing and brewing processes. About 14 to 18% and 27 to 28% of the added toxins were found in the final beers brewed from starting materials containing 1 and 10 μg, respectively, of either toxin per g. The possible route of transmission of mycotoxins into beer is discussed. PMID:1115503

  6. Survey of fungal counts and natural occurrence of aflatoxins in Malaysian starch-based foods.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, N; Nawawi, A; Othman, I

    1998-01-01

    In a survey of starch-based foods sampled from retail outlets in Malaysia, fungal colonies were mostly detected in wheat flour (100%), followed by rice flour (74%), glutinous rice grains (72%), ordinary rice grains (60%), glutinous rice flour (48%) and corn flour (26%). All positive samples of ordinary rice and glutinous rice grains had total fungal counts below 10(3) cfu/g sample, while among the positive rice flour, glutinous rice flour and corn flour samples, the highest total fungal count was more than 10(3) but less than 10(4) cfu/g sample respectively. However, in wheat flour samples total fungal count ranged from 10(2) cfu/g sample to slightly more than 10(4) cfu/g sample. Aflatoxigenic colonies were mostly detected in wheat flour (20%), followed by ordinary rice grains (4%), glutinous rice grains (4%) and glutinous rice flour (2%). No aflatoxigenic colonies were isolated from rice flour and corn flour samples. Screening of aflatoxin B1, aflatoxin B2, aflatoxin G1 and aflatoxin G2 using reversed-phase HPLC were carried out on 84 samples of ordinary rice grains and 83 samples of wheat flour. Two point four percent (2.4%) of ordinary rice grains were positive for aflatoxin G1 and 3.6% were positive for aflatoxin G2. All the positive samples were collected from private homes at concentrations ranging from 3.69-77.50 micrograms/kg. One point two percent (1.2%) of wheat flour samples were positive for aflatoxin B1 at a concentration of 25.62 micrograms/kg, 4.8% were positive for aflatoxin B2 at concentrations ranging from 11.25-252.50 micrograms/kg, 3.6% were positive for aflatoxin G1 at concentrations ranging from 25.00-289.38 micrograms/kg and 13.25% were positive for aflatoxin G2 at concentrations ranging from 16.25-436.25 micrograms/kg. Similarly, positive wheat flour samples were mostly collected from private homes.

  7. Modelling Aspergillus flavus growth and aflatoxins production in pistachio nuts.

    PubMed

    Marín, Sonia; Ramos, Antonio J; Sanchis, V

    2012-12-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are the main contaminants in pistachio nuts. AFs production in pistachio has been attributed to Aspergillus flavus. The aim of this study was to apply existing models to predict growth and AFs production by an A. flavus isolated from pistachios as a function of moisture content and storage temperature of pistachios in order to test their usefulness and complementarities. A full factorial design was used: the moisture content levels assayed were 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% and incubation temperatures were 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 37 and 42 °C. Both kinetic and probability models were built to predict growth of the strain under the assayed conditions. Among the assayed models, cardinal ones gave a good quality fit for radial growth rate data. Moreover, the progressive approach, which was developed based on a reduced number of experimental points led to an improved prediction in the validation step. This is quite significant as may allow for improved experimental designs, less costly than full factorial ones. Probability model proved to be concordant in 91% of the calibration set observations. Even though the validation set included conditions around the growth/no-growth interface, there was a 100% agreement in the predictions from the data set (n = 16, cut off = 0.5) after 60 days. Similarly, the probability for AF presence was rightly predicted in 89% of the cases. According to our results EC maximum aflatoxin levels would be surpassed in a period as short as 1 month if pistachio nuts reach 20 °C, unless %mc is ≤10%.

  8. Anti-CD47 Treatment Stimulates Phagocytosis of Glioblastoma by M1 and M2 Polarized Macrophages and Promotes M1 Polarized Macrophages In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Suzana A.; Azad, Tej D.; Gholamin, Sharareh; Xu, Chelsea Y.; Liu, Jie; Achrol, Achal S.; Richard, Chase; Sommerkamp, Pia; Schoen, Matthew Kenneth; McCracken, Melissa N.; Majeti, Ravi; Weissman, Irving; Mitra, Siddhartha S.; Cheshier, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent an important cellular subset within the glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) microenvironment and are a potential therapeutic target. TAMs display a continuum of different polarization states between antitumorigenic M1 and protumorigenic M2 phenotypes, with a lower M1/M2 ratio correlating with worse prognosis. Here, we investigated the effect of macrophage polarization on anti-CD47 antibody-mediated phagocytosis of human glioblastoma cells in vitro, as well as the effect of anti-CD47 on the distribution of M1 versus M2 macrophages within human glioblastoma cells grown in mouse xenografts. Bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and peripheral blood-derived human macrophages were polarized in vitro toward M1 or M2 phenotypes and verified by flow cytometry. Primary human glioblastoma cell lines were offered as targets to mouse and human M1 or M2 polarized macrophages in vitro. The addition of an anti-CD47 monoclonal antibody led to enhanced tumor-cell phagocytosis by mouse and human M1 and M2 macrophages. In both cases, the anti-CD47-induced phagocytosis by M1 was more prominent than that for M2. Dissected tumors from human glioblastoma xenografted within NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice and treated with anti-CD47 showed a significant increase of M1 macrophages within the tumor. These data show that anti-CD47 treatment leads to enhanced tumor cell phagocytosis by both M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes with a higher phagocytosis rate by M1 macrophages. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that anti-CD47 treatment alone can shift the phenotype of macrophages toward the M1 subtype in vivo. PMID:27092773

  9. Anti-CD47 Treatment Stimulates Phagocytosis of Glioblastoma by M1 and M2 Polarized Macrophages and Promotes M1 Polarized Macrophages In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Michael; Hutter, Gregor; Kahn, Suzana A; Azad, Tej D; Gholamin, Sharareh; Xu, Chelsea Y; Liu, Jie; Achrol, Achal S; Richard, Chase; Sommerkamp, Pia; Schoen, Matthew Kenneth; McCracken, Melissa N; Majeti, Ravi; Weissman, Irving; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Cheshier, Samuel H

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent an important cellular subset within the glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) microenvironment and are a potential therapeutic target. TAMs display a continuum of different polarization states between antitumorigenic M1 and protumorigenic M2 phenotypes, with a lower M1/M2 ratio correlating with worse prognosis. Here, we investigated the effect of macrophage polarization on anti-CD47 antibody-mediated phagocytosis of human glioblastoma cells in vitro, as well as the effect of anti-CD47 on the distribution of M1 versus M2 macrophages within human glioblastoma cells grown in mouse xenografts. Bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages and peripheral blood-derived human macrophages were polarized in vitro toward M1 or M2 phenotypes and verified by flow cytometry. Primary human glioblastoma cell lines were offered as targets to mouse and human M1 or M2 polarized macrophages in vitro. The addition of an anti-CD47 monoclonal antibody led to enhanced tumor-cell phagocytosis by mouse and human M1 and M2 macrophages. In both cases, the anti-CD47-induced phagocytosis by M1 was more prominent than that for M2. Dissected tumors from human glioblastoma xenografted within NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice and treated with anti-CD47 showed a significant increase of M1 macrophages within the tumor. These data show that anti-CD47 treatment leads to enhanced tumor cell phagocytosis by both M1 and M2 macrophage subtypes with a higher phagocytosis rate by M1 macrophages. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that anti-CD47 treatment alone can shift the phenotype of macrophages toward the M1 subtype in vivo.

  10. Development of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Method Specific for the Detection of G-Group Aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiwu; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Haiyan; Zhang, Wen; Ding, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Zhaowei; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Zhang, Qi

    2015-12-28

    To detect and monitor G-group aflatoxins in agricultural products, we generated class-specific monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognized aflatoxins G₁ and G₂. Of the final three positive and stable hybridomas obtained, clone 2G6 produced a monoclonal antibody that had equal sensitivity to aflatoxins G₁ and G₂, and did not cross-react with aflatoxins B₁, B₂, or M₁. Its IC50 values for aflatoxins G₁ and G₂ were 17.18 ng·mL(-1) and 19.75 ng·mL(-1), respectively. Using this new monoclonal antibody, we developed a competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CI-ELISA); the method had a limit of detection of 0.06 ng·mL(-1). To validate this CI-ELISA, we spiked uncontaminated peanut samples with various amounts of aflatoxins G₁ and G₂ and compared recovery rates with those determined by a standard HPLC method. The recovery rates of the CI-ELISA ranging from 94% to 103% were comparable to those of the HPLC (92% to 102%). We also used both methods to determine the amounts of G-group aflatoxins in five peanut samples contaminated by aflatoxin B₁-positive, and their relative standard deviations ranged from 8.4% to 17.7% (under 20%), which demonstrates a good correlation between the two methods. We further used this CI-ELISA to assess the ability of 126 fungal strains isolated from peanuts or field soils to produce G-group aflatoxins. Among these, seven stains producing different amounts of G-group aflatoxins were identified. Our results showed that the monoclonal antibody 2 G6-based CI-ELISA was suitable for the detection of G-group aflatoxins present in peanuts and also those produced by fungi.

  11. Two new aflatoxin producing species, and an overview of Aspergillus section Flavi

    PubMed Central

    Varga, J.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus subgenus Circumdati section Flavi includes species with usually biseriate conidial heads, in shades of yellow-green to brown, and dark sclerotia. Several species assigned to this section are either important mycotoxin producers including aflatoxins, cyclopiazonic acid, ochratoxins and kojic acid, or are used in oriental food fermentation processes and as hosts for heterologous gene expression. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data and partial calmodulin, β-tubulin and ITS sequences to examine the evolutionary relationships within this section. The data indicate that Aspergillus section Flavi involves 22 species, which can be grouped into seven clades. Two new species, A. pseudocaelatus sp. nov. and A. pseudonomius sp. nov. have been discovered, and can be distinguished from other species in this section based on sequence data and extrolite profiles. Aspergillus pseudocaelatus is represented by a single isolate collected from Arachis burkartii leaf in Argentina, is closely related to the non-aflatoxin producing A. caelatus, and produces aflatoxins B & G, cyclopiazonic acid and kojic acid, while A. pseudonomius was isolated from insects and soil in the USA. This species is related to A. nomius, and produces aflatoxin B1 (but not G-type aflatoxins), chrysogine and kojic acid. In order to prove the aflatoxin producing abilities of the isolates, phylogenetic analysis of three genes taking part in aflatoxin biosynthesis, including the transcriptional regulator aflR, norsolonic acid reductase and O-methyltransferase were also carried out. A detailed overview of the species accepted in Aspergillus section Flavi is presented. PMID:21892243

  12. Potential of essential oils for protection of grains contaminated by aflatoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Renata H.; Gonçalez, Edlayne; Marques, Marcia O. M.; Felicio, Roberto C.; Felicio, Joana D.

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a highly toxic and carcinogenic metabolite produced by Aspergillus species on food and agricultural commodities. Inhibitory effects of essential oils of Ageratum conyzoides (mentrasto) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) on the mycelial growth and aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus have been studied previously in culture medium. The aim of this study was to evaluate aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus in real food systems (corn and soybean) treated with Ageratum conyzoides (mentrasto) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) essential oils. Samples with 60 g of the grains were treated with different volumes of essential oils, 200, 100, 50, and 10 μL for oregano and 50, 30, 15, and 10 μL for mentrasto. Fungal growth was evaluated by disk diffusion method. Aflatoxin B1 production was evaluated inoculating suspensions of A. flavus containing 1.3 × 105 spores/mL in 60 g of grains (corn and soybeans) after adjusting the water activity at 0.94. Aflatoxin was quantified by photodensitometry. Fungal growth and aflatoxin production were inhibited by essential oils, but the mentrasto oil was more effective in soybeans than that of oregano. On the other hand, in corn samples, the oregano essential oil was more effective than that of mentrasto. Chemical compositions of the essential oils were also investigated. The GC/MS oils analysis showed that the main component of mentrasto essential oil is precocene I and of the main component of oregano essential oil is 4-terpineol. The results indicate that both essential oils can become an alternative for the control of aflatoxins in corn and soybeans. PMID:24926289

  13. Potential of essential oils for protection of grains contaminated by aflatoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Esper, Renata H; Gonçalez, Edlayne; Marques, Marcia O M; Felicio, Roberto C; Felicio, Joana D

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a highly toxic and carcinogenic metabolite produced by Aspergillus species on food and agricultural commodities. Inhibitory effects of essential oils of Ageratum conyzoides (mentrasto) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) on the mycelial growth and aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus have been studied previously in culture medium. The aim of this study was to evaluate aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus in real food systems (corn and soybean) treated with Ageratum conyzoides (mentrasto) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) essential oils. Samples with 60 g of the grains were treated with different volumes of essential oils, 200, 100, 50, and 10 μL for oregano and 50, 30, 15, and 10 μL for mentrasto. Fungal growth was evaluated by disk diffusion method. Aflatoxin B1 production was evaluated inoculating suspensions of A. flavus containing 1.3 × 10(5) spores/mL in 60 g of grains (corn and soybeans) after adjusting the water activity at 0.94. Aflatoxin was quantified by photodensitometry. Fungal growth and aflatoxin production were inhibited by essential oils, but the mentrasto oil was more effective in soybeans than that of oregano. On the other hand, in corn samples, the oregano essential oil was more effective than that of mentrasto. Chemical compositions of the essential oils were also investigated. The GC/MS oils analysis showed that the main component of mentrasto essential oil is precocene I and of the main component of oregano essential oil is 4-terpineol. The results indicate that both essential oils can become an alternative for the control of aflatoxins in corn and soybeans.

  14. Does aflatoxin exposure in the United Kingdom constitute a cancer risk?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, J C; Carvajal, M; Garner, R C

    1993-01-01

    Although the aflatoxins were discovered more than 30 years ago, there is still considerable controversy surrounding their human health effects. Most countries have introduced legislation to control the level of aflatoxins in food, but it is not known if these permitted levels still pose a significant cancer risk. Furthermore, it is unlikely that all the sources of human aflatoxin exposure have been discovered, nor if the liver is the only, or indeed, major target organ for aflatoxin-induced cancer in man. In our laboratory we have used both immunological and HPLC methods to examine human DNA from a variety of tissues and organs to identify and quantify aflatoxin DNA-adducts. We have already detected aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-DNA adducts in formalin-fixed tissue from an acute poisoning incident in Southeast Asia. Here we have examined human colon and rectum DNA from normal and tumorous tissue obtained from cancer patients and colon, liver, pancreas, breast, and cervix DNA from autopsy specimens. AFB1-DNA adducts were detected in all tissue types examined and ranged from 0-60 adducts/10(6) nucleotides. Where sample size allowed, the adduct levels were confirmed by HPLC analysis. Tumor tissues tended to have higher adduct levels than normal tissue from the same individual, and levels generally increased with patient age. In samples analyzed by HPLC, the adducts present had the chromatographic properties of [8,9-dihydro-8-(N5-formyl)-2',5',6'-triamino-4'-oxo-(N5-pyramidyl) -9- hydroxy-aflatoxin B1, the ring-opened form of the AFB1-guanine adduct.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8319666

  15. Non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus to prevent aflatoxin contamination in crops: advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a diverse assemblage of strains that include aflatoxin-producing and non-toxigenic strains with cosmopolitan distribution. The most promising strategy currently being used to reduce preharvest contamination of crops with aflatoxin is to introduce non-aflatoxin (biocontrol) A. flavus into the crop environment. Whether or not introduction of biocontrol strains into agricultural fields is enough to reduce aflatoxin contamination to levels required for acceptance of the contaminated food as fit for consumption is still unknown. There is no question that biocontrol strains are able to reduce the size of the populations of aflatoxin-producing strains but the available data suggests that at most only a four- to five-fold reduction in aflatoxin contamination is achieved. There are many challenges facing this strategy that are both short term and long term. First, the population biology of A. flavus is not well understood due in part to A. flavus’s diversity, its ability to form heterokaryotic reproductive forms, and its unknown ability to survive for prolonged periods after application. Second, biocontrol strains must be selected that are suitable for the environment, the type of crop, and the soil into which they will be introduced. Third, there is a need to guard against inadvertent introduction of A. flavus strains that could impose an additional burden on food safety and food quality, and fourth, with global warming and resultant changes in the soil nutrients and concomitant microbiome populations, the biocontrol strategy must be sufficiently flexible to adapt to such changes. Understanding genetic variation within strains of A. flavus is important for developing a robust biocontrol strategy and it is unlikely that a “one size fits all” strategy will work for preharvest aflatoxin reduction. PMID:24575088

  16. Common African cooking processes do not affect the aflatoxin binding efficacy of refined calcium montmorillonite clay

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Sarah E.; Mitchell, Nicole; Mays, Travis; Brown, Kristal; Marroquin-Cardona, Alicia; Romoser, Amelia; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are common contaminants of staple crops, such as corn and groundnuts, and a significant cause of concern for food safety and public health in developing countries. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) has been implicated in the etiology of acute and chronic disease in humans and animals, including growth stunting, liver cancer and death. Cost effective and culturally acceptable intervention strategies for the reduction of dietary AFB1 exposure are of critical need in populations at high risk for aflatoxicosis. Fermented gruels consisting of cornmeal are a common source for such exposure and are consumed by both children and adults in many countries with a history of frequent, high-level aflatoxin exposure. One proposed method to reduce aflatoxins in the diet is to include a selective enterosorbent, Uniform Particle Size NovaSil (UPSN), as a food additive in contaminated foods. For UPSN to be effective in this capacity, it must be stable in complex, acidic mixtures that are often exposed to heat during the process of fermented gruel preparation. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to test the ability of UPSN to sorb aflatoxin while common cooking conditions were applied. The influence of fermentation, heat treatment, acidity, and processing time were investigated with and without UPSN. Analyses were performed using the field-practical Vicam assay with HPLC verification of trends. Our findings demonstrated that UPSN significantly reduced aflatoxin levels (47-100%) in cornmeal, regardless of processing conditions. Upon comparison of each element tested, time appeared to be the primary factor influencing UPSN efficacy. The greatest decreases in AFB1 were reported in samples allowed to incubate (with or without fermentation) for 72 hrs. This data suggests that addition of UPSN to staple corn ingredients likely to contain aflatoxins would be a sustainable approach to reduce exposure. PMID:24311894

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma p53 G > T transversions at codon 249: the fingerprint of aflatoxin exposure?

    PubMed

    Lasky, T; Magder, L

    1997-04-01

    The molecular epidemiology of p53 mutations allows the possibility of correlating particular mutations with specific environmental carcinogens and establishing one step in the causal pathway between exposure to carcinogens and the development of cancer. A striking example is the G > T transversion at the third base pair of codon 249 observed in liver cancer patients possibly exposed to high levels of aflatoxins in their agricultural products. In this paper, we describe a systematic review of the literature and access the quality of the available data. We found methodologic limitations in the studies. In particular, the key independent variable, aflatoxin exposure, was not assessed in these studies, with the exception of one study that measured a marker of exposure. Instead, nationality, geographic residence, or geographic site of hospital were used as surrogate markers for exposure. Patients from areas with high aflatoxin levels were more likely to have p53 mutations than were patients from areas with low aflatoxin levels. In the group with p53 mutations, patients from areas with high aflatoxin levels had higher proportions of mutations with codon 249 G > T transversions. The differences in proportions with p53 mutations were significant, as were the differences in proportions of codon 249 G > T transversions among patients with p53 mutations. Aflatoxin may increase the proportion of p53 mutations by causing a single mutation, the codon 249 G > T transversion, thus explaining some of the excess liver cancer associated with aflatoxin exposure. However, it is premature to conclude that p53 mutations are established markers for environmental carcinogens.

  18. Surveillance of Aflatoxin and Microbiota Related to Brewer's Grain Destined for Swine Feed in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gerbaldo, Gisela A.; Pereyra, Carina M.; Cavaglieri, Lilia R.; Ruiz, Francisco; Pascual, Liliana; Dalcero, Ana M.; Barberis, Isabel L.

    2011-01-01

    Córdoba province in the center of Argentina is an important area of swine production. The use of industry by-product (brewer's grain) as feedstuff for swine is a regular practice and increases animal performance on these animals production. The occurrence of aflatoxin contamination is global, causing severe problems especially in developing countries. No reports on aflatoxin B1 production, micoflora, and potential aflatoxin B1 producing microorganism from brewer's grain are available. The aims of this study were (1) to isolate the microbiota species from brewer's grain, (2) to determine aflatoxin B1 natural contamination levels, and (3) to determine the ability of Aspergillus section Flavi isolates to produce aflatoxins in vitro. Physical properties, total fungal counts, lactic acid bacteria, and fungal genera distribution were determined on this substrate. In 65% of the samples, fungal counts were higher than recommended by GMP, and lactic bacterium counts ranged from 1.9 × 105 to 4.4 × 109 CFU g−1. Aspergillus spp. prevailed over other fungal genera. Aspergillus flavus was the prevalent species followed by A. fumigatus. Aflatoxin B1 levels in the samples were higher than the recommended limits (20 ng g−1) for complementary feedstuffs. Several Aspergillus section Flavi strains were able to produce aflatoxin B1  in vitro. Inadequate storage conditions promote the proliferation of mycotoxin-producing fungal species. Regular monitoring of feeds is required in order to prevent chronic and acute toxic syndromes related to this kind of contamination. PMID:21547231

  19. Development of a ten-signature classifier using a support vector machine integrated approach to subdivide the M1 stage into M1a and M1b stages of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with synchronous metastases to better predict patients' survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng-Xia; Wang, Tong-Min; Sun, Rui; Luo, Dong-Hua; Huang, Pei-Yu; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Hua, Yi-Jun; Tang, Lin-Quan; Guo, Ling; Mo, Hao-Yuan; Qian, Chao-Nan; Mai, Hai-Qiang; Hong, Ming-Huang; Cai, Hong-Min; Chen, Ming-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic classifier and subdivided the M1 stage for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with synchronous metastases (mNPC). A retrospective cohort of 347 mNPC patients was recruited between January 2000 and December 2010. Thirty hematological markers and 11 clinical characteristics were collected, and the association of these factors with overall survival (OS) was evaluated. Advanced machine learning schemes of a support vector machine (SVM) were used to select a subset of highly informative factors and to construct a prognostic model (mNPC-SVM). The mNPC-SVM classifier identified ten informative variables, including three clinical indexes and seven hematological markers. The median survival time for low-risk patients (M1a) as identified by the mNPC-SVM classifier was 38.0 months, and survival time was dramatically reduced to 13.8 months for high-risk patients (M1b) (P < 0.001). Multivariate adjustment using prognostic factors revealed that the mNPC-SVM classifier remained a powerful predictor of OS (M1a vs. M1b, hazard ratio, 3.45; 95% CI, 2.59 to 4.60, P < 0.001). Moreover, combination treatment of systemic chemotherapy and loco-regional radiotherapy was associated with significantly better survival outcomes than chemotherapy alone (the 5-year OS, 47.0% vs. 10.0%, P < 0.001) in the M1a subgroup but not in the M1b subgroup (12.0% vs. 3.0%, P = 0.101). These findings were validated by a separate cohort. In conclusion, the newly developed mNPC-SVM classifier led to more precise risk definitions that offer a promising subdivision of the M1 stage and individualized selection for future therapeutic regimens in mNPC patients. PMID:26636646

  20. Development of a ten-signature classifier using a support vector machine integrated approach to subdivide the M1 stage into M1a and M1b stages of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with synchronous metastases to better predict patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rou; You, Rui; Pei, Xiao-Qing; Zou, Xiong; Zhang, Meng-Xia; Wang, Tong-Min; Sun, Rui; Luo, Dong-Hua; Huang, Pei-Yu; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Hua, Yi-Jun; Tang, Lin-Quan; Guo, Ling; Mo, Hao-Yuan; Qian, Chao-Nan; Mai, Hai-Qiang; Hong, Ming-Huang; Cai, Hong-Min; Chen, Ming-Yuan

    2016-01-19

    The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic classifier and subdivided the M1 stage for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with synchronous metastases (mNPC). A retrospective cohort of 347 mNPC patients was recruited between January 2000 and December 2010. Thirty hematological markers and 11 clinical characteristics were collected, and the association of these factors with overall survival (OS) was evaluated. Advanced machine learning schemes of a support vector machine (SVM) were used to select a subset of highly informative factors and to construct a prognostic model (mNPC-SVM). The mNPC-SVM classifier identified ten informative variables, including three clinical indexes and seven hematological markers. The median survival time for low-risk patients (M1a) as identified by the mNPC-SVM classifier was 38.0 months, and survival time was dramatically reduced to 13.8 months for high-risk patients (M1b) (P < 0.001). Multivariate adjustment using prognostic factors revealed that the mNPC-SVM classifier remained a powerful predictor of OS (M1a vs. M1b, hazard ratio, 3.45; 95% CI, 2.59 to 4.60, P < 0.001). Moreover, combination treatment of systemic chemotherapy and loco-regional radiotherapy was associated with significantly better survival outcomes than chemotherapy alone (the 5-year OS, 47.0% vs. 10.0%, P < 0.001) in the M1a subgroup but not in the M1b subgroup (12.0% vs. 3.0%, P = 0.101). These findings were validated by a separate cohort. In conclusion, the newly developed mNPC-SVM classifier led to more precise risk definitions that offer a promising subdivision of the M1 stage and individualized selection for future therapeutic regimens in mNPC patients.

  1. Low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation targeted to PMC followed by M1 modulates excitability differently from PMC or M1 stimulation alone

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mo; Deng, Huiqiong; Schmidt, Rebekah L.; Kimberley, Teresa J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The excitability of primary motor cortex (M1) can be modulated by applying low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over M1 or premotor cortex (PMC). A comparison of inhibitory effect between the two locations has been reported with inconsistent results. This study compared the response secondary to rTMS applied over M1, PMC and a combined PMC+M1 stimulation approach which first targets stimulation over PMC then M1. Materials and Methods Ten healthy participants were recruited for a randomized, cross-over design with a 1-week wash-out between visits. Each visit consisted of a pre-test, an rTMS intervention and a post-test. Outcome measures included short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and cortical silent period (CSP). Participants received one of the three interventions in random order at each visit including: 1-Hz rTMS at 90% of resting motor threshold to: M1 (1200 pulses), PMC (1200 pulses) and PMC+M1 (600 pulses each, 1200 total). Results PMC+M1 stimulation resulted in significantly greater inhibition than the other locations for ICF (P = 0.005) and CSP (P < 0.001); for SICI, increased inhibition (group effect) was not observed after any of the three interventions and there was no significant difference between the three interventions. Conclusion The results indicate that PMC+M1 stimulation may modulate brain excitability differently from PMC or M1 alone. CSP was the assessment measure most sensitive to changes in inhibition and was able to distinguish between different inhibitory protocols. This work presents a novel procedure that may have positive implications for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26307511

  2. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method specific for the detection of G-group aflatoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To detect and monitor G-group aflatoxins in agricultural products, we generated class-specific monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognized aflatoxins G1 and G2. Of the final three positive and stable hybridomas obtained, hybridoma 2G6 produced a monoclonal antibody that did not cross-react wi...

  3. Comparison of the side-needle and knife techniques for inducing Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin accumulation in corn hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin in corn grain is a problem in many areas of the world. Any combination of environmentally stressful or agronomically unfavorable conditions can increase the likelihood of Aspergillus flavus infection and production of aflatoxin in the corn grain. In the absence of a consistent natural A....

  4. Screening a Strain of Aspergillus niger and Optimization of Fermentation Conditions for Degradation of Aflatoxin B1 †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xue, Beibei; Li, Mengmeng; Mu, Yang; Chen, Zhihui; Li, Jianping; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1, a type of highly toxic mycotoxin produced by some species belonging to the Aspergillus genus, such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, is widely distributed in feed matrices. Here, coumarin was used as the sole carbon source to screen microorganism strains that were isolated from types of feed ingredients. Only one isolate (ND-1) was able to degrade aflatoxin B1 after screening. ND-1 isolate, identified as a strain of Aspergillus niger using phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 18S rDNA, could remove 26.3% of aflatoxin B1 after 48 h of fermentation in nutrient broth (NB). Optimization of fermentation conditions for aflatoxin B1 degradation by selected Aspergillus niger was also performed. These results showed that 58.2% of aflatoxin B1 was degraded after 24 h of culture under the optimal fermentation conditions. The aflatoxin B1 degradation activity of Aspergillus niger supernatant was significantly stronger than cells and cell extracts. Furthermore, effects of temperature, heat treatment, pH, and metal ions on aflatoxin B1 degradation by the supernatant were examined. Results indicated that aflatoxin B1 degradation of Aspergillus niger is enzymatic and this process occurs in the extracellular environment. PMID:25401962

  5. Degradation kinetics of aflatoxin B1 and B2 in filter paper and rough rice by using pulsed light irradiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rough rice is susceptible to contamination by aflatoxins, which are highly toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic compounds. To develop aflatoxin degradation technology for rice with the use of pulsed light (PL) treatment, the objective of this study was to investigate the degradation characters of aflat...

  6. Non-linear relationships between aflatoxin B1 levels and the biological response of monkey kidney vero cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin (AF)-producing fungi contaminate food and feed during preharvest, storage and processing periods. Once consumed, AF accumulates in tissues, causing illnesses in animals and humans. At least 20 different types of AFs have been identified, and of these, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most ubiqui...

  7. Evaluation of intraspecific competition (Aspergillus flavus Link) and aflatoxin formation in suspended disc culture and preharvest maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abilities of non-aflatoxin producing strains of Aspergillus flavus NRRL 32354; 18543; 21882; 21368 as well as domesticated koji strains Aspergillus oryzae (syn. A. flavus var. oryzae) NRRL 451; 1911; 5592; 6271; 30038 to interfere with aflatoxin formation by A. flavus NRRL 3357; 32355 were exami...

  8. Evaluation of maize inbred lines for resistance to pre-harvest aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two important mycotoxins, aflatoxin and fumonisin, are among the most potent naturally occurring carcinogens, contaminating maize (Zea mays L.) and affecting the crop yield and quality. Resistance of maize to pre-harvest mycotoxin contamination, specifically aflatoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus ...

  9. Integration of fluorescence and reflectance visible near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral images for detection of aflatoxins in corn kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination in agricultural products has been an important and long-standing problem around the world. Produced by certain fungal species of the Aspergillus genus, aflatoxins are highly toxic and carcinogenic. This study investigated the integration of fluorescence and reflectance visibl...

  10. Evaluation of the expression genes associated with resistance to Aspergillus flavus colonization and aflatoxin production in different maize lines.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are carcinogenic toxic compounds produced by Aspergillus flavus during infection of crops including maize (Zea mays L.). Contamination of maize with aflatoxin is exacerbated by late season drought stress. Previous studies have implicated numerous resistance-associated proteins (RAPs) that...

  11. Differential accumulation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in maize lines with contrasting drought tolerance and aflatoxin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abiotic stresses such as drought stress can exacerbate aflatoxin contamination of maize kernels. Previous studies showed that maize lines resistance to aflatoxin contamination tend to exhibit enhanced drought tolerance and accumulate lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species...

  12. Determination of the aflatoxin AFB1 from corn by direct analysis in real time-mass spectrometry (DART-MS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer (MS) was used for screening of aflatoxins from a variety of surfaces and the rapid quantitative analysis of a common form of aflatoxin, AFB1, extracted from corn. Sample preparation procedure and instrument...

  13. Analysis of the aflatoxin AFB1 from corn by direct analysis in real time - mass spectrometry (DART-MS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer (MS) was used for screening of aflatoxins from a variety of surfaces and the rapid quantitative analysis of aflatoxins extracted from corn. Sample preparation procedure and instrument parameter settings wer...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6501(m)-1 - Tentative carryback adjustment assessment period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... period. 301.6501(m)-1 Section 301.6501(m)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(m)-1 Tentative carryback adjustment assessment period. (a) Period of limitation after tentative carryback adjustment. (1) Under section 6501(m), in a case where an amount...

  15. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-1 - Employee contributions and matching contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contributions. 1.401(m)-1 Section 1.401(m)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.401(m)-1 Employee contributions and matching contributions. (a) General... contributions satisfies the nondiscrimination test of section 401(m) under paragraph (b) of this section and...

  16. 26 CFR 301.6501(m)-1 - Tentative carryback adjustment assessment period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... period. 301.6501(m)-1 Section 301.6501(m)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Assessment and Collection § 301.6501(m)-1 Tentative carryback adjustment assessment period. (a) Period of limitation after tentative carryback adjustment. (1) Under section 6501(m), in a case where an amount...

  17. 26 CFR 301.6103(m)-1 - Disclosure of taxpayer identity information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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  20. 26 CFR 301.6103(m)-1 - Disclosure of taxpayer identity information.

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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  2. 26 CFR 301.6103(m)-1 - Disclosure of taxpayer identity information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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  3. Deregulation of FoxM1b leads to tumour metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jung; Gusarova, Galina; Wang, Zebin; Carr, Janai R; Li, Jing; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Qiu, Jin; Park, Yoon-Dong; Williamson, Peter R; Hay, Nissim; Tyner, Angela L; Lau, Lester F; Costa, Robert H; Raychaudhuri, Pradip

    2011-01-01

    The forkhead box M1b (FoxM1b) transcription factor is over-expressed in human cancers, and its expression often correlates with poor prognosis. Previously, using conditional knockout strains, we showed that FoxM1b is essential for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. However, over-expression of FoxM1b had only marginal effects on HCC progression. Here we investigated the effect of FoxM1b expression in the absence of its inhibitor Arf. We show that transgenic expression of FoxM1b in an Arf-null background drives hepatic fibrosis and metastasis of HCC. We identify novel mechanisms of FoxM1b that are involved in epithelial–mesenchymal transition, cell motility, invasion and a pre-metastatic niche formation. FoxM1b activates the Akt-Snail1 pathway and stimulates expression of Stathmin, lysyl oxidase, lysyl oxidase like-2 and several other genes involved in metastasis. Furthermore, we show that an Arf-derived peptide, which inhibits FoxM1b, impedes metastasis of the FoxM1b-expressing HCC cells. The observations indicate that FoxM1b is a potent activator of tumour metastasis and that the Arf-mediated inhibition of FoxM1b is a critical mechanism for suppression of tumour metastasis. PMID:21204266

  4. Development of narrow-band fluorescence index for the detection of aflatoxin contaminated corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Ononye, Ambrose; Brown, Robert L.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2011-06-01

    Aflatoxin is produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus when the fungus invades developing corn kernels. Because of its potent toxicity, the levels of aflatoxin are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, allowing 20 ppb (parts per billion) limits in food, and feed intended for interstate commerce. Currently, aflatoxin detection and quantification methods are based on analytical tests. These tests require the destruction of samples, can be costly and time consuming, and often rely on less than desirable sampling techniques. Thus, the ability to detect aflatoxin in a rapid, non-invasive way is crucial to the corn industry in particular. This paper described how narrow-band fluorescence indices were developed for aflatoxin contamination detection based on single corn kernel samples. The indices were based on two bands extracted from full wavelength fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. The two band results were later applied to two large sample experiments with 25 g and 1 kg of corn per sample. The detection accuracies were 85% and 95% when 100 ppb threshold was used. Since the data acquisition period is significantly lower for several image bands than for full wavelength hyperspectral data, this study would be helpful in the development of real-time detection instrumentation for the corn industry.

  5. Hyperspectral bright greenish-yellow fluorescence (BGYF) imaging of aflatoxin contaminated corn kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2006-10-01

    Aflatoxin contaminated corn poses a serious threat to both domestic animals and humans, because of its carcinogenic properties. Traditionally, corn kernels have been examined for evidence of bright greenish-yellow fluorescence (BGYF), which is an indication of possible presence of Aspergillus flavus, one of the aflatoxin producing strains of fungi, when illuminated with a high-intensity ultra-violet light. The BGYF test is typically the first step that leads to an in-depth chemical analysis for possible aflatoxin contamination. The objective of the present study was to analyze hyperspectral BGYF response of corn kernels under UVA excitation. The target corn samples were collected from a commercial corn field in 2005 and showed abundant BGYF response. The BGYF positive kernels were manually picked out and imaged under a visible near-infrared hyperspectral imaging system under UV radiation with excitation wavelength centered at 365 nm. Initial results exhibited strong emission spectra with peaks centered from 500 nm to 515 nm wavelength range for BGYF positive kernels. Aflatoxin levels on the BGYF positive and negative corn kernels (used as control) were measured subsequently with high performance liquid chromatography. The mean aflatoxin concentration level was 5114 ppb for the BGYF positive and undetectable for the normal kernels.

  6. Aflatoxin contaminated chili pepper detection by hyperspectral imaging and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atas, Musa; Yardimci, Yasemin; Temizel, Alptekin

    2011-06-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by fungi. They have been demonstrated to cause various health problems in humans, including immunosuppression and cancer. A class of mycotoxins, aflatoxins, has been studied extensively because they have caused many deaths particularly in developing countries. Chili pepper is also prone to aflatoxin contamination during harvesting, production and storage periods. Chemical methods to detect aflatoxins are quite accurate but expensive and destructive in nature. Hyperspectral and multispectral imaging are becoming increasingly important for rapid and nondestructive testing for the presence of such contaminants. We propose a compact machine vision system based on hyperspectral imaging and machine learning for detection of aflatoxin contaminated chili peppers. We used the difference images of consecutive spectral bands along with individual band energies to classify chili peppers into aflatoxin contaminated and uncontaminated classes. Both UV and halogen illumination sources were used in the experiments. The significant bands that provide better discrimination were selected based on their neural network connection weights. Higher classification rates were achieved with fewer numbers of spectral bands. This selection scheme was compared with an information-theoretic approach and it demonstrated robust performance with higher classification accuracy.

  7. Classification of corn kernels contaminated with aflatoxins using fluorescence and reflectance hyperspectral images analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fengle; Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Brown, Robert; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Aflatoxins are secondary metabolites produced by certain fungal species of the Aspergillus genus. Aflatoxin contamination remains a problem in agricultural products due to its toxic and carcinogenic properties. Conventional chemical methods for aflatoxin detection are time-consuming and destructive. This study employed fluorescence and reflectance visible near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral images to classify aflatoxin contaminated corn kernels rapidly and non-destructively. Corn ears were artificially inoculated in the field with toxigenic A. flavus spores at the early dough stage of kernel development. After harvest, a total of 300 kernels were collected from the inoculated ears. Fluorescence hyperspectral imagery with UV excitation and reflectance hyperspectral imagery with halogen illumination were acquired on both endosperm and germ sides of kernels. All kernels were then subjected to chemical analysis individually to determine aflatoxin concentrations. A region of interest (ROI) was created for each kernel to extract averaged spectra. Compared with healthy kernels, fluorescence spectral peaks for contaminated kernels shifted to longer wavelengths with lower intensity, and reflectance values for contaminated kernels were lower with a different spectral shape in 700-800 nm region. Principal component analysis was applied for data compression before classifying kernels into contaminated and healthy based on a 20 ppb threshold utilizing the K-nearest neighbors algorithm. The best overall accuracy achieved was 92.67% for germ side in the fluorescence data analysis. The germ side generally performed better than endosperm side. Fluorescence and reflectance image data achieved similar accuracy.

  8. Potential of Chitinolytic Serratia marcescens Strain JPP1 for Biological Control of Aspergillus parasiticus and Aflatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Yan, Pei-sheng; Cao, Li-xin; Ding, Qing-long; Shao, Chi; Zhao, Teng-fei

    2013-01-01

    Serratia marcescens strain JPP1 was isolated from peanut hulls in Huai'an city, Jiangsu Province, China. Its potential to inhibit the mycelial growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and the subsequent aflatoxin production was evaluated. The strain JPP1 could produce chitinase to degrade fungal cell walls, which was the main mechanism of strain JPP1 for biocontrol. Scanning electron microscopy of fungi treated with the crude chitinase revealed abnormal morphological changes. While the strain was grown in the peanut hulls-based medium, the chitinase activity reached 7.39 units. RT-PCR analysis showed that the crude chitinase repressed the transcription of genes involved in the aflatoxin gene cluster, such as aflR, aflC (pksL1), and aflO (dmtA) genes. By visual agar plate assay and tip culture method, the strain JPP1 exhibited remarkable inhibitory effect on mycelia growth (antifungal ratio >95%) and subsequent aflatoxin production (antiaflatoxigenic ratio >98%). An in vitro assay with seed coating agent of bacterial suspension showed that strain JPP1 effectively reduced fungal growth and subsequent aflatoxin production on peanut seeds, and its antagonistic effect was superior to the common agricultural fungicide of carbendazim. These characteristics suggest that S. marcescens JPP1 strain could potentially be utilized for the biological control of phytopathogenic fungi and aflatoxin in Chinese peanut main producing areas. PMID:23865052

  9. The aflatoxin B1 isolating potential of two lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Adel; Mirnejad, Reza; Yahaghi, Emad; Behnod, Vahid; Mirhosseini, Ali; Amani, Sajad; Sattari, Sara; Darian, Ebrahim Khodaverdi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine lactic acid bacteria's capability to enhance the process of binding and isolating aflatoxin B1 and to utilize such lactic acid bacteria as a food supplement or probiotic products for preventing absorption of aflatoxin B1 in human and animal bodies. Methods In the present research, the bacteria were isolated from five different sources. For surveying the capability of the bacteria in isolating aflatoxin B1, ELISA method was implemented, and for identifying the resultant strains through 16S rRNA sequencing method, universal primers were applied. Results Among the strains which were isolated, two strains of Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus beveris exhibited the capability of absorbing and isolating aflatoxin B1 by respectively absorbing and discharging 17.4% and 34.7% of the aforementioned toxin existing in the experiment solution. Conclusions Strains of Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus beveris were isolated from human feces and local milk samples, respectively. And both strains has the ability to isolate or bind with aflatoxin B1. PMID:23998015

  10. Direct visual detection of aflatoxin synthesis by minicolonies of Aspergillus species.

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, P A; Davis, N D; Creech, G W

    1989-01-01

    Single-spore colonies of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, grown for 4 to 5 days at 25 degrees C on a coconut extract agar containing sodium desoxycholate as a growth inhibitor, produced aflatoxin, readily detectable as blue fluorescent zones under long-wave (365 nm) UV light. Over 100 colonies per standard petri dish were scored for aflatoxin production by this procedure. Progeny from some strains remained consistently stable for toxin production after repeated subculture, whereas instability for toxin synthesis was revealed among progeny from other strains. Spore color markers were used to rule out cross-contamination in monitoring strains. A yellow-spored and nontoxigenic strain of A. flavus, reported previously to produce aflatoxin in response to cycloheximide treatment, proved to be toxin negative even after repeated exposure to cycloheximide. Extended series of progeny from another strain of A. flavus and from a strain of A. parasiticus were each compared by this plating procedure and by fluorometric analysis for aflatoxin when grown in a coconut extract broth. Both of these strains showed variation for toxin synthesis among their respective progeny, and specific progeny showed a good correlation for aflatoxin synthesis when examined by the two procedures. Images PMID:2504116

  11. Candida parapsilosis as a Potent Biocontrol Agent against Growth and Aflatoxin Production by Aspergillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Niknejad, F; Zaini, F; Faramarzi, MA; Amini, M; Kordbacheh, P; Mahmoudi, M; Safara, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aflatoxin contamination of food and feed stuff is a serious health problem and significant economic concerns. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of Candida parapsilosis IP1698 on mycelial growth and aflatoxin production in aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus species was investigated. Methods: Mycelial growth inhibitions of nine strains of aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species in the presence of C. parapsilosis investigated by pour plate technique at different pH, temperature and time of incubation. Reduction of aflatoxin was evaluated in co-cultured fungi in yeast extract sucrose broth after seven days of incubation using HPLC method. The data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5. Results: The presence of the C. parapsilosis at different pH did not affect significantly the growth rate of Aspergillus isolates. On the other hand, temperature and time of incubation showed to be significantly effective when compared to controls without C. parapsilosis (P≤0.05). In aflatoxigenic strains, minimum percentage of reductions in total aflatoxin and B1, B2, G1, G2 fractions were 92.98, 92.54, 77.48, 54.54 and 72.22 and maximum percentage of reductions were 99.59, not detectable, 94.42, and not detectable in both G1 and G2, respectively. Conclusion: C. parapsilosis might employ as a good biocontrol agent against growth and aflatoxin production by aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species PMID:23308351

  12. Aflatoxin B1 contamination in maize in Europe increases due to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battilani, P.; Toscano, P.; van der Fels-Klerx, H. J.; Moretti, A.; Camardo Leggieri, M.; Brera, C.; Rortais, A.; Goumperis, T.; Robinson, T.

    2016-04-01

    Climate change has been reported as a driver for emerging food and feed safety issues worldwide and its expected impact on the presence of mycotoxins in food and feed is of great concern. Aflatoxins have the highest acute and chronic toxicity of all mycotoxins; hence, the maximal concentration in agricultural food and feed products and their commodities is regulated worldwide. The possible change in patterns of aflatoxin occurrence in crops due to climate change is a matter of concern that may require anticipatory actions. The aim of this study was to predict aflatoxin contamination in maize and wheat crops, within the next 100 years, under a +2 °C and +5 °C climate change scenario, applying a modelling approach. Europe was virtually covered by a net, 50 × 50 km grids, identifying 2254 meshes with a central point each. Climate data were generated for each point, linked to predictive models and predictions were run consequently. Aflatoxin B1 is predicted to become a food safety issue in maize in Europe, especially in the +2 °C scenario, the most probable scenario of climate change expected for the next years. These results represent a supporting tool to reinforce aflatoxin management and to prevent human and animal exposure.

  13. Purification of a vesicle-vacuole fraction functionally linked to aflatoxin synthesis in Aspergillus parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    CHANDA, Anindya; ROZE, Ludmila; PASTOR, Alicia; FRAME, Melinda; LINZ, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Current studies in our laboratory demonstrate a functional link between vesicles, vacuoles and aflatoxin biosynthesis in the filamentous fungus, Aspergillus parasiticus. Under aflatoxin inducing conditions in liquid yeast-extract sucrose medium, A. parasiticus undergoes a shift from vacuole biogenesis to accumulation of an enhanced number of vesicles which exhibit significant heterogeneity in size and density. As a first step in conducting a detailed analysis of the role of these organelles in aflatoxin synthesis, we developed a novel method to purify the vesicle and vacuole fraction using protoplasts prepared from cells harvested during aflatoxin synthesis. The method includes the following steps: 1] preparation of protoplasts from mycelia grown for 36h under aflatoxin inducing conditions; 2] release of vesicles and vacuoles from purified protoplasts in the presence of Triton X-100; and 3] fractionation of the vesicles and vacuoles using a “one-step high density cushion”. The vesicle-vacuole fraction showed a 35 fold enrichment in alpha-mannosidase activity (vacuole marker) and non-detectable succinate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities (mitochondrial and cytoplasmic markers, respectively). Confocal laser scanning microscopy with the vacuole dyes MDY-64 and CMAC demonstrated that the fraction contained pure vesicles and vacuoles and was devoid of membranous debris. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that no mitochondria or unbroken protoplasts contaminated the purified fraction. The purified organelles exhibited significant size heterogeneity with a range of sizes similar to that observed in whole cells and protoplasts. PMID:19358865

  14. Aflatoxin B1 contamination in maize in Europe increases due to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Battilani, P.; Toscano, P.; Van der Fels-Klerx, H. J.; Moretti, A.; Camardo Leggieri, M.; Brera, C.; Rortais, A.; Goumperis, T.; Robinson, T.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change has been reported as a driver for emerging food and feed safety issues worldwide and its expected impact on the presence of mycotoxins in food and feed is of great concern. Aflatoxins have the highest acute and chronic toxicity of all mycotoxins; hence, the maximal concentration in agricultural food and feed products and their commodities is regulated worldwide. The possible change in patterns of aflatoxin occurrence in crops due to climate change is a matter of concern that may require anticipatory actions. The aim of this study was to predict aflatoxin contamination in maize and wheat crops, within the next 100 years, under a +2 °C and +5 °C climate change scenario, applying a modelling approach. Europe was virtually covered by a net, 50 × 50 km grids, identifying 2254 meshes with a central point each. Climate data were generated for each point, linked to predictive models and predictions were run consequently. Aflatoxin B1 is predicted to become a food safety issue in maize in Europe, especially in the +2 °C scenario, the most probable scenario of climate change expected for the next years. These results represent a supporting tool to reinforce aflatoxin management and to prevent human and animal exposure. PMID:27066906

  15. A survey of ethnic foods for microbial quality and aflatoxin content.

    PubMed

    Candlish AAG; Pearson, S M; Aidoo, K E; Smith, J E; Kelly, B; Irvine, H

    2001-02-01

    A range of ethnic foods was examined for their microbiological content in relation to total viable counts (TVC) of aerobic bacteria, counts of presumptive coliforms, yeast and mould counts; presence of Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter spp.; total enumeration of Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus spp.; identification of moulds and the presence of total aflatoxins. Samples, which included cereals, nuts, dried fruits, herbs and spices, were obtained from local retail outlets and distributors. It was established that three samples of pistachio nuts contained significant levels of aflatoxins. The concentration of total aflatoxins in these three nut samples ranged from 15 to 259 microg/kg of sample. Only two other samples contained trace amounts of aflatoxins, all other samples analysed were found to be free of any detectable level of aflatoxins. TVCs, coliform counts and yeast and mould counts varied widely depending on the matrix tested. Generally, rice, wheat and peanuts produced low counts whereas other nuts, gram flour and spices produced much higher counts. Cl. perfringens, Staph. aureus, and Bacillus spp. were common in spices, nuts and gram flour, however, Listeria monocytogenes was only detected in four samples and in no sample could Salmonella spp, E. coli O157:H7 or Campylobacter spp. be detected.

  16. The role of essential oils and the biological detoxification in the prevention of aflatoxin borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Kitic, Dusanka; Pavlovic, Dusica; Brankovic, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    Fungi are an important group of microorganisms. They are studied due to their significant impact on the environment, industry and human health. In relation to biological aspects, biogeochemical cycling of elements, the world of nature would not be possible without the contribution of fungi as the primary decomposers of organic material. On the other hand, food decay by the fungi spoilage causes considerable economic losses and constitutes a health risk for consumers due to the potential of fungi to produce mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are chemically diverse secondary metabolites that can be harmful both to animal and human health. Aflatoxins, a widely studied group of toxins among mycotoxins, are mainly biosynthesized by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Therefore, the control of fungi and the production of aflatoxins, especially the most toxic aflatoxins B1 and G1, is essential and decisive. Over the last few decades, numerous studies have demonstrated that plants, especially their essential oils, contain diverse bioactive components that can protect crops from becoming contaminated by different mold species, Aspergillus in particular, with an emphasis on A. flavus and A. parasiticus; as well as that, they can prevent the contamination of food produce during the processing and storage and prevent the production of aflatoxins. Plant essential oils are expected to be more advantageous than synthetic compounds because of their relatively safe status, easy decomposition, environmentally friendly and non-phytotoxic properties. This paper also presents the recent research in biological control of aflatoxin contamination.

  17. Structures of the ozonolysis products and ozonolysis pathway of aflatoxin B1 in acetonitrile solution.

    PubMed

    Diao, Enjie; Shan, Changpo; Hou, Hanxue; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Minghua; Dong, Haizhou

    2012-09-12

    The ozonolysis of aflatoxin B(1) (400 μg/mL) in acetonitrile solution was conducted with an ozone concentration of 6.28 mg/L at the flow rate of 60 mL/min for different times. The results showed that ozone was an effective detoxification agent because of its powerful oxidative role. Thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectra were applied to confirm and identify the ozonolysis products of aflatoxin B(1). A total of 13 products were identified, and 6 of them were main products. The structural identification of these products provided effective information for understanding the ozonolysis pathway of aflatoxin B(1). Two ozonolysis pathways were proposed on the basis of the accurate mass and molecular formulas of these product ions. Nine ozonolysis products came from the first oxidative pathway based on the Criegee mechanism, and the other four products were produced from the second pathway based on the oxidative and electrophilic reactions of ozone. According to the toxicity mechanism of aflatoxin B(1) to animals, the toxicity of aflatoxin B(1) was significantly reduced because of the disappearance of the double bond on the terminal furan ring or the lactone moiety on the benzene ring.

  18. Workgroup Report: Public Health Strategies for Reducing Aflatoxin Exposure in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Strosnider, Heather; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Banziger, Marianne; Bhat, Ramesh V.; Breiman, Robert; Brune, Marie-Noel; DeCock, Kevin; Dilley, Abby; Groopman, John; Hell, Kerstin; Henry, Sara H.; Jeffers, Daniel; Jolly, Curtis; Jolly, Pauline; Kibata, Gilbert N.; Lewis, Lauren; Liu, Xiumei; Luber, George; McCoy, Leslie; Mensah, Patience; Miraglia, Marina; Misore, Ambrose; Njapau, Henry; Ong, Choon-Nam; Onsongo, Mary T.K.; Page, Samuel W.; Park, Douglas; Patel, Manish; Phillips, Timothy; Pineiro, Maya; Pronczuk, Jenny; Rogers, Helen Schurz; Rubin, Carol; Sabino, Myrna; Schaafsma, Arthur; Shephard, Gordon; Stroka, Joerg; Wild, Christopher; Williams, Jonathan T.; Wilson, David

    2006-01-01

    Consecutive outbreaks of acute aflatoxicosis in Kenya in 2004 and 2005 caused > 150 deaths. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization convened a workgroup of international experts and health officials in Geneva, Switzerland, in July 2005. After discussions concerning what is known about aflatoxins, the workgroup identified gaps in current knowledge about acute and chronic human health effects of aflatoxins, surveillance and food monitoring, analytic methods, and the efficacy of intervention strategies. The workgroup also identified public health strategies that could be integrated with current agricultural approaches to resolve gaps in current knowledge and ultimately reduce morbidity and mortality associated with the consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated food in the developing world. Four issues that warrant immediate attention were identified: a) quantify the human health impacts and the burden of disease due to aflatoxin exposure; b) compile an inventory, evaluate the efficacy, and disseminate results of ongoing intervention strategies; c) develop and augment the disease surveillance, food monitoring, laboratory, and public health response capacity of affected regions; and d) develop a response protocol that can be used in the event of an outbreak of acute aflatoxicosis. This report expands on the workgroup’s discussions concerning aflatoxin in developing countries and summarizes the findings. PMID:17185282

  19. Biotransformation of aflatoxin B1 and aflatoxin G1 in peanut meal by anaerobic solid fermentation of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yujie; Kong, Qing; Chi, Chen; Shan, Shihua; Guan, Bin

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the ability of anaerobic solid fermentation of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus to biotransform aflatoxins in peanut meal. The pH of the peanut meal was adjusted above 10, and then heated for 10 min at 100 °C, 115 °C and 121 °C. The S. thermophilus and L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus were precultured together in MRS broth for 48 h at 37 °C. The heated peanut meal was mixed with precultured MRS broth containing 7.0×10(8) CFU/mL of S. thermophilus and 3.0×10(3) CFU/mL of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus with the ratio of 1 to 1 (weight to volume) and incubated in anaerobic jars at 37 °C for 3 days. The aflatoxin content in the peanut meal samples was determined by HPLC. The results showed that the peanut meal contained mainly aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) (10.5±0.64 μg/kg) and aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) (18.7±0.55 μg/kg). When heat treatment was combined with anaerobic solid fermentation, the biotransformation rate of aflatoxins in peanut meal could attain 100%. The cytotoxicity of fermented peanut meal to L929 mouse connective tissue fibroblast cells was determined by MTT assay and no significant toxicity was observed in the fermented peanut meal. Furthermore, heat treatment and anaerobic solid fermentation did not change the amino acid concentrations and profile in peanut meal.

  20. Chemistry and Biology of Aflatoxin-DNA Adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Michael P.; Banerjee, Surajit; Brown, Kyle L.; Egli, Martin

    2012-03-27

    Aspergillus flavus is a fungal contaminant of stored rice, wheat, corn, and other grainstuffs, and peanuts. This is of concern to human health because it produces the mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}), which is genotoxic and is implicated in the etiology of liver cancer. AFB{sub 1} is oxidized in vivo by cytochrome P450 to form aflatoxin B{sub 1} epoxide, which forms an N7-dG adduct (AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG) in DNA. The latter rearranges to a formamidopyrimidine (AFB{sub 1}-FAPY) derivative that equilibrates between {alpha} and {beta} anomers of the deoxyribose. In DNA, both the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adducts intercalate above the 5'-face of the damaged guanine. Each produces G {yields} T transversions in Escherichia coli, but the AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adduct is more mutagenic. The Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) provides a model for understanding error-prone bypass of the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG and AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adducts. It bypasses the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct, but it conducts error-prone replication past the AFB{sub 1}-FAPY adduct, including mis-insertion of dATP, consistent with the G {yields} T mutations characteristic of AFB{sub 1} mutagenesis in E. coli. Crystallographic analyses of a series of binary and ternary complexes with the Dpo4 polymerase revealed differing orientations of the N7-C8 bond of the AFB{sub 1}-N7-dG adduct as compared to the N{sup 5}-C8 bond in the AFB{sub 1}-{beta}-FAPY adduct, and differential accommodation of the intercalated AFB{sub 1} moieties within the active site. These may modulate AFB{sub 1} lesion bypass by this polymerase.

  1. Effect of γ irradiation on fungal load and aflatoxins reduction in red chillies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shahzad Zafar; Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad; Asi, Muhammad Rafique; Zuber, Mohammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Parveen, Ishrat

    2013-01-01

    Chillies are a very important cash crop of Pakistan. The effects of gamma irradiation on microbial load, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and total aflatoxins have been studied in chillies samples, collected from different districts of Punjab, Pakistan. Aflatoxins were analyzed using HPLC equipped with a fluorescence detector. The results revealed that among the Aspergillus species isolated, those belonging to section parasiticus were predominant. Gamma radiations of doses 2, 4 and 6 kGy were employed on fungi and chilli samples. The results have demonstrated that the dose of 6 kGy reduced the fungal load by 5 logs. Furthermore, 6 kGy reduced the level of AFB1 and total AFs in ground and whole chillies by 1-2 logs (α < 0.05).

  2. Influence of inoculum size of Aspergillus parasiticus spores on aflatoxin production

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.; Behere, A.G.; Padwal-Desai, S.R.; Nadkarni, G.B.

    1980-12-01

    The influence of the inoculum size on growth and aflatoxin production was examined in Aspergillus parasiticus (NRRL 3145) by using a synthetic medium. The reduction in the number of spores by 4 to 5 log cycles either by serial dilution or by gamma irradiation caused a two fold increase in the toxin production. The decrease in the inoculum size induced a lag in growth of the culture, though the final yield of the mycelium over the 28-day experimental period was the same. The maximal accumulation of aflatoxin was observed on day 14 of incubation. A transition from the biphasic to monophasic pattern in aflatoxin production could be correlated with the size of the inoculum. The enhanced toxin production from dilute inocula was similar to that obtained with the surviving fraction of the spores after gamma irradiation (0 to 150 krads).

  3. Inhibition effects of Chinese cabbage powder on aflatoxin B1-induced liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuoyi; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Yang; Li, Tiezhu; Zhang, Jie; Sun, Yonghai

    2015-11-01

    In this study, 0.25 μg/ml aflatoxin B1 was used to establish a liver cancer model for assessing the potential anticancer ability of Chinese cabbage powder, which is a complex water-soluble extract from Chinese cabbage by spray-drying at an outlet temperature of 130 °C. We found at least 11 potential anticancer substances in Chinese cabbage powder. A 90-d animal experiment demonstrated that 10% of Chinese cabbage powder in drinking water could improve the plasma micronutrient status, inhibit the formation of aflatoxin B1-DNA adducts in liver cells, and effectively reduce the incidence of liver tumor induced by aflatoxin B1 from 6.67% to 0%. The dose effect experiment revealed that 10% may be the minimal effective dose to prevent the occurrence of early liver tumors. This study will help elucidate the basis of epidemiological observations of dietary cancer prevention in humans, as well as explore related mechanisms.

  4. New Additive for Culture Media for Rapid Identification of Aflatoxin-Producing Aspergillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fente, C. A.; Ordaz, J. Jaimez; Vázquez, B. I.; Franco, C. M.; Cepeda, A.

    2001-01-01

    A new reliable, fast, and simple method for the detection of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus strains, consisting of the addition of a cyclodextrin (a methylated β-cyclodextrin derivative) to common media used for testing mycotoxin production ability, was developed. We propose the use of this compound as an additive for fungal culture media to enhance the natural fluorescence of aflatoxins. The production of aflatoxins coincided with the presence of a bright blue or blue-green fluorescent area surrounding colonies when observed under long-wavelength (365-nm) UV light after 3 days of incubation at 28°C. The presence of aflatoxins was confirmed by extracting the medium with chloroform and examining the extracts by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. PMID:11571194

  5. Impact on growth and aflatoxin B1 accumulation by Kluyveromyces isolates at different water activity conditions.

    PubMed

    Penna, Mariángeles La; Etcheverry, Miriam

    2006-11-01

    This study showed the impact on germination, mycelial growth and aflatoxin B(1) accumulation when interacting Aspergillus aflatoxigenic strains with Kluyveromyces isolates and the effect of water activity on this relationship. Isolates Y(14) and Y(16) reduced the percentage of germination of all Aspergillus strains and decrease germ tube elongation rate at majority of water activity assayed. Similarly they produced an increase of germination lag phase and lag phase of growth beside decreased growth rate of all Aspergillus strains. At water activities 0.994, 0.982, 0.955 and 0.937, no aflatoxins were produced in paired cultures with isolates Y(25,) Y(22), Y(16), and Y(14), and Kluyveromyces isolates Y(14) and Y(16) impact both growth and aflatoxin accumulation at wide range of water activity.

  6. Influence of inoculum size of Aspergillus parasiticus spores on aflatoxin production.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, A; Behere, A G; Padwal-Desai, S R; Nadkarni, G B

    1980-01-01

    The influence of the inoculum size on growth and aflatoxin production was examined in Aspergillus parasiticus (NRRL 3145) by using a synthetic medium. The reduction in the number of spores by 4 to 5 log cycles either by serial dilution or by gamma irradiation caused a two fold increase in the toxin production. The decrease in the inoculum size induced a lag in growth of the culture, though the final yield of the mycelium over the 28-day experimental period was the same. The maximal accumulation of aflatoxin was observed on day 14 of incubation. A transition from the biphasic to monophasic pattern in aflatoxin production could be correlated with the size of the inoculum. The enhanced toxin production from dilute inocula was similar to that obtained with the surviving fraction of the spores after gamma irradiation (0 to 150 krads). PMID:7458313

  7. Aflatoxin contamination in food and body fluids in relation to malnutrition and cancer status in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Tchana, Angele N; Moundipa, Paul F; Tchouanguep, Félicité M

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are food contaminants usually associated with hepatitis, immunodepression, impairment of fertility and cancer. The present work was to determine the presence of aflatoxins in eggs, milk, urine, and blood samples that were collected from various sources and periods; and hepatitis B virus antigen in blood samples. Aflatoxin was found in eggs (45.2%), cow raw milk (15.9%), breast milk (4.8%), urine from kwashiorkor and marasmic kwashiorkor children (45.5%), and sera from primary liver cancer patients (63.9%); HbsAg was also detected in 69.4% of the serum samples, but there was no association between both factors. Both AF and hepatitis B virus seem to be risk factors that could increase the incidence and prevalence rates of malnutrition and cancer in Cameroon.

  8. Use of high-performance liquid chromatography to assess airborne mycotoxins. Aflatoxins and ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Tarín, A; Rosell, M G; Guardino, X

    2004-08-27

    An HPLC analytical method combining methanol-deionised water (80:20, v/v) extraction, methanol-acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) extraction and fluorescence detection was implanted to analyse ochratoxin A and aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 of air samples collected during the usual production process in a number of workplaces of a coffee factory to assess the occupational exposure of the engaged workers. The average levels of airborne ochratoxin A and aflatoxins were less than 1.2 and 0.4 ng/m3, respectively, using 50 L air samples. When 150 L air samples were used, levels lower than 0.04 ng/m3 ochratoxin A and 0.013 ng/m3 for aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2, could be detected.

  9. Review of the decontamination of aflatoxins by ammoniation: current status and regulation.

    PubMed

    Park, D L; Lee, L S; Price, R L; Pohland, A E

    1988-01-01

    Ammoniation of corn, peanuts, cottonseed, and meals to alter the toxic and carcinogenic effects of aflatoxin contamination has been the subject of intense research effort by scientists in various government agencies and universities, both in the United States and abroad. Results of these studies have been well documented over the last 20 years. Engineers have devised workable systems of treatment of whole seeds, kernels, or meals; chemists have identified and characterized products formed from the reaction of aflatoxin B1 with ammonia with and without a meal matrix; biochemists have studied the biological effects of these compounds in model systems; and nutritionists have studied animal responses to rations containing ammoniated or non-ammoniated components. This review describes these studies. Results demonstrate overwhelming support for the efficacy and safety of ammoniation as a practical solution to aflatoxin detoxification in animal feeds.

  10. Effects of Aflatoxin on Some Haematological Parameters and Protective Effectiveness of Esterified Glucomannan in Merino Rams

    PubMed Central

    Dönmez, Nurcan; Dönmez, H. H.; Keskin, E.; Kısadere, İ.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the toxic effects of aflatoxin on some hematological parameters and to determine the preventive effectiveness of added glucomannan. In the study, 32 Merino rams were used, and the rams were separated equally to four groups as control (C), glucomannan (G), glucomannan + aflatoxin (AG), and aflatoxin (A). Erythrocyte, leukocyte count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels were decreased in A group compared with the other groups, and there was a reduction in similar parameters in AG group compared to control values. On the other hand, these parameters were tended to increase in AG group compared to A group values. Aflatoxicosis caused the lymphocytopenia and monocytopenia but increased percentage of neutrophil counts. In conclusion, the results determined in the study might be important to demonstrate the effects of aflatoxicosis and glucomannan on some haematological parameters before the clinical symptoms appear. PMID:22629132

  11. Aflatoxin B1, zearalenone and deoxynivalenol production on irradiated corn kernels: Influence of inoculum size.

    PubMed

    Magnoli, C; Etcheverry, M G; Cavaglieri, L; Saenz, M; Alvarez, G; Lecumberry, S

    1998-03-01

    The influence of inoculum size on aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), zearalenone (ZEN) and deoxynivalenol (DON) production was examined on irradiated corn kernels.Spore concentrations were determined in serial dilutions and adjusted to 10,10(2),10(3),10(5) and 10(6) spores/ml. Aflatoxin B1 production was dependent on the inoculum size. The high levels of aflatoxin B1 produced byA. parasiticus (21 and 30 mg/kg) were obtained with 10(2) and 10(3) spores/ml after 35 and 20 days incubation. There was no spore concentration influence on zearalenone and deoxynivalenol production after 10, 20 and 35 days incubation. At 28°C and 0.97 water activity (aw), the mean levels of zearalenone production were 382, 267 and 520 µg/kg and the mean levels on deoxynivalenol production were 697,465 and 782 µg/kg.

  12. Role of metabolism and viruses in aflatoxin-induced liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Groopman, John D. . E-mail: jgroopma@jhsph.edu; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2005-08-07

    The use of biomarkers in molecular epidemiology studies for identifying stages in the progression of development of the health effects of environmental agents has the potential for providing important information for critical regulatory, clinical and public health problems. Investigations of aflatoxins probably represent one of the most extensive data sets in the field and this work may serve as a template for future studies of other environmental agents. The aflatoxins are naturally occurring mycotoxins found on foods such as corn, peanuts, various other nuts and cottonseed and they have been demonstrated to be carcinogenic in many experimental models. As a result of nearly 30 years of study, experimental data and epidemiological studies in human populations, aflatoxin B{sub 1} was classified as carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The long-term goal of the research described herein is the application of biomarkers to the development of preventative interventions for use in human populations at high-risk for cancer. Several of the aflatoxin-specific biomarkers have been validated in epidemiological studies and are now being used as intermediate biomarkers in prevention studies. The development of these aflatoxin biomarkers has been based upon the knowledge of the biochemistry and toxicology of aflatoxins gleaned from both experimental and human studies. These biomarkers have subsequently been utilized in experimental models to provide data on the modulation of these markers under different situations of disease risk. This systematic approach provides encouragement for preventive interventions and should serve as a template for the development, validation and application of other chemical-specific biomarkers to cancer or other chronic diseases.

  13. Individual and combined effects of aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Huff, W E; Kubena, L F; Harvey, R B; Hagler, W M; Swanson, S P; Phillips, T D; Creger, C R

    1986-07-01

    The individual and combined effects of aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol (DON) were evaluated in young broiler chickens (Hubbard X Hubbard). The experimental design was a 2 X 2 factorial with treatments of 0 and 2.5 micrograms of aflatoxin/g of feed (ppm) and 0 and 16 micrograms of DON/g of feed. The broilers were maintained on these dietary treatments from hatching to 3 weeks of age in electrically heated batteries with feed and water available ad libitum. The aflatoxin treatment significantly (P less than .05) decreased body weight; weight gain; increased the relative weight of the spleen, liver, and kidney; induced hepatic hyperlipemia; decreased activity of lactic dehydrogenase; and decreased serum levels of protein, albumin, and phosphorus. The toxicity of DON was expressed through reduced growth rate, increased feed conversion; increased relative weight of the gizzard, anemia, decreased activity of lactic dehydrogenase, and decreased serum triglycerides. The interaction between aflatoxin and DON was characterized by reduced growth rates; increased feed conversion, increased relative weight of the proventriculus, gizzard, spleen, liver, and kidney, anemia, hepatic hyperlipemia, decreased activity of alkaline phosphatase, glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase, and decreased serum levels of protein, albumin, uric acid, cholesterol, triglycerides, and calcium. These data demonstrate that both aflatoxin and DON can limit broiler performance and adversely effect broiler health. The effects of the combination of aflatoxin and DON on broiler performance and health was more severe than the individual effects of these mycotoxins; however, the interaction was not severe enough to represent toxic synergy and can best be characterized as additive toxicity.

  14. The antioxidant effects of pumpkin seed oil on subacute aflatoxin poisoning in mice.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Gökhan; Kanbur, Murat; Aslan, Öznur; Karabacak, Mürsel

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed at the investigation of the antioxidant effect of pumpkin seed oil against the oxidative stress-inducing potential of aflatoxin. For this purpose, 48 male BALB/c mice were used. Four groups, each comprising 12 mice, were established. Group 1 was maintained as the control group. Group 2 was administered with pumpkin seed oil alone at a dose of 1.5 mL/kg.bw/day (∼1375mg/kg.bw/day). Group 3 received aflatoxin (82.45% AFB1 , 10.65% AFB2 , 4.13% AFG1, and 2.77% AFG2 ) alone at a dose of 625 μg/kg.bw/day. Finally, group 4 was given both 1.5 mL/kg.bw/day pumpkin seed oil and 625 μg/kg.bw/day aflatoxin. All administrations were oral, performed with the aid of a gastric tube and continued for a period of 21 days. At the end of day 21, the liver, lungs, kidneys, brain, heart, and spleen of the animals were excised, and the extirpated tissues were homogenized appropriately. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were determined in tissue homogenates. In conclusion, it was determined that aflatoxin exhibited adverse effects on most of the oxidative stress markers. The administration of pumpkin seed oil diminished aflatoxin-induced adverse effects. In other words, the values of the group, which was administered with both aflatoxin and pumpkin seed oil, were observed to have drawn closer to the values of the control group.

  15. Occurrence and exposure assessment of aflatoxins in Catalonia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Cano-Sancho, G; Sanchis, V; Marín, S; Ramos, A J

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the exposure of Catalonian (Spain) population to AFs. Thus, two sub-objectives were considered: (1) to assess the occurrence of AFs in food marketed in Catalonia, and (2) to assess the consumption of those foods susceptible to AFs contamination by Catalonian population. AFs were analysed in a total of 603 samples considering special commodities as free-gluten, ethnic or baby foods. Analytical method consisted of an extraction and clean-up of aflatoxins step using immunoaffinity columns, and determination by HPLC with post-column photochemical derivatization and fluorescence detection. Food dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire, administered to 1387 individuals by trained interviewers. Contamination and consumption raw datasets were combined by means of a direct method and a stochastic method, building the pseudo-parametric bootstrap confidence intervals of the main outputs. Margins of exposure (MoE) and cancer incidence were estimated for the different collectives. The highest percentages of positive samples were found in red pepper, pistachios and peanuts. Considering our results, the most exposed group was the celiac sufferer collective followed by the adolescents; however health concern should not be expected in the population groups.

  16. Liver lesions produced by aflatoxins in Rana catesbeiana (bullfrog).

    PubMed

    Grassi, Tony Fernando; Pires, Paulo Wagner; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Pai-Silva, Maeli Dal; Said, Roueda Abou; de Camargo, João Lauro Viana

    2007-09-01

    This study describes alterations induced in Rana catesbeiana (bullfrog) liver after extended dietary exposure to aflatoxins (AFs). Bullfrogs of both sexes were fed for 120 days a commercial chow blended with a rice bran-based mixture of AFs containing 667.0, 11.65, 141.74, and 3.53 mg/kg of AFs B1, B2, G1, and G2, respectively. Animals were sacrificed on study days 45, 90, and 120. Severe and progressive liver lesions with structural collapse, increased hepatocyte and biliary duct cell proliferation, appearance of basophilic hepatocytes, and diffuse scarring, were observed at all time points. There were no quantitative alterations in the liver melanomacrophage centers of the AFs-exposed animals. Increased amounts of lipid hydroperoxides, indicative of ongoing oxidative stress, were more evident in the Addutor magnum muscle than in the AFs-damaged livers. No tumors were found in the R. catesbeiana livers after 120 days of exposure to relatively high doses of AFs.

  17. Aflatoxin detoxification by manganese peroxidase purified from Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Yehia, Ramy Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) was produced from white rot edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus on the culture filtrate. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The final enzyme activity achieved 81 U mL−1, specific activity 78 U mg−1 with purification fold of 130 and recovery 1.2% of the crude enzyme. SDS-PAGE indicated that the pure enzyme have a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa. The optimum pH was between 4–5 and the optimum temperature was 25 °C. The pure MnP activity was enhanced by Mn2+, Cu2+, Ca2+ and K+ and inhibited by Hg+2 and Cd+2. H2O2 at 5 mM enhanced MnP activity while at 10 mM inhibited it significantly. The MnP-cDNA encoding gene was sequenced and determined (GenBank accession no. AB698450.1). The MnP-cDNA was found to consist of 497 bp in an Open Reading Frame (ORF) encoding 165 amino acids. MnP from P. ostreatus could detoxify aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) depending on enzyme concentration and incubation period. The highest detoxification power (90%) was observed after 48 h incubation at 1.5 U mL−1 enzyme activities. PMID:24948923

  18. DNAzyme-aptamer or aptamer-DNAzyme paradigm: biochemical approach for aflatoxin analysis.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Marzieh; Rezaei, Mohsen; Kalantari, Heibatullah; Tabarzad, Maryam; Daraei, Bahram

    2017-03-22

    DNAzyme and aptamer conjugations have already been used for sensitive and accurate detection of several molecules. In this study, we tested the relationship between conjugation orientation of DNAzyme and Aflatoxin B1 aptamer and their subsequent peroxidase activity. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and biochemical analysis were used here to difference between these two conjugation patterns. Results showed that DNAzyme-aptamer has more catalytic activity and efficiency than aptamer-DNAzyme. Thereby, DNAzyme-aptamer with its superior efficiency can be used for design and development of more sensitive Aflatoxin B1 DNA based biosensors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of growth and aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus by essential oils of selected plant materials.

    PubMed

    Tantaoui-Elaraki, A; Beraoud, L

    1994-01-01

    We studied the effect of 13 chemically different essential oils (EO) on the mycelial growth of and aflatoxin synthesis by Aspergillus parasiticus. Cinnamon, thyme, oregano, and cumin EO were able to stop mycelial growth at only 0.1% in the medium, while curcumin, ginger, lemon, and orange EO were unable to inhibit totally the growth even at 1% concentration. Coriander, black pepper, mugwort, bay, and rosemary EO caused the growth to stop at concentrations between 0.2 and 1%. The EO most active upon mycelial growth were also the most active against aflatoxinogenesis. However, aflatoxin synthesis was inhibited by all the EO at higher extent than the mycelial growth.

  20. Activation of Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Pasqui, Francesca; Colvin, Ellen M.; Sanger, Helen; Mogg, Adrian J.; Felder, Christian C.; Broad, Lisa M.; Fitzjohn, Steve M.; Isaac, John T.R.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors (M1Rs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and their inhibition or ablation disrupts the encoding of spatial memory. It has been hypothesized that the principal mechanism by which M1Rs influence spatial memory is by the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here, we use a combination of recently developed, well characterized, selective M1R agonists and M1R knock-out mice to define the roles of M1Rs in the regulation of hippocampal neuronal and synaptic function. We confirm that M1R activation increases input resistance and depolarizes hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and show that this profoundly increases excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling. Consistent with a critical role for M1Rs in synaptic plasticity, we now show that M1R activation produces a robust potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal neurons that has all the hallmarks of long-term potentiation (LTP): The potentiation requires NMDA receptor activity and bi-directionally occludes with synaptically induced LTP. Thus, we describe synergistic mechanisms by which acetylcholine acting through M1Rs excites CA1 pyramidal neurons and induces LTP, to profoundly increase activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These features are predicted to make a major contribution to the pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic transmission in rodents and humans. PMID:26472558