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Sample records for aflp genome scan

  1. AFLP Genome Scanning Reveals Divergent Selection in Natural Populations of Liriodendron chinense (Magnoliaceae) along a Latitudinal Transect.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai-Hong; Wei, Na; Fritsch, Peter W; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding adaptive genetic variation and its relation to environmental factors are important for understanding how plants adapt to climate change and for managing genetic resources. Genome scans for the loci exhibiting either notably high or low levels of population differentiation (outlier loci) provide one means of identifying genomic regions possibly associated with convergent or divergent selection. In this study, we combined Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan and environmental association analysis to test for signals of natural selection in natural populations of Liriodendron chinense (Chinese Tulip Tree; Magnoliaceae) along a latitudinal transect. We genotyped 276 individuals from 11 populations of L. chinense using 987 AFLP markers. Both frequency-based (Dfdist and BayeScan) and correlation-based (MLM) methods were applied to detect outlier loci. Our analyses recovered both neutral and potentially adaptive genetic differentiation among populations of L. chinense. We found moderate genetic diversity within populations and high genetic differentiation among populations with reduced genetic diversity toward the periphery of the species ranges. Nine AFLP marker loci showed evidence of being outliers for population differentiation for both detection methods. Of these, six were strongly associated with at least one climate factor. Temperature, precipitation, and radiation were found to be three important factors influencing local adaptation of L. chinense. The outlier AFLP loci are likely not the target of natural selection, but the neighboring genes of these loci might be involved in local adaptation. Hence, these candidates should be validated by further studies. PMID:27303414

  2. AFLP Genome Scanning Reveals Divergent Selection in Natural Populations of Liriodendron chinense (Magnoliaceae) along a Latitudinal Transect

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ai-Hong; Wei, Na; Fritsch, Peter W.; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding adaptive genetic variation and its relation to environmental factors are important for understanding how plants adapt to climate change and for managing genetic resources. Genome scans for the loci exhibiting either notably high or low levels of population differentiation (outlier loci) provide one means of identifying genomic regions possibly associated with convergent or divergent selection. In this study, we combined Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan and environmental association analysis to test for signals of natural selection in natural populations of Liriodendron chinense (Chinese Tulip Tree; Magnoliaceae) along a latitudinal transect. We genotyped 276 individuals from 11 populations of L. chinense using 987 AFLP markers. Both frequency-based (Dfdist and BayeScan) and correlation-based (MLM) methods were applied to detect outlier loci. Our analyses recovered both neutral and potentially adaptive genetic differentiation among populations of L. chinense. We found moderate genetic diversity within populations and high genetic differentiation among populations with reduced genetic diversity toward the periphery of the species ranges. Nine AFLP marker loci showed evidence of being outliers for population differentiation for both detection methods. Of these, six were strongly associated with at least one climate factor. Temperature, precipitation, and radiation were found to be three important factors influencing local adaptation of L. chinense. The outlier AFLP loci are likely not the target of natural selection, but the neighboring genes of these loci might be involved in local adaptation. Hence, these candidates should be validated by further studies. PMID:27303414

  3. Challenges and pitfalls in the characterization of anonymous outlier AFLP markers in non-model species: lessons from an ocellated lizard genome scan

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, V L; Beaumont, M A; Butlin, R K; Paulo, O S

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, dozens of studies have documented the detection of loci influenced by selection from genome scans in a wide range of non-model species. Many of those studies used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, which became popular for being easily applicable to any organism. However, because they are anonymous markers, AFLPs impose many challenges for their isolation and identification. Most recent AFLP genome scans used capillary electrophoresis (CE), which adds even more obstacles to the isolation of bands with a specific size for sequencing. These caveats might explain the extremely low number of studies that moved from the detection of outlier AFLP markers to their actual isolation and characterization. We document our efforts to characterize a set of outlier AFLP markers from a previous genome scan with CE in ocellated lizards (Lacerta lepida). Seven outliers were successfully isolated, cloned and sequenced. Their sequences are noncoding and show internal indels or polymorphic repetitive elements (microsatellites). Three outliers were converted into codominant markers by using specific internal primers to sequence and screen population variability from undigested DNA. Amplification in closely related lizard species was also achieved, revealing remarkable interspecific conservation in outlier loci sequences. We stress the importance of following up AFLP genome scans to validate selection signatures of outlier loci, but also report the main challenges and pitfalls that may be faced during the process. PMID:22892639

  4. Genomic scanning using AFLP to detect loci under selection in the moss Funaria hygrometrica along a climate gradient in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Spain.

    PubMed

    Magdy, M; Werner, O; McDaniel, S F; Goffinet, B; Ros, R M

    2016-03-01

    The common cord moss Funaria hygrometrica has a worldwide distribution and thrives in a wide variety of environments. Here, we studied the genetic diversity in F. hygrometrica along an abiotic gradient in the Mediterranean high mountain of Sierra Nevada (Spain) using a genome scan method. Eighty-four samples from 17 locations from 24 to 2700 m were fingerprinted based on their amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) banding pattern. Using PCA and Bayesian inference we found that the genetic diversity was structured in three or four clusters, respectively. Using a genome scan method we identified 13 outlier loci, which showed a signature of positive selection. Partial Mantel tests were performed between the Euclidean distance matrices of geographic and climatic variables, versus the pair-wise genetic distance of the AFLP dataset and AFLP-positive outliers dataset. AFLP-positive outlier data were significantly correlated with the gradient of the climatic variables, suggesting adaptive variation among populations of F. hygrometrica along the Sierra Nevada Mountains. We highlight the additional analyses necessary to identify the nature of these loci, and their biological role in the adaptation process. PMID:26284822

  5. AFLP Genome Scan to Detect Genetic Structure and Candidate Loci under Selection for Local Adaptation of the Invasive Weed Mikania micrantha

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Guopei; Zan, Qijie; Wang, Chunbo; Su, Ying-juan

    2012-01-01

    Why some species become successful invaders is an important issue in invasive biology. However, limited genomic resources make it very difficult for identifying candidate genes involved in invasiveness. Mikania micrantha H.B.K. (Asteraceae), one of the world's most invasive weeds, has adapted rapidly in response to novel environments since its introduction to southern China. In its genome, we expect to find outlier loci under selection for local adaptation, critical to dissecting the molecular mechanisms of invasiveness. An explorative amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan was used to detect candidate loci under selection in 28 M. micrantha populations across its entire introduced range in southern China. We also estimated population genetic parameters, bottleneck signatures, and linkage disequilibrium. In binary characters, such as presence or absence of AFLP bands, if all four character combinations are present, it is referred to as a character incompatibility. Since character incompatibility is deemed to be rare in populations with extensive asexual reproduction, a character incompatibility analysis was also performed in order to infer the predominant mating system in the introduced M. micrantha populations. Out of 483 AFLP loci examined using stringent significance criteria, 14 highly credible outlier loci were identified by Dfdist and Bayescan. Moreover, remarkable genetic variation, multiple introductions, substantial bottlenecks and character compatibility were found to occur in M. micrantha. Thus local adaptation at the genome level indeed exists in M. micrantha, and may represent a major evolutionary mechanism of successful invasion. Interactions between genetic diversity, multiple introductions, and reproductive modes contribute to increase the capacity of adaptive evolution. PMID:22829939

  6. Genomic distribution of AFLP markers relative to gene locations for different eukaryotic species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers are frequently used for a wide range of studies, such as genome-wide mapping, population genetic diversity estimation, hybridization and introgression studies, phylogenetic analyses, and detection of signatures of selection. An important issue to be addressed for some of these fields is the distribution of the markers across the genome, particularly in relation to gene sequences. Results Using in-silico restriction fragment analysis of the genomes of nine eukaryotic species we characterise the distribution of AFLP fragments across the genome and, particularly, in relation to gene locations. First, we identify the physical position of markers across the chromosomes of all species. An observed accumulation of fragments around (peri) centromeric regions in some species is produced by repeated sequences, and this accumulation disappears when AFLP bands rather than fragments are considered. Second, we calculate the percentage of AFLP markers positioned within gene sequences. For the typical EcoRI/MseI enzyme pair, this ranges between 28 and 87% and is usually larger than that expected by chance because of the higher GC content of gene sequences relative to intergenic ones. In agreement with this, the use of enzyme pairs with GC-rich restriction sites substantially increases the above percentages. For example, using the enzyme system SacI/HpaII, 86% of AFLP markers are located within gene sequences in A. thaliana, and 100% of markers in Plasmodium falciparun. We further find that for a typical trait controlled by 50 genes of average size, if 1000 AFLPs are used in a study, the number of those within 1 kb distance from any of the genes would be only about 1–2, and only about 50% of the genes would have markers within that distance. Conclusions The high coverage of AFLP markers across the genomes and the high proportion of markers within or close to gene sequences make them suitable for genome scans and

  7. Optimization of AFLP for extremely large genomes over 70 Gb.

    PubMed

    Veselá, Petra; Volařík, Daniel; Mráček, Jaroslav

    2016-07-01

    Here, we present an improved amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) protocol using restriction enzymes (AscI and SbfI) that recognize 8-base pair sequences to provide alternative optimization suitable for species with a genome size over 70 Gb. This cost-effective optimization massively reduces the number of amplified fragments using only +3 selective bases per primer during selective amplification. We demonstrate the effects of the number of fragments and genome size on the appearance of nonidentical comigrating fragments (size homoplasy), which has a negative impact on the informative value of AFLP genotypes. We also present various reaction conditions and their effects on reproducibility and the band intensity of the extremely large genome of Viscum album. The reproducibility of this octo-cutter protocol was calculated using several species with genome sizes ranging from 1 Gb (Carex panicea) to 76 Gb (V. album). The improved protocol also succeeded in detecting high intraspecific variability in species with large genomes (V. album, Galanthus nivalis and Pinus pumila). PMID:26849414

  8. Technical advances: genome-wide cDNA-AFLP analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Volkmuth, Wayne; Turk, Stefan; Shapiro, Amy; Fang, Yiwen; Kiegle, Ed; van Haaren, Mark; Donson, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    cDNA-AFLP, a technology historically used to identify small numbers of differentially expressed genes, was adapted as a genome-wide transcript profiling method. mRNA levels were assayed in a diverse range of tissues from Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under a variety of environmental conditions. The resulting cDNA-AFLP fragments were sequenced. By linking cDNA-AFLP fragments to their corresponding mRNAs via these sequences, a database was generated that contained quantitative expression information for up to two-thirds of gene loci in A. thaliana, ecotype Ws. Using this resource, the expression levels of genes, including those with high nucleotide sequence similarity, could be determined in a high-throughput manner merely by comparing cDNA-AFLP profiles with the database. The lengths of cDNA-AFLP fragments inferred from their electrophoretic mobilities correlated well with actual fragment lengths determined by sequencing. In addition, the concentrations of AFLP fragments from single cDNAs were highly correlated, illustrating the validity of cDNA-AFLP as a quantitative, genome-wide, transcript profiling method. cDNA-AFLP profiles were also qualitatively consistent with mRNA profiles obtained from parallel microarray analysis, and with data from previous studies. PMID:14506844

  9. Construction of an AFLP genetic map with nearly complete genome coverage in Pinus taeda.

    PubMed

    Remington, D L; Whetten, R W; Liu, B H; O'Malley, D M

    1999-06-01

    De novo construction of complete genetic linkage maps requires large mapping populations, large numbers of genetic markers, and efficient algorithms for ordering markers and evaluating order confidence. We constructed a complete genetic map of an individual loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers segregating in haploid megagametophytes and PGRI mapping software. We generated 521 polymorphic fragments from 21 AFLP primer pairs. A total of 508 fragments mapped to 12 linkage groups, which is equal to the Pinus haploid chromosome number. Bootstrap locus order matrices and recombination matrices generated by PGRI were used to select 184 framework markers that could be ordered confidently. Order support was also evaluated using log likelihood criteria in MAPMAKER. Optimal marker orders from PGRI and MAPMAKER were identical, but the implied reliability of orders differed greatly. The framework map provides nearly complete coverage of the genome, estimated at approximately 1700 cM in length using a modified estimator. This map should provide a useful framework for merging existing loblolly pine maps and adding multiallelic markers as they become available. Map coverage with dominant markers in both linkage phases will make the map useful for subsequent quantitative trait locus mapping in families derived by self-pollination. PMID:12238515

  10. Genetic changes in grapevine genomes after stress induced by in vitro cultivation, thermotherapy and virus infection, as revealed by AFLP

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The Amplification Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) technique was employed to study genetic variations which can be induced in vines by the stress occurring during different aspects of viticulture (in vitro cultivation, in vitro thermotherapy and virus infection). Analysis of AFLP banding patterns, generated by using 15 primer combinations, pointed to negligible genetic variation among plants exposed to individual stress. The average of similarity coefficients between differently stressed plants of the cultivars Müller Thurgau and Riesling were 0.984 and 0.991, respectively, as revealed by AFLP analysis. The low incidence of observed polymorphism demonstrates the high level of genome uniformity in plants reproduced by in vitro micropropagation via nodes, those subjected to in vitro thermotherapy and virus-infected plants. PMID:21637461

  11. Non PCR-amplified Transcripts and AFLP fragments as reduced representations of the quail genome for 454 Titanium sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) discovery is now routinely performed using high-throughput sequencing of reduced representation libraries. Our objective was to adapt 454 GS FLX based sequencing methodologies in order to obtain the largest possible dataset from two reduced representations libraries, produced by AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) for genomic DNA, and EST (Expressed Sequence Tag) for the transcribed fraction of the genome. Findings The expressed fraction was obtained by preparing cDNA libraries without PCR amplification from quail embryo and brain. To optimize the information content for SNP analyses, libraries were prepared from individuals selected in three quail lines and each individual in the AFLP library was tagged. Sequencing runs produced 399,189 sequence reads from cDNA and 373,484 from genomic fragments, covering close to 250 Mb of sequence in total. Conclusions Both methods used to obtain reduced representations for high-throughput sequencing were successful after several improvements. The protocols may be used for several sequencing applications, such as de novo sequencing, tagged PCR fragments or long fragment sequencing of cDNA. PMID:20667075

  12. A High-throughput AFLP-based Method for Constructing Integrated Genetic and Physical Maps: Progress Toward a Sorghum Genome Map

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Patricia E.; Klein, Robert R.; Cartinhour, Samuel W.; Ulanch, Paul E.; Dong, Jianmin; Obert, Jacque A.; Morishige, Daryl T.; Schlueter, Shannon D.; Childs, Kevin L.; Ale, Melissa; Mullet, John E.

    2000-01-01

    Sorghum is an important target for plant genomic mapping because of its adaptation to harsh environments, diverse germplasm collection, and value for comparing the genomes of grass species such as corn and rice. The construction of an integrated genetic and physical map of the sorghum genome (750 Mbp) is a primary goal of our sorghum genome project. To help accomplish this task, we have developed a new high-throughput PCR-based method for building BAC contigs and locating BAC clones on the sorghum genetic map. This task involved pooling 24,576 sorghum BAC clones (∼4× genome equivalents) in six different matrices to create 184 pools of BAC DNA. DNA fragments from each pool were amplified using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technology, resolved on a LI-COR dual-dye DNA sequencing system, and analyzed using Bionumerics software. On average, each set of AFLP primers amplified 28 single-copy DNA markers that were useful for identifying overlapping BAC clones. Data from 32 different AFLP primer combinations identified ∼2400 BACs and ordered ∼700 BAC contigs. Analysis of a sorghum RIL mapping population using the same primer pairs located ∼200 of the BAC contigs on the sorghum genetic map. Restriction endonuclease fingerprinting of the entire collection of sorghum BAC clones was applied to test and extend the contigs constructed using this PCR-based methodology. Analysis of the fingerprint data allowed for the identification of 3366 contigs each containing an average of 5 BACs. BACs in ∼65% of the contigs aligned by AFLP analysis had sufficient overlap to be confirmed by DNA fingerprint analysis. In addition, 30% of the overlapping BACs aligned by AFLP analysis provided information for merging contigs and singletons that could not be joined using fingerprint data alone. Thus, the combination of fingerprinting and AFLP-based contig assembly and mapping provides a reliable, high-throughput method for building an integrated genetic and physical map

  13. Large-scale Gene Ontology analysis of plant transcriptome-derived sequences retrieved by AFLP technology

    PubMed Central

    Botton, Alessandro; Galla, Giulio; Conesa, Ana; Bachem, Christian; Ramina, Angelo; Barcaccia, Gianni

    2008-01-01

    Background After 10-year-use of AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) technology for DNA fingerprinting and mRNA profiling, large repertories of genome- and transcriptome-derived sequences are available in public databases for model, crop and tree species. AFLP marker systems have been and are being extensively exploited for genome scanning and gene mapping, as well as cDNA-AFLP for transcriptome profiling and differentially expressed gene cloning. The evaluation, annotation and classification of genomic markers and expressed transcripts would be of great utility for both functional genomics and systems biology research in plants. This may be achieved by means of the Gene Ontology (GO), consisting in three structured vocabularies (i.e. ontologies) describing genes, transcripts and proteins of any organism in terms of their associated cellular component, biological process and molecular function in a species-independent manner. In this paper, the functional annotation of about 8,000 AFLP-derived ESTs retrieved in the NCBI databases was carried out by using GO terminology. Results Descriptive statistics on the type, size and nature of gene sequences obtained by means of AFLP technology were calculated. The gene products associated with mRNA transcripts were then classified according to the three main GO vocabularies. A comparison of the functional content of cDNA-AFLP records was also performed by splitting the sequence dataset into monocots and dicots and by comparing them to all annotated ESTs of Arabidopsis and rice, respectively. On the whole, the statistical parameters adopted for the in silico AFLP-derived transcriptome-anchored sequence analysis proved to be critical for obtaining reliable GO results. Such an exhaustive annotation may offer a suitable platform for functional genomics, particularly useful in non-model species. Conclusion Reliable GO annotations of AFLP-derived sequences can be gathered through the optimization of the experimental steps

  14. Characterization of the Complete Genome of Chikungunya in Zhejiang, China, Using a Modified Virus Discovery Method Based on cDNA-AFLP

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Yan, JuYing; Mao, HaiYan; Zhang, Lei; Lyu, QinFeng; Wu, ZhongHua; Zheng, Wei; Feng, Cen; Zhang, YanJun

    2013-01-01

    Background Chikungunya (CHIK) virus is a mosquito-borne emerging pathogen presenting great health challenges worldwide, particularly in tropical zones. Here we report a newly detected strain of CHIK, Zhejiang/chik-sy/2012, in China, a nonindigenous region for CHIK, using a modified approach based on the classic cDNA-AFLP. We then performed etiological and phylogenetic analyses to better understand its molecular characterization and phylogenetic pattern, and also to aid in further evaluating its persistence in Southeast Asia. Methods By using this modified procedure, we determined for the first time the complete genome sequence of the chikungunya virus strain, Zhejiang/chik-sy/2012, isolated in 2012 from a patient in Zhejiang, China. Sequence analyses revealed that this positive single strand of RNA is 12,017 bp long. We found no single amino acid mutation in A226V, D284E and A316V. Phylogenetic analysis showed that our strain shared the greatest homology with a strain isolated in Taiwan, which was derived from a strain from Indonesia. Chik-sy/2012 is in a different clade from other CHIK viruses found in China previously. Conclusions A modified cDNA-AFLP in virus discovery was used to isolate the first CHIK and the first complete genome sequence of virus strain chik-sy/2012 in 2012 from a patient with CHIK fever in Zhejiang, China. The infection displayed great phylogenetic distance from viruses detected in Guangdong, China, in 2008 and 2010, since they were derived from another evolutionary lineage. Additional molecular epidemiology data are needed to further understand, monitor and evaluate CHIK in China. PMID:24367579

  15. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A ... out to see if a technology called whole genome sequencing would help them find other genetic risk ...

  16. Significance tests and weighted values for AFLP similarities, based on Arabidopsis in silico AFLP fragment length distributions.

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Wim J M; Gort, Gerrit

    2004-01-01

    Many AFLP studies include relatively unrelated genotypes that contribute noise to data sets instead of signal. We developed: (1) estimates of expected AFLP similarities between unrelated genotypes, (2) significance tests for AFLP similarities, enabling the detection of unrelated genotypes, and (3) weighted similarity coefficients, including band position information. Detection of unrelated genotypes and use of weighted similarity coefficients will make the analysis of AFLP data sets more informative and more reliable. Test statistics and weighted coefficients were developed for total numbers of shared bands and for Dice, Jaccard, Nei and Li, and simple matching (dis)similarity coefficients. Theoretical and in silico AFLP fragment length distributions (FLDs) were examined as a basis for the tests. The in silico AFLP FLD based on the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence was the most appropriate for angiosperms. The G + C content of the selective nucleotides in the in silico AFLP procedure significantly influenced the FLD. Therefore, separate test statistics were calculated for AFLP procedures with high, average, and low G + C contents in the selective nucleotides. The test statistics are generally applicable for angiosperms with a G + C content of approximately 35-40%, but represent conservative estimates for genotypes with higher G + C contents. For the latter, test statistics based on a rice genome sequence are more appropriate. PMID:15342529

  17. AFLPs and Mitochondrial Haplotypes Reveal Local Adaptation to Extreme Thermal Environments in a Freshwater Gastropod

    PubMed Central

    Quintela, María; Johansson, Magnus P.; Kristjánsson, Bjarni K.; Barreiro, Rodolfo; Laurila, Anssi

    2014-01-01

    The way environmental variation shapes neutral and adaptive genetic variation in natural populations is a key issue in evolutionary biology. Genome scans allow the identification of the genetic basis of local adaptation without previous knowledge of genetic variation or traits under selection. Candidate loci for divergent adaptation are expected to show higher FST than neutral loci influenced solely by random genetic drift, migration and mutation. The comparison of spatial patterns of neutral markers and loci under selection may help disentangle the effects of gene flow, genetic drift and selection among populations living in contrasting environments. Using the gastropod Radix balthica as a system, we analyzed 376 AFLP markers and 25 mtDNA COI haplotypes for candidate loci and associations with local adaptation among contrasting thermal environments in Lake Mývatn, a volcanic lake in northern Iceland. We found that 2% of the analysed AFLP markers were under directional selection and 12% of the mitochondrial haplotypes correlated with differing thermal habitats. The genetic networks were concordant for AFLP markers and mitochondrial haplotypes, depicting distinct topologies at neutral and candidate loci. Neutral topologies were characterized by intense gene flow revealed by dense nets with edges connecting contrasting thermal habitats, whereas the connections at candidate loci were mostly restricted to populations within each thermal habitat and the number of edges decreased with temperature. Our results suggest microgeographic adaptation within Lake Mývatn and highlight the utility of genome scans in detecting adaptive divergence. PMID:25007329

  18. ATG-anchored AFLP (ATG-AFLP) Analysis in Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) marker system has had broad applications in biology, genetics, breeding, evolution, and ecology due to its no requirement for prior sequence information, high reproducibility, robustness, and high throughput nature. However, the anonymous AFLP markers ar...

  19. Genomic scan for genes predisposing to schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen. S.; Holik, J.

    1994-03-15

    We initiated a genome-wide search for genes predisposing to schizophrenia by ascertaining 9 families, each containing three to five cases of schizophrenia. The 9 pedigrees were initially genotyped with 329 polymorphic DNA loci distributed throughout the genome. Assuming either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance, 254 DNA loci yielded lod scores less than -2.0 at {theta} = 0.0, 101 DNA markers gave lod scores less than -2.0 at {theta} = 0.05, while 5 DNA loci produced maximum lod scores greater than 1: D4S35, D14S17, D15S1, D22S84, and D22S55. Of the DNA markers yielding lod scores greater than 1, D4S35 and D22S55 also were suggestive of linkage when the Affected-Pedigree-Member method was used. The families were then genotyped with four highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers; possible linkage diminished with DNA markers mapping nearby D4S35, while suggestive evidence of linkage remained with loci in the region of D22S55. Although follow-up investigation of these chromosomal regions may be warranted, our linkage results should be viewed as preliminary observations, as 35 unaffected persons are not past the age of risk. 90 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Identification of outliers in a genomic scan for selection along environmental gradients in the bamboo locust, Ceracris kiangsu.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Jing; Jiang, Guo-Fang; Fan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Identification of loci under divergent selection is a key step in understanding the evolutionary process because those loci are responsible for the genetic variations that affect fitness in different environments. Understanding how environmental forces give rise to adaptive genetic variation is a challenge in pest control. Here, we performed an amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan in populations of the bamboo locust, Ceracris kiangsu, to search for candidate loci that are influenced by selection along an environmental gradient in southern China. In outlier locus detection, loci that demonstrate significantly higher or lower among-population genetic differentiation than expected under neutrality are identified as outliers. We used several outlier detection methods to study the features of C. kiangsu, including method DFDIST, BayeScan, and logistic regression. A total of 97 outlier loci were detected in the C. kiangsu genome with very high statistical supports. Moreover, the results suggested that divergent selection arising from environmental variation has been driven by differences in temperature, precipitation, humidity and sunshine. These findings illustrate that divergent selection and potential local adaptation are prevalent in locusts despite seemingly high levels of gene flow. Thus, we propose that native environments in each population may induce divergent natural selection. PMID:26333424

  1. Identification of outliers in a genomic scan for selection along environmental gradients in the bamboo locust, Ceracris kiangsu

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiao-Jing; Jiang, Guo-Fang; Fan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Identification of loci under divergent selection is a key step in understanding the evolutionary process because those loci are responsible for the genetic variations that affect fitness in different environments. Understanding how environmental forces give rise to adaptive genetic variation is a challenge in pest control. Here, we performed an amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan in populations of the bamboo locust, Ceracris kiangsu, to search for candidate loci that are influenced by selection along an environmental gradient in southern China. In outlier locus detection, loci that demonstrate significantly higher or lower among-population genetic differentiation than expected under neutrality are identified as outliers. We used several outlier detection methods to study the features of C. kiangsu, including method DFDIST, BayeScan, and logistic regression. A total of 97 outlier loci were detected in the C. kiangsu genome with very high statistical supports. Moreover, the results suggested that divergent selection arising from environmental variation has been driven by differences in temperature, precipitation, humidity and sunshine. These findings illustrate that divergent selection and potential local adaptation are prevalent in locusts despite seemingly high levels of gene flow. Thus, we propose that native environments in each population may induce divergent natural selection. PMID:26333424

  2. A genome-wide scan for preeclampsia in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Lachmeijer, A M; Arngrímsson, R; Bastiaans, E J; Frigge, M L; Pals, G; Sigurdardóttir, S; Stéfansson, H; Pálsson, B; Nicolae, D; Kong, A; Aarnoudse, J G; Gulcher, J R; Dekker, G A; ten Kate, L P; Stéfansson, K

    2001-10-01

    Preeclampsia, hallmarked by de novo hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy, has a familial tendency. Recently, a large Icelandic genome-wide scan provided evidence for a maternal susceptibility locus for preeclampsia on chromosome 2p13 which was confirmed by a genome scan from Australia and New Zealand (NZ). The current study reports on a genome-wide scan of Dutch affected sib-pair families. In total 67 Dutch affected sib-pair families, comprising at least two siblings with proteinuric preeclampsia, eclampsia or HELLP-syndrome, were typed for 293 polymorphic markers throughout the genome and linkage analysis was performed. The highest allele sharing lod score of 1.99 was seen on chromosome 12q at 109.5 cM. Two peaks overlapped in the same regions between the Dutch and Icelandic genome-wide scan at chromosome 3p and chromosome 15q. No overlap was seen on 2p. Re-analysis in 38 families without HELLP-syndrome (preeclampsia families) and 34 families with at least one sibling with HELLP syndrome (HELLP families), revealed two peaks with suggestive evidence for linkage in the non-HELLP families on chromosome 10q (lod score 2.38, D10S1432, 93.9 cM) and 22q (lod score 2.41, D22S685, 32.4 cM). The peak on 12q appeared to be associated with HELLP syndrome; it increased to a lod score of 2.1 in the HELLP families and almost disappeared in the preeclampsia families. A nominal peak on chromosome 11 in the preeclampsia families showed overlap with the second highest peak in the Australian/NZ study. Results from our Dutch genome-wide scan indicate that HELLP syndrome might have a different genetic background than preeclampsia. PMID:11781687

  3. Enhancer scanning to locate regulatory regions in genomic loci.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Melissa; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Baskin, Rebekah; Carvalho, Renato S; Carvalho, Marcelo A; Woods, Nicholas T; Monteiro, Alvaro N A

    2016-01-01

    This protocol provides a rapid, streamlined and scalable strategy to systematically scan genomic regions for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions that are active in a specific cell type. It creates genomic tiles spanning a region of interest that are subsequently cloned by recombination into a luciferase reporter vector containing the simian virus 40 promoter. Tiling clones are transfected into specific cell types to test for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions. The protocol includes testing of different single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles to determine their effect on regulatory activity. This procedure provides a systematic framework for identifying candidate functional SNPs within a locus during functional analysis of genome-wide association studies. This protocol adapts and combines previous well-established molecular biology methods to provide a streamlined strategy, based on automated primer design and recombinational cloning, allowing one to rapidly go from a genomic locus to a set of candidate functional SNPs in 8 weeks. PMID:26658467

  4. Enhancer scanning to locate regulatory regions in genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Melissa; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Baskin, Rebekah; Carvalho, Renato S.; Carvalho, Marcelo A.; Woods, Nicholas T.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol provides a rapid, streamlined and scalable strategy to systematically scan genomic regions for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions active in a specific cell type. It creates genomic tiles spanning a region of interest that are subsequently cloned by recombination into a luciferase reporter vector containing the Simian Virus 40 promoter. Tiling clones are transfected into specific cell types to test for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions. The protocol includes testing of different SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) alleles to determine their effect on regulatory activity. This procedure provides a systematic framework to identify candidate functional SNPs within a locus during functional analysis of genome-wide association studies. This protocol adapts and combines previous well-established molecular biology methods to provide a streamlined strategy, based on automated primer design and recombinational cloning to rapidly go from a genomic locus to a set of candidate functional SNPs in eight weeks. PMID:26658467

  5. AFLP: a new technique for DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Vos, P; Hogers, R; Bleeker, M; Reijans, M; van de Lee, T; Hornes, M; Frijters, A; Pot, J; Peleman, J; Kuiper, M

    1995-01-01

    A novel DNA fingerprinting technique called AFLP is described. The AFLP technique is based on the selective PCR amplification of restriction fragments from a total digest of genomic DNA. The technique involves three steps: (i) restriction of the DNA and ligation of oligonucleotide adapters, (ii) selective amplification of sets of restriction fragments, and (iii) gel analysis of the amplified fragments. PCR amplification of restriction fragments is achieved by using the adapter and restriction site sequence as target sites for primer annealing. The selective amplification is achieved by the use of primers that extend into the restriction fragments, amplifying only those fragments in which the primer extensions match the nucleotides flanking the restriction sites. Using this method, sets of restriction fragments may be visualized by PCR without knowledge of nucleotide sequence. The method allows the specific co-amplification of high numbers of restriction fragments. The number of fragments that can be analyzed simultaneously, however, is dependent on the resolution of the detection system. Typically 50-100 restriction fragments are amplified and detected on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. The AFLP technique provides a novel and very powerful DNA fingerprinting technique for DNAs of any origin or complexity. Images PMID:7501463

  6. AFLP Markers Identify Cornus florida Cultivars and Line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) is an important tree of forests and urban landscapes in the eastern United States. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were generated from genomic DNA of 17 cultivars and lines and four duplicate samples. Cultivar specific markers were identified...

  7. Genome-Wide Scan for Methylation Profiles in Keloids

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lamont R.; Young, William; Divine, George; Datta, Indrani; Chen, Kang Mei; Ozog, David; Worsham, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Keloids are benign fibroproliferative tumors of the skin which commonly occur after injury mainly in darker skinned patients. Medical treatment is fraught with high recurrence rates mainly because of an incomplete understanding of the biological mechanisms that lead to keloids. The purpose of this project was to examine keloid pathogenesis from the epigenome perspective of DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiling used the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to interrogate DNA from 6 fresh keloid and 6 normal skin samples from 12 anonymous donors. A 3-tiered approach was used to call out genes most differentially methylated between keloid and normal. When compared to normal, of the 685 differentially methylated CpGs at Tier 3, 510 were hypomethylated and 175 were hypermethylated with 190 CpGs in promoter and 495 in nonpromoter regions. The 190 promoter region CpGs corresponded to 152 genes: 96 (63%) were hypomethylated and 56 (37%) hypermethylated. This exploratory genome-wide scan of the keloid methylome highlights a predominance of hypomethylated genomic landscapes, favoring nonpromoter regions. DNA methylation, as an additional mechanism for gene regulation in keloid pathogenesis, holds potential for novel treatments that reverse deleterious epigenetic changes. As an alternative mechanism for regulating genes, epigenetics may explain why gene mutations alone do not provide definitive mechanisms for keloid formation. PMID:26074660

  8. Whole genome SNP scanning of snow sheep (Ovis nivicola).

    PubMed

    Deniskova, T E; Okhlopkov, I M; Sermyagin, A A; Gladyr', E A; Bagirov, V A; Sölkner, J; Mamaev, N V; Brem, G; Zinov'eva, N A

    2016-07-01

    This is the first report performing the whole genome SNP scanning of snow sheep (Ovis nivicola). Samples of snow sheep (n = 18) collected in six different regions of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) from 64° to 71° N. For SNP genotyping, we applied Ovine 50K SNP BeadChip (Illumina, United States), designed for domestic sheep. The total number of genotyped SNPs (call rate 90%) was 47796 (88.1% of total SNPs), wherein 1006 SNPs were polymorphic (2.1%). Principal component analysis (PCA) showed the clear differentiation within the species O. nivicola: studied individuals were distributed among five distinct arrays corresponding to the geographical locations of sampling points. Our results demonstrate that the DNA chip designed for domestic sheep can be successfully used to study the allele pool and the genetic structure of snow sheep populations. PMID:27599514

  9. Duck (Anas platyrhynchos) linkage mapping by AFLP fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chang-Wen; Cheng, Yu-Shin; Rouvier, Roger; Yang, Kuo-Tai; Wu, Chean-Ping; Huang, Hsiu-Lin; Huang, Mu-Chiou

    2009-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) with multicolored fluorescent molecular markers was used to analyze duck (Anas platyrhynchos) genomic DNA and to construct the first AFLP genetic linkage map. These markers were developed and genotyped in 766 F2 individuals from six families from a cross between two different selected duck lines, brown Tsaiya and Pekin. Two hundred and ninety-six polymorphic bands (64% of all bands) were detected using 18 pairs of fluorescent TaqI/EcoRI primer combinations. Each primer set produced a range of 7 to 29 fragments in the reactions, and generated on average 16.4 polymorphic bands. The AFLP linkage map included 260 co-dominant markers distributed in 32 linkage groups. Twenty-one co-dominant markers were not linked with any other marker. Each linkage group contained three to 63 molecular markers and their size ranged between 19.0 cM and 171.9 cM. This AFLP linkage map provides important information for establishing a duck chromosome map, for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping) and for breeding applications. PMID:19291328

  10. Genome scan for linkage to Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, C.L.; Livingston, J.; Williamson, R.

    1994-09-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a familial, neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic, intermittent motor and vocal tics. In addition to tics, affected individuals frequently display symptoms such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or obsessive compulsive disorder. Genetic analyses of family data have suggested that susceptibility to the disorder is most likely due to a single genetic locus with a dominant mode of transmission and reduced penetrance. In the search for genetic linkage for TS, we have collected well-characterized pedigrees with multiple affected individuals on whom extensive diagnostic evaluations have been done. The first stage of our study is to scan the genome systematically using a panel of uniformly spaced (10 to 20 cM), highly polymorphic, microsatellite markers on 5 families segregating TS. To date, 290 markers have been typed and 3,660 non-overlapping cM of the genome have been excluded for possible linkage under the assumption of genetic homogeneity. Because of the possibility of locus heterogeneity overall summed exclusion is not considered tantamount to absolute exclusion of a disease locus in that region. The results from each family are carefully evaluated and a positive lod score in a single family is followed up by typing closely linked markers. Linkage to TS was examined by two-point analysis using the following genetic model: single autosomal dominant gene with gene frequency .003 and maximum penetrance of .99. An age-of-onset correction is included using a linear function increasing from age 2 years to 21 years. A small rate of phenocopies is also incorporated into the model. Only individuals with TS or CMT according to DSM III-R criteria were regarded as affected for the purposes of this summary. Additional markers are being tested to provide coverage at 5 cM intervals. Moreover, we are currently analyzing the data non-parametrically using the Affected-Pedigree-Member Method of linkage analysis.

  11. A Genome Scan for Positive Selection in Thoroughbred Horses

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jingjing; Orr, Nick; Park, Stephen D.; Katz, Lisa M.; Sulimova, Galina; MacHugh, David E.; Hill, Emmeline W.

    2009-01-01

    Thoroughbred horses have been selected for exceptional racing performance resulting in system-wide structural and functional adaptations contributing to elite athletic phenotypes. Because selection has been recent and intense in a closed population that stems from a small number of founder animals Thoroughbreds represent a unique population within which to identify genomic contributions to exercise-related traits. Employing a population genetics-based hitchhiking mapping approach we performed a genome scan using 394 autosomal and X chromosome microsatellite loci and identified positively selected loci in the extreme tail-ends of the empirical distributions for (1) deviations from expected heterozygosity (Ewens-Watterson test) in Thoroughbred (n = 112) and (2) global differentiation among four geographically diverse horse populations (FST). We found positively selected genomic regions in Thoroughbred enriched for phosphoinositide-mediated signalling (3.2-fold enrichment; P<0.01), insulin receptor signalling (5.0-fold enrichment; P<0.01) and lipid transport (2.2-fold enrichment; P<0.05) genes. We found a significant overrepresentation of sarcoglycan complex (11.1-fold enrichment; P<0.05) and focal adhesion pathway (1.9-fold enrichment; P<0.01) genes highlighting the role for muscle strength and integrity in the Thoroughbred athletic phenotype. We report for the first time candidate athletic-performance genes within regions targeted by selection in Thoroughbred horses that are principally responsible for fatty acid oxidation, increased insulin sensitivity and muscle strength: ACSS1 (acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 1), ACTA1 (actin, alpha 1, skeletal muscle), ACTN2 (actinin, alpha 2), ADHFE1 (alcohol dehydrogenase, iron containing, 1), MTFR1 (mitochondrial fission regulator 1), PDK4 (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 4) and TNC (tenascin C). Understanding the genetic basis for exercise adaptation will be crucial for the identification of genes

  12. Genomic resources and their influence on the detection of the signal of positive selection in genome scans.

    PubMed

    Manel, S; Perrier, C; Pratlong, M; Abi-Rached, L; Paganini, J; Pontarotti, P; Aurelle, D

    2016-01-01

    Genome scans represent powerful approaches to investigate the action of natural selection on the genetic variation of natural populations and to better understand local adaptation. This is very useful, for example, in the field of conservation biology and evolutionary biology. Thanks to Next Generation Sequencing, genomic resources are growing exponentially, improving genome scan analyses in non-model species. Thousands of SNPs called using Reduced Representation Sequencing are increasingly used in genome scans. Besides, genome sequences are also becoming increasingly available, allowing better processing of short-read data, offering physical localization of variants, and improving haplotype reconstruction and data imputation. Ultimately, genome sequences are also becoming the raw material for selection inferences. Here, we discuss how the increasing availability of such genomic resources, notably genome sequences, influences the detection of signals of selection. Mainly, increasing data density and having the information of physical linkage data expand genome scans by (i) improving the overall quality of the data, (ii) helping the reconstruction of demographic history for the population studied to decrease false-positive rates and (iii) improving the statistical power of methods to detect the signal of selection. Of particular importance, the availability of a high-quality reference genome can improve the detection of the signal of selection by (i) allowing matching the potential candidate loci to linked coding regions under selection, (ii) rapidly moving the investigation to the gene and function and (iii) ensuring that the highly variable regions of the genomes that include functional genes are also investigated. For all those reasons, using reference genomes in genome scan analyses is highly recommended. PMID:26562485

  13. Gene identification in bacterial and organellar genomes using GeneScan.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, R; Srinivasan, R

    1999-03-30

    The performance of the GeneScan algorithm for gene identification has been improved by incorporation of a directed iterative scanning procedure. Application is made here to the cases of bacterial and organnellar genomes. The sensitivity of gene identification was 100% in Plasmodium falciparum plastid-like genome (35 kb) and in 98% in the Mycoplasma genitalium genome (approximately 580 kb) and the Haemophilus influenzae Rd genome (approximately 1.8 Mb). Sensitivity was found to improve in both the Open Reading Frames (ORFs) which have been identified as genes (by homology or by other methods) and those that are classified as hypothetical. False positive assignments (at the nucleotide level) were 0.25% in H. influenzae genome and 0.3% in M. genitalium. There were no false positive assignments in the plastid-like genome. The agreement between the GeneScan predictions and GeneMark predictions of putative ORFs was 97% in M. genitalium genome and 86% in H. influenzae genome. In terms of an exact match between predicted genes/ORFs and the annotation in the databank, GeneScan performance was evaluated to be between 72% and 90% in different genomes. We predict five putative ORFs that were not annotated earlier in the GenBank files for both M. genitalium and H. influenzae genomes. Our preliminary analysis of the newly sequenced G + C rich genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv also shows comparable sensitivity (99%). PMID:10353188

  14. Genetic diversity in conventional and synthetic wheats with drought and salinity tolerance based on AFLP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity, among fourteen drought and twenty-seven salinity tolerant conventional and synthetic wheat (Triticum sp.) accessions containing different sources of the D genome, was assessed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). The wheat accessions were analyzed with 20 EcoRI/Mse...

  15. A Genome-Scan Method to Identify Selected Loci Appropriate for Both Dominant and Codominant Markers: A Bayesian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Foll, Matthieu; Gaggiotti, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    Identifying loci under natural selection from genomic surveys is of great interest in different research areas. Commonly used methods to separate neutral effects from adaptive effects are based on locus-specific population differentiation coefficients to identify outliers. Here we extend such an approach to estimate directly the probability that each locus is subject to selection using a Bayesian method. We also extend it to allow the use of dominant markers like AFLPs. It has been shown that this model is robust to complex demographic scenarios for neutral genetic differentiation. Here we show that the inclusion of isolated populations that underwent a strong bottleneck can lead to a high rate of false positives. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that it is possible to avoid them by carefully choosing the populations that should be included in the analysis. We analyze two previously published data sets: a human data set of codominant markers and a Littorina saxatilis data set of dominant markers. We also perform a detailed sensitivity study to compare the power of the method using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), SNP, and microsatellite markers. The method has been implemented in a new software available at our website (http://www-leca.ujf-grenoble.fr/logiciels.htm). PMID:18780740

  16. Characterizing Safflower Germplasm with AFLP Molecular Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characterization of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) germplasm with molecular markers is needed to enhance germplasm management and utilization. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was completed in safflower using two selective primer pairs resulting in 102 unambiguous polymor...

  17. Genetic diversity of Chilean and Brazilian alstroemeria species assessed by AFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, T H; de Jeu, M; van Eck, H; Jacobsen, E

    2000-05-01

    One to three accessions of 22 Alstroemeria species, an interspecific hybrid (A. aurea x A. inodora), and single accessions of Bomarea salsilla and Leontochir ovallei were evaluated using the AFLP-marker technique to estimate the genetic diversity within the genus Alstroemeria. Three primer combinations generated 716 markers and discriminated all Alstroemeria species. The dendrogram inferred from the AFLP fingerprints supported the conjecture of the generic separation of the Chilean and Brazilian Alstroemeria species. The principal co-ordinate plot showed the separate allocation of the A. ligtu group and the allocation of A. aurea, which has a wide range of geographical distribution and genetic variation, in the middle of other Alstroemeria species. The genetic distances, based on AFLP markers, determined the genomic contribution of the parents to the interspecific hybrid. PMID:10849081

  18. Meta-analysis of genome-wide linkage scans for renal function traits

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Madhumathi; Mottl, Amy K.; Cole, Shelley A.; Umans, Jason G.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Yang, Qiong; Cupples, Adrienne; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Hunt, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Several genome scans have explored the linkage of chronic kidney disease phenotypes to chromosomic regions with disparate results. Genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) is a quantitative method to synthesize linkage results from independent studies and assess their concordance. Methods. We searched PubMed to identify genome linkage analyses of renal function traits in humans, such as estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), albuminuria, serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance. We contacted authors for numerical data and extracted information from individual studies. We applied the GSMA nonparametric approach to combine results across 14 linkage studies for GFR, 11 linkage studies for albumin creatinine ratio, 11 linkage studies for serum creatinine and 4 linkage studies for creatinine clearance. Results. No chromosomal region reached genome-wide statistical significance in the main analysis which included all scans under each phenotype; however, regions on Chromosomes 7, 10 and 16 reached suggestive significance for linkage to two or more phenotypes. Subgroup analyses by disease status or ethnicity did not yield additional information. Conclusions. While heterogeneity across populations, methodologies and study designs likely explain this lack of agreement, it is possible that linkage scan methodologies lack the resolution for investigating complex traits. Combining family-based linkage studies with genome-wide association studies may be a powerful approach to detect private mutations contributing to complex renal phenotypes. PMID:21622988

  19. Genetic Comparison of B. Anthracis and its Close Relatives Using AFLP and PCR Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.J.; Hill, K.K.; Laker, M.T.; Ticknor, L.O.; Keim, P.S.

    1999-02-01

    Amplified Fragment length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis allows a rapid, relatively simple analysis of a large portion of a microbial genome, providing information about the species and its phylogenetic relationship to other microbes (Vos, et al., 1995). The method simply surveys the genome for length and sequence polymorphisms. The pattern identified can be used for comparison to the genomes of other species. Unlike other methods, it does not rely on analysis of a single genetic locus that may bias the interpretation of results and it does not require any prior knowledge of the targeted organism. Moreover, a standard set of reagents can be applied to any species without using species-specific information or molecular probes. The authors are using AFLP's to rapidly identify different bacterial species. A comparison of AFLP profiles generated from a large battery of B. anthracis strains shows very little variability among different isolates (Keim, et al., 1997). By contrast, there is a significant difference between AFLP profiles generated for any B. anthracis strain and even the most closely related Bacillus species. Sufficient variability is apparent among all known microbial species to allow phylogenetic analysis based on large numbers of genetically unlinked loci. These striking differences among AFLP profiles allow unambiguous identification of previously identified species and phylogenetic placement of newly characterized isolates relative to known species based on a large number of independent genetic loci. Data generated thus far show that the method provides phylogenetic analyses that are consistent with other widely accepted phylogenetic methods. However, AFLP analysis provides a more detailed analysis of the targets and samples a much larger portion of the genome. Consequently, it provides an inexpensive, rapid means of characterizing microbial isolates to further differentiate among strains and closely related microbial species. Such information cannot be

  20. A Fast Implementation of a Scan Statistic for Identifying Chromosomal Patterns of Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan V.; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Turner, Stephen T.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kardia, Sharon L.R.

    2009-01-01

    In order to take into account the complex genomic distribution of SNP variations when identifying chromosomal regions with significant SNP effects, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association scan statistic was developed. To address the computational needs of genome wide association (GWA) studies, a fast Java application, which combines single-locus SNP tests and a scan statistic for identifying chromosomal regions with significant clusters of significant SNP effects, was developed and implemented. To illustrate this application, SNP associations were analyzed in a pharmacogenomic study of the blood pressure lowering effect of thiazide-diuretics (N=195) using the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K Set. 55,335 tagSNPs (pair-wise linkage disequilibrium R2<0.5) were selected to reduce the frequency correlation between SNPs. A typical workstation can complete the whole genome scan including 10,000 permutation tests within 3 hours. The most significant regions locate on chromosome 3, 6, 13 and 16, two of which contain candidate genes that may be involved in the underlying drug response mechanism. The computational performance of ChromoScan-GWA and its scalability were tested with up to 1,000,000 SNPs and up to 4,000 subjects. Using 10,000 permutations, the computation time grew linearly in these datasets. This scan statistic application provides a robust statistical and computational foundation for identifying genomic regions associated with disease and provides a method to compare GWA results even across different platforms. PMID:20161066

  1. Analysis of genetic diversity in crocuses with Carpathian Basin origin using AFLP-markers.

    PubMed

    Surányi, G; Máthé, C; Mosolygó, Agnes; Borbély, G; Vasas, G

    2010-01-01

    Crocus taxonomy has until now been based primarily on morphology, taking chromosome numbers into consideration. The genetics and genome structure of the genus, the relationships and diversity within the genus are not well known. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) is a whole genome approach to study genetic variation that is gaining in popularity for lower-level systematics. The present study employed the AFLP technique for analyzing relationships among taxa of the Crocus genus (particularly the Crocus vernus aggregate) with Carpathian Basin origin. The molecular variance obtained was based on amplification, separation and detection of EcoRI and Tru1I double-digested Crocus spp. genomic DNAs. Our results confirm the relatedness of C. tommasinianus, C. vittatus and C. heuffelianus at the Verni series of the Crocus genus. C. banaticus is taxonomically isolated as the sole member of the subgenus Crociris based on unique morphological features, but the difference is not convincing from AFLP data. The second interesting AFLP analysis result is the position of C. scepusiensis which separated it from the Crocus vernus aggregate. PMID:21565773

  2. A Genome-wide Pleiotropy Scan for Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotou, Orestis A; Travis, Ruth C; Campa, Daniele; Berndt, Sonja I.; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Siddiq, Afshan; Papatheodorou, Stefania I.; Stanford, Janet L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; Overvad, Kim; Riboli, Elio; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Giovannucci, Edward; Stampfer, Meir; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian; Le Marchand, Loic; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hunter, DavidJ.; Koutros, Stella; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wacholder, Sholom; Key, Timothy J.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K

    2014-01-01

    Background No single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) specific for aggressive prostate cancer have been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Objective To test if SNPs associated with other traits may also affect the risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Design, setting, and participants SNPs implicated in any phenotype other than prostate cancer (p ≤ 10−7) were identified through the catalog of published GWAS and tested in 2891 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4592 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). The 40 most significant SNPs were followed up in 4872 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 24 534 controls from the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for aggressive prostate cancer were estimated. Results and limitations A total of 4666 SNPs were evaluated by the BPC3. Two signals were seen in regions already reported for prostate cancer risk. rs7014346 at 8q24.21 was marginally associated with aggressive prostate cancer in the BPC3 trial (p = 1.6 × 10-6), whereas after meta-analysis by PRACTICAL the summary OR was 1.21 (95%CI 1.16–1.27; p = 3.22 × 10−18). rs9900242 at 17q24.3 was also marginally associated with aggressive disease in the meta-analysis (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.86–0.94; p = 2.5 × 10−6). Neither of these SNPs remained statistically significant when conditioning on correlated known prostate cancer SNPs. The meta-analysis by BPC3 and PRACTICAL identified a third promising signal, marked by rs16844874 at 2q34, independent of known prostate cancer loci (OR 1.12,95% CI 1.06–1.19; p = 4.67 × 10−5); it has been shown that SNPs correlated with this signal affect glycine concentrations. The main limitation is the heterogeneity in the definition of aggressive prostate cancer between BPC3 and PRACTICAL. Conclusions We did

  3. Genome wide association scan for chronic periodontitis implicates novel locus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence for a genetic contribution to chronic periodontitis. In this study, we conducted a genome wide association study among 866 participants of the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy (N = 767) to severe chronic periodontitis (N = 99). Methods Genotypingi of over half-million single nucleotide polymorphisms was determined. Analyses were done twice, first in the complete dataset of all ethnicities, and second including only samples defined as self-reported Whites. From the top 100 results, twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms had consistent results in both analyses (borderline p-values ranging from 1E-05 to 1E-6) and were selected to be tested in two independent datasets derived from 1,460 individuals from Porto Alegre, and 359 from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Meta-analyses of the Single nucleotide polymorphisms showing a trend for association in the independent dataset were performed. Results The rs1477403 marker located on 16q22.3 showed suggestive association in the discovery phase and in the Porto Alegre dataset (p = 0.05). The meta-analysis suggested the less common allele decreases the risk of chronic periodontitis. Conclusions Our data offer a clear hypothesis to be independently tested regarding the contribution of the 16q22.3 locus to chronic periodontitis. PMID:25008200

  4. Genetic dissection of Al tolerance QTLs in the maize genome by high density SNP scan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is an important limitation to food security in the tropical and subtropical regions. High Al saturation in acid soils limits root development and its ability to uptake water and nutrients. In this study, we present a genome scan for Al tolerance loci with over 50,000 GBS-based...

  5. Genome-wide scan revealed genetic loci for energy metabolism in Hispanic children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide scans were conducted in a search for genetic locations linked to energy expenditure and substrate oxidation in children. Pedigreed data of 1030 Hispanic children and adolescents were from the Viva La Familia Study, which was designed to investigate genetic and environmental risk factors ...

  6. An EST-based genome scan using 454 sequencing in the marine snail Littorina saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Galindo, J; Grahame, J W; Butlin, R K

    2010-09-01

    Genome scans have been used in the studies of ecological speciation to find genomic regions ('outlier loci') showing reduced gene flow between divergent populations/species. High-throughput sequencing ('454') offers new opportunities in this field via transcriptome sequencing. Divergent ecotypes of the marine gastropod Littorina saxatilis represent a good example of incipient ecological speciation. We performed a 454-based genome scan between H and M ecotypes of L. saxatilis from the British Isles using cDNA of pooled individuals. Allele frequencies were calculated for 2454 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), within 572 contigs, and 7% of loci were detected as outliers. Functional annotation of the contigs containing outlier SNPs showed that they included shell matrix and muscle proteins (lithostathine, mucin, titin), proteins involved in energetic metabolism (arginine kinase, NADH dehydrogenase) and reverse transcriptases. Follow-up investigations into these proteins and unannotated outliers will be a promising route in the study of ecological speciation in L. saxatilis. PMID:20695960

  7. A critical assessment of storytelling: gene ontology categories and the importance of validating genomic scans.

    PubMed

    Pavlidis, Pavlos; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Stephan, Wolfgang; Stamatakis, Alexandros

    2012-10-01

    In the age of whole-genome population genetics, so-called genomic scan studies often conclude with a long list of putatively selected loci. These lists are then further scrutinized to annotate these regions by gene function, corresponding biological processes, expression levels, or gene networks. Such annotations are often used to assess and/or verify the validity of the genome scan and the statistical methods that have been used to perform the analyses. Furthermore, these results are frequently considered to validate "true-positives" if the identified regions make biological sense a posteriori. Here, we show that this approach can be potentially misleading. By simulating neutral evolutionary histories, we demonstrate that it is possible not only to obtain an extremely high false-positive rate but also to make biological sense out of the false-positives and construct a sensible biological narrative. Results are compared with a recent polymorphism data set from Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:22617950

  8. Ab initio gene identification: prokaryote genome annotation with GeneScan and GLIMMER.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Gautam; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2002-02-01

    We compare the annotation of three complete genomes using the ab initio methods of gene identification GeneScan and GLIMMER. The annotation given in GenBank, the standard against which these are compared, has been made using GeneMark. We find a number of novel genes which are predicted by both methods used here, as well as a number of genes that are predicted by GeneMark, but are not identified by either of the nonconsensus methods that we have used. The three organisms studied here are all prokaryotic species with fairly compact genomes. The Fourier measure forms the basis for an efficient non-consensus method for gene prediction, and the algorithm GeneScan exploits this measure. We have bench-marked this program as well as GLIMMER using 3 complete prokaryotic genomes. An effort has also been made to study the limitations of these techniques for complete genome analysis. GeneScan and GLIMMER are of comparable accuracy insofar as gene-identification is concerned, with sensitivities and specificities typically greater than 0.9. The number of false predictions (both positive and negative) is higher for GeneScan as compared to GLIMMER, but in a significant number of cases, similar results are provided by the two techniques. This suggests that there could be some as-yet unidentified additional genes in these three genomes, and also that some of the putative identifications made hitherto might require re-evaluation. All these cases are discussed in detail. PMID:11927773

  9. Controlling the False-Positive Rate in Multilocus Genome Scans for Selection

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Kevin R.; Jensen, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    Rapid typing of genetic variation at many regions of the genome is an efficient way to survey variability in natural populations in an effort to identify segments of the genome that have experienced recent natural selection. Following such a genome scan, individual regions may be chosen for further sequencing and a more detailed analysis of patterns of variability, often to perform a parametric test for selection and to estimate the strength of a recent selective sweep. We show here that not accounting for the ascertainment of loci in such analyses leads to false inference of natural selection when the true model is selective neutrality, because the procedure of choosing unusual loci (in comparison to the rest of the genome-scan data) selects regions of the genome with genealogies similar to those expected under models of recent directional selection. We describe a simple and efficient correction for this ascertainment bias, which restores the false-positive rate to near-nominal levels. For the parameters considered here, we find that obtaining a test with the expected distribution of P-values depends on accurately accounting both for ascertainment of regions and for demography. Finally, we use simulations to explore the utility of relying on outlier loci to detect recent selective sweeps. We find that measures of diversity and of population differentiation are more effective than summaries of the site-frequency spectrum and that sequencing larger regions (2.5 kbp) in genome-scan studies leads to more power to detect recent selective sweeps. PMID:17110489

  10. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  11. A Genetic Linkage Map of the Mouse Using Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning (Rlgs)

    PubMed Central

    Hayashizaki, Y.; Hirotsune, S.; Okazaki, Y.; Shibata, H.; Akasako, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Kawai, J.; Hirasawa, T.; Watanabe, S.; Shiroishi, T.; Moriwaki, K.; Taylor, B. A.; Matsuda, Y.; Elliott, R. W.; Manly, K. F.; Chapman, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a multiplex method of genome analysis, restriction landmark genomic scanning (RLGS) that has been used to construct genetic maps in mice. Restriction landmarks are end-labeled restriction fragments of genomic DNA that are separated by using high resolution, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identifying as many as two thousand landmark loci in a single gel. Variation for several hundred of these loci has been identified between laboratory strains and between these strains and Mus spretus. The segregation of more than 1100 RLGS loci has been analyxed in recombinant inbred (RI) strains and in two separate interspecific genetic crosses. Genetic maps have been derived that link 1045 RLGS loci to reference loci on all of the autosomes and the X chromosome of the mouse genome. The RLGS method can be applied to genome analysis in many different organisms to identify genomic loci because it used end-labeling of restriction landmarks rather than probe hybridization. Different combinations of restriction enzymes yield different sets of RLGS loci providing expanded power for genetic mapping. PMID:7896102

  12. Characterizing Safflower Germplasm with AFLP Molecular Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) accessions from the U.S. germplasm collection were characterized using AFLP (Amplified Length Polymorphisms) markers. Separation and scoring of 392 markers was completed using the Beckman CEQ8000 capillary electrophoresis system. Twelve plants from each of eight...

  13. SCAN+

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  14. A New Method to Scan Genomes for Introgression in a Secondary Contact Model

    PubMed Central

    Geneva, Anthony J.; Muirhead, Christina A.; Kingan, Sarah B.; Garrigan, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Secondary contact between divergent populations or incipient species may result in the exchange and introgression of genomic material. We develop a simple DNA sequence measure, called Gmin, which is designed to identify genomic regions experiencing introgression in a secondary contact model. Gmin is defined as the ratio of the minimum between-population number of nucleotide differences in a genomic window to the average number of between-population differences. Although it is conceptually simple, one advantage of Gmin is that it is computationally inexpensive relative to model-based methods for detecting gene flow and it scales easily to the level of whole-genome analysis. We compare the sensitivity and specificity of Gmin to those of the widely used index of population differentiation, FST, and suggest a simple statistical test for identifying genomic outliers. Extensive computer simulations demonstrate that Gmin has both greater sensitivity and specificity for detecting recent introgression than does FST. Furthermore, we find that the sensitivity of Gmin is robust with respect to both the population mutation and recombination rates. Finally, a scan of Gmin across the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster identifies candidate regions of introgression between sub-Saharan African and cosmopolitan populations that were previously missed by other methods. These results show that Gmin is a biologically straightforward, yet powerful, alternative to FST, as well as to more computationally intensive model-based methods for detecting gene flow. PMID:25874895

  15. GenoFrag: software to design primers optimized for whole genome scanning by long-range PCR amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ben Zakour, Nouri; Gautier, Michel; Andonov, Rumen; Lavenier, Dominique; Cochet, Marie-Françoise; Veber, Philippe; Sorokin, Alexei; Le Loir, Yves

    2004-01-01

    Genome sequence data can be used to analyze genome plasticity by whole genome PCR scanning. Small sized chromosomes can indeed be fully amplified by long-range PCR with a set of primers designed using a reference strain and applied to several other strains. Analysis of the resulting patterns can reveal the genome plasticity. To facilitate such analysis, we have developed GenoFrag, a software package for the design of primers optimized for whole genome scanning by long-range PCR. GenoFrag was developed for the analysis of Staphylococcus aureus genome plasticity by whole genome amplification in ∼10 kb-long fragments. A set of primers was generated from the genome sequence of S.aureus N315, employed here as a reference strain. Two subsets of primers were successfully used to amplify two portions of the N315 chromosome. This experimental validation demonstrates that GenoFrag is a robust and reliable tool for primer design and that whole genome PCR scanning can be envisaged for the analysis of genome diversity in S.aureus, one of the major public health concerns worldwide. PMID:14704339

  16. Genome scans for detecting footprints of local adaptation using a Bayesian factor model.

    PubMed

    Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Bazin, Eric; Blum, Michael G B

    2014-09-01

    There is a considerable impetus in population genomics to pinpoint loci involved in local adaptation. A powerful approach to find genomic regions subject to local adaptation is to genotype numerous molecular markers and look for outlier loci. One of the most common approaches for selection scans is based on statistics that measure population differentiation such as FST. However, there are important caveats with approaches related to FST because they require grouping individuals into populations and they additionally assume a particular model of population structure. Here, we implement a more flexible individual-based approach based on Bayesian factor models. Factor models capture population structure with latent variables called factors, which can describe clustering of individuals into populations or isolation-by-distance patterns. Using hierarchical Bayesian modeling, we both infer population structure and identify outlier loci that are candidates for local adaptation. In order to identify outlier loci, the hierarchical factor model searches for loci that are atypically related to population structure as measured by the latent factors. In a model of population divergence, we show that it can achieve a 2-fold or more reduction of false discovery rate compared with the software BayeScan or with an FST approach. We show that our software can handle large data sets by analyzing the single nucleotide polymorphisms of the Human Genome Diversity Project. The Bayesian factor model is implemented in the open-source PCAdapt software. PMID:24899666

  17. Genome scan for nonadditive heterotic trait loci reveals mainly underdominant effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Laiba, Efrat; Glikaite, Ilana; Levy, Yael; Pasternak, Zohar; Fridman, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    The overdominant model of heterosis explains the superior phenotype of hybrids by synergistic allelic interaction within heterozygous loci. To map such genetic variation in yeast, we used a population doubling time dataset of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 16 × 16 diallel and searched for major contributing heterotic trait loci (HTL). Heterosis was observed for the majority of hybrids, as they surpassed their best parent growth rate. However, most of the local heterozygous loci identified by genome scan were surprisingly underdominant, i.e., reduced growth. We speculated that in these loci adverse effects on growth resulted from incompatible allelic interactions. To test this assumption, we eliminated these allelic interactions by creating hybrids with local hemizygosity for the underdominant HTLs, as well as for control random loci. Growth of hybrids was indeed elevated for most hemizygous to HTL genes but not for control genes, hence validating the results of our genome scan. Assessing the consequences of local heterozygosity by reciprocal hemizygosity and allele replacement assays revealed the influence of genetic background on the underdominant effects of HTLs. Overall, this genome-wide study on a multi-parental hybrid population provides a strong argument against single gene overdominance as a major contributor to heterosis, and favors the dominance complementation model. PMID:26967146

  18. Improving AFLP analysis of large-scale patterns of genetic variation--a case study with the Central African lianas Haumania spp (Marantaceae) showing interspecific gene flow.

    PubMed

    Ley, A C; Hardy, O J

    2013-04-01

    AFLP markers are often used to study patterns of population genetic variation and gene flow because they offer a good coverage of the nuclear genome, but the reliability of AFLP scoring is critical. To assess interspecific gene flow in two African rainforest liana species (Haumania danckelmaniana, H. liebrechtsiana) where previous evidence of chloroplast captures questioned the importance of hybridization and species boundaries, we developed new AFLP markers and a novel approach to select reliable bands from their degree of reproducibility. The latter is based on the estimation of the broad-sense heritability of AFLP phenotypes, an improvement over classical scoring error rates, which showed that the polymorphism of most AFLP bands was affected by a substantial nongenetic component. Therefore, using a quantitative genetics framework, we also modified an existing estimator of pairwise kinship coefficient between individuals correcting for the limited heritability of markers. Bayesian clustering confirms the recognition of the two Haumania species. Nevertheless, the decay of the relatedness between individuals of distinct species with geographic distance demonstrates that hybridization affects the nuclear genome. In conclusion, although we showed that AFLP markers might be substantially affected by nongenetic factors, their analysis using the new methods developed considerably advanced our understanding of the pattern of gene flow in our model species. PMID:23398575

  19. Bayesian statistical treatment of the fluorescence of AFLP bands leads to accurate genetic structure inference.

    PubMed

    Gaggiotti, Oscar E

    2010-11-01

    Ever since the introduction of allozymes in the 1960s, evolutionary biologists and ecologists have continued to search for more powerful molecular markers to estimate important parameters such as effective population size and migration rates and to make inferences about the demographic history of populations, the relationships between individuals and the genetic architecture of phenotypic variation (Bensch & Akesson 2005; Bonin et al. 2007). Choosing a marker requires a thorough consideration of the trade-offs associated with the different techniques and the type of data obtained from them. Some markers can be very informative but require substantial amounts of start-up time (e.g. microsatellites), while others require very little time but are much less polymorphic. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) is a firmly established molecular marker technique that falls in this latter category. AFLPs are widely distributed throughout the genome and can be used on organisms for which there is no a priori sequence information (Meudt & Clarke 2007). These properties together with their moderate cost and short start-up time have made them the method of choice for many molecular ecology studies of wild species (Bensch & Akesson 2005). However, they have a major disadvantage, they are dominant. This represents a very important limitation because many statistical genetics methods appropriate for molecular ecology studies require the use of codominant markers. In this issue, Foll et al. (2010) present an innovative hierarchical Bayesian method that overcomes this limitation. The proposed approach represents a comprehensive statistical treatment of the fluorescence of AFLP bands and leads to accurate inferences about the genetic structure of natural populations. Besides allowing a quasi-codominant treatment of AFLPs, this new method also solves the difficult problems posed by subjectivity in the scoring of AFLP bands. PMID:20958811

  20. The application of high-throughput AFLP's in assessing genetic diversity in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, Susan; Van Den Berg, Noëlani; Marasas, Walter F O; Viljoen, Altus

    2006-03-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) is responsible for fusarium wilt of bananas. The pathogen consists of several variants that are divided into three races and 21 vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs). Several DNA-based techniques have previously been used to analyse the worldwide population of Foc, sometimes yielding results that were not always consistent. In this study, the high-resolution genotyping method of AFLP is introduced as a potentially effective molecular tool to investigate diversity in Foc at a genome-wide level. The population selected for this study included Foc isolates representing different VCGs and races, isolates of F. oxysporum f. sp. dianthi, a putatively non-pathogenic biological control strain F. oxysporum (Fo47), and F. circinatum. High-throughput AFLP analysis was attained using five different infrared dye-labelled primer combinations using a two-dye model 4200s LI-COR automated DNA analyser. An average of approx. 100 polymorphic loci were scored for each primer pair using the SAGA(MX) automated AFLP analysis software. Data generated from five primer pair combinations were combined and subjected to distance analysis, which included the use of neighbour-joining and a bootstrap of 1000 replicates. A tree inferred from AFLP distance analysis revealed the polyphyletic nature of the Foc isolates, and seven genotypic groups could be identified. The results indicate that AFLP is a powerful tool to perform detailed analysis of genetic diversity in the banana pathogen Foc. PMID:16483757

  1. Genome Scan for Parent-of-Origin QTL Effects on Bovine Growth and Carcass Traits.

    PubMed

    Imumorin, Ikhide G; Kim, Eun-Hee; Lee, Yun-Mi; De Koning, Dirk-Jan; van Arendonk, Johan A; De Donato, Marcos; Taylor, Jeremy F; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects (POE) such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents, and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus × Brahman cattle crossbreds. We identified 24 POE-QTL on 15 Bos taurus autosomes (BTAs) of which six were significant at 5% genome-wide (GW) level and 18 at the 5% chromosome-wide (CW) significance level. Six QTL were paternally expressed while 15 were maternally expressed. Three QTL influencing post-weaning growth map to the proximal end of BTA2 (linkage region of 0-9 cM; genomic region of 5.0-10.8 Mb), for which only one imprinted ortholog is known so far in the human and mouse genomes, and therefore may potentially represent a novel imprinted region. The detected QTL individually explained 1.4 ∼ 5.1% of each trait's phenotypic variance. Comparative in silico analysis of bovine genomic locations show that 32 out of 1,442 known mammalian imprinted genes from human and mouse homologs map to the identified QTL regions. Although several of the 32 genes have been associated with quantitative traits in cattle, only two (GNAS and PEG3) have experimental proof of being imprinted in cattle. These results lend additional support to recent reports that POE on quantitative traits in mammals may be more common than previously thought, and strengthen the need to identify and experimentally validate cattle orthologs of imprinted genes so as to investigate their effects on quantitative traits. PMID:22303340

  2. Genome Scan for Parent-of-Origin QTL Effects on Bovine Growth and Carcass Traits

    PubMed Central

    Imumorin, Ikhide G.; Kim, Eun-Hee; Lee, Yun-Mi; De Koning, Dirk-Jan; van Arendonk, Johan A.; De Donato, Marcos; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin effects (POE) such as genomic imprinting influence growth and body composition in livestock, rodents, and humans. Here, we report the results of a genome scan to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) with POE on growth and carcass traits in Angus × Brahman cattle crossbreds. We identified 24 POE–QTL on 15 Bos taurus autosomes (BTAs) of which six were significant at 5% genome-wide (GW) level and 18 at the 5% chromosome-wide (CW) significance level. Six QTL were paternally expressed while 15 were maternally expressed. Three QTL influencing post-weaning growth map to the proximal end of BTA2 (linkage region of 0–9 cM; genomic region of 5.0–10.8 Mb), for which only one imprinted ortholog is known so far in the human and mouse genomes, and therefore may potentially represent a novel imprinted region. The detected QTL individually explained 1.4 ∼ 5.1% of each trait’s phenotypic variance. Comparative in silico analysis of bovine genomic locations show that 32 out of 1,442 known mammalian imprinted genes from human and mouse homologs map to the identified QTL regions. Although several of the 32 genes have been associated with quantitative traits in cattle, only two (GNAS and PEG3) have experimental proof of being imprinted in cattle. These results lend additional support to recent reports that POE on quantitative traits in mammals may be more common than previously thought, and strengthen the need to identify and experimentally validate cattle orthologs of imprinted genes so as to investigate their effects on quantitative traits. PMID:22303340

  3. Two-dimensional genome-scan identifies novel epistatic loci for essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jordana Tzenova; Wallace, Chris; Dobson, Richard; Wiltshire, Steven; Mein, Charles; Pembroke, Janine; Brown, Morris; Clayton, David; Samani, Nilesh; Dominiczak, Anna; Webster, John; Lathrop, G Mark; Connell, John; Munroe, Patricia; Caulfield, Mark; Farrall, Martin

    2006-04-15

    It is well established that gene interactions influence common human diseases, but to date linkage studies have been constrained to searching for single genes across the genome. We applied a novel approach to uncover significant gene-gene interactions in a systematic two-dimensional (2D) genome-scan of essential hypertension. The study cohort comprised 2076 affected sib-pairs and 66 affected half-sib-pairs of the British Genetics of HyperTension study. Extensive simulations were used to establish significance thresholds in the context of 2D genome-scans. Our analyses found significant and suggestive evidence for loci on chromosomes 5, 9, 11, 15, 16 and 19, which influence hypertension when gene-gene interactions are taken into account (5q13.1 and 11q22.1, two-locus lod score=5.72; 5q13.1 and 19q12, two-locus lod score=5.35; 9q22.3 and 15q12, two-locus lod score=4.80; 16p12.3 and 16q23.1, two-locus lod score=4.50). For each significant and suggestive pairwise interaction, the two-locus genetic model that best fitted the data was determined. Regions that were not detected using single-locus linkage analysis were identified in the 2D scan as contributing significant epistatic effects. This approach has discovered novel loci for hypertension and offers a unique potential to use existing data to uncover novel regions involved in complex human diseases. PMID:16543358

  4. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier

  5. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  6. Asymmetric Introgression in the Horticultural Living Fossil Cycas Sect. Asiorientales Using a Genome-Wide Scanning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yu-Chung; Huang, Bing-Hong; Chang, Chun-Wen; Wan, Yu-Ting; Lai, Shih-Jie; Huang, Shong; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The Asian cycads are mostly allopatric, distributed in small population sizes. Hybridization between allopatric species provides clues in determining the mechanism of species divergence. Horticultural introduction provides the chance of interspecific gene flow between allopatric species. Two allopatrically eastern Asian Cycas sect. Asiorientales species, C. revoluta and C. taitungensis, which are widely distributed in Ryukyus and Fujian Province and endemic to Taiwan, respectively, were planted in eastern Taiwan for horticultural reason. Higher degrees of genetic admixture in cultivated samples than wild populations in both cycad species were detected based on multilocus scans by neutral AFLP markers. Furthermore, bidirectional but asymmetric introgression by horticultural introduction of C. revoluta is evidenced by the reanalyses of species associated loci, which are assumed to be diverged after species divergence. Partial loci introgressed from native cycad to the invaders were also detected at the loci of strong species association. Consistent results tested by all neutral loci, and the species-associated loci, specify the recent introgression from the paradox of sharing of ancestral polymorphisms. Phenomenon of introgression of cultivated cycads implies niche conservation among two geographic-isolated cycads, even though the habitats of the extant wild populations of two species are distinct. PMID:23591840

  7. Genome scanning of Amazonian Plasmodium falciparum shows subtelomeric instability and clindamycin-resistant parasites

    PubMed Central

    Dharia, Neekesh V.; Plouffe, David; Bopp, Selina E.R.; González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Lucas, Carmen; Salas, Carola; Soberon, Valeria; Bursulaya, Badry; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Bacon, David J.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we fully characterize the genomes of 14 Plasmodium falciparum patient isolates taken recently from the Iquitos region using genome scanning, a microarray-based technique that delineates the majority of single-base changes, indels, and copy number variants distinguishing the coding regions of two clones. We show that the parasite population in the Peruvian Amazon bears a limited number of genotypes and low recombination frequencies. Despite the essentially clonal nature of some isolates, we see high frequencies of mutations in subtelomeric highly variable genes and internal var genes, indicating mutations arising during self-mating or mitotic replication. The data also reveal that one or two meioses separate different isolates, showing that P. falciparum clones isolated from different individuals in defined geographical regions could be useful in linkage analyses or quantitative trait locus studies. Through pairwise comparisons of different isolates we discovered point mutations in the apicoplast genome that are close to known mutations that confer clindamycin resistance in other species, but which were hitherto unknown in malaria parasites. Subsequent drug sensitivity testing revealed over 100-fold increase of clindamycin EC50 in strains harboring one of these mutations. This evidence of clindamycin-resistant parasites in the Amazon suggests that a shift should be made in health policy away from quinine + clindamycin therapy for malaria in pregnant women and infants, and that the development of new lincosamide antibiotics for malaria should be reconsidered. PMID:20829224

  8. Genome-wide scans of genetic variants for psychophysiological endophenotypes: a methodological overview.

    PubMed

    Iacono, William G; Malone, Stephen M; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Vrieze, Scott I

    2014-12-01

    This article provides an introductory overview of the investigative strategy employed to evaluate the genetic basis of 17 endophenotypes examined as part of a 20-year data collection effort from the Minnesota Center for Twin and Family Research. Included are characterization of the study samples, descriptive statistics for key properties of the psychophysiological measures, and rationale behind the steps taken in the molecular genetic study design. The statistical approach included (a) biometric analysis of twin and family data, (b) heritability analysis using 527,829 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), (c) genome-wide association analysis of these SNPs and 17,601 autosomal genes, (d) follow-up analyses of candidate SNPs and genes hypothesized to have an association with each endophenotype, (e) rare variant analysis of nonsynonymous SNPs in the exome, and (f) whole genome sequencing association analysis using 27 million genetic variants. These methods were used in the accompanying empirical articles comprising this special issue, Genome-Wide Scans of Genetic Variants for Psychophysiological Endophenotypes. PMID:25387703

  9. Genome-Wide Association Scan for Variants Associated with Early-Onset Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Ethan M.; Johnson, Anna M.; Wang, Yunfei; Zuhlke, Kimberly A.; Lu, Yurong; Ribado, Jessica V.; Keele, Gregory R.; Li, Jin; Duan, Qing; Li, Ge; Gao, Zhengrong; Li, Yun; Xu, Jianfeng; Isaacs, William B.; Zheng, Siqun; Cooney, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related mortality for men in the United States. There is strong empirical and epidemiological evidence supporting a stronger role of genetics in early-onset prostate cancer. We performed a genome-wide association scan for early-onset prostate cancer. Novel aspects of this study include the focus on early-onset disease (defined as men with prostate cancer diagnosed before age 56 years) and use of publically available control genotype data from previous genome-wide association studies. We found genome-wide significant (p<5×10−8) evidence for variants at 8q24 and 11p15 and strong supportive evidence for a number of previously reported loci. We found little evidence for individual or systematic inflated association findings resulting from using public controls, demonstrating the utility of using public control data in large-scale genetic association studies of common variants. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of established common genetic variants for early-onset prostate cancer and the power of including early-onset prostate cancer cases in genetic association studies. PMID:24740154

  10. Cytoplasmic and Genomic Effects on Non-Meiosis-Driven Genetic Changes in Brassica Hybrids and Allotetraploids from Pairwise Crosses of Three Cultivated Diploids

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cheng; Ge, Xianhong; Zhou, Yingying; Li, Maoteng; Li, Zaiyun

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions are predicted to be important in shaping the genetic changes in early stage of allopolyploidization. Our previous study shows the specific role of genome and cytoplasm affecting the chromosome pairing in Brassica hybrids and allotetraploids from pairwise crosses between three cultivated diploids with A, B and C genomes, respectively. Herein, to address how parental genomes and cytoplasm affects genomic, epigenetic and gene expression changes prior to meiosis in these hybrids and allopolyploids, their patterns of AFLP (Amplified fragment length polymorphism), mAFLP (Methylation AFLP) and cDNA-AFLP were compared with the progenitors, revealing the major absent bands within each genome. These changes varied under various cytoplasm backgrounds and genome combinations, following the significant order of AFLP> mAFLP> cDNA -AFLP. The frequencies of AFLP bands lost were positively correlated with the divergence degrees of parental genomes, but not obvious for those of mAFLP and cDNA-AFLP absent bands, and methylation change showed least variations among hybrids and within each genome. These changes within each genome followed the A>B>C hierarchy, except the highest rate of cDNA loss in B genome. Among three changes, only overall AFLP bands were significantly correlated with cDNA-AFLP, and their correlations varied within each genome. These changes in allotetraploids were mainly caused by genome merger rather than doubling. Parental genomes altered differently at three levels, responded to the types of cytoplasm and genome and their interaction or divergence. The result provides new clues for instant non-meiosis-driven genome restructuring following genome merger and duplication. PMID:23741462

  11. Ion Torrent sequencing for conducting genome-wide scans for mutation mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Damerla, Rama Rao; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Li, You; Francis, Richard J B; Fatakia, Sarosh N; Lo, Cecilia W

    2014-04-01

    Mutation mapping in mice can be readily accomplished by genome wide segregation analysis of polymorphic DNA markers. In this study, we showed the efficacy of Ion Torrent next generation sequencing for conducting genome-wide scans to map and identify a mutation causing congenital heart disease in a mouse mutant, Bishu, recovered from a mouse mutagenesis screen. The Bishu mutant line generated in a C57BL/6J (B6) background was intercrossed with another inbred strain, C57BL/10J (B10), and the resulting B6/B10 hybrid offspring were intercrossed to generate mutants used for the mapping analysis. For each mutant sample, a panel of 123 B6/B10 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout the mouse genome was PCR amplified, bar coded, and then pooled to generate a single library used for Ion Torrent sequencing. Sequencing carried out using the 314 chip yielded >600,000 usable reads. These were aligned and mapped using a custom bioinformatics pipeline. Each SNP was sequenced to a depth >500×, allowing accurate automated calling of the B6/B10 genotypes. This analysis mapped the mutation in Bishu to an interval on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 4. This was confirmed by parallel capillary sequencing of the 123 polymorphic SNPs. Further analysis of genes in the map interval identified a splicing mutation in Dnaic1(c.204+1G>A), an intermediate chain dynein, as the disease causing mutation in Bishu. Overall, our experience shows Ion Torrent amplicon sequencing is high throughput and cost effective for conducting genome-wide mapping analysis and is easily scalable for other high volume genotyping analyses. PMID:24306492

  12. Phylogeny of bovine species based on AFLP fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Buntjer, J B; Otsen, M; Nijman, I J; Kuiper, M T R; Lenstra, J A

    2002-01-01

    The Bovini species comprise both domestic and wild cattle species. Published phylogenies of this tribe based on mitochondrial DNA contain anomalies, while nuclear sequences show only low variation. We have used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting in order to detect variation in loci distributed over the nuclear genome. Computer-assisted scoring of electrophoretic fingerprinting patterns yielded 361 markers, which provided sufficient redundancy to suppress stochastic effects of intraspecies polymorphisms and length homoplasies (comigration of non-homologous fragments). Tree reconstructions reveal three clusters: African buffalo with water buffalo, ox with zebu, and bison with wisent. Similarity values suggest a clustering of gaur and banteng, but bifurcating clustering algorithms did not assign consistent positions to these species and yak. We propose that because of shared polymorphisms and reticulations, tree topologies are only partially adequate to represent the phylogeny of the Bovini. Principal-coordinate analysis positions zebu between a gaur/banteng cluster and taurine cattle. This correlates with the region of origin of these species and suggests that genomic distances between the cattle species have been influenced by genetic exchange between neighbouring ancestral populations. PMID:11813106

  13. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of genomic DNA microarrays--study of adsorption and subsequent interactions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William S; Davis, Frank; Higson, Séamus P J

    2009-07-01

    The adsorption of genomic DNA and subsequent interactions between adsorbed and solvated DNA have been studied using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Microarrays of polyethylenimine (PEI) films could be deposited on screen-printed carbon substrates using the SECM. Single stranded herring DNA was electrostatically adsorbed at the surface of the polyethylenimine. The further adsorption of complementary single stranded DNA on the surface was observed to give rise to substantial decreases in interfacial impedance at the surface as measured by increases of tip current of the order of 1-2 nA (6%). Conversely adsorption of DNA from alternate species, i.e. salmon ssDNA on herring ssDNA, yielded much smaller changes in tip current of 0.2 nA. The significance of this work is that the approach opens up the possibility for direct label-free electrochemical interrogation of DNA microarrays as an alternative to other existing optical techniques. PMID:19562194

  14. A Genome Scan Conducted in a Multigenerational Pedigree with Convergent Strabismus Supports a Complex Genetic Determinism

    PubMed Central

    Georges, Anouk; Cambisano, Nadine; Ahariz, Naïma; Karim, Latifa; Georges, Michel

    2013-01-01

    A genome-wide linkage scan was conducted in a Northern-European multigenerational pedigree with nine of 40 related members affected with concomitant strabismus. Twenty-seven members of the pedigree including all affected individuals were genotyped using a SNP array interrogating > 300,000 common SNPs. We conducted parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses assuming segregation of an autosomal dominant mutation, yet allowing for incomplete penetrance and phenocopies. We detected two chromosome regions with near-suggestive evidence for linkage, respectively on chromosomes 8 and 18. The chromosome 8 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.80 and a rate of phenocopy of 0.11, while the chromosome 18 linkage implied a penetrance of 0.64 and a rate of phenocopy of 0. Our analysis excludes a simple genetic determinism of strabismus in this pedigree. PMID:24376720

  15. A Genome-wide Scan for Selective Sweeps in Racing Horses

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sunjin; Lee, Jin Woo; Shin, Donghyun; Shin, Kwang-Yun; Kim, Jun; Choi, Ik-Young; Kim, Jaemin; Kim, Heebal

    2015-01-01

    Using next-generation sequencing, we conducted a genome-wide scan of selective sweeps associated with selection toward genetic improvement in Thoroughbreds. We investigated potential phenotypic consequence of putative candidate loci by candidate gene association mapping for the finishing time in 240 Thoroughbred horses. We found a significant association with the trait for Ral GApase alpha 2 (RALGAP2) that regulates a variety of cellular processes of signal trafficking. Neighboring genes around RALGAP2 included insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1), pallid (PLDN), and Ras and Rab interactor 2 (RIN2) genes have similar roles in signal trafficking, suggesting that a co-evolving gene cluster located on the chromosome 22 is under strong artificial selection in racehorses. PMID:26333666

  16. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N.; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L.; et al

    2015-03-20

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, orderedmore » restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.« less

  17. Scanning the Landscape of Genome Architecture of Non-O1 and Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by Whole Genome Mapping Reveals Extensive Population Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N.; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L.; Mokashi, Vishwesh P.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, ordered restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks. PMID:25794000

  18. Efficient strategies for genome scanning using maximum-likelihood affected-sib-pair analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holmans, P.; Craddock, N.

    1997-03-01

    Detection of linkage with a systematic genome scan in nuclear families including an affected sibling pair is an important initial step on the path to cloning susceptibility genes for complex genetic disorders, and it is desirable to optimize the efficiency of such studies. The aim is to maximize power while simultaneously minimizing the total number of genotypings and probability of type I error. One approach to increase efficiency, which has been investigated by other workers, is grid tightening: a sample is initially typed using a coarse grid of markers, and promising results are followed up by use of a finer grid. Another approach, not previously considered in detail in the context of an affected-sib-pair genome scan for linkage, is sample splitting: a portion of the sample is typed in the screening stage, and promising results are followed up in the whole sample. In the current study, we have used computer simulation to investigate the relative efficiency of two-stage strategies involving combinations of both grid tightening and sample splitting and found that the optimal strategy incorporates both approaches. In general, typing half the sample of affected pairs with a coarse grid of markers in the screening stage is an efficient strategy under a variety of conditions. If Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds, it is most efficient not to type parents in the screening stage. If Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium does not hold (e.g., because of stratification) failure to type parents in the first stage increases the amount of genotyping required, although the overall probability of type I error is not greatly increased, provided the parents are used in the final analysis. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Genome-scan analysis for quantitative trait loci in an F2 tilapia hybrid.

    PubMed

    Cnaani, A; Zilberman, N; Tinman, S; Hulata, G; Ron, M

    2004-09-01

    We searched for genetic linkage between DNA markers and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for innate immunity, response to stress, biochemical parameters of blood, and fish size in an F2 population derived from an interspecific tilapia hybrid (Oreochromis mossambicusx O. aureus). A family of 114 fish was scanned for 40 polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers and two polymorphic genes, covering approximately 80% of the tilapia genome. These fish had previously been phenotyped for seven immune-response traits and six blood parameters. Critical values for significance were P <0.05 with the false discovery rate (FDR) controlled at 40%. The genome-scan analysis resulted in 35 significant marker-trait associations, involving 26 markers in 16 linkage groups. In a second experiment, nine markers were re-sampled in a second family of 79 fish of the same species hybrid. Seven markers (GM180, GM553, MHC-I, UNH848, UNH868, UNH898 and UNH925) in five linkage groups (LG 1, 3, 4, 22 and 23) were associated with stress response traits. An additional six markers (GM47, GM552, UNH208, UNH881, UNH952, UNH998) in five linkage groups (LG 4, 16, 19, 20 and 23) were verified for their associations with immune response traits, by linkage to several different traits. The portion of variance explained by each QTL was 11% on average, with a maximum of 29%. The average additive effect of QTLs was 0.2 standard deviation units of stress response traits and fish size, with a maximum of 0.33. In three linkage groups (LG 1, 3 and 23) markers were associated with stress response, body weight and sex determination, confirming the location of QTLs reported by several other studies. PMID:15449174

  20. Genome scan for human obesity and linkage to markers in 20q13.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J H; Reed, D R; Li, W D; Xu, W; Joo, E J; Kilker, R L; Nanthakumar, E; North, M; Sakul, H; Bell, C; Price, R A

    1999-01-01

    Obesity is a highly prevalent, multigenic trait that predicts increased morbidity and mortality. Here we report results from a genome scan based on 354 markers in 513 members of 92 nuclear families ascertained through extreme obesity and normal body weight. The average marker interval was approximately 10 cM. We examined four correlated obesity phenotypes, including the body-mass index (BMI) (both as a quantitative trait and as a discrete trait with a threshold of BMI > or /=30 kg/m2) and percentage of fat (both as a quantitative trait and as a discrete trait with a threshold of 40%) as assessed by bioelectrical impedance. In the initial stage of the genome scan, four markers in 20q gave positive evidence for linkage, which was consistent across most obesity phenotypes and analytic methods. After saturating 20q with additional markers (25 markers total) in an augmented sample of 713 members from 124 families, we found linkage to several markers in a region, 20q13, previously implicated in both human and animal studies. Three markers (D20S107, D20S211, and D20S149) in 20q13 had empirical P values (based on Monte Carlo simulations, which controlled for multiple testing) < or /=. 01 for single-point analysis. In addition, the parametric, affecteds-only analysis for D20S476 yielded a LOD score of 3.06 (P=. 00009), and the affected-sib-pair test yielded a LOD score of 3.17 (P=.000067). Multipoint analyses further strengthened and localized these findings. This region includes several plausible candidate genes for obesity. Our results suggest that one or more genes affecting obesity are located in 20q13. PMID:9915959

  1. Genomospecies identification and phylogenomic relevance of AFLP analysis of isolated and non-isolated strains of Frankia spp.

    PubMed

    Bautista, G H H; Cruz, H A; Nesme, X; Valdés, M; Mendoza, H A; Fernandez, M P

    2011-05-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was tested as an alternative to the DNA-DNA hybridization technique (DDH) to delineate genomospecies and the phylogenetic structure within the genus Frankia. Forty Frankia strains, including representatives of seven DDH genomospecies, were typed in order to infer current genome mispairing (CGM) and evolutionary genomic distance (EGD). The constructed phylogeny revealed the presence of three main clusters corresponding to the previously identified host-infecting groups. In all instances, strains previously assigned to the same genomospecies were grouped in coherent clusters. A highly significant correlation was found between DDH values and CGM computed from AFLP data. The species definition threshold was found to range from 0.071 to 0.098 mismatches per site, according to host-infecting groups, presumably as a result of large genome size differences. Genomic distances allowed new Frankia strains to be assigned to nine genomospecies previously determined by DDH. The applicability of AFLP for the characterization of uncultured endophytic strains was tested on experimentally inoculated plants and then applied to Alnus incana and A. viridis field nodules hosting culture refractory spore-positive (Sp+, that sporulate in planta) strains. Only 1.3% of all AFLP fragments were shown to be generated by the contaminant plant DNA and did not interfere with accurate genomospecies identification of strains. When applied to field nodules, the procedure revealed that Alnus Sp+ strains were bona fide members of the Alnus-Myrica host infecting group. They displayed significant genomic divergence from genomospecies G1 of Alnus infecting strains (i.e. Frankia alni) and thus may belong to another subspecies or genomospecies. PMID:21310572

  2. First genetic linkage map of Taraxacum koksaghyz Rodin based on AFLP, SSR, COS and EST-SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Arias, Marina; Hernandez, Monica; Remondegui, Naroa; Huvenaars, Koen; van Dijk, Peter; Ritter, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Taraxacum koksaghyz Rodin (TKS) has been studied in many occasions as a possible alternative source for natural rubber production of good quality and for inulin production. Some tire companies are already testing TKS tire prototypes. There are also many investigations on the production of bio-fuels from inulin and inulin applications for health improvement and in the food industry. A limited amount of genomic resources exist for TKS and particularly no genetic linkage map is available in this species. We have constructed the first TKS genetic linkage map based on AFLP, COS, SSR and EST-SSR markers. The integrated linkage map with eight linkage groups (LG), representing the eight chromosomes of Russian dandelion, has 185 individual AFLP markers from parent 1, 188 individual AFLP markers from parent 2, 75 common AFLP markers and 6 COS, 1 SSR and 63 EST-SSR loci. Blasting the EST-SSR sequences against known sequences from lettuce allowed a partial alignment of our TKS map with a lettuce map. Blast searches against plant gene databases revealed some homologies with useful genes for downstream applications in the future. PMID:27488242

  3. First genetic linkage map of Taraxacum koksaghyz Rodin based on AFLP, SSR, COS and EST-SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Marina; Hernandez, Monica; Remondegui, Naroa; Huvenaars, Koen; van Dijk, Peter; Ritter, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Taraxacum koksaghyz Rodin (TKS) has been studied in many occasions as a possible alternative source for natural rubber production of good quality and for inulin production. Some tire companies are already testing TKS tire prototypes. There are also many investigations on the production of bio-fuels from inulin and inulin applications for health improvement and in the food industry. A limited amount of genomic resources exist for TKS and particularly no genetic linkage map is available in this species. We have constructed the first TKS genetic linkage map based on AFLP, COS, SSR and EST-SSR markers. The integrated linkage map with eight linkage groups (LG), representing the eight chromosomes of Russian dandelion, has 185 individual AFLP markers from parent 1, 188 individual AFLP markers from parent 2, 75 common AFLP markers and 6 COS, 1 SSR and 63 EST-SSR loci. Blasting the EST-SSR sequences against known sequences from lettuce allowed a partial alignment of our TKS map with a lettuce map. Blast searches against plant gene databases revealed some homologies with useful genes for downstream applications in the future. PMID:27488242

  4. The genetic architecture of seed composition in soybean is refined by genome-wide association scans across multiple populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil and meal are major contributors to world-wide food production. Consequently, the genetic basis for soybean seed composition has been intensely studied using family-based mapping. Population-based mapping approaches, in the form of genome-wide association (GWA) scans, have been able to re...

  5. DETECTING SELECTION IN NATURAL POPULATIONS: MAKING SENSE OF GENOME SCANS AND TOWARDS ALTERNATIVE SOLUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Haasl, Ryan J.; Payseur, Bret A.

    2016-01-01

    Genomewide scans for natural selection (GWSS) have become increasingly common over the last 15 years due to increased availability of genome-scale genetic data. Here, we report a representative survey of GWSS from 1999 to present and find that (i) between 1999 and 2009, 35 of 49 (71%) GWSS focused on human, while from 2010 to present, only 38 of 83 (46%) of GWSS focused on human, indicating increased focus on nonmodel organisms; (ii) the large majority of GWSS incorporate interpopulation or interspecific comparisons using, for example FST, cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity or the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions; (iii) most GWSS focus on detection of directional selection rather than other modes such as balancing selection; and (iv) in human GWSS, there is a clear shift after 2004 from microsatellite markers to dense SNP data. A survey of GWSS meant to identify loci positively selected in response to severe hypoxic conditions support an approach to GWSS in which a list of a priori candidate genes based on potential selective pressures are used to filter the list of significant hits a posteriori. We also discuss four frequently ignored determinants of genomic heterogeneity that complicate GWSS: mutation, recombination, selection and the genetic architecture of adaptive traits. We recommend that GWSS methodology should better incorporate aspects of genomewide heterogeneity using empirical estimates of relevant parameters and/or realistic, whole-chromosome simulations to improve interpretation of GWSS results. Finally, we argue that knowledge of potential selective agents improves interpretation of GWSS results and that new methods focused on correlations between environmental variables and genetic variation can help automate this approach. PMID:26224644

  6. A Genome Wide Linkage Scan for Cleft Lip and Palate and Dental Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; McHenry, Toby G.; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    We revisited 46 families with two or more siblings affected with an orofacial cleft that participated in previous genome wide studies and collected complete dental information. Genotypes from 392 microsatellite markers at 10 cM intervals were reanalyzed. We carried out four sets of genome wide analyses. First, we ran the analysis solely on the cleft status. Second, we assigned to any dental anomaly (tooth agenesis, supernumerary teeth, and microdontia) an affection status, and repeated the analysis. Third, we ran only the 19 families where the proband had a cleft with no dental anomalies. Finally, we ran only the 27 families that had a proband with cleft and additional dental anomalies outside the cleft area. Chromosomes (1, 2, 6, 8, 16, and 19) presented regions with LOD scores >2.0. Chromosome 19 has the most compelling results in our study. The LOD scores increased from 3.11 (in the scan of all 46 families with clefts as the only assigned affection status) to 3.91 when the 19 families whose probands present with no additional dental anomalies were studied, suggesting the interval 19p13.12-19q12 may contain a gene that contributes to clefts but not to dental anomalies. On the other hand, we found a LOD score of 3.00 in the 2q22.3 region when dental anomalies data were added to the analysis to define affection status. Our preliminary results support the hypothesis that some loci may contribute to both clefts and congenital dental anomalies. Also, adding dental anomalies information will provide new opportunities to map susceptibility loci for clefts. PMID:18442096

  7. A clone-based statistical test for localizing disease genes using genomic mismatch scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, C.G.S.; Woodward, A.; Smalley, S.L.

    1994-09-01

    Genomic mismatch scanning (GMS) is a technique for isolating regions of DNA that are identical-by-descent (IBD) within pairs of relatives. GMS selected data are hybridized to an ordered array of DNA, e.g., metaphase chromosomes, YACs, to identify and localize enhanced region(s) of IBD across pairs of relatives affected with a trait of interest. If the trait has a genetic basis, it is reasonable to assume that the trait gene(s) will be located in these enhanced regions. Our approach to localize these enhanced regions is based on the availability of an ordered array of clones, e.g., YACs, which span the entire human genome. We use an exact binomial order statistic to develop a test for enhanced regions of IBD in sets of clones 1 cM in size selected for being biologically independent (i.e., separated by 50 cM). The test statistic is the maximum proportion of IBD pairs selected from the independent YACs within a set. Thus far, we have defined the power of the test under the alternative hypothesis of a single gene conditional on the maximum proportion IBD being located at the disease locus. As an example, for 60 grandparent-grandchild pairs, the exact power of the test with alpha=0.001 is 0.83 when the relative risk of the disease is 4.0 and the maximum proportion is at the disease locus. This method can be used in small samples and is not dependent on any specific mapping function.

  8. AFLP and MS-AFLP analysis of the variation within saffron crocus (Crocus sativus L.) germplasm.

    PubMed

    Busconi, Matteo; Colli, Licia; Sánchez, Rosa Ana; Santaella, Marcela; De-Los-Mozos Pascual, Marcelino; Santana, Omar; Roldán, Marta; Fernández, José-Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The presence and extent of genetic variation in saffron crocus are still debated, as testified by several contradictory articles providing contrasting results about the monomorphism or less of the species. Remarkably, phenotypic variations have been frequently observed in the field, such variations are usually unstable and can change from one growing season to another. Considering that gene expression can be influenced both by genetic and epigenetic changes, epigenetics could be a plausible cause of the alternative phenotypes. In order to obtain new insights into this issue, we carried out a molecular marker analysis of 112 accessions from the World Saffron and Crocus Collection. The accessions were grown for at least three years in the same open field conditions. The same samples were analysed using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) and Methyl Sensitive AFLP in order to search for variation at the genetic (DNA sequence) and epigenetic (cytosine methylation) level. While the genetic variability was low (4.23% polymorphic peaks and twelve (12) effective different genotypes), the methyl sensitive analysis showed the presence of high epigenetic variability (33.57% polymorphic peaks and twenty eight (28) different effective epigenotypes). The pattern obtained by Factorial Correspondence Analysis of AFLP and, in particular, of MS-AFLP data was consistent with the geographical provenance of the accessions. Very interestingly, by focusing on Spanish accessions, it was observed that the distribution of the accessions in the Factorial Correspondence Analysis is not random but tends to reflect the geographical origin. Two clearly defined clusters grouping accessions from the West (Toledo and Ciudad Real) and accessions from the East (Cuenca and Teruel) were clearly recognised. PMID:25885113

  9. AFLP and MS-AFLP Analysis of the Variation within Saffron Crocus (Crocus sativus L.) Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Busconi, Matteo; Colli, Licia; Sánchez, Rosa Ana; Santaella, Marcela; De-Los-Mozos Pascual, Marcelino; Santana, Omar; Roldán, Marta; Fernández, José-Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The presence and extent of genetic variation in saffron crocus are still debated, as testified by several contradictory articles providing contrasting results about the monomorphism or less of the species. Remarkably, phenotypic variations have been frequently observed in the field, such variations are usually unstable and can change from one growing season to another. Considering that gene expression can be influenced both by genetic and epigenetic changes, epigenetics could be a plausible cause of the alternative phenotypes. In order to obtain new insights into this issue, we carried out a molecular marker analysis of 112 accessions from the World Saffron and Crocus Collection. The accessions were grown for at least three years in the same open field conditions. The same samples were analysed using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) and Methyl Sensitive AFLP in order to search for variation at the genetic (DNA sequence) and epigenetic (cytosine methylation) level. While the genetic variability was low (4.23% polymorphic peaks and twelve (12) effective different genotypes), the methyl sensitive analysis showed the presence of high epigenetic variability (33.57% polymorphic peaks and twenty eight (28) different effective epigenotypes). The pattern obtained by Factorial Correspondence Analysis of AFLP and, in particular, of MS-AFLP data was consistent with the geographical provenance of the accessions. Very interestingly, by focusing on Spanish accessions, it was observed that the distribution of the accessions in the Factorial Correspondence Analysis is not random but tends to reflect the geographical origin. Two clearly defined clusters grouping accessions from the West (Toledo and Ciudad Real) and accessions from the East (Cuenca and Teruel) were clearly recognised. PMID:25885113

  10. [Morphology and AFLP analysis of tetraploid plantlets of Atractylodes macrocephala].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-juan; Li, Ya-ting; Xiang, Zeng-xu

    2015-02-01

    In order to investigate the genetic basis of morphological variation of tetraploid plantlets of Atractylodes macrocephala, diploid plantlets were taken as experimental material, sterile filtration colchicine was used to soak 0.5-1.0 cm long buds. The difference between morphology and stomatal of diploid and tetraploid of A. macrocephala was compared, and genome polymorphism was explored by AFLP. The results showed that the buds dipped in 0.1% colchicine solution for 36 h was optimal conditions to induce tetraploid of A. macrocephala with induction rate of 32.0%. Morphological indexes such as leaf area index, leaf length and width, the density of stomas and the number of chloroplast of tetraploid were distinctly different from diploid. Four hundred and fifty-one bands ranging with 80-500 bp were amplified with 24 pairs of primers, the rate of polymorphism was 32.59%. These amplification sites of diploid were different from tetraploid of A. macrocephala, and the differences in morphology of them were reflected in the DNA polymorphism. PMID:26084160

  11. A population genomic scan in Chorthippus grasshoppers unveils previously unknown phenotypic divergence.

    PubMed

    Berdan, Emma L; Mazzoni, Camila J; Waurick, Isabelle; Roehr, Johannes T; Mayer, Frieder

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the genetics of speciation and the processes that drive it is a central goal of evolutionary biology. Grasshoppers of the Chorthippus species group differ strongly in calling song (and corresponding female preferences) but are exceedingly similar in other characteristics such as morphology. Here, we performed a population genomic scan on three Chorthippus species (Chorthippus biguttulus, C. mollis and C. brunneus) to gain insight into the genes and processes involved in divergence and speciation in this group. Using an RNA-seq approach, we examined functional variation between the species by calling SNPs for each of the three species pairs and using FST -based approaches to identify outliers. We found approximately 1% of SNPs in each comparison to be outliers. Between 37% and 40% of these outliers were nonsynonymous SNPs (as opposed to a global level of 17%) indicating that we recovered loci under selection. Among the outliers were several genes that may be involved in song production and hearing as well as genes involved in other traits such as food preferences and metabolism. Differences in food preferences between species were confirmed with a behavioural experiment. This indicates that multiple phenotypic differences implicating multiple evolutionary processes (sexual selection and natural selection) are present between the species. PMID:26081018

  12. A genome-wide linkage scan for iron phenotype quantitative trait loci: the HEIRS Family Study.

    PubMed

    Acton, R T; Snively, B M; Barton, J C; McLaren, C E; Adams, P C; Rich, S S; Eckfeldt, J H; Press, R D; Sholinsky, P; Leiendecker-Foster, C; McLaren, G D; Speechley, M R; Harris, E L; Dawkins, F W; Gordeuk, V R

    2007-06-01

    Iron overload phenotypes in persons with and without hemochromatosis are variable. To investigate this further, probands with hemochromatosis or evidence of elevated iron stores and their family members were recruited for a genome-wide linkage scan to identify potential quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to variation in transferrin saturation (TS), unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC), and serum ferritin (SF). Genotyping utilized 402 microsatellite markers with average spacing of 9 cM. A total of 943 individuals, 64% Caucasian, were evaluated from 174 families. After adjusting for age, gender, and race/ethnicity, there was evidence for linkage of UIBC to chromosome 4q logarithm of the odds (LOD) = 2.08, p = 0.001) and of UIBC (LOD = 9.52), TS (LOD = 4.78), and SF (LOD = 2.75) to the chromosome 6p region containing HFE (each p < 0.0001). After adjustments for HFE genotype and other covariates, there was evidence of linkage of SF to chromosome 16p (LOD = 2.63, p = 0.0007) and of UIBC to chromosome 5q (LOD = 2.12, p = 0.002) and to chromosome 17q (LOD = 2.19, p = 0.002). We conclude that these regions should be considered for fine mapping studies to identify QTL that contribute to variation in SF and UIBC. PMID:17539901

  13. Genome-wide association scan for five major dimensions of personality

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Antonio; Sanna, Serena; Uda, Manuela; Deiana, Barbara; Usala, Gianluca; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Scally, Matthew; Patriciu, Nicholas; Chen, Wei-Min; Distel, Marijn A; Slagboom, Eline P; Boomsma, Dorret I; Villafuerte, Sandra; Śliwerska, Elżbieta; Burmeister, Margit; Amin, Najaf; Janssens, A. Cecile J.W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Costa, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Personality traits are summarized by five broad dimensions with pervasive influences on major life outcomes, strong links to psychiatric disorders, and clear heritable components. To identify genetic variants associated with each of the five dimensions of personality we performed a genome wide association (GWA) scan of 3,972 individuals from a genetically isolated population within Sardinia, Italy. Based on analyses of 362,129 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) we found several strong signals within or near genes previously implicated in psychiatric disorders. They include the association of Neuroticism with SNAP25 (rs362584, P = 5 × 10−5), Extraversion with BDNF and two cadherin genes (CDH13 and CDH23; Ps < 5 × 10−5), Openness with CNTNAP2 (rs10251794, P = 3 × 10−5), Agreeableness with CLOCK (rs6832769, P = 9 × 10−6), and Conscientiousness with DYRK1A (rs2835731, P = 3 × 10−5). Effect sizes were small (less than 1% of variance), and most failed to replicate in the follow-up independent samples (N up to 3,903), though the association between Agreeableness and CLOCK was supported in two of three replication samples (overall P = 2 × 10−5). We infer that a large number of loci may influence personality traits and disorders, requiring larger sample sizes for the GWA approach to identify significant genetic variants. PMID:18957941

  14. Genome-wide Scanning and Characterization of Sorghum bicolor L. Heat Shock Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, M; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Kumar, S Anil; Srivastava, Rakesh K; Kishor, P B Kavi; Rao, D Manohar

    2015-08-01

    A genome-wide scanning of Sorghum bicolor resulted in the identification of 25 SbHsf genes. Phylogenetic analysis shows the ortholog genes that are clustered with only rice, representing a common ancestor. Promoter analysis revealed the identification of different cis-acting elements that are responsible for abiotic as well as biotic stresses. Hsf domains like DBD, NLS, NES, and AHA have been analyzed for their sequence similarity and functional characterization. Tissue specific expression patterns of Hsfs in different tissues like mature embryo, seedling, root, and panicle were studied using real-time PCR. While Hsfs4 and 22 are highly expressed in panicle, 4 and 9 are expressed in seedlings. Sorghum plants were exposed to different abiotic stress treatments but no expression of any Hsf was observed when seedlings were treated with ABA. High level expression of Hsf1 was noticed during high temperature as well as cold stresses, 4 and 6 during salt and 5, 6, 10, 13, 19, 23 and 25 during drought stress. This comprehensive analysis of SbHsf genes will provide an insight on how these genes are regulated in different tissues and also under different abiotic stresses and help to determine the functions of Hsfs during drought and temperature stress tolerance. PMID:27006630

  15. Genome-wide Scanning and Characterization of Sorghum bicolor L. Heat Shock Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraju, M.; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar; Kumar, S. Anil; Srivastava, Rakesh K.; Kishor, P. B. Kavi; Rao, D. Manohar

    2015-01-01

    A genome-wide scanning of Sorghum bicolor resulted in the identification of 25 SbHsf genes. Phylogenetic analysis shows the ortholog genes that are clustered with only rice, representing a common ancestor. Promoter analysis revealed the identification of different cis-acting elements that are responsible for abiotic as well as biotic stresses. Hsf domains like DBD, NLS, NES, and AHA have been analyzed for their sequence similarity and functional characterization. Tissue specific expression patterns of Hsfs in different tissues like mature embryo, seedling, root, and panicle were studied using real-time PCR. While Hsfs4 and 22 are highly expressed in panicle, 4 and 9 are expressed in seedlings. Sorghum plants were exposed to different abiotic stress treatments but no expression of any Hsf was observed when seedlings were treated with ABA. High level expression of Hsf1 was noticed during high temperature as well as cold stresses, 4 and 6 during salt and 5, 6, 10, 13, 19, 23 and 25 during drought stress. This comprehensive analysis of SbHsf genes will provide an insight on how these genes are regulated in different tissues and also under different abiotic stresses and help to determine the functions of Hsfs during drought and temperature stress tolerance. PMID:27006630

  16. Whole genome association scan for genetic polymorphisms influencing information processing speed

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Michelle; Hansell, Narelle K.; Lahti, Jari; Davies, Gail; Medland, Sarah E.; Räikkönen, Katri; Tenesa, Albert; Widen, Elisabeth; McGhee, Kevin A.; Palotie, Aarno; Liewald, David; Porteous, David J.; Starr, John M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Deary, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    Processing speed is an important cognitive function that is compromised in psychiatric illness (e.g., schizophrenia, depression) and old age; it shares genetic background with complex cognition (e.g., working memory, reasoning). To find genes influencing speed we performed a genome-wide association scan in up to three cohorts: Brisbane (mean age 16 years; N = 1659); LBC1936 (mean age 70 years, N = 992); LBC1921 (mean age 82 years, N = 307), and; HBCS (mean age 64 years, N = 1080). Meta-analysis of the common measures highlighted various suggestively significant (p < 1.21 × 10−5) SNPs and plausible candidate genes (e.g., TRIB3). A biological pathways analysis of the speed factor identified two common pathways from the KEGG database (cell junction, focal adhesion) in two cohorts, while a pathway analysis linked to the GO database revealed common pathways across pairs of speed measures (e.g., receptor binding, cellular metabolic process). These highlighted genes and pathways will be able to inform future research, including results for psychiatric disease. PMID:21130836

  17. Scanning the effects of ethyl methanesulfonate on the whole genome of Lotus japonicus using second-generation sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Yusoff, Nur Fatihah; Ruperao, Pradeep; Tomoyoshi, Nurain Emylia; Edwards, David; Gresshoff, Peter M; Biswas, Bandana; Batley, Jacqueline

    2015-04-01

    Genetic structure can be altered by chemical mutagenesis, which is a common method applied in molecular biology and genetics. Second-generation sequencing provides a platform to reveal base alterations occurring in the whole genome due to mutagenesis. A model legume, Lotus japonicus ecotype Miyakojima, was chemically mutated with alkylating ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) for the scanning of DNA lesions throughout the genome. Using second-generation sequencing, two individually mutated third-generation progeny (M3, named AM and AS) were sequenced and analyzed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms and reveal the effects of EMS on nucleotide sequences in these mutant genomes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found in every 208 kb (AS) and 202 kb (AM) with a bias mutation of G/C-to-A/T changes at low percentage. Most mutations were intergenic. The mutation spectrum of the genomes was comparable in their individual chromosomes; however, each mutated genome has unique alterations, which are useful to identify causal mutations for their phenotypic changes. The data obtained demonstrate that whole genomic sequencing is applicable as a high-throughput tool to investigate genomic changes due to mutagenesis. The identification of these single-point mutations will facilitate the identification of phenotypically causative mutations in EMS-mutated germplasm. PMID:25660167

  18. Conjugation-specific small RNAs in Tetrahymena have predicted properties of scan (scn) RNAs involved in genome rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Kazufumi; Gorovsky, Martin A.

    2004-01-01

    We proposed a scan-RNA model for genome rearrangement based on finding small RNAs that hybridized preferentially to micronuclear-specific sequences and on the properties of Twi1p, a PPD protein required for both sequence elimination and small RNA accumulation in Tetrahymena. Here we show that Twi1p interacts with the small RNAs in both the old and the developing macronucleus, and is required for their stability. We show that the specificity of the small RNAs for micronuclear-limited sequences increases during conjugation. These results indicate that the small RNAs observed in conjugating cells have the properties predicted for scan RNAs. PMID:15314029

  19. Identification of novel susceptibility loci for Guam neurodegenerative disease: challenges of genome scans in genetic isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sieh, Weiva; Choi, Yoonha; Chapman, Nicola H.; Craig, Ulla-Katrina; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Garruto, Ralph M.; Bird, Thomas D.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Wijsman, Ellen M.

    2009-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism–dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease found in the Chamorro people of Guam and other Pacific Island populations. The etiology is unknown, although both genetic and environmental factors appear important. To identify loci for ALS/PDC, we conducted both genome-wide linkage and association analyses, using approximately 400 microsatellite markers, in the largest sample assembled to date, comprising a nearly complete sample of all living and previously sampled deceased cases. A single, large, complex pedigree was ascertained from a village on Guam, with smaller families and a case–control sample ascertained from the rest of Guam by population-based neurological screening and archival review. We found significant evidence for two regions with novel ALS/PDC loci on chromosome 12 and supportive evidence for the involvement of the MAPT region on chromosome 17. D12S1617 on 12p gave the strongest evidence of linkage (maximum LOD score, Zmax = 4.03) in our initial scan, with additional support in the complete case–control sample in the form of evidence of allelic association at this marker and another nearby marker. D12S79 on 12q also provided significant evidence of linkage (Zmax = 3.14) with support from flanking markers. Our results suggest that ALS/PDC may be influenced by as many as three loci, while illustrating challenges that are intrinsic in genetic analyses of isolated populations, as well as analytical strategies that are useful in this context. Elucidation of the genetic basis of ALS/PDC should improve our understanding of related neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, frontotemporal dementia and ALS. PMID:19567404

  20. Genomic Scan Reveals Loci under Altitude Adaptation in Tibetan and Dahe Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Yabin; He, Xiaohong; Zhao, Qianjun; Luan, Yizhao; Guan, Weijun; Rao, Shaoqi; Ma, Yuehui

    2014-01-01

    High altitude environments are of particular interest in the studies of local adaptation as well as their implications in physiology and clinical medicine in human. Some Chinese pig breeds, such as Tibetan pig (TBP) that is well adapted to the high altitude and Dahe pig (DHP) that dwells at the moderate altitude, provide ideal materials to study local adaptation to altitudes. Yet, it is still short of in-depth analysis and understanding of the genetic adaptation to high altitude in the two pig populations. In this study we conducted a genomic scan for selective sweeps using FST to identify genes showing evidence of local adaptations in TBP and DHP, with Wuzhishan pig (WZSP) as the low-altitude reference. Totally, we identified 12 specific selective genes (CCBE1, F2RL1, AGGF1, ZFPM2, IL2, FGF5, PLA2G4A, ADAMTS9, NRBF2, JMJD1C, VEGFC and ADAM19) for TBP and six (OGG1, FOXM, FLT3, RTEL1, CRELD1 and RHOG) for DHP. In addition, six selective genes (VPS13A, GNA14, GDAP1, PARP8, FGF10 and ADAMTS16) were shared by the two pig breeds. Among these selective genes, three (VEGFC, FGF10 and ADAMTS9) were previously reported to be linked to the local adaptation to high altitudes in pigs, while many others were newly identified by this study. Further bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that majority of these selective signatures have some biological functions relevant to the altitude adaptation, for examples, response to hypoxia, development of blood vessels, DNA repair and several hematological involvements. These results suggest that the local adaptation to high altitude environments is sophisticated, involving numerous genes and multiple biological processes, and the shared selective signatures by the two pig breeds may provide an effective avenue to identify the common adaptive mechanisms to different altitudes. PMID:25329542

  1. Comparison of DNA methylation patterns among mouse cell lines by restriction landmark genomic scanning.

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, J; Hirose, K; Fushiki, S; Hirotsune, S; Ozawa, N; Hara, A; Hayashizaki, Y; Watanabe, S

    1994-01-01

    Restriction landmark genomic scanning (RLGS) is a novel method which enables us to simultaneously visualize a large number of loci as two-dimensional gel spots. By this method, the status of DNA methylation can efficiently be determined by monitoring the appearance or disappearance of spots by using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme. In the present study, using RLGS with NotI, we examined, in comparison with a brain RLGS profile, the status of DNA methylation of more than 900 loci among three types of mouse cell lines: the embryonal carcinoma cell line P19, the stable mesenchymal cell line 10T1/2, and our established neuroepithelial (EM) cell lines. We found that the relative numbers of RLGS spots which appeared were less than 3.3% of those surveyed in all cell lines examined. However, 5 to 14% of spots disappeared, the numbers increasing with an increase in the length of the culture period, and many spots were commonly lost in 10T1/2 and in three EM cell lines. Thus, for these cell lines, many more spots disappeared than appeared. However, the numbers of spots disappearing and appearing were well balanced, and the ratio in P19 cells was almost equal to that in liver cells in vivo. These RLGS experimental observations suggested that permanent cell lines such as 10T1/2 are hypermethylated and that our newly established EM cell lines are also becoming heavily methylated at common loci. On the other hand, methylation and demethylation seem to be balanced in P19 cells in a manner similar to that in in vivo liver tissue. Images PMID:7935456

  2. Extension of Type 2 Diabetes Genome-Wide Association Scan Results in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Allan F.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; McAteer, Jarred B.; Saxena, Richa; Pollin, Toni I.; Franks, Paul W.; Hanson, Robert L.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Knowler, William C.; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE— Genome-wide association scans (GWASs) have identified novel diabetes-associated genes. We evaluated how these variants impact diabetes incidence, quantitative glycemic traits, and response to preventive interventions in 3,548 subjects at high risk of type 2 diabetes enrolled in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which examined the effects of lifestyle intervention, metformin, and troglitazone versus placebo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— We genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near diabetes-associated loci, including EXT2, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, IGF2BP2, HHEX, LOC387761, and SLC30A8 in DPP participants and performed Cox regression analyses using genotype, intervention, and their interactions as predictors of diabetes incidence. We evaluated their effect on insulin resistance and secretion at 1 year. RESULTS— None of the selected SNPs were associated with increased diabetes incidence in this population. After adjustments for ethnicity, baseline insulin secretion was lower in subjects with the risk genotype at HHEX rs1111875 (P = 0.01); there were no significant differences in baseline insulin sensitivity. Both at baseline and at 1 year, subjects with the risk genotype at LOC387761 had paradoxically increased insulin secretion; adjustment for self-reported ethnicity abolished these differences. In ethnicity-adjusted analyses, we noted a nominal differential improvement in β-cell function for carriers of the protective genotype at CDKN2A/B after 1 year of troglitazone treatment (P = 0.01) and possibly lifestyle modification (P = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS— We were unable to replicate the GWAS findings regarding diabetes risk in the DPP. We did observe genotype associations with differences in baseline insulin secretion at the HHEX locus and a possible pharmacogenetic interaction at CDKNA2/B. PMID:18544707

  3. A genome scan for QTL affecting resistance to Haemonchus contortus in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sallé, G; Jacquiet, P; Gruner, L; Cortet, J; Sauvé, C; Prévot, F; Grisez, C; Bergeaud, J P; Schibler, L; Tircazes, A; François, D; Pery, C; Bouvier, F; Thouly, J C; Brunel, J C; Legarra, A; Elsen, J M; Bouix, J; Rupp, R; Moreno, C R

    2012-12-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are one of the main health issues in sheep breeding. To identify loci affecting the resistance to Haemonchus contortus, a genome scan was carried out using 1,275 Romane × Martinik Black Belly backcross lambs. The entire population was challenged with Haemonchus contortus in 2 consecutive experimental infections, and fecal egg counts (FEC) and packed cell volumes were measured. A subgroup of 332 lambs with extreme FEC was necropsied to determine the total worm burden, length of female worms, sex ratio in the worm population, abomasal pH, and serum and mucosal G immunoglobulins (IgG) responses. Pepsinogen concentration was measured in another subset of 229 lambs. For QTL detection, 160 microsatellite markers were used as well as the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip that provided 42,469 SNP markers after quality control. Linkage, association, and joint linkage and association analyses were performed with the QTLMAP software. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was estimated within each pure breed, and association analyses were carried out either considering or not the breed origin of the haplotypes. Four QTL regions on sheep chromosomes (OAR)5, 12, 13, and 21 were identified as key players among many other QTL with small to moderate effects. A QTL on OAR21 affecting pepsinogen concentration exactly matched the pepsinogen (PGA5) locus. A 10-Mbp region affecting FEC after the 1st and 2nd infections was found on OAR12. The SNP markers outperformed microsatellites in the linkage analysis. Taking advantage of the LD helped to refine the locations of the QTL mapped on OAR5 and 13. PMID:22767094

  4. Evidence for multiple loci from a genome scan of autism kindreds.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, G D; Dawson, G; Sung, Y J; Estes, A; Munson, J; Rosenthal, E; Rothstein, J; Flodman, P; Smith, M; Coon, H; Leong, L; Yu, C-E; Stodgell, C; Rodier, P M; Spence, M A; Minshew, N; McMahon, W M; Wijsman, E M

    2006-11-01

    We performed a genome-wide linkage scan using highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. To minimize genetic heterogeneity, we focused on sibpairs meeting the strict diagnosis of autism. In our primary analyses, we observed a strong linkage signal (P=0.0006, 133.16 cM) on chromosome 7q at a location coincident with other linkage studies. When a more relaxed diagnostic criteria was used, linkage evidence at this location was weaker (P=0.01). The sample was stratified into families with only male affected subjects (MO) and families with at least one female affected subject (FC). The strongest signal unique to the MO group was on chromosome 11 (P=0.0009, 83.82 cM), and for the FC group on chromosome 4 (P=0.002, 111.41 cM). We also divided the sample into regression positive and regression negative families. The regression-positive group showed modest linkage signals on chromosomes 10 (P=0.003, 0 cM) and 14 (P=0.005, 104.2 cM). More significant peaks were seen in the regression negative group on chromosomes 3 (P=0.0002, 140.06 cM) and 4 (P=0.0005, 111.41 cM). Finally, we used language acquisition data as a quantitative trait in our linkage analysis and observed a chromosome 9 signal (149.01 cM) of P=0.00006 and an empirical P-value of 0.0008 at the same location. Our work provides strong conformation for an autism locus on 7q and suggestive evidence for several other chromosomal locations. Diagnostic specificity and detailed analysis of the autism phenotype is critical for identifying autism loci. PMID:16880825

  5. A genome scan for type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci in a genetically isolated population.

    PubMed

    Permutt, M A; Wasson, J C; Suarez, B K; Lin, J; Thomas, J; Meyer, J; Lewitzky, S; Rennich, J S; Parker, A; DuPrat, L; Maruti, S; Chayen, S; Glaser, B

    2001-03-01

    A total of 896 individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent were ascertained in Israel from 267 multiplex families, including 472 sib-pairs affected with type 2 diabetes. A genome-wide scan with average marker spacing of 9.5 cM revealed five regions on four chromosomes (4q, 8q, 14q, and 20q) that exhibited nominal evidence for linkage (P < 0.05). The highest observed nonparametric linkage Z score was 2.41 (equivalent to a logarithm of odds score of 1.26) at marker D4S1501. A maximal signal, with a Z score of 2.05, was observed on chromosome 20 near marker D20S195, and another on 20p near marker D20S103 (Z 1.80). A single marker on chromosome 8 (D8S593) and two adjacent markers on chromosome 14 (D14S749 and D14S605) also attained evidence of linkage. To explore the hypothesis that the signals on chromosomes 4 and 20 are differentially attributable to variation in BMI or age of onset, an ordered subset analysis was conducted. This analysis revealed that only when the families were ranked by BMI (in increasing order) did a subset attain nominal significance, and only for chromosome 4. The findings reported here lend credence to the hypothesis, now supported by four studies of Caucasian populations and most recently by a combined analysis of 1,852 pedigrees, that a type 2 diabetes susceptibility locus resides on chromosome 20q. This population, because of its unique genetic attributes, may facilitate identification of this and other genes contributing to type 2 diabetes. PMID:11246891

  6. Analysis of genetic variation within clonal lineages of grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch) using AFLP fingerprinting and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vorwerk, S; Forneck, A

    2007-07-01

    Two AFLP fingerprinting methods were employed to estimate the potential of AFLP fingerprints for the detection of genetic diversity within single founder lineages of grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch). Eight clonal lineages, reared under controlled conditions in a greenhouse and reproducing asexually throughout a minimum of 15 generations, were monitored and mutations were scored as polymorphisms between the founder individual and individuals of succeeding generations. Genetic variation was detected within all lineages, from early generations on. Six to 15 polymorphic loci (from a total of 141 loci) were detected within the lineages, making up 4.3% of the total amount of genetic variation. The presence of contaminating extra-genomic sequences (e.g., viral material, bacteria, or ingested chloroplast DNA) was excluded as a source of intraclonal variation. Sequencing of 37 selected polymorphic bands confirmed their origin in mostly noncoding regions of the grape phylloxera genome. AFLP techniques were revealed to be powerful for the identification of reproducible banding patterns within clonal lineages. PMID:17893744

  7. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A.; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J.; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10−8 to 3 × 10−119), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair. PMID:26926045

  8. A genome-wide association scan in admixed Latin Americans identifies loci influencing facial and scalp hair features.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fontanil, Tania; Cal, Santiago; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Chacón-Duque, Juan-Camilo; Al-Saadi, Farah; Johansson, Jeanette A; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; López-Otín, Carlos; Tobin, Desmond J; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan in over 6,000 Latin Americans for features of scalp hair (shape, colour, greying, balding) and facial hair (beard thickness, monobrow, eyebrow thickness). We found 18 signals of association reaching genome-wide significance (P values 5 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-119)), including 10 novel associations. These include novel loci for scalp hair shape and balding, and the first reported loci for hair greying, monobrow, eyebrow and beard thickness. A newly identified locus influencing hair shape includes a Q30R substitution in the Protease Serine S1 family member 53 (PRSS53). We demonstrate that this enzyme is highly expressed in the hair follicle, especially the inner root sheath, and that the Q30R substitution affects enzyme processing and secretion. The genome regions associated with hair features are enriched for signals of selection, consistent with proposals regarding the evolution of human hair. PMID:26926045

  9. The relative power of genome scans to detect local adaptation depends on sampling design and statistical method.

    PubMed

    Lotterhos, Katie E; Whitlock, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    Although genome scans have become a popular approach towards understanding the genetic basis of local adaptation, the field still does not have a firm grasp on how sampling design and demographic history affect the performance of genome scans on complex landscapes. To explore these issues, we compared 20 different sampling designs in equilibrium (i.e. island model and isolation by distance) and nonequilibrium (i.e. range expansion from one or two refugia) demographic histories in spatially heterogeneous environments. We simulated spatially complex landscapes, which allowed us to exploit local maxima and minima in the environment in 'pair' and 'transect' sampling strategies. We compared F(ST) outlier and genetic-environment association (GEA) methods for each of two approaches that control for population structure: with a covariance matrix or with latent factors. We show that while the relative power of two methods in the same category (F(ST) or GEA) depended largely on the number of individuals sampled, overall GEA tests had higher power in the island model and F(ST) had higher power under isolation by distance. In the refugia models, however, these methods varied in their power to detect local adaptation at weakly selected loci. At weakly selected loci, paired sampling designs had equal or higher power than transect or random designs to detect local adaptation. Our results can inform sampling designs for studies of local adaptation and have important implications for the interpretation of genome scans based on landscape data. PMID:25648189

  10. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of…

  11. A genome-wide scan of selective sweeps and association mapping of fruit traits using microsatellite markers in watermelon.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Umesh K; Abburi, Lavanya; Abburi, Venkata Lakshmi; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Cantrell, Robert; Vajja, Venkata Gopinath; Reddy, Rishi; Tomason, Yan R; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd C; Nimmakayala, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Our genetic diversity study uses microsatellites of known map position to estimate genome level population structure and linkage disequilibrium, and to identify genomic regions that have undergone selection during watermelon domestication and improvement. Thirty regions that showed evidence of selective sweep were scanned for the presence of candidate genes using the watermelon genome browser (www.icugi.org). We localized selective sweeps in intergenic regions, close to the promoters, and within the exons and introns of various genes. This study provided an evidence of convergent evolution for the presence of diverse ecotypes with special reference to American and European ecotypes. Our search for location of linked markers in the whole-genome draft sequence revealed that BVWS00358, a GA repeat microsatellite, is the GAGA type transcription factor located in the 5' untranslated regions of a structure and insertion element that expresses a Cys2His2 Zinc finger motif, with presumed biological processes related to chitin response and transcriptional regulation. In addition, BVWS01708, an ATT repeat microsatellite, located in the promoter of a DTW domain-containing protein (Cla002761); and 2 other simple sequence repeats that association mapping link to fruit length and rind thickness. PMID:25425675

  12. A Genome-Wide Scan of Selective Sweeps and Association Mapping of Fruit Traits Using Microsatellite Markers in Watermelon

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Umesh K.; Abburi, Lavanya; Abburi, Venkata Lakshmi; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Cantrell, Robert; Vajja, Venkata Gopinath; Reddy, Rishi; Tomason, Yan R.; Levi, Amnon; Wehner, Todd C.; Nimmakayala, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Our genetic diversity study uses microsatellites of known map position to estimate genome level population structure and linkage disequilibrium, and to identify genomic regions that have undergone selection during watermelon domestication and improvement. Thirty regions that showed evidence of selective sweep were scanned for the presence of candidate genes using the watermelon genome browser (www.icugi.org). We localized selective sweeps in intergenic regions, close to the promoters, and within the exons and introns of various genes. This study provided an evidence of convergent evolution for the presence of diverse ecotypes with special reference to American and European ecotypes. Our search for location of linked markers in the whole-genome draft sequence revealed that BVWS00358, a GA repeat microsatellite, is the GAGA type transcription factor located in the 5′ untranslated regions of a structure and insertion element that expresses a Cys2His2 Zinc finger motif, with presumed biological processes related to chitin response and transcriptional regulation. In addition, BVWS01708, an ATT repeat microsatellite, located in the promoter of a DTW domain-containing protein (Cla002761); and 2 other simple sequence repeats that association mapping link to fruit length and rind thickness. PMID:25425675

  13. First genetic linkage map for the mud crab (Scylla paramamosain) constructed using microsatellite and AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Ma, H Y; Li, S J; Feng, N N; Ma, C Y; Wang, W; Chen, W; Ma, L B

    2016-01-01

    The mud crab (Scylla paramamosain) is of economic importance for the fisheries and aquaculture industry in China. In this study, we constructed the first genetic linkage map for this species using microsatellite and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. The map consisted of 65 linkage groups, including 34 triplets and 9 doublets. A total of 212 molecular markers were mapped, including 60 microsatellites and 152 AFLP markers. The linkage groups ranged from 7 to 102.5 cM and covered 2746.4 cM in length. The mean length was 42.3 cM per linkage group, and the mean spacing was 18.68 cM. The genome size was estimated to be 5539.62 cM, with 50% coverage by the present map. Moreover, we reported 5 transcriptome-derived polymorphic microsatellite markers and characterized their polymorphism in a first-generation family. This study will facilitate studies on high-density maps and molecular marker-assisted selection in S. paramamosain and related crustacean species. PMID:27323059

  14. Identification of Genes Related to Paulownia Witches’ Broom by AFLP and MSAP

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xibing; Fan, Guoqiang; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Dong, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is believed to play important roles in regulating gene expression in plant growth and development. Paulownia witches’ broom (PaWB) infection has been reported to be related to gene expression changes in paulownia plantlets. To determine whether DNA methylation is associated with gene expression changes in response to phytoplasma, we investigated variations in genomic DNA sequence and methylation in PaWB plantlets treated with methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) techniques, respectively. The results indicated that PaWB seedings recovered a normal morphology after treatment with more than 15 mg·L−1 MMS. PaWB infection did not cause changes of the paulownia DNA sequence at the AFLP level; However, DNA methylation levels and patterns were altered. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that three of the methylated genes were up-regulated and three were down-regulated in the MMS-treated PaWB plantlets that had regained healthy morphology. These six genes might be involved in transcriptional regulation, plant defense, signal transduction and energy. The possible roles of these genes in PaWB are discussed. The results showed that changes of DNA methylation altered gene expression levels, and that MSAP might help identify genes related to PaWB. PMID:25196603

  15. Genetic Diversity in Musa acuminata Colla and Musa balbisiana Colla and some of their natural hybrids using AFLP Markers.

    PubMed

    Ude, G.; Pillay, M.; Nwakanma, D.; Tenkouano, A.

    2002-06-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships were assessed in 28 accessions of Musa acuminata (AA) Colla and Musa balbisiana (BB) Colla, and some of their natural hybrids, using the amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) technique. Fifteen AFLP +3 primer pairs produced 527 polymorphic bands among the accessions. Neighbor-joining and principal co-ordinate (PCO) analyses using Jaccard's similarity coefficient produced four major clusters that closely corresponded with the genome composition of the accessions (AA, BB, AAB and ABB). The AFLP data distinguished between the wild diploid accessions and suggested new subspecies relationships in the M. acuminata complex that are different from those based on morphological data. The data suggested that there are three subspecies within the M. acuminata complex (ssp. burmannica Simmonds, malaccensis Simmonds, and microcarpa Simmonds). 'Tjau Lagada' (ssp. microcarpa), 'Truncata' [ssp truncata (Ridl.) Shepherd] and 'SF247' [ssp. banksii (F.Muell) Simmonds] clustered very closely with 'Gros Michel' and 'Km 5', indicating that more than one M. acuminata subspecies may be involved in the origin of triploid AAA bananas. 'Calcutta 4' (ssp. burmannicoides De Langhe & Devreux) and 'Long Tavoy' (ssp. burmannica) were closely related and could be together in the same subspecies. This study also showed that there is much more genetic diversity within M. balbisiana that was split into two groups: (1) 'I-63' and 'HND' and (2) 'Los Banos', 'MPL' (Montpellier), '10852', 'Singapuri', 'Etikehel', and 'Butohan 1' as the other. PMID:12582577

  16. A bi-dimensional genome scan for prolificacy traits in pigs shows the existence of multiple epistatic QTL

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prolificacy is the most important trait influencing the reproductive efficiency of pig production systems. The low heritability and sex-limited expression of prolificacy have hindered to some extent the improvement of this trait through artificial selection. Moreover, the relative contributions of additive, dominant and epistatic QTL to the genetic variance of pig prolificacy remain to be defined. In this work, we have undertaken this issue by performing one-dimensional and bi-dimensional genome scans for number of piglets born alive (NBA) and total number of piglets born (TNB) in a three generation Iberian by Meishan F2 intercross. Results The one-dimensional genome scan for NBA and TNB revealed the existence of two genome-wide highly significant QTL located on SSC13 (P < 0.001) and SSC17 (P < 0.01) with effects on both traits. This relative paucity of significant results contrasted very strongly with the wide array of highly significant epistatic QTL that emerged in the bi-dimensional genome-wide scan analysis. As much as 18 epistatic QTL were found for NBA (four at P < 0.01 and five at P < 0.05) and TNB (three at P < 0.01 and six at P < 0.05), respectively. These epistatic QTL were distributed in multiple genomic regions, which covered 13 of the 18 pig autosomes, and they had small individual effects that ranged between 3 to 4% of the phenotypic variance. Different patterns of interactions (a × a, a × d, d × a and d × d) were found amongst the epistatic QTL pairs identified in the current work. Conclusions The complex inheritance of prolificacy traits in pigs has been evidenced by identifying multiple additive (SSC13 and SSC17), dominant and epistatic QTL in an Iberian × Meishan F2 intercross. Our results demonstrate that a significant fraction of the phenotypic variance of swine prolificacy traits can be attributed to first-order gene-by-gene interactions emphasizing that the phenotypic effects of alleles might be strongly modulated by the

  17. The Application of Restriction Landmark Genome Scanning Method for Surveillance of Non-Mendelian Inheritance in F1 Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Takamiya, Tomoko; Hosobuchi, Saeko; Noguchi, Tomotsugu; Paterson, Andrew H.; Iijima, Hiroshi; Murakami, Yasufumi; Okuizumi, Hisato

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed inheritance of DNA methylation in reciprocal F1 hybrids (subsp. japonica cv. Nipponbare × subsp. indica cv. Kasalath) of rice (Oryza sativa L.) using restriction landmark genome scanning (RLGS), and detected differing RLGS spots between the parents and reciprocal F1 hybrids. MspI/HpaII restriction sites in the DNA from these different spots were suspected to be heterozygously methylated in the Nipponbare parent. These spots segregated in F1 plants, but did not segregate in selfed progeny of Nipponbare, showing non-Mendelian inheritance of the methylation status. As a result of RT-PCR and sequencing, a specific allele of the gene nearest to the methylated sites was expressed in reciprocal F1 plants, showing evidence of biased allelic expression. These results show the applicability of RLGS for scanning of non-Mendelian inheritance of DNA methylation and biased allelic expression. PMID:20148066

  18. Genome wide instability scanning in chewing-tobacco associated oral cancer using inter simple sequence repeat PCR.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rekha; Kulkarni, Viraj; Saranath, Dhananjaya

    2004-11-01

    Genomic instability plays a major role in cancer, facilitating tumour progression and tumour heterogeneity. Inter simple sequence repeat PCR (ISSR-PCR) is a sensitive tool for detection of whole genome scanning. In fifteen oral cancer patients, using tumor tissue and adjacent normal tissue DNA, we investigated genomic instability regions using ISSR-PCR assay. The genomic fragments were cloned, sequenced and identified. Two-anchored dinucleotide repeat primers, (CA)(8)A/GG and (CA)(8)A/GC/T, were used in the study. About 40-50 fragments were observed on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with 25 distinct fragments of less than 2 kb. The electrophoretic pattern highlighted several distinct fragments in tumor adjacent normal tissues. The distinct fragments of 258, 325, 430, 440, 600 and 900 bp sizes using (CA)(8)A/GG primer, and 300, 475, 675 and 800 bp using (CA)(8)A/GC/T primers, in the normal tissues showed partial (>50%) or complete loss in multiple tumor tissues. These fragments were eluted from the gel, cloned in pMos Blue vector and subjected to nucleotide sequencing. Insilico analysis defined the specific genomic sequences, given as follows: RP11-399D2 () on chromosome (chr)4; RP1-39J2 (), NKp44RG () and RP11-518I13 () on chr6; NC-T-2 () on chr7; RP11-586K2 () and RP11-495O10 () on chr8; RP11-101K10 () on chr9; R-794A8 () on chr14; and RP11-679B19 () on chr16. The sequences of our clones have been submitted to NCBI gene bank, accession numbers to , and . The Genomic Instability Index was calculated and ranged from 6% to 28.5% (median 12%) in the oral cancer samples, excluding one case where genomic instability was not observed. Thus, our results indicate presence of widespread genomic alterations in chewing-tobacco associated oral cancers. PMID:15509495

  19. Genome-Wide Scans for Delineation of Candidate Genes Regulating Seed-Protein Content in Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Hari D; Bajaj, Deepak; Narnoliya, Laxmi; Das, Shouvik; Kumar, Vinod; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-01-01

    Identification of potential genes/alleles governing complex seed-protein content (SPC) is essential in marker-assisted breeding for quality trait improvement of chickpea. Henceforth, the present study utilized an integrated genomics-assisted breeding strategy encompassing trait association analysis, selective genotyping in traditional bi-parental mapping population and differential expression profiling for the first-time to understand the complex genetic architecture of quantitative SPC trait in chickpea. For GWAS (genome-wide association study), high-throughput genotyping information of 16376 genome-based SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) discovered from a structured population of 336 sequenced desi and kabuli accessions [with 150-200 kb LD (linkage disequilibrium) decay] was utilized. This led to identification of seven most effective genomic loci (genes) associated [10-20% with 41% combined PVE (phenotypic variation explained)] with SPC trait in chickpea. Regardless of the diverse desi and kabuli genetic backgrounds, a comparable level of association potential of the identified seven genomic loci with SPC trait was observed. Five SPC-associated genes were validated successfully in parental accessions and homozygous individuals of an intra-specific desi RIL (recombinant inbred line) mapping population (ICC 12299 × ICC 4958) by selective genotyping. The seed-specific expression, including differential up-regulation (>four fold) of six SPC-associated genes particularly in accessions, parents and homozygous individuals of the aforementioned mapping population with a high level of contrasting SPC (21-22%) was evident. Collectively, the integrated genomic approach delineated diverse naturally occurring novel functional SNP allelic variants in six potential candidate genes regulating SPC trait in chickpea. Of these, a non-synonymous SNP allele-carrying zinc finger transcription factor gene exhibiting strong association with SPC trait was found to be the most

  20. Genome-Wide Scans for Delineation of Candidate Genes Regulating Seed-Protein Content in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Bajaj, Deepak; Narnoliya, Laxmi; Das, Shouvik; Kumar, Vinod; Gowda, C. L. L.; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of potential genes/alleles governing complex seed-protein content (SPC) is essential in marker-assisted breeding for quality trait improvement of chickpea. Henceforth, the present study utilized an integrated genomics-assisted breeding strategy encompassing trait association analysis, selective genotyping in traditional bi-parental mapping population and differential expression profiling for the first-time to understand the complex genetic architecture of quantitative SPC trait in chickpea. For GWAS (genome-wide association study), high-throughput genotyping information of 16376 genome-based SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) discovered from a structured population of 336 sequenced desi and kabuli accessions [with 150–200 kb LD (linkage disequilibrium) decay] was utilized. This led to identification of seven most effective genomic loci (genes) associated [10–20% with 41% combined PVE (phenotypic variation explained)] with SPC trait in chickpea. Regardless of the diverse desi and kabuli genetic backgrounds, a comparable level of association potential of the identified seven genomic loci with SPC trait was observed. Five SPC-associated genes were validated successfully in parental accessions and homozygous individuals of an intra-specific desi RIL (recombinant inbred line) mapping population (ICC 12299 × ICC 4958) by selective genotyping. The seed-specific expression, including differential up-regulation (>four fold) of six SPC-associated genes particularly in accessions, parents and homozygous individuals of the aforementioned mapping population with a high level of contrasting SPC (21–22%) was evident. Collectively, the integrated genomic approach delineated diverse naturally occurring novel functional SNP allelic variants in six potential candidate genes regulating SPC trait in chickpea. Of these, a non-synonymous SNP allele-carrying zinc finger transcription factor gene exhibiting strong association with SPC trait was found to be the most

  1. Genome Wide Scan for Loci influencing Warner Bratzler Shear Force in Five Bos taurus Breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic tests for beef tenderness are currently limited to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within µ-calpain (CAPN1) and calpastatin (CAST) and explain little of the phenotypic variation in Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF). We performed a genome-wide association study for WBSF by genotyping...

  2. Genome-wide linkage scan of quantitative traits representing symptom dimensions in multiplex schizophrenia families.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seunghyong; Won, Hong-Hee; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Jong-Won; Park, Taesung; Cho, Eun-Young; Cho, Youngah; Park, Dong Yeon; Lee, Yu-Sang; Kwon, Jun Soo; Hong, Kyung Sue

    2013-12-30

    Symptom dimensions of schizophrenia are likely to be the intermediate phenotypes under the control of disease-susceptibility genes, or separate traits related to disease-modifier genes. This study aimed to identify chromosomal loci linked to symptom dimensions of schizophrenia through genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage analysis. The study subjects consisted of 56 families with 183 members including 123 affected individuals. Symptom evaluations were performed on lifetime basis. Through principal component factor analysis, eight quantitative phenotypes representing symptom dimensions were identified. Genotyping was done for 6008 SNP markers, and genome-wide QTL linkage analysis was performed. No symptom dimension showed a significant linkage attaining genome-wide empirical thresholds. We observed seven regions yielding linkage signals attaining genome-wide empirical thresholds for suggestive linkage (NPL Z score = 2.78-3.49); chromosome 15q26.1 for 'non-paranoid delusion factor', 2p24.3 and 7q31.1 for 'prodromal impairment factor', 1q32.1, 9p21.3, and 9q31.2 for 'negative symptom factor', and 10p13 for 'disorganization factor'. Among these loci, chromosome 2p24.3 and 1q32.1 overlap with susceptibility loci of schizophrenia identified in our previous linkage studies. This study suggests the existence of genetic loci related to various clinical features of schizophrenia. Further genetic analyses for these dimensional phenotypes are warranted. PMID:24035701

  3. A GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE AND ASSOCIATION SCAN REVEALS NOVEL LOCI FOR AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Lauren A.; Arking, Dan E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success 1. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits (http://www.genome.gov/26525384). Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide SNPs in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed a SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 × 10−7). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening while the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants. PMID:19812673

  4. Revealing misassembled segments in the bovine reference genome by high resolution linkage disequilibrium scan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Misassembly signatures, created by shuffling the order of sequences while assembling a genome, can be easily seen by analyzing the unexpected behaviour of the linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay. A heuristic process was proposed to identify those misassembly signatures and presented the ones found in ...

  5. A genome-wide scan for selection signatures in Nelore cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brazilian Nelore cattle have been selected for growth traits over more than four decades. In recent years, reproductive and meat quality traits have become more important because of increasing consumption, exports and consumer demand. The identification of genomic regions altered by artificial selec...

  6. Genome wide scan for quantitative trait loci affecting tick resistance in cattle (Bos taurus × Bos indicus)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In tropical countries, losses caused by bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus infestation have a tremendous economic impact on cattle production systems. Genetic variation between Bos taurus and Bos indicus to tick resistance and molecular biology tools might allow for the identification of molecular markers linked to resistance traits that could be used as an auxiliary tool in selection programs. The objective of this work was to identify QTL associated with tick resistance/susceptibility in a bovine F2 population derived from the Gyr (Bos indicus) × Holstein (Bos taurus) cross. Results Through a whole genome scan with microsatellite markers, we were able to map six genomic regions associated with bovine tick resistance. For most QTL, we have found that depending on the tick evaluation season (dry and rainy) different sets of genes could be involved in the resistance mechanism. We identified dry season specific QTL on BTA 2 and 10, rainy season specific QTL on BTA 5, 11 and 27. We also found a highly significant genome wide QTL for both dry and rainy seasons in the central region of BTA 23. Conclusions The experimental F2 population derived from Gyr × Holstein cross successfully allowed the identification of six highly significant QTL associated with tick resistance in cattle. QTL located on BTA 23 might be related with the bovine histocompatibility complex. Further investigation of these QTL will help to isolate candidate genes involved with tick resistance in cattle. PMID:20433753

  7. Siblings with Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): Results of a Genome-wide Scan for Stroke Loci

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael; Matarin, Mar; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Hardy, John; Kissela, Brett; Rich, Stephen S.; Singleton, Andrew; Hernandez, Dena; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pearce, Kerra; Keller, Margaret; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke has a strong familial component to risk. The Siblings with Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) is a genome-wide family-based analysis that included use of imputed genotypes. SWISS was conducted to examine associations between SNPs and risk of stroke and stroke subtypes within pairs. Methods SWISS enrolled 312 probands with ischemic stroke across 70 US and Canadian centers. Affected siblings were ascertained by centers and confirmed by central record review; unaffected siblings were ascertained by telephone contact. Ischemic stroke was subtyped using TOAST criteria. Genotyping was performed using an Illumina 610 quad array (probands) and an Illumina linkage V array (affected siblings). SNPs were imputed using 1000 Genomes Project data and MACH software. Family-based association analyses were conducted using the sibling-transmission disequilibrium test. Results For all pairs, the correlation of age at stroke within pairs of affected siblings was r = 0.83 (95%CI, 0.78 to 0.86; P < 2.2×10−16). The correlation did not differ substantially by subtype. The concordance of stroke subtypes among affected pairs was 33.8% (kappa = 0.13; P = 5.06×10−4) and did not differ by age at stroke in the proband. Although no SNP achieved genome-wide significance for risk of ischemic stroke, there was clustering of the most associated SNPs on chromosomes 3p (NOS1) and 6p. Conclusions Stroke subtype and age at stroke in affected sibling pairs exhibit significant clustering. No individual SNP reached genome-wide significance. However, two promising candidate loci were identified, including one that contains NOS1, though these risk loci warrant further examination in larger sample collections. PMID:21940970

  8. Genome-wide scans for candidate genes involved in the aquatic adaptation of dolphins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Bo; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Liu, He-Qun; Irwin, David M; Shen, Yong-Yi; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Since their divergence from the terrestrial artiodactyls, cetaceans have fully adapted to an aquatic lifestyle, which represents one of the most dramatic transformations in mammalian evolutionary history. Numerous morphological and physiological characters of cetaceans have been acquired in response to this drastic habitat transition, such as thickened blubber, echolocation, and ability to hold their breath for a long period of time. However, knowledge about the molecular basis underlying these adaptations is still limited. The sequence of the genome of Tursiops truncates provides an opportunity for a comparative genomic analyses to examine the molecular adaptation of this species. Here, we constructed 11,838 high-quality orthologous gene alignments culled from the dolphin and four other terrestrial mammalian genomes and screened for positive selection occurring in the dolphin lineage. In total, 368 (3.1%) of the genes were identified as having undergone positive selection by the branch-site model. Functional characterization of these genes showed that they are significantly enriched in the categories of lipid transport and localization, ATPase activity, sense perception of sound, and muscle contraction, areas that are potentially related to cetacean adaptations. In contrast, we did not find a similar pattern in the cow, a closely related species. We resequenced some of the positively selected sites (PSSs), within the positively selected genes, and showed that most of our identified PSSs (50/52) could be replicated. The results from this study should have important implications for our understanding of cetacean evolution and their adaptations to the aquatic environment. PMID:23246795

  9. A twin study of breastfeeding with a preliminary genome wide association scan

    PubMed Central

    Colodro-Conde, L.; Zhu, G.; Power, R. A.; Henders, A.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Medland, S. E.; Ordoñana, J.R.; Martin, N.G.

    2015-01-01

    Breastfeeding has been an important survival trait during human history, though it has long been recognised that individuals differ in their exact breastfeeding behaviour. Here our aims were, first, to explore to what extent genetic and environmental influences contributed to the individual differences in breastfeeding behaviour; second, to detect possible genetic variants related to breastfeeding; and lastly, to test if the genetic variants associated with breastfeeding have been previously found to be related with breast size. Data were collected from a large community-based cohort of Australian twins, with 3,364 women for the twin modelling analyses and 1,521 of them included in the genome wide association study. Monozygotic twin correlations (rMZ = .52, 95% CI .46 – .57) were larger than dizygotic twin correlations (rDZ = .35, 95% CI .25 – .43) and the best-fitting model was the one composed by additive genetics and unique environmental factors, explaining 53% and 47% of the variance in breastfeeding behaviour, respectively. No breastfeeding-related genetic variants reached genome-wide significance. The polygenic risk score analyses showed no significant results, suggesting breast size does not influence breastfeeding. This study confers a replication of a previous one exploring the sources of variance of breastfeeding and, to our knowledge, is the first one to conduct a Genome-Wide Association Study on breastfeeding and look at the overlap with variants for breast size. PMID:25475840

  10. Genome-wide scans provide evidence for positive selection of genes implicated in Lassa fever

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Shylakhter, Ilya; Tabrizi, Shervin; Grossman, Sharon R.; Happi, Christian T.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses and other pathogens can have an immense impact on human evolution as natural selection acts to increase the prevalence of genetic variants providing resistance to disease. With the emergence of large datasets of human genetic variation, we can search for signatures of natural selection in the human genome driven by such disease-causing microorganisms. Based on this approach, we have previously hypothesized that Lassa virus (LASV) may have been a driver of natural selection in West African populations where Lassa haemorrhagic fever is endemic. In this study, we provide further evidence for this notion. By applying tests for selection to genome-wide data from the International Haplotype Map Consortium and the 1000 Genomes Consortium, we demonstrate evidence for positive selection in LARGE and interleukin 21 (IL21), two genes implicated in LASV infectivity and immunity. We further localized the signals of selection, using the recently developed composite of multiple signals method, to introns and putative regulatory regions of those genes. Our results suggest that natural selection may have targeted variants giving rise to alternative splicing or differential gene expression of LARGE and IL21. Overall, our study supports the hypothesis that selective pressures imposed by LASV may have led to the emergence of particular alleles conferring resistance to Lassa fever, and opens up new avenues of research pursuit. PMID:22312054

  11. Genome-wide scans provide evidence for positive selection of genes implicated in Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shylakhter, Ilya; Tabrizi, Shervin; Grossman, Sharon R; Happi, Christian T; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2012-03-19

    Rapidly evolving viruses and other pathogens can have an immense impact on human evolution as natural selection acts to increase the prevalence of genetic variants providing resistance to disease. With the emergence of large datasets of human genetic variation, we can search for signatures of natural selection in the human genome driven by such disease-causing microorganisms. Based on this approach, we have previously hypothesized that Lassa virus (LASV) may have been a driver of natural selection in West African populations where Lassa haemorrhagic fever is endemic. In this study, we provide further evidence for this notion. By applying tests for selection to genome-wide data from the International Haplotype Map Consortium and the 1000 Genomes Consortium, we demonstrate evidence for positive selection in LARGE and interleukin 21 (IL21), two genes implicated in LASV infectivity and immunity. We further localized the signals of selection, using the recently developed composite of multiple signals method, to introns and putative regulatory regions of those genes. Our results suggest that natural selection may have targeted variants giving rise to alternative splicing or differential gene expression of LARGE and IL21. Overall, our study supports the hypothesis that selective pressures imposed by LASV may have led to the emergence of particular alleles conferring resistance to Lassa fever, and opens up new avenues of research pursuit. PMID:22312054

  12. Population Genomic Scan for Candidate Signatures of Balancing Selection to Guide Antigen Characterization in Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Amambua-Ngwa, Alfred; Tetteh, Kevin K. A.; Manske, Magnus; Gomez-Escobar, Natalia; Stewart, Lindsay B.; Deerhake, M. Elizabeth; Cheeseman, Ian H.; Newbold, Christopher I.; Holder, Anthony A.; Knuepfer, Ellen; Janha, Omar; Jallow, Muminatou; Campino, Susana; MacInnis, Bronwyn; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Conway, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Acquired immunity in vertebrates maintains polymorphisms in endemic pathogens, leading to identifiable signatures of balancing selection. To comprehensively survey for genes under such selection in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we generated paired-end short-read sequences of parasites in clinical isolates from an endemic Gambian population, which were mapped to the 3D7 strain reference genome to yield high-quality genome-wide coding sequence data for 65 isolates. A minority of genes did not map reliably, including the hypervariable var, rifin, and stevor families, but 5,056 genes (90.9% of all in the genome) had >70% sequence coverage with minimum read depth of 5 for at least 50 isolates, of which 2,853 genes contained 3 or more single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for analysis of polymorphic site frequency spectra. Against an overall background of negatively skewed frequencies, as expected from historical population expansion combined with purifying selection, the outlying minority of genes with signatures indicating exceptionally intermediate frequencies were identified. Comparing genes with different stage-specificity, such signatures were most common in those with peak expression at the merozoite stage that invades erythrocytes. Members of clag, PfMC-2TM, surfin, and msp3-like gene families were highly represented, the strongest signature being in the msp3-like gene PF10_0355. Analysis of msp3-like transcripts in 45 clinical and 11 laboratory adapted isolates grown to merozoite-containing schizont stages revealed surprisingly low expression of PF10_0355. In diverse clonal parasite lines the protein product was expressed in a minority of mature schizonts (<1% in most lines and ∼10% in clone HB3), and eight sub-clones of HB3 cultured separately had an intermediate spectrum of positive frequencies (0.9 to 7.5%), indicating phase variable expression of this polymorphic antigen. This and other identified targets of balancing selection are now

  13. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective . Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent multi-site GWAS of DSM-IV-TR ADHD. Method . Families were ascertained at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH, N=309 trios), Washington University at St Louis (WASH-U, N=272 trios), and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA, N=156 trios). Genotyping was conducted with the Illumina Human1M or Human1M-Duo BeadChip platforms. After applying quality control filters, association with ADHD was tested with 835,136 SNPs in 735 DSM-IV ADHD trios from 732 families. Results . Our smallest p-value (6.7E-07) did not reach the threshold for genome-wide statistical significance (5.0E-08) but one of the 20 most significant associations was located in a candidate gene of interest for ADHD, (SLC9A9, rs9810857, p=6.4E-6). We also conducted gene-based tests of candidate genes identified in the literature and found additional evidence of association with SLC9A9. Conclusion . We and our colleagues in the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium are working to pool together GWAS samples to establish the large data sets needed to follow-up on these results and to identify genes for ADHD and other disorders. PMID:20732626

  14. A genome-wide scan for signatures of differential artificial selection in ten cattle breeds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the times of domestication, cattle have been continually shaped by the influence of humans. Relatively recent history, including breed formation and the still enduring enormous improvement of economically important traits, is expected to have left distinctive footprints of selection within the genome. The purpose of this study was to map genome-wide selection signatures in ten cattle breeds and thus improve the understanding of the genome response to strong artificial selection and support the identification of the underlying genetic variants of favoured phenotypes. We analysed 47,651 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) using Cross Population Extended Haplotype Homozygosity (XP-EHH). Results We set the significance thresholds using the maximum XP-EHH values of two essentially artificially unselected breeds and found up to 229 selection signatures per breed. Through a confirmation process we verified selection for three distinct phenotypes typical for one breed (polledness in Galloway, double muscling in Blanc-Bleu Belge and red coat colour in Red Holstein cattle). Moreover, we detected six genes strongly associated with known QTL for beef or dairy traits (TG, ABCG2, DGAT1, GH1, GHR and the Casein Cluster) within selection signatures of at least one breed. A literature search for genes lying in outstanding signatures revealed further promising candidate genes. However, in concordance with previous genome-wide studies, we also detected a substantial number of signatures without any yet known gene content. Conclusions These results show the power of XP-EHH analyses in cattle to discover promising candidate genes and raise the hope of identifying phenotypically important variants in the near future. The finding of plausible functional candidates in some short signatures supports this hope. For instance, MAP2K6 is the only annotated gene of two signatures detected in Galloway and Gelbvieh cattle and is already known to be associated with carcass

  15. DNA Methylation and Methylation Polymorphism in Genetically Stable In vitro Regenerates of Jatropha curcas L. Using Methylation-Sensitive AFLP Markers.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Mangal S; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-03-01

    The present investigation aimed to evaluate the degree and pattern of DNA methylation using methylation-sensitive AFLP (MS-AFLP) markers in genetically stable in vitro regenerates of Jatropha curcas L.. The genetically stable in vitro regenerates were raised through direct organogenesis via enhanced axillary shoot bud proliferation (Protocol-1) and in vitro-derived leaf regeneration (Protocol-2). Ten selective combinations of MS-AFLP primers produced 462 and 477 MS-AFLP bands in Protocol-1 (P-1) and Protocol-2 (P-2) regenerates, respectively. In P-1 regenerates, 15.8-31.17 % DNA was found methylated with an average of 25.24 %. In P-2 regenerates, 15.93-32.7 % DNA was found methylated with an average of 24.11 %. Using MS-AFLP in P-1 and P-2 regenerates, 11.52-25.53 % and 13.33-25.47 % polymorphism in methylated DNA was reported, respectively. Compared to the mother plant, P-1 regenerates showed hyper-methylation while P-2 showed hypo-methylation. The results clearly indicated alternation in degree and pattern of DNA methylation; hence, epigenetic instability in the genetically stable in vitro regenerates of J. curcas, developed so far using two different regeneration systems and explants of two different origins. The homologous nucleotide fragments in genomes of P-1 and P-2 regenerates showing methylation re-patterning might be involved in immediate adaptive responses and developmental processes through differential regulation of transcriptome under in vitro conditions. PMID:26588922

  16. Genome-wide association scan suggests basis for microtia in Awassi sheep.

    PubMed

    Jawasreh, K; Boettcher, P J; Stella, A

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary underdevelopment of the ear, a condition also known as microtia, has been observed in several sheep breeds as well as in humans and other species. Its genetic basis in sheep is unknown. The Awassi sheep, a breed native to southwest Asia, carries this phenotype and was targeted for molecular characterization via a genome-wide association study. DNA samples were collected from sheep in Jordan. Eight affected and 12 normal individuals were genotyped with the Illumina OvineSNP50(®) chip. Multilocus analyses failed to identify any genotypic association. In contrast, a single-locus analysis revealed a statistically significant association (P = 0.012, genome-wide) with a SNP at basepair 34 647 499 on OAR23. This marker is adjacent to the gene encoding transcription factor GATA-6, which has been shown to play a role in many developmental processes, including chondrogenesis. The lack of extended homozygosity in this region suggests a fairly ancient mutation, and the time of occurrence was estimated to be approximately 3000 years ago. Many of the earless sheep breeds may thus share the causative mutation, especially within the subgroup of fat-tailed, wool sheep. PMID:26990958

  17. Genome Scan for Selection in Structured Layer Chicken Populations Exploiting Linkage Disequilibrium Information

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mahmood; Reimer, Christian; Erbe, Malena; Preisinger, Rudolf; Weigend, Annett; Weigend, Steffen; Servin, Bertrand; Simianer, Henner

    2015-01-01

    An increasing interest is being placed in the detection of genes, or genomic regions, that have been targeted by selection because identifying signatures of selection can lead to a better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. A common strategy for the detection of selection signatures is to compare samples from distinct populations and to search for genomic regions with outstanding genetic differentiation. The aim of this study was to detect selective signatures in layer chicken populations using a recently proposed approach, hapFLK, which exploits linkage disequilibrium information while accounting appropriately for the hierarchical structure of populations. We performed the analysis on 70 individuals from three commercial layer breeds (White Leghorn, White Rock and Rhode Island Red), genotyped for approximately 1 million SNPs. We found a total of 41 and 107 regions with outstanding differentiation or similarity using hapFLK and its single SNP counterpart FLK respectively. Annotation of selection signature regions revealed various genes and QTL corresponding to productions traits, for which layer breeds were selected. A number of the detected genes were associated with growth and carcass traits, including IGF-1R, AGRP and STAT5B. We also annotated an interesting gene associated with the dark brown feather color mutational phenotype in chickens (SOX10). We compared FST, FLK and hapFLK and demonstrated that exploiting linkage disequilibrium information and accounting for hierarchical population structure decreased the false detection rate. PMID:26151449

  18. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism.

    PubMed

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S; Sykes, Nuala; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Carson, Andrew R; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chu, Su H; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L; Crossett, Andrew; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A; Folstein, Susan E; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M; Lamb, Janine A; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L; Lionel, Anath C; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M; Melhem, Nadine M; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J; Mirza, Ghazala K; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Piven, Joseph; Posey, David J; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L; Bierut, Laura J; Rice, John P; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Yaspan, Brian L; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Cantor, Rita M; Cook, Edwin H; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P; Nurnberger, John I; Paterson, Andrew D; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Scherer, Stephen W; Sutcliffe, James S; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M; Vieland, Veronica J; Wijsman, Ellen M; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2010-10-15

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10(-8). When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner's curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10(-8) threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C. PMID:20663923

  19. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism

    PubMed Central

    Anney, Richard; Klei, Lambertus; Pinto, Dalila; Regan, Regina; Conroy, Judith; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Correia, Catarina; Abrahams, Brett S.; Sykes, Nuala; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Almeida, Joana; Bacchelli, Elena; Bailey, Anthony J.; Baird, Gillian; Battaglia, Agatino; Berney, Tom; Bolshakova, Nadia; Bölte, Sven; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bourgeron, Thomas; Brennan, Sean; Brian, Jessica; Carson, Andrew R.; Casallo, Guillermo; Casey, Jillian; Chu, Su H.; Cochrane, Lynne; Corsello, Christina; Crawford, Emily L.; Crossett, Andrew; Dawson, Geraldine; de Jonge, Maretha; Delorme, Richard; Drmic, Irene; Duketis, Eftichia; Duque, Frederico; Estes, Annette; Farrar, Penny; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Folstein, Susan E.; Fombonne, Eric; Freitag, Christine M.; Gilbert, John; Gillberg, Christopher; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goldberg, Jeremy; Green, Jonathan; Guter, Stephen J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Heron, Elizabeth A.; Hill, Matthew; Holt, Richard; Howe, Jennifer L.; Hughes, Gillian; Hus, Vanessa; Igliozzi, Roberta; Kim, Cecilia; Klauck, Sabine M.; Kolevzon, Alexander; Korvatska, Olena; Kustanovich, Vlad; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Lamb, Janine A.; Laskawiec, Magdalena; Leboyer, Marion; Le Couteur, Ann; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Lionel, Anath C.; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Lord, Catherine; Lotspeich, Linda; Lund, Sabata C.; Maestrini, Elena; Mahoney, William; Mantoulan, Carine; Marshall, Christian R.; McConachie, Helen; McDougle, Christopher J.; McGrath, Jane; McMahon, William M.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Merikangas, Alison; Migita, Ohsuke; Minshew, Nancy J.; Mirza, Ghazala K.; Munson, Jeff; Nelson, Stanley F.; Noakes, Carolyn; Noor, Abdul; Nygren, Gudrun; Oliveira, Guiomar; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Parr, Jeremy R.; Parrini, Barbara; Paton, Tara; Pickles, Andrew; Piven, Joseph; Posey, David J; Poustka, Annemarie; Poustka, Fritz; Prasad, Aparna; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Renshaw, Katy; Rickaby, Jessica; Roberts, Wendy; Roeder, Kathryn; Roge, Bernadette; Rutter, Michael L.; Bierut, Laura J.; Rice, John P.; Salt, Jeff; Sansom, Katherine; Sato, Daisuke; Segurado, Ricardo; Senman, Lili; Shah, Naisha; Sheffield, Val C.; Soorya, Latha; Sousa, Inês; Stoppioni, Vera; Strawbridge, Christina; Tancredi, Raffaella; Tansey, Katherine; Thiruvahindrapduram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann P.; Thomson, Susanne; Tryfon, Ana; Tsiantis, John; Van Engeland, Herman; Vincent, John B.; Volkmar, Fred; Wallace, Simon; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhouzhi; Wassink, Thomas H.; Wing, Kirsty; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Wood, Shawn; Yaspan, Brian L.; Zurawiecki, Danielle; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Betancur, Catalina; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cantor, Rita M.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Gallagher, Louise; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Gill, Michael; Haines, Jonathan L.; Miller, Judith; Monaco, Anthony P.; Nurnberger, John I.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Devlin, Bernie; Ennis, Sean; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10−8. When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner's curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10−8 threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C. PMID:20663923

  20. A Genome-Wide Linkage Scan for Age at Menarche in Three Populations of European Descent

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Carl A.; Zhu, Gu; Falchi, Mario; van den Berg, Stéphanie M.; Treloar, Susan A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Visscher, Peter M.; Montgomery, Grant W.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Age at menarche (AAM) is an important trait both biologically and socially, a clearly defined event in female pubertal development, and has been associated with many clinically significant phenotypes. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify genetic loci influencing variation in AAM in large population-based samples from three countries. Design/Participants: Recalled AAM data were collected from 13,697 individuals and 4,899 pseudoindependent sister-pairs from three different populations (Australia, The Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) by mailed questionnaire or interview. Genome-wide variance components linkage analysis was implemented on each sample individually and in combination. Results: The mean, sd, and heritability of AAM across the three samples was 13.1 yr, 1.5 yr, and 0.69, respectively. No loci were detected that reached genome-wide significance in the combined analysis, but a suggestive locus was detected on chromosome 12 (logarithm of the odds = 2.0). Three loci of suggestive significance were seen in the U.K. sample on chromosomes 1, 4, and 18 (logarithm of the odds = 2.4, 2.2 and 3.2, respectively). Conclusions: There was no evidence for common highly penetrant variants influencing AAM. Linkage and association suggest that one trait locus for AAM is located on chromosome 12, but further studies are required to replicate these results. PMID:18647812

  1. Genome-wide association Scan of dental caries in the permanent dentition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over 90% of adults aged 20 years or older with permanent teeth have suffered from dental caries leading to pain, infection, or even tooth loss. Although caries prevalence has decreased over the past decade, there are still about 23% of dentate adults who have untreated carious lesions in the US. Dental caries is a complex disorder affected by both individual susceptibility and environmental factors. Approximately 35-55% of caries phenotypic variation in the permanent dentition is attributable to genes, though few specific caries genes have been identified. Therefore, we conducted the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genes affecting susceptibility to caries in adults. Methods Five independent cohorts were included in this study, totaling more than 7000 participants. For each participant, dental caries was assessed and genetic markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) were genotyped or imputed across the entire genome. Due to the heterogeneity among the five cohorts regarding age, genotyping platform, quality of dental caries assessment, and study design, we first conducted genome-wide association (GWA) analyses on each of the five independent cohorts separately. We then performed three meta-analyses to combine results for: (i) the comparatively younger, Appalachian cohorts (N = 1483) with well-assessed caries phenotype, (ii) the comparatively older, non-Appalachian cohorts (N = 5960) with inferior caries phenotypes, and (iii) all five cohorts (N = 7443). Top ranking genetic loci within and across meta-analyses were scrutinized for biologically plausible roles on caries. Results Different sets of genes were nominated across the three meta-analyses, especially between the younger and older age cohorts. In general, we identified several suggestive loci (P-value ≤ 10E-05) within or near genes with plausible biological roles for dental caries, including RPS6KA2 and PTK2B, involved in p38-depenedent MAPK signaling

  2. Scanning the Corynebacterium glutamicum R genome for high-efficiency secretion signal sequences.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Keiro; Tsuchida, Yoshiki; Okibe, Naoko; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    Systematic screening of secretion proteins using an approach based on the completely sequenced genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum R revealed 405 candidate signal peptides, 108 of which were able to heterologously secrete an active-form alpha-amylase derived from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. These comprised 90 general secretory (Sec)-type, 10 twin-arginine translocator (Tat)-type and eight Sec-type with presumptive lipobox peptides. Only Sec- and Tat-type signals directed high-efficiency secretion. In two assays, 11 of these signals resulted in 50- to 150-fold increased amounts of secreted alpha-amylase compared with the well-known corynebacterial secretory protein PS2. While the presence of an AXA motif at the cleavage sites was readily apparent, it was the presence of a glutamine residue adjacent to the cleavage site that may affect secretion efficiency. PMID:19246745

  3. Multiple type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes following genome-wide association scan in UK samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Weedon, Michael N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Lango, Hana; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Perry, John R.B.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Shields, Beverley; Morris, Andrew P.; Ellard, Sian; Groves, Christopher J.; Harries, Lorna W.; Marchini, Jonathan L.; Owen, Katharine R.; Knight, Beatrice; Cardon, Lon R.; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham A.; Morris, Andrew D.; Doney, Alex S.F.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of type 2 diabetes are poorly understood. Starting from genome-wide genotype data for 1,924 diabetic cases and 2,938 population controls generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, we set out to detect replicated diabetes association signals through analysis of 3,757 additional cases and 5,346 controls, and by integration of our findings with equivalent data from other international consortia. We detected diabetes susceptibility loci in and around the genes CDKAL1, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and IGF2BP2 and confirmed the recently described associations at HHEX/IDE and SLC30A8. Our findings provide insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes, emphasizing the contribution of multiple variants of modest effect. The regions identified underscore the importance of pathways influencing pancreatic beta cell development and function in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. PMID:17463249

  4. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  5. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C.; Muir, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  6. A genome-wide association scan on estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and may be characterized on the basis of whether estrogen receptors (ER) are expressed in the tumour cells. ER status of breast cancer is important clinically, and is used both as a prognostic indicator and treatment predictor. In this study, we focused on identifying genetic markers associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk. Methods We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 285,984 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 617 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 4,583 controls. We also conducted a genome-wide pathway analysis on the discovery dataset using permutation-based tests on pre-defined pathways. The extent of shared polygenic variation between ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancers was assessed by relating risk scores, derived using ER-positive breast cancer samples, to disease state in independent, ER-negative breast cancer cases. Results Association with ER-negative breast cancer was not validated for any of the five most strongly associated SNPs followed up in independent studies (1,011 ER-negative breast cancer cases, 7,604 controls). However, an excess of small P-values for SNPs with known regulatory functions in cancer-related pathways was found (global P = 0.052). We found no evidence to suggest that ER-negative breast cancer shares a polygenic basis to disease with ER-positive breast cancer. Conclusions ER-negative breast cancer is a distinct breast cancer subtype that merits independent analyses. Given the clinical importance of this phenotype and the likelihood that genetic effect sizes are small, greater sample sizes and further studies are required to understand the etiology of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:21062454

  7. Genomic Scans of Zygotic Disequilibrium and Epistatic SNPs in HapMap Phase III Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin-Sheng; Hu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Previous theory indicates that zygotic linkage disequilibrium (LD) is more informative than gametic or composite digenic LD in revealing natural population history. Further, the difference between the composite digenic and maximum zygotic LDs can be used to detect epistatic selection for fitness. Here we corroborate the theory by investigating genome-wide zygotic LDs in HapMap phase III human populations. Results show that non-Africa populations have much more significant zygotic LDs than do Africa populations. Africa populations (ASW, LWK, MKK, and YRI) possess more significant zygotic LDs for the double-homozygotes (DAABB) than any other significant zygotic LDs (DAABb, DAaBB, and DAaBb), while non-Africa populations generally have more significant DAaBb’s than any other significant zygotic LDs (DAABB, DAABb, and DAaBB). Average r-squares for any significant zygotic LDs increase generally in an order of populations YRI, MKK, CEU, CHB, LWK, JPT, CHD, TSI, GIH, ASW, and MEX. Average r-squares are greater for DAABB and DAaBb than for DAaBB and DAABb in each population. YRI and MKK can be separated from LWK and ASW in terms of the pattern of average r-squares. All population divergences in zygotic LDs can be interpreted with the model of Out of Africa for modern human origins. We have also detected 19735-95921 SNP pairs exhibiting strong signals of epistatic selection in different populations. Gene-gene interactions for some epistatic SNP pairs are evident from empirical findings, but many more epistatic SNP pairs await evidence. Common epistatic SNP pairs rarely exist among all populations, but exist in distinct regions (Africa, Europe, and East Asia), which helps to understand geographical genomic medicine. PMID:26126177

  8. A genome-wide sib-pair scan for quantitative language traits reveals linkage to chromosomes 10 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P. D.; Mueller, K. L.; Gamazon, E. R.; Cox, N. J.; Tomblin, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is considerable evidence that individual differences in language development are highly heritable, there have been few genome-wide scans to locate genes associated with the trait. Previous analyses of language impairment have yielded replicable evidence for linkage to regions on chromosomes 16q, 19q, 13q (within lab) and at 13q (between labs). Here we report the first linkage study to screen the continuum of language ability, from normal to disordered, as found in the general population. 383 children from 147 sib-ships (214 sib-pairs) were genotyped on the Illumina® Linkage IVb Marker Panel using three composite language-related phenotypes and a measure of phonological memory (PM). Two regions (10q23.33; 13q33.3) yielded genome-wide significant peaks for linkage with PM. A peak suggestive of linkage was also found at 17q12 for the overall language composite. This study presents two novel genetic loci for the study of language development and disorders, but fails to replicate findings by previous groups. Possible reasons for this are discussed. PMID:25997078

  9. Genome-wide scan of 29,141 African Americans finds no evidence of directional selection since admixture.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Aldrich, Melinda C; Ambrosone, Christine B; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Deming, Sandra L; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harris, Curtis C; Henderson, Brian E; Ingles, Sue A; Isaacs, William; De Jager, Phillip L; John, Esther M; Kittles, Rick A; Larkin, Emma; McNeill, Lorna H; Millikan, Robert C; Murphy, Adam; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Press, Michael F; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret; Strom, Sara S; Tucker, Margaret A; Wiencke, John K; Witte, John S; Wu, Xifeng; Yamamura, Yuko; Zanetti, Krista A; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Chanock, Stephen J; Haiman, Christopher A; Reich, David; Price, Alkes L

    2014-10-01

    The extent of recent selection in admixed populations is currently an unresolved question. We scanned the genomes of 29,141 African Americans and failed to find any genome-wide-significant deviations in local ancestry, indicating no evidence of selection influencing ancestry after admixture. A recent analysis of data from 1,890 African Americans reported that there was evidence of selection in African Americans after their ancestors left Africa, both before and after admixture. Selection after admixture was reported on the basis of deviations in local ancestry, and selection before admixture was reported on the basis of allele-frequency differences between African Americans and African populations. The local-ancestry deviations reported by the previous study did not replicate in our very large sample, and we show that such deviations were expected purely by chance, given the number of hypotheses tested. We further show that the previous study's conclusion of selection in African Americans before admixture is also subject to doubt. This is because the FST statistics they used were inflated and because true signals of unusual allele-frequency differences between African Americans and African populations would be best explained by selection that occurred in Africa prior to migration to the Americas. PMID:25242497

  10. Evolutionary change driven by metal exposure as revealed by coding SNP genome scan in wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    PubMed

    Bélanger-Deschênes, Sébastien; Couture, Patrice; Campbell, Peter G C; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-07-01

    Pollution can drive rapid evolutionary change in wild populations. This study targets functional polymorphisms of chronically metal-contaminated wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A de novo transcriptome scan contrasted subsets of individuals from clean (n = 16) and contaminated (n = 16) lakes to identify 87 candidate annotated coding SNPs. Candidate genotypes and liver [metal] were obtained in 10 populations (n = 1,052) and a genome scan distinguished outliers: one nuclear (cyclin G1 gene) and two mitochondrial (cytochrome b and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 genes) also displaying allelic correlation to mean population [cadmium]. Whole mtDNA and 17 kb surrounding cyclin G1 were characterised through 454 sequencing thus revealing two non-synonymous substitutions involving dissimilar amino acids. Based on associated functions and inter-population differentiation, contaminated perch may have been selected for fast life cycle completion (p53 pathway) and memorization impairment mitigation (long-term potentiation pathway). In accordance with predicted evolutionary trajectory for stressed and energy deprived organisms, adapted perch would not compensate for repair mechanism inhibition, instead reallocating energy towards growth and favouring inexpensive impairment mitigation adaptations over costly detoxification. Overall, 85 years of selection could have driven rapid, potentially adaptive evolution by selecting alleles increasing perch fitness in polluted environments. PMID:23722603

  11. Copy Number Variation of UGT 2B Genes in Indian Families Using Whole Genome Scans

    PubMed Central

    Veerappa, Avinash M.; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 2B (UGT2B) is a family of genes involved in metabolizing steroid hormones and several other xenobiotics. These UGT2B genes are highly polymorphic in nature and have distinct polymorphisms associated with specific regions around the globe. Copy number variations (CNVs) status of UGT2B17 in Indian population is not known and their disease associations have been inconclusive. It was therefore of interest to investigate the CNV profile of UGT2B genes. Methods. We investigated the presence of CNVs in UGT2B genes in 31 members from eight Indian families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 chip. Results. Our data revealed >50% of the study members carried CNVs in UGT2B genes, of which 76% showed deletion polymorphism. CNVs were observed more in UGT2B17 (76.4%) than in UGT2B15 (17.6%). Molecular network and pathway analysis found enrichment related to steroid metabolic process, carboxylesterase activity, and sequence specific DNA binding. Interpretation and Conclusion. We report the presence of UGT2B gene deletion and duplication polymorphisms in Indian families. Network analysis indicates the substitutive role of other possible genes in the UGT activity. The CNVs of UGT2B genes are very common in individuals indicating that the effect is neutral in causing any suspected diseases. PMID:27092269

  12. Genome-wide association scan of the time to onset of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Lasky-Su, Jessica; Anney, Richard J L; Neale, Benjamin M; Franke, Barbara; Zhou, Kaixin; Maller, Julian B; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Chen, Wai; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Banaschewski, Tobias; Ebstein, Richard; Gill, Michael; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Steinhausen, Hans Christoph; Taylor, Eric; Daly, Mark; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V

    2008-12-01

    A time-to-onset analysis for family-based samples was performed on the genomewide association (GWAS) data for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to determine if associations exist with the age at onset of ADHD. The initial dataset consisted of 958 parent-offspring trios that were genotyped on the Perlegen 600,000 SNP array. After data cleaning procedures, 429,981 autosomal SNPs and 930 parent-offspring trios were used found suitable for use and a family-based logrank analysis was performed using that age at first ADHD symptoms as the quantitative trait of interest. No SNP achieved genome-wide significance, and the lowest P-values had a magnitude of 10(-7). Several SNPs among a pre-specified list of candidate genes had nominal associations including SLC9A9, DRD1, ADRB2, SLC6A3, NFIL3, ADRB1, SYT1, HTR2A, ARRB2, and CHRNA4. Of these findings SLC9A9 stood out as a promising candidate, with nominally significant SNPs in six distinct regions of the gene. PMID:18937294

  13. A genome-wide scan identifies variants in NFIB associated with metastasis in patients with osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirabello, Lisa; Koster, Roelof; Moriarity, Branden S.; Spector, Logan G.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Gary, Joy; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Pankratz, Nathan; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Largaespada, David; Wang, Zhaoming; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gorlick, Richard; Khanna, Chand; de Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada; Petrilli, Antonio S.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Lecanda, Fernando; Andrulis, Irene L.; Wunder, Jay S.; Gokgoz, Nalan; Serra, Massimo; Hattinger, Claudia; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, Maria Fernanda; Halai, Dina; Ballinger, Mandy L.; Thomas, David M.; Davis, Sean; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Marina, Neyssa; Helman, Lee; Otto, George M.; Becklin, Kelsie L.; Wolf, Natalie K.; Weg, Madison T.; Tucker, Margaret; Wacholder, Sholom; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Boland, Joseph F.; Hicks, Belynda D.; Vogt, Aurelie; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in osteosarcoma patients, the most common pediatric bone malignancy. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of osteosarcoma metastasis at diagnosis in 935 osteosarcoma patients to determine whether germline genetic variation contributes to risk of metastasis. We identified a SNP, rs7034162, in NFIB significantly associated with metastasis in European osteosarcoma cases, as well as in cases of African and Brazilian ancestry (meta-analysis of all cases: P=1.2×10−9, OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.83–3.24). The risk allele was significantly associated with lowered NFIB expression, which led to increased osteosarcoma cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, a transposon screen in mice identified a significant proportion of osteosarcomas harboring inactivating insertions in Nfib, and had lowered Nfib expression. These data suggest that germline genetic variation at rs7034162 is important in osteosarcoma metastasis, and that NFIB is an osteosarcoma metastasis susceptibility gene. PMID:26084801

  14. Genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs identifies candidate genes involved in T helper cells and macrophage signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted a genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs from a highly endemic area in Brazil using 149,648 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers genotyped in 20 cases and 28 controls. Using a mixed model approach, we found two candidate loci on canine autosomes 1 and 2....

  15. A GENOME-WIDE SCAN FOR QTL AFFECTING CARCASS TRAITS AT CONSTANT FAT DEPTH IN A HEREFORD X COMPOSITE DOUBLE BACKCROSS POPULATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide scan for chromosomal regions influencing carcass traits was conducted spanning 2.497 Morgans on 29 bovine autosomes using 170 microsatellite markers. There were 151 progeny from a single Hereford x composite bull produced by backcross matings to both Hereford and composite dams. Cattl...

  16. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  17. The Genetic Architecture of Seed Composition in Soybean Is Refined by Genome-Wide Association Scans Across Multiple Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Justin N.; Nelson, Randall L.; Song, Qijian; Cregan, Perry B.; Li, Zenglu

    2014-01-01

    Soybean oil and meal are major contributors to world-wide food production. Consequently, the genetic basis for soybean seed composition has been intensely studied using family-based mapping. Population-based mapping approaches, in the form of genome-wide association (GWA) scans, have been able to resolve loci controlling moderately complex quantitative traits (QTL) in numerous crop species. Yet, it is still unclear how soybean’s unique population history will affect GWA scans. Using one of the populations in this study, we simulated phenotypes resulting from a range of genetic architectures. We found that with a heritability of 0.5, ∼100% and ∼33% of the 4 and 20 simulated QTL can be recovered, respectively, with a false-positive rate of less than ∼6×10−5 per marker tested. Additionally, we demonstrated that combining information from multi-locus mixed models and compressed linear-mixed models improves QTL identification and interpretation. We applied these insights to exploring seed composition in soybean, refining the linkage group I (chromosome 20) protein QTL and identifying additional oil QTL that may allow some decoupling of highly correlated oil and protein phenotypes. Because the value of protein meal is closely related to its essential amino acid profile, we attempted to identify QTL underlying methionine, threonine, cysteine, and lysine content. Multiple QTL were found that have not been observed in family-based mapping studies, and each trait exhibited associations across multiple populations. Chromosomes 1 and 8 contain strong candidate alleles for essential amino acid increases. Overall, we present these and additional data that will be useful in determining breeding strategies for the continued improvement of soybean’s nutrient portfolio. PMID:25246241

  18. Diagnostic FDG and FDOPA positron emission tomography scans distinguish the genomic type and treatment outcome of neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Lu, Ching-Chu; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Yang, Yung-Li; Lee, Ya-Ling; Huang, Shiu-Feng; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Lee, Hsinyu; Miser, James S.; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Liao, Yung-Feng; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Tzen, Kai-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a heterogeneous childhood cancer that requires multiple imaging modalities for accurate staging and surveillances. This study aims to investigate the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 18F-fluoro-dihydroxyphenylalanine (FDOPA) in determining the prognosis of NB. During 2007–2014, forty-two NB patients (male:female, 28:14; median age, 2.0 years) undergoing paired FDG and FDOPA PET scans at diagnosis were evaluated for the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of FDG or FDOPA by the primary tumor. Patients with older age, advanced stages, or MYCN amplification showed higher FDG and lower FDOPA SUVmax (all P < 0.02). Receiver operating characteristics analysis identified FDG SUVmax≥ 3.31 and FDOPA SUVmax < 4.12 as an ultra-high-risk feature (PET-UHR) that distinguished the most unfavorable genomic types, i.e. segmental chromosomal alterations and/or MYCN amplification, at a sensitivity of 81.3% (54.4%–96.0%) and a specificity of 93.3% (68.1%–99.8%). Considering with age, stage, MYCN status, and anatomical image-defined risk factor, PET-UHR was an independent predictor of inferior event-free survival (multivariate hazard ratio, 4.9 [1.9–30.1]; P = 0.012). Meanwhile, the ratio between FDG and FDOPA SUVmax (G:D) correlated positively with HK2 (Spearman's ρ = 0.86, P < 0.0001) and negatively with DDC (ρ = −0.58, P = 0.02) gene expression levels, which might suggest higher glycolytic activity and less catecholaminergic differentiation in NB tumors taking up higher FDG and lower FDOPA. In conclusion, the intensity of FDG and FDOPA uptake on diagnostic PET scans may predict the tumor behavior and complement the current risk stratification systems of NB. PMID:26959748

  19. A genome-wide linkage scan reveals CD53 as an important regulator of innate TNF-α levels

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Steffan D; Lakenberg, Nico; van der Breggen, Ruud; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Kloppenburg, Margreet; de Craen, Anton JM; Beekman, Marian; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline

    2010-01-01

    Cytokines are major immune system regulators. Previously, innate cytokine profiles determined by lipopolysaccharide stimulation were shown to be highly heritable. To identify regulating genes in innate immunity, we analyzed data from a genome-wide linkage scan using microsatellites in osteoarthritis (OA) patients (The GARP study) and their innate cytokine data on interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. A confirmation cohort consisted of the Leiden 85-Plus study. In this study, a linkage analysis was followed by manual selection of candidate genes in linkage regions showing LOD scores over 2.5. An single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) gene tagging method was applied to select SNPs on the basis of the highest level of gene tagging and possible functional effects. QTDT was used to identify the SNPs associated with innate cytokine production. Initial association signals were modeled by a linear mixed model. Through these analyses, we identified 10 putative genes involved in the regulation of TNFα. SNP rs6679497 in gene CD53 showed significant association with TNFα levels (P=0.001). No association of this SNP was observed with OA. A novel gene involved in the innate immune response of TNFα is identified. Genetic variation in this gene may have a role in diseases and disorders in which TNFα is closely involved. PMID:20407468

  20. Genome-wide copy number scan identifies IRF6 involvement in Van der Woude syndrome in an Indian family.

    PubMed

    Manjegowda, Dinesh S; Prasad, Manu; Veerappa, Avinash M; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-01-01

    Summary Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal dominant developmental malformation presenting with bilateral lower lip pits related to cleft lip, cleft palate and other malformations. We performed a whole-genome copy number variations (CNVs) scan in an Indian family with members suffering from VWS using 2·6 million combined SNP and CNV markers. We found CNVs affecting IRF6, a known candidate gene for VWS, in all three cases, while none of the non-VWS members showed any CNVs in the IRF6 region. The duplications and deletions of the chromosomal critical region in 1q32-q41 confirm the involvement of CNVs in IRF6 in South Indian VWS patients. Molecular network analysis of these and other cleft lip/palate related module genes suggests that they are associated with cytokine-mediated signalling pathways and response to interferon-gamma mediated signalling pathways. This is a maiden study indicating the involvement of CNVs in IRF6 in causing VWS in the Indian population. PMID:25579819

  1. The first genome-wide scan in a tunisian family with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFS+).

    PubMed

    Fendri-Kriaa, Nourhene; Louhichi, Nacim; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Chabchoub, Ghazi; Kammoun, Fatma; Salem, Ikhlass Hadj; Rebai, Ahmed; Triki, Chahnez; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2010-11-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFS+) is an autosomal dominant disorder. In the literature, 5 responsible genes were identified and 2 novel susceptibility loci for GEFS+ at 2p24 and 8p23-p21 were reported, indicating the genetic heterogeneity of this disorder. The aim of this report is to identify the responsible loci in a large affected Tunisian family by performing a 10cM density genome-wide scan. The highest multipoint logarithm of odds (LOD) score (1.04) was found for D5S407 in the absence of recombination. Two other interesting regions were found around marker D19S210 (LOD=0.799) and D7S484 (LOD=0.61) markers. To fine map these loci, additional markers in 2 regions on 5q13.3 and 7p14.2 were analyzed and positive LOD scores for both loci were obtained. Sequencing of the Sodium channel subunit beta-1 gene (SCN1B) (19q13.1) showed the absence of any causal mutation. Our findings emphasized the genetic heterogeneity of febrile seizures. PMID:20382841

  2. Predicting Offspring Performance in Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) Using AFLP Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pedigree and combining ability information for male and female hop accessions is limited and choice of breeding parents remains guesswork. This studies’ objective was to determine if AFLP markers could be used to predict offspring performance in hop. AFLP assays were used to estimate genetic dista...

  3. AFLPs support deep relationships among darters (Percidae: Etheostomatinae) consistent with morphological hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Smith, T A; Mendelson, T C; Page, L M

    2011-01-01

    Recent attention has focused on the efficacy of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) for resolving deep evolutionary relationships. Here we show that AFLPs provide resolution of deep relationships within the family Percidae that are more consistent with previous morphological hypotheses than are relationships proposed by previous molecular analyses. Despite in silico predictions, we were able to resolve relatively ancient divergences, estimated at >25 MA. We show that the most distantly related species share the fewest fragments, but suggest that large data sets and extensive taxon sampling are sufficient to overcome this obstacle of the AFLP technique for deep divergences. We compare genetic distances estimated from mitochondrial DNA with those from AFLPs and contrast traditional PAUP* Nei–Li AFLP genetic distances with a recently proposed method utilizing the Dice equation with constraining nucleotides. PMID:21712845

  4. Morphological Changes of Paulownia Seedlings Infected Phytoplasmas Reveal the Genes Associated with Witches' Broom through AFLP and MSAP

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xibing; Fan, Guoqiang; Zhao, Zhenli; Deng, Minjie; Dong, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) caused by phytoplasma might result in devastating damage to the growth and wood production of Paulownia. To study the effect of phytoplasma on DNA sequence and to discover the genes related to PaWB occurrence, DNA polymorphisms and DNA methylation levels and patterns in PaWB seedlings, the ones treated with various concentration of methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) and healthy seedlings were investigated with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP). Our results indicated that PaWB seedlings recovered a normal morphology, similar to healthy seedlings, after treatment with more than 20 mg·L−1 MMS; Phytoplasma infection did not change the Paulownia genomic DNA sequence at AFLP level, but changed the global DNA methylation levels and patterns; Genes related to PaWB were discovered through MSAP and validated using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These results implied that changes of DNA methylation levels and patterns were closely related to the morphological changes of seedlings infected with phytoplasmas. PMID:25427154

  5. AFLP markers resolve intra-specific relationships and infer genetic structure among lineages of the canyon treefrog, Hyla arenicolor.

    PubMed

    Klymus, Katy E; Carl Gerhardt, H

    2012-11-01

    The canyon treefrog, Hyla arenicolor, is a wide-ranging hylid found from southwestern US into southern Mexico. Recent studies have shown this species to have a complex evolutionary history, with several phylogeographically distinct lineages, a probable cryptic species, and multiple episodes of mitochondrial introgression with the sister group, the H. eximia complex. We aimed to use genome wide AFLP markers to better resolve relationships within this group. As in other studies, our inferred phylogeny not only provides evidence for repeated mitochondrial introgression between H. arenicolor lineages and H. eximia/H. wrightorum, but it also affords more resolution within the main H. arenicolor clade than was previously achieved with sequence data. However, as with a previous study, the placement of a lineage of H. arenicolor whose distribution is centered in the Balsas Basin of Mexico remains poorly resolved, perhaps due to past hybridization with the H. eximia complex. Furthermore, the AFLP data set shows no differentiation among lineages from the Grand Canyon and Colorado Plateau despite their large mitochondrial sequence divergence. Finally, our results infer a well-supported sister relationship between this combined Colorado Plateau/Grand Canyon lineage and the Sonoran Desert lineage, a relationship that strongly contradicts conclusions drawn from the mtDNA evidence. Our study provides a basis for further behavioral and ecological speciation studies of this system and highlights the importance of multi-taxon (species) sampling in phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. PMID:22898531

  6. A simple yet accurate correction for winner's curse can predict signals discovered in much larger genome scans

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli, T. Bernard; Lee, Donghyung; Webb, Bradley Todd; Riley, Brien P.; Vladimirov, Vladimir I.; Fanous, Ayman H.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: For genetic studies, statistically significant variants explain far less trait variance than ‘sub-threshold’ association signals. To dimension follow-up studies, researchers need to accurately estimate ‘true’ effect sizes at each SNP, e.g. the true mean of odds ratios (ORs)/regression coefficients (RRs) or Z-score noncentralities. Naïve estimates of effect sizes incur winner’s curse biases, which are reduced only by laborious winner’s curse adjustments (WCAs). Given that Z-scores estimates can be theoretically translated on other scales, we propose a simple method to compute WCA for Z-scores, i.e. their true means/noncentralities. Results:WCA of Z-scores shrinks these towards zero while, on P-value scale, multiple testing adjustment (MTA) shrinks P-values toward one, which corresponds to the zero Z-score value. Thus, WCA on Z-scores scale is a proxy for MTA on P-value scale. Therefore, to estimate Z-score noncentralities for all SNPs in genome scans, we propose FDR Inverse Quantile Transformation (FIQT). It (i) performs the simpler MTA of P-values using FDR and (ii) obtains noncentralities by back-transforming MTA P-values on Z-score scale. When compared to competitors, realistic simulations suggest that FIQT is more (i) accurate and (ii) computationally efficient by orders of magnitude. Practical application of FIQT to Psychiatric Genetic Consortium schizophrenia cohort predicts a non-trivial fraction of sub-threshold signals which become significant in much larger supersamples. Conclusions: FIQT is a simple, yet accurate, WCA method for Z-scores (and ORs/RRs, via simple transformations). Availability and Implementation: A 10 lines R function implementation is available at https://github.com/bacanusa/FIQT. Contact: sabacanu@vcu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27187203

  7. First environmental isolation of Cryptococcus gattii, genotype AFLP5, from India and a global review.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, A; Prakash, A; Randhawa, H S; Kathuria, S; Hagen, F; Klaassen, C H; Meis, J F

    2013-05-01

    We report the first environmental isolation from India of Cryptococcus gattii, genotype amplified fragment length polymorphism 5 (AFLP5), which is one of the rarely reported genotypes of this pathogen. It originated from decayed wood inside a trunk hollow of Manilkara hexandra, a native tree in Delhi. We investigated 101 isolates of C. gattii, originating from 556 samples of decayed wood inside trunk hollows of 311 heterogeneous tree species and their surrounding soil. Of these, only a solitary isolate proved to be AFLP5, the remainder belonged to AFLP4. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed a low MIC90 (0.25 μg ml(-1) ) of the new azoles posaconazole and isavuconazole for these environmental isolates. Genotype AFLP5 has been mainly reported from environmental sources in Colombia and from clinical sources in California (USA), where it seems to be endemic. Phylogenetic analysis of multi-locus sequence typing data showed that the Indian AFLP5 C. gattii isolate had a distinct profile compared with a cluster of mainly Colombian and Californian C. gattii AFLP5 isolates. As molecular typing of human pathogenic fungi is still in its infancy and not accessible to many countries, our current knowledge cannot be taken as reflective of the true geographic distribution of C. gattii AFLP5 or its other rarely reported molecular types. PMID:23336629

  8. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N.; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L.; Mokashi, Vishwesh P.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Minogue, Timothy D.

    2015-03-20

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, ordered restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera

  9. An AFLP genetic linkage map of pacific abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li; Yanhong, Xu; Ruihai, Yu; Akihiro, Kijima

    2007-07-01

    A genetic linkage map of Pacific abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai) was constructed using AFLP markers based on a two-way pseudo-testeross strategy in a full-sib family. With 33 primer combinations, a total of 455 markers (225 from the female parent and 230 from the male parent) segregated in a 1:1 ratio, corresponding to DNA polymorphism: heterozygous in one parent and null in the other. The female framework map consisted of 174 markers distributed in 18 linkage groups, equivalent to the H. discus hannai haploid chromosome number, and spanning a total length of 2031.4 cM, with an average interval of 13.0 cM between adjacent markers. The male framework map consisted of 195 markers mapped on 19 linkage groups, spanning a total length of 2273.4 cM, with an average spacing of 12.9 cM between adjacent markers. The estimated coverage for the framework linkage maps was 81.2% for the female and 82.1% for the male, on the basis of two estimates of genome length. Fifty-two markers (11.4%) remained unlinked. The level of segregation distortion observed in this cross was 20.4%. These linkage maps will serve as a starting point for linkage studies in the Pacific abalone with potential application for marker-assisted selection in breeding programs.

  10. Additive and epistatic genome-wide association for growth and ultrasound scan measures of carcass-related traits in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Ali, A A; Khatkar, M S; Kadarmideen, H N; Thomson, P C

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies are routinely used to identify genomic regions associated with traits of interest. However, this ignores an important class of genomic associations, that of epistatic interactions. A genome-wide interaction analysis between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using highly dense markers can detect epistatic interactions, but is a difficult task due to multiple testing and computational demand. However, It is important for revealing complex trait heredity. This study considers analytical methods that detect statistical interactions between pairs of loci. We investigated a three-stage modelling procedure: (i) a model without the SNP to estimate the variance components; (ii) a model with the SNP using variance component estimates from (i), thus avoiding iteration; and (iii) using the significant SNPs from (ii) for genome-wide epistasis analysis. We fitted these three-stage models to field data for growth and ultrasound measures for subcutaneous fat thickness in Brahman cattle. The study demonstrated the usefulness of modelling epistasis in the analysis of complex traits as it revealed extra sources of genetic variation and identified potential candidate genes affecting the concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 and ultrasound scan measure of fat depth traits. Information about epistasis can add to our understanding of the complex genetic networks that form the fundamental basis of biological systems. PMID:25754883

  11. A first AFLP-Based Genetic Linkage Map for Brine Shrimp Artemia franciscana and Its Application in Mapping the Sex Locus

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Stephanie; Bossier, Peter; Van Stappen, Gilbert; Vercauteren, Ilse; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Vuylsteke, Marnik

    2013-01-01

    We report on the construction of sex-specific linkage maps, the identification of sex-linked markers and the genome size estimation for the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana. Overall, from the analysis of 433 AFLP markers segregating in a 112 full-sib family we identified 21 male and 22 female linkage groups (2n = 42), covering 1,041 and 1,313 cM respectively. Fifteen putatively homologous linkage groups, including the sex linkage groups, were identified between the female and male linkage map. Eight sex-linked AFLP marker alleles were inherited from the female parent, supporting the hypothesis of a WZ–ZZ sex-determining system. The haploid Artemia genome size was estimated to 0.93 Gb by flow cytometry. The produced Artemia linkage maps provide the basis for further fine mapping and exploring of the sex-determining region and are a possible marker resource for mapping genomic loci underlying phenotypic differences among Artemia species. PMID:23469207

  12. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for blood pressure and cardiac mass in the rat by genome scanning of recombinant inbred strains.

    PubMed Central

    Pravenec, M; Gauguier, D; Schott, J J; Buard, J; Kren, V; Bila, V; Szpirer, C; Szpirer, J; Wang, J M; Huang, H

    1995-01-01

    In the HXB and BXH recombinant inbred strains derived from the spontaneously hypertensive rat and the normotensive Brown Norway rat, we determined the strain distribution patterns of 500 genetic markers to scan the rodent genome for quantitative trait loci regulating cardiac mass and blood pressure. The markers spanned approximately 1,139 cM of the genome and were tested for correlations with left ventricular mass adjusted for body weight, and with systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures. The marker for the dopamine 1A receptor (Drd1a) on chromosome 17 showed the strongest correlation with left ventricular heart weight (P = .00038, r = -0.59) and the relationship to heart weight was independent of blood pressure. The markers showing the strongest correlations with systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure were D19Mit7 on chromosome 19 (P = .0012, r = .55), D2N35 on chromosome 2 (P = .0008, r = .56), and Il6 on chromosome 4 (P = .0018, r = .53), respectively. These studies demonstrate that the HXB and BXH strains can be effectively used for genome scanning studies of complex traits and have revealed several chromosome regions that may be involved in the genetic control of blood pressure and cardiac mass in the rat. PMID:7560090

  13. Genetic Relationships of Aglaonema Species and Cultivars Inferred from AFLP Markers

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JIANJUN; DEVANAND, PACHANOOR S.; NORMAN, DAVID J.; HENNY, RICHARD J.; CHAO, CHIH‐CHENG T.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Aglaonema is an important ornamental foliage plant genus, but genetic relationships among its species and cultivars have not been reported. This study analysed genetic relatedness of 54 cultivars derived from nine species using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. • Methods Initially, 48 EcoRI + 2/MseI + 3 primer set combinations were screened, from which six primer sets that showed clear scoreable and highly polymorphic fragments were selected and used for AFLP reactions. AFLP fragments were scored and entered into a binary data matrix as discrete variables. Jaccard’s coefficient of similarity was calculated for all pair‐wise comparisons among the 54 cultivars, and a dendrogram was constructed by the unweighted pair‐group method using the arithmetic average (UPGMA). • Key Results The number of AFLP fragments generated per primer set ranged from 59 to 112 with fragment sizes varying from 50 to 565 bp. A total of 449 AFLP fragments was detected, of which 314 were polymorphic (70 %). All cultivars were clearly differentiated by their AFLP fingerprints. The 54 cultivars were divided into seven clusters; cultivars within each cluster generally share similar morphological characteristics. Cluster I contains 35 cultivars, most of them are interspecific hybrids developed mainly from A. commutatum, A. crispum or A. nitidum. However, Jaccard’s similarity coefficients among these hybrids are 0·84 or higher, suggesting that these popular hybrid cultivars are genetically much closer than previously thought. This genetic similarity may imply that A. nitidum and A. crispum are likely progenitors of A. commutatum. • Conclusions Results of this study demonstrate the efficiency and ease of using AFLP markers for investigating genetic relationships of ornamental foliage plants, a group usually propagated vegetatively. The AFLP markers developed will help future Aglaonema cultivar identification, germplasm conservation and

  14. Scanning genomic areas under selection sweep and association mapping as tools to identify horticultural important genes in watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) contains 88% water, sugars, and several important health-related compounds, including lycopene, citrulline, arginine, and glutathione. The current genetic diversity study uses microsatellites with known map positions to identify genomic regions that under...

  15. A genetic linkage map of the Durum x Triticum dicoccoides backcross population based on SSRs and AFLP markers, and QTL analysis for milling traits.

    PubMed

    Elouafi, I; Nachit, M M

    2004-02-01

    Durum wheat ( Triticum turgidum L. var durum) is mainly produced and consumed in the Mediterranean region; it is used to produce several specific end-products; such as local pasta, couscous and burghul. To study the genetics of grain-milling quality traits, chromosomal locations, and interaction with the environment, a genetic linkage map of durum was constructed and the quantitative trait loci QTLs for the milling-related traits, test weight (TW) and thousand-kernel weight (TKW), were identified. The population constituted 114 recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross: Omrabi 5 /Triticum dicoccoides 600545// Omrabi 5. TW and TKW were analyzed over 18 environments (sites x years). Single-sequence-repeat markers (SSRs), Amplified-fragment-length-polymorphism markers (AFLPs), and seed storage proteins (SSPs) showed a high level of polymorphism (>60%). The map was constructed with 124 SSRs, 149 AFLPs and 6 SSPs; its length covered 2,288.8 cM (8.2 cM/marker). The map showed high synteny with previous wheat maps, and both SSRs and AFLPs mapped evenly across the genome, with more markers in the B genome. However, some rearrangements were observed. For TW, a high genotypic effect was detected and two QTLs with epistasic effect were identified on 7AS and 6BS, explaining 30% of the total variation. The TKW showed a significant transgressive inheritance and five QTLs were identified, explaining 32% of the total variation, out of which 25% was of a genetic nature, and showing QTLxE interaction. The major TKW-QTLs were around the centromere region of 6B. For both traits, Omrabi 5 alleles had a significant positive effect. This population will be used to determine other QTLs of interest, as its parents are likely to harbor different genes for diseases and drought tolerance. PMID:14676946

  16. Dense genetic linkage maps of three Populus species (Populus deltoides, P. nigra and P. trichocarpa) based on AFLP and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, M T; Storme, V; Ivens, B; Gusmão, J; Liu, B H; Hostyn, V; Van Slycken, J; Van Montagu, M; Boerjan, W

    2001-01-01

    Populus deltoides, P. nigra, and P. trichocarpa are the most important species for poplar breeding programs worldwide. In addition, Populus has become a model for fundamental research on trees. Linkage maps were constructed for these three species by analyzing progeny of two controlled crosses sharing the same female parent, Populus deltoides cv. S9-2 x P. nigra cv. Ghoy and P. deltoides cv. S9-2 x P. trichocarpa cv. V24. The two-way pseudotestcross mapping strategy was used to construct the maps. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers that segregated 1:1 were used to form the four parental maps. Microsatellites and sequence-tagged sites were used to align homoeologous groups between the maps and to merge linkage groups within the individual maps. Linkage analysis and alignment of the homoeologous groups resulted in 566 markers distributed over 19 groups for P. deltoides covering 86% of the genome, 339 markers distributed over 19 groups for P. trichocarpa covering 73%, and 369 markers distributed over 28 groups for P. nigra covering 61%. Several tests for randomness showed that the AFLP markers were randomly distributed over the genome. PMID:11404342

  17. Assessing The Spatial Dependence of Adaptive Loci in 43 European and Western Asian Goat Breeds Using AFLP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Negrini, Riccardo; Nicoloso, Letizia; Crepaldi, Paola; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background During the past decades, neutral DNA markers have been extensively employed to study demography, population genetics and structure in livestock, but less interest has been devoted to the evaluation of livestock adaptive potential through the identification of genomic regions likely to be under natural selection. Methodology/Principal findings Landscape genomics can greatly benefit the entire livestock system through the identification of genotypes better adapted to specific or extreme environmental conditions. Therefore we analyzed 101 AFLP markers in 43 European and Western Asian goat breeds both with Matsam software, based on a correlative approach (SAM), and with Mcheza and Bayescan, two FST based software able to detect markers carrying signatures of natural selection. Matsam identified four loci possibly under natural selection – also confirmed by FST-outlier methods – and significantly associated with environmental variables such as diurnal temperature range, frequency of precipitation, relative humidity and solar radiation. Conclusions/Significance These results show that landscape genomics can provide useful information on the environmental factors affecting the adaptive potential of livestock living in specific climatic conditions. Besides adding conservation value to livestock genetic resources, this knowledge may lead to the development of novel molecular tools useful to preserve the adaptive potential of local breeds during genetic improvement programs, and to increase the adaptability of industrial breeds to changing environments. PMID:24497965

  18. DNA methylation and methylation polymorphism in ecotypes of Jatropha curcas L. using methylation-sensitive AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Mastan, Shaik G; Rathore, Mangal S; Bhatt, Vacha D; Chikara, J; Ghosh, A

    2014-12-01

    We investigated DNA methylation and polymorphism in the methylated DNA using AFLP based methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MS-AFLP) markers in ecotypes of Jatropha curcas L. growing in similar and different geo-ecological conditions. Three ecotypes growing in different geo-ecological conditions with environmental heterogeneity (Group-1) and five ecotypes growing in similar environmental conditions (Group-2) were assessed. In ecotypes growing in group-1, 44.32 % DNA was methylated and of which 93.59 % DNA was polymorphic. While in group-2, 32.27 % DNA was methylated, of which 51.64 % DNA was polymorphic. In site 1 and site 2 of group-1, overall methylation was 18.94 and 22.44 % respectively with difference of 3.5 %, while overall polymorphism was 41.14 and 39.23 % with a difference of 1.91 %. In site 1 and site 2 of group-2, overall methylation was 24.68 and 24.18 % respectively with difference of 0.5 %, while overall polymorphism was 12.19 and 12.65 % with a difference of 0.46 %. The difference of methylation percentage and percentage of methylation polymorphism throughout the genome of J. curcas at site 1 and 2 of group-1 is higher than that of J. curcas at site 1 and 2 of group-2. These results correlated the physico-chemical properties of soil at these sites. The variations of physico-chemical properties of soil at Chorwadla (site 1 in group-1 and site 2 in group-2) compared to the soil at Brahmapur (site 2 in group-1) is higher than that of soil at Neswad (site 1 in group-2). The study suggests that these homologous nucleotide sequences probably play important role in ecotype adaptation to environmental heterogeneity by creating epiallelic variations hence in evolution of ecotypes/clines or forms of species showing phenotypic/genotypic differences in different geographical areas. PMID:25227523

  19. Revisiting AFLP fingerprinting for an unbiased assessment of genetic structure and differentiation of taurine and zebu cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Descendants from the extinct aurochs (Bos primigenius), taurine (Bos taurus) and zebu cattle (Bos indicus) were domesticated 10,000 years ago in Southwestern and Southern Asia, respectively, and colonized the world undergoing complex events of admixture and selection. Molecular data, in particular genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, can complement historic and archaeological records to elucidate these past events. However, SNP ascertainment in cattle has been optimized for taurine breeds, imposing limitations to the study of diversity in zebu cattle. As amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers are discovered and genotyped as the samples are assayed, this type of marker is free of ascertainment bias. In order to obtain unbiased assessments of genetic differentiation and structure in taurine and zebu cattle, we analyzed a dataset of 135 AFLP markers in 1,593 samples from 13 zebu and 58 taurine breeds, representing nine continental areas. Results We found a geographical pattern of expected heterozygosity in European taurine breeds decreasing with the distance from the domestication centre, arguing against a large-scale introgression from European or African aurochs. Zebu cattle were found to be at least as diverse as taurine cattle. Western African zebu cattle were found to have diverged more from Indian zebu than South American zebu. Model-based clustering and ancestry informative markers analyses suggested that this is due to taurine introgression. Although a large part of South American zebu cattle also descend from taurine cows, we did not detect significant levels of taurine ancestry in these breeds, probably because of systematic backcrossing with zebu bulls. Furthermore, limited zebu introgression was found in Podolian taurine breeds in Italy. Conclusions The assessment of cattle diversity reported here contributes an unbiased global view to genetic differentiation and structure of taurine and zebu cattle

  20. High-resolution genome-wide scan of genes, gene-networks and cellular systems impacting the yeast ionome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To balance the demand for uptake of essential elements with their potential toxicity living cells have complex regulatory mechanisms. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen to identify genes that impact the elemental composition (‘ionome’) of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using inductively coupled...

  1. A genome-wide scan of selective sweeps in two broiler chicken lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genomic regions controlling abdominal fatness (AF) were studied in the Northeast Agricultural University broiler line divergently selected for AF. In this study, the chicken 60KSNP chip and extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH) test were used to detect genome-wide signatures of AF. Results A total of 5357 and 5593 core regions were detected in the lean and fat lines, and 51 and 57 reached a significant level (P<0.01), respectively. A number of genes in the significant core regions, including RB1, BBS7, MAOA, MAOB, EHBP1, LRP2BP, LRP1B, MYO7A, MYO9A and PRPSAP1, were detected. These genes may be important for AF deposition in chickens. Conclusions We provide a genome-wide map of selection signatures in the chicken genome, and make a contribution to the better understanding the mechanisms of selection for AF content in chickens. The selection for low AF in commercial breeding using this information will accelerate the breeding progress. PMID:23241142

  2. Genome-Wide Scan of Gastrointestinal Nematode Resistance in Closed Angus Population Selected for Minimized Influence of MHC

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eui-Soo; Sonstegard, Tad S.; da Silva, Marcos V. G. B.; Gasbarre, Louis C.; Van Tassell, Curtis P.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic markers associated with parasite indicator traits are ideal targets for study of marker assisted selection aimed at controlling infections that reduce herd use of anthelminthics. For this study, we collected gastrointestinal (GI) nematode fecal egg count (FEC) data from post-weaning animals of an Angus resource population challenged to a 26 week natural exposure on pasture. In all, data from 487 animals was collected over a 16 year period between 1992 and 2007, most of which were selected for a specific DRB1 allele to reduce the influence of potential allelic variant effects of the MHC locus. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) based on BovineSNP50 genotypes revealed six genomic regions located on bovine Chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 15 and 27; which were significantly associated (-log10 p=4.3) with Box-Cox transformed mean FEC (BC-MFEC). DAVID analysis of the genes within the significant genomic regions suggested a correlation between our results and annotation for genes involved in inflammatory response to infection. Furthermore, ROH and selection signature analyses provided strong evidence that the genomic regions associated BC-MFEC have not been affected by local autozygosity or recent experimental selection. These findings provide useful information for parasite resistance prediction for young grazing cattle and suggest new candidate gene targets for development of disease-modifying therapies or future studies of host response to GI parasite infection. PMID:25803687

  3. Detecting Loci under recent positive selection in dairy and beef cattle by combining different genome-wide scan methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the methodologies available for the detection of positive selection from genomic data vary in terms of assumptions and execution, weak correlations are expected among them. However, if there is any given signal that is consistently supported across different tests, it might be a strong evidence o...

  4. Genome-wide scans of genetic variants for psychophysiological endophenotypes: introduction to this special issue of Psychophysiology.

    PubMed

    Iacono, William G

    2014-12-01

    This special issue addresses the heritability and molecular genetic basis of 17 putative endophenotypes involving resting EEG power, P300 event-related potential amplitude, electrodermal orienting and habituation, antisaccade eye tracking, and affective modulation of the startle eye blink. These measures were collected from approximately 4,900 twins and parents who provided DNA samples through their participation in the Minnesota Twin Family Study. Included are papers that detail the methodology followed, genome-wide association analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms and genes, analysis of rare variants in the human exome, and a whole genome sequencing study. Also included are 11 articles by leading experts in psychophysiology and genetics that provide perspective and commentary. A final integrative report summarizes findings and addresses issues raised. This introduction provides an overview of the aims and rationale behind these studies. PMID:25387700

  5. Evolution of the polyploid north-west Iberian Leucanthemum pluriflorum clan (Compositae, Anthemideae) based on plastid DNA sequence variation and AFLP fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Roland; Vogt, Robert; Oberprieler, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Leucanthemum is a species-rich polyploid complex from southern and central Europe, comprising 41 species with ploidy ranging from 2x to 22x. The present contribution aims at reconstructing the evolutionary history of a geographically isolated species group (the L. pluriflorum clan) from the north-west Iberian Peninsula comprising the diploid L. pluriflorum, the tetraploids L. ircutianum subsp. pseudosylvaticum and L. × corunnense (a putative hybrid taxon based on crossing between L. pluriflorum and L. merinoi), and the hexaploids L. sylvaticum and L. merinoi. Methods Chromosome number variation (determined flow cytometrically) and sequence variation were analysed for two intergenic spacer regions on the plastid genome (psbA-trnH and trnC-petN) for individuals from 54 populations in combination with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting of 246 representative individuals from these populations. Key Results Plastid sequence data revealed that all surveyed members of the L. pluriflorum clan possess plastid haplotypes that are closely related to each other and distinctly separated from other Leucanthemum species. AFLP fingerprinting resulted in allopolyploid fragment patterns for most of the polyploid populations, except for the tetraploid L. × corunnense and a further tetraploid population in northern Galicia, which cluster with the diploids rather than with the other polyploids. In silico modelling of (auto)tetraploid AFLP genotypes further corroborates the allopolyploid nature of L. ircutianum subsp. pseudosylvaticum, L. sylvaticum and L. merinoi. Conclusions The present study provides evidence for recognizing one diploid (L. pluriflorum), one autotetraploid (L. corunnense), one allotetraploid (L. pseudosylvaticum) and one allohexaploid (L. sylvaticum with the two geographically and ecologically differentiated subspecies subsp. sylvaticum and subsp. merinoi) in the L. pluriflorum clan. It also has implications

  6. Family based genome-wide copy number scan identifies complex rearrangements at 17q21.31 in dyslexics.

    PubMed

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Saldanha, Marita; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-10-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a complex heritable disorder with unexpected difficulty in learning to read and spell despite adequate intelligence, education, environment, and normal senses. We performed genome-wide screening for copy number variations (CNVs) in 10 large Indian dyslexic families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results revealed the complex genomic rearrangements due to one non-contiguous deletion and five contiguous micro duplications and micro deletions at 17q21.31 region in three dyslexic families. CNVs in this region harbor the genes KIAA1267, LRRC37A, ARL17A/B, NSFP1, and NSF. The CNVs in case 1 and case 2 at this locus were found to be in homozygous state and case 3 was a de novo CNV. These CNVs were found with at least one CNV having a common break and end points in the parents. This cluster of genes containing NSF is implicated in learning, cognition, and memory, though not formally associated with dyslexia. Molecular network analysis of these and other dyslexia related module genes suggests NSF and other genes to be associated with cellular/vesicular membrane fusion and synaptic transmission. Thus, we suggest that NSF in this cluster would be the nearest gene responsible for the learning disability phenotype. PMID:25139666

  7. PerPlot & PerScan: tools for analysis of DNA curvature-related periodicity in genomic nucleotide sequences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Periodic spacing of short adenine or thymine runs phased with DNA helical period of ~10.5 bp is associated with intrinsic DNA curvature and deformability, which play important roles in DNA-protein interactions and in the organization of chromosomes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Local differences in DNA sequence periodicity have been linked to differences in gene expression in some organisms. Despite the significance of these periodic patterns, there are virtually no publicly accessible tools for their analysis. Results We present novel tools suitable for assessments of DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity in nucleotide sequences at the genome scale. Utility of the present software is demonstrated on a comparison of sequence periodicities in the genomes of Haemophilus influenzae, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Arabidopsis thaliana. The software can be accessed through a web interface and the programs are also available for download. Conclusions The present software is suitable for comparing DNA curvature-related sequence periodicity among different genomes as well as for analysis of intrachromosomal heterogeneity of the sequence periodicity. It provides a quick and convenient way to detect anomalous regions of chromosomes that could have unusual structural and functional properties and/or distinct evolutionary history. PMID:22587738

  8. Genome-Wide Linkage Scan for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: Influences of Ancestry and Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xuejun; Liu, Yutao; Gibson, Jason R.; Santiago-Turla, Cecilia; Larocque-Abramson, Karen R.; Del Bono, Elizabeth; Challa, Pratap; Herndon, Leon W.; Akafo, Stephen; Wiggs, Janey L.; Schmidt, Silke; Hauser, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma and one of the leading causes of vision loss worldwide. The genetic etiology of POAG is complex and poorly understood. The purpose of this work is to identify genomic regions of interest linked to POAG. This study is the largest genetic linkage study of POAG performed to date: genomic DNA samples from 786 subjects (538 Caucasian ancestry, 248 African ancestry) were genotyped using either the Illumina GoldenGate Linkage 4 Panel or the Illumina Infinium Human Linkage-12 Panel. A total of 5233 SNPs was analyzed in 134 multiplex POAG families (89 Caucasian ancestry, 45 African ancestry). Parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses were performed on the overall dataset and within race-specific datasets (Caucasian ancestry and African ancestry). Ordered subset analysis was used to stratify the data on the basis of age of glaucoma diagnosis. Novel linkage regions were identified on chromosomes 1 and 20, and two previously described loci—GLC1D on chromosome 8 and GLC1I on chromosome 15—were replicated. These data will prove valuable in the context of interpreting results from genome-wide association studies for POAG. PMID:21765929

  9. Functional genomic response of apple to fire blight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this project is to use a functional genomic analysis to characterize the response of apple (Malus x domestica) to fire blight disease and in doing so, identify new opportunities for improving fire blight resistance. cDNA suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA-AFLP analysis were ...

  10. Genome scan for cognitive trait loci of dyslexia: Rapid naming and rapid switching of letters, numbers, and colors.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Kevin B; Raskind, Wendy H; Berninger, Virginia W; Matsushita, Mark M; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2014-06-01

    Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is a common developmental disorder that affects 5-12% of school-aged children. Dyslexia and its component phenotypes, assessed categorically or quantitatively, have complex genetic bases. The ability to rapidly name letters, numbers, and colors from rows presented visually correlates strongly with reading in multiple languages and is a valid predictor of reading and spelling impairment. Performance on measures of rapid naming and switching, RAN and RAS, is stable throughout elementary school years, with slowed performance persisting in adults who still manifest dyslexia. Targeted analyses of dyslexia candidate regions have included RAN measures, but only one other genome-wide linkage study has been reported. As part of a broad effort to identify genetic contributors to dyslexia, we performed combined oligogenic segregation and linkage analyses of measures of RAN and RAS in a family-based cohort ascertained through probands with dyslexia. We obtained strong evidence for linkage of RAN letters to the DYX3 locus on chromosome 2p and RAN colors to chromosome 10q, but were unable to confirm the chromosome 6p21 linkage detected for a composite measure of RAN colors and objects in the previous genome-wide study. PMID:24807833

  11. Evolution of the pygmy phenotype: evidence of positive selection fro genome-wide scans in African, Asian, and Melanesian pygmies.

    PubMed

    Migliano, Andrea Bamberg; Romero, Irene Gallego; Metspalu, Mait; Leavesley, Matthew; Pagani, Luca; Antao, Tiago; Huang, Da-Wei; Sherman, Brad T; Siddle, Katharine; Scholes, Clarissa; Hudjashov, Georgi; Kaitokai, Elton; Babalu, Avis; Belatti, Maggie; Cagan, Alex; Hopkinshaw, Byrony; Shaw, Colin; Nelis, Mari; Metspalu, Ene; Mägi, Reedik; Lempicki, Richard A; Villems, Richard; Lahr, Marta Mirazon; Kivisild, Toomas

    2013-01-01

    Human pygmy populations inhabit different regions of the world, from Africa to Melanesia. In Asia, short-statured populations are often referred to as "negritos." Their short stature has been interpreted as a consequence of thermoregulatory, nutritional, and/or locomotory adaptations to life in tropical forests. A more recent hypothesis proposes that their stature is the outcome of a life history trade-off in high-mortality environments, where early reproduction is favored and, consequently, early sexual maturation and early growth cessation have coevolved. Some serological evidence of deficiencies in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor axis have been previously associated with pygmies' short stature. Using genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype data, we first tested whether different negrito groups living in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea are closely related and then investigated genomic signals of recent positive selection in African, Asian, and Papuan pygmy populations. We found that negritos in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea are genetically more similar to their nonpygmy neighbors than to one another and have experienced positive selection at different genes. These results indicate that geographically distant pygmy groups are likely to have evolved their short stature independently. We also found that selection on common height variants is unlikely to explain their short stature and that different genes associated with growth, thyroid function, and sexual development are under selection in different pygmy groups. PMID:24297229

  12. [Ethical issues raised by direct-to-consumer personal genome analysis and whole body scans: discussion and contextualisation of a report by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics].

    PubMed

    Buyx, Alena M; Strech, Daniel; Schmidt, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The paradigm of personalised medicine has many different facets, further to the application of pharmacogenetics. We examine here (direct-to-consumer) personal genome analysis and whole body scans and summarise findings from the Nuffield Council's on Bioethics recent report "Medical profiling and online medicine: the ethics of 'personalised healthcare' in a consumer age". We describe the current situation in Germany with regard to access to such services, and contextualise the Nuffield Council's report with summaries of position statements by German professional bodies. We conclude with three points that merit examination further to the analyses of the Nuffield Council's report and the German professional bodies. These concern the role of indirect evidence in considering restrictive policies, the question of whether regulations should require commercial providers to contribute to the generation of better evidence, and the option of using data from evaluations in combination with indirect evidence in justifying restrictive policies. PMID:22325105

  13. Meta-Analysis of 13 Genome Scans Reveals Multiple Cleft Lip/Palate Genes with Novel Loci on 9q21 and 2q32-35

    PubMed Central

    Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Cooper, Margaret E.; Goldstein, Toby; Maher, Brion S.; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Schultz, Rebecca; Mansilla, M. Adela; Field, L. Leigh; Liu, You-e; Prescott, Natalie; Malcolm, Sue; Winter, Robin; Ray, Ajit; Moreno, Lina; Valencia, Consuelo; Neiswanger, Katherine; Wyszynski, Diego F.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Albacha-Hejazi, Hasan; Beaty, Terri H.; McIntosh, Iain; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Tunçbilek, Gökhan; Edwards, Matthew; Harkin, Louise; Scott, Rodney; Roddick, Laurence G.

    2004-01-01

    Isolated or nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common birth defect with a complex etiology. A 10-cM genome scan of 388 extended multiplex families with CL/P from seven diverse populations (2,551 genotyped individuals) revealed CL/P genes in six chromosomal regions, including a novel region at 9q21 (heterogeneity LOD score [HLOD]=6.6). In addition, meta-analyses with the addition of results from 186 more families (six populations; 1,033 genotyped individuals) showed genomewide significance for 10 more regions, including another novel region at 2q32-35 (P=.0004). These are the first genomewide significant linkage results ever reported for CL/P, and they represent an unprecedented demonstration of the power of linkage analysis to detect multiple genes simultaneously for a complex disorder. PMID:15185170

  14. Sex-specific variability and a 'cage effect' independently mask a neuropathic pain quantitative trait locus detected in a whole genome scan.

    PubMed

    Devor, Marshall; Gilad, Amit; Arbilly, Michal; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Yakir, Benjamin; Raber, Pnina; Minert, Anne; Pisanté, Anne; Darvasi, Ariel

    2007-08-01

    Sex and environment may dramatically affect genetic studies, and thus should be carefully considered. Beginning with two inbred mouse strains with contrasting phenotype in the neuroma model of neuropathic pain (autotomy), we established a backcross population on which we conducted a genome-wide scan. The backcross population was partially maintained in small social groups and partially in isolation. The genome scan detected one previously reported quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 15 (pain1), but no additional QTLs were found. Interestingly, group caging introduced phenotypic noise large enough to completely mask the genetic effect of the chromosome 15 QTL. The reason appears to be that group-caging animals from the low-autotomy strain together with animals from the high-autotomy strain dramatically increases autotomy in the otherwise low-autotomy mice (males or females). The converse, suppression of pain behaviour in the high-autotomy strain when caged with the low-autotomy strain was also observed, but only in females. Even in isolated mice, the genetic effect of the chromosome 15 QTL was significant only in females. To determine why, we evaluated autotomy levels of females in 12 different inbred stains of mice and compared them to previously reported levels for males. Strikingly larger environmental variation was observed in males than in females for this pain phenotype. The high baseline variance in males can explain the difficulty in detecting the genetic effect, which was readily seen in females. Our study emphasizes the importance of sex and environment in the genetic analysis of pain. PMID:17686043

  15. Genome scan for spelling deficits: effects of verbal IQ on models of transmission and trait gene localization.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Kevin; Matsushita, Mark; Berninger, Virginia W; Raskind, Wendy H; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2011-01-01

    Dyslexia is a complex learning disability with evidence for a genetic basis. Strategies that may be useful for dissecting its genetic basis include the study of component phenotypes, which may simplify the underlying genetic complexity, and use of an analytic approach that accounts for the multilocus nature of the trait to guide the investigation and increase power to detect individual loci. Here we present results of a genetic analysis of spelling disability as a component phenotype. Spelling disability is informative in analysis of extended pedigrees because it persists into adulthood. We show that a small number of hypothesized loci are sufficient to explain the inheritance of the trait in our sample, and that each of these loci maps to one of four genomic regions. Individual trait models and locations are a function of whether a verbal IQ adjustment is included, suggesting mediation through both IQ-related and unrelated pathways. PMID:20852926

  16. Single-copy nuclear gene primers for Streptanthus and other Brassicaceae from genomic scans, published data, and ESTs1

    PubMed Central

    Cacho, N. Ivalú; Strauss, Sharon Y.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: We report 11 primer sets for nine single-copy nuclear genes in Streptanthus and other Thelypodieae (Brassicaceae) and their utility at tribal-level and species-level phylogenetics in this poorly resolved group. • Methods and Results: We selected regions based on a cross-referenced matrix of previous studies and public Brassica expressed sequence tags. To design primers, we used alignments of low-depth-coverage Illumina sequencing of genomic DNA for two species of Brassica mapped onto Arabidopsis thaliana. We report several primer combinations for five regions that consistently amplified a single band and yielded high-quality sequences for at least 70% of the species assayed, and for four additional regions whose utility might be clade specific. • Conclusions: Our primers will be useful in improving resolution at shallow depths across the Thelypodieae, and likely in other Brassicaceae. PMID:25202560

  17. A genome-wide "pleiotropy scan" does not identify new susceptibility loci for estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Campa, Daniele; Barrdahl, Myrto; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Severi, Gianluca; Diver, W Ryan; Siddiq, Afshan; Chanock, Stephen; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Berg, Christine D; Buys, Saundra S; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Le Marchand, Loïc; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Lindström, Sara; Hunter, David J; Hankinson, Susan E; Willett, Walter C; Kraft, Peter; Cox, David G; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Tjønneland, Anne; Dossus, Laure; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Panico, Salvatore; van Gils, Carla H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Barricarte, Aurelio; Sund, Malin; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham; Southey, Melissa; Baglietto, Laura; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 15-30% of all breast cancer tumors are estrogen receptor negative (ER-). Compared with ER-positive (ER+) disease they have an earlier age at onset and worse prognosis. Despite the vast number of risk variants identified for numerous cancer types, only seven loci have been unambiguously identified for ER-negative breast cancer. With the aim of identifying new susceptibility SNPs for this disease we performed a pleiotropic genome-wide association study (GWAS). We selected 3079 SNPs associated with a human complex trait or disease at genome-wide significance level (P<5 × 10(-8)) to perform a secondary analysis of an ER-negative GWAS from the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3), including 1998 cases and 2305 controls from prospective studies. We then tested the top ten associations (i.e. with the lowest P-values) using three additional populations with a total sample size of 3509 ER+ cases, 2543 ER- cases and 7031 healthy controls. None of the 3079 selected variants in the BPC3 ER-GWAS were significant at the adjusted threshold. 186 variants were associated with ER- breast cancer risk at a conventional threshold of P<0.05, with P-values ranging from 0.049 to 2.3 × 10(-4). None of the variants reached statistical significance in the replication phase. In conclusion, this study did not identify any novel susceptibility loci for ER-breast cancer using a "pleiotropic approach". PMID:24523857

  18. Genome-wide linkage scan for contraction velocity characteristics of knee musculature in the Leuven Genes for Muscular Strength Study.

    PubMed

    De Mars, Gunther; Windelinckx, An; Huygens, Wim; Peeters, Maarten W; Beunen, Gaston P; Aerssens, Jeroen; Vlietinck, Robert; Thomis, Martine A I

    2008-09-17

    The torque-velocity relationship is known to be affected by ageing, decreasing its protective role in the prevention of falls. Interindividual variability in this torque-velocity relationship is partly determined by genetic factors (h(2): 44-67%). As a first attempt, this genome-wide linkage study aimed to identify chromosomal regions linked to the torque-velocity relationship of the knee flexors and extensors. A selection of 283 informative male siblings (17-36 yr), belonging to 105 families, was used to conduct a genome-wide SNP-based (Illumina Linkage IVb panel) multipoint linkage analysis for the torque-velocity relationship of the knee flexors and extensors. The strongest evidence for linkage was found at 15q23 for the torque-velocity slope of the knee extensors (TVSE). Other interesting linkage regions with LOD scores >2 were found at 7p12.3 [logarithm of the odds ratio (LOD) = 2.03, P = 0.0011] for the torque-velocity ratio of the knee flexors (TVRF), at 2q14.3 (LOD = 2.25, P = 0.0006) for TVSE, and at 4p14 and 18q23 for the torque-velocity ratio of the knee extensors TVRE (LOD = 2.23 and 2.08; P = 0.0007 and 0.001, respectively). We conclude that many small contributing genes are involved in causing variation in the torque-velocity relationship of the knee flexor and extensor muscles. Several earlier reported candidate genes for muscle strength and muscle mass and new candidates are harbored within or in close vicinity of the linkage regions reported in the present study. PMID:18682575

  19. Detecting Loci under Recent Positive Selection in Dairy and Beef Cattle by Combining Different Genome-Wide Scan Methods

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Yuri Tani; Pérez O’Brien, Ana Maria; Sonstegard, Tad Stewart; Van Tassell, Curtis Paul; do Carmo, Adriana Santana; Mészáros, Gábor; Sölkner, Johann; Garcia, José Fernando

    2013-01-01

    As the methodologies available for the detection of positive selection from genomic data vary in terms of assumptions and execution, weak correlations are expected among them. However, if there is any given signal that is consistently supported across different methodologies, it is strong evidence that the locus has been under past selection. In this paper, a straightforward frequentist approach based on the Stouffer Method to combine P-values across different tests for evidence of recent positive selection in common variations, as well as strategies for extracting biological information from the detected signals, were described and applied to high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data generated from dairy and beef cattle (taurine and indicine). The ancestral Bovinae allele state of over 440,000 SNP is also reported. Using this combination of methods, highly significant (P<3.17×10−7) population-specific sweeps pointing out to candidate genes and pathways that may be involved in beef and dairy production were identified. The most significant signal was found in the Cornichon homolog 3 gene (CNIH3) in Brown Swiss (P = 3.82×10−12), and may be involved in the regulation of pre-ovulatory luteinizing hormone surge. Other putative pathways under selection are the glucolysis/gluconeogenesis, transcription machinery and chemokine/cytokine activity in Angus; calpain-calpastatin system and ribosome biogenesis in Brown Swiss; and gangliosides deposition in milk fat globules in Gyr. The composite method, combined with the strategies applied to retrieve functional information, may be a useful tool for surveying genome-wide selective sweeps and providing insights in to the source of selection. PMID:23696874

  20. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10−8) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  1. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10(-8)) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  2. Signatures of selection in the Iberian honey bee (Apis mellifera iberiensis) revealed by a genome scan analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Galarza, Julio; Henriques, Dora; Johnston, J Spencer; Azevedo, João C; Patton, John C; Muñoz, Irene; De la Rúa, Pilar; Pinto, M Alice

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the genetic mechanisms of adaptive population divergence is one of the most fundamental endeavours in evolutionary biology and is becoming increasingly important as it will allow predictions about how organisms will respond to global environmental crisis. This is particularly important for the honey bee, a species of unquestionable ecological and economical importance that has been exposed to increasing human-mediated selection pressures. Here, we conducted a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genome scan in honey bees collected across an environmental gradient in Iberia and used four FST -based outlier tests to identify genomic regions exhibiting signatures of selection. Additionally, we analysed associations between genetic and environmental data for the identification of factors that might be correlated or act as selective pressures. With these approaches, 4.4% (17 of 383) of outlier loci were cross-validated by four FST -based methods, and 8.9% (34 of 383) were cross-validated by at least three methods. Of the 34 outliers, 15 were found to be strongly associated with one or more environmental variables. Further support for selection, provided by functional genomic information, was particularly compelling for SNP outliers mapped to different genes putatively involved in the same function such as vision, xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune response. This study enabled a more rigorous consideration of selection as the underlying cause of diversity patterns in Iberian honey bees, representing an important first step towards the identification of polymorphisms implicated in local adaptation and possibly in response to recent human-mediated environmental changes. PMID:24118235

  3. A Dominant X-Linked QTL Regulating Pubertal Timing in Mice Found by Whole Genome Scanning and Modified Interval-Specific Congenic Strain Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Guo, Zhengxia; Zhao, Ying; Zhou, Yuxun; Li, Kai; Xing, Zhenghong; Chen, Guoqiang; Liang, Yinming; Jin, Li; Xiao, Junhua

    2008-01-01

    Background Pubertal timing in mammals is triggered by reactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and modulated by both genetic and environmental factors. Strain-dependent differences in vaginal opening among inbred mouse strains suggest that genetic background contribute significantly to the puberty timing, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a genome-wide scanning for linkage in reciprocal crosses between two strains, C3H/HeJ (C3H) and C57BL6/J (B6), which differed significantly in the pubertal timing. Vaginal opening (VO) was used to characterize pubertal timing in female mice, and the age at VO of all female mice (two parental strains, F1 and F2 progeny) was recorded. A genome-wide search was performed in 260 phenotypically extreme F2 mice out of 464 female progeny of the F1 intercrosses to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling this trait. A QTL significantly associated was mapped to the DXMit166 marker (15.5 cM, LOD = 3.86, p<0.01) in the reciprocal cross population (C3HB6F2). This QTL contributed 2.1 days to the timing of VO, which accounted for 32.31% of the difference between the original strains. Further study showed that the QTL was B6-dominant and explained 10.5% of variation to this trait with a power of 99.4% at an alpha level of 0.05.The location of the significant ChrX QTL found by genome scanning was then fine-mapped to a region of ∼2.5 cM between marker DXMit68 and rs29053133 by generating and phenotyping a panel of 10 modified interval-specific congenic strains (mISCSs). Conclusions/Significance Such findings in our study lay a foundation for positional cloning of genes regulating the timing of puberty, and also reveal the fact that chromosome X (the sex chromosome) does carry gene(s) which take part in the regulative pathway of the pubertal timing in mice. PMID:18725948

  4. A genome scan revealed significant associations of growth traits with a major QTL and GHR2 in tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Fei; Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Jian; Fu, Gui Hong; Lin, Grace; Tu, Rong Jian; Wan, Zi Yi; Quek, Delia; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-01-01

    Growth is an important trait in animal breeding. However, the genetic effects underpinning fish growth variability are still poorly understood. QTL mapping and analysis of candidate genes are effective methods to address this issue. We conducted a genome-wide QTL analysis for growth in tilapia. A total of 10, 7 and 8 significant QTLs were identified for body weight, total length and standard length at 140 dph, respectively. The majority of these QTLs were sex-specific. One major QTL for growth traits was identified in the sex-determining locus in LG1, explaining 71.7%, 67.2% and 64.9% of the phenotypic variation (PV) of body weight, total length and standard length, respectively. In addition, a candidate gene GHR2 in a QTL was significantly associated with body weight, explaining 13.1% of PV. Real-time qPCR revealed that different genotypes at the GHR2 locus influenced the IGF-1 expression level. The markers located in the major QTL for growth traits could be used in marker-assisted selection of tilapia. The associations between GHR2 variants and growth traits suggest that the GHR2 gene should be an important gene that explains the difference in growth among tilapia species. PMID:25435025

  5. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Robino, Antonietta; van der Spek, Ashley; Navarini, Luciano; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using additive, recessive and dominant models for analysis. This has uncovered a significant association in the PDSS2 gene under the recessive model that has been replicated in an independent cohort from the Netherlands (ERF). The identified gene has been shown to negatively regulate the expression of the caffeine metabolism genes and can thus be linked to coffee consumption. Further bioinformatics analysis of eQTL and histone marks from Roadmap data has evidenced a possible role of the identified SNPs in regulating PDSS2 gene expression through enhancers present in its intron. Our results highlight a novel gene which regulates coffee consumption by regulating the expression of the genes linked to caffeine metabolism. Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanism which links PDSS2 and coffee consumption. PMID:27561104

  6. Non-additive genome-wide association scan reveals a new gene associated with habitual coffee consumption

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Robino, Antonietta; van der Spek, Ashley; Navarini, Luciano; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Gasparini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages world-wide and one of the primary sources of caffeine intake. Given its important health and economic impact, the underlying genetics of its consumption has been widely studied. Despite these efforts, much has still to be uncovered. In particular, the use of non-additive genetic models may uncover new information about the genetic variants driving coffee consumption. We have conducted a genome-wide association study in two Italian populations using additive, recessive and dominant models for analysis. This has uncovered a significant association in the PDSS2 gene under the recessive model that has been replicated in an independent cohort from the Netherlands (ERF). The identified gene has been shown to negatively regulate the expression of the caffeine metabolism genes and can thus be linked to coffee consumption. Further bioinformatics analysis of eQTL and histone marks from Roadmap data has evidenced a possible role of the identified SNPs in regulating PDSS2 gene expression through enhancers present in its intron. Our results highlight a novel gene which regulates coffee consumption by regulating the expression of the genes linked to caffeine metabolism. Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanism which links PDSS2 and coffee consumption. PMID:27561104

  7. A genome scan revealed significant associations of growth traits with a major QTL and GHR2 in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Sun, Fei; Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Jian; Fu, Gui Hong; Lin, Grace; Tu, Rong Jian; Wan, Zi Yi; Quek, Delia; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-01-01

    Growth is an important trait in animal breeding. However, the genetic effects underpinning fish growth variability are still poorly understood. QTL mapping and analysis of candidate genes are effective methods to address this issue. We conducted a genome-wide QTL analysis for growth in tilapia. A total of 10, 7 and 8 significant QTLs were identified for body weight, total length and standard length at 140 dph, respectively. The majority of these QTLs were sex-specific. One major QTL for growth traits was identified in the sex-determining locus in LG1, explaining 71.7%, 67.2% and 64.9% of the phenotypic variation (PV) of body weight, total length and standard length, respectively. In addition, a candidate gene GHR2 in a QTL was significantly associated with body weight, explaining 13.1% of PV. Real-time qPCR revealed that different genotypes at the GHR2 locus influenced the IGF-1 expression level. The markers located in the major QTL for growth traits could be used in marker-assisted selection of tilapia. The associations between GHR2 variants and growth traits suggest that the GHR2 gene should be an important gene that explains the difference in growth among tilapia species. PMID:25435025

  8. Integration of genome and phenotypic scanning gives evidence of genetic structure in Mesoamerican common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces from the southwest of Europe.

    PubMed

    Santalla, M; De Ron, A M; De La Fuente, M

    2010-05-01

    Southwestern Europe has been considered as a secondary centre of genetic diversity for the common bean. The dispersal of domesticated materials from their centres of origin provides an experimental system that reveals how human selection during cultivation and adaptation to novel environments affects the genetic composition. In this paper, our goal was to elucidate how distinct events could modify the structure and level of genetic diversity in the common bean. The genome-wide genetic composition was analysed at 42 microsatellite loci in individuals of 22 landraces of domesticated common bean from the Mesoamerican gene pool. The accessions were also characterised for phaseolin seed protein and for nine allozyme polymorphisms and phenotypic traits. One of this study's important findings was the complementary information obtained from all the polymorphisms examined. Most of the markers found to be potentially under the influence of selection were located in the proximity of previously mapped genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to important agronomic traits, which indicates that population genomics approaches are very efficient in detecting QTLs. As it was revealed by outlier simple sequence repeats, loci analysis with STRUCTURE software and multivariate analysis of phenotypic data, the landraces were grouped into three clusters according to seed size and shape, vegetative growth habit and genetic resistance. A total of 151 alleles were detected with an average of 4 alleles per locus and an average polymorphism information content of 0.31. Using a model-based approach, on the basis of neutral markers implemented in the software STRUCTURE, three clusters were inferred, which were in good agreement with multivariate analysis. Geographic and genetic distances were congruent with the exception of a few putative hybrids identified in this study, suggesting a predominant effect of isolation by distance. Genomic scans using both markers linked to genes affected

  9. Phylogenetic relationships in the genus Leontopodium (Asteraceae: Gnaphalieae) based on AFLP data

    PubMed Central

    SAFER, STEFAN; TREMETSBERGER, KARIN; GUO, YAN-PING; KOHL, GUDRUN; SAMUEL, MARY R.; STUESSY, TOD F.; STUPPNER, HERMANN

    2012-01-01

    The genus Leontopodium comprises 30–41 species. The centre of diversity is the Sino-Himalayan region in south-western China, where about 15 species occur. The two species native to Europe, L. alpinum (known as the common ‘Edelweiss’) and L. nivale, are part of the cultural heritage of the people living there. Despite its importance, very little is known about the systematics of the genus. Because recent molecular studies have shown that species within this genus are closely related and difficult to distinguish with rDNA and cpDNA data, we used AFLPs to obtain a more detailed understanding of the phylogeny of the genus. Our main aims were as follows: (1) to clarify species relationships within the genus; and (2) to reveal information about the biogeography of the genus. We used AFLPs with six primer combinations to investigate 216 individuals in 38 populations of 16 different species. With AFLPs, we were able to recognize 10 different groups, all of which had strong bootstrap support. These results were also congruent with the morphology-based taxonomy of the genus. Most private and rare fragments were found in the Yunnan region (south-western China) relative to Europe and Mongolia/central China, suggesting a long-lasting in situ history of populations in the centre of diversity of the genus. Our results illustrate the utility of AFLPs to resolve phylogenetic relationships between these closely related species. PMID:23258943

  10. Relationship of European Persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) Cultivars to Asian Cultivars, Characterized Using AFLPs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixty one persimmon (Diospyros kaki Thunb.) selections, including 17 Italian, 11 Spanish, 13 Japanese, six Korean, five Chinese, one Israeli, and eight of unknown origin, were evaluated for genetic differences by AFLP analysis. Relationships among cultivars were evaluated by UPGMA clustering, Neigh...

  11. Molecular Phylogeny of Citrullus Species as Inferred from AFLPs and SSRs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-one accessions of Citrullus spp. belonging to C. lanatus var. lanatus, C. lanatus var. citroids and Citrullus colocynthis were subjected to phylogenetic analysis using combined data sets of AFLPs and SSRs. Tree topologies inferred by Neighbor Joining analysis have resolved the phylogenic rel...

  12. Bootsie: estimation of coefficient of variation of AFLP data by bootstrap analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bootsie is an English-native replacement for ASG Coelho’s “DBOOT” utility for estimating coefficient of variation of a population of AFLP marker data using bootstrapping. Bootsie improves on DBOOT by supporting batch processing, time-to-completion estimation, built-in graphs, and a suite of export t...

  13. Genetic diversity of Aquilegia (Ranunculaceae) species and cultivars assessed by AFLPs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, R R; Gao, Y K; Xu, L J; Zhang, Q X

    2011-01-01

    Species of the genus Aquilegia are exceptionally diverse in their floral morphology and color, commonly known as columbine. They are widely planted ornamentals and are highly attractive for hummingbirds. However, little is known about their genetic diversity. We examined the genetic diversity of the species and cultivars using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Sixteen EcoRI/MseI AFLP primer combinations produced 327 informative polymorphic bands, with a mean of 20.4 bands scored per primer. Jaccard's coefficient of similarity varied from 0.61 to 0.93, indicative of high levels of genetic variation. Cluster analysis using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean algorithm placed the 64 accessions into two main clusters, each divided into two sub-clusters. The AFLP variability was significantly associated with the geographic origins, as the Asian species and the North American species grouped into two distinct clusters. The genetic diversity found among Aquilegia demonstrated the potential value of Chinese germplasm for cultivar improvement and for widening the genetic basis of breeding programs and breeding material selection. We concluded that AFLPs are informative and can provide significant insights for genetic diversity research in columbine species. PMID:21574138

  14. Developing AFLP Markers to study genetic differentiation of the Cotton Fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic comparisons of fleahopper populations in cotton and weed hosts may be useful for identifying the weed sources contributing the majority of fleahoppers in cotton. Molecular markers such as amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) are useful to identify genetic similarities and differen...

  15. Genetic diversity of sweet sorghum germplasm in Mexico using AFLP and SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the diversity and genetic relationships between lines and varieties of the sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) germplasm bank of the National Institute for Forestry, Agriculture and Livestock Research, Mexico, using AFLP and SSR markers. The molecular markers ...

  16. A Replication Study and Genome-wide Scan of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Pancreatic Cancer Risk and Overall Survival

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jason A.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Mukherjee, Semanti; McWilliams, Robert R.; Kurtz, Robert C.; Klein, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on pancreatic cancer risk and overall survival. Experimental Design The germline DNA of 531 pancreatic cancer cases and 305 healthy controls from a hospital-based study was genotyped at SNPs previously reported to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk or clinical outcome. We analyzed putative risk SNPs for replication of their reported effects on risk and tested for novel effects on overall survival (OS). Similarly, we analyzed putative survival-associated SNPs for replication of their reported effects on OS and tested for novel effects on risk. Lastly, we performed a genome-wide association study of OS using a subset of 252 cases, with two subsequent validation sets of 261 and 572 patients, respectively. Results Among seven risk SNPs analyzed, two (rs505922, rs9543325) were associated with risk (p<0.05). Among 24 survival-associated SNPs analyzed, one (rs9350) was associated with OS (p<0.05). No putative risk SNPs or putative survival-associated SNPs were found to be associated with OS or risk, respectively. Further, our GWAS identified a novel SNP (rs1482426, combined stage 1 and 2 p = 1.7 ×10−6, per-allele HR = 1.74, 95% CI 1.38–2.18) to be putatively associated with OS. Conclusions The effects of SNPs on pancreatic cancer risk and overall survival were replicated in our study, though further work is necessary to understand the functional mechanisms underlying these effects. More importantly, the putative association with OS identified by GWAS suggests that GWAS may be useful in identifying SNPs associated with clinical outcome in pancreatic cancer. PMID:22665904

  17. Schizophrenia: A genome scan targets chromosomes 3p and 8p as potential sites of susceptibility genes

    SciTech Connect

    Pulver, A.E.; Lasseter, V.K.; Kasch, L.

    1995-06-19

    Using a systematically ascertained sample of 57 families, each having 2 or more members with a consensus diagnosis of schizophrenia (DSM-III-R criteria), we have carried out linkage studies of 520 loci, covering approximately 70% of the genome for susceptibility loci for schizophrenia. A two-stage strategy based on lod score thresholds from simulation studies of our sample identified regions for further exploration. In each region, a dense map of highly informative dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms (heterozygosity greater than .70) was analyzed using dominant, recessive, and {open_quotes}affected only{close_quotes} models and nonparametric sib pair identity-by-descent methods. For one region, 8p22-p21, affected sib-pair analyses gave a P value = .0001, corresponding to a lod score approximately equal to 3.00. For 8p22-p21, the maximum two-point lod score occurred using the {open_quotes}affected only{close_quotes} recessive model (Z{sub max} = 2.35; {theta}{sub M} = {theta}{sub F}); allowing for a constant sex difference in recombination fractions found in reference pedigrees, Z{sub max} = 2.78 ({theta}{sub M}/{theta}{sub F} = 3). For a second region, 3p26-p24, the maximum two-point lod score was 2.34 ({open_quotes}affected only{close_quotes} dominant model), and the affected sib-pair P value was .01. These two regions are worthy of further exploration as potential sites of susceptibility genes for schizophrenia. 59 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. A genome-wide scan for common variants affecting the rate of age-related cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    De Jager, Philip L.; Shulman, Joshua M.; Chibnik, Lori B.; Keenan, Brendan T.; Raj, Towfique; Wilson, Robert S.; Yu, Lei; Leurgans, Sue E.; Tran, Dong; Aubin, Cristin; Anderson, Christopher D.; Biffi, Alessandro; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Rosand, Jonathan; Daly, Mark J.; Myers, Amanda J.; Reiman, Eric M.; Bennett, David A.; Evans, Denis A.

    2011-01-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is likely promoted by accumulated brain injury due to chronic conditions of aging, including neurodegenerative and vascular disease. Since common neuronal mechanisms may mediate the adaptation to diverse cerebral insults, we hypothesized that susceptibility for age-related cognitive decline may be due in part to a shared genetic network. We have therefore performed a genome-wide association study using a quantitative measure of global cognitive decline slope, based on repeated measures of 17 cognitive tests in 749 subjects from the Religious Orders Study. Top results were evaluated in three independent replication cohorts, consisting of 2,279 additional subjects with repeated cognitive testing. As expected, we find that the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) susceptibility locus, APOE, is strongly associated with rate of cognitive decline (PDISC=5.6×10−9; PJOINT=3.7×10−27). We additionally discover a variant, rs10808746, which shows consistent effects in the replication cohorts and modestly improved evidence of association in the joint analysis (PDISC=6.7×10−5; PREP=9.4×10−3; PJOINT=2.3×10−5). This variant influences the expression of two adjacent genes, PDE7A and MTFR1, which are potential regulators of inflammation and oxidative injury, respectively. Using aggregate measures of genetic risk, we find that known susceptibility loci for cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, and inflammatory diseases are not significantly associated with cognitive decline in our cohort. Our results suggest that intermediate phenotypes, when coupled with larger sample sizes, may be a useful tool to dissect susceptibility loci for age-related cognitive decline and uncover shared molecular pathways with a role in neuronal injury. PMID:22054870

  19. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci influencing carcass, post-natal growth and reproductive traits in commercial Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    McClure, M C; Morsci, N S; Schnabel, R D; Kim, J W; Yao, P; Rolf, M M; McKay, S D; Gregg, S J; Chapple, R H; Northcutt, S L; Taylor, J F

    2010-12-01

    To gain insight into the number of loci of large effect that underlie variation in cattle, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) scan for 14 economically important traits was performed in two commercial Angus populations using 390 microsatellites, 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and one duplication loci. The first population comprised 1769 registered Angus bulls born between 1955 and 2003, with Expected Progeny Differences computed by the American Angus Association. The second comprised 38 half-sib families containing 1622 steers with six post-natal growth and carcass phenotypes. Linkage analysis was performed by half-sib least squares regression with gridqtl or Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of complex pedigrees with loki. Of the 673 detected QTL, only 118 have previously been reported, reflecting both the conservative approach to QTL reporting in the literature, and the more liberal approach taken in this study. From 33 to 71% of the genetic variance and 35 to 56% of the phenotypic variance in each trait was explained by the detected QTL. To analyse the effects of 11 SNPs and one duplication locus within candidate genes on each trait, a single marker analysis was performed by fitting an additive allele substitution model in both mapping populations. There were 53 associations detected between the SNP/duplication loci and traits with -log(10) P(nominal) ≥ 4.0, where each association explained 0.92% to 4.4% of the genetic variance and 0.01% to 1.86% of the phenotypic variance. Of these associations, only six SNP/duplication loci were located within 8 cM of a QTL peak for the trait, with two being located at the QTL peak: SST_DG156121:c.362A>G for ribeye muscle area and TG_X05380:c.422C>T for calving ease. Strong associations between several SNP/duplication loci and trait variation were obtained in the absence of any detected linked QTL. However, we reject the causality of several commercialized DNA tests, including an association between TG

  20. A genetic linkage map of marine shrimp Penaeus ( Fenneropenaeus) chinensis based on AFLP, SSR, and RAPD markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Qingyin; Li, Jian; Liu, Ping; He, Yuying

    2010-07-01

    The Chinese shrimp Penaeus ( Fenneropaeneus) chinensis is an important species in marine fishery and aquaculture in China. A female Chinese shrimp Penaeus ( Fenneropaeneus) chinensis was captured from west coast of the Korean peninsula and mated with a “Yellow Sea No. 1” male to produce the first filial generation (F1) 100 F2 full-sib progeny from brother-sister crosses between F1 families was used for the mapping study. A genetic linkage map of the Chinese shrimp was constructed, based on 354 markers, including 300 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers, 42 microsatellite (SSR) markers, and 12 randomly amplified polymorphism (RAPD) markers. Forty-seven linkage groups (LGs) were identified. The total map length was 4 580.5 cM, with an average spacing of 11.3 cM, covering 75.8% of the estimated genome size. The construction of this genetic linkage map was part of a genetic breeding program. This linkage map will contribute to the discovery of genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in Chinese shrimp.

  1. Rapid Microsatellite Isolation from a Butterfly by De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing: Performance and a Comparison with AFLP-Derived Distances

    PubMed Central

    Mikheyev, Alexander S.; Vo, Tanya; Wee, Brian; Singer, Michael C.; Parmesan, Camille

    2010-01-01

    Background The isolation of microsatellite markers remains laborious and expensive. For some taxa, such as Lepidoptera, development of microsatellite markers has been particularly difficult, as many markers appear to be located in repetitive DNA and have nearly identical flanking regions. We attempted to circumvent this problem by bioinformatic mining of microsatellite sequences from a de novo-sequenced transcriptome of a butterfly (Euphydryas editha). Principal Findings By searching the assembled sequence data for perfect microsatellite repeats we found 10 polymorphic loci. Although, like many expressed sequence tag-derived microsatellites, our markers show strong deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in many populations, and, in some cases, a high incidence of null alleles, we show that they nonetheless provide measures of population differentiation consistent with those obtained by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. Estimates of pairwise population differentiation between 23 populations were concordant between microsatellite-derived data and AFLP analysis of the same samples (r = 0.71, p<0.00001, 425 individuals from 23 populations). Significance De novo transcriptional sequencing appears to be a rapid and cost-effective tool for developing microsatellite markers for difficult genomes. PMID:20585453

  2. Scanning, Scanning, Everywhere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia; Myers, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    Discusses uses of scanning (process of copying or converting text, images, and objects into information that the computer can recognize and manipulate) in schools and notes possible desktop publishing projects. Describes popular scanners and ways to edit a scanned image. A sidebar gives costs and telephone numbers for nine scanners. (AEF)

  3. Genome-Wide Scan for Visceral Leishmaniasis in Mixed-Breed Dogs Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in T Helper Cells and Macrophage Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Yuri T.; Ribeiro, Érica S.; Quintal, Amanda P. N.; Sangalli, Juliano R.; Gazola, Valquiria R.; Paula, Henrique B.; Trinconi, Cristiana M.; Lima, Valéria M. F.; Perri, Silvia H. V.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Garcia, José F.; Nunes, Cáris M.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs from a highly endemic area in Brazil using 149,648 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers genotyped in 20 cases and 28 controls. Using a mixed model approach, we found two candidate loci on canine autosomes 1 and 2. The positional association on chromosome 2 mapped to a predicted DNAse sensitive site in CD14+ monocytes that serve as a cis-regulatory element for the expression of interleukin alpha receptors 2 (IL2RA) and 15 (IL15RA). Both interleukins were previously found to lead to protective T helper 1 cell (Th1) response against Leishmania spp. in humans and mice. The associated marker on chromosome 1 was located between two predicted transcription factor binding sites regulating the expression of the transducin-like enhancer of split 1 gene (TLE1), an important player in Notch signaling. This pathway is critical for macrophage activity and CD4+ T cell differentiation into Th1 and T helper 2. Together, these findings suggest that the human and mouse model for protective response against Leishmania spp., which involves Th1 and macrophage modulation by interleukins 2, 15, gamma interferon and Notch signaling, may also hold for the canine model. PMID:26348501

  4. A genome scan in multigenerational families with dyslexia: Identification of a novel locus on chromosome 2q that contributes to phonological decoding efficiency.

    PubMed

    Raskind, W H; Igo, R P; Chapman, N H; Berninger, V W; Thomson, J B; Matsushita, M; Brkanac, Z; Holzman, T; Brown, M; Wijsman, E M

    2005-07-01

    Dyslexia is a common and complex developmental disorder manifested by unexpected difficulty in learning to read. Multiple different measures are used for diagnosis, and may reflect different biological pathways related to the disorder. Impaired phonological decoding (translation of written words without meaning cues into spoken words) is thought to be a core deficit. We present a genome scan of two continuous measures of phonological decoding ability: phonemic decoding efficiency (PDE) and word attack (WA). PDE measures both accuracy and speed of phonological decoding, whereas WA measures accuracy alone. Multipoint variance component linkage analyses (VC) and Markov chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) multipoint joint linkage and segregation analyses were performed on 108 families. A strong signal was observed on chromosome 2 for PDE using both VC (LOD=2.65) and MCMC methods (intensity ratio (IR)=32.1). The IR is an estimate of the ratio of the posterior to prior probability of linkage in MCMC analysis. The chromosome 2 signal was not seen for WA. More detailed mapping with additional markers provided statistically significant evidence for linkage of PDE to chromosome 2, with VC-LOD=3.0 and IR=59.6 at D2S1399. Parametric analyses of PDE, using a model obtained by complex segregation analysis, provided a multipoint maximum LOD=2.89. The consistency of results from three analytic approaches provides strong evidence for a locus on chromosome 2 that influences speed but not accuracy of phonological decoding. PMID:15753956

  5. When genetic distance matters: Measuring genetic differentiation at microsatellite loci in whole-genome scans of recent and incipient mosquito species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Zheng, Liangbiao; Touré, Yeya T.; Dandekar, Thomas; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    2001-01-01

    Genetic distance measurements are an important tool to differentiate field populations of disease vectors such as the mosquito vectors of malaria. Here, we have measured the genetic differentiation between Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae, as well as between proposed emerging species of the latter taxon, in whole genome scans by using 23–25 microsatellite loci. In doing so, we have reviewed and evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of standard parameters of genetic distance, FST, RST, (δμ)2, and D. Further, we have introduced new parameters, D′ and DK, which have well defined statistical significance tests and complement the standard parameters to advantage. D′ is a modification of D, whereas DK is a measure of covariance based on Pearson's correlation coefficient. We find that A. gambiae and A. arabiensis are closely related at most autosomal loci but appear to be distantly related on the basis of X-linked chromosomal loci within the chromosomal Xag inversion. The M and S molecular forms of A. gambiae are practically indistinguishable but differ significantly at two microsatellite loci from the proximal region of the X, outside the Xag inversion. At one of these loci, both M and S molecular forms differ significantly from A. arabiensis, but remarkably, at the other locus, A. arabiensis is indistinguishable from the M molecular form of A. gambiae. These data support the recent proposal of genetically differentiated M and S molecular forms of A. gambiae. PMID:11553812

  6. Shared clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aberrant mast cells and leukemic myeloid blasts detected by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based whole-genome scanning.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Shao, Lina; Bixby, Dale L; Ross, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of aberrant mast cells within extracutaneous sites. In a subset of SM cases, a second associated hematologic non-mast cell disease (AHNMD) is also present, usually of myeloid origin. Polymerase chain reaction and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization studies have provided evidence that, in at least some cases, the aberrant mast cells are related clonally to the neoplastic cells of the AHNMD. In this work, a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-A) was used to characterize the cytogenetics of the aberrant mast cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and concomitant mast cell leukemia associated with a KIT D816A mutation. The results demonstrate the presence of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the mast cells and myeloid blasts, as well as additional abnormalities within mast cells (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) not detectable by routine karyotypic analysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of SNP-A whole-genome scanning to the detection of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the two components of a case of SM-AHNMD. The findings provide additional evidence of a frequent clonal link between aberrant mast cells and cells of myeloid AHNMDs, and also highlight the importance of direct sequencing for identifying uncommon activating KIT mutations. PMID:26865278

  7. Quantification of genetic relationships among A genomes of wheats.

    PubMed

    Brandolini, A; Vaccino, P; Boggini, G; Ozkan, H; Kilian, B; Salamini, F

    2006-04-01

    The genetic relationships of A genomes of Triticum urartu (Au) and Triticum monococcum (Am) in polyploid wheats are explored and quantified by AFLP fingerprinting. Forty-one accessions of A-genome diploid wheats, 3 of AG-genome wheats, 19 of AB-genome wheats, 15 of ABD-genome wheats, and 1 of the D-genome donor Ae. tauschii have been analysed. Based on 7 AFLP primer combinations, 423 bands were identified as potentially A genome specific. The bands were reduced to 239 by eliminating those present in autoradiograms of Ae. tauschii, bands interpreted as common to all wheat genomes. Neighbour-joining analysis separates T. urartu from T. monococcum. Triticum urartu has the closest relationship to polyploid wheats. Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccum and T. turgidum subsp. durum lines are included in tightly linked clusters. The hexaploid spelts occupy positions in the phylogenetic tree intermediate between bread wheats and T. turgidum. The AG-genome accessions cluster in a position quite distant from both diploid and other polyploid wheats. The estimates of similarity between A genomes of diploid and polyploid wheats indicate that, compared with Am, Au has around 20% higher similarity to the genomes of polyploid wheats. Triticum timo pheevii AG genome is molecularly equidistant from those of Au and Am wheats. PMID:16699549

  8. Genetic and physical mapping of sex-linked AFLP markers in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo-Young; Coutanceau, Jean-Pierre; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-Francois; Kocher, Thomas D

    2011-06-01

    Identification of the sex-determining genes of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) has important implications for commercial aquaculture. We previously identified an XX/XY sex-determining locus in this species within a 10-cM interval between markers GM201 and UNH995 on linkage group one (LG1). In order to refine this region, we developed new AFLP markers using bulked segregant analysis of the mapping families. We identified three AFLP markers that showed a sex-specific pattern of segregation. All three mapped near, but just outside, the previously identified sex-determining region on LG1. Hybridization of BAC clones containing these markers to chromosome spreads confirmed that the XX/XY sex-determining locus is on one of the small chromosomes in O. niloticus. PMID:20953654

  9. An Islet-Targeted Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies Novel Genes Implicated in Cytokine-Mediated Islet Stress in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam R.; Mackey, Aaron J.; Dejene, Eden A.; Ramadan, James W.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Taylor, Kent D.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Watanabe, Richard M.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies in human type 2 diabetes (T2D) have renewed interest in the pancreatic islet as a contributor to T2D risk. Chronic low-grade inflammation resulting from obesity is a risk factor for T2D and a possible trigger of β-cell failure. In this study, microarray data were collected from mouse islets after overnight treatment with cytokines at concentrations consistent with the chronic low-grade inflammation in T2D. Genes with a cytokine-induced change of >2-fold were then examined for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) using data from the Genetics Underlying Diabetes in Hispanics (GUARDIAN) Consortium. Significant evidence of association was found between AIRg and single nucleotide polymorphisms in Arap3 (5q31.3), F13a1 (6p25.3), Klhl6 (3q27.1), Nid1 (1q42.3), Pamr1 (11p13), Ripk2 (8q21.3), and Steap4 (7q21.12). To assess the potential relevance to islet function, mouse islets were exposed to conditions modeling low-grade inflammation, mitochondrial stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, glucotoxicity, and lipotoxicity. RT-PCR revealed that one or more forms of stress significantly altered expression levels of all genes except Arap3. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress up-regulated both Pamr1 and Klhl6. Three genes confirmed microarray predictions of significant cytokine sensitivity: F13a1 was down-regulated 3.3-fold by cytokines, Ripk2 was up-regulated 1.5- to 3-fold by all stressors, and Steap4 was profoundly cytokine sensitive (167-fold up-regulation). Three genes were thus closely associated with low-grade inflammation in murine islets and also with a marker for islet function (AIRg) in a diabetes-prone human population. This islet-targeted genome-wide association scan identified several previously unrecognized candidate genes related to islet dysfunction during the development of T2D. PMID:26018251

  10. A Genome-Wide Association Scan on the Levels of Markers of Inflammation in Sardinians Reveals Associations That Underpin Its Complex Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Naitza, Silvia; Porcu, Eleonora; Steri, Maristella; Taub, Dennis D.; Mulas, Antonella; Xiao, Xiang; Strait, James; Dei, Mariano; Lai, Sandra; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Usala, Gianluca; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Pitzalis, Maristella; Loi, Alessia; Virdis, Francesca; Piras, Roberta; Deidda, Francesca; Whalen, Michael B.; Crisponi, Laura; Concas, Antonio; Podda, Carlo; Uzzau, Sergio; Scheet, Paul; Longo, Dan L.; Lakatta, Edward; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Cao, Antonio; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the genes that influence levels of pro-inflammatory molecules can help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this process. We first conducted a two-stage genome-wide association scan (GWAS) for the key inflammatory biomarkers Interleukin-6 (IL-6), the general measure of inflammation erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in a large cohort of individuals from the founder population of Sardinia. By analysing 731,213 autosomal or X chromosome SNPs and an additional ∼1.9 million imputed variants in 4,694 individuals, we identified several SNPs associated with the selected quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and replicated all the top signals in an independent sample of 1,392 individuals from the same population. Next, to increase power to detect and resolve associations, we further genotyped the whole cohort (6,145 individuals) for 293,875 variants included on the ImmunoChip and MetaboChip custom arrays. Overall, our combined approach led to the identification of 9 genome-wide significant novel independent signals—5 of which were identified only with the custom arrays—and provided confirmatory evidence for an additional 7. Novel signals include: for IL-6, in the ABO gene (rs657152, p = 2.13×10−29); for ESR, at the HBB (rs4910472, p = 2.31×10−11) and UCN119B/SPPL3 (rs11829037, p = 8.91×10−10) loci; for MCP-1, near its receptor CCR2 (rs17141006, p = 7.53×10−13) and in CADM3 (rs3026968, p = 7.63×10−13); for hsCRP, within the CRP gene (rs3093077, p = 5.73×10−21), near DARC (rs3845624, p = 1.43×10−10), UNC119B/SPPL3 (rs11829037, p = 1.50×10−14), and ICOSLG/AIRE (rs113459440, p = 1.54×10−08) loci. Confirmatory evidence was found for IL-6 in the IL-6R gene (rs4129267); for ESR at CR1 (rs12567990) and TMEM57 (rs10903129); for MCP-1 at DARC (rs12075); and for hsCRP at CRP (rs1205), HNF1A (rs225918), and APOC-I (rs

  11. Species-specific AFLP markers for identification of Zingiber officinale, Z. montanum and Z. zerumbet (Zingiberaceae).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Majumder, P B; Sen Mandi, S

    2011-01-01

    The Zingiber genus, which includes the herbs known as gingers, commonly used in cooking, is well known for its medicinal properties, as described in the Indian pharmacopoeia. Different members of this genus, although somewhat similar in morphology, differ widely in their pharmacological and therapeutic properties. The most important species of this genus, with maximal therapeutic properties, is Zingiber officinale (garden ginger), which is often adulterated with other less-potent Zingiber sp. There is an existing demand in the herbal drug industry for an authentication system for the Zingiber sp in order to facilitate their commercial use as genuine phytoceuticals. To this end, we used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) to produce DNA fingerprints for three Zingiber species. Sixteen collections (six of Z. officinale, five of Z. montanum, and five of Z. zerumbet) were used in the study. Seven selective primer pairs were found to be useful for all the accessions. A total of 837 fragments were produced by these primer pairs. Species-specific markers were identified for all three Zingiber species (91 for Z. officinale, 82 for Z. montanum, and 55 for Z. zerumbet). The dendogram analysis generated from AFLP patterns showed that Z. montanum and Z. zerumbet are phylogenetically closer to each other than to Z. officinale. The AFLP fingerprints of the Zingiber species could be used to authenticate Zingiber sp-derived drugs and to resolve adulteration-related problems faced by the commercial users of these herbs. PMID:21341214

  12. Assessment of genetic diversity in Chinese eared pheasant using fluorescent-AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiujuan; Zhu, Yaohong; Liu, Panqi; Zhuge, Zengyu; Su, Guosheng; Wang, Jiufeng

    2010-10-01

    The eared pheasant consists of four species: white eared pheasant (Crossoptilon crossoptilon), Tibetan eared pheasant (Crossoptilon harmani), blue eared pheasant (Crossoptilon auritum), and brown eared pheasant (Crossoptilon mantchuricum). These species are found only in China, and are also on the list of the world's threatened species. In this paper, 74 individuals from the four eared pheasant species were assessed for population genetic diversity by means of fluorescent-AFLP markers. A total of 429 AFLP peaks were amplified by 11 pairs of fluorescent EcoRI/TaqI primer combinations. Out of all markers, 329 AFLPs were polymorphic. Each primer combination produced in reactions from 19 to 72 fragments and the polymorphic peaks percentage ranged from 53.33% to 86.11% with an average of 74.36% polymorphic bands. Genetic distance between species and genetic diversity within species were evaluated using Jaccard's similarity coefficients (SC) and the corresponding dendrogram. It was found that there was a moderate genetic distance between the four species (SC=0.674-0.832). Brown eared pheasant was genetically closely related to blue eared pheasant (SC=0.832), while white eared pheasant was more closely related to Tibetan eared pheasant (SC=0.812). Genetic diversity was lower in brown eared pheasant (SC=0.913) and Tibetan eared pheasant (SC=0.903) than in white eared pheasant (SC=0.832) and blue eared pheasant (SC=0.853). PMID:20595068

  13. Extended metAFLP approach in studies of tissue culture induced variation (TCIV) in triticale.

    PubMed

    Machczyńska, Joanna; Orłowska, Renata; Zimny, Janusz; Bednarek, Piotr Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    We present the development of the theoretical background of the metAFLP approach which allows for partition of complex variation into sequence changes, de novo methylation and demethylation of the regenerants derived via in vitro tissue culture methods in the case of triticale. It was demonstrated that, independent of whether andro- or embryogenesis was used for plant regeneration, the level of sequence changes identified between regenerants is about 10 %. Moreover, DNA demethylation prevails over de novo methylation of the regenerants compared to the donor plant. The metAFLP approach allows for the evaluation of numerous quantitative characteristics. For instance, one may quantify the number of sites unaffected by tissue culture approaches, global site DNA methylation etc. It is suggested that the approach could be useful for breeders in order to control plant material uniformity or for the evaluation of modified in vitro tissue culture approaches allowing for control of the (epi)mutation level. The extended metAFLP approach presented here delivers sufficient background for the evaluation of software that could facilitate analyses of the tissue culture induced variation. PMID:25242884

  14. Determination of genetic relationships between evergreen azalea cultivars in China using AFLP markers*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Liao, Jin; Xia, Yi-ping; Teng, Yuan-wen

    2013-01-01

    Evergreen azaleas are among the most important ornamental shrubs in China. Today, there are probably over 300 cultivars preserved in different nurseries, but with little information available on the cultivar itself or relationships between cultivars. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were employed to determine the genetic relationships between evergreen azalea cultivars in China. One hundred and thirty genotypes collected from gardens and nurseries, including cultivars classified in the groups East, West, Hairy, and Summer, unknown cultivars, and close species, were analyzed using three primer pairs. A total of 408 polymorphic fragments were generated by AFLP reactions with an average of 136 fragments per primer pair. The average values of expected heterozygosity and Shannon’s information index were 0.3395 and 0.5153, respectively. Genetic similarities were generated based on Dice coefficients, used to construct a neighbor joining tree, and bootstrapped for 100 replicates in Treecon V1.3b. Principal coordinate analysis (PCO) was performed based on Dice distances using NTSYS-pc software. The AFLP technique was useful for analyzing genetic diversity in evergreen azaleas. Cluster analysis revealed that cultivars in the West and Summer groups were quite distinct from other groups in the four-group classification system and that the East and Hairy groups should be redefined. PMID:23549847

  15. GOGOT: a method for the identification of differentially expressed fragments from cDNA-AFLP data

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background One-dimensional (1-D) electrophoretic data obtained using the cDNA-AFLP method have attracted great interest for the identification of differentially expressed transcript-derived fragments (TDFs). However, high-throughput analysis of the cDNA-AFLP data is currently limited by the need for labor-intensive visual evaluation of multiple electropherograms. We would like to have high-throughput ways of identifying such TDFs. Results We describe a method, GOGOT, which automatically detects the differentially expressed TDFs in a set of time-course electropherograms. Analysis by GOGOT is conducted as follows: correction of fragment lengths of TDFs, alignment of identical TDFs across different electropherograms, normalization of peak heights, and identification of differentially expressed TDFs using a special statistic. The output of the analysis is a highly reduced list of differentially expressed TDFs. Visual evaluation confirmed that the peak alignment was performed perfectly for the TDFs by virtue of the correction of peak fragment lengths before alignment in step 1. The validity of the automated ranking of TDFs by the special statistic was confirmed by the visual evaluation of a third party. Conclusion GOGOT is useful for the automated detection of differentially expressed TDFs from cDNA-AFLP temporal electrophoretic data. The current algorithm may be applied to other electrophoretic data and temporal microarray data. PMID:17535446

  16. Genetic variability of Brazilian isolates of Alternaria alternata detected by AFLP and RAPD techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Pietrobon, Vivian Cristina; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Romão, Aline Silva; Spósito, Marcel Bellato; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The Alternaria brown spot (ABS) is a disease caused in tangerine plants and its hybrids by the fungus Alternaria alternata f. sp. citri which has been found in Brazil since 2001. Due to the recent occurrence in Brazilian orchards, the epidemiology and genetic variability of this pathogen is still an issue to be addressed. Here it is presented a survey about the genetic variability of this fungus by the characterization of twenty four pathogenic isolates of A. alternata f. sp. citri from citrus plants and four endophytic isolates from mango (one Alternaria tenuissima and three Alternaria arborescens). The application of two molecular markers Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) had revealed the isolates clustering in distinct groups when fingerprintings were analyzed by Principal Components Analysis (PCA). Despite the better assessment of the genetic variability through the AFLP, significant modifications in clusters components were not observed, and only slight shifts in the positioning of isolates LRS 39/3 and 25M were observed in PCA plots. Furthermore, in both analyses, only the isolates from lemon plants revealed to be clustered, differently from the absence of clustering for other hosts or plant tissues. Summarizing, both RAPD and AFLP analyses were both efficient to detect the genetic variability within the population of the pathogenic fungus Alternaria spp., supplying information on the genetic variability of this species as a basis for further studies aiming the disease control. PMID:24031413

  17. Extensive de Novo genomic variation in rice induced by introgression from wild rice (Zizania latifolia Griseb.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Ming; Dong, Zhen-Ying; Zhang, Zhong-Juan; Lin, Xiu-Yun; Shen, Ye; Zhou, Daowei; Liu, Bao

    2005-08-01

    To study the possible impact of alien introgression on a recipient plant genome, we examined >6000 unbiased genomic loci of three stable rice recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from intergeneric hybridization between rice (cv. Matsumae) and a wild relative (Zizania latifolia Griseb.) followed by successive selfing. Results from amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis showed that, whereas the introgressed Zizania DNA comprised <0.1% of the genome content in the RILs, extensive and genome-wide de novo variations occurred in up to 30% of the analyzed loci for all three lines studied. The AFLP-detected changes were validated by DNA gel-blot hybridization and/or sequence analysis of genomic loci corresponding to a subset of the differentiating AFLP fragments. A BLAST analysis revealed that the genomic variations occurred in diverse sequences, including protein-coding genes, transposable elements, and sequences of unknown functions. Pairwise sequence comparison of selected loci between a RIL and its rice parent showed that the variations represented either base substitutions or small insertion/deletions. Genome variations were detected in all 12 rice chromosomes, although their distribution was uneven both among and within chromosomes. Taken together, our results imply that even cryptic alien introgression can be highly mutagenic to a recipient plant genome. PMID:15937131

  18. Identification of molecular markers associated with fruit traits in olive and assessment of olive core collection with AFLP markers and fruit traits.

    PubMed

    Ipek, M; Seker, M; Ipek, A; Gul, M K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize olive core collection with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers and fruit traits and to determine AFLP markers significantly associated with these fruit characters in olive. A total of 168 polymorphic AFLP markers generated by five primer combinations and nine fruit traits were used to characterize relationships between 18 olive cultivars. Although all olive cultivars were discriminated from each other by either AFLP markers (<0.75 similarity level) or fruit traits, clustering based on the AFLP markers and fruit traits was not significantly correlated (r = 0.13). Partial clustering of olive cultivars by AFLP markers according to their geographical origin was observed. Associations of AFLP markers with fruits were determined using a multiple-regression analysis with stepwise addition of AFLP markers. Significant associations between eight AFLP markers and fruit traits were identified. While five AFLP markers demonstrated significant negative correlation with fruit and stone weight, width and length and total polyphenols (P < 0.05), three AFLP markers displayed significant positive correlation with α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol (P < 0.01). This is the first report on the association of molecular markers with fruit traits in olive. Molecular markers associated with morphological and agronomic traits could be utilized for the breeding of olive cultivars. However, the association power of these markers needs to be confirmed in larger populations, and highly correlated markers should then be converted to PCR-based DNA markers such as sequence-characterized amplified region markers for better utilization. PMID:25867425

  19. Analyses of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) indicate rapid radiation of Diospyros species (Ebenaceae) endemic to New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation in some plant groups has occurred on islands and due to the characteristic rapid pace of phenotypic evolution, standard molecular markers often provide insufficient variation for phylogenetic reconstruction. To resolve relationships within a clade of 21 closely related New Caledonian Diospyros species and evaluate species boundaries we analysed genome-wide DNA variation via amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP). Results A neighbour-joining (NJ) dendrogram based on Dice distances shows all species except D. minimifolia, D. parviflora and D. vieillardii to form unique clusters of genetically similar accessions. However, there was little variation between these species clusters, resulting in unresolved species relationships and a star-like general NJ topology. Correspondingly, analyses of molecular variance showed more variation within species than between them. A Bayesian analysis with BEAST produced a similar result. Another Bayesian method, this time a clustering method, Structure, demonstrated the presence of two groups, highly congruent with those observed in a principal coordinate analysis (PCO). Molecular divergence between the two groups is low and does not correspond to any hypothesised taxonomic, ecological or geographical patterns. Conclusions We hypothesise that such a pattern could have been produced by rapid and complex evolution involving a widespread progenitor for which an initial split into two groups was followed by subsequent fragmentation into many diverging populations, which was followed by range expansion of then divergent entities. Overall, this process resulted in an opportunistic pattern of phenotypic diversification. The time since divergence was probably insufficient for some species to become genetically well-differentiated, resulting in progenitor/derivative relationships being exhibited in a few cases. In other cases, our analyses may have revealed evidence for the existence of cryptic species, for which

  20. An AFLP-based genetic linkage map of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) constructed by using an interspecific hybrid resource family.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhanjiang; Karsi, Attila; Li, Ping; Cao, Dongfeng; Dunham, R

    2003-01-01

    Catfish is the major aquaculture species in the United States. The hybrid catfish produced by crossing channel catfish females with blue catfish males exhibit a number of desirable production traits, but their mass production has been difficult. To introduce desirable genes from blue catfish into channel catfish through introgression, a genetic linkage map is helpful. In this project, a genetic linkage map was constructed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). A total of 607 AFLP markers were analyzed using 65 primer combinations and an interspecific backcross resource family. A total of 418 AFLP markers were assigned to 44 linkage groups. Among the remaining 189 markers, 101 were not used because of significant segregation distortion, 29 were unlinked, and 59 were eliminated because they span very large distances. The 418 AFLP markers covered 1593 cM Kosambi. The AFLP markers showed a high level of clustering that appears to be related to certain primer combinations. This linkage map will serve as the basis for mapping a greater number of markers to provide a map with high enough resolution for it to be useful for selective breeding programs using introgression. PMID:14573480

  1. Coincident linkage of type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and measures of cardiovascular disease in a genome scan of the diabetes heart study.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Donald W; Rudock, Megan; Ziegler, Julie; Lehtinen, Allison B; Xu, Jianzhao; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Herrington, David; Rich, Stephen S; Freedman, Barry I; Carr, J Jeffrey; Langefeld, Carl D

    2006-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes, but the relationship between CVD and type 2 diabetes is not well understood. The Diabetes Heart Study is a study of type 2 diabetes-enriched families extensively phenotyped for measures of CVD, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. A total of 977 Caucasian subjects from 358 pedigrees (575 type 2 diabetic relative pairs) with at least two individuals with type 2 diabetes and, where possible, unaffected siblings were included in a genome scan. Qualitative traits evaluated in this analysis are with or without the presence of coronary calcified plaque (CCP) and with or without carotid calcified plaque (CarCP) measured by electrocardiogram-gated helical computed tomography. In addition, prevalent CVD was measured using two definitions: CVD1, based on self-reported history of clinical CVD (393 subjects), and CVD2, defined as CVD1 and/or CCP >400 (606 subjects). These discrete traits (type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, CVD1, CVD2, CCP, and CarCP) frequently coincide in the same individuals with concordance ranging from 42.9 to 99%. Multipoint nonparametric linkage analysis revealed evidence for coincident mapping of each trait (type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, CVD1, CVD2, CCP, and CarCP) to three different genomic regions: a broad region on chromosome 3 (70-160 cM; logarithm of odds [LOD] scores ranging between 1.15 and 2.71), chromosome 4q31 (peak LOD 146 cM; LOD scores ranging between 0.90 and 2.41), and on chromosome 14p (peak LOD 23 cM; LOD scores ranging between 1.43 and 2.31). Ordered subset analysis (OSA) suggests that the linked chromosome 3 region consists of at least two separate loci on 3p and 3q. In addition, OSA based on lipid measures and other traits identify family subsets with significantly stronger evidence of linkage (e.g., CVD2 on chromosome 3 at 87 cM subsetting on low HDL with an initial LOD of 2.19 is maximized to an LOD of 7.04 in a subset of

  2. The attractiveness fragment—AFLP analysis of local adaptation and sexual selection in a caeliferan grasshopper, Chorthippus biguttulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klappert, Kirsten; Butlin, Roger K.; Reinhold, Klaus

    2007-08-01

    Genetic variability among males is a necessary precondition for the evolution of female choice based on indirect genetic benefits. In addition to mutations and host parasite cycles, migration of locally adapted individuals offers an explanation for the maintenance of genetic variability. In a previous study, conducting a reciprocal transplant experiment on a grasshopper, Chorthippus biguttulus, we found that environmental conditions significantly influenced not only body condition but also an important trait of male calling song, the amplitude of song. Although not significant, all other analysed physical and courtship song traits and attractiveness were superior in native than in transferred males. Thus, we concluded that local adaptation has a slight but consistent influence on a range of traits in our study populations, including male acoustic attractiveness. In our present study, we scanned male grasshoppers from the same two populations for amplification fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) loci connected with acoustic attractiveness to conspecific females. We found greater differences in allele frequencies between the two populations, for some loci, than are expected from a balance between drift and gene flow. These loci are potentially connected with locally adapted traits. We examined whether these alleles show the proposed genotype environment interaction by having different associations with attractiveness in the two populations. One locus was significantly related to sexual attractiveness; however, this was independent of the males’ population affiliation. Future research on the evolution of female choice will benefit from knowledge of the underlying genetic architecture of male traits under intraspecific sexual selection, and the ‘population genomics’ approach can be a powerful tool for revealing this structure.

  3. Genome Scan, Fine-Mapping, and Candidate Gene Analysis of Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate Reveals Phenotype-Specific Differences in Linkage and Association Results

    PubMed Central

    Marazita, Mary L.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Field, L.Leigh; Maher, Brion S.; Goldstein McHenry, Toby; Cooper, Margaret E.; Govil, Manika; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Riley, Bridget; Jugessur, Astanand; Felix, Temis; Morene, Lina; Mansilla, M.Adela; Vieira, Alexandre R.; Doheny, Kim; Pugh, Elizabeth; Valencia-Ramirez, Consuelo; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Non-syndromic orofacial clefts, i.e. cleft lip (CL) and cleft palate (CP), are among the most common birth defects. The goal of this study was to identify genomic regions and genes for CL with or without CP (CL/P). Methods We performed linkage analyses of a 10 cM genome scan in 820 multiplex CL/P families (6,565 individuals). Significant linkage results were followed by association analyses of 1,476 SNPs in candidate genes and regions, utilizing a weighted false discovery rate (wFDR) approach to control for multiple testing and incorporate the genome scan results. Results Significant (multipoint HLOD ≥3.2) or genome-wide-significant (HLOD ≥4.02) linkage results were found for regions 1q32, 2p13, 3q27-28, 9q21, 12p11, 14q21-24 and 16q24. SNPs in IRF6 (1q32) and in or near FOXE1 (9q21) reached formal genome-wide wFDR-adjusted significance. Further, results were phenotype dependent in that the IRF6 region results were most significant for families in which affected individuals have CL alone, and the FOXE1 region results were most significant in families in which some or all of the affected individuals have CL with CP. Conclusions These results highlight the importance of careful phenotypic delineation in large samples of families for genetic analyses of complex, heterogeneous traits such as CL/P. PMID:19521098

  4. Genomic and transcriptomic alterations following hybridisation and genome doubling in trigenomic allohexaploid Brassica carinata × Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhao, Q; Mei, S; Wang, J

    2012-09-01

    Allopolyploidisation is a prominent evolutionary force that involves two major events: interspecific hybridisation and genome doubling. Both events have important functional consequences in shaping the genomic architecture of the neo-allopolyploids. The respective effects of hybridisation and genome doubling upon genomic and transcriptomic changes in Brassica allopolyploids are unresolved. In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) and cDNA-AFLP approaches were used to track genetic, epigenetic and transcriptional changes in both allohexaploid Brassica (ArArBcBcCcCc genome) and triploid hybrids (ArBcCc genome). Results from these groups were compared with each other and also to their parents Brassica carinata (BBCC genome) and Brassica rapa (AA genome). Rapid and dramatic genetic, DNA methylation and gene expression changes were detected in the triploid hybrids. During the shift from triploidy to allohexaploidy, some of the hybridisation-induced alterations underwent reversion. Additionally, novel genetic, epigenetic and transcriptional alterations were also detected. The proportions of A-genome-specific DNA methylation and gene expression alterations were significantly greater than those of BC-genome-specific alterations in the triploid hybrids. However, the two parental genomes were equally affected during the ploidy shift. Hemi-CCG methylation changes induced by hybridisation were recovered after genome doubling. Full-CG methylation changes were a more general process initiated in the hybrid and continued after genome doubling. These results indicate that genome doubling could ameliorate genomic and transcriptomic alterations induced by hybridisation and instigate additional alterations in trigenomic Brassica allohexaploids. Moreover, genome doubling also modified hybridisation-induced progenitor genome-biased alterations and epigenetic alteration characteristics. PMID:22309095

  5. WBC scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body. It is a type of nuclear scan . How the Test is Performed Blood will ... radiation. Due to the slight radiation exposure, most nuclear scans (including WBC scan) are not recommended for ...

  6. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan; Computed axial tomography scan; Computed tomography scan ... Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, et al. eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ...

  7. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  8. AFLP analysis of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of Brassica oleracea in Ireland.

    PubMed

    El-Esawi, Mohamed A; Germaine, Kieran; Bourke, Paula; Malone, Renee

    2016-01-01

    Brassica oleracea L. is one of the most economically important vegetable crop species of the genus Brassica L. This species is threatened in Ireland, without any prior reported genetic studies. The use of this species is being very limited due to its imprecise phylogeny and uncompleted genetic characterisation. The main objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of a set of 25 Irish B. oleracea accessions using the powerful amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique. A total of 471 fragments were scored across all the 11 AFLP primer sets used, out of which 423 (89.8%) were polymorphic and could differentiate the accessions analysed. The dendrogram showed that cauliflowers were more closely related to cabbages than kales were, and accessions of some cabbage types were distributed among different clusters within cabbage subgroups. Approximately 33.7% of the total genetic variation was found among accessions, and 66.3% of the variation resided within accessions. The total genetic diversity (HT) and the intra-accessional genetic diversity (HS) were 0.251 and 0.156, respectively. This high level of variation demonstrates that the Irish B. oleracea accessions studied should be managed and conserved for future utilisation and exploitation in food and agriculture. In conclusion, this study addressed important phylogenetic questions within this species, and provided a new insight into the inclusion of four accessions of cabbages and kales in future breeding programs for improving varieties. AFLP markers were efficient for assessing genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships in Irish B. oleracea species. PMID:27156498

  9. Comparison of RAPD, ISSR, and AFLP Molecular Markers to Reveal and Classify Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Germplasm Variations

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Rita; Pereira, Graça; Garrido, Inmaculada; Tavares-de-Sousa, Manuel María; Espinosa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Three different DNA-based techniques, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers, were used for fingerprinting Dactylis glomerata genotypes and for detecting genetic variation between the three different subspecies. In this study, RAPD assays produced 97 bands, of which 40 were polymorphic (41.2%). The ISSR primers amplified 91 bands, and 54 showed polymorphism (59.3%). Finally, the AFLP showed 100 bands, of which 92 were polymorphic (92%). The fragments were scored as present (1) or absent (0), and those readings were entered in a computer file as a binary matrix (one for each marker). Three cluster analyses were performed to express–in the form of dendrograms–the relationships among the genotypes and the genetic variability detected. All DNA-based techniques used were able to amplify all of the genotypes. There were highly significant correlation coefficients between cophenetic matrices based on the genetic distance for the RAPD, ISSR, AFLP, and combined RAPD-ISSR-AFLP data (0.68, 0.78, 0.70, and 0.70, respectively). Two hypotheses were formulated to explain these results; both of them are in agreement with the results obtained using these three types of molecular markers. We conclude that when we study genotypes close related, the analysis of variability could require more than one DNA-based technique; in fact, the genetic variation present in different sources could interfere or combine with the more or less polymorphic ability, as our results showed for RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers. Our results indicate that AFLP seemed to be the best-suited molecular assay for fingerprinting and assessing genetic relationship among genotypes of Dactylis glomerata. PMID:27070939

  10. Comparison of RAPD, ISSR, and AFLP Molecular Markers to Reveal and Classify Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Germplasm Variations.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rita; Pereira, Graça; Garrido, Inmaculada; Tavares-de-Sousa, Manuel María; Espinosa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Three different DNA-based techniques, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers, were used for fingerprinting Dactylis glomerata genotypes and for detecting genetic variation between the three different subspecies. In this study, RAPD assays produced 97 bands, of which 40 were polymorphic (41.2%). The ISSR primers amplified 91 bands, and 54 showed polymorphism (59.3%). Finally, the AFLP showed 100 bands, of which 92 were polymorphic (92%). The fragments were scored as present (1) or absent (0), and those readings were entered in a computer file as a binary matrix (one for each marker). Three cluster analyses were performed to express--in the form of dendrograms--the relationships among the genotypes and the genetic variability detected. All DNA-based techniques used were able to amplify all of the genotypes. There were highly significant correlation coefficients between cophenetic matrices based on the genetic distance for the RAPD, ISSR, AFLP, and combined RAPD-ISSR-AFLP data (0.68, 0.78, 0.70, and 0.70, respectively). Two hypotheses were formulated to explain these results; both of them are in agreement with the results obtained using these three types of molecular markers. We conclude that when we study genotypes close related, the analysis of variability could require more than one DNA-based technique; in fact, the genetic variation present in different sources could interfere or combine with the more or less polymorphic ability, as our results showed for RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers. Our results indicate that AFLP seemed to be the best-suited molecular assay for fingerprinting and assessing genetic relationship among genotypes of Dactylis glomerata. PMID:27070939

  11. Identification of Lactobacillus brevis using a species-specific AFLP-derived marker.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Vincenzina; Quero, Grazia Marina; Chieffi, Daniele; Franz, Charles M A P

    2016-09-01

    A simple and specific method for the rapid detection and identification of Lactobacillus brevis was developed. A fAFLP (Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms) marker for L. brevis was used to design oligonucleotide primers for a species-specific PCR assay, targeting a 125bp fragment of the gene encoding the aldo/keto reductase of the diketogulonate-reductase family of L. brevis. This assay resulted in 100% inclusivity and exclusivity of assignment of strains to the species L. brevis. The analytical specificity of this assay was successfully tested to identify L. brevis isolates from sourdoughs. PMID:27289191

  12. The unstable 'clone': evidence from monitoring AFLP-based mutations for short-term clonal genetic variation in two asexual lineages of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.).

    PubMed

    Loxdale, H D; Vorwerk, S; Forneck, A

    2013-02-01

    Clones have been in the forefront of biological interest for many years. Even so, open discussions continue to surround the concept of clonality, which has been recently much debated in the scientific literature, both in terms of philosophical meaning as well as empirical determination. Philosophically, the clone is the horizontally produced lineage from a single fertlized egg (e.g. mammals by division of the fertilized egg and representing a single generation) or vertically produced offspring (e.g. aphids representing different successive generations) from a single asexual stem mother (originally for a particular lineage, following hatching of the overwintering sexual egg in the spring); empirically, the aspect of genetic fidelity is also considered important, so-called clones being assumed to have an identical genome among clone mates. In reality of course, such members of a clonal lineage must differ at various regions of the genome, since mutation is a fundamental property of the DNA itself. Yet few studies have so far set out to show this empirically in eukaryotic organisms, which indulge in periods of asexual reproduction, sometimes, as in aphids, over many generations. In the present study, we have investigated asexual lineages of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.), a global pest of cereals, over five successive generations employing AFLP-PCR molecular techniques. Our main interest was to see how much variation was present in the early generations and if this variation was transmitted through the asexual lineages. By monitoring AFLP-based polymorphisms, we show that, in this aphid species, of a total of 110 individuals from two lineages tested (termed SA and SB), random mutations (band deletions, more rarely additions) were apparent from the third generation onwards, and although some mutations were found to be transmitted transgenerationally, others were rarely transmitted through the particular lineages they were detected in. Using Arlequin v. 2

  13. PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    You may feel a sharp sting when the needle with the tracer is placed into your vein. A PET scan causes no pain. The table may be ... The amount of radiation used in a PET scan is about the same amount as used in most CT scans. These scans use ...

  14. Development of a SCAR marker for male gametophyte of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis based on AFLP technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Ding, Hongye; Sui, Zhenghong; Wang, Zhongxia; Wang, Jinguo

    2014-05-01

    The red alga Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (Bory) is an economically valuable macroalgae. As a means to identify the sex of immature Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique was used to search for possible sex- or phase-related markers in male gametophytes, female gametophytes, and tetrasporophytes, respectively. Seven AFLP selective amplification primers were used in this study. The primer combination E-TG/M-CCA detected a specific band linked to male gametophytes. The DNA fragment was recovered and a 402-bp fragment was sequenced. However, no DNA sequence match was found in public databases. Sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) primers were designed from the sequence to test the repeatability of the relationship to the sex, using 69 male gametophytes, 139 female gametophytes, and 47 tetrasporophytes. The test results demonstrate a good linkage and repeatability of the SCAR marker to sex. The SCAR primers developed in this study could reduce the time required for sex identification of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis by four to six months. This can reduce both the time investment and number of specimens required in breeding experiments.

  15. Molecular characterisation of Aspergillus flavus isolates from peanut fields in India using AFLP

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Diwakar; Radhakrishnan, T.; Kumar, Vinod; Bagwan, N.B.; Basu, M.S.; Dobaria, J.R.; Mishra, Gyan P.; Chanda, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination of peanut, due to infection by Aspergillus flavus, is a major problem of rain-fed agriculture in India. In the present study, molecular characterisation of 187 Aspergillus flavus isolates, which were sampled from the peanut fields of Gujarat state in India, was performed using AFLP markers. On a pooled cluster analysis, the markers could successfully discriminate among the ‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘G’ group A. flavus isolates. PCoA analysis also showed equivalent results to the cluster analysis. Most of the isolates from one district could be clustered together, which indicated genetic similarity among the isolates. Further, a lot of genetic variability was observed within a district and within a group. The results of AMOVA test revealed that the variance within a population (84%) was more than that between two populations (16%). The isolates, when tested by indirect competitive ELISA, showed about 68.5% of them to be atoxigenic. Composite analysis between the aflatoxin production and AFLP data was found to be ineffective in separating the isolate types by aflatoxigenicity. Certain unique fragments, with respect to individual isolates, were also identified that may be used for development of SCAR marker to aid in rapid and precise identification of isolates. PMID:26413047

  16. Genetic diversity of the Chinese traditional herb Blumea balsamifera (Asteraceae) based on AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Pang, Y X; Wang, W Q; Zhang, Y B; Yuan, Y; Yu, J B; Zhu, M; Chen, Y Y

    2014-01-01

    Blumea balsamifera is a commercially important medicinal herb in China and other parts of Asia. It is used to produce borneol. This plant grows in the wild, but resources have diminished greatly in recent years. We examined the genetic diversity of this species to help develop conservation strategies; 35 plants from five provinces were analyzed using AFLPs. Eight AFLP primer combinations generated 1367 fragments, giving a mean of 172 fragments per primer combination. Polymorphism in the germplasm analysis was found for 1360 (99.48%) of the fragments, of which 264 (19.27%) fragments were unique (accession specific) and 423 (25.33%) of the fragments were rare (present in less than 10% of the accessions). The polymorphic fragments were used to group the accessions in a UPGMA phenogram. Most grouping was geographical. In general, accessions coming from Guizhou and Guangxi showed higher diversities as these accessions were scattered in different groups. The genetic distance estimated by Jaccard similarity coefficient index showed low variability among genotypes (coefficient value ranged from 0.60 to 0.95). More attention should be given to the study and conservation of the biodiversity of this economically important genus. PMID:24782086

  17. [AFLP Analysis of Genetic Diversity in the Genus Mallus Mill. (Apple)].

    PubMed

    Savelyeva, E N; Kudryavtsev, A M

    2015-10-01

    The first molecular genetic analysis of the apple species and varieties from Russian collections with the AFLP marker system was performed in order to study the genetic diversity of the genus Malus, as well as to clarify the phylogeny and solve some systematic issues of the genus. Nienty-one apple accessions, including species from five sections of the genus Malus and hybrid species, were examined. The level of polymorphism constituted 90.2%. It was demonstrated that the classical taxonomy of the genus Malus, which identifies five sections based on differences in their morphological characters, is valid and may be used to classify apple species. The species assignment of the Antonovka landraces was established. All of them belonged to the species M. domestica. It was demonstrated that the Yakutskaya apple variety was a domesticated species of the section Gymnomeles, presumably, M. baccata. AFLP analysis confirmed the hybrid nature of many species. The relationships between apple varieties of the Golden group with American wild species were demonstrated. The data suggest that the species M. sieversii was the ancestor of not only the domestic apple but also of other species of the Malus sections. PMID:27169227

  18. Genetic Diversity of Hibiscus tiliaceus (Malvaceae) in China Assessed using AFLP Markers

    PubMed Central

    TANG, TIAN; ZHONG, YANG; JIAN, SHUGUANG; SHI, SUHUA

    2003-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to investigate the genetic variations within and among nine natural populations of Hibiscus tiliaceus in China. DNA from 145 individuals was amplified with eight primer pairs. No polymorphisms were found among the 20 samples of a marginal population of recent origin probably due to a founder effect. Across the other 125 individuals, 501 of 566 bands (88·5 %) were polymorphic, and 125 unique AFLP phenotypes were observed. Estimates of genetic diversity agreed with life history traits of H. tiliaceus and geographical distribution. AMOVA analysis revealed that most genetic diversity resided within populations (84·8 %), which corresponded to results reported for outcrossing plants. The indirect estimate of gene flow based on ϕST was moderate (Nm = 1·395). Long-distance dispersal of floating seeds and local environments may play an important role in shaping the genetic diversity of the population and the genetic structure of this species. PMID:12930729

  19. Analysis of the genetic diversity and differentiation of Fenneropenaeus penicillatus populations using AFLP technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guiling; Cao, Yuanyu; Li, Zhongbao; Chen, Jin; Zhao, Binli; Lei, Guanggao; Wang, Zhanlin

    2012-05-01

    Fenneropenaeus penicillatus (redtail shrimp) is an important marine commercial animal in China. Recently, its resources have been depleted rapidly as a result of, for example, over-exploitation and environmental degradation of spawning grounds. Therefore, we analyzed the genetic diversity and differentiation of nine wild populations of F. penicillatus of China (Ningde, Lianjiang, Putian, Xiamen, Quanzhou, Zhangpu, Dongshan, Nanao, and Shenzhen populations) by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technology, to provide genetic information necessary for resource protection, rejuvenation, artificial breeding, and sustainable use of the resource. Eight AFLP primer pairs were used for amplification, and 508 bands were detected among the populations. The results show that the percentage of polymorphic loci ( P) ranged from 41.34% to 63.58%; the Nei's gene diversity ( H) of the populations was 0.119 4-0.230 5; and Shannon's Information Index ( I) was 0.184 1-0.342 5. These genetic data indicate that the genetic diversity of F. penicillatus was high. The genetic differentiation coefficient ( G ST=0.216 2) and gene flow ( N m=1.812 4) show that there was a high level of genetic differentiation and a moderate level of gene flow among populations. More studies on the genetic differentiation mechanism of F. penicillatus along the south-eastern coast of China need to be conducted to find more effective scientific protection strategies for the conservation of F. penicillatus genetic resources.

  20. Key Processes for Cheirolophus (Asteraceae) Diversification on Oceanic Islands Inferred from AFLP Data

    PubMed Central

    Vitales, Daniel; García-Fernández, Alfredo; Pellicer, Jaume; Vallès, Joan; Santos-Guerra, Arnoldo; Cowan, Robyn S.; Fay, Michael F.; Hidalgo, Oriane; Garnatje, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The radiation of the genus Cheirolophus (Asteraceae) in Macaronesia constitutes a spectacular case of rapid diversification on oceanic islands. Twenty species – nine of them included in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species – have been described to date inhabiting the Madeiran and Canarian archipelagos. A previous phylogenetic study revealed that the diversification of Cheirolophus in Macaronesia started less than 2 Ma. As a result of such an explosive speciation process, limited phylogenetic resolution was reported, mainly due to the low variability of the employed molecular markers. In the present study, we used highly polymorphic AFLP markers to i) evaluate species' boundaries, ii) infer their evolutionary relationships and iii) investigate the patterns of genetic diversity in relation to the potential processes likely involved in the radiation of Cheirolophus. One hundred and seventy-two individuals representing all Macaronesian Cheirolophus species were analysed using 249 AFLP loci. Our results suggest that geographic isolation played an important role in this radiation process. This was likely driven by the combination of poor gene flow capacity and a good ability for sporadic long-distance colonisations. In addition, we also found some traces of introgression and incipient ecological adaptation, which could have further enhanced the extraordinary diversification of Cheirolophus in Macaronesia. Last, we hypothesize that current threat categories assigned to Macaronesian Cheirolophus species do not reflect their respective evolutionary relevance, so future evaluations of their conservation status should take into account the results presented here. PMID:25412495

  1. DETECTION OF GENETIC VARIATION IN WILD POPULATIONS OF THREE ALLIUM SPECIES USING AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS (AFLP)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Allium is distributed worldwide and includes about 80 North American species, with at least 13 occurring in Utah. This study examines amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) variation within and among wild populations of three Allium species varying in abundance and distribution, na...

  2. REDUCTION OF SPECIES IN THE WILD POTATO SOLANUM SECTION PETOTA SERIES LONGIPEDICELLATA: AFLP, RAPD AND CHLOROPLAST SSR DATA.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Species boundaries were assessed with three molecular markers (AFLPs, RAPDs, chloroplast microsatellites, also known as chloroplast single sequence repeats [cpSSRs]) for all six species of wild potatoes (Solanum L. section Petota Dumort.) assigned to ser. Longipedicellata: S. fendleri, S. hjertingii...

  3. Impact of deep coalescence and recombination on the estimation of phylogenetic relationships among species using AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    García-Pereira, María Jesús; Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio; Whelan, Simon; Caballero, Armando; Quesada, Humberto

    2014-07-01

    Deep coalescence and the nongenealogical pattern of descent caused by recombination have emerged as a common problem for phylogenetic inference at the species level. Here we use computer simulations to assess whether AFLP-based phylogenies are robust to the uncertainties introduced by these factors. Our results indicate that phylogenetic signal can prevail even in the face of extensive deep coalescence allowing recovering the correct species tree topology. The impact of recombination on tree accuracy was related to total tree depth and species effective population size. The correct tree topology could be recovered upon many simulation settings due to a trade-off between the conflicting signals resulting from intra-locus recombination and the benefits of the joint consideration of unlinked loci that better matched overall the true species tree. Errors in tree topology were not only determined by deep coalescence, but also by the timing of divergence and the tree-building errors arising from an insufficient number of characters. DNA sequences generally outperformed AFLPs upon any simulated scenario, but this difference in performance was nearly negligible when a sufficient number of AFLP characters were sampled. Our simulations suggest that the impact of deep coalescence and intra-locus recombination on the reliability of AFLP trees could be minimal for effective population sizes equal to or lower than 10,000 (typical of many vertebrates and tree plants) given tree depths above 0.02 substitutions per site. PMID:24631855

  4. Transcriptome response of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) to infection with Vibrio tubiashii using cDNA AFLP differential display

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used qualitative complementary DNA-Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) differential display analysis and real-time, quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) to identify genes in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas whose transcription either changes in response to exposure to a pathogenic bacter...

  5. Bone scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test used to diagnose bone diseases and find out how severe they are. How ... a 3-phase bone scan. To evaluate metastatic bone disease, images are taken only after the 3- to ...

  6. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Cancer Goiter - simple Hyperthyroidism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II PET scan Skin ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Nuclear Scans Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Diseases Thyroid ...

  7. Bone scan

    MedlinePlus

    A bone scan is an imaging test used to diagnose bone diseases and find out how severe they are. ... A bone scan involves injecting a very small amount of radioactive material (radiotracer) into a vein. The substance travels through ...

  8. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  9. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    Liver gallium scan; Bony gallium scan ... You will get a radioactive material called gallium injected into your vein. The gallium travels through the bloodstream and collects in the bones and certain organs. Your health care provider will ...

  10. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  11. SNP Discovery by Illumina-Based Transcriptome Sequencing of the Olive and the Genetic Characterization of Turkish Olive Genotypes Revealed by AFLP, SSR and SNP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Hilal Betul; Cetin, Oznur; Kaya, Hulya; Sahin, Mustafa; Sefer, Filiz; Kahraman, Abdullah; Tanyolac, Bahattin

    2013-01-01

    Background The olive tree (Olea europaea L.) is a diploid (2n = 2x = 46) outcrossing species mainly grown in the Mediterranean area, where it is the most important oil-producing crop. Because of its economic, cultural and ecological importance, various DNA markers have been used in the olive to characterize and elucidate homonyms, synonyms and unknown accessions. However, a comprehensive characterization and a full sequence of its transcriptome are unavailable, leading to the importance of an efficient large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery in olive. The objectives of this study were (1) to discover olive SNPs using next-generation sequencing and to identify SNP primers for cultivar identification and (2) to characterize 96 olive genotypes originating from different regions of Turkey. Methodology/Principal Findings Next-generation sequencing technology was used with five distinct olive genotypes and generated cDNA, producing 126,542,413 reads using an Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx. Following quality and size trimming, the high-quality reads were assembled into 22,052 contigs with an average length of 1,321 bases and 45 singletons. The SNPs were filtered and 2,987 high-quality putative SNP primers were identified. The assembled sequences and singletons were subjected to BLAST similarity searches and annotated with a Gene Ontology identifier. To identify the 96 olive genotypes, these SNP primers were applied to the genotypes in combination with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers. Conclusions/Significance This study marks the highest number of SNP markers discovered to date from olive genotypes using transcriptome sequencing. The developed SNP markers will provide a useful source for molecular genetic studies, such as genetic diversity and characterization, high density quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis, association mapping and map-based gene cloning in the olive. High levels of

  12. A genome-wide linkage scan of bipolar disorder in Latino families identifies susceptibility loci at 8q24 and 14q32.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Camarillo, Cynthia; Rodriguez, Marco; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Almasy, Laura; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2014-09-01

    A genome-wide nonparametric linkage screen was performed to localize Bipolar Disorder (BP) susceptibility loci in a sample of 3757 individuals of Latino ancestry. The sample included 963 individuals with BP phenotype (704 relative pairs) from 686 families recruited from the US, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Guatemala. Non-parametric analyses were performed over a 5 cM grid with an average genetic coverage of 0.67 cM. Multipoint analyses were conducted across the genome using non-parametric Kong & Cox LOD scores along with Sall statistics for all relative pairs. Suggestive and significant genome-wide thresholds were calculated based on 1000 simulations. Single-marker association tests in the presence of linkage were performed assuming a multiplicative model with a population prevalence of 2%. We identified two genome-wide significant susceptibly loci for BP at 8q24 and 14q32, and a third suggestive locus at 2q13-q14. Within these three linkage regions, the top associated single marker (rs1847694, P = 2.40 × 10(-5)) is located 195 Kb upstream of DPP10 in Chromosome 2. DPP10 is prominently expressed in brain neuronal populations, where it has been shown to bind and regulate Kv4-mediated A-type potassium channels. Taken together, these results provide additional evidence that 8q24, 14q32, and 2q13-q14 are susceptibly loci for BP and these regions may be involved in the pathogenesis of BP in the Latino population. PMID:25044503

  13. Genome scans reveal candidate domestication and improvement genes in cultivated sunflower, as well as post-domestication introgression with wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Baute, Gregory J; Kane, Nolan C; Grassa, Christopher J; Lai, Zhao; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-04-01

    The development of modern crops typically involves both selection and hybridization, but to date most studies have focused on the former. In the present study, we explore how both processes, and their interactions, have molded the genome of the cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a globally important oilseed. To identify genes targeted by selection during the domestication and improvement of sunflower, and to detect post-domestication hybridization with wild species, we analyzed transcriptome sequences of 80 genotypes, including wild, landrace, and modern lines of H. annuus, as well as two cross-compatible wild relatives, Helianthus argophyllus and Helianthus petiolaris. Outlier analyses identified 122 and 15 candidate genes associated with domestication and improvement, respectively. As in several previous studies, genes putatively involved in oil biosynthesis were the most extreme outliers. Additionally, several promising associations were observed with previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs), such as branching. Admixture analyses revealed that all the modern cultivar genomes we examined contained one or more introgressions from wild populations, with every chromosome having evidence of introgression in at least one modern line. Cumulatively, introgressions cover c. 10% of the cultivated sunflower genome. Surprisingly, introgressions do not avoid candidate domestication genes, probably because of the reintroduction of branching. PMID:25641359

  14. AFLP analysis of nephthytis (Syngonium podophyllum Schott) selected from somaclonal variants.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Henny, R J; Devanand, P S; Chao, C T

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzed genetic differences of 19 cultivars selected from somaclonal variants of Syngonium podophyllum Schott along with their parents as well as seven additional Syngonium species and six other aroids using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers generated by 12 primer sets. Among the 19 somaclonal cultivars, 'Pink Allusion' was selected from 'White Butterfly'. Tissue culture of 'Pink Allusion' through organogenesis resulted in the development of 13 additional cultivars. Self-pollination of 'Pink Allusion' obtained a cultivar, 'Regina Red Allusion', and tissue culture propagation of 'Regina Red Allusion' led to the release of five other cultivars. The 12 primer sets generated a total of 1,583 scorable fragments from all accessions, of which 1,284 were polymorphic (81.9%). The percentages of polymorphic fragments within 'White Butterfly' and 'Regina Red Allusion' groups, however, were only 1.2% and 0.4%, respectively. Jaccard's similarity coefficients among somaclonal cultivars derived from 'White Butterfly' and 'Regina Red Allusion', on average, were 0.98 and 0.99, respectively. Seven out of the 15 cultivars from the 'White Butterfly' group and three out of six from the 'Regina Red Allusion' group were clearly distinguished by AFLP analysis as unique fragments were associated with respective cultivars. The unsuccessful attempt to distinguish the remaining eight cultivars from the 'White Butterfly' group and three from the 'Regina Red Allusion' group was not attributed to experimental errors or the number of primer sets used; rather it is hypothesized to be caused by DNA methylation and/or some rare mutations. This study also calls for increased genetic diversity of cultivated Syngonium as they are largely derived from somaclonal variants. PMID:16133347

  15. AFLP-based genetic mapping of the “bud-flowering” trait in heather (Calluna vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calluna vulgaris is one of the most important landscaping plants produced in Germany. Its enormous economic success is due to the prolonged flower attractiveness of mutants in flower morphology, the so-called bud-bloomers. In this study, we present the first genetic linkage map of C. vulgaris in which we mapped a locus of the economically highly desired trait “flower type”. Results The map was constructed in JoinMap 4.1. using 535 AFLP markers from a single mapping population. A large fraction (40%) of markers showed distorted segregation. To test the effect of segregation distortion on linkage estimation, these markers were sorted regarding their segregation ratio and added in groups to the data set. The plausibility of group formation was evaluated by comparison of the “two-way pseudo-testcross” and the “integrated” mapping approach. Furthermore, regression mapping was compared to the multipoint-likelihood algorithm. The majority of maps constructed by different combinations of these methods consisted of eight linkage groups corresponding to the chromosome number of C. vulgaris. Conclusions All maps confirmed the independent inheritance of the most important horticultural traits “flower type”, “flower colour”, and “leaf colour”. An AFLP marker for the most important breeding target “flower type” was identified. The presented genetic map of C. vulgaris can now serve as a basis for further molecular marker selection and map-based cloning of the candidate gene encoding the unique flower architecture of C. vulgaris bud-bloomers. PMID:23915059

  16. A first linkage map of pecan cultivars based on RAPD and AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Beedanagari, Sudheer R; Dove, Sue K; Wood, Bruce W; Conner, Patrick J

    2005-04-01

    We report here the first genetic linkage maps of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch], using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Independent maps were constructed for the cultivars 'Pawnee' and 'Elliot' using the double pseudo-testcross mapping strategy and 120 F1 seedlings from a full-sib family. A total of 477 markers, including 217 RAPD, 258 AFLP, and two morphological markers were used in linkage analysis. The 'Pawnee' linkage map has 218 markers, comprising 176 testcross and 42 intercross markers placed in 16 major and 13 minor (doublets and triplets) linkage groups. The 'Pawnee' linkage map covered 2,227 cM with an average map distance of 12.7 cM between adjacent markers. The 'Elliot' linkage map has 174 markers comprising 150 testcross and 22 intercross markers placed in 17 major and nine minor linkage groups. The 'Elliot' map covered 1,698 cM with an average map distance of 11.2 cM between adjacent markers. Segregation ratios for dichogamy type and stigma color were not significantly different from 1:1, suggesting that both traits are controlled by single loci with protogyny and green stigmas dominant to protandry and red stigmas. These loci were tightly linked (1.9 cM) and were placed in 'Elliot' linkage group 16. These linkage maps are an important first step towards the detection of genes controlling horticulturally important traits such as nut size, nut maturity date, kernel quality, and disease resistance. PMID:15782296

  17. Genome-Wide Linkage Scan for Prostate Cancer Susceptibility in Finland: Evidence for a Novel Locus on 2q37.3 and confirmation of signal on 17q21-q22

    PubMed Central

    Cropp, Cheryl D.; Simpson, Claire L; Wahlfors, Tiina; Ha, Nati; George, Asha; Jones, MaryPat S.; Harper, Ursula; Ponciano-Jackson, Damaris; Green, Tiffany A.; Tammela, Teuvo L. J.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan; Schleutker, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage studies have been used to localize rare and highly penetrant prostate cancer (PRCA) susceptibility genes. Linkage studies performed in different ethnic backgrounds and populations have been somewhat disparate, resulting in multiple, often irreproducible signals because of genetic heterogeneity and high sporadic background of the disease. Our first genome-wide linkage study and subsequent fine-mapping study of Finnish hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) families gave evidence of linkage to one region. Here, we conducted subsequent scans with microsatellites and SNPs in a total of 69 Finnish HPC families. GENEHUNTER-PLUS was used for parametric and non-parametric analyses. Our microsatellite genome-wide linkage study provided evidence of linkage to 17q12-q23, with a heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) score of 3.14 in a total of 54 of the 69 families. Genome-wide SNP analysis of 59 of the 69 families gave a highest HLOD score of 3.40 at 2q37.3 under a dominant high penetrance model. Analyzing all 69 families by combining microsatellite and SNP maps also yielded HLOD scores of > 3.3 in two regions (2q37.3 and 17q12-q21.3). These significant linkage peaks on chromosome 2 and 17 confirm previous linkage evidence of a locus on 17q from other populations and provide a basis for continued research into genetic factors involved in PRCA. Fine-mapping analysis of these regions is ongoing and candidate genes at linked loci are currently under analysis. PMID:21207418

  18. Modification of the aggregation behaviour of the environmental Ralstonia eutropha-like strain AE815 is reflected by both surface hydrophobicity and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) patterns.

    PubMed

    Bossier, P; Top, E M; Huys, G; Kersters, K; Boonaert, C J; Rouxhet, P G; Verstraete, W

    2000-02-01

    After inoculation of the plasmid-free non-aggregative Ralstonia eutropha-like strain AE815 in activated sludge, followed by reisolation on a selective medium, a mutant strain A3 was obtained, which was characterized by an autoaggregative behaviour. Strain A3 had also acquired an IncP1 plasmid, pLME1, co-aggregated with yeast cells when co-cultured, and stained better with Congo red than did the AE815 strain. Contact angle measurements showed that the mutant strain was considerably more hydrophobic than the parent strain AE815, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the production of an extracellular substance. A similar hydrophobic mutant (AE176R) could be isolated from the AE815-isogenic R. eutropha-like strain AE176. With the DNA fingerprinting technique repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR), no differences between these four strains, AE815, A3, AE176 and AE176R, could be revealed. However, using the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA fingerprinting technique with three different primer combinations, small but clear reproducible differences between the banding patterns of the autoaggregative mutants and their non-autoaggregative parent strains were observed for each primer set. These studies demonstrate that, upon introduction of a strain in an activated sludge microbial community, minor genetic changes readily occur, which can nevertheless have major consequences for the phenotype of the strain and its aggregation behaviour. PMID:11243262

  19. Genome-wide scan with nearly 700 000 SNPs in two Sardinian sub-populations suggests some regions as candidate targets for positive selection

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Ignazio Stefano; De Montis, Antonella; Calò, Carla Maria; Marini, Monica; Atzori, Manuela; Corrias, Laura; Sazzini, Marco; Boattini, Alessio; Vona, Giuseppe; Contu, Licinio

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the genetic structure and signatures of natural selection in different sub-populations from the Island of Sardinia, exploiting information from nearly 700 000 autosomal SNPs genotyped with the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 Array. The genetic structure of the Sardinian population and its position within the context of other Mediterranean and European human groups were investigated in depth by comparing our data with publicly available data sets. Principal components and admixture analyses suggest a clustering of the examined samples in two significantly differentiated sub-populations (Ogliastra and Southern Sardinia), as confirmed by AMOVA (FST=0.011; P<0.001). Differentiation of these sub-populations was still evident when they were pooled together with supplementary Sardinian samples from HGDP and compared with several other European, North-African and Near Eastern populations, confirming the uniqueness of the Sardinian genetic background. Moreover, by applying several statistical approaches aimed at assessing differences at the SNP level, the highest differentiated genomic regions between Ogliastra and Southern Sardinia were thus investigated via an extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH)-based test to point out potential selective sweeps. Using this approach, 40 genomic regions were detected, with significant differences between Ogliastra and Southern Sardinia. These regions were subsequently investigated using a long-range haplotype test, which found significant REHH values for SNPs rs11070188 and rs11070192 in the Ogliastra sub-population. In the light of these results and the overlap of the different computed statistics, the region encompassing these loci can be considered a strong candidate to have undergone selective pressure in Ogliastra. PMID:22535185

  20. Biodiversity of Asian rice gall midge (Orseolia oryzae Wood Mason) from five countries examined by AFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Chandel, G; Tan, Y; Zhang, Y; Huang, B; Nugaliyadde, L; Fernando, K; Bentur, J S; Inthavong, S; Constantino, S; Bennett, J

    2000-04-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was used to assess the biodiversity of one of the most important dipteran pests of cereals, the Asian rice gall midge (Orseolia oryzae Wood Mason). Larvae and pupae were collected at 15 locations in five Asian countries and preserved in 95% ethanol for storage, shipment, and DNA extraction using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Although only approximately 1 microg of DNA was extracted from a single pupa or larva, the use of several AFLP primers in various combinations meant that this amount of DNA was sufficient to allow many DNA fingerprints to be made per individual. Fingerprints were sufficiently reproducible, especially during selective amplification, to allow the genetic diversity within a field population to be characterized. Extraction of DNA from a pool of 20 insects yielded AFLP fingerprints in which variation among individuals was sacrificed in favor of detecting differences among populations. For each location, pooled DNA was amplified with three primer pairs. A total of 261 distinct AFLP bands were identified for the 45 fingerprints. Cluster analysis, performed by the unweighted pair-group method (UPGMA), separated the populations into two distinct groups. Group I included two populations from Guangdong province of southern China and one each from Laos and Imphal in northeastern India, while group II was comprised of eleven populations from elsewhere in India (Assam, Orissa, Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, and Kerala) and from Nepal and Sri Lanka. AFLP analysis provided insight into the origins of gall midge biotypes. In 1992, the prevailing biotype in Imphal changed from Indian biotype 3 to a new biotype 3M. Our data show that biotype 3M belongs to group I and did not arise by a recent mutation from biotype 3, which belongs to group II. By contrast, Indian biotypes 2 and 4 are likely to have diverged through recent mutation and selection, as are Chinese biotypes 1 and 4. The almost

  1. Tree Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.; Maxwell, Taylor; Posada, David; Stengård, Jari H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    We use evolutionary trees of haplotypes to study phenotypic associations by exhaustively examining all possible biallelic partitions of the tree, a technique we call tree scanning. If the first scan detects significant associations, additional rounds of tree scanning are used to partition the tree into three or more allelic classes. Two worked examples are presented. The first is a reanalysis of associations between haplotypes at the Alcohol Dehydrogenase locus in Drosophila melanogaster that was previously analyzed using a nested clade analysis, a more complicated technique for using haplotype trees to detect phenotypic associations. Tree scanning and the nested clade analysis yield the same inferences when permutation testing is used with both approaches. The second example is an analysis of associations between variation in various lipid traits and genetic variation at the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene in three human populations. Tree scanning successfully identified phenotypic associations expected from previous analyses. Tree scanning for the most part detected more associations and provided a better biological interpretative framework than single SNP analyses. We also show how prior information can be incorporated into the tree scan by starting with the traditional three electrophoretic alleles at APOE. Tree scanning detected genetically determined phenotypic heterogeneity within all three electrophoretic allelic classes. Overall, tree scanning is a simple, powerful, and flexible method for using haplotype trees to detect phenotype/genotype associations at candidate loci. PMID:15371364

  2. Using an Inbred Horse Breed in a High Density Genome-Wide Scan for Genetic Risk Factors of Insect Bite Hypersensitivity (IBH)

    PubMed Central

    Velie, Brandon D.; Shrestha, Merina; Franҫois, Liesbeth; Schurink, Anouk; Tesfayonas, Yohannes G.; Stinckens, Anneleen; Blott, Sarah; Ducro, Bart J.; Mikko, Sofia; Thomas, Ruth; Swinburne, June E.; Sundqvist, Marie; Eriksson, Susanne; Buys, Nadine; Lindgren, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    While susceptibility to hypersensitive reactions is a common problem amongst humans and animals alike, the population structure of certain animal species and breeds provides a more advantageous route to better understanding the biology underpinning these conditions. The current study uses Exmoor ponies, a highly inbred breed of horse known to frequently suffer from insect bite hypersensitivity, to identify genomic regions associated with a type I and type IV hypersensitive reaction. A total of 110 cases and 170 controls were genotyped on the 670K Axiom Equine Genotyping Array. Quality control resulted in 452,457 SNPs and 268 individuals being tested for association. Genome-wide association analyses were performed using the GenABEL package in R and resulted in the identification of two regions of interest on Chromosome 8. The first region contained the most significant SNP identified, which was located in an intron of the DCC netrin 1 receptor gene. The second region identified contained multiple top SNPs and encompassed the PIGN, KIAA1468, TNFRSF11A, ZCCHC2, and PHLPP1 genes. Although additional studies will be needed to validate the importance of these regions in horses and the relevance of these regions in other species, the knowledge gained from the current study has the potential to be a step forward in unraveling the complex nature of hypersensitive reactions. PMID:27070818

  3. Using an Inbred Horse Breed in a High Density Genome-Wide Scan for Genetic Risk Factors of Insect Bite Hypersensitivity (IBH).

    PubMed

    Velie, Brandon D; Shrestha, Merina; Franҫois, Liesbeth; Schurink, Anouk; Tesfayonas, Yohannes G; Stinckens, Anneleen; Blott, Sarah; Ducro, Bart J; Mikko, Sofia; Thomas, Ruth; Swinburne, June E; Sundqvist, Marie; Eriksson, Susanne; Buys, Nadine; Lindgren, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    While susceptibility to hypersensitive reactions is a common problem amongst humans and animals alike, the population structure of certain animal species and breeds provides a more advantageous route to better understanding the biology underpinning these conditions. The current study uses Exmoor ponies, a highly inbred breed of horse known to frequently suffer from insect bite hypersensitivity, to identify genomic regions associated with a type I and type IV hypersensitive reaction. A total of 110 cases and 170 controls were genotyped on the 670K Axiom Equine Genotyping Array. Quality control resulted in 452,457 SNPs and 268 individuals being tested for association. Genome-wide association analyses were performed using the GenABEL package in R and resulted in the identification of two regions of interest on Chromosome 8. The first region contained the most significant SNP identified, which was located in an intron of the DCC netrin 1 receptor gene. The second region identified contained multiple top SNPs and encompassed the PIGN, KIAA1468, TNFRSF11A, ZCCHC2, and PHLPP1 genes. Although additional studies will be needed to validate the importance of these regions in horses and the relevance of these regions in other species, the knowledge gained from the current study has the potential to be a step forward in unraveling the complex nature of hypersensitive reactions. PMID:27070818

  4. First genome-wide association scan on neurophysiological endophenotypes points to trans-regulation effects on SLC2A3 in dyslexic children.

    PubMed

    Roeske, D; Ludwig, K U; Neuhoff, N; Becker, J; Bartling, J; Bruder, J; Brockschmidt, F F; Warnke, A; Remschmidt, H; Hoffmann, P; Müller-Myhsok, B; Nöthen, M M; Schulte-Körne, G

    2011-01-01

    Dyslexia is one of the most common learning disorders affecting about 5% of all school-aged children. It has been shown that event-related potential measurements reveal differences between dyslexic children and age-matched controls. This holds particularly true for mismatch negativity (MMN), which reflects automatic speech deviance processing and is altered in dyslexic children. We performed a whole-genome association analysis in 200 dyslexic children, focusing on MMN measurements. We identified rs4234898, a marker located on chromosome 4q32.1, to be significantly associated with the late MMN component. This association could be replicated in an independent second sample of 186 dyslexic children, reaching genome-wide significance in the combined sample (P = 5.14e-08). We also found an association between the late MMN component and a two-marker haplotype of rs4234898 and rs11100040, one of its neighboring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In the combined sample, this marker combination withstands correction for multiple testing (P = 6.71e-08). Both SNPs lie in a region devoid of any protein-coding genes; however, they both show significant association with mRNA-expression levels of SLC2A3 on chromosome 12, the predominant facilitative glucose transporter in neurons. Our results suggest a possible trans-regulation effect on SLC2A3, which might lead to glucose deficits in dyslexic children and could explain their attenuated MMN in passive listening tasks. PMID:19786962

  5. Estimation of outcrossing rates in interspecific backcross plants of Jatropha curcas (L.) using AFLP and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pratima; Islam, Md Aminul; Negi, Madan Singh; Tripathi, Shashi Bhushan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report the estimates of outcrossing rates using open-pollinated progeny arrays of 40 BC1 individuals of Jatropha developed as a result of interspecific hybridization between J. curcas and J. integerrima. For analysis PCR-based dominant AFLP and codominant SSR markers were used. The multilocus outcrossing rate (tm) estimated from AFLP markers (0.892 ± 0.112) are almost in the same range with SSR (0.884 ± 0.293) markers which indicate a high level of heterozygosity. A low value of inbreeding coefficient (F) also points out to the fact that outcrossing was the prevalent mode of reproduction in Jatropha and suggests maintenance of adequate genetic variability within families. PMID:26600687

  6. Genome-Wide Scan and Test of Candidate Genes in the Snail Biomphalaria glabrata Reveal New Locus Influencing Resistance to Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Tennessen, Jacob A.; Bonner, Kaitlin M.; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Johnstun, Joel A.; Yeh, Jan-Ying; Marine, Melanie; Tavalire, Hannah F.; Bayne, Christopher J.; Blouin, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background New strategies to combat the global scourge of schistosomiasis may be revealed by increased understanding of the mechanisms by which the obligate snail host can resist the schistosome parasite. However, few molecular markers linked to resistance have been identified and characterized in snails. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we test six independent genetic loci for their influence on resistance to Schistosoma mansoni strain PR1 in the 13-16-R1 strain of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata. We first identify a genomic region, RADres, showing the highest differentiation between susceptible and resistant inbred lines among 1611 informative restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) markers, and show that it significantly influences resistance in an independent set of 439 outbred snails. The additive effect of each RADres resistance allele is 2-fold, similar to that of the previously identified resistance gene sod1. The data fit a model in which both loci contribute independently and additively to resistance, such that the odds of infection in homozygotes for the resistance alleles at both loci (13% infected) is 16-fold lower than the odds of infection in snails without any resistance alleles (70% infected). Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium is high, with both sod1 and RADres residing on haplotype blocks >2Mb, and with other markers in each block also showing significant effects on resistance; thus the causal genes within these blocks remain to be demonstrated. Other candidate loci had no effect on resistance, including the Guadeloupe Resistance Complex and three genes (aif, infPhox, and prx1) with immunological roles and expression patterns tied to resistance, which must therefore be trans-regulated. Conclusions/Significance The loci RADres and sod1 both have strong effects on resistance to S. mansoni. Future approaches to control schistosomiasis may benefit from further efforts to characterize and harness this natural genetic variation. PMID:26372103

  7. Genome-wide scan of job-related exhaustion with three replication studies implicate a susceptibility variant at the UST gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Sulkava, Sonja; Ollila, Hanna M.; Ahola, Kirsi; Partonen, Timo; Viitasalo, Katriina; Kettunen, Johannes; Lappalainen, Maarit; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Lindström, Jaana; Härmä, Mikko; Puttonen, Sampsa; Salomaa, Veikko; Paunio, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    Job-related exhaustion is the core dimension of burnout, a work-related stress syndrome that has several negative health consequences. In this study, we explored the molecular genetic background of job-related exhaustion. A genome-wide analysis of job-related exhaustion was performed in the GENMETS subcohort (n = 1256) of the Finnish population-based Health 2000 study. Replication analyses included an analysis of the strongest associations in the rest of the Health 2000 sample (n = 1660 workers) and in three independent populations (the FINRISK population cohort, n = 10 753; two occupational cohorts, total n = 1451). Job-related exhaustion was ascertained using a standard self-administered questionnaire (the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI)-GS exhaustion scale in the Health 2000 sample and the occupational cohorts) or a single question (FINRISK). A variant located in an intron of UST, uronyl-2-sulfotransferase (rs13219957), gave the strongest statistical evidence in the initial genome-wide study (P = 1.55 × 10−7), and was associated with job-related exhaustion in all the replication sets (P < 0.05; P = 6.75 × 10−7 from the meta-analysis). Consistent with studies of mood disorders, individual common genetic variants did not have any strong effect on job-related exhaustion. However, the nominally significant signals from the allelic variant of UST in four separate samples suggest that this variant might be a weak risk factor for job-related exhaustion. Together with the previously reported associations of other dermatan/chondroitin sulfate genes with mood disorders, these results indicate a potential molecular pathway for stress-related traits and mark a candidate region for further studies of job-related and general exhaustion. PMID:23620144

  8. A genome-wide linkage scan identifies multiple chromosomal regions influencing serum lipid levels in the population on the Samoan islands* s⃞

    PubMed Central

    Åberg, Karolina; Dai, Feng; Sun, Guangyun; Keighley, Ember; Indugula, Subba Rao; Bausserman, Linda; Viali, Satupaitea; Tuitele, John; Deka, Ranjan; Weeks, Daniel E.; McGarvey, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal lipid levels are important risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. We conducted genome-wide variance component linkage analyses to search for loci influencing total cholesterol (TC), LDL, HDL and triglyceride in families residing in American Samoa and Samoa as well as in a combined sample from the two polities. We adjusted the traits for a number of environmental covariates, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and material lifestyle. We found suggestive univariate linkage with log of the odds (LOD) scores > 3 for LDL on 6p21-p12 (LOD 3.13) in Samoa and on 12q21-q23 (LOD 3.07) in American Samoa. Furthermore, in American Samoa on 12q21, we detected genome-wide linkage (LODeq 3.38) to the bivariate trait TC-LDL. Telomeric of this region, on 12q24, we found suggestive bivariate linkage to TC-HDL (LODeq 3.22) in the combined study sample. In addition, we detected suggestive univariate linkage (LOD 1.9–2.93) on chromosomes 4p-q, 6p, 7q, 9q, 11q, 12q 13q, 15q, 16p, 18q, 19p, 19q and Xq23 and suggestive bivariate linkage (LODeq 2.05–2.62) on chromosomes 6p, 7q, 12p, 12q, and 19p-q. In conclusion, chromosome 6p and 12q may host promising susceptibility loci influencing lipid levels; however, the low degree of overlap between the three study samples strongly encourages further studies of the lipid-related traits. PMID:18594117

  9. A Whole-Genome Scan and Fine-Mapping Linkage Study of Auditory-Visual Synesthesia Reveals Evidence of Linkage to Chromosomes 2q24, 5q33, 6p12, and 12p12

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Julian E.; Lamb, Janine A.; Brocklebank, Denise; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Maestrini, Elena; Addis, Laura; Sen, Mallika; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Monaco, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    Synesthesia, a neurological condition affecting between 0.05%–1% of the population, is characterized by anomalous sensory perception and associated alterations in cognitive function due to interference from synesthetic percepts. A stimulus in one sensory modality triggers an automatic, consistent response in either another modality or a different aspect of the same modality. Familiality studies show evidence of a strong genetic predisposition; whereas initial pedigree analyses supported a single-gene X-linked dominant mode of inheritance with a skewed F:M ratio and a notable absence of male-to-male transmission, subsequent analyses in larger samples indicated that the mode of inheritance was likely to be more complex. Here, we report the results of a whole-genome linkage scan for auditory-visual synesthesia with 410 microsatellite markers at 9.05 cM density in 43 multiplex families (n = 196) with potential candidate regions fine-mapped at 5 cM density. Using NPL and HLOD analysis, we identified four candidate regions. Significant linkage at the genome-wide level was detected to chromosome 2q24 (HLOD = 3.025, empirical genome-wide p = 0.047). Suggestive linkage was found to chromosomes 5q33, 6p12, and 12p12. No support was found for linkage to the X chromosome; furthermore, we have identified two confirmed cases of male-to-male transmission of synesthesia. Our results demonstrate that auditory-visual synesthesia is likely to be an oligogenic disorder subject to multiple modes of inheritance and locus heterogeneity. This study comprises a significant step toward identifying the genetic substrates underlying synesthesia, with important implications for our understanding of the role of genes in human cognition and perception. PMID:19200526

  10. Assessment of genetic diversity of landraces of Dendrocalamus hamiltonii using AFLP markers and association with biochemical traits.

    PubMed

    Waikhom, S D; Ghosh, S; Talukdar, N C; Mandi, S S

    2012-01-01

    Fermented bamboo shoots are popular traditional food items of various ethnic groups of the northeastern India, especially in Manipur State. Dendrocalamus hamiltonii is an economically important bamboo species used to produce fermented bamboo shoots. We studied genetic variability of this bamboo species in Chandel and Imphal-East (commercial production districts), using AFLP molecular markers. Each of the selected primers detected polymorphisms and 1614 (95.8%) were found to be polymorphic. Cluster analysis based on Dice similarity coefficients using UPGMA differentiated the populations into two major groups. Principal coordinate analysis based on the AFLP data clearly separated the populations according to their genetic diversity and antioxidant activity. Four primers were tested through multiple regression analysis to identify marker-trait association between AFLP data and biochemical attributes, i.e., antioxidant activity and total cyanide content. The 273 bp generated by EcoRI-AAG(Joe)/MseI-CTC showed high positive correlation with antioxidant activity (r = 0.729, P < 0.01). The 396 bp generated by EcoRI-AAC(Ned)/MseI-CTG were negatively correlated with cyanide content (r = -0.694, P < 0.01). Thus, we found association of DNA markers with antioxidant activities and total cyanide content. These results could be of use for the identification of superior genotypes with desirable traits. PMID:22782634

  11. Outgroup effects on root position and tree topology in the AFLP phylogeny of a rapidly radiating lineage of cichlid fish☆

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Paul C.; Sefc, Kristina M.; Sturmbauer, Christian; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of rapid radiations are particularly challenging as short basal branches and incomplete lineage sorting complicate phylogenetic inference. Multilocus data of presence-absence polymorphisms such as obtained by AFLP genotyping overcome some of the difficulties, but also present their own intricacies. Here we analyze >1000 AFLP markers to address the evolutionary history of the Limnochromini, a cichlid fish lineage endemic to Lake Tanganyika, and to test for potential effects of outgroup composition on tree topology. The data support previous mitochondrial evidence on the tribe’s taxonomy by confirming the polyphyly of the genus Limnochromis and – in contradiction to a recent taxonomic revision – nesting the genus Greenwoodochromis within the Limnochromini. Species relationships suggest that ecological segregation occurred during the rapid basal radiation of the Limnochromini. The large phylogenetic distance between candidate outgroup taxa and the Limnochromini radiation caused random outgroup effects. Bootstrap support for ingroup nodes was lower in outgroup-rooted than in midpoint-rooted trees, and root positions and ingroup tree topologies varied in response to the composition of the outgroup. These observations suggest that the predisposition for homoplastic evolution makes AFLP-based phylogenetic analyses particularly susceptible to random biases introduced by too-distant outgroup taxa. PMID:24055738

  12. AFLP fingerprinting as a tool to study the genetic diversity of Rhizobium galegae isolated from Galega orientalis and Galega officinalis.

    PubMed

    Terefework, Z; Kaijalainen, S; Lindström, K

    2001-10-01

    AFLP fingerprints of Rhizobium galegae strains that infect Galega orientalis and Galega officinalis obtained from different geographical sources, and of taxonomically diverse rhizobia representing the recognized species, were generated. Comparisons of the fingerprints from fluorescent labeled AFLP products using capillary electrophoresis on ABI prism 310, slab gel electrophoresis on ABI prism 377 genetic analyzers and silver staining were in good agreement. All methods delineated the G. orientalis strains from G. officinalis strains, the G. orientalis strains formed a tight cluster whereas the G. officinalis strains seem to show a greater level of genetic diversity. Comparison of fluorescent AFLP with other detection methods revealed that fluorescent labeling is more sensitive and practical, in addition, the deleterious effect of radioactivity associated with 32P-labeling, the delicate process of blotting polyacrylamide gels or the tedious procedure of silver staining can be avoided. The automated system facilitated a large number of runs at a time and the subsequent analysis of the data by generating exportable raw data. The congruency of the experiments was analyzed using the Bionumerics software. PMID:11566388

  13. Mapping a stripe rust resistance gene YrC591 in wheat variety C591 with SSR and AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Niu, Y C; Chen, X M

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici (PST), is one of the most destructive diseases of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). To determine inheritance of stripe rust resistance and map the resistance gene(s) in wheat variety C591, F(1), F(2,) and F(3) progenies derived from the Taichung 29 x C591 cross were inoculated with Chinese PST race CY32 in the greenhouse. Genetic analysis identified a single dominant gene, temporarily designated YrC591. A total of 178 SSR and 130 AFLP markers were used to test the parents and resistant and susceptible bulks. From the bulk segregant analysis, seven polymorphic SSR and two AFLP markers were selected for genotyping the F(2) population. SSR marker Xcfa2040-7B, and SCAR marker SC-P35M48 derived from AFLP marker P35M48 ( 373 ) were identified to be closely linked to the resistance gene with genetic distances of 8.0 and 11.7 cM, respectively. The SSR markers mapped the resistance gene on chromosome arm 7BL. In the seedling test with five PST races, the reaction patterns of C591 were different from wheat cultivars or lines carrying Yr2 or Yr6 that also are found on chromosome 7B. The results indicate that YrC591 is probably a novel stripe rust resistance gene. PMID:18946654

  14. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions inside your body. They use a special camera that detects radioactivity. Before the test, you receive ... you lie still on a table while the camera makes images. Most scans take 20 to 45 ...

  15. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  16. A Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Important Roles of DNA Methylation in Human Longevity by Regulating Age-Related Disease Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi-Gang; Wu, Huan; Luo, Long-Hai; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2015-01-01

    It is recognized that genetic factors contribute to human longevity. Besides the hypothesis of existence of longevity genes, another suggests that a lower frequency of risk alleles decreases the incidence of age-related diseases in the long-lived people. However, the latter finds no support from recent genetic studies. Considering the crucial role of epigenetic modification in gene regulation, we then hypothesize that suppressing disease-related genes in longevity individuals is likely achieved by epigenetic modification, e.g. DNA methylation. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the genome-wide methylation profile in 4 Chinese female centenarians and 4 middle-aged controls using methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing. 626 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were observed between both groups. Interestingly, genes with these DMRs were enriched in age-related diseases, including type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease. This pattern remains rather stable after including methylomes of two white individuals. Further analyses suggest that the observed DMRs likely have functional roles in regulating disease-associated gene expressions, with some genes [e.g. caspase 3 (CASP3)] being down-regulated whereas the others [i.e. interleukin 1 receptor, type 2 (IL1R2)] up-regulated. Therefore, our study suggests that suppressing the disease-related genes via epigenetic modification is an important contributor to human longevity. PMID:25793257

  17. Evaluating the impact of scoring parameters on the structure of intra-specific genetic variation using RawGeno, an R package for automating AFLP scoring

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Nils; Tuszynski, Jarek W; Ehrich, Dorothee; Gerdes, Tommy; Alvarez, Nadir

    2009-01-01

    Background Since the transfer and application of modern sequencing technologies to the analysis of amplified fragment-length polymorphisms (AFLP), evolutionary biologists have included an increasing number of samples and markers in their studies. Although justified in this context, the use of automated scoring procedures may result in technical biases that weaken the power and reliability of further analyses. Results Using a new scoring algorithm, RawGeno, we show that scoring errors – in particular "bin oversplitting" (i.e. when variant sizes of the same AFLP marker are not considered as homologous) and "technical homoplasy" (i.e. when two AFLP markers that differ slightly in size are mistakenly considered as being homologous) – induce a loss of discriminatory power, decrease the robustness of results and, in extreme cases, introduce erroneous information in genetic structure analyses. In the present study, we evaluate several descriptive statistics that can be used to optimize the scoring of the AFLP analysis, and we describe a new statistic, the information content per bin (Ibin) that represents a valuable estimator during the optimization process. This statistic can be computed at any stage of the AFLP analysis without requiring the inclusion of replicated samples. Finally, we show that downstream analyses are not equally sensitive to scoring errors. Indeed, although a reasonable amount of flexibility is allowed during the optimization of the scoring procedure without causing considerable changes in the detection of genetic structure patterns, notable discrepancies are observed when estimating genetic diversities from differently scored datasets. Conclusion Our algorithm appears to perform as well as a commercial program in automating AFLP scoring, at least in the context of population genetics or phylogeographic studies. To our knowledge, RawGeno is the only freely available public-domain software for fully automated AFLP scoring, from electropherogram

  18. A new genome scan for primary nonsyndromic vesicoureteric reflux emphasizes high genetic heterogeneity and shows linkage and association with various genes already implicated in urinary tract development

    PubMed Central

    Darlow, J M; Dobson, M G; Darlay, R; Molony, C M; Hunziker, M; Green, A J; Cordell, H J; Puri, P; Barton, D E

    2014-01-01

    Primary vesicoureteric reflux (VUR), the retrograde flow of urine from the bladder toward the kidneys, results from a developmental anomaly of the vesicoureteric valve mechanism, and is often associated with other urinary tract anomalies. It is the most common urological problem in children, with an estimated prevalence of 1–2%, and is a major cause of hypertension in childhood and of renal failure in childhood or adult life. We present the results of a genetic linkage and association scan using 900,000 markers. Our linkage results show a large number of suggestive linkage peaks, with different results in two groups of families, suggesting that VUR is even more genetically heterogeneous than previously imagined. The only marker achieving P < 0.02 for linkage in both groups of families is 270 kb from EMX2. In three sibships, we found recessive linkage to KHDRBS3, previously reported in a Somali family. In another family we discovered sex-reversal associated with VUR, implicating PRKX, for which there was weak support for dominant linkage in the overall data set. Several other candidate genes are suggested by our linkage or association results, and four of our linkage peaks are within copy-number variants recently found to be associated with renal hypodysplasia. Undoubtedly there are many genes related to VUR. Our study gives support to some loci suggested by earlier studies as well as suggesting new ones, and provides numerous indications for further investigations. PMID:24498626

  19. AFLPs Reveal Different Population Genetic Structure under Contrasting Environments in the Marine Snail Nucella lapillus L.

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Belén; Quintela, María; Ruiz, José Miguel; Barreiro, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    Dispersal has received growing attention in marine ecology, particularly since evidence obtained with up-to-date techniques challenged the traditional view. The dogwhelk Nucella lapillus L., a sedentary gastropod with direct development, is a good example: dispersal was traditionally assumed to be limited until studies with microsatellites disputed this idea. To shed some light on this controversy, the genetic structure of dogwhelk populations in northwest Spain was investigated with highly polymorphic AFLP markers giving special attention to the influence of hydrodynamic stress. In agreement with the expectations for a poor disperser, our results show a significant genetic structure at regional (<200 km) and areal scales (<15 km). However, the spatial genetic structure varied with wave-exposure in the present case study: IBD was evident under sheltered conditions but absent from the exposed area where genetic differentiation was stronger. Our results provide evidence that differences in wave-exposure can exert a detectable influence on the genetic structure of coastal organisms, even in species without a planktonic larva. PMID:23185435

  20. Sex-linked AFLP markers indicate a pseudoautosomal region in hemp ( Cannabis sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Peil, A; Flachowsky, H; Schumann, E; Weber, W E

    2003-06-01

    In dioecious plants of hemp ( Cannabis sativa L.), males are regarded as heterogametic XY and females as homogametic XX, although it is difficult to discriminate the X cytologically from the Y. The Y chromosome is somewhat larger than the X. Our aim was to analyse AFLP markers on X and Y, and to use them to gain some insight into the structure of the sex chromosomes. Markers located on the sex chromosomes can be grouped into different classes, depending on the presence or absence of a fragment on the X and/or the Y. They are detected by separately analysing male and female progenies of a single cross. Five markers were found to be located on both chromosomes. A few recombinants were observed for marker pairs of this class in the male progenies. Two completely linked markers located on the Y chromosome in the male parent show a recombination rate of r = 0.25 with sex. Recombination must have occurred between the sex chromosomes in the male parent. The recombination analysis led to the conclusion that there is a pseudoautosomal region (PAR) on the sex chromosomes, allowing recombination between the X and the Y chromosome. The other regions of the sex chromosomes show only a few recombination events, for the Y as well as for the X. These results are discussed in comparison to other dioecious plants. PMID:12835935

  1. Genetic diversity analysis of Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. using AFLP molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Pereira, A M S; Coppede, J S; França, S C; Ming, L C; Bertoni, B W

    2016-01-01

    Croton antisyphiliticus Mart. is a medicinal plant native to Cerrado vegetation in Brazil, and it is popularly used to treat urogenital tract infections. The objective of the present study was to assess the genetic variability of natural C. antisyphiliticus populations using AFLP molecular markers. Accessions were collected in the states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo, and Goiás. The genotyping of individuals was performed using a LI-COR® DNA Analyzer 4300. The variability within populations was found to be greater than the variability between them. The F(ST) value was 0.3830, which indicated that the populations were highly structured. A higher percentage of polymorphic loci (92.16%) and greater genetic diversity were found in the population accessions from Pratinha-MG. Gene flow was considered restricted (N(m) = 1.18), and there was no correlation between genetic and geographic distances. The populations of C. antisyphiliticus exhibited an island-model structure, which demonstrates the vulnerability of the species. PMID:26909989

  2. Combined Analysis of Genome Scans of Dutch and Finnish Families Reveals a Susceptibility Locus for High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol on Chromosome 16q

    PubMed Central

    Pajukanta, Päivi; Allayee, Hooman; Krass, Kelly L.; Kuraishy, Ali; Soro, Aino; Lilja, Heidi E.; Mar, Rebecca; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Nuotio, Ilpo; Laakso, Markku; Rotter, Jerome I.; de Bruin, Tjerk W. A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Peltonen, Leena

    2003-01-01

    Several genomewide screens have been performed to identify novel loci predisposing to unfavorable serum lipid levels and coronary heart disease (CHD). We hypothesized that the accumulating data of these screens in different study populations could be combined to verify which of the identified loci truly harbor susceptibility genes. The power of this strategy has recently been demonstrated with other complex diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and asthma. We assessed the largely unknown genetic background of CHD by investigating the most common dyslipidemia predisposing to CHD, familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL), affecting 1%–2% of Western populations and 10%–20% of families with premature CHD. To be able to perform a combined data analysis, we unified the diagnostic criteria for FCHL and its component traits and combined the data from two genomewide scans performed in two populations, the Finns and the Dutch. As a result of our pooled data analysis, we identified three chromosomal regions, on chromosomes 2p25.1, 9p23, and 16q24.1, exceeding the statistical significance level of a LOD score >2.0. The 2p25.1 region was detected for the FCHL trait, and the 9p23 and 16q24.1 regions were detected for the low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) trait. In addition, the previously recognized 1q21 region also obtained additional support in the other study sample, when the triglyceride trait was used. Analysis of the 16q24.1 region resulted in a statistically significant LOD score of 3.6 when the data from Finnish families with low HDL-C were included in the analysis. To search for the underlying gene in the 16q24.1 region, we investigated a novel functional and positional candidate gene, helix/forkhead transcription factor (FOXC2), by sequencing and by genotyping of two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the families. PMID:12638083

  3. High Genetic and Epigenetic Stability in Coffea arabica Plants Derived from Embryogenic Suspensions and Secondary Embryogenesis as Revealed by AFLP, MSAP and the Phenotypic Variation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Bobadilla Landey, Roberto; Cenci, Alberto; Georget, Frédéric; Bertrand, Benoît; Camayo, Gloria; Dechamp, Eveline; Herrera, Juan Carlos; Santoni, Sylvain; Lashermes, Philippe; Simpson, June; Etienne, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Embryogenic suspensions that involve extensive cell division are risky in respect to genome and epigenome instability. Elevated frequencies of somaclonal variation in embryogenic suspension-derived plants were reported in many species, including coffee. This problem could be overcome by using culture conditions that allow moderate cell proliferation. In view of true-to-type large-scale propagation of C. arabica hybrids, suspension protocols based on low 2,4-D concentrations and short proliferation periods were developed. As mechanisms leading to somaclonal variation are often complex, the phenotypic, genetic and epigenetic changes were jointly assessed so as to accurately evaluate the conformity of suspension-derived plants. The effects of embryogenic suspensions and secondary embryogenesis, used as proliferation systems, on the genetic conformity of somatic embryogenesis-derived plants (emblings) were assessed in two hybrids. When applied over a 6 month period, both systems ensured very low somaclonal variation rates, as observed through massive phenotypic observations in field plots (0.74% from 200 000 plant). Molecular AFLP and MSAP analyses performed on 145 three year-old emblings showed that polymorphism between mother plants and emblings was extremely low, i.e. ranges of 0–0.003% and 0.07–0.18% respectively, with no significant difference between the proliferation systems for the two hybrids. No embling was found to cumulate more than three methylation polymorphisms. No relation was established between the variant phenotype (27 variants studied) and a particular MSAP pattern. Chromosome counting showed that 7 of the 11 variant emblings analyzed were characterized by the loss of 1–3 chromosomes. This work showed that both embryogenic suspensions and secondary embryogenesis are reliable for true-to-type propagation of elite material. Molecular analyses revealed that genetic and epigenetic alterations are particularly limited during coffee somatic

  4. Infrared Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    United Scanning Technologies, Inc.'s Infrared thermography is a relatively new noncontact, nondestructive inspection and testing tool which makes temperatures visible to the human eye. Infrared scanning devices produce images that show, by color or black and white shading differences, heat losses through damaged or inadequately insulated walls or roofs. The MISS Aeroscan services are designed to take the guesswork out of industrial roof maintenance and provide companies big savings by identifying the location of moisture damage from roof leaks, effectively targeting maintenance attention.

  5. Species phylogeny and diversification process of Northeast Asian Pungitius revealed by AFLP and mtDNA markers.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Møller, Peter R; Shedko, Sergei V; Ramatulla, Temirbekov; Joen, Sang-Rin; Zhang, Chun-Guang; Sideleva, Valentina G; Takata, Keisuke; Sakai, Harumi; Goto, Akira; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2016-06-01

    Pungitius is a highly diversified genus of sticklebacks (Gasterosteidae) occurring widely in northern parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Several ecologically and genetically divergent types that are largely isolated reproductively but occasionally hybridize in sympatry have been discovered in Northeast Asia, although the taxonomy and evolutionary relationships among them remain unclear. We used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers to infer phylogenies among individuals collected from sympatric and allopatric populations, including the type localities of the described species. Phylogenetic analyses based on 2683 polymorphic AFLP loci confirmed seven species, each of which (except for one entirely allopatric species P. platygaster) was clearly differentiated from one or two other sympatric species and constituted a highly supported monophyletic clade with conspecific allopatric populations. The phylogeny showed that two lineages arose early; one gave rise to two species (circumpolar species P. pungitius and Paratethys species P. platygaster) and the other to five species endemic to Northeast Asia (P. sinensis, P. tymensis, P. polyakovi, P. kaibarae, and P. bussei). The brackish-water, freshwater, and Omono types previously discovered in Japan were reidentified as P. pungitius, P. sinensis, and P. kaibarae, respectively. A marked incongruence was noted between the phylogenies of AFLP and mtDNA markers, suggesting the occasional occurrence of hybridization and mtDNA introgression among distinct species. Our results highlight that the marginal seas of Northeast Asia played a key role as barriers to or facilitators of gene flow in the evolution of species diversity of Pungitius concentrated in this region. PMID:26997522

  6. Comparison of MALDI-TOF MS and AFLP for strain typing of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veenemans, J; Welker, M; van Belkum, A; Saccomani, M C; Girard, V; Pettersson, A; Verhulst, C; Kluytmans-Vandenbergh, M; Kluytmans, J

    2016-05-01

    Typing of bacterial isolates using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) potentially provides an efficient on-site method to monitor the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and rapidly detect outbreaks. We compared MALDI-MS typing results to those of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) in a collection of 52 ESBL-producing Escherichia coli, isolated in a Dutch nursing home with an on-going outbreak of ST131 E. coli. Specific MALDI types were defined based on spectral data from four replicate colony samples of isolates grown on Columbia agar using multivariate statistical procedures. Type-specific superspectra were computed for four E .coli MALDI-types and tested for the potential of rapid and automated typing. The effect of different incubation conditions on typing performance was tested by analysing five isolates incubated for 24 h and 48 h on five different media. Types defined based on MALDI spectra were largely in agreement with the AFLP results, although some MALDI types comprised of more than one AFLP type. In particular, isolates belonging to ST131 showed distinct mass patterns. The proportion of isolates correctly assigned was substantially lower for isolates incubated on Sabouraud-dextrose and Drigalski agars for 24 h, and for those incubated for 48 h (all media). Our results show that the identification of type-specific peaks potentially allows direct typing of isolates belonging to specific clonal lineages. Both incubation time and media affected type assignment, suggesting that there is a need for a careful standardization of incubation time and culturing conditions when developing MALDI-typing schemes for E. coli. PMID:26922068

  7. AFLP marking and polymorphism among progenies of Gymnema sylvestre: an important medicinal plant of India.

    PubMed

    Osman, Magda Abbaker; Dhawan, Sunita Singh; Bahl, Janak Raj; Darokar, Mahendra P; Khanuja, Suman P S

    2011-11-01

    The level of polymorphism among twelve selected progenies of Gymnema sylvestre was investigated through AFLP markers by multiplexing PCR reactions using 64 (8x8) primer combinations. Fourteen primer combinations were selected as the most suitable combination for G. sylvestre. Analysis of the 12 progenies with these 14 primer pairs produced 1689 fragments of which 972 (57.5%) were polymorphic and 485 (28.7%) were unique to a particular genotype. The number of fragments produced by individual primer pairs was in the range of 55 to 225. Out of these, polymorphic fragments were in the range of 34 (E-ACC/M-CAC) to 157 (E-AGG/M-CAG) and unique bands observed were 8 (E-ACC / M-CAC) to 69 (E-AGG/M-CAC). Different primer combinations detected different levels of polymorphism, ranging from 33% (E-AGG/ M-CAC) to 69.8% (E-AGG/ M-CAC). From the observations, it appears that the primer combinations E-AGG/M-CAC, E-AGG/CTG, E-AGG/CAG and E-ACA/CAT were the most informative for the detection of polymorphism among the progenies compared with others, since they produced a high number of unique fragments. The similarity coefficient ranged from 0.212 to 0.731. High similarity was observed between progeny S8 and S9 (73%) and high divergence between progenies S3 and S11. Among the selected progeny, S9 was found to be the most similar to the parent (63%), while genotype S11 was the most distant (36.9%). PMID:22224288

  8. Genetic diversity of populations and clones of Rhopilema esculentum in China based on AFLP analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Hongjin; Liu, Xiangquan; Zhang, Xijia; Jiang, Haibin; Wang, Jiying; Zhang, Limin

    2013-03-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) markers were developed to assess the genetic variation of populations and clones of Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye (Scyphozoa, Rhizostomatidae). One hundred and seventy-nine loci from 56 individuals of two hatchery populations and two wild populations were genotyped with five primer combinations. The polymorphic ratio, Shannon's diversity index and average heterozygosity were 70.3%, 0.346 and 0.228 for the white hatchery population, 74.3%, 0.313, and 0.201 for the red hatchery population, 79.3%, 0.349, and 0.224 for the Jiangsu wild population, and 74.9%, 0.328 and 0.210 for the Penglai wild population, respectively. Thus, all populations had a relatively high level of genetic diversity. A specific band was identified that could separate the white from the red hatchery population. There was 84.85% genetic differentiation within populations. Individual cluster analysis using unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) suggested that hatchery populations and wild populations could be divided. For the hatchery populations, the white and red populations clustered separately; however, for the wild populations, Penglai and Jiangsu populations clustered together. The genetic diversity at the clone level was also determined. Our data suggest that there are relatively high genetic diversities within populations but low genetic differentiation between populations, which may be related to the long-term use of germplasm resources from Jiangsu Province for artificial seeding and releasing. These findings will benefit the artificial seeding and conservation of the germplasm resources.

  9. Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 2015 - 31 March 2015.

    PubMed

    Arthofer, Wolfgang; Bertini, Laura; Caruso, Carla; Cicconardi, Francesco; Delph, Lynda F; Fields, Peter D; Ikeda, Minoru; Minegishi, Yuki; Proietti, Silvia; Ritthammer, Heike; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C; Steiner, Florian M; Wachter, Gregor A; Wagner, Herbert C; Weingartner, Laura A

    2015-07-01

    This article documents the public availability of (i) raw transcriptome sequence data, assembled contigs and BLAST hits of the Antarctic plant Colobanthus quitensis grown in two different climatic conditions, (ii) the draft genome sequence data (raw reads, assembled contigs and unassembled reads) and RAD-tag read data of the marbled flounder Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae, (iii) transcriptome resources from four white campion (Silene latifolia) individuals from two morphologically divergent populations and (iv) nuclear DNA markers from 454 sequencing of reduced representation libraries (RRL) based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) PCR products of four species of ants in the genus Tetramorium. PMID:26095006

  10. The Finland–United States Investigation of Non–Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Genetics (FUSION) Study. I. An Autosomal Genome Scan for Genes That Predispose to Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Watanabe, Richard M.; Valle, Timo T.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Magnuson, Victoria L.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Ally, Delphine S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Silander, Kaisa; Kohtamäki, Kimmo; Chines, Peter; Balow, Jr., James; Birznieks, Gunther; Chang, Jennie; Eldridge, William; Erdos, Michael R.; Karanjawala, Zarir E.; Knapp, Julie I.; Kudelko, Kristina; Martin, Colin; Morales-Mena, Anabelle; Musick, Anjene; Musick, Tiffany; Pfahl, Carrie; Porter, Rachel; Rayman, Joseph B.; Rha, David; Segal, Leonid; Shapiro, Shane; Sharaf, Ravi; Shurtleff, Ben; So, Alistair; Tannenbaum, Joyce; Te, Catherine; Tovar, Jason; Unni, Arun; Welch, Christian; Whiten, Ray; Witt, Alyson; Blaschak-Harvan, Jillian; Douglas, Julie A.; Duren, William L.; Epstein, Michael P.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Kaleta, Hong Shi; Lange, Ethan M.; Li, Chun; McEachin, Richard C.; Stringham, Heather M.; Trager, Edward; White, Peggy P.; Eriksson, Johan; Toivanen, Liisa; Vidgren, Gabriele; Nylund, Stella J.; Tuomilehto-Wolf, Eva; Ross, Edna H.; Demirchyan, Elza; Hagopian, William A.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Boehnke, Michael

    2000-01-01

    We performed a genome scan at an average resolution of 8 cM in 719 Finnish sib pairs with type 2 diabetes. Our strongest results are for chromosome 20, where we observe a weighted maximum LOD score (MLS) of 2.15 at map position 69.5 cM from pter and secondary weighted LOD-score peaks of 2.04 at 56.5 cM and 1.99 at 17.5 cM. Our next largest MLS is for chromosome 11 (MLS = 1.75 at 84.0 cM), followed by chromosomes 2 (MLS = 0.87 at 5.5 cM), 10 (MLS = 0.77 at 75.0 cM), and 6 (MLS = 0.61 at 112.5 cM), all under an additive model. When we condition on chromosome 2 at 8.5 cM, the MLS for chromosome 20 increases to 5.50 at 69.0 cM (P=.0014). An ordered-subsets analysis based on families with high or low diabetes-related quantitative traits yielded results that support the possible existence of disease-predisposing genes on chromosomes 6 and 10. Genomewide linkage-disequilibrium analysis using microsatellite marker data revealed strong evidence of association for D22S423 (P=.00007). Further analyses are being carried out to confirm and to refine the location of these putative diabetes-predisposing genes. PMID:11032783

  11. Differentiation of species of the family Acetobacteraceae by AFLP DNA fingerprinting: Gluconacetobacter kombuchae is a later heterotypic synonym of Gluconacetobacter hansenii.

    PubMed

    Cleenwerck, Ilse; De Wachter, Marjan; González, Angel; De Vuyst, Luc; De Vos, Paul

    2009-07-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA fingerprinting was investigated as a tool for fast and accurate identification of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) to the species level. One hundred and thirty five reference strains and 15 additional strains, representing 50 recognized species of the family Acetobacteraceae, were subjected to AFLP analysis using the restriction enzyme combination ApaI/TaqI and the primer combination A03/T03. The reference strains had been previously subjected to either DNA-DNA hybridization or 16S-23S rRNA spacer region gene sequence analysis and were regarded as being accurately classified at the species level. The present study revealed that six of these strains should be reclassified, namely Gluconacetobacter europaeus LMG 1518 and Gluconacetobacter xylinus LMG 1510 as Gluconacetobacter xylinus and Gluconacetobacter europaeus, respectively; Gluconacetobacter kombuchae LMG 23726(T) as Gluconacetobacter hansenii; and Acetobacter orleanensis strains LMG 1545, LMG 1592 and LMG 1608 as Acetobacter cerevisiae. Cluster analysis of the AFLP DNA fingerprints of the reference strains revealed one cluster for each species, showing a linkage level below 50 % with other clusters, except for Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter indonesiensis and Acetobacter cerevisiae. These three species were separated into two, two, and three clusters, respectively. At present, confusion exists regarding the taxonomic status of Gluconacetobacter oboediens and Gluconacetobacter intermedius; the AFLP data from this study supported their classification as separate taxa. The 15 additional strains could all be identified at the species level. AFLP analysis further revealed that some species harboured genetically diverse strains, whereas other species consisted of strains showing similar banding patterns, indicating a more limited genetic diversity. It can be concluded that AFLP DNA fingerprinting is suitable for accurate identification and classification of a broad

  12. Comparative analyses of plastid and AFLP data suggest different colonization history and asymmetric hybridization between Betula pubescens and B. nana.

    PubMed

    Eidesen, Pernille Bronken; Alsos, Inger Greve; Brochmann, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Birches (Betula spp.) hybridize readily, confounding genetic signatures of refugial isolation and postglacial migration. We aimed to distinguish hybridization from range-shift processes in the two widespread and cold-adapted species B. nana and B. pubescens, previously shown to share a similarly east-west-structured variation in plastid DNA (pDNA). We sampled the two species throughout their ranges and included reference samples of five other Betula species and putative hybrids. We analysed 901 individual plants using mainly nuclear high-resolution markers (amplified fragment length polymorphisms; AFLPs); a subset of 64 plants was also sequenced for two pDNA regions. Whereas the pDNA variation as expected was largely shared between B. nana and B. pubescens, the two species were distinctly differentiated at AFLP loci. In B. nana, both the AFLP and pDNA results corroborated the former pDNA-based hypothesis that it expanded from at least two major refugia in Eurasia, one south of and one east of the North European ice sheets. In contrast, B. pubescens showed a striking lack of geographic structuring of its AFLP variation. We identified a weak but significant increase in nuclear (AFLP) gene flow from B. nana into B. pubescens with increasing latitude, suggesting hybridization has been most frequent at the postglacial expansion front of B. pubescens and that hybrids mainly backcrossed to B. pubescens. Incongruence between pDNA and AFLP variation in B. pubescens can be explained by efficient expansion from a single large refugium combined with leading-edge hybridization and plastid capture from B. nana during colonization of new territory already occupied by this more cold-tolerant species. PMID:26113148

  13. A Genome-Wide Survey of Genetic Instability by Transposition in Drosophila Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Doris; Fontdevila, Antonio; Vieira, Cristina; García Guerreiro, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization between species is a genomic instability factor involved in increasing mutation rate and new chromosomal rearrangements. Evidence of a relationship between interspecific hybridization and transposable element mobilization has been reported in different organisms, but most studies are usually performed with particular TEs and do not discuss the real effect of hybridization on the whole genome. We have therefore studied whole genome instability of Drosophila interspecific hybrids, looking for the presence of new AFLP markers in hybrids. A high percentage (27–90%) of the instability markers detected corresponds to TEs belonging to classes I and II. Moreover, three transposable elements (Osvaldo, Helena and Galileo) representative of different families, showed an overall increase of transposition rate in hybrids compared to parental species. This research confirms the hypothesis that hybridization induces genomic instability by transposition bursts and suggests that genomic stress by transposition could contribute to a relaxation of mechanisms controlling TEs in the Drosophila genome. PMID:24586475

  14. Genome-Wide Macrosynteny among Fusarium Species in the Gibberella fujikuroi Complex Revealed by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Lieschen; Steenkamp, Emma T.; Martin, Simon H.; Santana, Quentin C.; Fourie, Gerda; van der Merwe, Nicolaas A.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Wingfield, Brenda D.

    2014-01-01

    The Gibberella fujikuroi complex includes many Fusarium species that cause significant losses in yield and quality of agricultural and forestry crops. Due to their economic importance, whole-genome sequence information has rapidly become available for species including Fusarium circinatum, Fusarium fujikuroi and Fusarium verticillioides, each of which represent one of the three main clades known in this complex. However, no previous studies have explored the genomic commonalities and differences among these fungi. In this study, a previously completed genetic linkage map for an interspecific cross between Fusarium temperatum and F. circinatum, together with genomic sequence data, was utilized to consider the level of synteny between the three Fusarium genomes. Regions that are homologous amongst the Fusarium genomes examined were identified using in silico and pyrosequenced amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fragment analyses. Homology was determined using BLAST analysis of the sequences, with 777 homologous regions aligned to F. fujikuroi and F. verticillioides. This also made it possible to assign the linkage groups from the interspecific cross to their corresponding chromosomes in F. verticillioides and F. fujikuroi, as well as to assign two previously unmapped supercontigs of F. verticillioides to probable chromosomal locations. We further found evidence of a reciprocal translocation between the distal ends of chromosome 8 and 11, which apparently originated before the divergence of F. circinatum and F. temperatum. Overall, a remarkable level of macrosynteny was observed among the three Fusarium genomes, when comparing AFLP fragments. This study not only demonstrates how in silico AFLPs can aid in the integration of a genetic linkage map to the physical genome, but it also highlights the benefits of using this tool to study genomic synteny and architecture. PMID:25486277

  15. Genetic Diversity of the USDA Brachypodium distachyon Collection Assessed by AFLP and TRAP Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The small grass species Brachypodium distachyon L has been employed as a model grass for genomics research for its small genome, minimum growth requirements and rapid generation time. We assessed the genetic diversity of all 30 accessions in the USDA B. distachyon collection held in Pullman, WA wi...

  16. A Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Scans Identifies IL18RAP, PTPN2, TAGAP, and PUS10 As Shared Risk Loci for Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Gabrielle; Beauchamp, Claudine; Trynka, Gosia; Dubois, Patrick C.; Lagacé, Caroline; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Hommes, Daan W.; Barisani, Donatella; Palmieri, Orazio; Annese, Vito; van Heel, David A.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Daly, Mark J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rioux, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and celiac disease (CelD) are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases, involving genetic and environmental factors in their pathogenesis. The two diseases can co-occur within families, and studies suggest that CelD patients have a higher risk to develop CD than the general population. These observations suggest that CD and CelD may share common genetic risk loci. Two such shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, have already been identified independently in these two diseases. The aim of our study was to explicitly identify shared risk loci for these diseases by combining results from genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets of CD and CelD. Specifically, GWAS results from CelD (768 cases, 1,422 controls) and CD (3,230 cases, 4,829 controls) were combined in a meta-analysis. Nine independent regions had nominal association p-value <1.0×10−5 in this meta-analysis and showed evidence of association to the individual diseases in the original scans (p-value <1×10−2 in CelD and <1×10−3 in CD). These include the two previously reported shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, with p-values of 3.37×10−8 and 6.39×10−9, respectively, in the meta-analysis. The other seven had not been reported as shared loci and thus were tested in additional CelD (3,149 cases and 4,714 controls) and CD (1,835 cases and 1,669 controls) cohorts. Two of these loci, TAGAP and PUS10, showed significant evidence of replication (Bonferroni corrected p-values <0.0071) in the combined CelD and CD replication cohorts and were firmly established as shared risk loci of genome-wide significance, with overall combined p-values of 1.55×10−10 and 1.38×10−11 respectively. Through a meta-analysis of GWAS data from CD and CelD, we have identified four shared risk loci: PTPN2, IL18RAP, TAGAP, and PUS10. The combined analysis of the two datasets provided the power, lacking in the individual GWAS for single diseases, to detect shared loci with a relatively small effect. PMID:21298027

  17. Analysis of genetic relationships among Rosa damascena plants grown in Turkey by using AFLP and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Baydar, Nilgün Göktürk; Baydar, Hasan; Debener, Thomas

    2004-08-01

    Rosa damascena Mill. is the most important rose species for rose oil production. The main rose oil producers in the world are Turkey and Bulgaria and they obtain the rose oil almost exclusively from R. damascena. In spite of coming from the same original populations, R. damascena plants grown in Turkey show some morphological differences. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the genetic relationships among R. damascena plants grown in Turkey by using microsatellite and AFLP markers. Twenty three AFLP and nine microsatellite primer pairs were used for this aim. No polymorphism could be detected among the plants, as the marker patterns obtained from different plants are identical. The conclusion from these data is that all R. damascena plants under study are derived from the same original genotype by vegetative propagation. Furthermore, the observed morphological differences originate from point mutations not detectable by molecular markers. Therefore, they are equivalent to sport mutations frequently observed in cut and garden rose varieties. PMID:15246662

  18. AFLP analysis of genetic variation among three natural populations of horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus along Chinese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qian; Chen, Fei; Shin, Paul K. S.; Cheung, S. G.; Chen, Yan; Ke, Caihuan

    2011-03-01

    The AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) technique was used to analyze and compare the genetic diversity of Tachypleus tridentatus from three south-eastern coastal sites of China (Pingtan, Hong Kong and Beihai). Eight pairs of primers generated 361 loci, including 285 polymorphic loci. The ratio of polymorphic loci was 96.97%. Nei's genetic diversity index was 0.420 8 and the Shannon information index was 0.607 5, both of which were higher than that reported for many other arthropods. These results show that the genetic diversity detected was mainly caused by individual differences within a population. Genetic distance showed that the rational division of the three geographic populations of T. tridentatus along the south-eastern coast of China was not significant, in which the genetic distance was not proportional to the geographic distance. All three horseshoe crab populations may belong to a large group, and had a high degree of genetic similarity. The high level of genetic diversity obtained from the present AFLP analysis may be due to the large effective population size of the species in Chinese waters.

  19. Differential Gene Expression in Sugarcane in Response to Challenge by Fungal Pathogen Ustilago scitaminea Revealed by cDNA-AFLP

    PubMed Central

    You-Xiong, Que; Jian-Wei, Lin; Xian-Xian, Song; Li-Ping, Xu; Ru-Kai, Chen

    2011-01-01

    Differential gene expression in sugarcane during sugarcane-Ustilago scitaminea interaction was conducted in a smut-resistant genotype. Using cDNA-AFLP along with silver staining, a total of 136 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were found to be differentially expressed in response to challenge by U. scitaminea. Forty TDFs, 34 newly induced plus six with obvious upregulated expression after infection, were sequenced and validated by RT-PCR analysis. These results demonstrated that the expression of 37 out of these TDFs in RT-PCR analysis was consistent with that in cDNA-AFLP analysis. Based on BlastX in NCBI, 28 TDFs were assumed to function in sugarcane under U. scitaminea stress. Analysis of expression profile of three TDFs revealed that they responded differently after infection with U. scitaminea, and the transcription was significantly enhanced. The response of two TDFs, SUC06 and SUC09, occurred before that of SUC10. This study enriches our knowledge of the molecular basis for sugarcane response to U. scitaminea infection. PMID:21792273

  20. Genetic variation in wild populations of the tuber crop Amorphophallus konjac (Araceae) in central China as revealed by AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Pan, C; Gichira, A W; Chen, J M

    2015-01-01

    Amorphophallus konjac is an economically important crop. In order to provide baseline information for sustainable development and conservation of the wild plant resources of A. konjac, we studied the genetic diversity and population structure of this species using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) molecular markers. We sampled 139 individuals from 10 wild populations of A. konjac in central China. Using five AFLP primer combinations, we scored a total of 270 DNA fragments, most of which were polymorphic (98.2%). Percentage of polymorphic loci, Nei's genetic diversity index, and Shannon's information index showed high levels of genetic variation within A. konjac populations. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that most of the variance (68%) resided within populations. The coefficient of genetic differentiation between populations was 0.348 and the estimated gene flow was 0.469, indicating that there was limited gene flow among the populations. Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analysis and principal coordinates analysis indicated that geographically close populations were more likely to cluster together. The Mantel test revealed a significant correlation between geographic and genetic distances (R2 = 0.2521, P < 0.05). The special insect-pollination system of A. konjac and the complex geography of central China are likely to have contributed to the current pattern of genetic variation of this species. In the present study, we provide several suggestions on the future protection of the wild plant genetic resources of A. konjac. PMID:26782525

  1. Genetic Differentiation between Natural and Hatchery Stocks of Japanese Scallop (Mizuhopecten yessoensis) as Revealed by AFLP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Dong; Li, Hong-Jun; Bao, Xiang-Bo; Gao, Xiang-gang; Li, Yun-feng; He, Chong-Bo; Liu, Zhan-Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Japanese scallop (Mizuhopecten yessoensis) is a cold-tolerant bivalve that was introduced to China for aquaculture in 1982. In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to investigate levels of genetic diversity within M. yessoensis cultured stocks and compare them with wild populations. Six pairs of primer combinations generated 368 loci among 332 individuals, in four cultured and three wild populations. High polymorphism at AFLP markers was found within both cultured and wild M. yessoensis populations. The percentage of polymorphic loci ranged from 61.04% to 72.08%, while the mean heterozygosity ranged from 0.2116 to 0.2596. Compared with wild populations, the four hatchery populations showed significant genetic changes, such as lower expected heterozygosity and percentage of polymorphic loci, and smaller frequency of private alleles, all indicative of a reduction in genetic diversity. Some genetic structures were associated with the geographical distribution of samples; with all samples from Dalian and Japan being closely related, while the population from Russia fell into a distinct clade in the phylogenetic analysis. The genetic information derived from this study indicated that intentional or accidental release of selected Japanese scallops into natural sea areas might result in disturbance of local gene pools and loss of genetic variability. We recommend monitoring the genetic variability of selected hatchery populations to enhance conservation of natural Japanese scallop resources. PMID:21152310

  2. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - heart; Computed axial tomography scan - heart; Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT scan - heart; Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agaston score; Coronary calcium scan

  3. Genetic structure of Pilosocereus gounellei (Cactaceae) as revealed by AFLP marker to guide proposals for improvement and restoration of degraded areas in Caatinga biome.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, E R; Strioto, D K; Meirelles, A C S; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2015-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was used to evaluate DNA polymorphism in Pilosocereus gounellei with the aim of differentiating samples grown in different Brazilian semiarid regions. Seven primer pairs were used to amplify 703 AFLP markers, of which 700 (99.21%) markers were polymorphic. The percentage of polymorphic markers ranged from 95.3% for the primer combination E-AAG/M-CTT to 100% for E-ACC/M-CAT, E-ACC/M-CAA, E-AGC/M-CAG, E-ACT/M-CTA, and E-AGG/M-CTG. The largest number of informative markers (126) was detected using the primer combination E-AAC/M-CTA. Polymorphism of the amplified DNA fragments ranged from 72.55% (in sample from Piauí State) to 82.79% (in samples from Rio Grande Norte State), with an average of 75.39%. Despite the high genetic diversity of AFLP markers in xiquexique, analysis using the STRUCTURE software identified relatively homogeneous clusters of xiquexique from the same location, indicating a differentiation at the molecular level, among the plant samples from different regions of the Caatinga biome. The AFLP methodology identified genetically homogeneous and contrasting plants, as well as plants from different regions with common DNA markers. Seeds from such plants can be used for further propagation of plants for establishment of biodiversity conservation units and restoration of degraded areas of the Caatinga biome. PMID:26681043

  4. Differentially expressed genes in Populus simonii x P. nigra in respnse to NaCl stress using cDNA-AFLP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salinity is an important environmental factor limiting growth and productivity of plants, and affects almost every aspect of the plant physiology and biochemistry. The objective of this study was to apply cDNA-AFLP and to identify differentially expressed genes in response to NaCl stress vs. no-stre...

  5. AFLP Polymorphisms Allow High Resolution Genetic Analysis of American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis Agents Circulating in Panama and Other Members of the Leishmania Genus

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Carlos M.; De La Guardia, Carolina; Sousa, Octavio E.; Calzada, José E.; Fernández, Patricia L.; Lleonart, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis is caused by parasites of the genus Leishmania, and causes significant health problems throughout the Americas. In Panama, Leishmania parasites are endemic, causing thousands of new cases every year, mostly of the cutaneous form. In the last years, the burden of the disease has increased, coincident with increasing disturbances in its natural sylvatic environments. The study of genetic variation in parasites is important for a better understanding of the biology, population genetics, and ultimately the evolution and epidemiology of these organisms. Very few attempts have been made to characterize genetic polymorphisms of parasites isolated from Panamanian patients of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Here we present data on the genetic variability of local isolates of Leishmania, as well as specimens from several other species, by means of Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP), a technique seldom used to study genetic makeup of parasites. We demonstrate that this technique allows detection of very high levels of genetic variability in local isolates of Leishmania panamensis in a highly reproducible manner. The analysis of AFLP fingerprints generated by unique selective primer combinations in L. panamensis suggests a predominant clonal mode of reproduction. Using fluorescently labeled primers, many taxon-specific fragments were identified which may show potential as species diagnostic fragments. The AFLP permitted a high resolution genetic analysis of the Leishmania genus, clearly separating certain groups among L. panamensis specimens and highly related species such as L. panamensis and L. guyanensis. The phylogenetic networks reconstructed from our AFLP data are congruent with established taxonomy for the genus Leishmania, even when using single selective primer combinations. Results of this study demonstrate that AFLP polymorphisms can be informative for genetic characterization in Leishmania parasites, at both intra and inter

  6. AFLP analysis reveals high genetic diversity but low population structure in Coccidioides posadasii isolates from Mexico and Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii cause coccidioidomycosis, a disease that is endemic to North and South America, but for Central America, the incidence of coccidioidomycosis has not been clearly established. Several studies suggest genetic variability in these fungi; however, little definitive information has been discovered about the variability of Coccidioides fungi in Mexico (MX) and Argentina (AR). Thus, the goals for this work were to study 32 Coccidioides spp. isolates from MX and AR, identify the species of these Coccidioides spp. isolates, analyse their phenotypic variability, examine their genetic variability and investigate the Coccidioides reproductive system and its level of genetic differentiation. Methods Coccidioides spp. isolates from MX and AR were taxonomically identified by phylogenetic inference analysis using partial sequences of the Ag2/PRA gene and their phenotypic characteristics analysed. The genetic variability, reproductive system and level of differentiation were estimated using AFLP markers. The level of genetic variability was assessed measuring the percentage of polymorphic loci, number of effective allele, expected heterocygosity and Index of Association (IA). The degree of genetic differentiation was determined by AMOVA. Genetic similarities among isolates were estimated using Jaccard index. The UPGMA was used to contsruct the corresponding dendrogram. Finally, a network of haplotypes was built to evaluate the genealogical relationships among AFLP haplotypes. Results All isolates of Coccidioides spp. from MX and AR were identified as C. posadasii. No phenotypic variability was observed among the C. posadasii isolates from MX and AR. Analyses of genetic diversity and population structure were conducted using AFLP markers. Different estimators of genetic variability indicated that the C. posadasii isolates from MX and AR had high genetic variability. Furthermore, AMOVA, dendrogram and haplotype network showed a small

  7. Different genome-specific chromosome stabilities in synthetic Brassica allohexaploids revealed by wide crosses with Orychophragmus

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xian-Hong; Wang, Jing; Li, Zai-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims In sexual hybrids between cultivated Brassica species and another crucifer, Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24), parental genome separation during mitosis and meiosis is under genetic control but this phenomenon varies depending upon the Brassica species. To further investigate the mechanisms involved in parental genome separation, complex hybrids between synthetic Brassica allohexaploids (2n = 54, AABBCC) from three sources and O. violaceus were obtained and characterized. Methods Genomic in situ hybridization, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) were used to explore chromosomal/genomic components and rRNA gene expression of the complex hybrids and their progenies. Key Results Complex hybrids with variable fertility exhibited phenotypes that were different from the female allohexaploids and expressed some traits from O. violaceus. These hybrids were mixoploids (2n = 34–46) and retained partial complements of allohexaploids, including whole chromosomes of the A and B genomes and some of the C genome but no intact O. violaceus chromosomes; AFLP bands specific for O. violaceus, novel for two parents and absent in hexaploids were detected. The complex hybrids produced progenies with chromosomes/genomic complements biased to B. juncea (2n = 36, AABB) and novel B. juncea lines with two genomes of different origins. The expression of rRNA genes from B. nigra was revealed in all allohexaploids and complex hybrids, showing that the hierarchy of nucleolar dominance (B. nigra, BB > B. rapa, AA > B. oleracea, CC) in Brassica allotetraploids was still valid in these plants. Conclusions The chromosomes of three genomes in these synthetic Brassica allohexaploids showed different genome-specific stabilities (B > A > C) under induction of alien chromosome elimination in crosses with O. violaceus, which was possibly affected by nucleolar dominance. PMID:19403626

  8. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gallbladder scan; Biliary scan; Cholescintigraphy: HIDA; Hepatobiliary nuclear imaging scan ... test results. This test is combined with other imaging (such as CT or ultrasound). After the gallbladder ...

  9. Cryptococcal meningitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans genotype AFLP1/VNI in Iran: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Badali, Hamid; Alian, Shahriar; Fakhim, Hamed; Falahatinejad, Mahsa; Moradi, Ali; Mohammad Davoudi, Mehrnaz; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the most important opportunistic fungal infection with a high mortality in HIV-patients in less developed regions. Here, we report a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a 49-year-old HIV-positive female due to Cryptococcus neoformans (serotype A, mating-type alpha, genotype AFLP1/VNI) in Sari, Iran. In vitro antifungal susceptibility tests showed MICs of isavuconazole (0.016 μg ml(-1) ), voriconazole (0.031 μg ml(-1) ), posaconazole (0.031 μg ml(-1) ), itraconazole (0.063 μg ml(-1) ), amphotericin B (0.125 μg ml(-1) ) and fluconazole (8 μg ml(-1) ). Despite immediate antifungal therapy, the patient died 4 days later due to respiratory failure. Cryptococcal infections have been infrequently reported from Iran and therefore we analysed all published cases of cryptococcosis in Iran since the first reported case from 1969. PMID:26444438

  10. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  11. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... Mosby; 2013:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  12. Sinus CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - sinus; Computed axial tomography scan - sinus; Computed tomography scan - sinus; CT scan - sinus ... 2014:chap 67. Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's ...

  13. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  14. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... gov/pubmed/18381118 . Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, ...

  15. Shoulder CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - shoulder; Computed axial tomography scan - shoulder; Computed tomography scan - shoulder; CT scan - shoulder ... Mosby; 2012:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  16. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... or other growth (mass) Cerebral atrophy (loss of brain tissue) ... with the hearing nerve Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)

  17. Timing and rate of genome variation in triticale following allopolyploidization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Gustafson, J Perry

    2006-08-01

    The timing and rate of genomic variation induced by allopolyploidization in the intergeneric wheat-rye (Triticum spp. - Secale cereale L.) hybrid triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack) was studied using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses with 2 sets of primers, EcoRI-MseI (E-M) and PstI-MseI (P-M), which primarily amplify repetitive and low-copy sequences, respectively. The results showed that allopolyploidization induced genome sequence variation in triticale and that a great degree of the genome variation occurred immediately following wide hybridization. Specifically, about 46.3% and 36.2% of the wheat parental band loss and 74.5% and 68.4% of the rye parental band loss occurred in the F1 hybrids (before chromosome doubling) for E-M and P-M primers, respectively. The sequence variation events that followed chromosome doubling consisted of continuous modifications that occurred at a very small rate compared with the rate of variation before chromosome doubling. However, the rate of sequence variation involving the rye parental genome was much higher in the first 5 generations following chromosome doubling than in any subsequent generation. Surprisingly, the highest rate of rye genomic variation occurring after chromosome doubling was in C3 or later, but not in C1. The data suggested that the cytoplasm and the degree of the relationship between the parental genomes were the key factors in determining the direction, amount, timing, and rate of genomic sequence variation occurring during intergeneric allopolyploidization. PMID:17036070

  18. Identification of Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) Markers Tightly Associated with Drought Stress Gene in Male Sterile and Fertile Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuejin; Guo, Lijun; Shu, Zhiming; Sun, Yiyue; Chen, Yuanyuan; Liang, Zongsuo; Guo, Hongbo

    2013-01-01

    Consistent grain yield in drought environment has attracted wide attention due to global climate change. However, the important drought-related traits/genes in crops have been rarely reported. Many near-isogenic lines (NILs) of male sterile and fertile Salvia miltiorrhiza have been obtained in our previous work through testcross and backcross in continuous field experiments conducted in 2006–2009. Both segregating sterile and fertile populations were subjected to bulked segregant analysis (BSA) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) with 384 and 170 primer combinations, respectively. One out of 14 AFLP markers (E9/M3246) was identified in treated fertile population as tightly linked to the drought stress gene with a recombination frequency of 6.98% and at a distance of 7.02 cM. One of 15 other markers (E2/M5357) was identified in a treated sterile population that is closely associated with the drought stress gene. It had a recombination frequency of 4.65% and at a distance of 4.66 cM. Interestingly, the E9/M3246 fragment was found to be identical to another AFLP fragment E11/M4208 that was tightly linked to the male sterile gene of S. miltiorrhiza with 95% identity and e-value 4 × 10−93. Blastn analysis suggested that the drought stress gene sequence showed higher identity with nucleotides in Arabidopsis chromosome 1–5. PMID:23525049

  19. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  20. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... Saunders; 2015:chap 93. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  1. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  2. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  3. Population genetic structure in apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivars revealed by fluorescent-AFLP markers in southern Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhaohe; Chen, Xuesen; He, Tianming; Feng, Jianrong; Feng, Tao; Zhang, Chunyu

    2007-11-01

    Population-wide genetic structure was studied using fluorescent-AFLP markers on 85 apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivars collected from Kuche, Kashi, Hetian in the Tarim Basin, southern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic structure and genotypic diversity among the different eco-geographical populations. Based on the results from this study, 8 pairs of fluorescent-AFLP primers showed clear electrophoregram and high polymorphism amongst the 64 pairs of EcoR|/Mse|(Mse|--a FAM fluorescent marked primer) primers screened. There was a significant polymorphic difference for the same primer pair in different populations and for the same population with different primer pairs. The percentage of polymorphic loci (P) at species level was higher than Kuche, Hetian, Kashi population levels, respectively. The Nei's gene diversity index (H) and Shannon's information index (I) at species level were higher than those of Kuche, Hetian, and Kashi at population level, respectively. H and I of Kuche population were the highest amongst the three populations. Apricot population genetic diversity was found mainly within the population. Genetic differentiation coefficient between populations (G(ST)) was 0.0882. Gene flow Nm between the populations was 5.1689. Population genetic identity was between 0.9772-0.9811 and genetic distance was between 0.0191-0.0232. These results further indicated that the similarity between populations was higher and the genetic distance between populations was smaller. The UPGMA cluster analysis indicates that the geographical populations at Kuche, Kashi, Hetian were relatively independent Mendelian populations. Concurrently, there was also partial gene exchange between the populations. All the evidences indicated that the genetic diversity in Kuche population was the highest, suggesting that it could be a transition population from wild apricot to cultivated apricot. There were abundant genetic

  4. Space environment induced mutations prefer to occur at polymorphic sites of rice genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Liu, M.; Cheng, Z.; Sun, Y.

    To explore the genomic characteristics of rice mutants induced by space environment, space-induced mutants 971-5, 972-4, and R955, which acquired new traits after space flight such as increased yield, reduced resistance to rice blast, and semi-dwarfism compared with their on-ground controls, 971ck, 972ck, and Bing95-503, respectively, together with other 8 japonica and 3 indica rice varieties, 17 in total, were analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method. We chose 16 AFLP primer-pairs which generated a total of 1251 sites, of which 745 (59.6%) were polymorphic over all the genotypes. With the 16 pairs of primer combinations, 54 space-induced mutation sites were observed in 971-5, 86 in 972-4, and 5 in R955 compared to their controls, and the mutation rates were 4.3%, 6.9% and 0.4%, respectively. Interestingly, 75.9%, 84.9% and 100% of the mutation sites identified in 971-5, 972-4, and R955 occurred in polymorphic sites. This result suggests that the space environment preferentially induced mutations at polymorphic sites in rice genomes and might share a common mechanism with other types of mutagens. It also implies that polymorphic sites in genomes are potential "hotspots" for mutations induced by the space environment.

  5. Genetic variation and differentiation in wide ranging populations of razor clam ( Sinonovacula constricta) inferred from AFLP markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingbo; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng

    2010-09-01

    The genetic variation and differentiation of the razor clam Sinonovacula constricta distributed along the coast of China were studied through amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Six primer combinations generated 193 fragments. The H e values varied from 0.322 to 0.463 and the percentage of polymorphic loci ranged from 74.1% to 98.4%, which indicates a high level of genetic diversity. Cluster analysis by Nei’s pairwise distance grouped all specimens by geographical origins. AMOVA consistently showed that genetic variation among populations was 8.71%, and most of the variation came from the genetic variation within populations (91.29%). Genetic differentiation among the six populations was moderate; pairwise F ST ranged from 0.0282 to 0.1480, which indicated that S. constricta populations along the coast of China are genetically connected. Among all the six populations, the Beihai population is the mostly differentiated from the others, suggesting that Hainan Island and Leizhou Peninsula act as barriers to gene flow. All populations abide isolation by distance model as indicated by Mantel test, except for ZS (Zhoushan) and YQ (Yueqing) populations. Information obtained in this study will provide guidelines for conservation and fishery management of this species in the future.

  6. Identification on commercialized products of AFLP markers able to discriminate slow- from fast-growing chicken strains.

    PubMed

    Fumière, Olivier; Dubois, Marc; Grégoire, Dimitrie; Théwis, André; Berben, Gilbert

    2003-02-26

    The European chicken meat market is characterized by numerous quality marks: "Label de Qualité Wallon" in Belgium, "Label Rouge" in France, denominations of geographical origin, organic agriculture, etc. Most of those certified productions have specifications requiring the use of slow-growing chicken strains. The amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique has been used to search molecular markers able to discriminate slow-growing chicken strains from fast-growing ones and to authenticate certified products. Two pairs of restriction enzymes (EcoRI/MseI and EcoRI/TaqI) and 121 selective primer combinations were tested on individual DNA samples from chicken products essentially in carcass form that were ascribed as belonging to either slow- or fast-growing strains. Within the resulting fingerprints, two fragments were identified as type-strains specific markers. One primer combination gives a band (333 bp) that is specific for slow-growing chickens, and another primer pair generates a band (372 bp) that was found to be characteristic of fast-growing chickens. The two markers were isolated, cloned, and sequenced. The effectiveness and the specificity of the two interesting determinants were assessed on individuals of two well-known strains (ISA 657 and Cobb 500) and on commercialized products coming from various origins. PMID:12590443

  7. Towards an optimal sampling strategy for assessing genetic variation within and among white clover (Trifolium repens L.) cultivars using AFLP.

    PubMed

    Khanlou, Khosro Mehdi; Vandepitte, Katrien; Asl, Leila Kheibarshekan; Van Bockstaele, Erik

    2011-04-01

    Cost reduction in plant breeding and conservation programs depends largely on correctly defining the minimal sample size required for the trustworthy assessment of intra- and inter-cultivar genetic variation. White clover, an important pasture legume, was chosen for studying this aspect. In clonal plants, such as the aforementioned, an appropriate sampling scheme eliminates the redundant analysis of identical genotypes. The aim was to define an optimal sampling strategy, i.e., the minimum sample size and appropriate sampling scheme for white clover cultivars, by using AFLP data (283 loci) from three popular types. A grid-based sampling scheme, with an interplant distance of at least 40 cm, was sufficient to avoid any excess in replicates. Simulations revealed that the number of samples substantially influenced genetic diversity parameters. When using less than 15 per cultivar, the expected heterozygosity (He) and Shannon diversity index (I) were greatly underestimated, whereas with 20, more than 95% of total intra-cultivar genetic variation was covered. Based on AMOVA, a 20-cultivar sample was apparently sufficient to accurately quantify individual genetic structuring. The recommended sampling strategy facilitates the efficient characterization of diversity in white clover, for both conservation and exploitation. PMID:21734826

  8. Genetic differentiation in the winter pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa--wilkinsoni complex), inferred by AFLP and mitochondrial DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Salvato, Paola; Battisti, Andrea; Concato, Silvia; Masutti, Luigi; Patarnello, Tomaso; Zane, Lorenzo

    2002-11-01

    The winter pine processionary moth has become an important pine pest in the last century, as a consequence of the spread of pine cultivation in the Mediterranean region. The pattern of genetic differentiation of this group, that includes two sibling species (Thaumetopoea pityocampa and Th. wilkinsoni), has been studied in nine populations using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and single strand conformation polymorphism-sequence analysis (SSCP) of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (COI) and cytochrome oxydase 2 (COII). Results indicate the existence of strong genetic differentiation between the two species that became separated before the Quaternary ice ages. Moreover data indicate that Th. pityocampa has a strong geographical structure, particularly evident at the nuclear level, where all pairwise phiST resulted to be highly significant and individuals from the same population resulted to be strongly clustered when an individual tree was reconstructed. The estimates of the absolute number of migrants between populations (Nm), obtained from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers, suggest that gene flow is low and that a gender-related dispersal could occur in this species. The males appear to disperse more than females, contributing to the genetic diversity of populations on a relatively wide range, reducing the risks of inbreeding and the genetic loss associated with bottlenecks occurring in isolated populations. PMID:12406253

  9. Differential Gene Expression for Curvularia eragrostidis Pathogenic Incidence in Crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis) Revealed by cDNA-AFLP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianshu; Wang, Xuemin; Yuan, Bohua; Qiang, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of Digitaria sanguinalis infected by Curvularia eragrostidis strain QZ-2000 at two concentrations of conidia and two dew durations were analyzed by cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphisms (cDNA-AFLP). Inoculum strength was more determinant of gene expression than dew duration. A total of 256 primer combinations were used for selective amplification and 1214 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were selected for their differential expression. Of these, 518 up-regulated differentially expressed TDFs were identified. Forty-six differential cDNA fragments were chosen to be cloned and 35 of them were successfully cloned and sequenced, of which 25 were homologous to genes of known function according to the GenBank database. Only 6 genes were up-regulated in Curvularia eragrostidis-inoculated D. sanguinalis, with functions involved in signal transduction, energy metabolism, cell growth and development, stress responses, abscisic acid biosynthesis and response. It appears that a few pathways may be important parts of the pathogenic strategy of C. eragrostidis strain QZ-2000 on D. sanguinalis. Our study provides the fundamentals to further study the pathogenic mechanism, screen for optimal C. eragrostidis strains as potential mycoherbicide and apply this product to control D. sanguinalis. PMID:24116044

  10. Alterations of leaf cell ultrastructures and AFLP DNA profiles in Earth-grown tomato plants propagated from long-term six years Mir-flown seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Xue, Huai; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Chunhua; Lu, Jinying

    Leaf cell ultrastructures and DNA variations in the firstand the second-generation of Earthgrown tomato (Lycopersicon esculentun Mill) plants that had been endured a long-term six years spaceflight in the Mir were compared to their ground-based control plants, under observations with a Transmission Electron Microscope and the Amplification Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. For alterations in the morphological ultrastructures, one plant among the 11 first-generation plants generated from 30 Mir-flown seeds had a three-layered palisade cell structure, while other 10 first-generation plants and all ground-based controls had one-layered palisade cell structure in leaves. Starch grains were larger and in clusters, numbers of starch grains increased in the chloroplasts in the Mir-flown plants. Leaf cells became contracted and deformed, and cell shape patterns were different in the Mir-flown plants. For the leaf genomic DNA alterations, 34 DNA bands were polymorphic with a 1.32% polymorphism among 2582 DNA bands in the first-generation Mir-flown plants. Band types in the spaceflight treated plants were also different from those in the ground-based control. Of 11 survived first-generation plants, 7 spaceflight treated plants (Plant Nos. 1-6 and No. 9) had a same 7 polymorphic bands and a same 0.27%DNA mutation. The DNA mutation rate was greatest in Plants No.10 and No.7 (0.90% and 0.94%), less in Plant No.11 (0.31%) and least in Plant No.8 (0.20%). For the 38 send-generation plants propagated from the No. 5 Mir-flown seed, 6 DNA bands were polymorphic with a 0.23% polymorphism among 2564 amplified DNA bands. Among those 38 second-generation plants amplified by primer pair (E4: ACC, M8: CTT), one DNA band disappeared in 29 second-generation plants and in the original Mir-flown No. 5 plant, compared to the ground-base controls. Among the 38 second-generation plants generated from the Mir-flown No. 5 seed, the DNA band types of 29 second-generation plants were

  11. Widespread utility of highly informative AFLP molecular markers across divergent shark species.

    PubMed

    Zenger, Kyall R; Stow, Adam J; Peddemors, Victor; Briscoe, David A; Harcourt, Robert G

    2006-01-01

    Population numbers of many shark species are declining rapidly around the world. Despite the commercial and conservation significance, little is known on even the most fundamental aspects of their population biology. Data collection that relies on direct observation can be logistically challenging with sharks. Consequently, molecular methods are becoming increasingly important to obtain knowledge that is critical for conservation and management. Here we describe an amplified fragment length polymorphism method that can be applied universally to sharks to identify highly informative genome-wide polymorphisms from 12 primer pairs. We demonstrate the value of our method on 15 divergent shark species within the superorder Galeomorphii, including endangered species which are notorious for low levels of genetic diversity. Both the endangered sand tiger shark (Carcharodon taurus, N = 18) and the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias, N = 7) displayed relatively high levels of allelic diversity. A total of 59 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.373) and 78 polymorphic loci (H(e) = 0.316) were resolved in C. taurus and C. carcharias, respectively. Results from other sharks (e.g., Orectolobus ornatus, Orectolobus sp., and Galeocerdo cuvier) produced remarkably high numbers of polymorphic loci (106, 94, and 86, respectively) from a limited sample size of only 2. A major constraint to obtaining much needed genetic data from sharks is the time-consuming process of developing molecular markers. Here we demonstrate the general utility of a technique that provides large numbers of informative loci in sharks. PMID:17150982

  12. Molecular Genetic Maps in Wild Emmer Wheat, Triticum dicoccoides: Genome-Wide Coverage, Massive Negative Interference, and Putative Quasi-Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Junhua; Korol, Abraham B.; Fahima, Tzion; Röder, Marion S.; Ronin, Yefim I.; Li, Youchun C.; Nevo, Eviatar

    2000-01-01

    The main objectives of the study reported here were to construct a molecular map of wild emmer wheat, Triticum dicoccoides, to characterize the marker-related anatomy of the genome, and to evaluate segregation and recombination patterns upon crossing T. dicoccoides with its domesticated descendant Triticum durum (cultivar Langdon). The total map length exceeded 3000 cM and possibly covered the entire tetraploid genome (AABB). Clusters of molecular markers were observed on most of the 14 chromosomes. AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers manifested a random distribution among homologous groups, but not among genomes and chromosomes. Genetic differentiation between T. dicoccoides and T. durum was attributed mainly to the B genome as revealed by AFLP markers. The segregation-distorted markers were mainly clustered on 4A, 5A, and 5B chromosomes. Homeoalleles, differentially conferring the vigor of gametes, might be responsible for the distortion on 5A and 5B chromosomes. Quasilinkage, deviation from free recombination between markers of nonhomologous chromosomes, was discovered. Massive negative interference was observed in most of the chromosomes (an excess of double crossovers in adjacent intervals relative to the expected rates on the assumption of no interference). The general pattern of distribution of islands of negative interference included near-centromeric location, spanning the centromere, and median/subterminal location. [An appendix describing the molecular marker loci is available as an online supplement at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:11042150

  13. Natural selection influences AFLP intraspecific genetic variability and introgression patterns in Atlantic eels.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, P A; Albert, V; Jónsson, B; Bernatchez, L

    2009-04-01

    Investigating patterns of genetic variation in hybridizing species provides an opportunity to understand the impact of natural selection on intraspecific genetic variability and interspecific gene exchange. The Atlantic eels Anguilla rostrata and A. anguilla each occupy a large heterogeneous habitat upon which natural selection could differentially shape genetic variation. They also produce viable hybrids only found in Iceland. However, the possible footprint of natural selection on patterns of genetic variation within species and introgressive hybridization in Icelandic eels has never been assessed. We revisited amplified fragment length polymorphism data collected previously using population genomics and admixture analyses to test if (i) genetic variation could be influenced by non-neutral mechanisms at both the intra- and interspecific levels, and if (ii) selection could shape the spatio-temporal distribution of Icelandic hybrids. We first found candidate loci for directional selection within both species. Spatial distributions of allelic frequencies displayed by some of these loci were possibly related with the geographical patterns of life-history traits in A. rostrata, and could have been shaped by natural selection associated with an environmental gradient along European coasts in A. anguilla. Second, we identified outlier loci at the interspecific level. Non-neutral introgression was strongly suggested for some of these loci. We detected a locus at which typical A. rostrata allele hardly crossed the species genetic barrier, whereas three other loci showed accelerated patterns of introgression into A. anguilla in Iceland. Moreover, the level of introgression at these three loci increased from the glass eel to the yellow eel stage, supporting the hypothesis that differential survival of admixed genotypes partly explains the spatio-temporal pattern of hybrid abundance previously documented in Iceland. PMID:19302349

  14. cDNA-AFLP analysis reveals differential gene expression in incompatible interaction between infected non-heading Chinese cabbage and Hyaloperonospora parasitica.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Liu, Shi-Tuo; Wei, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Dao-Yun; Hou, Xi-Lin; Li, Ying; Hu, Chun-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) is one of the main green leafy vegetables in the world, especially in China, with significant economic value. Hyaloperonospora parasitica is a fungal pathogen responsible for causing downy mildew disease in Chinese cabbage, which greatly affects its production. The objective of this study was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during incompatible interactions between non-heading Chinese cabbage and H. parasitica using complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP). We obtained 129 reliable differential transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) in a resistant line 'Suzhou Qing'. Among them, 121 upregulated TDFs displayed an expression peak at 24-48 h post inoculation (h.p.i.). Fifteen genes were further selected for validation of cDNA-AFLP expression patterns using quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results confirmed the altered expression patterns of 13 genes (86.7%) revealed by the cDNA-AFLP. We identified four TDFs related to fungal resistance among the 15 TDFs. Furthermore, comparative analysis of four TDFs between resistant line 'Suzhou Qing' and susceptible line 'Aijiao Huang' showed that transcript levels of TDF14 (BcLIK1_A01) peaked at 48 h.p.i. and 25.1-fold increased in the resistant line compared with the susceptible line. Similarly, transcript levels of the other three genes, TDF42 (BcCAT3_A07), TDF75 (BcAAE3_A06) and TDF88 (BcAMT2_A05) peaked at 24, 48 and 24 h.p.i. with 25.1-, 100- and 15.8-fold increases, respectively. The results suggested that the resistance genes tended to transcribe at higher levels in the resistance line than in the susceptible line, which may provide resistance against pathogen infections. The present study might facilitate elucidating the molecular basis of the infection process and identifying candidate genes for resistance improvement of susceptible cultivars. PMID:27602230

  15. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  16. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  17. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  18. Breast PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007469.htm Breast PET scan To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. A breast positron emission tomography (PET) scan is an imaging test that uses a radioactive ...

  19. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... any concerns you have about radiation with the health care provider who recommends the test. ... Usually the health care provider will recommend this scan based on ... the scan. For this reason, this test is not often done anymore.

  20. Orbit CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may mean: Bleeding Broken eye socket bone Graves disease Infection Tumor Risks CT scans and other x- ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 66. Read More CT scan Graves disease Tumor Update Date 1/18/2015 Updated by: ...

  1. Semi-quantitative differences in gene transcription profiles between sexes of a marine snail by a new variant of cDNA-AFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, M; Bernatchez, L; Rolán-Alvarez, E; Quesada, H

    2010-03-01

    A variant of the cDNA-AFLP method coupled to an automated sequencer was used to quantify transcripts differentially expressed between sexes of the marine snail Littorina saxatilis. First, we conducted a validation study of the technique using known concentrations of a commercial marker. Second, we analysed six replicates of males and females from a population showing no apparent sexual dimorphism. The results confirm that the method can be properly used within the range of DNA concentrations utilized. In addition, we detected a small percentage of spots (1.8%) differentially expressed between sexes, as expected from a low to moderately sexual dimorphic species. PMID:21565027

  2. Complex hybridization dynamics between golden-winged and blue-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera and Vermivora pinus) revealed by AFLP, microsatellite, intron and mtDNA markers.

    PubMed

    Vallender, R; Robertson, R J; Friesen, V L; Lovette, I J

    2007-05-01

    Blue-winged (Vermivora pinus) and golden-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) have an extensive mosaic hybrid zone in eastern North America. Over the past century, the general trajectory has been a rapid replacement of chrysoptera by pinus in a broad, northwardly moving area of contact. Previous mtDNA-based studies on these species' hybridization dynamics have yielded variable results: asymmetric and rapid introgression from pinus into chrysoptera in some areas and bidirectional maternal gene flow in others. To further explore the hybridization genetics of this otherwise well-studied complex, we surveyed variation in three nuclear DNA marker types--microsatellites, introns, and a panel of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs)--with the goal of generating a multilocus assay of hybrid introgression. All markers were first tested on birds from phenotypically and mitochondrially pure parental-type populations from outside the hybrid zone. Searches for private alleles and assignment test approaches found no combination of microsatellite or intron markers that could separate the parental populations, but seven AFLP characters exhibited significant frequency differences among them. We then used the AFLP markers to examine the extent and pattern of introgression in a population where pinus-phenotype individuals have recently invaded a region that previously supported only a chrysoptera-phenotype population. Despite the low frequency of phenotypic hybrids at this location, the AFLP data suggest that almost a third of the phenotypically pure chrysoptera have introgressed genotypes, indicating the presence of substantial cryptic hybridization in the history of this species. The evidence for extensive cryptic introgression, combined with the lack of differentiation at other nuclear loci, cautions against hybrid assessments based on single markers or on phenotypic traits that are likely to be determined by a small number of loci. Considered in concert, these

  3. Polyploid formation in cotton is not accompanied by rapid genomic changes.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Brubaker, C L; Mergeai, G; Cronn, R C; Wendel, J F

    2001-06-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that allopolyploid speciation in plants may be associated with non-Mendelian genomic changes in the early generations following polyploid synthesis. To address the question of whether rapid genomic changes also occur in allopolyploid cotton (Gossypium) species, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was performed to evaluate nine sets of newly synthesized allotetraploid and allohexaploid plants, their parents, and the selfed progeny from colchicine-doubled synthetics. Using both methylation-sensitive and methylation-insensitive enzymes, the extent of fragment additivity in newly combined genomes was ascertained for a total of approximately 22,000 genomic loci. Fragment additivity was observed in nearly all cases, with the few exceptions most likely reflecting parental heterozygosity or experimental error. In addition, genomic Southern analysis on six sets of synthetic allopolyploids probed with five retrotransposons also revealed complete additivity. Because no alterations were observed using methylation-sensitive isoschizomers, epigenetic changes following polyploid synthesis were also minimal. These indications of genomic additivity and epigenetic stasis during allopolyploid formation provide a contrast to recent evidence from several model plant allopolyploids, most notably wheat and Brassica, where rapid and unexplained genomic changes have been reported. In addition, the data contrast with evidence from repetitive DNAs in Gossypium, some of which are subject to non-Mendelian molecular evolutionary phenomena in extant polyploids. These contrasts indicate polyploid speciation in plants is accompanied by a diverse array of molecular evolutionary phenomena, which will vary among both genomic constituents and taxa. PMID:11444689

  4. Multipurpose binocular scanning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, F. R.; Parker, G. L.

    1969-01-01

    Optical gimballing apparatus directs narrow fields of view throughout solid angle approaching 4 pi steradians. Image rotation produced by scanning can be eliminated or altered by gear trains directly linked to the scanning drive assembly. It provides the basis for a binocular scanning capability.

  5. Optical scanning cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a technique called optical scanning cryptography (OSC). The technique can perform encryption on-the-fly using laser beams and can be implemented using an optical heterodyne scanning. We shall first describe the optical heterodyne scanning system and then provide some computer simulations to clarify and confirm the idea of encryption and decryption.

  6. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  7. Multiple displacement amplification of whole genomic DNA from urediospores of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Ma, Z H; Wu, B M

    2015-05-01

    Biotrophic fungi, such as Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, because they cannot be cultured on nutrient media, to obtain adequate quantity of DNA for molecular genetic analysis, are usually propagated on living hosts, wheat plants in case of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici. The propagation process is time-, space- and labor-consuming and has been a bottleneck to molecular genetic analysis of this pathogen. In this study we evaluated multiple displacement amplification (MDA) of pathogen genomic DNA from urediospores as an alternative approach to traditional propagation of urediospores followed by DNA extraction. The quantities of pathogen genomic DNA in the products were further determined via real-time PCR with a pair of primers specific for the β-tubulin gene of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici. The amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints were also compared between the DNA products. The results demonstrated that adequate genomic DNA at fragment size larger than 23 Kb could be amplified from 20 to 30 urediospores via MDA method. The real-time PCR results suggested that although fresh urediospores collected from diseased leaves were the best, spores picked from diseased leaves stored for a prolonged period could also be used for amplification. AFLP fingerprints exhibited no significant differences between amplified DNA and DNA extracted with CTAB method, suggesting amplified DNA can represent the pathogen's genomic DNA very well. Therefore, MDA could be used to obtain genomic DNA from small precious samples (dozens of spores) for molecular genetic analysis of wheat stripe rust pathogen, and other fungi that are difficult to propagate. PMID:25652158

  8. Rapid frequency scan EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-08-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  9. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5 T2, even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B1, periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  10. Line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carucci, John A.; Stevenson, Mary; Gareau, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We created a line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope as part of a new procedure: video assisted micrographic surgery (VAMS). The need for rapid pathological assessment of the tissue on the surface of skin excisions very large since there are 3.5 million new skin cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. The new design presented here is a confocal microscope without any scanning optics. Instead, a line is focused in space and the sample, which is flattened, is physically translated such that the line scans across its face in a direction perpendicular to the line its self. The line is 6mm long and the stage is capable of scanning 50 mm, hence the field of view is quite large. The theoretical diffraction-limited resolution is 0.7um lateral and 3.7um axial. However, in this preliminary report, we present initial results that are a factor of 5-7 poorer in resolution. The results are encouraging because they demonstrate that the linear array detector measures sufficient signal from fluorescently labeled tissue and also demonstrate the large field of view achievable with VAMS.

  11. Genomic variation in cline shape across a hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Sarah E; Jernigan, Robert W; Fagan, William F; Braun, David; Braun, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    Hybrid zones are unique biological interfaces that reveal both population level and species level evolutionary processes. A genome-scale approach to assess gene flow across hybrid zones is vital, and now possible. In Mexican towhees (genus Pipilo), several morphological hybrid gradients exist. We completed a genome survey across one such gradient (9 populations, 140 birds) using mitochondrial DNA, 28 isozyme, and 377 AFLP markers. To assess variation in introgression among loci, cline parameters (i.e., width, center) for the 61 clinally varying loci were estimated and compiled into genomic distributions for tests against three empirical models spanning the range of observed cline shape. No single model accounts for observed variation in cline shape among loci. Numerous backcross individuals near the gradient center confirm a hybrid origin for these populations, contrary to a previous hypothesis based on social mimicry and character displacement. In addition, the observed variation does not bin into well-defined categories of locus types (e.g., neutral vs. highly selected). Our multi-locus analysis reveals cross-genomic variation in selective constraints on gene flow and locus-specific flexibility in the permeability of the interspecies membrane. PMID:23170209

  12. Genomic variation in cline shape across a hybrid zone

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, Sarah E; Jernigan, Robert W; Fagan, William F; Braun, David; Braun, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid zones are unique biological interfaces that reveal both population level and species level evolutionary processes. A genome-scale approach to assess gene flow across hybrid zones is vital, and now possible. In Mexican towhees (genus Pipilo), several morphological hybrid gradients exist. We completed a genome survey across one such gradient (9 populations, 140 birds) using mitochondrial DNA, 28 isozyme, and 377 AFLP markers. To assess variation in introgression among loci, cline parameters (i.e., width, center) for the 61 clinally varying loci were estimated and compiled into genomic distributions for tests against three empirical models spanning the range of observed cline shape. No single model accounts for observed variation in cline shape among loci. Numerous backcross individuals near the gradient center confirm a hybrid origin for these populations, contrary to a previous hypothesis based on social mimicry and character displacement. In addition, the observed variation does not bin into well-defined categories of locus types (e.g., neutral vs. highly selected). Our multi-locus analysis reveals cross-genomic variation in selective constraints on gene flow and locus-specific flexibility in the permeability of the interspecies membrane. PMID:23170209

  13. Profiling of Leptospira interrogans, L. santarosai, L. meyeri and L. borgpetersenii by SE-AFLP, PFGE and susceptibility testing--a continuous attempt at species and serovar differentiation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Miraglia, Fabiana; Lilenbaum, Walter; Neto, José S F; Freitas, Julio C; Morais, Zenaide M; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; da Costa, Barbara L P; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a widespread systemic zoonosis, considered as reemerging in certain developing countries. Although the cross agglutinin absorption test is still considered the standard method for Leptospira identification, it presents several disadvantages. The aim of this study was to characterize Leptospira spp. isolated from various hosts by genotyping and broth microdilution susceptibility testing in an attempt to differentiate Leptospira species, serogroups and serovars. Forty-seven isolates were studied. They were previously serotyped, and species confirmation was performed by 16S rRNA sequencing. Single-enzyme amplified fragment length polymorphism (SE-AFLP) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis enabled the distinction of L. interrogans from L. santarosai, L. meyeri and L. borgpetersenii in two main clusters. Among L. interrogans, it was possible to differentiate into two new clusters the serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae from the serogroups Canicola and Pomona. L. santarosai isolates presented higher genetic variation than the other species in both techniques. Interestingly, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) cluster analysis also provided Leptospira serogroup differentiation. Further studies are necessary regarding serovar Bananal isolates, as they presented the highest MIC values for most of the antimicrobials tested. All studied techniques successfully distinguished Leptospira species and serogroups. Despite being library-dependent methods, these approaches are less labor intensive and more economically viable, particularly SE-AFLP, and can be implemented in most reference laboratories worldwide to enable faster Leptospira typing. PMID:26956446

  14. Profiling of Leptospira interrogans, L. santarosai, L. meyeri and L. borgpetersenii by SE-AFLP, PFGE and susceptibility testing—a continuous attempt at species and serovar differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Miraglia, Fabiana; Lilenbaum, Walter; Neto, José SF; Freitas, Julio C; Morais, Zenaide M; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; da Costa, Barbara LP; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Moreno, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a widespread systemic zoonosis, considered as reemerging in certain developing countries. Although the cross agglutinin absorption test is still considered the standard method for Leptospira identification, it presents several disadvantages. The aim of this study was to characterize Leptospira spp. isolated from various hosts by genotyping and broth microdilution susceptibility testing in an attempt to differentiate Leptospira species, serogroups and serovars. Forty-seven isolates were studied. They were previously serotyped, and species confirmation was performed by 16S rRNA sequencing. Single-enzyme amplified fragment length polymorphism (SE-AFLP) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis enabled the distinction of L. interrogans from L. santarosai, L. meyeri and L. borgpetersenii in two main clusters. Among L. interrogans, it was possible to differentiate into two new clusters the serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae from the serogroups Canicola and Pomona. L. santarosai isolates presented higher genetic variation than the other species in both techniques. Interestingly, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) cluster analysis also provided Leptospira serogroup differentiation. Further studies are necessary regarding serovar Bananal isolates, as they presented the highest MIC values for most of the antimicrobials tested. All studied techniques successfully distinguished Leptospira species and serogroups. Despite being library-dependent methods, these approaches are less labor intensive and more economically viable, particularly SE-AFLP, and can be implemented in most reference laboratories worldwide to enable faster Leptospira typing. PMID:26956446

  15. Genomics and Ethics: The Case of Cloned and/or Transgenic Animals

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The point of the present study is to illustrate and, if possible, promote the existing link between genomics and ethics, taking the example of cloned and transgenic animals. These ‘new animals’ raise theoretical and practical problems that concern applied ethics. We will explore more particularly an original strategy showing that it is possible, starting from philosophical questioning about the nature of identity, to use a genomic approach, based on amplification fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) detection, to provide useful tools to define more rigorously what cloned animals are, by testing their genetic and epigenetic identity. We expect from the future results of this combined approach to stimulate the creativity of the philosophical and ethical reflection about the impact of biotechnology on animals, and to increase scientific involvement in such issues. PMID:18629111

  16. Radionucleotide scanning in osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, W.; Kanat, I.O.

    1986-07-01

    Radionucleotide bone scanning can be an excellent adjunct to the standard radiograph and clinical findings in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Bone scans have the ability to detect osteomyelitis far in advance of the standard radiograph. The sequential use of technetium and gallium has been useful in differentiating cellulitis and osteomyelitis. Serial scanning with technetium and gallium may be used to monitor the response of osteomyelitis to antibiotic therapy.

  17. Optical Scanning Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Hans

    The successful use of optical scanning at the University of the Pacific (UOP) indicates that such techniques can simplify a number of administrative data processing tasks. Optical scanning is regularly used at UOP to assist with data processing in the areas of admissions, registration and grade reporting and also has applications for other tasks…

  18. Getting a CAT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means ...

  19. Environmental Scanning Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truckee Meadows Community Coll., Sparks, NV.

    This report describes Truckee Meadows Community College's (Nevada) environmental scanning process and results. The college decided that environmental scanning and forecasting techniques should be used to plan for both short-term and long-term external factors that impact programs, enrollment, and budgets. Strategic goals include: (1) keeping pace…

  20. Genome walking.

    PubMed

    Shapter, Frances M; Waters, Daniel L E

    2014-01-01

    Genome walking is a method for determining the DNA sequence of unknown genomic regions flanking a region of known DNA sequence. The Genome walking has the potential to capture 6-7 kb of sequence in a single round. Ideal for identifying gene promoter regions where only the coding region. Genome walking also has significant utility for capturing homologous genes in new species when there are areas in the target gene with strong sequence conservation to the characterized species. The increasing use of next-generation sequencing technologies will see the principles of genome walking adapted to in silico methods. However, for smaller projects, PCR-based genome walking will remain an efficient method of characterizing unknown flanking sequence. PMID:24243201

  1. cDNA-AFLP analysis reveals differential gene expression in incompatible interaction between infected non-heading Chinese cabbage and Hyaloperonospora parasitica

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dong; Liu, Shi-Tuo; Wei, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Dao-Yun; Hou, Xi-Lin; Li, Ying; Hu, Chun-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) is one of the main green leafy vegetables in the world, especially in China, with significant economic value. Hyaloperonospora parasitica is a fungal pathogen responsible for causing downy mildew disease in Chinese cabbage, which greatly affects its production. The objective of this study was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during incompatible interactions between non-heading Chinese cabbage and H. parasitica using complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP). We obtained 129 reliable differential transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) in a resistant line ‘Suzhou Qing’. Among them, 121 upregulated TDFs displayed an expression peak at 24–48 h post inoculation (h.p.i.). Fifteen genes were further selected for validation of cDNA-AFLP expression patterns using quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results confirmed the altered expression patterns of 13 genes (86.7%) revealed by the cDNA-AFLP. We identified four TDFs related to fungal resistance among the 15 TDFs. Furthermore, comparative analysis of four TDFs between resistant line ‘Suzhou Qing’ and susceptible line ‘Aijiao Huang’ showed that transcript levels of TDF14 (BcLIK1_A01) peaked at 48 h.p.i. and 25.1-fold increased in the resistant line compared with the susceptible line. Similarly, transcript levels of the other three genes, TDF42 (BcCAT3_A07), TDF75 (BcAAE3_A06) and TDF88 (BcAMT2_A05) peaked at 24, 48 and 24 h.p.i. with 25.1-, 100- and 15.8-fold increases, respectively. The results suggested that the resistance genes tended to transcribe at higher levels in the resistance line than in the susceptible line, which may provide resistance against pathogen infections. The present study might facilitate elucidating the molecular basis of the infection process and identifying candidate genes for resistance improvement of susceptible cultivars. PMID:27602230

  2. Genomic Change, Retrotransposon Mobilization and Extensive Cytosine Methylation Alteration in Brassica napus Introgressions from Two Intertribal Hybridizations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueli; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Sun, Genlou; Li, Zaiyun

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression represent important means for the transfer and/or de novo origination of traits and play an important role in facilitating speciation and plant breeding. Two sets of introgression lines in Brassica napus L. were previously established by its intertribal hybridizations with two wild species and long-term selection. In this study, the methods of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP), sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP) and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) were used to determine their genomic change, retrotransposon mobilization and cytosine methylation alteration in these lines. The genomic change revealed by the loss or gain of AFLP bands occurred for ∼10% of the total bands amplified in the two sets of introgressions, while no bands specific for wild species were detected. The new and absent SSAP bands appeared for 9 out of 11 retrotransposons analyzed, with low frequency of new bands and their total percentage of about 5% in both sets. MSAP analysis indicated that methylation changes were common in these lines (33.4–39.8%) and the hypermethylation was more frequent than hypomethylation. Our results suggested that certain extents of genetic and epigenetic alterations were induced by hybridization and alien DNA introgression. The cryptic mechanism of these changes and potential application of these lines in breeding were also discussed. PMID:23468861

  3. Annotation of differentially expressed genes in the somatic embryogenesis of musa and their location in the banana genome.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Borges, Josefina Ines; Ku-Cauich, José Roberto; Escobedo-Graciamedrano, Rosa Maria

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of cDNA-AFLP was used to study the genes expressed in zygotic and somatic embryogenesis of Musa acuminata Colla ssp. malaccensis, and a comparison was made between their differential transcribed fragments (TDFs) and the sequenced genome of the double haploid- (DH-) Pahang of the malaccensis subspecies that is available in the network. A total of 253 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were detected with apparent size of 100-4000 bp using 5 pairs of AFLP primers, of which 21 were differentially expressed during the different stages of banana embryogenesis; 15 of the sequences have matched DH-Pahang chromosomes, with 7 of them being homologous to gene sequences encoding either known or putative protein domains of higher plants. Four TDF sequences were located in all Musa chromosomes, while the rest were located in one or two chromosomes. Their putative individual function is briefly reviewed based on published information, and the potential roles of these genes in embryo development are discussed. Thus the availability of the genome of Musa and the information of TDFs sequences presented here opens new possibilities for an in-depth study of the molecular and biochemical research of zygotic and somatic embryogenesis of Musa. PMID:24027442

  4. Prophage Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Canchaya, Carlos; Proux, Caroline; Fournous, Ghislain; Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2003-01-01

    The majority of the bacterial genome sequences deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database contain prophage sequences. Analysis of the prophages suggested that after being integrated into bacterial genomes, they undergo a complex decay process consisting of inactivating point mutations, genome rearrangements, modular exchanges, invasion by further mobile DNA elements, and massive DNA deletion. We review the technical difficulties in defining such altered prophage sequences in bacterial genomes and discuss theoretical frameworks for the phage-bacterium interaction at the genomic level. The published genome sequences from three groups of eubacteria (low- and high-G+C gram-positive bacteria and γ-proteobacteria) were screened for prophage sequences. The prophages from Streptococcus pyogenes served as test case for theoretical predictions of the role of prophages in the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. The genomes from further human, animal, and plant pathogens, as well as commensal and free-living bacteria, were included in the analysis to see whether the same principles of prophage genomics apply for bacteria living in different ecological niches and coming from distinct phylogenetical affinities. The effect of selection pressure on the host bacterium is apparently an important force shaping the prophage genomes in low-G+C gram-positive bacteria and γ-proteobacteria. PMID:12794192

  5. Laser Scanning In Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Patricia; Baker, Lionel R.

    1989-03-01

    This paper is a review of the applications of laser scanning in inspection. The reasons for the choice of a laser in flying spot scanning and the optical properties of a laser beam which are of value in a scanning instrument will be given. The many methods of scanning laser beams in both one and two dimensions will be described. The use of one dimensional laser scanners for automatic surface inspection for transmitting and reflective products will be covered in detail, with particular emphasis on light collection techniques. On-line inspection applications which will be mentioned include: photographic film web, metal strip products, paper web, glass sheet, car body paint surfaces and internal cylinder bores. Two dimensional laser scanning is employed in applications where increased resolution, increased depth of focus, and better contrast are required compared with conventional vidicon TV or solid state array cameras. Such examples as special microscope laser scanning systems and a TV compatible system for use in restricted areas of a nuclear reactor will be described. The technical and economic benefits and limitations of laser scanning video systems will be compared with conventional TV and CCD array devices.

  6. Virtual slit scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiolka, Reto; Stemmer, Andreas; Belyaev, Yury

    2007-12-01

    We present a novel slit scanning confocal microscope with a CCD camera image sensor and a virtual slit aperture for descanning that can be adjusted during post-processing. A very efficient data structure and mathematical criteria for aligning the virtual aperture guarantee the ease of use. We further introduce a method to reduce the anisotropic lateral resolution of slit scanning microscopes. System performance is evaluated against a spinning disk confocal microscope on identical specimens. The virtual slit scanning microscope works as the spinning disk type and outperforms on thick specimens. PMID:17891411

  7. Comparative cDNA-AFLP analysis of Cd-tolerant and -sensitive genotypes derived from crosses between the Cd hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Adrian Radu; Courbot, Mikael; Bourgis, Fabienne; Salis, Pietrino; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) tolerance seems to be a constitutive species-level trait in Arabidopsis halleri. In order to identify genes potentially implicated in Cd tolerance, a backcross (BC1) segregating population was produced from crosses between A. halleri ssp. halleri and its closest non-tolerant relative A. lyrata ssp. petraea. The most sensitive and tolerant genotypes of the BC1 were analysed on a transcriptome-wide scale by cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). A hundred and thirty-four genes expressed more in the root of tolerant genotypes than in sensitive genotypes were identified. Most of the identified genes showed no regulation in their expression when exposed to Cd in a hydroponic culture medium and belonged to diverse functional classes, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification, cellular repair, metal sequestration, water transport, signal transduction, transcription regulation, and protein degradation, which are discussed. PMID:16916885

  8. Molecular identification of the economically important freshwater mussels (Mollusca-Bivalvia-Unionoida) of Thailand: developing species-specific markers from AFLPs.

    PubMed

    Vannarattanarat, S; Zieritz, A; Kanchanaketu, T; Kovitvadhi, U; Kovitvadhi, S; Hongtrakul, V

    2014-04-01

    Shells of certain freshwater mussel (Unionoida) species are highly demanded and serve as raw material for a range of decorative and pharmaceutical products. In Thailand, most animals for this purpose are currently harvested from wild populations, with unionoid culture still being in its infancy. Whilst reliable species identification is a prerequisite for developing a large-scale industry, identification by morphological means is hampered by extensive phenotypic plasticity and poor knowledge of species delimitations. To facilitate alternative molecular identification, we developed species-specific markers for the three Thai unionoids with considerable economic potential (CEP): that is, Chamberlainia hainesiana, Hyriopsis desowitzi and Hyriopsis myersiana. For this purpose, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints using 24 specific primer pairs were generated for eight samples of each CEP species and four samples of the closely related, non-CEP species Contradens contradens. Cloning and sequencing of 13 CEP species-specific AFLP bands revealed fragment collision at three occasions. In total, 16 species-specific primer pairs were designed and tested on 92 Thai specimens spanning seven species and four genera. Thereby, specificity of (1) three primers to C. hainesiana, (2) one primer to H. desowitzi + Hyriopsis bialata, (3) one primer to H. myersiana + H. bialata and (4) four primers to all three Hyriopsis species tested was confirmed. Respective multiplex PCR protocols are provided. The developed primers enable cheap, quick and reliable identification of the Thai CEP species by one to three PCRs and offer a tool for a range of additional applications within mussel culture and ecological and evolutionary research on these important organisms. PMID:24313464

  9. AFLP-Based Analysis of Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Relationships with Agronomic Traits in Rice Germplasm from North Region of Iran and World Core Germplasm Set.

    PubMed

    Sorkheh, Karim; Masaeli, Mohammad; Chaleshtori, Maryam Hosseini; Adugna, Asfaw; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of the genetic diversity and population structure of crops is very important for use in breeding programs and for genetic resources conservation. We analyzed the genetic diversity and population structure of 47 rice genotypes from diverse origins using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers and morphological characters. The 47 genotypes, which were composed of four populations: Iranian native varieties, Iranian improved varieties, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) rice varieties, and world rice collections, were analyzed using ten primer combinations. A total of 221 scorable bands were produced with an average of 22.1 alleles per pair of primers, of which 120 (54.30%) were polymorphic. The polymorphism information content (PIC) values varied from 0.32 to 0.41 with an average of 0.35. The high percentage of polymorphic bands (%PB) was found to be 64.71 and the resolving power (R p) collections were 63.36. UPGMA clustering based on numerical data from AFLP patterns clustered all 47 genotypes into three large groups. The genetic similarity between individuals ranged from 0.54 to 0.94 with an average of 0.74. Population genetic tree showed that Iranian native cultivars formed far distant cluster from the other populations, which may indicate that these varieties had minimal genetic change over time. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that the largest proportion of the variation (84%) to be within populations showing the inbreeding nature of rice. Therefore, Iranian native varieties (landraces) may have unique genes, which can be used for future breeding programs and there is a need to conserve this unique diversity. Furthermore, crossing of Iranian genotypes with the genetically distant genotypes in the other three populations may result in useful combinations, which can be used as varieties and/or lines for future rice breeding programs. PMID:26762294

  10. Spatial patterns of AFLP diversity in Bulbophyllum occultum (Orchidaceae) indicate long-term refugial isolation in Madagascar and long-distance colonization effects in La Réunion.

    PubMed

    Jaros, U; Fischer, G A; Pailler, T; Comes, H P

    2016-05-01

    Bulbophyllum occultum, an epiphytic orchid mainly distributed in the rainforests of (north)eastern Madagascar and La Réunion, represents an interesting model case for testing the effects of anthropogenic vs historical (e.g., climate induced) habitat isolation and long-distance colonization on the genetic structure of plant species with disjunct distributions in the Madagascan region. To this aim, we surveyed amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) across 13 populations in Madagascar and nine in La Réunion (206 individuals in total). We found overall high levels of population subdivision (Φ(PT)=0.387) and low within-population diversity (H(E), range: 0.026-0.124), indicating non-equilibrium conditions in a mainly selfing species. There was no impact of recent deforestation (Madagascar) or habitat disturbance (La Réunion) detectable on AFLP diversity. K-means clustering and BARRIER analyses identified multiple gene pools and several genetic breaks, both within and among islands. Inter-island levels of population genetic diversity and subdivision were similar, whereby inter-individual divergence in flower colour explained a significant part of gene pool divergence in La Réunion. Our results suggest that (i) B. occultum persisted across multiple isolated ('refugial') regions along the eastern rainforest corridor of Madagascar over recent climatic cycles and (ii) populations in La Réunion arose from either single or few independent introductions from Madagascar. High selfing rates and sufficient time for genetic drift likely promoted unexpectedly high population genetic and phenotypic (flower colour) differentiation in La Réunion. Overall, this study highlights a strong imprint of history on the genetic structure of a low-gene-dispersing epiphytic orchid from the Madagascan region. PMID:26883184

  11. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the knee joint and ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  12. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  13. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  14. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  15. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  16. CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  17. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging - leg; Magnetic resonance imaging - lower extremity; MRI - ankle; Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg ... or bone scan Birth defects of the leg, ankle, or foot Bone pain and fever Broken bone ...

  18. Fiber-Scanned Microdisplays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman-Bosworth, Janet; Seibel, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Helmet- and head-mounted display systems, denoted fiber-scanned microdisplays, have been proposed to provide information in an "augmented reality" format (meaning that the information would be optically overlaid on the user's field of view).

  19. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  20. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  1. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... pictures to create a very detailed, three-dimensional (3D) model of organs. Sometimes, a substance called contrast dye is injected into a vein in your arm for the CT scan. This substance highlights areas in your chest, which ...

  2. Brain PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) and computed tomography ( CT ) scans only reveal the structure of the ... a PET/CT. Alternative Names ... PT, Rijntjes M, Weiller C. Neuroimaging: Functional neuroimaging. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic ...

  3. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the lower part of ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  4. Aquaculture Genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomics chapter covers the basics of genome mapping and sequencing and the current status of several relevant species. The chapter briefly describes the development and use of (cDNA, BAC, etc.) libraries for mapping and obtaining specific sequence information. Other topics include comparative ...

  5. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.; Weiss, S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Chemla, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have developed a general technique which combines the temporal resolution of ultrafast laser spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of scanned probe microscopy (SPM). Using this technique with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), they have obtained simultaneous 2 ps time resolution and 50 {angstrom} spatial resolution. This improves the time resolution currently attainable with STM by nine orders of magnitude. The potential of this powerful technique for studying ultrafast dynamical phenomena on surfaces with atomic resolution is discussed.

  6. Wide scanning spherical antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bing (Inventor); Stutzman, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for calculating the surface shapes for subreflectors in a suboptic assembly of a tri-reflector spherical antenna system is introduced, modeled from a generalization of Galindo-Israel's method of solving partial differential equations to correct for spherical aberration and provide uniform feed to aperture mapping. In a first embodiment, the suboptic assembly moves as a single unit to achieve scan while the main reflector remains stationary. A feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan thereby eliminating the need to oversize the main spherical reflector. In an alternate embodiment, both the main spherical reflector and the suboptic assembly are fixed. A flat mirror is used to create a virtual image of the suboptic assembly. Scan is achieved by rotating the mirror about the spherical center of the main reflector. The feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan.

  7. Genetic differentiation and admixture among Eurasian and North American Leymus (Triticeae) wildryes detected using chloroplast DNA sequences and AFLP profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leymus is a genomically defined group of allopolyploid Triticeae taxa that show homologous chromosome pairing when hybridized and contain the Ns and Xm subgenomes. Recent investigations showed that Leymus chloroplast DNA sequences are polyphyletic with most Eurasian taxa similar to the Psathyrostac...

  8. Linking the genomes of nonmodel teleosts through comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Sarropoulou, E; Nousdili, D; Magoulas, A; Kotoulas, G

    2008-01-01

    Recently the genomes of two more teleost species have been released: the medaka (Oryzias latipes), and the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculateus). The rapid developments in genomics of fish species paved the way to new and valuable research in comparative genetics and genomics. With the accumulation of information in model species, the genetic and genomic characterization of nonmodel, but economically important species, is now feasible. Furthermore, comparison of low coverage gene maps of aquacultured fish species against fully sequenced fish species will enhance the efficiency of candidate genes identification projected for quantitative trait loci (QTL) scans for traits of commercial interest. This study shows the syntenic relationship between the genomes of six different teleost species, including three fully sequenced model species: Tetraodon nigroviridis, Oryzias latipes, Gasterosteus aculateus, and three marine species of commercial and evolutionary interest: Sparus aurata, Dicentrarchus labrax, Oreochromis spp. All three commercial fish species belong to the order Perciformes, which is the richest in number of species (approximately 10,000) but poor in terms of available genomic information and tools. Syntenic relationships were established by using 800 EST and microsatellites sequences successfully mapped on the RH map of seabream. Comparison to the stickleback genome produced most positive BLAT hits (58%) followed by medaka (32%) and Tetraodon (30%). Thus, stickleback was used as the major stepping stone to compare seabass and tilapia to seabream. In addition to the significance for the aquaculture industry, this approach can encompass important ecological and evolutionary implications. PMID:18297360

  9. Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-09-01

    Preface; List of acronyms; Introduction; Part I. Experimental Methods and Theoretical Background of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 1. Scanning tunnelling microscopy; 2. Scanning force microscopy; 3. Related scanning probe techniques; Part II. Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 4. Condensed matter physics; 5. Chemistry; 6. Organic materials; 7. Metrology and standards; 8. Nanotechnology; References; Index.

  10. Whole genome sequencing as a tool to investigate a cluster of seven cases of listeriosis in Austria and Germany, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Schmid, D; Allerberger, F; Huhulescu, S; Pietzka, A; Amar, C; Kleta, S; Prager, R; Preußel, K; Aichinger, E; Mellmann, A

    2014-05-01

    A cluster of seven human cases of listeriosis occurred in Austria and in Germany between April 2011 and July 2013. The Listeria monocytogenes serovar (SV) 1/2b isolates shared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP) patterns indistinguishable from those from five food producers. The seven human isolates, a control strain with a different PFGE/fAFLP profile and ten food isolates were subjected to whole genome sequencing (WGS) in a blinded fashion. A gene-by-gene comparison (multilocus sequence typing (MLST)+) was performed, and the resulting whole genome allelic profiles were compared using SeqSphere(+) software version 1.0. On analysis of 2298 genes, the four human outbreak isolates from 2012 to 2013 had different alleles at ≤6 genes, i.e. differed by ≤6 genes from each other; the dendrogram placed these isolates in between five Austrian unaged soft cheese isolates from producer A (≤19-gene difference from the human cluster) and two Austrian ready-to-eat meat isolates from producer B (≤8-gene difference from the human cluster). Both food products appeared on grocery bills prospectively collected by these outbreak cases after hospital discharge. Epidemiological results on food consumption and MLST+ clearly separated the three cases in 2011 from the four 2012-2013 outbreak cases (≥48 different genes). We showed that WGS is capable of discriminating L. monocytogenes SV1/2b clones not distinguishable by PFGE and fAFLP. The listeriosis outbreak described clearly underlines the potential of sequence-based typing methods to offer enhanced resolution and comparability of typing systems for public health applications. PMID:24698214

  11. Whole genome sequencing as a tool to investigate a cluster of seven cases of listeriosis in Austria and Germany, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, D; Allerberger, F; Huhulescu, S; Pietzka, A; Amar, C; Kleta, S; Prager, R; Preußel, K; Aichinger, E; Mellmann, A; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    A cluster of seven human cases of listeriosis occurred in Austria and in Germany between April 2011 and July 2013. The Listeria monocytogenes serovar (SV) 1/2b isolates shared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (fAFLP) patterns indistinguishable from those from five food producers. The seven human isolates, a control strain with a different PFGE/fAFLP profile and ten food isolates were subjected to whole genome sequencing (WGS) in a blinded fashion. A gene-by-gene comparison (multilocus sequence typing (MLST)+) was performed, and the resulting whole genome allelic profiles were compared using SeqSphere+ software version 1.0. On analysis of 2298 genes, the four human outbreak isolates from 2012 to 2013 had different alleles at ≤6 genes, i.e. differed by ≤6 genes from each other; the dendrogram placed these isolates in between five Austrian unaged soft cheese isolates from producer A (≤19-gene difference from the human cluster) and two Austrian ready-to-eat meat isolates from producer B (≤8-gene difference from the human cluster). Both food products appeared on grocery bills prospectively collected by these outbreak cases after hospital discharge. Epidemiological results on food consumption and MLST+ clearly separated the three cases in 2011 from the four 2012–2013 outbreak cases (≥48 different genes). We showed that WGS is capable of discriminating L. monocytogenes SV1/2b clones not distinguishable by PFGE and fAFLP. The listeriosis outbreak described clearly underlines the potential of sequence-based typing methods to offer enhanced resolution and comparability of typing systems for public health applications. PMID:24698214

  12. Genetic and genomic relationships in Leymus Hochst.

    PubMed

    Anamthawat-Jónsson, K

    2001-01-01

    Genetic and genomic relationships among three taxonomically related species of Leymus, northern European L. arenarius (octoploid, 2n = 56), northern American/Pacific L. mollis (tetraploid, 2n = 28) and central Eurasian L. racemosus (tetraploid, 2n = 28), were examined using molecular and cytogenetic methods. The amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis clearly differentiated Icelandic populations of L. arenarius from Alaskan populations of L. mollis. The former group is more genetically homogeneous than the latter. Leymus arenarius in Iceland has a common gene pool and a relatively recent origin. The Alaskan L. mollis, on the other hand, is probably a glacial survival that has accumulated high level of genetic variation and has differentiated into subspecies. Analysis of the 18S-26S ribosomal genes, by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), revealed a very close relationship between the octoploid northern European L. arenarius and the tetraploid Eurasian L. racemosus, such that the former could have originated from the latter, probably via interspecific hybridization. Leymus-specific DNA sequences were isolated and used for analyzing genetic relatedness among five Leymus species and four Psathyrostachys species. The RFLP analysis of retrotransposon sequence pLm44 and ribosomal clone pTa71 clearly revealed a close relationship between these two genera, i.e. higher variation was found within genera than between them. The results support the previous notion that Leymus is autopolyploid having all genomes being designated Ns as in Psathyrostachys, but a major taxonomic revision of this group would require analysis of more species. PMID:12152343

  13. Genome Mapping and Molecular Breeding of Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Foolad, Majid R.

    2007-01-01

    The cultivated tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, is the second most consumed vegetable worldwide and a well-studied crop species in terms of genetics, genomics, and breeding. It is one of the earliest crop plants for which a genetic linkage map was constructed, and currently there are several molecular maps based on crosses between the cultivated and various wild species of tomato. The high-density molecular map, developed based on an L. esculentum × L. pennellii cross, includes more than 2200 markers with an average marker distance of less than 1 cM and an average of 750 kbp per cM. Different types of molecular markers such as RFLPs, AFLPs, SSRs, CAPS, RGAs, ESTs, and COSs have been developed and mapped onto the 12 tomato chromosomes. Markers have been used extensively for identification and mapping of genes and QTLs for many biologically and agriculturally important traits and occasionally for germplasm screening, fingerprinting, and marker-assisted breeding. The utility of MAS in tomato breeding has been restricted largely due to limited marker polymorphism within the cultivated species and economical reasons. Also, when used, MAS has been employed mainly for improving simply-inherited traits and not much for improving complex traits. The latter has been due to unavailability of reliable PCR-based markers and problems with linkage drag. Efforts are being made to develop high-throughput markers with greater resolution, including SNPs. The expanding tomato EST database, which currently includes ∼214 000 sequences, the new microarray DNA chips, and the ongoing sequencing project are expected to aid development of more practical markers. Several BAC libraries have been developed that facilitate map-based cloning of genes and QTLs. Sequencing of the euchromatic portions of the tomato genome is paving the way for comparative and functional analysis of important genes and QTLs. PMID:18364989

  14. Antarctic Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Andrew; Cockell, Charles S.; Convey, Peter; Detrich III, H. William; Fraser, Keiron P. P.; Johnston, Ian A.; Methe, Barbara A.; Murray, Alison E.; Peck, Lloyd S.; Römisch, Karin; Rogers, Alex D.

    2004-01-01

    With the development of genomic science and its battery of technologies, polar biology stands on the threshold of a revolution, one that will enable the investigation of important questions of unprecedented scope and with extraordinary depth and precision. The exotic organisms of polar ecosystems are ideal candidates for genomic analysis. Through such analyses, it will be possible to learn not only the novel features that enable polar organisms to survive, and indeed thrive, in their extreme environments, but also fundamental biological principles that are common to most, if not all, organisms. This article aims to review recent developments in Antarctic genomics and to demonstrate the global context of such studies. PMID:18629155

  15. Femtosecond scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Gosnell, T.R.; Trugman, S.A.; Some, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with ultrafast optical techniques we have developed a novel tool to probe phenomena on atomic time and length scales. We have built and characterized an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range. Using a novel photoconductive low-temperature-grown GaAs tip, we have achieved a temporal resolution of 1.5 picoseconds and a spatial resolution of 10 nanometers. This scanning tunneling microscope has both cryogenic and ultra-high vacuum capabilities, enabling the study of a wide range of important scientific problems.

  16. Shipborne hydrographic laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfennigbauer, Martin; Rieger, Peter; Schaich, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Applications like hydro-archeology, hydrobiology, or hydraulic engineering sometimes require accurate surveying of submerged areas with point densities usually only achieved with mobile or terrestrial laser scanning. For navigable waterbodies, hydrographic laser scanning from a floating platform represents a viable solution. RIEGL's new hydrographic laser scanner VQ-820-G with its exceptionally high measurement rate of up to 110,000 net measurements per second and its small laser footprint is optimally suited for such applications. We present results from a measurement campaign surveying prehistoric lake dwellings at Lake Constance in Germany. While the aim of typical hydrographic laser scanning applications is to roughly acquire the ground's shape and structure, in this case it was tried to determine the exact position, shape, and attitude of the remainders of the piles. The special requirements with respect to mission planning and data processing are discussed and the performance of the laser scanner is assessed.

  17. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  18. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  19. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  20. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  1. Scanning computed confocal imager

    DOEpatents

    George, John S.

    2000-03-14

    There is provided a confocal imager comprising a light source emitting a light, with a light modulator in optical communication with the light source for varying the spatial and temporal pattern of the light. A beam splitter receives the scanned light and direct the scanned light onto a target and pass light reflected from the target to a video capturing device for receiving the reflected light and transferring a digital image of the reflected light to a computer for creating a virtual aperture and outputting the digital image. In a transmissive mode of operation the invention omits the beam splitter means and captures light passed through the target.

  2. Genomic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Working Group Independent Web site Informing the effective integration of genomics into health practice—Lynch syndrome ACCE Model for Evaluating Genetic Tests Recommendations by the EGAPP Working Group Top of ... ...

  3. Assessing inhomogeneities in bacterial long genomic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Karlin, S.

    1997-12-01

    Several complete prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes are already at hand (S. cerevisiae, H. influenzae, M. genitalium, M. jannaschii, Synechocystis, sp.) and many are forthcoming (e.g., E. coli, H, pylori, C. elegans). The comparative analysis of genomes generally strives to identify genes and characterize function/structure relationships inferred mostly via amino acid sequence comparisons. We describe concisely methods for comparing genomes (or long contigs) emphasizing sequence features other than gene comparisons. These center on the following measures of genomic organization and sequence heterogeneity: (i) compositional biases of short oligonucleotides; (ii) dinucleotide relative abundance distances within and between genomes; (iii) rare and frequent word (oligonucleotide) determinations and their distributional properties; (iv) r-scan statistics assessing clustering, overdispersion, or excessive evenness of various marker arrays; and (v) characterizations of repeat structures in the genome. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Skimming & Scanning. Advanced Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Edward B.

    Part of a series intended to develop essential specialized reading skills, this text/workbook is designed to provide instruction and practice in skimming and scanning for students reading at the seventh through tenth grade reading levels, considered the advanced level. Part 1 of the book deals with skimming. A lesson defines skimming (the rapid…

  5. Scan This Book!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Andrew Richard

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an interview with Brewster Kahle, leader of the Open Content Alliance (OCA). OCA book scan program is an alternative to Google's library project that aims to make books accessible online. In this interview, Kahle discusses his views on the challenges of getting books on the Web, on Google's library…

  6. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  7. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Gallbladder radionuclide scan is a test that uses radioactive material to check gallbladder function. It is also used to look for bile duct blockage or leak. How the Test is Performed The health care provider will inject ...

  8. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  9. THE 2016 ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Gene

    2015-09-01

    Every year, the American Hospital Association compiles the Environmental Scan to provide hospital leaders with insight and information about market forces that are likely to affect the health care field. One common theme this year is the pace of change. PMID:26495611

  10. Teratoma - MRI scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This MRI scan shows a tumor (teratoma) at the base of the spine (seen on the left lower edge of the screen), located in the sacrum and coccyx (sacrococcygeal) area. Teratomas are present at birth and may contain hair, teeth, and other tissues.

  11. Environmental Scanning Report, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Min

    In response to the change in the provincial economy from natural-resource-based industries to service-oriented industries, Vancouver Community College (VCC) in British Columbia (BC) conducted an environmental scan of the social and economic trends in the college's service region that will most likely affect prospective students' educational and…

  12. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  13. A genome scan for meat quality in Nelore beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meat quality traits are economically important because they impact consumers’ acceptance which, in turn, influences the demand for beef. However, selection to improve meat quality is limited by the small numbers of animals on which meat tenderness can be evaluated due to the cost of performing shear...

  14. Genome Scanning in Haemophilus influenzae for Identification of Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Karl A.; Chovan, Linda; Hessler, Paul

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a method for identifying essential genes by using an in vitro transposition system, with a small (975 bp) insertional element containing an antibiotic resistance cassette, and mapping these inserts relative to the deduced open reading frames of Haemophilus influenzae by PCR and Southern analysis. Putative essential genes are identified by two methods: mutation exclusion or zero time analysis. Mutation exclusion consists of growing an insertional library and identifying open reading frames that do not contain insertional elements: in a growing population of bacteria, insertions in essential genes are excluded. Zero time analysis consists of monitoring the fate of individual insertions after transformation in a growing culture: the loss of inserts in essential genes is observed over time. Both methods of analysis permit the identification of genes required for bacterial survival. Details of the mutant library construction and the mapping strategy, examples of mutant exclusion, and zero time analysis are presented. PMID:10438768

  15. Genome databases

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, J.

    1991-10-11

    Since the Genome Project began several years ago, a plethora of databases have been developed or are in the works. They range from the massive Genome Data Base at Johns Hopkins University, the central repository of all gene mapping information, to small databases focusing on single chromosomes or organisms. Some are publicly available, others are essentially private electronic lab notebooks. Still others limit access to a consortium of researchers working on, say, a single human chromosome. An increasing number incorporate sophisticated search and analytical software, while others operate as little more than data lists. In consultation with numerous experts in the field, a list has been compiled of some key genome-related databases. The list was not limited to map and sequence databases but also included the tools investigators use to interpret and elucidate genetic data, such as protein sequence and protein structure databases. Because a major goal of the Genome Project is to map and sequence the genomes of several experimental animals, including E. coli, yeast, fruit fly, nematode, and mouse, the available databases for those organisms are listed as well. The author also includes several databases that are still under development - including some ambitious efforts that go beyond data compilation to create what are being called electronic research communities, enabling many users, rather than just one or a few curators, to add or edit the data and tag it as raw or confirmed.

  16. Distinct colonization patterns and cDNA-AFLP transcriptome profiles in compatible and incompatible interactions between melon and different races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis Snyd. & Hans. (FOM) causes Fusarium wilt, the most important infectious disease of melon (Cucumis melo L.). The four known races of this pathogen can be distinguished only by infection on appropriate cultivars. No molecular tools are available that can discriminate among the races, and the molecular basis of compatibility and disease progression are poorly understood. Resistance to races 1 and 2 is controlled by a single dominant gene, whereas only partial polygenic resistance to race 1,2 has been described. We carried out a large-scale cDNA-AFLP analysis to identify host genes potentially related to resistance and susceptibility as well as fungal genes associated with the infection process. At the same time, a systematic reisolation procedure on infected stems allowed us to monitor fungal colonization in compatible and incompatible host-pathogen combinations. Results Melon plants (cv. Charentais Fom-2), which are susceptible to race 1,2 and resistant to race 1, were artificially infected with a race 1 strain of FOM or one of two race 1,2 w strains. Host colonization of stems was assessed at 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, 16, 18 and 21 days post inoculation (dpi), and the fungus was reisolated from infected plants. Markedly different colonization patterns were observed in compatible and incompatible host-pathogen combinations. Five time points from the symptomless early stage (2 dpi) to obvious wilting symptoms (21 dpi) were considered for cDNA-AFLP analysis. After successful sequencing of 627 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) differentially expressed in infected plants, homology searching retrieved 305 melon transcripts, 195 FOM transcripts expressed in planta and 127 orphan TDFs. RNA samples from FOM colonies of the three strains grown in vitro were also included in the analysis to facilitate the detection of in planta-specific transcripts and to identify TDFs differentially expressed among races/strains. Conclusion Our data

  17. Somatic Embryogenesis in Peach Palm Using the Thin Cell Layer Technique: Induction, Morpho-histological Aspects and AFLP Analysis of Somaclonal Variation

    PubMed Central

    Steinmacher, D. A.; Krohn, N. G.; Dantas, A. C. M.; Stefenon, V. M.; Clement, C. R.; Guerra, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The thin cell layer (TCL) technique is based on the use of very small explants and has allowed enhanced in vitro morphogenesis in several plant species. The present study evaluated the TCL technique as a procedure for somatic embryo production and plantlet regeneration of peach palm. Methods TCL explants from different positions in the shoot apex and leaf sheath of peach palm were cultivated in MS culture medium supplemented with 0–600 µm Picloram in the presence of activated charcoal. The production of primary calli and embryogenic calli was evaluated in these different conditions. Histological and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses were conducted to study in vitro morphogenetic responses and genetic stability, respectively, of the regenerated plantlets. Key Results Abundant primary callus induction was observed from TCLs of the shoot meristem in culture media supplemented with 150–600 µm Picloram (83–97 %, respectively). The production of embryogenic calli depends on Picloram concentration and explant position. The best response observed was 43 % embryogenic callus production from shoot meristem TCL on 300 µm Picloram. In maturation conditions, 34 ± 4 somatic embryos per embryogenic callus were obtained, and 45·0 ± 3·4 % of these fully developed somatic embryos were converted, resulting in plantlets ready for acclimatization, of which 80 % survived. Histological studies revealed that the first cellular division events occurred in cells adjacent to vascular tissue, resulting in primary calli, whose growth was ensured by a meristematic zone. A multicellular origin of the resulting somatic embryos arising from the meristematic zone is suggested. During maturation, histological analyses revealed bipolarization of the somatic embryos, as well as the development of new somatic embryos. AFLP analyses revealed that 92 % of the regenerated plantlets were true to type. The use of TCL explants considerably improves the

  18. Quantitative trait loci on chromosome 8q24 for pancreatic beta-cell function and 7q11 for insulin sensitivity in obese nondiabetic white and black families: evidence from genome-wide linkage scans in the NHLBI Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN) study.

    PubMed

    An, Ping; Freedman, Barry I; Rich, Stephen S; Mandel, Stephen A; Arnett, Donna K; Myers, Richard H; Chen, Yii-Der I; Hunt, Steven C; Rao, D C

    2006-02-01

    Genome-wide linkage scans were carried out using a multipoint variance components method in white and black families of the NHLBI Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN) study to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity estimated through the newly released nonlinear computer version of homeostasis model assessment 2. Participants fasting <8 h, with diagnosed type 2 diabetes, or taking blood glucose or blood lipid-lowering medications were excluded. Both phenotypes were adjusted separately by race and sex for the effects of age, BMI, and field center before linkage scans using 370 microsatellite markers were performed. A total of 685 white families (1,180 sibpairs) and 773 black families (775 sibpairs) were evaluated as well as subsets including 267 obese white families (757 sibpairs) and 427 obese black families (599 sibpairs) identified through tree-linkage analyses using interacting covariates of age, sex, and BMI. For beta-cell function in the obese white families, significant (logarithm of odds [LOD] score >3.6) evidence supporting linkages was detected on chromosome 8q24 at D8S1179 (135 cM, LOD score 4.2, empirical P = 0.002) and at D8S1128 (140 cM, LOD score 3.7, empirical P = 0.003). In addition, two regions supported linkage for insulin sensitivity index in the obese black families on chromosome 7q11 at D7S3046 (79 cM, LOD score 3.0, empirical P = 0.018) and on chromosome 6q26 at D6S1277 (173 cM, LOD score 3.0, empirical P = 0.018). Reducing clinical heterogeneity using obesity data and improved estimates of beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity may have permitted identification of a QTL on chromosome 8q24 for beta-cell function in the presence of estimated insulin resistance and a QTL on chromosome 7q11 for insulin sensitivity. These regions replicate previous reports for type 2 diabetes-associated traits. PMID:16443794

  19. Scanning thermal plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Madding, R. P.; Green, T., III

    1975-01-01

    Over a three-year period 800 thermal line scans of power plant plumes were made by an airborne scanner, with ground truth measured concurrently at the plants. Computations using centered finite differences in the thermal scanning imagery show a lower bound in the horizontal temperature gradient in excess of 1.6 C/m. Gradients persist to 3 m below the surface. Vector plots of the velocity of thermal fronts are constructed by tracing the front motion in successive thermal images. A procedure is outlined for the two-point ground calibration of a thermal scanner from an equation describing the scanner signal and the voltage for two known temperatures. The modulation transfer function is then calculated by input of a thermal step function and application of digital time analysis techniques using Fast Fourier Transforms to the voltage output. Field calibration tests are discussed. Data accuracy is limited by the level of ground truth effort chosen.

  20. Scanning micro-sclerometer

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, Warren C.; Blau, Peter J.

    1994-01-01

    A scanning micro-sclerometer measures changes in contact stiffness and correlates these changes to characteristics of a scratch. A known force is applied to a contact junction between two bodies and a technique employing an oscillating force is used to generate the contact stiffness between the two bodies. As the two bodies slide relative to each other, the contact stiffness changes. The change is measured to characterize the scratch.

  1. Fly-scan ptychography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Xiaojing; Lauer, Kenneth; Clark, Jesse N.; Xu, Weihe; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.; Chu, Yong S.

    2015-03-13

    We report an experimental ptychography measurement performed in fly-scan mode. With a visible-light laser source, we demonstrate a 5-fold reduction of data acquisition time. By including multiple mutually incoherent modes into the incident illumination, high quality images were successfully reconstructed from blurry diffraction patterns. This approach significantly increases the throughput of ptychography, especially for three-dimensional applications and the visualization of dynamic systems.

  2. Scanning micro-sclerometer

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, W.C.; Blau, P.J.

    1994-11-01

    A scanning micro-sclerometer measures changes in contact stiffness and correlates these changes to characteristics of a scratch. A known force is applied to a contact junction between two bodies and a technique employing an oscillating force is used to generate the contact stiffness between the two bodies. As the two bodies slide relative to each other, the contact stiffness changes. The change is measured to characterize the scratch. 2 figs.

  3. Fly-scan ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojing; Lauer, Kenneth; Clark, Jesse N.; Xu, Weihe; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.; Chu, Yong S.

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental ptychography measurement performed in fly-scan mode. With a visible-light laser source, we demonstrate a 5-fold reduction of data acquisition time. By including multiple mutually incoherent modes into the incident illumination, high quality images were successfully reconstructed from blurry diffraction patterns. This approach significantly increases the throughput of ptychography, especially for three-dimensional applications and the visualization of dynamic systems. PMID:25766519

  4. Listeria Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  5. Genome Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Raimond L.; Boguski, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in genomics and informatics relevant to cardiovascular research. In particular, we review the status of (1) whole genome sequencing efforts in human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and dog; (2) the development of data mining and analysis tools; (3) the launching of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Programs for Genomics Applications and Proteomics Initiative; (4) efforts to characterize the cardiac transcriptome and proteome; and (5) the current status of computational modeling of the cardiac myocyte. In each instance, we provide links to relevant sources of information on the World Wide Web and critical appraisals of the promises and the challenges of an expanding and diverse information landscape. PMID:12750305

  6. Scanning Tomographic Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G.; Meyyappan, A.

    1988-07-01

    The technology for "seeing" with sound has an important and interesting history. Some of nature's creatures have been using sound waves for many millenia to image otherwise unobservable objects. The human species, lacking this natural ability, have overcome this deficiency by developing several different ultrasonic imaging techniques. acoustic microscopy is one such technique, which produces high resolution images of detailed structure of small objects in a non-destructive fashion. Two types of acoustic microscopes have evolved for industrial exploitation. They are the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) and the scanning acoustic microscope (SAM). In this paper, we review the principles of SLAM and describe how we use elements of SLAM to realize the scanning tomographic acoustic microscope (STAM). We describe the data acquisition process and the image reconstruction procedure. We also describe techniques to obtain projection data from different angles of wave incidence enabling us to reconstruct different planes of a complex specimen tomo-graphically. Our experimental results show that STAM is capable of producing high-quality high-resolution subsurface images.

  7. Scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hua

    2002-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and development of the scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy (STAM). This research effort spans over a period of more than 12 years, which successfully elevated the acoustic microscopy from the traditional intensity-mapping mode to the level of holographic and tomographic imaging. The tomographic imaging capability of STAM was developed on the platform of the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM), which operates in a coherent transmission mode with plane-wave illumination and scanning laser wavefield detection. The image formation techniques were based on the backward propagation method implemented in the plane-to-plane format. In this paper, the key elements of the design and development, including the modification of the data-acquisition hardware, implementation of image reconstruction algorithms for multiple-frequency and multiple-angle tomography, and the high-precision phase-correction and image registration techniques for the superposition of coherent sub-images, will be discussed. Results of full-scale experiments will also be included to demonstrate the capability of holographic and tomographic image formation in microscopic scale.

  8. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  9. Scanning holographic lidar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a unique telescope for lidar using a holographic optical element (HOE) as the primary optic. The HOE diffracts 532 nm laser backscatter making a 43 deg angle with a normal to its surface to a focus located 130 cm along the normal. The field of view scans a circle as the HOE rotates about the normal. The detector assembly and baffling remain stationary, compared to conventional scanning lidars in which the entire telescope and detector assembly require steering, or which use a large flat steerable mirror in front of the telescope to do the pointing. The spectral bandpass of our HOE is 50 nm (FWHM). Light within that bandpass is spectrally dispersed at 0.6 nm/mm in the focal plane. An aperture stop reduces the bandpass of light reaching the detector from one direction to 1 nm while simultaneously reducing the field of view to 1 mrad. Wavelengths outside the 50 nm spectral bandpass pass undiffracted through HOE to be absorbed by a black backing. Thus, the HOE combines three functions into one optic: the scanning mirror, the focusing mirror, and a narrowband filter.

  10. Descreening of scanned images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilin, Ilya V.; Safonov, Ilia V.; Lee, HoKeun; Kim, Sang Ho

    2010-01-01

    Screen or halftone pattern appears on the majority of images printed on electrophotographic and ink-jet printers as well as offset machines. When such halftoned image is scanned, a noisy effect called a Moiré pattern often appears on the image. There are plenty of methods proposed for descreening of images. Common way is adaptive smoothing of scanned images. However the descreening techniques face the following dilemma: deep screen reduction and restoration of contone images leads to blurring of sharp edges of text and other graphics primitives, on the other hand insufficient smoothing keeps screen in halftoned areas. We propose novel descreening algorithm that is primarily intended for preservation of sharpness and contrast of text edges and for restoration contone images from halftone ones accurately. Proposed technique for descreening of scanned images comprises five steps. The first step is decrease of edge transition slope length via local tone mapping with ordering; it is carried out before adaptive smoothing, and it allows better preservation of edges. Adaptive low-pass filter applies simplified idea of Non-Local Means filter for area classification; similarity is calculated between central block of window and different adjacent block that is selected randomly. If similarity is high then current pixel relates to flat region, otherwise pixel relates to edge region. For prevention of edges blurring, flat regions are smoothed stronger than edge regions. By random selection of blocks we avoid the computational overhead related to excessive directional edge detection. Final three stages include additional decrease of edge transition slope length using local tone mapping, increase of local contrast via modified unsharp mask filter, that uses bilateral filter with special edge-stop function for modest smoothing of edges, and global contrast stretching. These stages are intended to compensate decreasing of sharpness and contrast due to low-pass filtering, it allows

  11. Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    With the availability of genomic sequence from numerousvertebrates, a paradigm shift has occurred in the identification ofdistant-acting gene regulatory elements. In contrast to traditionalgene-centric studies in which investigators randomly scanned genomicfragments that flank genes of interest in functional assays, the modernapproach begins electronically with publicly available comparativesequence datasets that provide investigators with prioritized lists ofputative functional sequences based on their evolutionary conservation.However, although a large number of tools and resources are nowavailable, application of comparative genomic approaches remains far fromtrivial. In particular, it requires users to dynamically consider thespecies and methods for comparison depending on the specific biologicalquestion under investigation. While there is currently no single generalrule to this end, it is clear that when applied appropriately,comparative genomic approaches exponentially increase our power ingenerating biological hypotheses for subsequent experimentaltesting.

  12. Methods for Genome-Wide Analysis of Gene Expression Changes in Polyploids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianlin; Lee, Jinsuk J.; Tian, Lu; Lee, Hyeon-Se; Chen, Meng; Rao, Sheetal; Wei, Edward N.; Doerge, R. W.; Comai, Luca; Jeffrey Chen, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Polyploidy is an evolutionary innovation, providing extra sets of genetic material for phenotypic variation and adaptation. It is predicted that changes of gene expression by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms are responsible for novel variation in nascent and established polyploids (Liu and Wendel, 2002; Osborn et al., 2003; Pikaard, 2001). Studying gene expression changes in allopolyploids is more complicated than in autopolyploids, because allopolyploids contain more than two sets of genomes originating from divergent, but related, species. Here we describe two methods that are applicable to the genome-wide analysis of gene expression differences resulting from genome duplication in autopolyploids or interactions between homoeologous genomes in allopolyploids. First, we describe an amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)–complementary DNA (cDNA) display method that allows the discrimination of homoeologous loci based on restriction polymorphisms between the progenitors. Second, we describe microarray analyses that can be used to compare gene expression differences between the allopolyploids and respective progenitors using appropriate experimental design and statistical analysis. We demonstrate the utility of these two complementary methods and discuss the pros and cons of using the methods to analyze gene expression changes in autopolyploids and allopolyploids. Furthermore, we describe these methods in general terms to be of wider applicability for comparative gene expression in a variety of evolutionary, genetic, biological, and physiological contexts. PMID:15865985

  13. AFLP marker analysis revealing genetic structure of the tree Parapiptadenia rigida (Benth.) Brenan (Leguminosae-Mimosoideae) in the southern Brazilian Tropical Rainforest.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Laís Bérgamo; Ruas, Eduardo A; Rodrigues, Luana A; Ruas, Claudete F; Ruas, Paulo M

    2013-12-01

    Parapiptadenia rigida is a tropical early secondary succession tree characteristic of the Tropical Atlantic Rainforest. This species is of great ecological importance in the recovery of degraded areas. In this study we investigated the variability and population genetic structure of eight populations of P. rigida. Five AFLP primer combinations were used in a sample of 159 individuals representing these eight populations, rendering a total of 126 polymorphic fragments. The averages of percentage of polymorphic loci, gene diversity, and Shannon index were 60.45%, 0.217, and 0.322, respectively. A significant correlation between the population genetic variability and the population sizes was observed. The genetic variability within populations (72.20%) was higher than between these (22.80%). No perfect correlation was observed between geographic and genetic distances, which might be explained by differences in deforestation intensities that occurred in these areas. A dendrogram constructed by the UPGMA method revealed the formation of two clusters, these also confirmed by Bayesian analysis for the number of K cluster. These results show that it is necessary to develop urgent management strategies for the conservation of certain populations of P. rigida, while other populations still preserve reasonably high levels of genetic variability. PMID:24385857

  14. DNA barcoding, MALDI-TOF, and AFLP data support Fusarium ficicrescens as a distinct species within the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex.

    PubMed

    Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Mirabolfathy, Mansoureh; Hagen, Ferry; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Stielow, J Benjamin; Karami-Osbo, Rouhollah; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Meis, Jacques F; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2016-02-01

    The Fusarium fujikuroi species complex (FFSC) is one of the most common groups of fusaria associated with plant diseases, mycotoxin production and traumatic and disseminated human infections. Here we present the description and taxonomy of a new taxon, Fusarium ficicrescens sp. nov., collected from contaminated fig fruits in Iran. Initially this species was identified as Fusarium andiyazi by morphology. In the present study the species was studied by multilocus sequence analysis, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and phenotypic characters. Multilocus analyses were based on translation elongation factor 1α (TEF1), RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2) and beta-tubulin (BT2) and proved F. ficicrescens as a member of the FFSC. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the fungus is closely related to Fusarium lactis, Fusarium ramigenum, and Fusarium napiforme; known plant pathogens, mycotoxin producers, and occasionally occurring multidrug resistant opportunists. The new species differed by being able to grow at 37 °C and by the absence of mycotoxin production. TEF1 was confirmed as an essential barcode for identifying Fusarium species. In addition to TEF1, we evaluated BT2 and RPB2 in order to provide sufficient genetic and species boundaries information for recognition of the novel species. PMID:26781381

  15. Comparison of genetic diversity of the invasive weed Rubus alceifolius poir. (Rosaceae) in its native range and in areas of introduction, using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers.

    PubMed

    Amsellem, L; Noyer, J L; Le Bourgeois, T; Hossaert-McKey, M

    2000-04-01

    Theory predicts that colonization of new areas will be associated with population bottlenecks that reduce within-population genetic diversity and increase genetic differentiation among populations. This should be especially true for weedy plant species, which are often characterized by self-compatible breeding systems and vegetative propagation. To test this prediction, and to evaluate alternative scenarios for the history of introduction, the genetic diversity of Rubus alceifolius was studied with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers in its native range in southeast Asia and in several areas where this plant has been introduced and is now a serious weed (Indian Ocean islands, Australia). In its native range, R. alceifolius showed great genetic variability within populations and among geographically close populations (populations sampled ranging from northern Vietnam to Java). In Madagascar, genetic variability was somewhat lower than in its native range, but still considerable. Each population sampled in the other Indian Ocean islands (Mayotte, La Réunion, Mauritius) was characterized by a single different genotype of R. alceifolius for the markers studied, and closely related to individuals from Madagascar. Queensland populations also included only a single genotype, identical to that found in Mauritius. These results suggest that R. alceifolius was first introduced into Madagascar, perhaps on multiple occasions, and that Madagascan individuals were the immediate source of plants that colonized other areas of introduction. Successive nested founder events appear to have resulted in cumulative reduction in genetic diversity. Possible explanations for the monoclonality of R. alceifolius in many areas of introduction are discussed. PMID:10736047

  16. Clonal structure and flowering traits of a bamboo [Phyllostachys pubescens (Mazel) Ohwi] stand grown from a simultaneous flowering as revealed by AFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Isagi, Y; Shimada, K; Kushima, H; Tanaka, N; Nagao, A; Ishikawa, T; OnoDera, H; Watanabe, S

    2004-07-01

    Abstract Although many bamboo species are characterized by simultaneous flowering at long intervals of up to 120 years, few studies have revealed the length of the flowering interval for very-long-lived bamboo species by observing the whole life cycle of a single clone. The flowering interval of Phyllostachys pubescens had been determined to be 67 years by means of observation through the entire life cycle from 1912 to 1979. We observed and analysed the clonal structure and flowering traits of a P. pubescens community which had regenerated from seed in 1930 and began to flower in 1997. Although this interval was again 67 years, flowering and nonflowering culms were mixed, and the flowering event lasted three years in the community. AFLP analysis of DNA samples showed distinct genets that originated from the previous flowering event and that each genet had its own flowering time. This is the first report to show that (i) different genets are mixed in a community of a large bamboo species with a leptomorphic rhizome system, and (ii) a community that originated from a single flowering event can have a range of flowering years. PMID:15189222

  17. Whither genomics?

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Andrew W

    2000-01-01

    The flood of data from genome-wide analysis is transforming biology. We need to develop new, interdisciplinary approaches to convert these data into information about the components and structures of individual biological pathways and to use the resulting information to yield knowledge about general principles that explain the functions and evolution of life. PMID:11104516

  18. Scanning radiographic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    Visual display of dental, medical or other radiographic images is realized with an x-ray tube in which an electron beam is scanned through an x-y raster pattern on a broad anode plate, the scanning being synchronized with the x-y sweep signals of a cathode ray tube display and the intensity signal for the display being derived from a small x-ray detector which receives x-rays that have passed through the subject to be imaged. Positioning and support of the detector are provided for by disposing the detector in a probe which may be attached to the x-ray tube at any of a plurality of different locations and by providing a plurality of such probes of different configuration in order to change focal length, to accommodate to different detector placements relative to the subject, to enhance patient comfort and to enable production of both periapical images and wider angle pantomographic images. High image definition with reduced radiation dosage is provided for by a lead glass collimator situated between the x-ray tube and subject and having a large number of spaced-apart minute radiation transmissive passages convergent on the position of the detector. Releasable mounting means enable changes of collimator in conjunction with changes of the probe to change focal length. A control circuit modifies the x-y sweep signals applied to the x-ray tube and modulates electron beam energy and current in order to correct for image distortions and other undesirable effects which can otherwise be present in a scanning x-ray system.

  19. Scans Solo: A One-Person Environmental Scanning Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A.

    An effective environmental scan will improve the quality of community college planning and decision making by alerting institutional leaders to the challenges and opportunities in the environment. Scanning can be done in three ways: (1) establishing a scanning committee to gather and synthesize information to guide planning; (2) sponsoring a…

  20. Adaptation to nocturnality - learning from avian genomes.

    PubMed

    Le Duc, Diana; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    The recent availability of multiple avian genomes has laid the foundation for a huge variety of comparative genomics analyses including scans for changes and signatures of selection that arose from adaptions to new ecological niches. Nocturnal adaptation in birds, unlike in mammals, is comparatively recent, a fact that makes birds good candidates for identifying early genetic changes that support adaptation to dim-light environments. In this review, we give examples of comparative genomics analyses that could shed light on mechanisms of adaptation to nocturnality. We present advantages and disadvantages of both "data-driven" and "hypothesis-driven" approaches that lead to the discovery of candidate genes and genetic changes promoting nocturnality. We anticipate that the accessibility of multiple genomes from the Genome 10K Project will allow a better understanding of evolutionary mechanisms and adaptation in general. PMID:27172298

  1. Free Motion Scanning System

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, Charles K.

    1998-06-18

    The present invention relates to an ultrasonic scanner and method for the imaging of a part surface, the scanner comprising: a probe assembly spaced apart from the surface including at least two tracking signals for emitting electromagnetic radiation and a transmitter for emitting ultrasonic waves onto a surface in order to induce at least a portion of said waves to be reflected from the surface, at least one detector for receiving the electromagnetic radiation wherein the detector is positioned to receive said radiation from the tracking signals, an analyzing means for recognizing a three-dimensional location of the tracking signals based on said emitted electromagnetic radiation, a differential conversion means for generating an output signal representative of the waveform of the reflected waves, and a means for relating said tracking signal location with the output signal and projecting an image of the resulting data. The scanner and method are particularly useful to acquire ultrasonic inspection data by scanning the probe-over a complex part surface in an arbitrary scanning pattern.

  2. A-Scan Echoencephalography

    PubMed Central

    White, D. Naldrett

    1966-01-01

    The technique of A-scan echoencephalography is criticized in so far as it lacks objectivity and reproducibility. In the author's laboratory, the M-echo, being of higher amplitude than other intracranial echoes, is distinguished from other echoes by an averaging technique—a time exposure. Double transmission pulses indicate the theoretical position of echoes from the true mid-line and superimposition of far-side echoes ensures that the transducers are correctly aligned. The very considerable difficulties in identifying the anatomical structures giving rise to other echoes seen within the skull are outlined. They are largely due to variations in the reflected energy, depending upon the shape and orientation and position of the various interfaces with respect to the ultrasonic beam. Despite these difficulties and limitations, A-scan echoencephalography appears to have an important part to play as a simple, safe and quick form of neurological examination, if the technique can be made truly objective. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:5901162

  3. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  4. Free motion scanning system

    DOEpatents

    Sword, Charles K.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to an ultrasonic scanner system and method for the imaging of a part system, the scanner comprising: a probe assembly spaced apart from the surface of the part including at least two tracking signals for emitting radiation and a transmitter for emitting ultrasonic waves onto a surface in order to induce at least a portion of the waves to be reflected from the part, at least one detector for receiving the radiation wherein the detector is positioned to receive the radiation from the tracking signals, an analyzer for recognizing a three-dimensional location of the tracking signals based on the emitted radiation, a differential converter for generating an output signal representative of the waveform of the reflected waves, and a device such as a computer for relating said tracking signal location with the output signal and projecting an image of the resulting data. The scanner and method are particularly useful to acquire ultrasonic inspection data by scanning the probe over a complex part surface in an arbitrary scanning pattern.

  5. What can patterns of differentiation across plant genomes tell us about adaptation and speciation?

    PubMed Central

    Strasburg, Jared L.; Sherman, Natasha A.; Wright, Kevin M.; Moyle, Leonie C.; Willis, John H.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2012-01-01

    Genome scans have become a common approach to identify genomic signatures of natural selection and reproductive isolation, as well as the genomic bases of ecologically relevant phenotypes, based on patterns of polymorphism and differentiation among populations or species. Here, we review the results of studies taking genome scan approaches in plants, consider the patterns of genomic differentiation documented and their possible causes, discuss the results in light of recent models of genomic differentiation during divergent adaptation and speciation, and consider assumptions and caveats in their interpretation. We find that genomic regions of high divergence generally appear quite small in comparisons of both closely and more distantly related populations, and for the most part, these differentiated regions are spread throughout the genome rather than strongly clustered. Thus, the genome scan approach appears well-suited for identifying genomic regions or even candidate genes that underlie adaptive divergence and/or reproductive barriers. We consider other methodologies that may be used in conjunction with genome scan approaches, and suggest further developments that would be valuable. These include broader use of sequence-based markers of known genomic location, greater attention to sampling strategies to make use of parallel environmental or phenotypic transitions, more integration with approaches such as quantitative trait loci mapping and measures of gene flow across the genome, and additional theoretical and simulation work on processes related to divergent adaptation and speciation. PMID:22201166

  6. Discovery of Genomic DNA Polymorphisms using oligonucleotide arrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are applying oligonucleotide microarray technology as a means of rapidly discovering DNA-based markers for genetic mapping in finger millet and rice. A test genome scan was conducted using the full genome sequences of rice varieties 93-11 (indica) and Nipponbare (japonica) compared with the Affy...

  7. Genomic analysis of the native European Solanum species, S. dulcamara

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Solanum dulcamara (bittersweet, climbing nightshade) is one of the few species of the Solanaceae family native to Europe. As a common weed it is adapted to a wide range of ecological niches and it has long been recognized as one of the alternative hosts for pathogens and pests responsible for many important diseases in potato, such as Phytophthora. At the same time, it may represent an alternative source of resistance genes against these diseases. Despite its unique ecology and potential as a genetic resource, genomic research tools are lacking for S. dulcamara. We have taken advantage of next-generation sequencing to speed up research on and use of this non-model species. Results In this work, we present the first large-scale characterization of the S. dulcamara transcriptome. Through comparison of RNAseq reads from two different accessions, we were able to predict transcript-based SNP and SSR markers. Using the SNP markers in combination with genomic AFLP and CAPS markers, the first genome-wide genetic linkage map of bittersweet was generated. Based on gene orthology, the markers were anchored to the genome of related Solanum species (tomato, potato and eggplant), revealing both conserved and novel chromosomal rearrangements. This allowed a better estimation of the evolutionary moment of rearrangements in a number of cases and showed that chromosomal breakpoints are regularly re-used. Conclusion Knowledge and tools developed as part of this study pave the way for future genomic research and exploitation of this wild Solanum species. The transcriptome assembly represents a resource for functional analysis of genes underlying interesting biological and agronomical traits and, in the absence of the full genome, provides a reference for RNAseq gene expression profiling aimed at understanding the unique biology of S. dulcamara. Cross-species orthology-based marker selection is shown to be a powerful tool to quickly generate a comparative genetic map, which

  8. Citrus Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Talon, Manuel; Gmitter Jr., Fred G.

    2008-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most widespread fruit crops globally, with great economic and health value. It is among the most difficult plants to improve through traditional breeding approaches. Currently, there is risk of devastation by diseases threatening to limit production and future availability to the human population. As technologies rapidly advance in genomic science, they are quickly adapted to address the biological challenges of the citrus plant system and the world's industries. The historical developments of linkage mapping, markers and breeding, EST projects, physical mapping, an international citrus genome sequencing project, and critical functional analysis are described. Despite the challenges of working with citrus, there has been substantial progress. Citrus researchers engaged in international collaborations provide optimism about future productivity and contributions to the benefit of citrus industries worldwide and to the human population who can rely on future widespread availability of this health-promoting and aesthetically pleasing fruit crop. PMID:18509486

  9. The Scanning Process: Getting Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfro, William L.; Morrison, James L.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning the external environment will become more essential to colleges in the coming decade. Developing an environmental scanning system can identify important emerging issues that may constitute either threats or opportunities. The organizational features of a mature scanning process are described. (MLW)

  10. Ancient genomics

    PubMed Central

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten E.; Ávila-Arcos, María C.; Barnett, Ross; Campos, Paula F.; Cappellini, Enrico; Ermini, Luca; Fernández, Ruth; da Fonseca, Rute; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Hansen, Anders J.; Jónsson, Hákon; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Margaryan, Ashot; Martin, Michael D.; Moreno-Mayar, J. Víctor; Raghavan, Maanasa; Rasmussen, Morten; Velasco, Marcela Sandoval; Schroeder, Hannes; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Wales, Nathan; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a revolution in ancient DNA (aDNA) research. Although the field's focus was previously limited to mitochondrial DNA and a few nuclear markers, whole genome sequences from the deep past can now be retrieved. This breakthrough is tightly connected to the massive sequence throughput of next generation sequencing platforms and the ability to target short and degraded DNA molecules. Many ancient specimens previously unsuitable for DNA analyses because of extensive degradation can now successfully be used as source materials. Additionally, the analytical power obtained by increasing the number of sequence reads to billions effectively means that contamination issues that have haunted aDNA research for decades, particularly in human studies, can now be efficiently and confidently quantified. At present, whole genomes have been sequenced from ancient anatomically modern humans, archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when testing specific hypotheses related to the past. PMID:25487338

  11. Genomic Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Bajrami, Emirjeta; Spiroski, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic imprinting is the inheritance out of Mendelian borders. Many of inherited diseases and human development violates Mendelian law of inheritance, this way of inheriting is studied by epigenetics. AIM: The aim of this review is to analyze current opinions and options regarding to this way of inheriting. RESULTS: Epigenetics shows that gene expression undergoes changes more complex than modifications in the DNA sequence; it includes the environmental influence on the gametes before conception. Humans inherit two alleles from mother and father, both are functional for the majority of the genes, but sometimes one is turned off or “stamped” and doesn’t show in offspring, that gene is imprinted. Imprinting means that that gene is silenced, and gene from other parent is expressed. The mechanisms for imprinting are still incompletely defined, but they involve epigenetic modifications that are erased and then reset during the creation of eggs and sperm. Genomic imprinting is a process of silencing genes through DNA methylation. The repressed allele is methylated, while the active allele is unmethylated. The most well-known conditions include Prader-Willi syndrome, and Angelman syndrome. Both of these syndromes can be caused by imprinting or other errors involving genes on the long arm of chromosome 15. CONCLUSIONS: Genomic imprinting and other epigenetic mechanisms such as environment is shown that plays role in offspring neurodevelopment and autism spectrum disorder. PMID:27275355

  12. The personal genome browser: visualizing functions of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Juan, Liran; Teng, Mingxiang; Zang, Tianyi; Hao, Yafeng; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Chengwu; Liu, Yongzhuang; Li, Jie; Zhang, Tianjiao; Wang, Yadong

    2014-07-01

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have brought us into the individual genome era. Projects such as the 1000 Genomes Project have led the individual genome sequencing to become more and more popular. How to visualize, analyse and annotate individual genomes with knowledge bases to support genome studies and personalized healthcare is still a big challenge. The Personal Genome Browser (PGB) is developed to provide comprehensive functional annotation and visualization for individual genomes based on the genetic-molecular-phenotypic model. Investigators can easily view individual genetic variants, such as single nucleotide variants (SNVs), INDELs and structural variations (SVs), as well as genomic features and phenotypes associated to the individual genetic variants. The PGB especially highlights potential functional variants using the PGB built-in method or SIFT/PolyPhen2 scores. Moreover, the functional risks of genes could be evaluated by scanning individual genetic variants on the whole genome, a chromosome, or a cytoband based on functional implications of the variants. Investigators can then navigate to high risk genes on the scanned individual genome. The PGB accepts Variant Call Format (VCF) and Genetic Variation Format (GVF) files as the input. The functional annotation of input individual genome variants can be visualized in real time by well-defined symbols and shapes. The PGB is available at http://www.pgbrowser.org/. PMID:24799434

  13. The personal genome browser: visualizing functions of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Liran; Teng, Mingxiang; Zang, Tianyi; Hao, Yafeng; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Chengwu; Liu, Yongzhuang; Li, Jie; Zhang, Tianjiao; Wang, Yadong

    2014-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have brought us into the individual genome era. Projects such as the 1000 Genomes Project have led the individual genome sequencing to become more and more popular. How to visualize, analyse and annotate individual genomes with knowledge bases to support genome studies and personalized healthcare is still a big challenge. The Personal Genome Browser (PGB) is developed to provide comprehensive functional annotation and visualization for individual genomes based on the genetic–molecular–phenotypic model. Investigators can easily view individual genetic variants, such as single nucleotide variants (SNVs), INDELs and structural variations (SVs), as well as genomic features and phenotypes associated to the individual genetic variants. The PGB especially highlights potential functional variants using the PGB built-in method or SIFT/PolyPhen2 scores. Moreover, the functional risks of genes could be evaluated by scanning individual genetic variants on the whole genome, a chromosome, or a cytoband based on functional implications of the variants. Investigators can then navigate to high risk genes on the scanned individual genome. The PGB accepts Variant Call Format (VCF) and Genetic Variation Format (GVF) files as the input. The functional annotation of input individual genome variants can be visualized in real time by well-defined symbols and shapes. The PGB is available at http://www.pgbrowser.org/. PMID:24799434

  14. Telescopic horizon scanning.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan

    2014-12-20

    The problem of "distortionless" viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems (mainly "binoculars") remains problematic. The so called "globe effect" is only partially counteracted in modern designs. Theories addressing the phenomenon have never reached definitive closure. In this paper, we show that exact distortionless viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems is not possible in general, but that it is in principle possible in-very frequent in battle field and marine applications-the case of horizon scanning. However, this involves cylindrical optical elements. For opto-electronic systems, a full solution is more readily feasible. The solution involves a novel interpretation of the relevant constraints and objectives. For final design decisions, it is not necessary to rely on a corpus of psychophysical (or ergonomic) data, although one has to decide whether the instrument is intended as an extension of the eye or as a "pictorial" device. PMID:25608206

  15. A scanning cavity microscope.

    PubMed

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm(2); we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  16. A scanning cavity microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm2; we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  17. Quadrature wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-07-10

    A novel method to double the measurement range of wavelength scanning interferometery (WSI) is described. In WSI the measured optical path difference (OPD) is affected by a sign ambiguity, that is, from an interference signal it is not possible to distinguish whether the OPD is positive or negative. The sign ambiguity can be resolved by measuring an interference signal in quadrature. A method to obtain a quadrature interference signal for WSI is described, and a theoretical analysis of the advantages is reported. Simulations of the advantages of the technique and of signal errors due to nonideal quadrature are discussed. The analysis and simulation are supported by experimental measurements to show the improved performances. PMID:27409307

  18. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Shigeru; Bard, Allen J.; Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Mirkin, Michael V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2008-07-01

    This review describes work done in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) since 2000 with an emphasis on new applications and important trends, such as nanometer-sized tips. SECM has been adapted to investigate charge transport across liquid/liquid interfaces and to probe charge transport in thin films and membranes. It has been used in biological systems like single cells to study ion transport in channels, as well as cellular and enzyme activity. It is also a powerful and useful tool for the evaluation of the electrocatalytic activities of different materials for useful reactions, such as oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation. SECM has also been used as an electrochemical tool for studies of the local properties and reactivity of a wide variety of materials, including metals, insulators, and semiconductors. Finally, SECM has been combined with several other nonelectrochemical techniques, such as atomic force microscopy, to enhance and complement the information available from SECM alone.

  19. Adaptive scanning probe microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Swartzentruber, B.S.; Bouchard, A.M.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1997-02-01

    This work is comprised of two major sections. In the first section the authors develop multivariate image classification techniques to distinguish and identify surface electronic species directly from multiple-bias scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images. Multiple measurements at each site are used to distinguish and categorize inequivalent electronic or atomic species on the surface via a computerized classification algorithm. Then, comparison with theory or other suitably chosen experimental data enables the identification of each class. They demonstrate the technique by analyzing dual-polarity constant-current topographs of the Ge(111) surface. Just two measurements, negative- and positive-bias topography height, permit pixels to be separated into seven different classes. Labeling four of the classes as adatoms, first-layer atoms, and two inequivalent rest-atom sites, they find excellent agreement with the c(2 x 8) structure. The remaining classes are associated with structural defects and contaminants. This work represents a first step toward developing a general electronic/chemical classification and identification tool for multivariate scanning probe microscopy imagery. In the second section they report measurements of the diffusion of Si dimers on the Si(001) surface at temperatures between room temperature and 128 C using a novel atom-tracking technique that can resolve every diffusion event. The atom tracker employs lateral-positioning feedback to lock the STM probe tip into position above selected atoms with sub-Angstrom precision. Once locked the STM tracks the position of the atoms as they migrate over the crystal surface. By tracking individual atoms directly, the ability of the instrument to measure dynamic events is increased by a factor of {approximately} 1,000 over conventional STM imaging techniques.

  20. StarScan: a web server for scanning small RNA targets from degradome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shun; Li, Jun-Hao; Wu, Jie; Zhou, Ke-Ren; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), including microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs and small interfering RNAs, play important gene regulatory roles in animals and plants by pairing to the protein-coding and non-coding transcripts. However, computationally assigning these various sRNAs to their regulatory target genes remains technically challenging. Recently, a high-throughput degradome sequencing method was applied to identify biologically relevant sRNA cleavage sites. In this study, an integrated web-based tool, StarScan (sRNA target Scan), was developed for scanning sRNA targets using degradome sequencing data from 20 species. Given a sRNA sequence from plants or animals, our web server performs an ultrafast and exhaustive search for potential sRNA–target interactions in annotated and unannotated genomic regions. The interactions between small RNAs and target transcripts were further evaluated using a novel tool, alignScore. A novel tool, degradomeBinomTest, was developed to quantify the abundance of degradome fragments located at the 9–11th nucleotide from the sRNA 5′ end. This is the first web server for discovering potential sRNA-mediated RNA cleavage events in plants and animals, which affords mechanistic insights into the regulatory roles of sRNAs. The StarScan web server is available at http://mirlab.sysu.edu.cn/starscan/. PMID:25990732

  1. Genetic Diversity of Bacillus thuringiensis from Different Geo-Ecological Regions of Ukraine by Analyzing the 16S rRNA and gyrB Genes and by AP-PCR and saAFLP

    PubMed Central

    Punina, N. V.; Zotov, V. S.; Parkhomenko, A. L.; Parkhomenko, T. U.; Topunov, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group consists of closely related species of bacteria and is of interest to researchers due to its importance in industry and medicine. However, it remains difficult to distinguish these bacteria at the intra- and inter-species level. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a member of the B. cereus group. In this work, we studied the inter-species structure of five entomopathogenic strains and 20 isolates of Bt, which were collected from different geo-ecological regions of Ukraine, using various methods: physiological and biochemical analyses, analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA and gyrB genes, by AP-PCR (BOX and ERIC), and by saAFLP. The analysis of the 16S rRNA and gyrB genes revealed the existence of six subgroups within theB.cereus group: B anthracis, B. cereus I and II, Bt I and II, and Bt III, and confirmed that these isolates belong to the genus Bacillus. All strains were subdivided into 3 groups. Seventeen strains belong to the group Bt II of commercial, industrial strains. The AP-PCR (BOX and ERIC) and saAFLP results were in good agreement and with the results obtained for the 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. Based on the derived patterns, all strains were reliably combined into 5 groups. Interestingly, a specific pattern was revealed by the saAFLP analysis for the industrial strain Bt 0376 р.о., which is used to produce the entomopathogenic preparation “STAR-t”. PMID:23556134

  2. Prediction of single-cross hybrid performance for grain yield and grain dry matter content in maize using AFLP markers associated with QTL.

    PubMed

    Schrag, T A; Melchinger, A E; Sørensen, A P; Frisch, M

    2006-10-01

    Prediction methods to identify single-cross hybrids with superior yield performance have the potential to greatly improve the efficiency of commercial maize (Zea mays L.) hybrid breeding programs. Our objectives were to (1) identify marker loci associated with quantitative trait loci for hybrid performance or specific combining ability (SCA) in maize, (2) compare hybrid performance prediction by genotypic value estimates with that based on general combining ability (GCA) estimates, and (3) investigate a newly proposed combination of the GCA model with SCA predictions from genotypic value estimates. A total of 270 hybrids was evaluated for grain yield and grain dry matter content in four Dent x Flint factorial mating experiments, their parental inbred lines were genotyped with 20 AFLP primer-enzyme combinations. Markers associated significantly with hybrid performance and SCA were identified, genotypic values and SCA effects were estimated, and four hybrid performance prediction approaches were evaluated. For grain yield, between 38 and 98 significant markers were identified for hybrid performance and between zero and five for SCA. Estimates of prediction efficiency (R (2)) ranged from 0.46 to 0.86 for grain yield and from 0.59 to 0.96 for grain dry matter content. Models enhancing the GCA approach with SCA estimates resulted in the highest prediction efficiency if the SCA to GCA ratio was high. We conclude that it is advantageous for prediction of single-cross hybrids to enhance a GCA-based model with SCA effects estimated from molecular marker data, if SCA variances are of similar or larger importance as GCA variances. PMID:16896712

  3. Mechanisms on Boron-Induced Alleviation of Aluminum-Toxicity in Citrus grandis Seedlings at a Transcriptional Level Revealed by cDNA-AFLP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin-Xing; Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Guo, Peng; Chen, Li-Song

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and biochemical mechanisms on boron (B)-induced alleviation of aluminum (B)-toxicity in plants have been examined in some details, but our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes is very limited. In this study, we first used the cDNA-AFLP to investigate the gene expression patterns in Citrus grandis roots responsive to B and Al interactions, and isolated 100 differentially expressed genes. Results showed that genes related to detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and aldehydes (i.e., glutathione S-transferase zeta class-like isoform X1, thioredoxin M-type 4, and 2-alkenal reductase (NADP+-dependent)-like), metabolism (i.e., carboxylesterases and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase-like 4-like, nicotianamine aminotransferase A-like isoform X3, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase 18-like isoform X1, and FNR, root isozyme 2), cell transport (i.e., non-specific lipid-transfer protein-like protein At2g13820-like and major facilitator superfamily protein), Ca signal and hormone (i.e., calcium-binding protein CML19-like and IAA-amino acid hydrolase ILR1-like 4-like), gene regulation (i.e., Gag-pol polyprotein) and cell wall modification (i.e., glycosyl hydrolase family 10 protein) might play a role in B-induced alleviation of Al-toxicity. Our results are useful not only for our understanding of molecular processes associated with B-induced alleviation of Al-toxicity, but also for obtaining key molecular genes to enhance Al-tolerance of plants in the future. PMID:25747450

  4. The possible physical barrier and coastal dispersal strategy for Japanese grenadier anchovy, Coilia nasus in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea: evidence from AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Gang; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Tian-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    In order to ascertain the taxonomic status of the Ariake Sea population of Japanese grenadier anchovy, Coilia nasus, and assess the contemporary possible genetic barrier between the west and east coastal waters of the East China Sea, we used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers to detect the genetic structure of C. nasus, in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea. Eighty-one individuals of C. nasus were collected from five locations and 12 individuals of Coilia mystus were sampled from the Yangtze River Estuary. A total of 371 loci were detected by five primer combinations, 310 of which were polymorphic (83.56%). Analysis of molecular variation (AMOVA) and pairwise fixation index (FST) revealed significant genetic differentiation among five samples, indicating limited gene flow among populations. The dendrogram for populations by neighbor-joining (NJ) cluster analysis provided evidence of a clear relationship between genetic and geographic patterns, supporting significant genetic differentiation between China coastal populations and Ariake Sea populations. Compared to the genetic divergence between C. nasus and C. mystus, the level of genetic differentiation between China and the Ariake Sea populations of C. nasus is obvious below the species level, indicating isolated populations of C. nasus in the Ariake Sea. Isolation by distance analysis revealed that direct ocean distance with deep-water at the continental slope and high salinity between west and east coastal waters of the East China Sea served as major physical barrier to C. nasus, supporting the coastal dispersal pattern in this estuarine species, and rejecting offshore dispersal strategy. PMID:25654225

  5. A Preliminary Study of Genetic Variation in Populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae) from North-East Brazil, Estimated with AFLP Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, I. M.; Mayo, S. J.; van den Berg, C.; Fay, M. F.; Chester, M.; Lexer, C.; Kirkup, D.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims This study sought genetic evidence of long-term isolation in populations of Monstera adansonii var. klotzschiana (Araceae), a herbaceous, probably outbreeding, humid forest hemi-epiphyte, in the brejo forests of Ceará (north-east Brazil), and clarification of their relationships with populations in Amazonia and the Atlantic forest of Brazil. Methods Within-population genetic diversity and between-population dissimilarity were estimated using AFLP molecular markers in 75 individuals from eight populations located in Ceará, the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and Amazonia. Key Results The populations showed a clinal pattern of weak genetic differentiation over a large geographical region (FST = 0·1896). A strong correlation between genetic and geographical distance (Mantel test: r = 0·6903, P = 0·002) suggests a historical pattern of isolation by distance. Genetic structure analysis revealed at least two distinct gene pools in the data. The two isolated Ceará populations are significantly different from each other (pairwise ΦPT = 0·137, P = 0·003) and as diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·1832, 0·1706) as those in the Atlantic and Amazon forest regions. The population in southern Brazil is less diverse (Nei's gene diversity, average He = 0·127) than the rest. The Ceará populations are related to those of the Atlantic forest rather than those from Amazonia (AMOVA, among-groups variation = 11·95 %, P = 0·037). Conclusions The gene pools detected within an overall pattern of clinal variation suggest distinct episodes of gene flow, possibly correlated with past humid forest expansions. The Ceará populations show no evidence of erosion of genetic diversity, although this was expected because of their isolation. Their genetic differentiation and relatively high diversity reinforce the importance of conserving the endangered brejo forests. PMID:17823112

  6. Long-term boron-deficiency-responsive genes revealed by cDNA-AFLP differ between Citrus sinensis roots and leaves

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Bin; Qi, Yi-Ping; Yang, Lin-Tong; Lee, Jinwook; Guo, Peng; Ye, Xin; Jia, Meng-Yang; Li, Mei-Li; Chen, Li-Song

    2015-01-01

    Seedlings of Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck were supplied with boron (B)-deficient (without H3BO3) or -sufficient (10 μM H3BO3) nutrient solution for 15 weeks. We identified 54 (38) and 38 (45) up (down)-regulated cDNA-AFLP bands (transcript-derived fragments, TDFs) from B-deficient leaves and roots, respectively. These TDFs were mainly involved in protein and amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, cell transport, signal transduction, and stress response and defense. The majority of the differentially expressed TDFs were isolated only from B-deficient roots or leaves, only seven TDFs with the same GenBank ID were isolated from the both. In addition, ATP biosynthesis-related TDFs were induced in B-deficient roots, but unaffected in B-deficient leaves. Most of the differentially expressed TDFs associated with signal transduction and stress defense were down-regulated in roots, but up-regulated in leaves. TDFs related to protein ubiquitination and proteolysis were induced in B-deficient leaves except for one TDF, while only two down-regulated TDFs associated with ubiquitination were detected in B-deficient roots. Thus, many differences existed in long-term B-deficiency-responsive genes between roots and leaves. In conclusion, our findings provided a global picture of the differential responses occurring in B-deficient roots and leaves and revealed new insight into the different adaptive mechanisms of C. sinensis roots and leaves to B-deficiency at the transcriptional level. PMID:26284101

  7. Mechanisms on boron-induced alleviation of aluminum-toxicity in Citrus grandis seedlings at a transcriptional level revealed by cDNA-AFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin-Xing; Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Guo, Peng; Chen, Li-Song

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and biochemical mechanisms on boron (B)-induced alleviation of aluminum (B)-toxicity in plants have been examined in some details, but our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes is very limited. In this study, we first used the cDNA-AFLP to investigate the gene expression patterns in Citrus grandis roots responsive to B and Al interactions, and isolated 100 differentially expressed genes. Results showed that genes related to detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and aldehydes (i.e., glutathione S-transferase zeta class-like isoform X1, thioredoxin M-type 4, and 2-alkenal reductase (NADP+-dependent)-like), metabolism (i.e., carboxylesterases and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase-like 4-like, nicotianamine aminotransferase A-like isoform X3, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase 18-like isoform X1, and FNR, root isozyme 2), cell transport (i.e., non-specific lipid-transfer protein-like protein At2g13820-like and major facilitator superfamily protein), Ca signal and hormone (i.e., calcium-binding protein CML19-like and IAA-amino acid hydrolase ILR1-like 4-like), gene regulation (i.e., Gag-pol polyprotein) and cell wall modification (i.e., glycosyl hydrolase family 10 protein) might play a role in B-induced alleviation of Al-toxicity. Our results are useful not only for our understanding of molecular processes associated with B-induced alleviation of Al-toxicity, but also for obtaining key molecular genes to enhance Al-tolerance of plants in the future. PMID:25747450

  8. Long-Term Boron-Excess-Induced Alterations of Gene Profiles in Roots of Two Citrus Species Differing in Boron-Tolerance Revealed by cDNA-AFLP

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peng; Qi, Yi-Ping; Yang, Lin-Tong; Ye, Xin; Huang, Jing-Hao; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-01-01

    Boron (B) toxicity is observed in some citrus orchards in China. However, limited data are available on the molecular mechanisms of citrus B-toxicity and B-tolerance. Using cDNA-AFLP, we identified 20 up- and 52 down-regulated genes, and 44 up- and 66 down-regulated genes from excess B-treated Citrus sinensis and Citrus grandis roots, respectively, thereby demonstrating that gene expression profiles were more affected in the latter. In addition, phosphorus and total soluble protein concentrations were lowered only in excess B-treated C. grandis roots. Apparently, C. sinensis had higher B-tolerance than C. grandis. Our results suggested that the following several aspects were responsible for the difference in the B-tolerance between the two citrus species including: (a) B-excess induced Root Hair Defective 3 expression in C. sinensis roots, and repressed villin4 expression in C. grandis roots; accordingly, root growth was less inhibited by B-excess in the former; (b) antioxidant systems were impaired in excess B-treated C. grandis roots, hence accelerating root senescence; (c) genes related to Ca2+ signals were inhibited (induced) by B-excess in C. grandis (C. sinensis) roots. B-excess-responsive genes related to energy (i.e., alternative oxidase and cytochrome P450), lipid (i.e., Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 9 and citrus dioxygenase), and nucleic acid (i.e., HDA19, histone 4, and ribonucleotide reductase RNR1 like protein) metabolisms also possibly accounted for the difference in the B-tolerance between the two citrus species. These data increased our understanding of the mechanisms on citrus B-toxicity and B-tolerance at transcriptional level. PMID:27446128

  9. Long-Term Boron-Excess-Induced Alterations of Gene Profiles in Roots of Two Citrus Species Differing in Boron-Tolerance Revealed by cDNA-AFLP.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng; Qi, Yi-Ping; Yang, Lin-Tong; Ye, Xin; Huang, Jing-Hao; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-01-01

    Boron (B) toxicity is observed in some citrus orchards in China. However, limited data are available on the molecular mechanisms of citrus B-toxicity and B-tolerance. Using cDNA-AFLP, we identified 20 up- and 52 down-regulated genes, and 44 up- and 66 down-regulated genes from excess B-treated Citrus sinensis and Citrus grandis roots, respectively, thereby demonstrating that gene expression profiles were more affected in the latter. In addition, phosphorus and total soluble protein concentrations were lowered only in excess B-treated C. grandis roots. Apparently, C. sinensis had higher B-tolerance than C. grandis. Our results suggested that the following several aspects were responsible for the difference in the B-tolerance between the two citrus species including: (a) B-excess induced Root Hair Defective 3 expression in C. sinensis roots, and repressed villin4 expression in C. grandis roots; accordingly, root growth was less inhibited by B-excess in the former; (b) antioxidant systems were impaired in excess B-treated C. grandis roots, hence accelerating root senescence; (c) genes related to Ca(2+) signals were inhibited (induced) by B-excess in C. grandis (C. sinensis) roots. B-excess-responsive genes related to energy (i.e., alternative oxidase and cytochrome P450), lipid (i.e., Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 9 and citrus dioxygenase), and nucleic acid (i.e., HDA19, histone 4, and ribonucleotide reductase RNR1 like protein) metabolisms also possibly accounted for the difference in the B-tolerance between the two citrus species. These data increased our understanding of the mechanisms on citrus B-toxicity and B-tolerance at transcriptional level. PMID:27446128

  10. Long-term boron-deficiency-responsive genes revealed by cDNA-AFLP differ between Citrus sinensis roots and leaves.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Bin; Qi, Yi-Ping; Yang, Lin-Tong; Lee, Jinwook; Guo, Peng; Ye, Xin; Jia, Meng-Yang; Li, Mei-Li; Chen, Li-Song

    2015-01-01

    Seedlings of Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck were supplied with boron (B)-deficient (without H3BO3) or -sufficient (10 μM H3BO3) nutrient solution for 15 weeks. We identified 54 (38) and 38 (45) up (down)-regulated cDNA-AFLP bands (transcript-derived fragments, TDFs) from B-deficient leaves and roots, respectively. These TDFs were mainly involved in protein and amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, cell transport, signal transduction, and stress response and defense. The majority of the differentially expressed TDFs were isolated only from B-deficient roots or leaves, only seven TDFs with the same GenBank ID were isolated from the both. In addition, ATP biosynthesis-related TDFs were induced in B-deficient roots, but unaffected in B-deficient leaves. Most of the differentially expressed TDFs associated with signal transduction and stress defense were down-regulated in roots, but up-regulated in leaves. TDFs related to protein ubiquitination and proteolysis were induced in B-deficient leaves except for one TDF, while only two down-regulated TDFs associated with ubiquitination were detected in B-deficient roots. Thus, many differences existed in long-term B-deficiency-responsive genes between roots and leaves. In conclusion, our findings provided a global picture of the differential responses occurring in B-deficient roots and leaves and revealed new insight into the different adaptive mechanisms of C. sinensis roots and leaves to B-deficiency at the transcriptional level. PMID:26284101

  11. A normalization strategy applied to HiCEP (an AFLP-based expression profiling) analysis: Toward the strict alignment of valid fragments across electrophoretic patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Koji; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Rodrigue, Joseph J; Araki, Ryoko; Abe, Masumi

    2005-01-01

    Background Gene expression analysis based on comparison of electrophoretic patterns is strongly dependent on the accuracy of DNA fragment sizing. The current normalization strategy based on molecular weight markers has limited accuracy because marker peaks are often masked by intense peaks nearby. Cumulative errors in fragment lengths cause problems in the alignment of same-length fragments across different electropherograms, especially for small fragments (< 100 bp). For accurate comparison of electrophoretic patterns, further inspection and normalization of electrophoretic data after fragment sizing by conventional strategies is needed. Results Here we describe a method for the normalization of a set of time-course electrophoretic data to be compared. The method uses Gaussian curves fitted to the complex peak mixtures in each electropherogram. It searches for target ranges for which patterns are dissimilar to the other patterns (called "dissimilar ranges") and for references (a kind of mean or typical pattern) in the set of resultant approximate patterns. It then constructs the optimal normalized pattern whose correlation coefficient against the reference in the range achieves the highest value among various combinations of candidates. We applied the procedure to time-course electrophoretic data produced by HiCEP, an AFLP-based expression profiling method which can detect a slight expression change in DNA fragments. We obtained dissimilar ranges whose electrophoretic patterns were obviously different from the reference and as expected, most of the fragments in the detected ranges were short (< 100 bp). The normalized electrophoretic patterns also agreed well with reference patterns. Conclusion The normalization strategy presented here demonstrates the importance of pre-processing before electrophoretic signal comparison, and we anticipate its usefulness especially for temporal expression analysis by the electrophoretic method. PMID:15748295

  12. Personal genomics and individual identities: motivations and moral imperatives of early users

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Michelle L.; Fishman, Jennifer R.; Lambrix, Marcie A.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2007, consumer genomics companies have marketed personal genome scanning services to assess users’ genetic predispositions to a variety of complex diseases and traits. This study investigates early users’ reasons for utilizing personal genome services, their evaluation of the technology, how they interpret the results, and how they incorporate the results into health-related decision-making. The analysis contextualizes early users’ relationships to the technology, the knowledge generated by it, and how it mediates their relationship to their own health and to biomedicine more broadly. The results reveal that early users approach personal genome scanning with both optimism for genomic research and scepticism about the technology’s current capabilities, which runs contrary to concerns that consumers may be ill equipped to interpret and understand genome scan results. These findings provide important qualitative insight into early users’ conceptualizations of personal genomic risk assessment and illuminate their involvement in configuring this technology in the making. PMID:21076647

  13. Earth observing scanning polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travis, Larry

    1993-01-01

    Climate forcing by tropospheric aerosols is receiving increased attention because of the realization that the climate effects may be large, while our knowledge of global aerosol characteristics and temporal changes is very poor. Tropospheric aerosols cause a direct radiative forcing due simply to their scattering and absorption of solar radiation, as well as an indirect effect as cloud condensation nuclei which can modify the shortwave reflectivity of clouds. Sulfate aerosols tend to increase planetary albedo through both the direct and indirect effects; a cooling due to anthropogenic sulfate aerosols has been estimated of order 1 W/sq m, noting that this is similar in magnitude to the present anthropogenic greenhouse gas warming. Other aerosols, including those from biomass burning and wind-blown desert dust are also of potential climatic importance. At present, the only global monitoring of tropospheric aerosols is a NOAA operational product, aerosol optical thickness, obtained using channel-1 (0.58-0.68 mu m) radiances from the AVHRR. With this single channel radiance data, one must use an approach which is based on the inferred excess of reflected radiance owing to scattering by the aerosols over that expected from theoretical calculations. This approach is suited only for situations where the surface has a low albedo that is well known a priori. Thus, the NOAA operational product is restricted to coverage over the ocean at AVHRR scan angles well away from sun glint, and aerosol changes are subject to confusion with changes caused by either optically thin or subpixel clouds. Because optically thin aerosols have only a small effect on the radiance, accurate measurements for optical thickness less than 0.1 (which is a typical background level) are precluded. Moreover, some of the largest and most important aerosol changes are expected over land. The Earth Observing Scanning Polarimeter (EOSP) instrument, based upon design heritage and analysis techniques

  14. Thermocouple homogeneity scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, E.; White, D. R.

    2015-02-01

    The inhomogeneities within a thermocouple influence the measured temperature and contribute the largest component to uncertainty. Currently there is no accepted best practice for measuring the inhomogeneities or for forecasting their effects on real-world measurements. The aim of this paper is to provide guidance on the design and performance assessment of thermocouple inhomogeneity scanners by characterizing the qualitative performance of the various designs reported in the literature, and developing a quantitative measure of scanner resolution. Numerical simulations incorporating Fourier transforms and convolutions are used to gauge the levels of attenuation and distortion present in single- and double-gradient scanners. Single-gradient scanners are found to be far superior to double-gradient scanners, which are unsuitable for quantitative measurements due to their blindness to inhomogeneities at many spatial frequencies and severe attenuation of signals at other frequencies. It is recommended that the standard deviation of the temperature gradient within the scanner is used as a measure of the scanner resolution and spatial bandwidth. Recommendations for the design of scanners are presented, and include advice on the basic design of scanners, the media employed, operating temperature, scan rates, construction of survey probes, data processing, gradient symmetry, and the spatial resolution required for research and calibration applications.

  15. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Nels W.

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  16. GPR scan assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Abbas M.; Salah, Hany; Massoud, Usama; Fouad, Mona; Abdel-Hafez, Mahmoud

    2015-06-01

    Mekaad Radwan monument is situated in the neighborhood of Bab Zuweila in the historical Cairo, Egypt. It was constructed at the middle XVII century (1635 AD). The building has a rectangle shape plan (13 × 6 m) with the longitudinal sides approximately WNW-ESE. It comprises three storages namely; the ground floor; the opened floor (RADWAN Bench) and the living floor with a total elevation of 15 m above the street level. The building suffers from severe deterioration phenomena with patterns of damage which have occurred over time. These deterioration and damages could be attributed to foundation problems, subsoil water and also to the earthquake that affected the entire Greater Cairo area in October 1992. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) scan was accomplished against the walls of the opened floor (RADWAN Bench) to evaluate the hazard impact on the walls textures and integrity. The results showed an anomalous feature through the southern wall of RADWAN Bench. A mathematical model has been simulated to confirm the obtained anomaly and the model response exhibited a good matching with the outlined anomaly.

  17. Scanning probe nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinelli, F.; Menozzi, C.; Baschieri, P.; Facci, P.; Pingue, P.

    2010-02-01

    The present paper reports on a novel lithographic approach at the nanoscale level, which is based on scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The experimental set-up consists of an atomic force microscope (AFM) operated via software specifically developed for the purpose. In particular, this software allows one to apply a predefined external load for a given lapse of time while monitoring in real-time the relative distance between the tip and the sample as well as the normal and lateral force during the embossing process. Additionally, we have employed AFM tips sculptured by means of focused ion beam in order to create indenting tools of the desired shape. Anti-sticking layers can also be used to functionalize the tips if one needs to investigate the effects of different treatments on the indentation and de-molding processes. The lithographic capabilities of this set-up are demonstrated on a polystyrene NIL-patterned sample, where imprinted features have been obtained upon using different normal load values for increasing time intervals, and on a thermoplastic polymer film, where the imprint process has been monitored in real-time.

  18. Stochastic scanning multiphoton multifocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jureller, Justin E; Kim, Hee Y; Scherer, Norbert F

    2006-04-17

    Multiparticle tracking with scanning confocal and multiphoton fluorescence imaging is increasingly important for elucidating biological function, as in the transport of intracellular cargo-carrying vesicles. We demonstrate a simple rapid-sampling stochastic scanning multifocal multiphoton microscopy (SS-MMM) fluorescence imaging technique that enables multiparticle tracking without specialized hardware at rates 1,000 times greater than conventional single point raster scanning. Stochastic scanning of a diffractive optic generated 10x10 hexagonal array of foci with a white noise driven galvanometer yields a scan pattern that is random yet space-filling. SS-MMM creates a more uniformly sampled image with fewer spatio-temporal artifacts than obtained by conventional or multibeam raster scanning. SS-MMM is verified by simulation and experimentally demonstrated by tracking microsphere diffusion in solution. PMID:19516485

  19. Radioisotope scanning in osseous sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    Technetium-99m (/sup 99m/Tc)-labeled pyrophosphate or diphosphonate compounds and gallium-67 citrate (/sup 67/Ga) are two radionuclide scanning agents that are in widespread use in clinical practice. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate is used extensively for bone scanning to detect metastatic bone disease, benign bone tumors, osteomyelitis, benign hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, and Paget's disease. Only two reports describe abnormal /sup 99m/Tc/ pyrophosphate bone scans in four patients with osseous sarcoidosis. Gallium-67 scans are used primarily to localize neoplastic or inflammatory lesions anywhere in the body. In recent years /sup 67/Ga scans have also been used to detect the presence of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary sarcoidosis, but there are no reports describing abnormal uptake of gallium in patients with osseous sarcoidosis. This report describes experience with radioisotope scanning in two patients with osseous sarcoidosis.

  20. FeatureScan: revealing property-dependent similarity of nucleotide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Deyneko, Igor V.; Bredohl, Björn; Wesely, Daniel; Kalybaeva, Yulia M.; Kel, Alexander E.; Blöcker, Helmut; Kauer, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    FeatureScan is a software package aiming to reveal novel types of DNA sequence similarity by comparing physico-chemical properties. Thirty-eight different parameters of DNA double strands such as charge, melting enthalpy, conformational parameters and the like are provided. As input FeatureScan requires two sequences, a pattern sequence and a target sequence, search conditions are set by selecting a specific DNA parameter and a threshold value. Search results are displayed in FASTA format and directly linked to external genome databases/browsers (ENSEMBL, NCBI, UCSC). An Internet version of FeatureScan is accessible at . As part of the HOBIT initiative () FeatureScan is also accessible as a web service at its above home page. Currently, several preloaded genomes are provided at this Internet website (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus and four strains of Escherichia coli) as target sequences. Standalone executables of FeatureScan are available on request. PMID:16845077