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Sample records for afm analysis revealed

  1. Crystallization of Probucol in Nanoparticles Revealed by AFM Analysis in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Egami, Kiichi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2015-08-01

    The crystallization behavior of a pharmaceutical drug in nanoparticles was directly evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve measurements in aqueous solution. A ternary spray-dried sample (SPD) was prepared by spray drying the organic solvent containing probucol (PBC), hypromellose (HPMC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The amorphization of PBC in the ternary SPD was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and solid-state 13C NMR measurements. A nanosuspension containing quite small particles of 25 nm in size was successfully prepared immediately after dispersion of the ternary SPD into water. Furthermore, solution-state 1H NMR measurements revealed that a portion of HPMC coexisted with PBC as a mixed state in the freshly prepared nanosuspension particles. After storing the nanosuspension at 25 °C, a gradual increase in the size of the nanoparticles was observed, and the particle size changed to 93.9 nm after 7 days. AFM enabled the direct observation of the morphology and agglomeration behavior of the nanoparticles in water. Moreover, AFM force-distance curves were changed from (I) to (IV), depending on the storage period, as follows: (I) complete indentation within an applied force of 1 nN, (II) complete indentation with an applied force of 1-5 nN, (III) partial indentation with an applied force of 5 nN, and (IV) nearly no indentation with an applied force of 5 nN. This stiffness increase of the nanoparticles was attributed to gradual changes in the molecular state of PBC from the amorphous to the crystal state. Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of the freeze-dried samples demonstrated the presence of metastable PBC Form II crystals in the stored nanosuspension, strongly supporting the AFM results. PMID:26106951

  2. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves.

    PubMed

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-05-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  3. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves

    PubMed Central

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Four-way DNA Junctions Dynamics Revealed by Single-Molecule AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubchenko, Yuri

    2004-03-01

    For-way DNA junctions (Holliday junctions) are critical intermediates for homologous, site-specific recombination, DNA repair and replication. A wealth of structural information is available for immobile four-way junctions. However, these data cannot give the answer on the mechanism of branch migration, the major property of the Holliday junction. Two models for the mechanism of branch migration were suggested. According to the early model of Alberts-Meselson-Sigal, exchanging DNA strands around the junction remain parallel during branch migration. Kinetic studies of branch migration suggest an alternative model in which the junction adopts an extended conformation. We tested these models using a Holliday junction undergoing branch migration. Note that it was the first time when the dynamics of the four-way DNA junction capable of branch migration had been analyzed. We applied time-lapse atomic force microscopy (single molecule dynamics AFM) to image directly loosely bound DNA at liquid-surface interface. These experiments show that mobile Holliday junctions adopt an unfolded conformation during branch migration. This conformation of the junction remains unchanged until strand separation. The data obtained support the model for branch migration having the extended conformation of the Holliday junction. The analysis of the Holliday junctions dynamics at conditions limiting branch migration revealed a broad movement of the arms suggesting that the range of mobility of these junctions is much wider than detected before. Further applications of the time-lapse AFM approach in attempt to resolve the subpopulations of the junctions conformers and the prospects for analyses of dynamics of complex biological systems will be discussed.

  5. Structure of crystal defects in damaged RDX as revealed by an AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, J.; Hoover, S. M.; Coffey, C. S.; Tompa, A. S.; Sandusky, H. W.; Armstrong, R. W.; Elban, W. L.

    1998-07-10

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) was employed to reveal the structure of defects produced in single crystals of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), damaged either by indentation, heat or underwater shock. In general, all of these stimuli produced dislocation pits, cracks, fissures and mosaics, however, the details were different. Indentation generated a large number of triangular dislocation pits, which in their turn produced fissures, cracks and holes by coalescing. Heat produced fine parallel cracks. Slivers as thin as sixty molecules across were observed. Shock caused the crystal to become a three-dimensional mosaic structure, 100-500 nm in size, produced by intensive cleavage and delamination. In all cases very fine particles, 20-500 nm in size, were ejected onto the surface as debris from the formation of defects. The AFM has revealed for the first time un-etched dislocation pits in their pristine condition, so that their internal structure could be investigated. A dislocation density of 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} has been observed. RDX is found to behave like a very fragile crystal in which numerous imperfections show up at a level of the stimuli, far below that necessary for the start of chemical reaction.

  6. STM and AFM; Which is Better for Surface Structural Analysis? Non- contact AFM Studies on Ge/Si(105) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been utilized to determine surface atomic structure with its highly resolved images. Probing surface electronic states near the Fermi energy (EF), STM images, however, do not necessarily represent the atomic structure of surfaces. It has been believed that atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides us surface topographic images without being disturbed by the electronic states. In order to prove the surpassing performance, we performed noncontact (nc) AFM on the Ge/Si(105) surface [1], which is a facet plane of the ?hut? clusters formed on Ge-deposited Si(001) surface. It is found that STM images taken on the surface, either filled- or empty-state images, do not show all surface atoms because of the electronic effect; some surface atoms have dangling bond states below EF and other surface atoms have states above EF. [2]. In a nc-AFM image, on the other hand, all surface atoms having a dangling bond are observed [3], directly representing an atomic structure of the surface. Electronic information can also be obtained in AFM by using a Kelvin-probe method. From atomically resolved potential profile we obtained, charge transfer among the dangling bond states is directly demonstrated. These results clearly demonstrate that highly-resolved nc-AFM with a Kelvin-probe method is an ideal tool for analysis of atomic structures and electronic properties of surfaces. This work was done in collaboration with T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama, T. An, and M. Ono, ISSP, Univ. Tokyo and JST, Y. Fujikawa and T. Sakurai, IMR. Tohoku Univ. T. Hashimoto, AIST, Y. Morikawa, ISIR, Osaka Univ. K. Terakura, Hokkaido Univ., and M.G. Lagally, University of Wisconsin-Madison. [1] T. Eguchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 266102 (2004). [2] Y. Fujikawa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 176101 (2002). [3] T. Eguchi and Y. Hasegawa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 256105 (2002)

  7. Structural changes of polysulfone membrane use for hemodialysis in the consecutive regime: nanometric analysis by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batina, Nikola; Acosta García, Ma. Cristina; Avalos Pérez, Angélica; Alberto Ramírez, Mario; Franco, Martha; Pérez Gravas, Héctor; Cadena Méndez, Miguel

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, the hemodialytic treatment of patients with either acute or chronic renal failure has been improved by promoting biocompatibility in the use of new materials and improve membrane surface characteristics. Low and high flux polysulfone membranes (PM) used in dialysis and ultra filtration have been studied in order to understand the geometry and surface chemistry of the pores at inner (nanometric) and outer (micrometric) membrane parts. The surface changes of polysulfone cartridge membrane (PM) during different number of consecutive reuse trials: after 1st, 10th and 23th times of use. The morphology of the hollow fibers surfaces was studied by means of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and the surface roughness analysis. The roughness of both inner and outer part of PM surface increases with numbers of reuse trails. Thus, small and medium size pores were wiped out when the number of uses changed from zero to 23 on the outer surface. The pore density decreases. The inner part of membrane shows some nanometric size deformation in forms of new openings and raptures. The AFM analysis show differences in the PM morphology at the nanometric level, not previously revealed, which could be important in the evaluation of the PM.

  8. Viscoelasticity of gelatin surfaces probed by AFM noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Benmouna, Farida; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2004-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of surfaces of swollen gelatin were investigated by analyzing the Brownian motion of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever in contact with the gel surface. A micron-sized glass sphere attached to the AFM cantilever is used as the dynamic probe. When the sphere approaches the gelatin surface, there is a static repulsive force without a jump into contact. The cantilever's Brownian movement is monitored in parallel, providing access to the dynamic sphere-surface interaction as quantified by the dynamic spring constant, kappa, and the drag coefficient, xi. Gelatin is used as a model substance for a variety of other soft surfaces, where the stiffness of the gel can be varied via the solvent quality, the bloom number, and the pH. The modulus derived from the static force-distance curve is in the kPa range, consistent with the literature. However, the dynamic spring constant as derived from the Brownian motion is much larger than the static differential spring constant dF/dz. On retraction, one observes a rather strong adhesion hysteresis. The strength of the bridge (as given by the dynamic spring constant and the drag coefficient) is very small. PMID:15745019

  9. Analysis of AFM cantilever dynamics close to sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, A.; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2013-07-01

    For imaging and manipulation of biological specimens application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid is necessary. In this paper, tapping-mode AFM cantilever dynamics in liquid close to sample surface is modeled and simulated by well defining the contact forces. The effect of cantilever tilting angle has been accounted carefully. Contact forces have some differences in liquid in comparison to air or vacuum in magnitude or formulation. Hydrodynamic forces are also applied on the cantilever due to the motion in liquid. A continuous beam model is used with its first mode and forward-time simulation method for simulation of its hybrid dynamics and the frequency response and amplitude versus separation diagrams are extracted. The simulation results show a good agreement with experimental results. The resonance frequency in liquid is so small in comparison to air due to additional mass and also additional damping due to the viscosity of the liquid around. The results show that the effect of separation on free vibration amplitude is great. Its effect on resonance frequency is considerable too.

  10. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  11. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPM8 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Andrew P.; Egressy, Kinga; Lim, Annabel; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2010-04-02

    Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily have been shown to assemble as tetramers. Here we have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) channel using atomic force microscopy (AFM). TRPM8 channels were isolated from transfected cells, and complexes were formed between the channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The complexes were then subjected to AFM imaging. A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of antibody decorated channels had a peak at 1305 nm{sup 3}, close to the expected size of a TRPM8 tetramer. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 93{sup o} and 172{sup o}, confirming that the channel assembles as a tetramer. We suggest that this assembly pattern is common to all members of the TRP channel superfamily.

  12. Dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode: overview and challenges in revealing the appropriate mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Makasheva, K; Villeneuve-Faure, C; Laurent, C; Despax, B; Boudou, L; Teyssedre, G

    2015-07-24

    The study of charge distribution on the surface and in the bulk of dielectrics is of great scientific interest because of the information gained on the storage and transport properties of the medium. Nevertheless, the processes at the nanoscale level remain out of the scope of the commonly used diagnostic methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is currently applied for both injection and imaging of charges on dielectric thin films at the nanoscale level to answer the increasing demand for characterization of miniaturized components used in microelectronics, telecommunications, electrophotography, electrets, etc. However, the mechanisms for dielectric charging by AFM are not well documented, and an analysis of the literature shows that inappropriate mechanisms are sometimes presented. It is shown here that corona discharge, frequently pointed out as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode, cannot develop in such small distances. Furthermore, a review of different mechanisms surmised to be at the origin of dielectric charging at the nanoscale level is offered. Field electron emission enhanced by thermionic emission is identified as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging at the nanoscale level. Experimental validation of this mechanism is obtained for typical electric field strengths in AFM. PMID:26133237

  13. Dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode: overview and challenges in revealing the appropriate mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makasheva, K.; Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Laurent, C.; Despax, B.; Boudou, L.; Teyssedre, G.

    2015-07-01

    The study of charge distribution on the surface and in the bulk of dielectrics is of great scientific interest because of the information gained on the storage and transport properties of the medium. Nevertheless, the processes at the nanoscale level remain out of the scope of the commonly used diagnostic methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is currently applied for both injection and imaging of charges on dielectric thin films at the nanoscale level to answer the increasing demand for characterization of miniaturized components used in microelectronics, telecommunications, electrophotography, electrets, etc. However, the mechanisms for dielectric charging by AFM are not well documented, and an analysis of the literature shows that inappropriate mechanisms are sometimes presented. It is shown here that corona discharge, frequently pointed out as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode, cannot develop in such small distances. Furthermore, a review of different mechanisms surmised to be at the origin of dielectric charging at the nanoscale level is offered. Field electron emission enhanced by thermionic emission is identified as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging at the nanoscale level. Experimental validation of this mechanism is obtained for typical electric field strengths in AFM.

  14. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPC1 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Nelson P.; Shaifta, Yasin; McFadzean, Ian; Ward, Jeremy P.T.; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J. Michael . E-mail: jme1000@cam.ac.uk

    2007-07-13

    We have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential C1 (TRPC1) channel by imaging isolated channels using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of individual channel particles had two peaks, at 170 and 720 nm{sup 3}, corresponding with the expected sizes of TRPC1 monomers and tetramers, respectively. Complexes were formed between TRPC1 channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 88{sup o} and 178{sup o}. This result again indicates that the channel assembles as a tetramer.

  15. Multiparametric AFM reveals turgor-responsive net-like peptidoglycan architecture in live streptococci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar Dover, Ron; Bitler, Arkady; Shimoni, Eyal; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Shai, Yechiel

    2015-05-01

    Cell-wall peptidoglycan (PG) of Gram-positive bacteria is a strong and elastic multi-layer designed to resist turgor pressure and determine the cell shape and growth. Despite its crucial role, its architecture remains largely unknown. Here using high-resolution multiparametric atomic force microscopy (AFM), we studied how the structure and elasticity of PG change when subjected to increasing turgor pressure in live Group B Streptococcus. We show a new net-like arrangement of PG, which stretches and stiffens following osmotic challenge. The same structure also exists in isogenic mutants lacking surface appendages. Cell aging does not alter the elasticity of the cell wall, yet destroys the net architecture and exposes single segmented strands with the same circumferential orientation as predicted for intact glycans. Together, we show a new functional PG architecture in live Gram-positive bacteria.

  16. Analysis of grating inscribed micro-cantilever for high resolution AFM probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balajee, N.; Mahapatra, D. R.; Hegde, G. M.

    2013-06-01

    We present a mathematical modelling and analysis of reflection grating etched Si AFM cantilever deflections under different loading conditions. A simple analysis of the effect of grating structures on cantilever deflection is carried out with emphasis on optimizing the beam and gratings such that maximum amount of diffracted light remains within the detector area.

  17. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  18. Size and orientation of the lipid II headgroup as revealed by AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Ganchev, D N; Hasper, H E; Breukink, E; de Kruijff, B

    2006-05-16

    In this study, we investigated the size and orientation of the bacterial Lipid II (L II) headgroup when the L II molecule is present in liquid-crystalline domains of DOPC in a supported DPPC bilayer. Using atomic force microscopy, we detected that L II causes the appearance of a 1.9 nm thick layer, situated over the DOPC headgroup region. With an increased scanning force, this layer can be penetrated by the AFM tip down to the level of the DOPC bilayer. Using different L II precursor molecules, we demonstrated that the detected layer consists of the headgroups of L II and that the MurNAc-pentapeptide unit of the headgroup is responsible for the measured 1.9 nm height of that layer. Monolayer experiments provided information about the in-plane dimensions of the L II headgroup. On the basis of these results and considerations of the molecular dimensions of L II headgroup constituents, we propose a model for the orientation of the L II headgroup in the membrane. In this model, the pentapeptide of the L II headgroup is rather extended and points away from the bilayer surface, which could be important for biological processes, in which L II is involved. PMID:16681392

  19. AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li-S batteries.

    PubMed

    Hiesgen, Renate; Sörgel, Seniz; Costa, Rémi; Carlé, Linus; Galm, Ines; Cañas, Natalia; Pascucci, Brigitta; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium-sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur)(-1) after 43 cycles. PMID:24205455

  20. AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li–S batteries

    PubMed Central

    Sörgel, Seniz; Costa, Rémi; Carlé, Linus; Galm, Ines; Cañas, Natalia; Pascucci, Brigitta; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium–sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur)−1 after 43 cycles. PMID:24205455

  1. Using 2D correlation analysis to enhance spectral information available from highly spatially resolved AFM-IR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcott, Curtis; Lo, Michael; Hu, Qichi; Kjoller, Kevin; Boskey, Adele; Noda, Isao

    2014-07-01

    The recent combination of atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) has led to the ability to obtain IR spectra with nanoscale spatial resolution, nearly two orders-of-magnitude better than conventional Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. This advanced methodology can lead to significantly sharper spectral features than are typically seen in conventional IR spectra of inhomogeneous materials, where a wider range of molecular environments are coaveraged by the larger sample cross section being probed. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis is used to examine position sensitive spectral variations in datasets of closely spaced AFM-IR spectra. This analysis can reveal new key insights, providing a better understanding of the new spectral information that was previously hidden under broader overlapped spectral features. Two examples of the utility of this new approach are presented. Two-dimensional correlation analysis of a set of AFM-IR spectra were collected at 200-nm increments along a line through a nucleation site generated by remelting a small spot on a thin film of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate). There are two different crystalline carbonyl band components near 1720 cm-1 that sequentially disappear before a band at 1740 cm-1 due to more disordered material appears. In the second example, 2D correlation analysis of a series of AFM-IR spectra spaced every 1 μm of a thin cross section of a bone sample measured outward from an osteon center of bone growth. There are many changes in the amide I and phosphate band contours, suggesting changes in the bone structure are occurring as the bone matures.

  2. Evaluation of shooting distance by AFM and FTIR/ATR analysis of GSR.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yongyan; Lakadwar, Jyoti; Rabalais, J Wayne

    2008-11-01

    The techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR) spectroscopy are applied to the analysis of gun-shot residue (GSR) to test their ability to determine shooting distance and discrimination of the powder manufacturers. AFM is a nondestructive technique that is capable of characterizing the shapes and size distributions of GSR particles with resolution down to less than a nanometer. This may be useful for estimation of the shooting distance. Our AFM images of GSR show that the size distribution of the particles is inversely proportional to the shooting distance. Discrimination of powder manufacturers is tested by FTIR/ATR investigation of GSR. Identifying the specific compounds in the GSR by FTIR/ATR was not possible because it is a mixture of the debris of several compounds that compose the residue. However, it is shown that the GSR from different cartridges has characteristic FTIR/ATR bands that may be useful in differentiating the powder manufacturers. It appears promising that the development of AFM and FTIR/ATR databases for various powder manufacturers may be useful in analysis and identification of GSR. PMID:18761553

  3. Simulation of CNT-AFM tip based on finite element analysis for targeted probe of the biological cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Amin Termeh; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop; Miyake, Mikio; Ikeda, Shoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potentially ideal tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to the robust mechanical properties, nano scale diameter and also their ability to be functionalized by chemical and biological components at the tip ends. This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cell's. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). This reliable integration of CNT-AFM tip process provides a new class of high performance nanoprobes for single biological cell analysis.

  4. AFM and pulsed laser ablation methods for Cultural Heritage: application to archeometric analysis of stone artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Stranges, F.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F.; Antici, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) and of the pulsed laser ablation as methods for morphological diagnostic with nanoscale precision of archeological artifacts and corrosive patina removal from stone artifacts. We test our methodology on stone artifacts extracted from the Church of Sotterra (located in Calabria, South Italy). The AFM microscopy was compared with different petrographic, chemical, optical and morphological analysis methods for identifying the textural characteristics, evaluating the state of preservation and formulating some hypotheses about the provenance and composition of the impurity patina located on the artifact surfaces. We demonstrate that with the nanometric precision obtained with AFM microscopy, it is possible to distinguish the different states of preservation, much better than using conventional petrographic methods. The surface's roughness is evaluated from very small artifact's fragments, reducing the coring at micrometric scale with a minimal damage to the artworks. After the diagnosis, we performed restoration tests using the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method and compared it with the more common micro-sandblasting under dry conditions. We find that the PLA is highly effective for the removal of the surficial patina, with a control of a few hundreds of nanometers in the cleaning of surface, without introducing chemical or morphological damages to the artifacts. Moreover, PLA can be easily implemented in underwater conditions; this has the great advantage that stone and pottery artifacts for marine archeological sites do not need to be removed from the site.

  5. Dynamic modeling and sensitivity analysis of dAFM in the transient and steady state motions.

    PubMed

    Payam, Amir Farokh

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, based on the slow time varying function theory, dynamical equations for the amplitude and phase of the dynamic atomic force microscope are derived. Then, the sensitivity of the amplitude and phase to the dissipative and conservative parts of interaction force is investigated. The most advantage of this dynamical model is the ability to simulate and analysis the dynamics behavior of amplitude and phase of the AFM tip motion not only in the steady state but also in the transient regime. Using numerical analysis the transient and steady state behavior of amplitude and phase is studied and the sensitivity of amplitude and phase to the interaction force is analyzed. PMID:27448201

  6. Automated AFM force curve analysis for determining elastic modulus of biomaterials and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yow-Ren; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Garland, Shaun P; Morgan, Joshua T; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J

    2014-09-01

    The analysis of atomic force microscopy (AFM) force data requires the selection of a contact point (CP) and is often time consuming and subjective due to influence from intermolecular forces and low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). In this report, we present an automated algorithm for the selection of CPs in AFM force data and the evaluation of elastic moduli. We propose that CP may be algorithmically easier to detect by identifying a linear elastic indentation region of data (high SNR) rather than the contact point itself (low SNR). Utilizing Hertzian mechanics, the data are fitted for the CP. We first detail the algorithm and then evaluate it on sample polymeric and biological materials. As a demonstration of automation, 64 × 64 force maps were analyzed to yield spatially varying topographical and mechanical information of cells. Finally, we compared manually selected CPs to automatically identified CPs and demonstrated that our automated approach is both accurate (< 10nm difference between manual and automatic) and precise for non-interacting polymeric materials. Our data show that the algorithm is useful for analysis of both biomaterials and biological samples. PMID:24951927

  7. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-03-23

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemicalmore » data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found inWT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  8. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-01-01

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemical data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found in WT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  9. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions. PMID:25999318

  10. AFM mapping of the elastic properties of brain tissue reveals kPa μm(-1) gradients of rigidity.

    PubMed

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Meyer, Mikaël; Gaude, Christophe; Gay, Emmanuel; Ratel, David; Nicolas, Alice

    2016-07-20

    It is now well established that the mechanical environment of the cells in tissues deeply impacts cellular fate, including life cycle, differentiation and tumor progression. Designs of biomaterials already include the control of mechanical parameters, and in general, their main focus is to control the rheological properties of the biomaterials at a macroscopic scale. However, recent studies have demonstrated that cells can stress their environment below the micron scale, and therefore could possibly respond to the rheological properties of their environment at this micron scale. In this context, probing the mechanical properties of physiological cellular environments at subcellular scales is becoming critical. To this aim, we performed in vitro indentation measurements using AFM on sliced human pituitary gland tissues. A robust methodology was implemented using elasto-adhesive models, which shows that accounting for the adhesion of the probe on the tissue is critical for the reliability of the measurement. In addition to quantifying for the first time the rigidity of normal pituitary gland tissue, with a geometric mean of 9.5 kPa, our measurements demonstrated that the mechanical properties of this tissue are far from uniform at subcellular scales. Gradients of rigidity as large as 12 kPa μm(-1) were observed. This observation suggests that physiological rigidity can be highly non-uniform at the micron-scale. PMID:27377831

  11. Comparative quantification and statistical analysis of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 by TEM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Adrian Luis Dominguez-Lopez, Ivan Lopez-Jimenez, Luis Barceinas-Sanchez, J.D. Oscar

    2014-01-15

    Quantification of nanometric precipitates in metallic alloys has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy, which is nominally a low throughput technique. This work presents a comparative study of quantification of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM quantification was compared with 2-D stereological results reported elsewhere. Also, a method was developed, using specialized software, to characterize nanometric size precipitates observed in dark-field TEM micrographs. Statistical analysis of the quantification results from both measurement techniques supports the use of AFM for precipitate characterization. Once the precipitate stoichiometry has been determined by appropriate analytical techniques like TEM, as it is the case for η′ and η in AA7075-T651, the relative ease with which specimens are prepared for AFM analysis could be advantageous in product and process development, and quality control, where a large number of samples are expected for analysis on a regular basis. - Highlights: • Nanometric MgZn{sub 2} precipitates in AA7075-T651 were characterized using AFM and TEM. • Phase-contrast AFM was used to differentiate metal matrix from MgZn{sub 2} precipitates. • TEM and AFM micrographs were analyzed using commercially available software. • AFM image analysis and TEM 2-D stereology render statistically equivalent results.

  12. Lower nanometer-scale size limit for the deformation of a metallic glass by shear transformations revealed by quantitative AFM indentation

    PubMed Central

    Bennewitz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Summary We combine non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and AFM indentation in ultra-high vacuum to quantitatively and reproducibly determine the hardness and deformation mechanisms of Pt(111) and a Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass with unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results on plastic deformation mechanisms of crystalline Pt(111) are consistent with the discrete mechanisms established for larger scales: Plasticity is mediated by dislocation gliding and no rate dependence is observed. For the metallic glass we have discovered that plastic deformation at the nanometer scale is not discrete but continuous and localized around the indenter, and does not exhibit rate dependence. This contrasts with the observation of serrated, rate-dependent flow of metallic glasses at larger scales. Our results reveal a lower size limit for metallic glasses below which shear transformation mechanisms are not activated by indentation. In the case of metallic glass, we conclude that the energy stored in the stressed volume during nanometer-scale indentation is insufficient to account for the interfacial energy of a shear band in the glassy matrix. PMID:26425424

  13. Morphological analysis of stainless steel scale like surface morphology using STM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Vignal, V.; Olive, J.M.; Desjardins, D.; Roux, J.C.; Genton, V.

    1997-12-19

    A combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) investigation of stainless steel like surface morphology formed either in electropolishing bath or in HNO{sub 3} medium is reported. A new numerical technique using the Nanoscope III software is proposed. The dimension, slope and orientation of scales can be easily determined. Moreover, grain boundaries structure and probable oxides present in the upper part of the film can be deduced.

  14. Ultrasharp high-aspect-ratio probe array for SECM and AFM Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ye; Fasching, Rainer J.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2004-07-01

    A powerful experimental tool, ultra-sharp nano-electrode array is designed, fabricated and characterized. The application on a combination of Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) and the Atomic Force Microcopy (AFM) is demonstrated. It can measure sample electrochemically initiated by SECM changes of topography while detecting topography using AFM. In order to realize this, a specialized probe system that is composed of a micro-mechanical bending structure necessary for the AFM mode and an electrochemical UME-tip required for a high performance SECM is crucial. The probe array is a row of silicon transducers embedded in silicon nitride cantilever array. The sharp high-aspect ratio (20:1) silicon tips are shaped and a thin layer of silicon nitride is deposited, which embeds the silicon tips in a silicon nitride layer so that they protrude through the nitride. Thus, the embedded silicon tips with a diameter less than 600 nm, the top radius less than 20 nm, and the aspect ratio as high as 20 can be achieved. A metal layer and an insulator layer are deposited on these tip structures to make each probe selectively conductive. Finally, cantilever structures are shaped and released by etching the silicon substrate from the backside. Electrochemical and impedance spectroscopic characterization show electrochemical functionality of the transducer system.

  15. Application of the Discrete Wavelet Transform to SEM and AFM Micrographs for Quantitative Analysis of Complex Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Workman, Michael J; Serov, Alexey; Halevi, Barr; Atanassov, Plamen; Artyushkova, Kateryna

    2015-05-01

    The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has found significant utility in process monitoring, filtering, and feature isolation of SEM, AFM, and optical images. Current use of the DWT for surface analysis assumes initial knowledge of the sizes of the features of interest in order to effectively isolate and analyze surface components. Current methods do not adequately address complex, heterogeneous surfaces in which features across multiple size ranges are of interest. Further, in situations where structure-to-property relationships are desired, the identification of features relevant for the function of the material is necessary. In this work, the DWT is examined as a tool for quantitative, length-scale specific surface metrology without prior knowledge of relevant features or length-scales. A new method is explored for determination of the best wavelet basis to minimize variation in roughness and skewness measurements with respect to change in position and orientation of surface features. It is observed that the size of the wavelet does not directly correlate with the size of features on the surface, and a method to measure the true length-scale specific roughness of the surface is presented. This method is applied to SEM and AFM images of non-precious metal catalysts, yielding new length-scale specific structure-to-property relationships for chemical speciation and fuel cell performance. The relationship between SEM and AFM length-scale specific roughness is also explored. Evidence is presented that roughness distributions of SEM images, as measured by the DWT, is representative of the true surface roughness distribution obtained from AFM. PMID:25879382

  16. XPS and AFM analysis of antifouling PEG interfaces for microfabricated silicon biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sadhana; Johnson, Robert W; Desai, Tejal A

    2004-09-15

    In the past two decades, the biological and medical fields have seen great advances in the development of biosensors capable of quantifying biomolecules. Many of these biosensors have micro- and nano-scale features, are fabricated using biochip technology, and use silicon as a base material. The creation of antifouling sensor interfaces is critical to avoid serious consequences that arise due to their contact with biological fluids. To this end, we have created thin PEG interfaces of various grafting densities on silicon using a single-step PEG-silane coupling reaction scheme. Initial PEG concentration (5-50 mM) and coupling time (0.5-24 h) were varied to attain different grafting densities, and different PEG interfaces so created were analyzed using XPS and AFM. Furthermore, all the PEG interfaces were evaluated using XPS and AFM for their antifouling abilities using fibrinogen as the model protein. Results indicated that PEG interfaces created in this investigation are appropriate for biosensors with micro- and nano-scale features, and are efficient in controlling protein fouling. PMID:15308226

  17. Protein-DNA interactions in high speed AFM: single molecule diffusion analysis of human RAD54.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Humberto; Suzuki, Yuki; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Wyman, Claire

    2011-11-01

    High-speed AFM (atomic force microscopy also called scanning force microscopy) provides nanometre spatial resolution and sub-second temporal resolution images of individual molecules. We exploit these features to study diffusion and motor activity of the RAD54 DNA repair factor. Human RAD54 functions at critical steps in recombinational-DNA repair. It is a member of the Swi2/Snf2 family of chromatin remodelers that translocate on DNA using ATP hydrolysis. A detailed single molecular description of DNA-protein interactions shows intermediate states and distribution of variable states, usually hidden by ensemble averaging. We measured the motion of individual proteins using single-particle tracking and observed that random walks were affected by imaging-buffer composition. Non-Brownian diffusion events were characterized in the presence and in the absence of nucleotide cofactors. Double-stranded DNA immobilized on the surface functioned as a trap reducing Brownian motion. Distinct short range slides and hops on DNA were visualized by high-speed AFM. These short-range interactions were usually inaccessible by other methods based on optical resolution. RAD54 monomers displayed a diffusive behavior unrelated to the motor activity. PMID:21986699

  18. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from {sup 31}P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-15

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and {sup 31}P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse {sup 31}P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}ν{sub 1} bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν{sub 1} band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. - Graphical abstract: Carbonated apatite shows an abrupt change in spectral (NMR, Raman) and morphological (AFM) properties at a composition of about one carbonate substitution per unit cell. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystallinity (XRD), particle size (AFM) of carbonated apatites and bone mineral. • Linear relationships among crystallinity, {sup 31}P NMR and Raman inverse bandwidths. • Low and high carbonated apatites use different charge-balancing ion-loss mechanism.

  19. Fabrication of an electrochemical tip-probe system embedded in SiNx cantilevers for simultaneous SECM and AFM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasching, Rainer J.; Tao, Yao; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2004-01-01

    An electrochemical transducer system embedded in silicon nitride cantilevers has been fabricated for simultaneous Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis. Sharpened high-aspect ratio silicon tips are shaped combining isotropic and anisotropic deep-reactive etch processes and form the body of the transducer. Deposition of a silicon nitride followed by a back-etch step allows embedding these silicon tips in a silicon nitride layer so that they protrude through the nitride. This way, embedded silicon tips with a diameter smaller than 600 nm, a radius smaller than 50 nm, and an aspect ratio higher than 20 can be achieved. Subsequently, a platinum layer and an insulator layer are deposited on these tip structures. Introducing a metal masking technology utilizing Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology, a precise exposure of the buried metal layer can be achieved to form ultra-micro electrodes on top of the tip. Finally, cantilever structures are shaped and released by etching the silicon substrate from the backside. Electrochemical and impedance spectroscopic characterization show electrochemical functionality of the transducer system. Due to the high aspect ratio topography of the tip structure and low spring constant of silicon nitride cantilevers, these probes are particularly suited for high resolution SECM and AFM analysis. Furthermore, this technology allows a production of both linear probe-arrays and two-dimensional probe-arrays.

  20. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  1. Biophysical analysis of bacterial and viral systems. A shock tube study of bio-aerosols and a correlated AFM/nanosims investigation of vaccinia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Sean Damien

    2013-05-01

    The work presented herein is concerned with the development of biophysical methodology designed to address pertinent questions regarding the behavior and structure of select pathogenic agents. Two distinct studies are documented: a shock tube analysis of endospore-laden bio-aerosols and a correlated AFM/NanoSIMS study of the structure of vaccinia virus.

  2. Determination of surface roughness and topography of dental resin-based nanocomposites using AFM analysis.

    PubMed

    Lainović, Tijana; Vilotić, Marko; Blažić, Larisa; Kakaš, Damir; Marković, Dubravka; Ivanišević, Aljoša

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine surface roughness and topography of polished dental resin-based nanocomposites. Four representative dental resin-based nanocomposites were tested in the study: two nanohybrids (Filtek Z550 and Tetric EvoCeram) and two nanofilled (Filtek Ultimate Body and Filtek Ultimate Translucent); and two reference materials: one microfilled (Gradia Direct) and one microhybrid (Filtek Z250). Polymerized cylindrical specimens (4 mm x 2 mm) were polished with multi-step polishing system- Super Snap. Immediately after the polishing, topography of each specimen was examined by Veeco di CP-II Atomic Force Microscope. Specimen's surface has been scanned in 6 points in contact mode with CONT20A-CP tips. 1 Hz scan rate and 256 × 256 resolution were used to obtain topography on a 90 µm × 90 µm scanning area. Measured topography data were processed by Image Processing and Data Analysis v2.1.15 software. Following parameters were compared among specimens: average roughness and maximum peak-to-valley distance. All of the tested materials had similar average surface roughness after finishing and polishing procedure. The lowest values occurred in the material Filtek Ultimate Body, and the highest in the Filtek Z550. When interpreting maximum peak-to-valley distance the larger differences in values (up to 100%) occurred in Filtek Z550, Filtek Z250 and Filtek Ultimate Body, which is a result of the deep polishing channels and tracks. Type, size, distribution of fillers and filler loading in tested materials, didn't influence average roughness values, but had an impact on maximum peak-to-valley distance values. PMID:23448609

  3. Topographic Characterization of Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H Films by AFM and Multifractal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Ghodselahi, Tayebeh; Ghaderi, Atefeh; Solaymani, Shahram; Boochani, Arash; Garczyk, Żaneta

    2015-04-30

    In the present work three-dimensional (3-D) surface topography of Cu-Ni nanoparticles in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H) with constant thickness of Cu and three thicknesses of Ni prepared by RF-Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (RF-PECVD) system were investigated. The thin films of Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H with constant thickness of Cu and three thicknesses of Ni deposited by radio frequency (RF)-sputtering and RF-PECVD systems, were characterized. To determine the mass thickness and atomic structure of the films, the Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) spectra was applied. The absorption spectra were applied to study localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks of Cu-Ni NPs (observed around 608 nm in visible spectra), which is widened and shifted to lower wavelengths as the thickness of Ni over layer increases, and their changes are also evaluated by the 3-D surface topography. These nanostructures were investigated over square areas of 1 μm × 1 μm using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifractal analysis. Topographic characterization of surface samples (in amplitude, spatial distribution, and pattern of surface characteristics) highlighted 3-D surfaces with multifractal features which can be quantitatively estimated by the multifractal measures. The 3-D surface topography Cu-Ni NPs @ a-C:H with constant thickness of Cu and three thicknesses of Ni prepared by RF-PECVD system can be characterized using the multifractal geometry in correlation with the surface statistical parameters. PMID:25839675

  4. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  5. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  6. Characterization of single α-tracks by photoresist detection and AFM analysis-focus on biomedical science and technology.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Nadia; Myhra, Sverre; Chakalova, Radka; Hill, Mark A; Thomson, James; Vallis, Katherine A

    2013-11-01

    The interactions between energetic ions and biological and/or organic target materials have recently attracted theoretical and experimental attention, due to their implications for detector and device technologies, and for therapeutic applications. Most of the attention has focused on detection of the primary ionization tracks, and their effects, while recoil target atom tracks remain largely unexplored. Detection of tracks by a negative tone photoresist (SU-8), followed by standard development, in combination with analysis by atomic force microscopy, shows that both primary and recoil tracks are revealed as conical spikes, and can be characterized at high spatial resolution. The methodology has the potential to provide detailed information about single impact events, which may lead to more effective and informative detector technologies and advanced therapeutic procedures. In comparison with current characterization methods the advantageous features include: greater spatial resolution by an order of magnitude (20 nm); detection of single primary and associated recoil tracks; increased range of fluence (to 2.5 × 10(9) cm(-2)); sensitivity to impacts at grazing angle incidence; and better definition of the lateral interaction volume in target materials. PMID:24113400

  7. AFM and XPA data on structural features and properties of films and powders based on naphthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramonova, A. G.; Nakusov, A. T.; Sozanov, V. G.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2015-06-01

    The template synthesis is used to produce powders and films based on naphthalocyanines and the corresponding metal complexes (Pc, CuPc, and NiPc). The atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray phase analysis (XPA) are employed in the study of structure and phase of fine powders and nanostructured films. The AFM data are used to determine the orientation and density of primary particles packed in the film. The XPA method is used to study the chemical composition and crystal structure of the synthesized samples. The regularities related to the structural features that affect the electrophysical properties of the films under study are revealed.

  8. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell. PMID:27562998

  9. Ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy is used to reveal the coexistence of coupled antiferromagnetic (AFM)/ferroelectric (FE) and ferromagnetic (FM) orders in multiferroic TbMnO3 films, which can guide researchers in creating new kinds of multiferroic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jingbo; Zhu, Jianxin; Trugman, Stuart A.; Taylor, Antoinette; Jia, Quanxi; Prasankumar, Rohit

    2012-07-06

    Multiferroic materials have attracted much interest in the past decade, due not only to their novel device applications, but also their manifestations of coupling and interactions between different order parameters (particularly electric polarization and magnetic order). Recently, much attention has been focused on perovskite manganites, RMnO{sub 3} (R = rare earth ions), due to the discovery of a large magnetoelectric effect in these materials. The first member of this family to be discovered was TbMnO{sub 3} (TMO), which is now well established as a typical magnetoelectric multiferroic. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies have already been done on single crystal TMO (SC-TMO). In brief, SC-TMO, with a distorted orthorhombic perovskite structure, has an antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transition at T{sub N} {approx}40 K with sinusoidally ordered Mn moments. Below T{sub FE} {approx} 28 K, ferroelectric (FE) order develops owing to the appearance of cycloidal spiral spin structure. In contrast, there are relatively few reports describing the properties of TMO thin films (typically grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) substrates). In general, thin films can enable new functionality in materials, as their physical parameters can be changed by modifying their structure via strain imposed by the substrate. Strain in particular has the potential to directly couple FE and FM orders, which is very rare. This could benefit electronic device applications by providing low power consumption, high speed operation, and greater electric/magnetic field controllability. Previous investigations of magnetic properties in TMO films revealed an unexpected ferromagnetic (FM) order, in contrast to SC-TMO. However, several important questions regarding these films are still unanswered for instance: (1) What mechanism induces FM order? (2) Can FM, sinusoidal AFM and spiral AFM (or FE) orders coexist? (3) Can FM order be coupled to FE order? To fully understand these unique materials

  10. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2013-02-05

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  11. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  12. Quantitative interactome analysis reveals a chemoresistant edgotype

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Juan D.; Schweppe, Devin K.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Zheng, Chunxiang; Taipale, Alex; Zhang, Yiyi; Takara, Kohji; Bruce, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a common mode of therapy failure for many cancers. Tumours develop resistance to chemotherapeutics through a variety of mechanisms, with proteins serving pivotal roles. Changes in protein conformations and interactions affect the cellular response to environmental conditions contributing to the development of new phenotypes. The ability to understand how protein interaction networks adapt to yield new function or alter phenotype is limited by the inability to determine structural and protein interaction changes on a proteomic scale. Here, chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry were employed to quantify changes in protein structures and interactions in multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells. Quantitative analysis of the largest crosslinking-derived, protein interaction network comprising 1,391 crosslinked peptides allows for ‘edgotype' analysis in a cell model of chemoresistance. We detect consistent changes to protein interactions and structures, including those involving cytokeratins, topoisomerase-2-alpha, and post-translationally modified histones, which correlate with a chemoresistant phenotype. PMID:26235782

  13. Quantitative interactome analysis reveals a chemoresistant edgotype.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Juan D; Schweppe, Devin K; Eng, Jimmy K; Zheng, Chunxiang; Taipale, Alex; Zhang, Yiyi; Takara, Kohji; Bruce, James E

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a common mode of therapy failure for many cancers. Tumours develop resistance to chemotherapeutics through a variety of mechanisms, with proteins serving pivotal roles. Changes in protein conformations and interactions affect the cellular response to environmental conditions contributing to the development of new phenotypes. The ability to understand how protein interaction networks adapt to yield new function or alter phenotype is limited by the inability to determine structural and protein interaction changes on a proteomic scale. Here, chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry were employed to quantify changes in protein structures and interactions in multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells. Quantitative analysis of the largest crosslinking-derived, protein interaction network comprising 1,391 crosslinked peptides allows for 'edgotype' analysis in a cell model of chemoresistance. We detect consistent changes to protein interactions and structures, including those involving cytokeratins, topoisomerase-2-alpha, and post-translationally modified histones, which correlate with a chemoresistant phenotype. PMID:26235782

  14. The effect of 5% sodium hypochlorite, 17% EDTA and triphala on two different rotary Ni-Ti instruments: An AFM and EDS analysis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Pramod Siva; Sam, Jonathan Emi; Kumar, Arvind; Kannan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To use Atomic Force Microscope and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy to evaluate the effect of 5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and triphala on ProTaper and iRaCe rotary Ni-Ti instruments. Methodology: A total of eight Ni-Ti rotary files, four files each of ProTaper - S2 (Dentsply) and iRaCe - R3 (FKG DENTAIRE) were used. Three out of four files each from ProTaper and iRaCe were immersed in 5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and Triphala separately for five minutes. The Roughness average (Ra), Root Mean Square (RMS) and Mean Height of Roughness Profile Elements (Rc) of the scanned profiles were then recorded using AFM and the elemental composition was evaluated with EDS. Data were analyzed by Student's t test, One Way ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple Range Test. Results: Topographic irregularities at the nanometric scale were observed for all files. Files immersed in EDTA and NaOCl showed highly significant surface roughness than untreated files. Conclusion: Short-term contact with 17% EDTA and 5% NaOCl can cause significant surface deterioration of ProTaper and iRaCe rotary NiTi files. AFM proves to be a suitable method for evaluating the instrument surface. PMID:25298649

  15. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  16. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  17. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study

  18. AFM analysis of the multiple types of molecular interactions involved in rituximab lymphoma therapy on patient tumor cells and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2014-08-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody drug approved for the treatment of patients with lymphomas. Rituximab's main killing mechanism is antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). During ADCC, rituximab's fragment antigen binding (Fab) region binds to the CD20 antigen on the tumor cell and its fragment crystallizable (Fc) region binds to the Fc receptor (FcR) on the natural killer (NK) cells. In this study, two types of molecular interactions (CD20-rituximab, FcR-rituximab) involved in ADCC were measured simultaneously on cells prepared from biopsy specimens of lymphoma patients by utilizing atomic force microscopy (AFM) with functionalized tips carrying rituximab. NK cells were detected by specific NKp46 fluorescent labeling and tumor cells were detected by specific ROR1 fluorescent labeling. Based on the fluorescence recognition, the binding affinity and distribution of FcRs on NK cells, and CD20 on tumor cells, were quantitatively measured and mapped. The binding affinity and distribution of FcRs (on NK cells) and CD20 (on tumor cells) were associated with rituximab clinical efficacy. The experimental results provide a new approach to simultaneously quantify the multiple types of molecular interactions involved in rituximab ADCC mechanism on patient biopsy cells, which is of potential clinical significance to predict rituximab efficacy for personalized medicine. PMID:25117605

  19. Effect of tip mass on frequency response and sensitivity of AFM cantilever in liquid.

    PubMed

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    The effect of tip mass on the frequency response and sensitivity of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever in the liquid environment is investigated. For this purpose, using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and considering tip mass and hydrodynamic functions in a liquid environment, an expression for the resonance frequencies of AFM cantilever in liquid is derived. Then, based on this expression, the effect of the surface contact stiffness on the flexural mode of a rectangular AFM cantilever in fluid is investigated and compared with the case where the AFM cantilever operates in the air. The results show that in contrast with an air environment, the tip mass has no significant impact on the resonance frequency and sensitivity of the AFM cantilever in the liquid. Hence, analysis of AFM behaviour in liquid environment by neglecting the tip mass is logical. PMID:25562584

  20. Single ricin detection by AFM chemomechanical mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research reports a method of detecting ricin molecules immobilized on chemically modified gold (Au;111) surface by chemomechanically mapping the molecular interactions with a chemically modified Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tip. AFM images resolved the different fold-up conformations of single...

  1. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

    2008-06-10

    Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

  2. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  3. High speed AFM studies of 193 nm immersion photoresists during TMAH development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngunjiri, Johnpeter; Meyers, Greg; Cameron, Jim; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Jeon, Hyun; Lee, Dave; Choi, Kwang Mo; Kim, Jung Woo; Im, Kwang-Hwyi; Lim, Hae-Jin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report on our studies of the dynamic process of resist development in real time. Using High Speed - Atomic Force Microscopy (HS-AFM) in dilute developer solution, changes in morphology and nanomechanical properties of patterned resist were monitored. The Bruker Dimension FastScan AFMTM was applied to analyze 193 nm acrylic-based immersion resists in developer. HS-AFM operated in Peak Force mapping mode allowed for concurrent measurements of image topography resist stiffness, adhesion to AFM probe and deformation during development. In our studies we focused on HS-AFM topography data as it readily revealed detailed information about initial resist morphology, followed by a resist swelling process and eventual dissolution of the exposed resist areas. HS-AFM showed potential for tracking and understanding development of patterned resist films and can be useful in evaluating the dissolution properties of different resist designs.

  4. AFM PeakForce QNM mode: Evidencing nanometre-scale mechanical properties of chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Smolyakov, G; Pruvost, S; Cardoso, L; Alonso, B; Belamie, E; Duchet-Rumeau, J

    2016-10-20

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (QNM) AFM mode was used to explore the mechanical properties of textured chitin-silica hybrid films at the nanoscale. The influence of the force applied by the tip on the sample surface was studied for standard homogeneous samples, for chitin nanorods and for chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites. Thick films of superimposed chitin nanorods showed a monotonous increase of DMT modulus (based on the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model) owing to an increase in modulus at the interface between nanorods due to geometrical constraints of the AFM acquisition. A similar variation of DMT modulus was obtained for chitin-silica hybrid thick films related to mechanical strengthening induced by the presence of silica. This work revealed the role of the organic-inorganic interface, at the nanoscale, in the mechanical behaviour of textured materials using PeakForce QNM mode, with optimized analysis conditions. PMID:27474579

  5. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  6. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-01

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions. PMID:27403761

  7. Microhardness, chemical etching, SEM, AFM and SHG studies of novel nonlinear optical crystal -L-threonine formate

    SciTech Connect

    Hanumantha Rao, Redrothu; Kalainathan, S.

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microhardness studies of novel LTF crystal reported first time in the literature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface studies are done by AFM, chemical etching and SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer From SHG studies, it is known that LTF is potential NLO crystal. -- Abstract: The crystal L-threonine formate, an organic NLO crystal was synthesized from aqueous solution by slow evaporation technique. The grown crystal surface has been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), chemical etching and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM analysis reveals pyramidal shaped minute crystallites on the growth surface. The etching study indicates the occurrence of etch pit patterns like striations and step like pattern. The mechanical properties of LTF crystals were evaluated by mechanical testing which reveals certain mechanical characteristics like elastic stiffness constant (C{sub 11}) and young's modulus (E). The Vickers and Knoop microhardness studies have been carried out on LTF crystals over a range of 10-50 g. Hardness anisotropy has been observed in accordance with the orientation of the crystal. AFM image shows major hillock on growth surface. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency has been tested by the Kurtz powder technique using Nd:YAG laser and found to be about 1.21 times in comparison with standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals.

  8. AFM study of polymer lubricants on hard disk surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, G. W.; Troemel, M.; Li, S. F. Y.

    Thin liquid films of PFPE (perfluoropolyether) lubricants dip-coated on hard disk surfaces were imaged with non-contact mode AFM. Demnum lubricants with phosphazene additives exhibited strong interactions with a silicon tip due to the formation of liquid bridges between the lubricants and the tip, as indicated by a remarkable hysteresis loop between approach and retraction curves in force vs. distance measurements. Features resulting from capillary forces due to tip tapping to the lubricants were revealed, which demonstrated that the capillary forces could be used to lock the non-contacting tip at a certain separation from the substrate surface to obtain AFM images. Force vs. distance curves for Fomblin Z-dol lubricants showed negligible hysteresis effects and features corresponding to lateral distortion of the tip by the lubricants only were observed. In both cases, only when the tip was positioned far above the surfaces could the natural distributions of the lubricants be imaged.

  9. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  10. Determination of the aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) from milk by direct analysis in real time - mass spectrometry (DART-MS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certain fungi that grow on crops can produce aflatoxins, which are highly carcinogenic. One of these, aflatoxin B1 can be metabolized by mammals to aflatoxin M1, a form that retains potent carcinogenicity and which can be excreted into milk. Direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization coupled to ...

  11. Bacteria attachment to surfaces--AFM force spectroscopy and physicochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2011-12-01

    Understanding bacterial adhesion to surfaces requires knowledge of the forces that govern bacterial-surface interactions. Biofilm formation on stainless steel 316 (SS316) by three bacterial species was investigated by examining surface force interaction between the cells and metal surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Bacterial-metal adhesion force was quantified at different surface delay time from 0 to 60s using AFM tip coated with three different bacterial species: Gram-negative Massilia timonae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The results revealed that bacterial adhesion forces on SS316 surface by Gram-negative bacteria is higher (8.53±1.40 nN and 7.88±0.94 nN) when compared to Gram-positive bacteria (1.44±0.21 nN). Physicochemical analysis on bacterial surface properties also revealed that M. timonae and P. aeruginosa showed higher hydrophobicity and surface charges than B. subtilis along with the capability of producing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The higher hydrophobicity, surface charges, and greater propensity to form EPS by M. timonae and P. aeruginosa led to high adhesive force on the metal surface. PMID:21889162

  12. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  13. Mathematical Analysis of Biomolecular Network Reveals Connections Between Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2012-02-01

    Connections between cancer and metabolic diseases may consist in the complex network of interactions among a common set of biomolecules. By applying singularity and bifurcation analysis, the phenotypes constrained by the AKT signaling pathway are identified and mapped onto the parameter space, which include cancer and certain metabolic diseases. By considering physiologic properties (sensitivity, robustness and adaptivity) the AKT pathway must possess in order to efficiently sense growth factors and nutrients, the region of normal responses is located. The analysis illuminates the parameter space and reveals system-level mechanisms in regulating biological functions (cell growth, survival, proliferation and metabolism) and how their deregulation may lead to the development of diseases. The analytical expressions summarize the synergistic interactions among many molecules, which provides valuable insights into therapeutic interventions.

  14. Geometric morphometric analysis reveals sexual dimorphism in the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Cavaignac, Etienne; Savall, Frederic; Faruch, Marie; Reina, Nicolas; Chiron, Philippe; Telmon, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    An individual's sex can be determined by the shape of their distal femur. The goal of this study was to show that differences in distal femur shape related to sexual dimorphism could be identified, visualized, and quantified using 3D geometric morphometric analysis. Geometric morphometric analysis was carried out on CT scans of the distal femur of 256 subjects living in the south of France. Ten landmarks were defined on 3D reconstructions of the distal femur. Both traditional metric and geometric morphometric analyses were carried out on these bone reconstructions; these analyses identified trends in bone shape in sex-based subgroups. Sex-related differences in shape were statistically significant. The subject's sex was correctly assigned in 77.3% of cases using geometric morphometric analysis. This study has shown that geometric morphometric analysis of the distal femur is feasible and has revealed sexual dimorphism differences in this bone segment. This reliable, accurate method could be used for virtual autopsy and be used to perform diachronic and interethnic comparisons. Moreover, this study provides updated morphometric data for a modern population in the south of France. PMID:26743712

  15. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  16. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  17. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  18. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  19. Interactome Analysis Reveals Ezrin Can Adopt Multiple Conformational States*

    PubMed Central

    Viswanatha, Raghuvir; Wayt, Jessica; Ohouo, Patrice Y.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Bretscher, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin, a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM), is an essential regulator of the structure of microvilli on the apical aspect of epithelial cells. Ezrin provides a linkage between membrane-associated proteins and F-actin, oscillating between active/open and inactive/closed states, and is regulated in part by phosphorylation of a C-terminal threonine. In the open state, ezrin can bind a number of ligands, but in the closed state the ligand-binding sites are inaccessible. In vitro analysis has proposed that there may be a third hyperactivated form of ezrin. To gain a better understanding of ezrin, we conducted an unbiased proteomic analysis of ezrin-binding proteins in an epithelial cell line, Jeg-3. We refined our list of interactors by comparing the interactomes using quantitative mass spectrometry between wild-type ezrin, closed ezrin, open ezrin, and hyperactivated ezrin. The analysis reveals several novel interactors confirmed by their localization to microvilli, as well as a significant class of proteins that bind closed ezrin. Taken together, the data indicate that ezrin can exist in three different conformational states, and different ligands “perceive” ezrin conformational states differently. PMID:24151071

  20. Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-02-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis. PMID:24389050

  1. Wedged AFM-cantilevers for parallel plate cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Martin P; Hodel, Adrian W; Spielhofer, Andreas; Cattin, Cedric J; Müller, Daniel J; Helenius, Jonne

    2013-04-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy has gained popularity for mechanical analysis of living cells. In particular, recent AFM-based assays featuring tipless cantilevers and whole-cell deformation have yielded insights into cellular function, structure, and dynamics. However, in these assays the standard ≈10° tilt of the cantilever prevents uniaxial loading, which complicates assessment of cellular geometry and can cause cell sliding or loss of loosely adherent cells. Here, we describe an approach to modify tipless cantilevers with wedges and, thereby, achieve proper parallel plate mechanics. We provide guidance on material selection, the wedge production process, property and geometry assessment, and the calibration of wedged cantilevers. Furthermore, we demonstrate their ability to simplify the assessment of cell shape, prevent lateral displacement of round cells during compression, and improve the assessment of cell mechanical properties. PMID:23473778

  2. Graph analysis of cortical networks reveals complex anatomical communication substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora-López, Gorka; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Sensory information entering the nervous system follows independent paths of processing such that specific features are individually detected. However, sensory perception, awareness, and cognition emerge from the combination of information. Here we have analyzed the corticocortical network of the cat, looking for the anatomical substrate which permits the simultaneous segregation and integration of information in the brain. We find that cortical communications are mainly governed by three topological factors of the underlying network: (i) a large density of connections, (ii) segregation of cortical areas into clusters, and (iii) the presence of highly connected hubs aiding the multisensory processing and integration. Statistical analysis of the shortest paths reveals that, while information is highly accessible to all cortical areas, the complexity of cortical information processing may arise from the rich and intricate alternative paths in which areas can influence each other.

  3. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  4. AFM indentation study of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.S.; Lee, G.Y.H.; Ong, C.N.; Lim, C.T.

    2008-10-03

    Mechanical properties of individual living cells are known to be closely related to the health and function of the human body. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation using a micro-sized spherical probe was carried out to characterize the elasticity of benign (MCF-10A) and cancerous (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells. AFM imaging and confocal fluorescence imaging were also used to investigate their corresponding sub-membrane cytoskeletal structures. Malignant (MCF-7) breast cells were found to have an apparent Young's modulus significantly lower (1.4-1.8 times) than that of their non-malignant (MCF-10A) counterparts at physiological temperature (37 deg. C), and their apparent Young's modulus increase with loading rate. Both confocal and AFM images showed a significant difference in the organization of their sub-membrane actin structures which directly contribute to their difference in cell elasticity. This change may have facilitated easy migration and invasion of malignant cells during metastasis.

  5. Single cell transcriptional analysis reveals novel innate immune cell types.

    PubMed

    Kippner, Linda E; Kim, Jinhee; Gibson, Greg; Kemp, Melissa L

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis has the potential to provide us with a host of new knowledge about biological systems, but it comes with the challenge of correctly interpreting the biological information. While emerging techniques have made it possible to measure inter-cellular variability at the transcriptome level, no consensus yet exists on the most appropriate method of data analysis of such single cell data. Methods for analysis of transcriptional data at the population level are well established but are not well suited to single cell analysis due to their dependence on population averages. In order to address this question, we have systematically tested combinations of methods for primary data analysis on single cell transcription data generated from two types of primary immune cells, neutrophils and T lymphocytes. Cells were obtained from healthy individuals, and single cell transcript expression data was obtained by a combination of single cell sorting and nanoscale quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) for markers of cell type, intracellular signaling, and immune functionality. Gene expression analysis was focused on hierarchical clustering to determine the existence of cellular subgroups within the populations. Nine combinations of criteria for data exclusion and normalization were tested and evaluated. Bimodality in gene expression indicated the presence of cellular subgroups which were also revealed by data clustering. We observed evidence for two clearly defined cellular subtypes in the neutrophil populations and at least two in the T lymphocyte populations. When normalizing the data by different methods, we observed varying outcomes with corresponding interpretations of the biological characteristics of the cell populations. Normalization of the data by linear standardization taking into account technical effects such as plate effects, resulted in interpretations that most closely matched biological expectations. Single cell transcription profiling provides

  6. Transcriptome meta-analysis reveals dysregulated pathways in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tulalamba, Warut; Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Sirachainan, Ekaphop; Tantiwetrueangdet, Aunchalee; Janvilisri, Tavan

    2015-08-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant cancer arising from the epithelial surface of the nasopharynx that mostly appears in advanced stages of the disease, leading to a poor prognosis. To date, a number of mRNA profiling investigations on NPC have been reported in order to identify suitable biomarkers for early detection. However, the results may be specific to each study with distinct sample types. In this study, an integrative meta-analysis of NPC transcriptome data was performed to determine dysregulated pathways, potentially leading to identification of molecular markers. Ten independent NPC gene expression profiling microarray datasets, including 135 samples from NPC cell lines, primary cell lines, and tissues were assimilated into a meta-analysis and cross-validation to identify a cohort of genes that were significantly dysregulated in NPC. Bioinformatics analyses of these genes revealed the significant pathways and individual players involving in cellular metabolism, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair, as well as ErbB pathway. Altogether, we propose that dysregulation of these molecular pathways in NPC might play a role in the NPC pathogenesis, providing clues, which could eventually translate into diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25724187

  7. In Situ AFM Imaging of Solid Electrolyte Interfaces on HOPG with Ethylene Carbonate and Fluoroethylene Carbonate-Based Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cai; Wang, Shuwei; Jin, Yan; Han, Wei-Qiang

    2015-11-18

    Chemical and morphological structure of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) plays a vital role in lithium-ion battery (LIB), especially for its cyclability and safety. To date, research on SEI is quite limited because of the complexity of SEI and lack of effective in situ characterization techniques. Here, we present real-time views of SEI morphological evolution using electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM). Complemented by an ex situ XPS analysis, fundamental differences of SEI formation from ethylene carbonate (EC) and fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-based electrolytes during first lithiation/delithiation cycle on HOPG electrode surface were revealed. PMID:26502161

  8. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Overlapping Functions of Clustered Protocadherins*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Meng-Hsuan; Lin, Chengyi; Meng, Shuxia; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2010-01-01

    The three tandem-arrayed protocadherin (Pcdh) gene clusters, namely Pcdh-α, Pcdh-β, and Pcdh-γ, play important roles in the development of the vertebrate central nervous system. To gain insight into the molecular action of PCDHs, we performed a systematic proteomics analysis of PCDH-γ-associated protein complexes. We identified a list of 154 non-redundant proteins in the PCDH-γ complexes. This list includes nearly 30 members of clustered Pcdh-α, -β, and -γ families as core components of the complexes and additionally over 120 putative PCDH-associated proteins. We validated a selected subset of PCDH-γ-associated proteins using specific antibodies. Analysis of the identities of PCDH-associated proteins showed that the majority of them overlap with the proteomic profile of postsynaptic density preparations. Further analysis of membrane protein complexes revealed that several validated PCDH-γ-associated proteins exhibit reduced levels in Pcdh-γ-deficient brain tissues. Therefore, PCDH-γs are required for the integrity of the complexes. However, the size of the overall complexes and the abundance of many other proteins remained unchanged, raising a possibility that PCDH-αs and PCDH-βs might compensate for PCDH-γ function in complex formation. As a test of this idea, RNA interference knockdown of both PCDH-αs and PCDH-γs showed that PCDHs have redundant functions in regulating neuronal survival in the chicken spinal cord. Taken together, our data provide evidence that clustered PCDHs coexist in large protein complexes and have overlapping functions during vertebrate neural development. PMID:19843561

  9. Microsporidian genome analysis reveals evolutionary strategies for obligate intracellular growth

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Christina A.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Bakowski, Malina A.; Goldberg, Jonathan; Ma, Amy T.; Becnel, James J.; Didier, Elizabeth S.; Fan, Lin; Heiman, David I.; Levin, Joshua Z.; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Troemel, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    Microsporidia comprise a large phylum of obligate intracellular eukaryotes that are fungal-related parasites responsible for widespread disease, and here we address questions about microsporidia biology and evolution. We sequenced three microsporidian genomes from two species, Nematocida parisii and Nematocida sp1, which are natural pathogens of Caenorhabditis nematodes and provide model systems for studying microsporidian pathogenesis. We performed deep sequencing of transcripts from a time course of N. parisii infection. Examination of pathogen gene expression revealed compact transcripts and a dramatic takeover of host cells by Nematocida. We also performed phylogenomic analyses of Nematocida and other microsporidian genomes to refine microsporidian phylogeny and identify evolutionary events of gene loss, acquisition, and modification. In particular, we found that all microsporidia lost the tumor-suppressor gene retinoblastoma, which we speculate could accelerate the parasite cell cycle and increase the mutation rate. We also found that microsporidia acquired transporters that could import nucleosides to fuel rapid growth. In addition, microsporidian hexokinases gained secretion signal sequences, and in a functional assay these were sufficient to export proteins out of the cell; thus hexokinase may be targeted into the host cell to reprogram it toward biosynthesis. Similar molecular changes appear during formation of cancer cells and may be evolutionary strategies adopted independently by microsporidia to proliferate rapidly within host cells. Finally, analysis of genome polymorphisms revealed evidence for a sexual cycle that may provide genetic diversity to alleviate problems caused by clonal growth. Together these events may explain the emergence and success of these diverse intracellular parasites. PMID:22813931

  10. Microsporidian genome analysis reveals evolutionary strategies for obligate intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Christina A; Desjardins, Christopher A; Bakowski, Malina A; Goldberg, Jonathan; Ma, Amy T; Becnel, James J; Didier, Elizabeth S; Fan, Lin; Heiman, David I; Levin, Joshua Z; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Troemel, Emily R

    2012-12-01

    Microsporidia comprise a large phylum of obligate intracellular eukaryotes that are fungal-related parasites responsible for widespread disease, and here we address questions about microsporidia biology and evolution. We sequenced three microsporidian genomes from two species, Nematocida parisii and Nematocida sp1, which are natural pathogens of Caenorhabditis nematodes and provide model systems for studying microsporidian pathogenesis. We performed deep sequencing of transcripts from a time course of N. parisii infection. Examination of pathogen gene expression revealed compact transcripts and a dramatic takeover of host cells by Nematocida. We also performed phylogenomic analyses of Nematocida and other microsporidian genomes to refine microsporidian phylogeny and identify evolutionary events of gene loss, acquisition, and modification. In particular, we found that all microsporidia lost the tumor-suppressor gene retinoblastoma, which we speculate could accelerate the parasite cell cycle and increase the mutation rate. We also found that microsporidia acquired transporters that could import nucleosides to fuel rapid growth. In addition, microsporidian hexokinases gained secretion signal sequences, and in a functional assay these were sufficient to export proteins out of the cell; thus hexokinase may be targeted into the host cell to reprogram it toward biosynthesis. Similar molecular changes appear during formation of cancer cells and may be evolutionary strategies adopted independently by microsporidia to proliferate rapidly within host cells. Finally, analysis of genome polymorphisms revealed evidence for a sexual cycle that may provide genetic diversity to alleviate problems caused by clonal growth. Together these events may explain the emergence and success of these diverse intracellular parasites. PMID:22813931

  11. Nanomechanics of new materials — AFM and computer modelling studies of trichoptera silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelecki, Janusz; Strzelecka, Joanna; Mikulska, Karolina; Tszydel, Mariusz; Balter, Aleksander; Nowak, Wiesław

    2011-04-01

    Caddisfly (Trichopera) can glue diverse material underwater with a silk fiber. This makes it a particularly interesting subject for biomimetcs. Better understanding of silk composition and structure could lead to an adhesive capable to close bleeding wounds or to new biomaterials. However, while spiderweb or silkworm secretion is well researched, caddisfly silk is still poorly understood. Here we report a first nanomechanical analysis of H. Angustipennis caddisfly silk fiber. An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) imaging shows dense 150 nm bumps on silk surface, which can be identified as one of features responsible for its outstanding adhesive properties. AFM force spectroscopy at the fiber surface showed, among others, characteristic saw like pattern. This pattern is attributed to sacrificial bond stretching and enhances energy dissipation in mechanical deformation. Similarities of some force curves observed on Tegenaria domestica spiderweb and caddisfly silk are also discussed. Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations revealed that the strength of short components of Fib-H HA species molecules, abundant in Trichoptera silk is critically dependent on calcium presence.

  12. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  13. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  14. A Batch Fabricated SECM-AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, P. S.; Macpherson, J. V.; Holder, M.; Weaver, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A scheme for the fabrication of combined Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy — Atomic Force Microscopy (SECM-AFM) probes is presented for both silicon nitride and silicon cantilevers. The advantages over exsisting methods used for their production is explained. The process flow is described and initial results from electrodeposition of silver are presented.

  15. Lipidome analysis reveals antifungal polyphenol curcumin affects membrane lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Singh, Ashutosh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2012-01-01

    This study shows that antifungal curcumin (CUR), significantly depletes ergosterol levels in Candida albicans. CUR while displaying synergy with fluconazole (FLC) lowers ergosterol. However, CUR alone at its synergistic concentration (lower than MIC50), could not affect ergosterol contents. For deeper insight of CUR effects on lipids, we performed high throughput mass spectroscopy (MS) based lipid profiling of C. albicans cells. The lipidome analysis revealed that there were no major changes in phosphoglycerides (PGLs) composition following CUR treatment of Candida, however, significant differences in molecular species of PGLs were detected. Among major SPLs, CUR treatment resulted in the reduction of ceramide and accumulation of IPCs levels. The lipidome of CUR treated cells confirmed a dramatic drop in the ergosterol levels with a simultaneous accumulation of its biosynthetic precursors. This was further supported by the fact that the mutants defective in ergosterol biosynthesis (ERG2 and ERG11) and those lacking the transcription factor regulating ergosterol biosynthesis, UPC2, were highly susceptible to CUR. Our study first time shows that CUR, for its antifungal activity, targets and down regulates delta 5, 6 desaturase (ERG3) resulting in depletion of ergosterol. This results in parallel accumulation of ergosterol biosynthetic precursors, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death. PMID:22201946

  16. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals regulatory mechanisms at the kidney filtration barrier.

    PubMed

    Rinschen, Markus M; Wu, Xiongwu; König, Tim; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hagmann, Henning; Pahmeyer, Caroline; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Kohli, Priyanka; Schnell, Nicole; Schermer, Bernhard; Dryer, Stuart; Brooks, Bernard R; Beltrao, Pedro; Krueger, Marcus; Brinkkoetter, Paul T; Benzing, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Diseases of the kidney filtration barrier are a leading cause of ESRD. Most disorders affect the podocytes, polarized cells with a limited capacity for self-renewal that require tightly controlled signaling to maintain their integrity, viability, and function. Here, we provide an atlas of in vivo phosphorylated, glomerulus-expressed proteins, including podocyte-specific gene products, identified in an unbiased tandem mass spectrometry-based approach. We discovered 2449 phosphorylated proteins corresponding to 4079 identified high-confidence phosphorylated residues and performed a systematic bioinformatics analysis of this dataset. We discovered 146 phosphorylation sites on proteins abundantly expressed in podocytes. The prohibitin homology domain of the slit diaphragm protein podocin contained one such site, threonine 234 (T234), located within a phosphorylation motif that is mutated in human genetic forms of proteinuria. The T234 site resides at the interface of podocin dimers. Free energy calculation through molecular dynamic simulations revealed a role for T234 in regulating podocin dimerization. We show that phosphorylation critically regulates formation of high molecular weight complexes and that this may represent a general principle for the assembly of proteins containing prohibitin homology domains. PMID:24511133

  17. Sequential analysis of the numerical Stroop effect reveals response suppression.

    PubMed

    Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Gevers, Wim; Notebaert, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Automatic processing of irrelevant stimulus dimensions has been demonstrated in a variety of tasks. Previous studies have shown that conflict between relevant and irrelevant dimensions can be reduced when a feature of the irrelevant dimension is repeated. The specific level at which the automatic process is suppressed (e.g., perceptual repetition, response repetition), however, is less understood. In the current experiment we used the numerical Stroop paradigm, in which the processing of irrelevant numerical values of 2 digits interferes with the processing of their physical size, to pinpoint the precise level of the suppression. Using a sequential analysis, we dissociated perceptual repetition from response repetition of the relevant and irrelevant dimension. Our analyses of reaction times, error rates, and diffusion modeling revealed that the congruity effect is significantly reduced or even absent when the response sequence of the irrelevant dimension, rather than the numerical value or the physical size, is repeated. These results suggest that automatic activation of the irrelevant dimension is suppressed at the response level. The current results shed light on the level of interaction between numerical magnitude and physical size as well as the effect of variability of responses and stimuli on automatic processing. PMID:21500951

  18. Point-of-gaze analysis reveals visual search strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekar, Umesh; Cormack, Lawrence K.; Bovik, Alan C.

    2004-06-01

    Seemingly complex tasks like visual search can be analyzed using a cognition-free, bottom-up framework. We sought to reveal strategies used by observers in visual search tasks using accurate eye tracking and image analysis at point of gaze. Observers were instructed to search for simple geometric targets embedded in 1/f noise. By analyzing the stimulus at the point of gaze using the classification image (CI) paradigm, we discovered CI templates that indeed resembled the target. No such structure emerged for a random-searcher. We demonstrate, qualitatively and quantitatively, that these CI templates are useful in predicting stimulus regions that draw human fixations in search tasks. Filtering a 1/f noise stimulus with a CI results in a 'fixation prediction map'. A qualitative evaluation of the prediction was obtained by overlaying k-means clusters of observers' fixations on the prediction map. The fixations clustered around the local maxima in the prediction map. To obtain a quantitative comparison, we computed the Kullback-Leibler distance between the recorded fixations and the prediction. Using random-searcher CIs in Monte Carlo simulations, a distribution of this distance was obtained. The z-scores for the human CIs and the original target were -9.70 and -9.37 respectively indicating that even in noisy stimuli, observers deploy their fixations efficiently to likely targets rather than casting them randomly hoping to fortuitously find the target.

  19. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  20. Genetic heterogeneity in rhabdomyosarcoma revealed by SNP array analysis.

    PubMed

    Walther, Charles; Mayrhofer, Markus; Nilsson, Jenny; Hofvander, Jakob; Jonson, Tord; Mandahl, Nils; Øra, Ingrid; Gisselsson, David; Mertens, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children and adolescents. Alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS) histologies predominate, but rare cases are classified as spindle cell/sclerosing (SRMS). For treatment stratification, RMS is further subclassified as fusion-positive (FP-RMS) or fusion-negative (FN-RMS), depending on whether a gene fusion involving PAX3 or PAX7 is present or not. We investigated 19 cases of pediatric RMS using high resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. FP-ARMS displayed, on average, more structural rearrangements than ERMS; the single FN-ARMS had a genomic profile similar to ERMS. Apart from previously known amplification (e.g., MYCN, CDK4, and MIR17HG) and deletion (e.g., NF1, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B) targets, amplification of ERBB2 and homozygous loss of ASCC3 or ODZ3 were seen. Combining SNP array with cytogenetic data revealed that most cases were polyploid, with at least one case having started as a near-haploid tumor. Further bioinformatic analysis of the SNP array data disclosed genetic heterogeneity, in the form of subclonal chromosomal imbalances, in five tumors. The outcome was worse for patients with FP-ARMS than ERMS or FN-ARMS (6/8 vs. 1/9 dead of disease), and the only children with ERMS showing intratumor diversity or with MYOD1 mutation-positive SRMS also died of disease. High resolution SNP array can be useful in evaluating genomic imbalances in pediatric RMS. PMID:26482321

  1. Quantitative flux analysis reveals folate-dependent NADPH production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; Ye, Jiangbin; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Shlomi, Tomer; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-06-01

    ATP is the dominant energy source in animals for mechanical and electrical work (for example, muscle contraction or neuronal firing). For chemical work, there is an equally important role for NADPH, which powers redox defence and reductive biosynthesis. The most direct route to produce NADPH from glucose is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, with malic enzyme sometimes also important. Although the relative contribution of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to ATP production has been extensively analysed, similar analysis of NADPH metabolism has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the ability to directly track, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the passage of deuterium from labelled substrates into NADPH, and combine this approach with carbon labelling and mathematical modelling to measure NADPH fluxes. In proliferating cells, the largest contributor to cytosolic NADPH is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Surprisingly, a nearly comparable contribution comes from serine-driven one-carbon metabolism, in which oxidation of methylene tetrahydrofolate to 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate is coupled to reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. Moreover, tracing of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism revealed complete oxidation of 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate to make NADPH. As folate metabolism has not previously been considered an NADPH producer, confirmation of its functional significance was undertaken through knockdown of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) genes. Depletion of either the cytosolic or mitochondrial MTHFD isozyme resulted in decreased cellular NADPH/NADP+ and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH/GSSG) and increased cell sensitivity to oxidative stress. Thus, although the importance of folate metabolism for proliferating cells has been long recognized and attributed to its function of producing one-carbon units for nucleic acid synthesis, another crucial function of this pathway is generating reducing power.

  2. Isotope Analysis Reveals Foraging Area Dichotomy for Atlantic Leatherback Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Elena; Das, Krishna; Girondot, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background The leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) has undergone a dramatic decline over the last 25 years, and this is believed to be primarily the result of mortality associated with fisheries bycatch followed by egg and nesting female harvest. Atlantic leatherback turtles undertake long migrations across ocean basins from subtropical and tropical nesting beaches to productive frontal areas. Migration between two nesting seasons can last 2 or 3 years, a time period termed the remigration interval (RI). Recent satellite transmitter data revealed that Atlantic leatherbacks follow two major dispersion patterns after nesting season, through the North Gulf Stream area or more eastward across the North Equatorial Current. However, information on the whole RI is lacking, precluding the accurate identification of feeding areas where conservation measures may need to be applied. Methodology/Principal Findings Using stable isotopes as dietary tracers we determined the characteristics of feeding grounds of leatherback females nesting in French Guiana. During migration, 3-year RI females differed from 2-year RI females in their isotope values, implying differences in their choice of feeding habitats (offshore vs. more coastal) and foraging latitude (North Atlantic vs. West African coasts, respectively). Egg-yolk and blood isotope values are correlated in nesting females, indicating that egg analysis is a useful tool for assessing isotope values in these turtles, including adults when not available. Conclusions/Significance Our results complement previous data on turtle movements during the first year following the nesting season, integrating the diet consumed during the year before nesting. We suggest that the French Guiana leatherback population segregates into two distinct isotopic groupings, and highlight the urgent need to determine the feeding habitats of the turtle in the Atlantic in order to protect this species from incidental take by commercial fisheries. Our

  3. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, R S J; Brousseau, E B; Geng, Y; Borodich, F M

    2016-09-23

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves. PMID:27532247

  4. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV), revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution. PMID:21711703

  5. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  6. Characterizing Cell Mechanics with AFM and Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, N.; Micoulet, A.; Suresh, S.; Spatz, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Cell mechanical properties and functionality are mainly determined by the cytoskeleton, besides the cell membrane, the nucleus and the cytosol, and depend on various parameters e.g. surface chemistry and rigidity, surface area and time available for cell spreading, nutrients and drugs provided in the culture medium. Human epithelial pancreatic and mammary cancer cells and their keratin intermediate filaments are the main focus of our work. We use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study cells adhering to substrates and Microfluidic Channels to probe cells in suspension, respectively. Local and global properties are extracted by varying AFM probe tip size and the available adhesion area for cells. Depth-sensing, instrumented indentation tests with AFM show a clear difference in contact stiffness for cells that are spread of controlled substrates and those that are loosely attached. Microfluidic Channels are utilized in parallel to evaluate cell deformation and ``flow resistance'', which are dependent on channel cross section, flow rate, cell nucleus size and the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton and membrane. The results from the study are used to provide some broad and quantitative assessments of the connections between cellular/subcellular mechanics and biochemical origins of disease states.

  7. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  8. Elastic modulus, oxidation depth and adhesion force of surface modified polystyrene studied by AFM and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarsky, G. V.; Davidson, M. R.; Bradley, R. H.

    2004-06-01

    AFM and XPS have been used to investigate the surface and near-surface properties of polystyrene (PS) substrates which have been subjected to one of three controlled surface modification processes performed in situ in a specially constructed cell. The cell was fitted to a Digital Instruments Nanoscope III AFM measuring head and allowed close control of the gaseous environment and made it possible to UV irradiate the sample during AFM measurements. Treatments were carried out using UV at 184.9 and 253.7 nm wavelengths, in oxygen (UV-ozone), and in nitrogen (UV-only). Polystyrene surfaces were also modified by an exposure to an atmosphere of ozone in the absence of UV (ozone-only). Data show that adhesion force is highest between tip and sample for the UV-ozone exposed surfaces and that the adhesion force increases with sample exposure time. Exposure to UV-only or ozone alone results in lower ultimate adhesion levels with a slower rate of increase with exposure time. Evaluation of Young's modulus for unmodified PS gave a value of 3.37 (±0.52) GPa which agrees well with the textbook value which ranges from 2 to 4 GPa depending on the measurement technique. A 60 s exposure to combined UV-ozone resulted in the formation of a surface layer with a modulus at the surface of 1.25 (±0.19) GPa which increased to 2.5 (±0.37) GPa at a depth of 3.5 nm. The sample exposed for 60 s to UV-only had a Young's modulus of 2.6 (±0.39) GPa but showed no reduced modulus layer at the surface. The modulus of the ozone-only treated material was the least affected with a decrease of around 0.75 GPa with some evidence for a surface layer with a modulus ranging from 2.6 (±0.39) GPa at the surface to 3.2 (±0.48) GPa at a depth of 2 nm. XPS analyses reveal that the oxygen content of the modified surfaces decreased in the order of UV-ozone > UV > ozone with approximate concentrations for a 60 s exposure of 5, 0.7 and 0.05 at.%, respectively. Friction force imaging of patterned surfaces

  9. Applications of AFM for atomic manipulation and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custance, Oscar

    2009-03-01

    Since the first demonstration of atom-by-atom assembly [1], atomic manipulation with scanning tunneling microscopy has yielded stunning realizations in nanoscience. A new exciting panorama has been recently opened with the possibility of manipulating atoms at surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [2-5]. In this talk, we will present two different approaches that enable patterning structures at semiconductor surfaces by manipulating individual atoms with AFM and at room temperature [2, 3]. We will discuss the physics behind each protocol through the analysis of the measured forces associated with these manipulations [3-5]. Another challenging issue in scanning probe microscopy is the ability to disclose the local chemical composition of a multi-element system at atomic level. Here, we will introduce a single-atom chemical identification method, which is based on detecting the forces between the outermost atom of the AFM tip and the atoms at a surface [6]. We demonstrate this identification procedure on a particularly challenging system, where any discrimination attempt based solely on topographic measurements would be impossible to achieve. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] D. M. Eigler and E. K. Schweizer, Nature 344, 524 (1990); [0pt] [2] Y. Sugimoto, M. Abe, S. Hirayama, N. Oyabu, O. Custance and S. Morita, Nature Materials 4, 156 (2005); [0pt] [3] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, O. Custance, P. Jelinek, M. Abe, R. Perez and S. Morita, Science 322, 413 (2008); [0pt] [4] Y. Sugimoto, P. Jelinek, P. Pou, M. Abe, S. Morita, R. Perez and O. Custance, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 106104 (2007); [0pt] [5] M. Ternes, C. P. Lutz, C. F. Hirjibehedin, F. J. Giessibl and A. J. Heinrich, Science 319, 1066 (2008); [0pt] [6] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, M. Abe, P. Jelinek, R. Perez, S. Morita, and O. Custance, Nature 446, 64 (2007)

  10. Direct visualization of the trimeric structure of the ASIC1a channel, using AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carnally, Stewart M.; Dev, Harveer S.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Van Bemmelen, Miguel X.; Schild, Laurent; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J.Michael

    2008-08-08

    There has been confusion about the subunit stoichiometry of the degenerin family of ion channels. Recently, a crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a revealed that it assembles as a trimer. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image unprocessed ASIC1a bound to mica. We detected a mixture of subunit monomers, dimers and trimers. In some cases, triple-subunit clusters were clearly visible, confirming the trimeric structure of the channel, and indicating that the trimer sometimes disaggregated after adhesion to the mica surface. This AFM-based technique will now enable us to determine the subunit arrangement within heteromeric ASICs.

  11. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  12. Review and perspectives of AFM application on the study of deformable drop/bubble interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Kai; Ma, Mengyu; Jin, Hang; Angeli, Panagiota; Gong, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The applications of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) on the study of dynamic interactions and film drainage between deformable bodies dispersed in aqueous solutions are reviewed in this article. Novel experimental designs and recent advances in experimental methodologies are presented, which show the advantage of using AFM as a tool for probing colloidal interactions. The effects of both DLVO and non-DLVO forces on the colloid stabilization mechanism are discussed. Good agreement is found between the force - drop/bubble deformation behaviour revealed by AFM measurements and the theoretical modeling of film drainage process, giving a convincing explanation of the occurrence of certain phenomenon. However, the behaviour and shape of deformable drops as they approach or retract is still not well resolved. In addition, when surfactants are present further research is needed on the absorption of surfactant molecules into the interfaces, their mobility and the effects on interfacial film properties. PMID:26344865

  13. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Bingyao; Yan Xiong; Wei Qufu Gao Weidong

    2007-10-15

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces.

  14. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits. PMID:26005137

  15. Subfield profitability analysis reveals an economic case for cropland diversification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, E.; McNunn, G. S.; Schulte, L. A.; Bonner, I. J.; Muth, D. J.; Babcock, B. A.; Sharma, B.; Heaton, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Public agencies and private enterprises increasingly desire to achieve ecosystem service outcomes in agricultural systems, but are limited by perceived conflicts between economic and ecosystem service goals and a lack of tools enabling effective operational management. Here we use Iowa—an agriculturally homogeneous state representative of the Maize Belt—to demonstrate an economic rationale for cropland diversification at the subfield scale. We used a novel computational framework that integrates disparate but publicly available data to map ˜3.3 million unique potential management polygons (9.3 Mha) and reveal subfield opportunities to increase overall field profitability. We analyzed subfield profitability for maize/soybean fields during 2010-2013—four of the most profitable years in recent history—and projected results for 2015. While cropland operating at a loss of US 250 ha-1 or more was negligible between 2010 and 2013 at 18 000-190 000 ha (<2% of row-crop land), the extent of highly unprofitable land increased to 2.5 Mha, or 27% of row-crop land, in the 2015 projection. Aggregation of these areas to the township level revealed ‘hotspots’ for potential management change in Western, Central, and Northeast Iowa. In these least profitable areas, incorporating conservation management that breaks even (e.g., planting low-input perennials), into low-yielding portions of fields could increase overall cropland profitability by 80%. This approach is applicable to the broader region and differs substantially from the status quo of ‘top-down’ land management for conservation by harnessing private interest to align profitability with the production of ecosystem services.

  16. Sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube-polymer composites using dynamic AFM methods.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Maria J; Misiego, Rocio; Smith, Kyle C; Avila, Alba; Pipes, Byron; Reifenberger, Ron; Raman, Arvind

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks within polymer nanocomposites is demonstrated through electrical characterization techniques based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). We compare three techniques implemented in the single-pass configuration: DC-biased amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in terms of the physics of sub-surface image formation and experimental robustness. The methods were applied to study the dispersion of sub-surface networks of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in a polyimide (PI) matrix. We conclude that among these methods, the KPFM channel, which measures the capacitance gradient (∂C/∂d) at the second harmonic of electrical excitation, is the best channel to obtain high-contrast images of the CNT network embedded in the polymer matrix, without the influence of surface conditions. Additionally, we propose an analysis of the ∂C/∂d images as a tool to characterize the dispersion and connectivity of the CNTs. Through the analysis we demonstrate that these AFM-based sub-surface methods probe sufficiently deep within the SWNT composites, to resolve clustered networks that likely play a role in conductivity percolation. This opens up the possibility of dynamic AFM-based characterization of sub-surface dispersion and connectivity in nanostructured composites, two critical parameters for nanocomposite applications in sensors and energy storage devices. PMID:23478510

  17. Trophic hierarchies revealed via amino acid isotopic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the potential of isotopic methods to illuminate trophic function, accurate estimates of lifetime feeding tendencies have remained elusive. A relatively new approach—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino ...

  18. Analysis of copy number variations reveals differences among cattle breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. Here we describe the first systematic and genome-wide analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) in the modern domesticated cattle using array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and quanti...

  19. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  20. Fractal analysis reveals reduced complexity of retinal vessels in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Michele; Falco, Teresa; Frontali, Marina; Romano, Silvia; Bagnato, Francesca; Orzi, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) affects mainly small cerebral arteries and leads to disability and dementia. The relationship between clinical expression of the disease and progression of the microvessel pathology is, however, uncertain as we lack tools for imaging brain vessels in vivo. Ophthalmoscopy is regarded as a window into the cerebral microcirculation. In this study we carried out an ophthalmoscopic examination in subjects with CADASIL. Specifically, we performed fractal analysis of digital retinal photographs. Data are expressed as mean fractal dimension (mean-D), a parameter that reflects complexity of the retinal vessel branching. Ten subjects with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CADASIL and 10 sex and age-matched control subjects were enrolled. Fractal analysis of retinal digital images was performed by means of a computer-based program, and the data expressed as mean-D. Brain MRI lesion volume in FLAIR and T1-weighted images was assessed using MIPAV software. Paired t-test was used to disclose differences in mean-D between CADASIL and control groups. Spearman rank analysis was performed to evaluate potential associations between mean-D values and both disease duration and disease severity, the latter expressed as brain MRI lesion volumes, in the subjects with CADASIL. The results showed that mean-D value of patients (1.42±0.05; mean±SD) was lower than control (1.50±0.04; p = 0.002). Mean-D did not correlate with disease duration nor with MRI lesion volumes of the subjects with CADASIL. The findings suggest that fractal analysis is a sensitive tool to assess changes of retinal vessel branching, likely reflecting early brain microvessel alterations, in CADASIL patients. PMID:21556373

  1. Molecular Analysis of Sarcoidosis Granulomas Reveals Antimicrobial Targets.

    PubMed

    Rotsinger, Joseph E; Celada, Lindsay J; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Atkinson, James B; Drake, Wonder P

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown cause. Prior molecular and immunologic studies have confirmed the presence of mycobacterial virulence factors, such as catalase peroxidase and superoxide dismutase A, within sarcoidosis granulomas. Molecular analysis of granulomas can identify targets of known antibiotics classes. Currently, major antibiotics are directed against DNA synthesis, protein synthesis, and cell wall formation. We conducted molecular analysis of 40 sarcoidosis diagnostic specimens and compared them with 33 disease control specimens for the presence of mycobacterial genes that encode antibiotic targets. We assessed for genes involved in DNA synthesis (DNA gyrase A [gyrA] and DNA gyrase B), protein synthesis (RNA polymerase subunit β), cell wall synthesis (embCAB operon and enoyl reductase), and catalase peroxidase. Immunohistochemical analysis was conducted to investigate the locale of mycobacterial genes such as gyrA within 12 sarcoidosis specimens and 12 disease controls. Mycobacterial DNA was detected in 33 of 39 sarcoidosis specimens by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction compared with 2 of 30 disease control specimens (P < 0.001, two-tailed Fisher's test). Twenty of 39 were positive for three or more mycobacterial genes, compared with 1 of 30 control specimens (P < 0.001, two-tailed Fisher's test). Immunohistochemistry analysis localized mycobacterial gyrA nucleic acids to sites of granuloma formation in 9 of 12 sarcoidosis specimens compared with 1 of 12 disease controls (P < 0.01). Microbial genes encoding enzymes that can be targeted by currently available antimycobacterial antibiotics are present in sarcoidosis specimens and localize to sites of granulomatous inflammation. Use of antimicrobials directed against target enzymes may be an innovative treatment alternative. PMID:26807608

  2. Multiple etiologies for Alzheimer disease are revealed by segregation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.S.; Connor-Lacke, L.; Cupplies, L.A.; Growdon, J.H.; Farrer, L.A.; Duijn, C.M. van

    1994-11-01

    We have evaluated several transmission models for Alzheimer disease (AD), using the logistic regressive approach in 401 nuclear families of consecutively ascertained and rigorously diagnosed probands. Models postulating no major gene effect, random environmental transmission, recessive inheritance, and sporadic occurrence were rejected under varied assumptions regarding the associations among sex, age, and major gene susceptibility. Transmission of the disorder was not fully explained by a single Mendelian model for all families. Stratification of families as early- and late-onset by using the median of family mean onset ages showed that, regardless of the model studied, two groups of families fit better than a single group. AD in early-onset families is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with full penetrance in both sexes and has a gene frequency of 1.5%. Dominant inheritance also gave the best fit of the data in late-onset families, but this hypothesis was rejected, suggesting the presence of heterogeneity within this subset. Our study also revealed that genetically nonsusceptible males and females develop AD, indicating the presence of phenocopies within early-onset and late-onset groups. Moreover, our results suggest that the higher risk to females is not solely due to their increased longevity. 50 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Previously Uncharacterized Virulence Factors in Vibrio proteolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ann; Kinch, Lisa N.; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the genus Vibrio include many pathogens of humans and marine animals that share genetic information via horizontal gene transfer. Hence, the Vibrio pan-genome carries the potential to establish new pathogenic strains by sharing virulence determinants, many of which have yet to be characterized. Here, we investigated the virulence properties of Vibrio proteolyticus, a Gram-negative marine bacterium previously identified as part of the Vibrio consortium isolated from diseased corals. We found that V. proteolyticus causes actin cytoskeleton rearrangements followed by cell lysis in HeLa cells in a contact-independent manner. In search of the responsible virulence factor involved, we determined the V. proteolyticus secretome. This proteomics approach revealed various putative virulence factors, including active type VI secretion systems and effectors with virulence toxin domains; however, these type VI secretion systems were not responsible for the observed cytotoxic effects. Further examination of the V. proteolyticus secretome led us to hypothesize and subsequently demonstrate that a secreted hemolysin, belonging to a previously uncharacterized clan of the leukocidin superfamily, was the toxin responsible for the V. proteolyticus-mediated cytotoxicity in both HeLa cells and macrophages. Clearly, there remains an armory of yet-to-be-discovered virulence factors in the Vibrio pan-genome that will undoubtedly provide a wealth of knowledge on how a pathogen can manipulate host cells. PMID:27460800

  4. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel RASSF2 Interaction Partners.

    PubMed

    Barnoud, Thibaut; Wilkey, Daniel W; Merchant, Michael L; Clark, Jennifer A; Donninger, Howard

    2016-01-01

    RASSF2 is a tumor suppressor that shares homology with other Ras-association domain (RASSF) family members. It is a powerful pro-apoptotic K-Ras effector that is frequently inactivated in many human tumors. The exact mechanism by which RASSF2 functions is not clearly defined, but it likely acts as a scaffolding protein, modulating the activity of other pro-apoptotic effectors, thereby regulating and integrating tumor suppressor pathways. However, only a limited number of RASSF2 interacting partners have been identified to date. We used a proteomics based approach to identify additional RASSF2 interactions, and thereby gain a better insight into the mechanism of action of RASSF2. We identified several proteins, including C1QBP, Vimentin, Protein phosphatase 1G and Ribonuclease inhibitor that function in diverse biological processes, including protein post-translational modifications, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell migration and redox homeostasis, which have not previously been reported to interact with RASSF2. We independently validated two of these novel interactions, C1QBP and Vimentin and found that the interaction with C1QBP was enhanced by K-Ras whereas, interestingly, the Vimentin interaction was reduced by K-Ras. Additionally, RASSF2/K-Ras regulated the acetylation of Vimentin. Our data thus reveal novel mechanisms by which RASSF2 may exert its functions, several of which may be Ras-regulated. PMID:26999212

  5. Tremor patches in Cascadia revealed by seismic array analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Vidale, John E.; Sweet, Justin R.; Creager, Kenneth C.; Wech, Aaron G.

    2009-09-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events in Cascadia have recently been observed, illuminating the general area that radiates seismic energy in the form of non-volcanic tremor (NVT). However, the picture of the ETS zone remains fuzzy because of difficulties in tremor detection and location. To observe the intimate details of tremor, we deployed a dense 84-element small-aperture seismic array on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, above the tremor migration path. It recorded the main ETS event in May 2008, as well as a weaker tremor episode two months earlier. Using a beamforming technique, we are able to capture and track tremor activity with an unprecedented resolution from southern Puget Sound to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The array technique reveals up to four times more duration of tremor compared to the conventional envelope cross-correlation method. Our findings suggest that NVT is not uniformly distributed on the subduction interface, and unveils several distinct patches that release much of the tremor moment. The patches appear to be devoid of ordinary earthquakes, and may indicate the heterogeneity in fault strength that affects the modes of stress release within the ETS zone.

  6. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel RASSF2 Interaction Partners

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Thibaut; Wilkey, Daniel W.; Merchant, Michael L.; Clark, Jennifer A.; Donninger, Howard

    2016-01-01

    RASSF2 is a tumor suppressor that shares homology with other Ras-association domain (RASSF) family members. It is a powerful pro-apoptotic K-Ras effector that is frequently inactivated in many human tumors. The exact mechanism by which RASSF2 functions is not clearly defined, but it likely acts as a scaffolding protein, modulating the activity of other pro-apoptotic effectors, thereby regulating and integrating tumor suppressor pathways. However, only a limited number of RASSF2 interacting partners have been identified to date. We used a proteomics based approach to identify additional RASSF2 interactions, and thereby gain a better insight into the mechanism of action of RASSF2. We identified several proteins, including C1QBP, Vimentin, Protein phosphatase 1G and Ribonuclease inhibitor that function in diverse biological processes, including protein post-translational modifications, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell migration and redox homeostasis, which have not previously been reported to interact with RASSF2. We independently validated two of these novel interactions, C1QBP and Vimentin and found that the interaction with C1QBP was enhanced by K-Ras whereas, interestingly, the Vimentin interaction was reduced by K-Ras. Additionally, RASSF2/K-Ras regulated the acetylation of Vimentin. Our data thus reveal novel mechanisms by which RASSF2 may exert its functions, several of which may be Ras-regulated. PMID:26999212

  7. Molecular analysis of Baylisascaris columnaris revealed mitochondrial and nuclear polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Baylisascaris species are intestinal nematodes of skunks, raccoons, badgers, and bears belonging to the genus Ascarididae. Oral uptake of embryonated Baylisascaris sp. eggs by a wide variety of mammals and birds can lead to visceral, ocular and neurological larva migrans. B. procyonis, the raccoon roundworm, is known to cause severe illness in intermediate hosts and in humans, whereas the skunk roundworm B. columnaris is probably less pathogenic. Skunks and raccoons are kept as pets in Europe, sometimes together with cats and dogs, living in close contact with humans. B. procyonis and B. columnaris are difficult to differentiate based on morphological criteria and molecular and phylogenetic information concerning B. columnaris is missing. This is the first study on the genetic characterisation of B. columnaris, based on mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers. Methods B. columnaris worms were isolated from pet skunks, and used for molecular analysis. PCR primers targeted at mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 and 2 (CO1 and CO2), ribosomal ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and ribosomal 28S genes were used. DNA sequences from B. columnaris, B. procyonis and B. transfuga from bears were analysed by cluster analysis. Results Four different multi-locus genotypes were found in B. columnaris, based on 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two insertions / deletions in CO1, CO2, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 28S. Conclusions The genetic characteristics of B. columnaris show close resemblance to those of B. procyonis, but in contrast to B. procyonis, show several polymorphisms in both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. These polymorphisms could be used as a tool to differentiate B. columnaris from B. procyonis in molecular diagnostic assays, and to identify B. columnaris by PCR, in addition to or replacing morphometric analysis. This might lead to more insight into the zoonotic relevance of B. columnaris in humans. PMID:23627901

  8. Clostridium clariflavum: Key Cellulosome Players Are Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Artzi, Lior; Morag, Ely; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium clariflavum is an anaerobic, cellulosome-forming thermophile, containing in its genome genes for a large number of cellulosomal enzyme and a complex scaffoldin system. Previously, we described the major cohesin-dockerin interactions of the cellulosome components, and on this basis a model of diverse cellulosome assemblies was derived. In this work, we cultivated C. clariflavum on cellobiose-, microcrystalline cellulose-, and switchgrass-containing media and isolated cell-free cellulosome complexes from each culture. Gel filtration separation of the cellulosome samples revealed two major fractions, which were analyzed by label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in order to identify the key players of the cellulosome assemblies therein. From the 13 scaffoldins present in the C. clariflavum genome, 11 were identified, and a variety of enzymes from different glycoside hydrolase and carbohydrate esterase families were identified, including the glycoside hydrolase families GH48, GH9, GH5, GH30, GH11, and GH10. The expression level of the cellulosomal proteins varied as a function of the carbon source used for cultivation of the bacterium. In addition, the catalytic activity of each cellulosome was examined on different cellulosic substrates, xylan and switchgrass. The cellulosome isolated from the microcrystalline cellulose-containing medium was the most active of all the cellulosomes that were tested. The results suggest that the expression of the cellulosome proteins is regulated by the type of substrate in the growth medium. Moreover, both cell-free and cell-bound cellulosome complexes were produced which together may degrade the substrate in a synergistic manner. These observations are compatible with our previously published model of cellulosome assemblies in this bacterium. PMID:25991683

  9. Lipidomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii reveals unusual polar lipids†

    PubMed Central

    Welti, Ruth; Mui, Ernie; Sparks, Alexis; Wernimont, Sarah; Isaac, Giorgis; Kirisits, Michael; Roth, Mary; Roberts, Craig W.; Botté, Cyrille; Maréchal, Eric; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the polar lipids of Toxoplasma gondii by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provides a detailed picture of the lipid molecular species of this parasitic protozoan. Most notably, T. gondii contains a relatively high level, estimated to about 2% of the total polar lipid, of ceramide phosphoethanolamine. The ceramide phosphoethanolamine has a fatty amide profile with only 16- and 18-carbon species. Compared with the host fibroblasts in which it was grown, T. gondii also has higher levels of phosphatidylcholine, but lower levels of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylserine. Analysis at the molecular species level indicated that T. gondii has greater amounts of shorter-chain fatty acid in its polar lipid molecular species than the host fibroblasts. Shorter-chain fatty acids with a combined total of 30 or fewer acyl carbons make up 21% of Toxoplasma’s, but only 3% of the host’s, diacyl phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, diacyl phosphatidylcholine with two saturated acyl chains with 12, 14, or 16 carbons make up over 11% of parasite phosphatidylcholine, but less than 3% of the host phosphatidylcholine molecular species. The distinctive T. gondii tachyzoite lipid profile may be particularly suited to the function of parasitic membranes and the interaction of the parasite with the host cell and the host’s immune system. Combined with T. gondii genomic data, these lipidomic data will assist in elucidation of metabolic pathways for lipid biosynthesis in this important human pathogen. PMID:17988103

  10. Extensive exometabolome analysis reveals extended overflow metabolism in various microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Overflow metabolism is well known for yeast, bacteria and mammalian cells. It typically occurs under glucose excess conditions and is characterized by excretions of by-products such as ethanol, acetate or lactate. This phenomenon, also denoted the short-term Crabtree effect, has been extensively studied over the past few decades, however, its basic regulatory mechanism and functional role in metabolism is still unknown. Here we present a comprehensive quantitative and time-dependent analysis of the exometabolome of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Bacillus licheniformis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae during well-controlled bioreactor cultivations. Most surprisingly, in all cases a great diversity of central metabolic intermediates and amino acids is found in the culture medium with extracellular concentrations varying in the micromolar range. Different hypotheses for these observations are formulated and experimentally tested. As a result, the intermediates in the culture medium during batch growth must originate from passive or active transportation due to a new phenomenon termed “extended” overflow metabolism. Moreover, we provide broad evidence that this could be a common feature of all microorganism species when cultivated under conditions of carbon excess and non-inhibited carbon uptake. In turn, this finding has consequences for metabolite balancing and, particularly, for intracellular metabolite quantification and 13C-metabolic flux analysis. PMID:22963408

  11. Genomic analysis of regulatory network dynamics reveals large topological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Madan Babu, M.; Yu, Haiyuan; Snyder, Michael; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Gerstein, Mark

    2004-09-01

    Network analysis has been applied widely, providing a unifying language to describe disparate systems ranging from social interactions to power grids. It has recently been used in molecular biology, but so far the resulting networks have only been analysed statically. Here we present the dynamics of a biological network on a genomic scale, by integrating transcriptional regulatory information and gene-expression data for multiple conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We develop an approach for the statistical analysis of network dynamics, called SANDY, combining well-known global topological measures, local motifs and newly derived statistics. We uncover large changes in underlying network architecture that are unexpected given current viewpoints and random simulations. In response to diverse stimuli, transcription factors alter their interactions to varying degrees, thereby rewiring the network. A few transcription factors serve as permanent hubs, but most act transiently only during certain conditions. By studying sub-network structures, we show that environmental responses facilitate fast signal propagation (for example, with short regulatory cascades), whereas the cell cycle and sporulation direct temporal progression through multiple stages (for example, with highly inter-connected transcription factors). Indeed, to drive the latter processes forward, phase-specific transcription factors inter-regulate serially, and ubiquitously active transcription factors layer above them in a two-tiered hierarchy. We anticipate that many of the concepts presented here-particularly the large-scale topological changes and hub transience-will apply to other biological networks, including complex sub-systems in higher eukaryotes.

  12. Proteogenomic analysis reveals exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes.

    PubMed

    Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Gangoda, Lahiru; Liem, Michael; Fonseka, Pamali; Atukorala, Ishara; Ozcitti, Cemil; Mechler, Adam; Adda, Christopher G; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-06-20

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, using label-free quantitative proteomics, we highlight proteins that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes. For the first time, a global proteogenomics analysis unveiled the secretion of mutant proteins that are implicated in cancer progression through tumor-derived EVs. Follow up integrated bioinformatics analysis highlighted the enrichment of oncogenic cargo in exosomes and ectosomes. Interestingly, exosomes induced significant cell proliferation and migration in recipient cells compared to ectosomes confirming the oncogenic nature of exosomes. These findings ascertain that cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes. The integrative proteogenomics approach utilized in this study has the potential to identify disease biomarker candidates which can be later assayed in liquid biopsies obtained from cancer patients. PMID:25944692

  13. Network analysis reveals potential markers for pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Anurag; Suman, Shikha; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor outcome. Molecular mechanisms of pediatric ACC oncogenesis and advancement are not well understood. Accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease requires identification of new markers for pediatric ACC. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from the gene expression profile of pediatric ACC and obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology functional and pathway enrichment analysis was implemented to recognize the functions of DEGs. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) and gene–gene functional interaction (GGI) network of DEGs was constructed. Hub gene detection and enrichment analysis of functional modules were performed. Furthermore, a gene regulatory network incorporating DEGs–microRNAs–transcription factors was constructed and analyzed. A total of 431 DEGs including 228 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs were screened. These genes were largely involved in cell cycle, steroid biosynthesis, and p53 signaling pathways. Upregulated genes, CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B, were identified as the common hubs of PPI and GGI networks. All the four common hub genes were also part of modules of the PPI network. Moreover, all the four genes were also present in the largest module of GGI network. A gene regulatory network consisting of 82 microRNAs and 100 transcription factors was also constructed. CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B may serve as potential biomarker of pediatric ACC and as potential targets for therapeutic approach, although experimental studies are required to authenticate our findings. PMID:27555782

  14. Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution.

    PubMed

    Warren, Wesley C; Hillier, LaDeana W; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Birney, Ewan; Ponting, Chris P; Grützner, Frank; Belov, Katherine; Miller, Webb; Clarke, Laura; Chinwalla, Asif T; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Heger, Andreas; Locke, Devin P; Miethke, Pat; Waters, Paul D; Veyrunes, Frédéric; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Bob; Graves, Tina; Wallis, John; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R; Eichler, Evan E; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Deakin, Janine E; Alsop, Amber; Thompson, Katherine; Kirby, Patrick; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Wakefield, Matthew J; Olender, Tsviya; Lancet, Doron; Huttley, Gavin A; Smit, Arian F A; Pask, Andrew; Temple-Smith, Peter; Batzer, Mark A; Walker, Jerilyn A; Konkel, Miriam K; Harris, Robert S; Whittington, Camilla M; Wong, Emily S W; Gemmell, Neil J; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M; Merkel, Angelika; Schmitz, Juergen; Zemann, Anja; Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Brosius, Juergen; Murchison, Elizabeth P; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Smith, Carly; Hannon, Gregory J; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; McMillan, Daniel; Attenborough, Rosalind; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; Lefèvre, Christophe M; Sharp, Julie A; Nicholas, Kevin R; Ray, David A; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Pringle, Thomas H; Taylor, James; Jones, Russell C; Nixon, Brett; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Niwa, Hitoshi; Sekita, Yoko; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Stark, Alexander; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis; Flicek, Paul; Chen, Yuan; Webber, Caleb; Hardison, Ross; Nelson, Joanne; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Minx, Pat; Feng, Yucheng; Kremitzki, Colin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Glasscock, Jarret; Wylie, Todd; Wohldmann, Patricia; Thiru, Prathapan; Nhan, Michael N; Pohl, Craig S; Smith, Scott M; Hou, Shunfeng; Nefedov, Mikhail; de Jong, Pieter J; Renfree, Marilyn B; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K

    2008-05-01

    We present a draft genome sequence of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. This monotreme exhibits a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. For example, platypuses have a coat of fur adapted to an aquatic lifestyle; platypus females lactate, yet lay eggs; and males are equipped with venom similar to that of reptiles. Analysis of the first monotreme genome aligned these features with genetic innovations. We find that reptile and platypus venom proteins have been co-opted independently from the same gene families; milk protein genes are conserved despite platypuses laying eggs; and immune gene family expansions are directly related to platypus biology. Expansions of protein, non-protein-coding RNA and microRNA families, as well as repeat elements, are identified. Sequencing of this genome now provides a valuable resource for deep mammalian comparative analyses, as well as for monotreme biology and conservation. PMID:18464734

  15. Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Wesley C.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.; Birney, Ewan; Ponting, Chris P.; Grützner, Frank; Belov, Katherine; Miller, Webb; Clarke, Laura; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Heger, Andreas; Locke, Devin P.; Miethke, Pat; Waters, Paul D.; Veyrunes, Frédéric; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Bob; Graves, Tina; Wallis, John; Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Eichler, Evan E.; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Deakin, Janine E.; Alsop, Amber; Thompson, Katherine; Kirby, Patrick; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Wakefield, Matthew J.; Olender, Tsviya; Lancet, Doron; Huttley, Gavin A.; Smit, Arian F. A.; Pask, Andrew; Temple-Smith, Peter; Batzer, Mark A.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Harris, Robert S.; Whittington, Camilla M.; Wong, Emily S. W.; Gemmell, Neil J.; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M.; Merkel, Angelika; Schmitz, Juergen; Zemann, Anja; Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Brosius, Juergen; Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Smith, Carly; Hannon, Gregory J.; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; McMillan, Daniel; Attenborough, Rosalind; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; Lefèvre, Christophe M.; Sharp, Julie A.; Nicholas, Kevin R.; Ray, David A.; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Pringle, Thomas H.; Taylor, James; Jones, Russell C.; Nixon, Brett; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Niwa, Hitoshi; Sekita, Yoko; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Stark, Alexander; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis; Flicek, Paul; Chen, Yuan; Webber, Caleb; Hardison, Ross; Nelson, Joanne; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Minx, Pat; Feng, Yucheng; Kremitzki, Colin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Glasscock, Jarret; Wylie, Todd; Wohldmann, Patricia; Thiru, Prathapan; Nhan, Michael N.; Pohl, Craig S.; Smith, Scott M.; Hou, Shunfeng; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    We present a draft genome sequence of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. This monotreme exhibits a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. For example, platypuses have a coat of fur adapted to an aquatic lifestyle; platypus females lactate, yet lay eggs; and males are equipped with venom similar to that of reptiles. Analysis of the first monotreme genome aligned these features with genetic innovations. We find that reptile and platypus venom proteins have been co-opted independently from the same gene families; milk protein genes are conserved despite platypuses laying eggs; and immune gene family expansions are directly related to platypus biology. Expansions of protein, non-protein-coding RNA and microRNA families, as well as repeat elements, are identified. Sequencing of this genome now provides a valuable resource for deep mammalian comparative analyses, as well as for monotreme biology and conservation. PMID:18464734

  16. Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ida E; Backes, André; Walsh, Patrick T; Morgan, Kate V; Meddle, Simone L; Healy, Susan D

    2015-06-01

    In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual weaverbird that built them. We found that a computer-aided texture analysis approach does allow the assignment of a signature to weaverbirds' nests. We suggest that this approach will be a useful tool with which to examine individual variation across a range of animal constructions, not just for nests. PMID:26543586

  17. Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Ida E.; Backes, André; Walsh, Patrick T.; Morgan, Kate V.; Meddle, Simone L.; Healy, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual weaverbird that built them. We found that a computer-aided texture analysis approach does allow the assignment of a signature to weaverbirds' nests. We suggest that this approach will be a useful tool with which to examine individual variation across a range of animal constructions, not just for nests. PMID:26543586

  18. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2015-06-01

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function.

  19. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms.

    PubMed

    Puckett, James G; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2015-06-26

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function. PMID:26197145

  20. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals vertebrate phylotypic period during organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Naoki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    One of the central issues in evolutionary developmental biology is how we can formulate the relationships between evolutionary and developmental processes. Two major models have been proposed: the 'funnel-like' model, in which the earliest embryo shows the most conserved morphological pattern, followed by diversifying later stages, and the 'hourglass' model, in which constraints are imposed to conserve organogenesis stages, which is called the phylotypic period. Here we perform a quantitative comparative transcriptome analysis of several model vertebrate embryos and show that the pharyngula stage is most conserved, whereas earlier and later stages are rather divergent. These results allow us to predict approximate developmental timetables between different species, and indicate that pharyngula embryos have the most conserved gene expression profiles, which may be the source of the basic body plan of vertebrates. PMID:21427719

  1. Enabling accurate gate profile control with inline 3D-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Tianming; Lopez, Andrew; Dawson, Dean

    2009-05-01

    The logic and memory semiconductor device technology strives to follow the aggressive ITRS roadmap. The ITRS calls for increased 3D metrology to meet the demand for tighter process control at 45nm and 32nm nodes. In particular, gate engineering has advanced to a level where conventional metrology by CD-SEM and optical scatterometry (OCD) faces fundamental limitations without involvement of 3D atomic force microscope (3D-AFM or CD-AFM). This paper reports recent progress in 3D-AFM to address the metrology need to control gate dimension in MOSFET transistor formation. 3D-AFM metrology measures the gate electrode at post-etch with the lowest measurement uncertainty for critical gate geometry, including linewidth, sidewall profile, sidewall angle (SWA), line width roughness (LWR), and line edge roughness (LER). 3D-AFM enables accurate gate profile control in three types of metrology applications: reference metrology to validate CD-SEM and OCD, inline depth or 3D monitoring, or replacing TEM for 3D characterization for engineering analysis.

  2. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  4. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  5. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  6. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  7. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners.

    PubMed

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W Thomas; Bush, Nicole R; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of "reciprocal" interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored. PMID:26973572

  8. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners

    PubMed Central

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W. Thomas; Bush, Nicole R.; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of “reciprocal” interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored. PMID:26973572

  9. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a scattered distribution of autumn colours

    PubMed Central

    Archetti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf colour in autumn is rarely considered informative for taxonomy, but there is now growing interest in the evolution of autumn colours and different hypotheses are debated. Research efforts are hindered by the lack of basic information: the phylogenetic distribution of autumn colours. It is not known when and how autumn colours evolved. Methods Data are reported on the autumn colours of 2368 tree species belonging to 400 genera of the temperate regions of the world, and an analysis is made of their phylogenetic relationships in order to reconstruct the evolutionary origin of red and yellow in autumn leaves. Key Results Red autumn colours are present in at least 290 species (70 genera), and evolved independently at least 25 times. Yellow is present independently from red in at least 378 species (97 genera) and evolved at least 28 times. Conclusions The phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that autumn colours have been acquired and lost many times during evolution. This scattered distribution could be explained by hypotheses involving some kind of coevolutionary interaction or by hypotheses that rely on the need for photoprotection. PMID:19126636

  10. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts

    PubMed Central

    Arena, Ellen T.; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L.; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host–pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host–pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent. PMID:26056271

  11. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ellen T; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2015-06-23

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host-pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host-pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent. PMID:26056271

  12. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Kevin J.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Likens, Gene E.; Buso, Donald C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  13. Neuronal Networks during Burst Suppression as Revealed by Source Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reinicke, Christine; Moeller, Friederike; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Pressler, Ronit; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burst-suppression (BS) is an electroencephalography (EEG) pattern consisting of alternant periods of slow waves of high amplitude (burst) and periods of so called flat EEG (suppression). It is generally associated with coma of various etiologies (hypoxia, drug-related intoxication, hypothermia, and childhood encephalopathies, but also anesthesia). Animal studies suggest that both the cortex and the thalamus are involved in the generation of BS. However, very little is known about mechanisms of BS in humans. The aim of this study was to identify the neuronal network underlying both burst and suppression phases using source reconstruction and analysis of functional and effective connectivity in EEG. Material/Methods Dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) was applied to EEG segments of 13 neonates and infants with burst and suppression EEG pattern. The brain area with the strongest power in the analyzed frequency (1–4 Hz) range was defined as the reference region. DICS was used to compute the coherence between this reference region and the entire brain. The renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) was used to describe the informational flow between the identified sources. Results/Conclusion Delta activity during the burst phases was associated with coherent sources in the thalamus and brainstem as well as bilateral sources in cortical regions mainly frontal and parietal, whereas suppression phases were associated with coherent sources only in cortical regions. Results of the RPDC analyses showed an upwards informational flow from the brainstem towards the thalamus and from the thalamus to cortical regions, which was absent during the suppression phases. These findings may support the theory that a “cortical deafferentiation” between the cortex and sub-cortical structures exists especially in suppression phases compared to burst phases in burst suppression EEGs. Such a deafferentiation may play a role in the poor neurological outcome of

  14. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kevin J.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Likens, Gene E.; Buso, Donald C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks. PMID:24753575

  15. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Kevin J; Torgersen, Christian E; Likens, Gene E; Buso, Donald C; Lowe, Winsor H; Bailey, Scott W

    2014-05-13

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks. PMID:24753575

  16. Demographic analysis reveals gradual senescence in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano

    PubMed Central

    Mouton, Stijn; Willems, Maxime; Back, Patricia; Braeckman, Bart P; Borgonie, Gaetan

    2009-01-01

    Free-living flatworms ("Turbellaria") are appropriate model organisms to gain better insight into the role of stem cells in ageing and rejuvenation. Ageing research in flatworms is, however, still scarce. This is partly due to culture difficulties and the lack of a complete set of demographic data, including parameters such as median lifespan and age-specific mortality rate. In this paper, we report on the first flatworm survival analysis. We used the species Macrostomum lignano, which is an emerging model for studying the reciprocal influence between stem cells, ageing and rejuvenation. This species has a median lifespan of 205 ± 13 days (average ± standard deviation [SD]) and a 90th percentile lifespan of 373 ± 32 days. The maximum lifespan, however, is more than 745 days, and the average survival curve is characterised by a long tail because a small number of individuals lives twice as long as 90% of the population. Similar to earlier observations in a wide range of animals, in M. lignano the age-specific mortality rate increases exponentially, but levels off at the oldest ages. To compare the senescence of M. lignano with that of other ageing models, we determined the mortality rate doubling time, which is 0.20 ± 0.02 years. As a result, we can conclude that M. lignano shows gradual senescence at a rate similar to the vertebrate ageing models Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus. We argue that M. lignano is a suitable model for ageing and rejuvenation research, and especially for the role of stem cells in these processes, due to its accessible stem cell system and regeneration capacity, and the possibility of combining stem cell studies with demographic analyses. PMID:19642971

  17. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution. PMID:24743419

  18. Combination of ToF-SIMS imaging and AFM to study the early stages of corrosion in Al-Cu thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Seyeux, A.; Missert, Nancy; Frankel, Gerald; Unocic, Kinga A; Klein, L. H.; Galtayries, A.; Marcus, P

    2011-01-01

    The pitting corrosion of Al-Cu thin film alloys was investigated using samples that were heat treated in air to form through-thickness Al2Cu particles within an Al-0.5%Cu matrix. Time-of-Flight SIMS (ToF-SIMS) analysis revealed Cu-rich regions 250 - 800 nm in lateral extent near the metal/oxide interface. Following exposure that generated pitting corrosion, secondary electron, secondary ion, and AFM images showed pits with size and density similar to those of the Cu-rich regions. The role of the Cu-rich regions is addressed.

  19. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Groundwater Reveals an Active Anammox Bacterial Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a major natural resource, yet little is known about the contribution of microbial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity to subsurface nitrogen cycling. During anammox, energy is generated as ammonium is oxidized under anaerobic conditions to dinitrogen gas, using nitrite as the final electron acceptor. This process is a global sink for fixed nitrogen. Only a narrow range of monophyletic bacteria within the Planctomycetes carries out anammox, and the full extent of their metabolism, and subsequent impact on nitrogen cycling and microbial community structure, is still unknown. Here, we employ a metatranscriptomic analysis on enriched mRNA to identify the abundance and activity of a population of anammox bacteria within an aquifer at Rifle, CO. Planktonic biomass was collected over a two-month period after injection of up to 1.5 mM nitrate. Illumina-generated sequences were mapped to a phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome database. We identified transcripts for genes with high protein sequence identities (81-98%) to those of anammox strain KSU-1 and to two of the five anammox bacteria genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia, suggesting an active, if not diverse, anammox population. Many of the most abundant anammox transcripts mapped to a single scaffold, indicative of a single dominant anammox species. Transcripts of the genes necessary for the anammox pathway were present, including an ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrite/formate transporter, nitrite reductase (nirK), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzoB). The form of nitrite reductase encoded by anammox is species-dependent, and we only identified nirK, with no evidence of anammox nirS. In addition to the anammox pathway we saw evidence of the anammox bacterial dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium pathway (narH, putative nrfA, and nrfB), which provides an alternate means of generating substrates for anammox from nitrate, rather than relying on an external pool. Transcripts for hydroxylamine

  20. Acriflavine treatment promotes dyskinetoplasty in Trypanosoma cruzi as revealed by ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Manchester, Thiago; Cavalcanti, Danielle Pereira; Zogovich, Marcelo; DE Souza, Wanderley; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado

    2013-09-01

    Trypanosomatid mitochondrial DNA is structured as a giant network of thousands of interlocked DNA molecules enclosed within the kinetoplast. The structure and replication mechanism of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) is unique, thereby making it an excellent chemotherapeutic target. Alteration in the structural organization of kDNA can give rise to dyskinetoplastic (Dk) strains. In Dk cells, the kDNA is dispersed in clumps throughout the mitochondrial matrix and not organized into a network. In this work, Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes were treated with acriflavine, a DNA intercalating drug, which promoted a decrease in cell proliferation and induced the appearance of Dk protozoa. In treated cells, the kinetoplast lost its normal disc-shaped structure because the fibrillar arrangement was reduced to a compact, amorphous mass within the mitochondrion. Moreover, basic proteins associated with kDNA were redistributed throughout the Dk protozoal kinetoplast. We sought to understand how the disruption of the kDNA leads to the emergence of the Dk phenotype with atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of isolated networks. Our results demonstrate that the detachment of minicircles from the kDNA disk promotes the disassembly of the network, thereby generating Dk cells. Our data strongly suggest that acriflavine inhibits T. cruzi multiplication by interfering with kDNA replication. PMID:23965822

  1. Particle deformation induced by AFM tapping under different setpoint voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Lin; Farkas, Natalia; Dagata, John A.; He, Bo-Ching; Fu, Wei-En

    2014-09-01

    The measured height of polystyrene nanoparticles varies with setpoint voltage during atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping-mode imaging. Nanoparticle height was strongly influenced by the magnitude of the deformation caused by the AFM tapping forces, which was determined by the setpoint voltage. This influence quantity was studied by controlling the operational AFM setpoint voltage. A test sample consisting of well-dispersed 60-nm polystyrene and gold nanoparticles co-adsorbed on poly-l-lysine-coated mica was studied in this research. Gold nanoparticles have not only better mechanical property than polystyrene nanoparticles, but also obvious facets in AFM phase image. By using this sample of mixed nanoparticles, it allows us to confirm that the deformation resulted from the effect of setpoint voltage, not noise. In tapping mode, the deformation of polystyrene nanoparticles increased with decreasing setpoint voltage. Similar behavior was observed with both open loop and closed loop AFM instruments.

  2. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  3. Manufacturing process of nanofluidics using afm probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karingula, Varun Kumar

    A new process for fabricating a nano fluidic device that can be used in medical application is developed and demonstrated. Nano channels are fabricated using a nano tip in indentation mode on AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). The nano channels are integrated between the micro channels and act as a filter to separate biomolecules. Nano channels of 4 to7 m in length, 80nm in width, and at varying depths from 100nm to 850 nm allow the resulting device to separate selected groups of lysosomes and other viruses. Sharply developed vertical micro channels are produced from a deep reaction ion etching followed by deposition of different materials, such as gold and polymers, on the top surface, allowing the study of alternative ways of manufacturing a nanofluidic device. PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) bonding is performed to close the top surface of the device. An experimental setup is used to test and validate the device by pouring fluid through the channels. A detailed cost evaluation is conducted to compare the economical merits of the proposed process. It is shown that there is a 47:7% manufacturing time savings and a 60:6% manufacturing cost savings.

  4. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  5. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  6. Segmental calibration for commercial AFM in vertical direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yushu; Gao, Sitian; Lu, Mingzhen; Li, Wei; Xu, Xuefang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is most widely applied in scientific research and industrial production. AFM is a scanning probe imaging and measuring device, useful for physical and chemical studies. Depends on its basic structure, microscopic surface pattern can be measured and captured by mechanically scanning. Its vertical and horizon resolution can reach to 0.01nm and 0.1nm. Commonly the measurement values of commercial AFM are directly from scanning piezoelectric tube, so that it not a traceable value. In order to solve the problem of commercial AFM's traceability, step height standard references are applied to calibrate the piezoelectric ceramic housing in scanning tube. All of the serial of step height standard references, covering the commercial AFM vertical scale, are calibrated by Metrology AFM developed by National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. Three interferometers have been assembled in its XYZ axis, therefore the measurement value can directly trace to laser wavelength. Because of nonlinear characteristic of PZT, the method of segmental calibration is proposed. The measurement scale can be divided into several subsections corresponding to the calibrated values of the series of step height standards references. By this method the accuracy of measurements can be ensured in each segment measurement scale and the calibration level of the whole instrument can be promoted. In order to get a standard step shape by commercial AFM, substrate removal method is applied to deal with the bow shape problem.

  7. Dynamics of the nanoneedle probe in trolling mode AFM.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Ahmad; Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat; Keramati, Ramtin; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2015-05-22

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), as an indispensable tool for nanoscale characterization, presents major drawbacks for operation in a liquid environment arising from the large hydrodynamic drag on the vibrating cantilever. The newly introduced 'Trolling mode' (TR-mode) AFM resolves this complication by using a specialized nanoneedle cantilever that keeps the cantilever outside of the liquid. Herein, a mechanical model with a lumped mass was developed to capture the dynamics of such a cantilever with a nanoneedle tip. This new developed model was applied to investigate the effects of the needle-liquid interface on the performance of the AFM, including the imaging capability in liquid. PMID:25915451

  8. AFM Studies of Conformational Changes in Proteins and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploscariu, Nicoleta; Sukthankar, Pinakin; Tomich, John; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present estimates of molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors for some examples of proteins and peptides. The results are obtained from AFM force spectroscopy measurements. To determine molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors we developed a model based on measuring several resonance frequencies of an AFM cantilever in contact with either single protein molecule or peptides adsorbed on arbitrary surface. We used compliant AFM cantilevers with a small aspect ratio - a ratio of length to width - in air and in liquid, including biologically relevant phosphate buffered saline medium. Department of Physics.

  9. Accurate Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation of the Normal Spring Constant of Various AFM Cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke’s law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%. PMID:25763650

  10. Ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GAF01 to remove AFM1 in vitro and to counteract AFM1 immunotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Salah-Abbès, Jalila Ben; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Jebali, Rania; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Oueslati, Ridha

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) has been detected in many parts of the world both in raw milk and many dairy products, causing great economic losses and human disease. Unfortunately, there are few studies dealing with AFM1 immunotoxicity/interactions with lactic acid bacteria for potential application as a natural preventive agent. The aim of this study was to isolate (from dairy products) food-grade probiotic bacteria able to degrade/bind AFM1 in vitro and evaluate whether the same organism(s) could impart a protective role against AFM1-induced immunotoxicity in exposed Balb/c mice. Bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01) were isolated from Tunisian artisanal butter and then tested for abilities to eliminate AFM1 from phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and reconstituted milk (containing 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 µg AFM1/ml) after 0, 6, and 24 h at 37°C. Results showed that the selected bacteria could 'remove' AFM1 both in PBS and skimmed milk. The binding abilities of AFM1 by L. plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01 strains (at 10(8) CFU/ml) in PBS and reconstituted milk ranged, respectively, from 16.1-78.6% and 15.3-95.1%; overall, L. rhamnosus showed a better potential for removal than L. plantarum. 'Removal' appeared to be by simple binding; the bacteria/AFM1 complex was stable and only a very small proportion of mycotoxin was released back into the solution. L. rhamnosus GAF01 had the highest binding capacity and was selected for use in the in vivo study. Those results indicated that use of the organism prevented AFM1-induced effects on total white and red blood cells, and lymphocyte subtypes, after 15 days of host treatment. These studies clearly indicated that L. rhamnosus GAF01 was able to bind AFM1 in vitro and-by mechanisms that might also be related to a binding effect-counteract AFM1-induced immunotoxicity. Moreover, by itself, this bacterium was not toxic and could potentially be used as an additive in dairy products and in biotechnology for

  11. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical tweezers (AFM/OT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, F.; Zembrzycki, K.; Nakielski, P.; Pawłowska, S.; Kowalewski, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    The role of mechanical properties is essential to understand molecular, biological materials, and nanostructures dynamics and interaction processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the most commonly used method of direct force evaluation, but due to its technical limitations this single probe technique is unable to detect forces with femtonewton resolution. In this paper we present the development of a combined atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers (AFM/OT) instrument. The focused laser beam, on which optical tweezers are based, provides us with the ability to manipulate small dielectric objects and to use it as a high spatial and temporal resolution displacement and force sensor in the same AFM scanning zone. We demonstrate the possibility to develop a combined instrument with high potential in nanomechanics, molecules manipulation and biological studies. AFM/OT equipment is described and characterized by studying the ability to trap dielectric objects and quantifying the detectable and applicable forces. Finally, optical tweezers calibration methods and instrument applications are given.

  12. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  13. The Conductance of Nanotubes Deformed by the AFM Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anantram, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    The conductance drop under AFM-tip deformation can be explained by stretching of the tube length. NT sensors can be built utilizing uniform stretching. Single sp3 bond cross section cannot block electrons, because another conducting path may exist. AFM tip which forms sp3 bonds with the tube will decrease conductance. In the "table experiment" a conductance drop of 2 orders of magnitude happened only after some bonds were broken.

  14. Characterization of the interaction between AFM tips and surface nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Wiktoria; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-06-24

    While the presence of gaseous enclosures observed at various solid-water interfaces, the so-called "surface nanobubles", has been confirmed by many groups in recent years, their formation, properties, and stability have not been convincingly and exhaustively explained. Here we report on an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of argon nanobubbles on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) in water to elucidate the properties of nanobubble surfaces and the mechanism of AFM tip-nanobubble interaction. In particular, the deformation of the nanobubble-water interface by the AFM tip and the question whether the AFM tip penetrates the nanobubble during scanning were addressed by this combined intermittent contact (tapping) mode and force volume AFM study. We found that the stiffness of nanobubbles was smaller than the cantilever spring constant and comparable with the surface tension of water. The interaction with the AFM tip resulted in severe quasi-linear deformation of the bubbles; however, in the case of tip-bubble attraction, the interface deformed toward the tip. We tested two models of tip-bubble interaction, namely, the capillary force and the dynamic interaction model, and found, depending on the tip properties, good agreement with experimental data. The results showed that the tip-bubble interaction strength and the magnitude of the bubble deformation depend strongly on tip and bubble geometry and on tip and substrate material, and are very sensitive to the presence of contaminations that alter the interfacial tension. In particular, nanobubbles interacted differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic AFM tips, which resulted in qualitatively and quantitatively different force curves measured on the bubbles in the experiments. To minimize bubble deformation and obtain reliable AFM results, nanobubbles must be measured with a sharp hydrophilic tip and with a cantilever having a very low spring constant in a contamination-free system. PMID:24856074

  15. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  16. Probing of local dissolution of Al-alloys in chloride solutions by AFM and SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, A.; Pan, J.; Leygraf, C.; Norgren, S.

    2006-05-01

    Local dissolution of Al alloys was probed in situ in chloride solutions by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Preferential dissolution in the boundary region between some intermetallic particles (IMPs) and alloy matrix, and trench formation around large IMPs during free immersion and under electrochemical anodic polarization were observed, which indicate different dissolution behavior associated to different types of IMPs. Moreover, by using an integrated AFM/SECM system with a dual mode cantilever/microelectrode probe, simultaneous probing of electrochemical active sites and topographic changes over the same area was performed with sub-micron resolution. This allowed the ongoing localized corrosion processes related to the IMP to be revealed.

  17. Modeling the Interaction between AFM Tips and Pinned Surface Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenjiang; Liu, Yawei; Xiao, Qianxiang; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Xianren

    2016-01-26

    Although the morphology of surface nanobubbles has been studied widely with different AFM modes, AFM images may not reflect the real shapes of the nanobubbles due to AFM tip-nanobubble interactions. In addition, the interplay between surface nanobubble deformation and induced capillary force has not been well understood in this context. In our work we used constraint lattice density functional theory to investigate the interaction between AFM tips and pinned surface nanobubbles systematically, especially concentrating on the effects of tip hydrophilicity and shape. For a hydrophilic tip contacting a nanobubble, its hydrophilic nature facilitates its departure from the bubble surface, displaying a weak and intermediate-range attraction. However, when the tip squeezes the nanobubble during the approach process, the nanobubble shows an elastic effect that prevents the tip from penetrating the bubble, leading to a strong nanobubble deformation and repulsive interactions. On the contrary, a hydrophobic tip can easily pierce the vapor-liquid interface of the nanobubble during the approach process, leading to the disappearance of the repulsive force. In the retraction process, however, the adhesion between the tip and the nanobubble leads to a much stronger lengthening effect on nanobubble deformation and a strong long-range attractive force. The trends of force evolution from our simulations agree qualitatively well with recent experimental AFM observations. This favorable agreement demonstrates that our model catches the main intergradient of tip-nanobubble interactions for pinned surface nanobubbles and may therefore provide important insight into how to design minimally invasive AFM experiments. PMID:26751634

  18. Calibration of AFM cantilever stiffness: a microfabricated array of reflective springs.

    PubMed

    Cumpson, P J Peter J; Zhdan, Peter; Hedley, John

    2004-08-01

    Calibration of the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is necessary for the measurement of nanonewton and piconewton forces, which are critical to analytical applications of AFM in the analysis of polymer surfaces, biological structures and organic molecules. We have developed a compact and easy-to-use reference standard for this calibration. The new artifact consists of an array of 12 dual spiral-cantilever springs, each supporting a mirrored polycrystalline silicon disc of 160 microm in diameter. These devices were fabricated by a three-layer polysilicon surface micromachining method, including a reflective layer of gold on chromium. We call such an array a Microfabricated Array of Reference Springs (MARS). These devices have a number of advantages. Cantilever calibration using this device is straightforward and rapid. The devices have very small inertia, and are therefore resistant to shock and vibration. This means they need no careful treatment except reasonably clean laboratory conditions. The array spans the range of spring constant from around 0.16 to 11 N/m important in AFM, allowing almost all contact-mode AFM cantilevers to be calibrated easily and rapidly. Each device incorporates its own discrete gold mirror to improve reflectivity. The incorporation of a gold mirror both simplifies calibration of the devices themselves (via Doppler velocimetry) and allows interferometric calibration of the AFM z-axis using the apparent periodicity in the force-distance curve before contact. Therefore, from a single force-distance curve, taking about one second to acquire, one can calibrate the cantilever spring constant and, optionally, the z-axis scale. These are all the data one needs to make accurate and reliable force measurements. PMID:15231316

  19. Label-free and quantitative evaluation of cytotoxicity based on surface nanostructure and biophysical property of cells utilizing AFM.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Gi-Ja; Kang, Sung Wook; Cheong, Youjin; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the four commonly used cytotoxicity assays and the mechanical properties as evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) were compared in a cellular system. A cytotoxicity assay is the first and most essential test to evaluate biocompatibility of various toxic substances. Many of the cytotoxicity methods require complicated and labor-intensive process, as well as introduce experimental error. In addition, these methods cannot provide instantaneous and quantitative cell viability information. AFM has become an exciting analytical tool in medical, biological, and biophysical research due to its unique abilities. AFM-based force-distance curve measurements precisely measure the changes in the biophysical properties of the cell. Therefore, we observed the morphological changes and mechanical property changes in L929 cells following sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) treatment utilizing AFM. AFM imaging showed that the toxic effects of SLS changed not only the spindle-like shape of L929 cells into a round shape, but also made a rough cell surface. As the concentration of SLS was increased, the surface roughness of L929 cell was increased, and stiffness decreased. We confirmed that inhibition of proliferation clearly increased with increases in SLS concentration based on results from MTT, WST, neutral red uptake, and LIVE/DEAD viability/cytotoxicity assays. The estimated IC₅₀ value by AFM analysis was similar to those of other conventional assays and was included within the 95% confidence interval range. We suggest that an AFM quantitative analysis of the morphological and biophysical changes in cells can be utilized as a new method for evaluating cytotoxicity. PMID:23582483

  20. Molecular dynamics study on the mechanism of AFM-based nanoscratching process with water-layer lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiaqi; Zhao, Jinsheng; Dong, Zeguang; Liu, Pinkuan

    2015-08-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) based direct nanoscratching has been thoroughly studied but the mechanism of nanoscratching with water-layer lubrication is yet to be well understood. In current study, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to evaluate the effects of the water-layer lubrication on the AFM-based nanoscratching process on monocrystalline copper. Comparisons of workpiece deformation, scratching forces, and friction coefficients are made between the water-lubricated and dry scratching under various thickness of water layer, scratching depth and scratching velocity. Simulation results reveal that the water layer has positive impact on the surface quality and significant influence on the scratching forces (normal forces and tangential forces). The friction coefficients of the tip in water-lubricated nanoscratching are significantly bigger than those in the dry process. Our simulation results shed lights on a promising AFM-based nanofabrication method, which can assist to get nanoscale surface morphologies with higher quality than traditional approaches.

  1. AFM method to detect differences in adhesion of silica bids to cancer and normal epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Iyer, Swaminathan; Gaikwad, Ravi; Woodworth, Craig

    2009-03-01

    To date, the methods of detection of cancer cells have been mostly based on traditional techniques used in biology, such as visual identification of malignant changes, cell growth analysis, specific ligand-receptor labeling, or genetic tests. Despite being well developed, these methods are either insufficiently accurate or require a lengthy complicated analysis. A search for alternative methods for the detection of cancer cells may be a fruitful approach. Here we describe an AFM study that may result in a new method for detection of cancer cells in vitro. Here we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study adhesion of single silica beads to malignant and normal cells cultured from human cervix. We found that adhesion depends on the time of contact, and can be statistically different for malignant and normal cells. Using these data, one could develop an optical method of cancer detection based on adhesion of various silica beads.

  2. Liquid solution delivery through the pulled nanopipette combined with QTF-AFM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sangmin; Stambaugh, Corey; Kim, Gunn; Lee, Manhee; Kim, Yonghee; Lee, Kunyoung; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-02-01

    Nanopipette is a versatile fluidic tool for biochemical analysis, controlled liquid delivery in bio-nanotechnology. However, most of the researches have been performed in solution based system, thus it is challenge to study nanofluidic properties of the liquid solution delivery through the nanopipette in ambient conditions. In this work, we demonstrated the liquid ejection, dispersion, and subsequent deposition of the nanoparticles via a 30 nm aperture pipette based on the quartz tuning fork -- atomic force microscope (QTF-AFM) combined nanopipette system.

  3. Temporal analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell elasticity and adhesion reveals oscillation waveforms that differ with aging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Qiu, Hongyu; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P; Sun, Zhe; Li, Zhaohui; Hong, Zhongkui; Hill, Michael A; Hunter, William C; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F; Meininger, Gerald A

    2012-10-01

    A spectral analysis approach was developed for detailed study of time-resolved, dynamic changes in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) elasticity and adhesion to identify differences in VSMC from young and aged monkeys. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure Young's modulus of elasticity and adhesion as assessed by fibronectin (FN) or anti-beta 1 integrin interaction with the VSMC surface. Measurements demonstrated that VSMC cells from old vs. young monkeys had increased elasticity (21.6 kPa vs. 3.5 kPa or a 612% increase in elastic modulus) and adhesion (86 pN vs. 43 pN or a 200% increase in unbinding force). Spectral analysis identified three major frequency components in the temporal oscillation patterns for elasticity (ranging from 1.7 × 10(-3) to 1.9 × 10(-2) Hz in old and 8.4 × 10(-4) to 1.5 × 10(-2) Hz in young) and showed that the amplitude of oscillation was larger (P < 0.05) in old than in young at all frequencies. It was also observed that patterns of oscillation in the adhesion data were similar to the elasticity waveforms. Cell stiffness was reduced and the oscillations were inhibited by treatment with cytochalasin D, ML7 or blebbistatin indicating the involvement of actin-myosin-driven processes. In conclusion, these data demonstrate the efficacy of time-resolved analysis of AFM cell elasticity and adhesion measurements and that it provides a uniquely sensitive method to detect real-time functional differences in biomechanical and adhesive properties of cells. The oscillatory behavior suggests that mechanisms governing elasticity and adhesion are coupled and affected differentially during aging, which may link these events to changes in vascular stiffness. PMID:22639979

  4. OTU Deubiquitinases Reveal Mechanisms of Linkage Specificity and Enable Ubiquitin Chain Restriction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mevissen, Tycho E.T.; Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Geurink, Paul P.; Elliott, Paul R.; Akutsu, Masato; Arnaudo, Nadia; Ekkebus, Reggy; Kulathu, Yogesh; Wauer, Tobias; El Oualid, Farid; Freund, Stefan M.V.; Ovaa, Huib; Komander, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary Sixteen ovarian tumor (OTU) family deubiquitinases (DUBs) exist in humans, and most members regulate cell-signaling cascades. Several OTU DUBs were reported to be ubiquitin (Ub) chain linkage specific, but comprehensive analyses are missing, and the underlying mechanisms of linkage specificity are unclear. Using Ub chains of all eight linkage types, we reveal that most human OTU enzymes are linkage specific, preferring one, two, or a defined subset of linkage types, including unstudied atypical Ub chains. Biochemical analysis and five crystal structures of OTU DUBs with or without Ub substrates reveal four mechanisms of linkage specificity. Additional Ub-binding domains, the ubiquitinated sequence in the substrate, and defined S1’ and S2 Ub-binding sites on the OTU domain enable OTU DUBs to distinguish linkage types. We introduce Ub chain restriction analysis, in which OTU DUBs are used as restriction enzymes to reveal linkage type and the relative abundance of Ub chains on substrates. PMID:23827681

  5. A phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13 in patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Achim; Sasse, Stephanie; Topp, Max S.; Eichenauer, Dennis A.; Hummel, Horst; Reiners, Katrin S.; Dietlein, Markus; Kuhnert, Georg; Kessler, Joerg; Buerkle, Carolin; Ravic, Miroslav; Knackmuss, Stefan; Marschner, Jens-Peter; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Borchmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    AFM13 is a bispecific, tetravalent chimeric antibody construct (TandAb) designed for the treatment of CD30-expressing malignancies. AFM13 recruits natural killer (NK) cells via binding to CD16A as immune effector cells. In this phase 1 dose-escalation study, 28 patients with heavily pretreated relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma received AFM13 at doses of 0.01 to 7 mg/kg body weight. Primary objectives were safety and tolerability. Secondary objectives included pharmacokinetics, antitumor activity, and pharmacodynamics. Adverse events were generally mild to moderate. The maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Pharmacokinetics assessment revealed a half-life of up to 19 hours. Three of 26 evaluable patients achieved partial remission (11.5%) and 13 patients achieved stable disease (50%), with an overall disease control rate of 61.5%. AFM13 was also active in brentuximab vedotin–refractory patients. In 13 patients who received doses of ≥1.5 mg/kg AFM13, the overall response rate was 23% and the disease control rate was 77%. AFM13 treatment resulted in a significant NK-cell activation and a decrease of soluble CD30 in peripheral blood. In conclusion, AFM13 represents a well-tolerated, safe, and active targeted immunotherapy of Hodgkin lymphoma. A phase 2 study is currently planned to optimize the dosing schedule in order to further improve the therapeutic efficacy. This phase 1 study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01221571. PMID:25887777

  6. Tracer kinetic modeling of [(11)C]AFM, a new PET imaging agent for the serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Mika; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Planeta, Beata; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Lin, Shu-Fei; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Williams, Wendol; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E

    2013-12-01

    [(11)C]AFM, or [(11)C]2-[2-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenylthio]-5-fluoromethylphenylamine, is a new positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand with high affinity and selectivity for the serotonin transporter (SERT). The purpose of this study was to determine the most appropriate kinetic model to quantify [(11)C]AFM binding in the healthy human brain. Positron emission tomography data and arterial input functions were acquired from 10 subjects. Compartmental modeling and the multilinear analysis-1(MA1) method were tested using the arterial input functions. The one-tissue model showed a lack of fit in low-binding regions, and the two-tissue model failed to estimate parameters reliably. Regional time-activity curves were well described by MA1. The rank order of [(11)C]AFM binding potential (BPND) matched well with the known regional SERT densities. For routine use of [(11)C]AFM, several noninvasive methods for quantification of regional binding were evaluated, including simplified reference tissue models (SRTM and SRTM2), and multilinear reference tissue models (MRTM and MRTM2). The best methods for region of interest (ROI) analysis were MA1, MRTM2, and SRTM2, with fixed population kinetic values ( or b') for the reference methods. The MA1 and MRTM2 methods were best for parametric imaging. These results showed that [(11)C]AFM is a suitable PET radioligand to image and quantify SERT in humans. PMID:23921898

  7. Nano-scale Topographical Studies on the Growth Cones of Nerve Cells using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkaya, Goksel; Zhong, Lei; Rehder, Vincent; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-11-01

    Nerve cells are the fundamental units which are responsible for intercommunication within the nervous system. The neurites, fibrous cable-like extensions for information delivery, of nerve cells are tipped by highly motile sensory structures known as the growth cones which execute important functions; neural construction, decision making and navigation during development and regeneration of the nervous system. The highly dynamic subcomponents of the growth cones are important in neural activity. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is the most powerful microscopy technique which is capable of imaging without conductivity constraint and in liquid media. AFM providing nano-scale topographical information on biological structures is also informative on the physical properties such as: elasticity, adhesion, and softness. This contribution focuses on AFM analysis of the growth cones of the nerve cells removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis. The results of nano-scale topography and softness analysis on growth cone central domain, filopodia and overlying lamellopodium (veil) are presented. The subcomponents of the growth cones of different nerve cells are compared to each other. The results of the analysis are linked to the mechanical properties and internal molecular density distribution of the growth cones.

  8. Absorption Spectroscopy and Imaging from the Visible through Mid-IR with 20 nm Resolution Using AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrone, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Correlated nanoscale composition and optical property maps are important to engineer nanomaterials in applications ranging from photovoltaics to sensing and therapeutics. Wavelengths (λs) from the visible to near-IR probe electronic transitions in materials, providing information regarding band gap and defects while light in mid-IR probes vibrational transitions and provide chemical composition. However, light diffraction limits the lateral resolution of conventional micro-spectroscopic techniques to approximately λ/2, which is insufficient to image nanomaterials. Additionally, the λ-dependent resolution impedes direct comparison of spectral maps from different spectral ranges. Photo Thermal Induced Resonance (PTIR) is a novel technique that circumvents light diffraction by employing an AFM tip as a local detector for measuring light absorption with λ-independent nanoscale resolution. Our PTIR setup combines an AFM microscope with three lasers providing λ-tunability from 500 nm to 16000 nm continuously. The AFM tip transduces locally the sample thermal expansion induced by light absorption into large cantilever oscillations. Local absorption spectra (electronic or vibrational) and maps are obtained recording the amplitude of the tip deflection as a function of λ and position, respectively. The working principles of the PTIR technique will be described first, and nano-patterned polymer samples will be used to evaluate its lateral resolution, sensitivity and linearity. Results show that the PTIR signal intensity is proportional to the local absorbed energy suggesting applicability of this technique for quantitative chemical analysis at nanoscale, at least for thin (less than 1000 nm thick) samples. Additionally, a λ-independent resolution as high as 20 nm is demonstrated across the whole spectral range. In the second part of the talk, PTIR will be applied to image the dark plasmonic resonance of gold Asymmetric Split Ring Resonators (A-SRRs) in the mid

  9. APOBEC3G Interacts with ssDNA by Two Modes: AFM Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Dutta, Samrat; Banga, Jaspreet; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2015-10-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) protein has antiviral activity against HIV and other pathogenic retroviruses. A3G has two domains: a catalytic C-terminal domain (CTD) that deaminates cytidine, and a N-terminal domain (NTD) that binds to ssDNA. Although abundant information exists about the biological activities of A3G protein, the interplay between sequence specific deaminase activity and A3G binding to ssDNA remains controversial. We used the topographic imaging and force spectroscopy modalities of Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFM) to characterize the interaction of A3G protein with deaminase specific and nonspecific ssDNA substrates. AFM imaging demonstrated that A3G has elevated affinity for deaminase specific ssDNA than for nonspecific ssDNA. AFM force spectroscopy revealed two distinct binding modes by which A3G interacts with ssDNA. One mode requires sequence specificity, as demonstrated by stronger and more stable complexes with deaminase specific ssDNA than with nonspecific ssDNA. Overall these observations enforce prior studies suggesting that both domains of A3G contribute to the sequence specific binding of ssDNA.

  10. AFM investigation of Martian soil simulants on micromachined Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Vijendran, S; Sykulska, H; Pike, W T

    2007-09-01

    The micro and nanostructures of Martian soil simulants with particles in the micrometre-size range have been studied using a combination of optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in preparation for the 2007 NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The operation of an atomic force microscope on samples of micrometre-sized soil particles is a poorly investigated area where the unwanted interaction between the scanning tip and loose particles results in poor image quality and tip contamination by the sample. In order to mitigate these effects, etched silicon substrates with a variety of features have been used to facilitate the sorting and gripping of particles. From these experiments, a number of patterns were identified that were particularly good at isolating and immobilizing particles for AFM imaging. This data was used to guide the design of micromachined substrates for the Phoenix AFM. Both individual particles as well as aggregates were successfully imaged, and information on sizes, shapes and surface morphologies were obtained. This study highlights both the strengths and weaknesses of AFM for the potential in situ investigation of Martian soil and dust. Also presented are more general findings of the limiting operational constraints that exist when attempting the AFM of high aspect ratio particles with current technology. The performance of the final designs of the substrates incorporated on Phoenix will be described in a later paper. PMID:17760618

  11. Temperature Dependence Study of Noncontact Afm Images Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Meghdari, Ali

    The effect of temperature on the noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) surface imaging is investigated with the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) analysis based on the Sutton-Chen (SC) interatomic potential. Particular attention is devoted to the tip and sample flexibility at different temperatures. When a gold coated probe is brought close to the Au (001) surface at high temperatures, the tip and surface atoms are pulled together and their distance becomes smaller. The tip and sample atoms displacement varies in the different environment temperatures and this leads to the different interaction forces. Along this line, to study the effect of temperature on the resulting images, we have employed the well-known NC-AFM model and carried out realistic non-equilibrium MD 3D simulations of atomic scale imaging at different close approach positions to the surface.

  12. Fracture Growth Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Martinez, Jonathan; McLean, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant in orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent flaws will not cause failure during the design life. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environmentally-assisted cracking (K (sub EAC)) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched specimens SE(B) representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to the monopropellant at 50 degrees Centigrade for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant was found to be at least 22.0 kilopounds per square inch. The stress intensity factor of the weld material was at least 31.3 kilopounds per square inch.

  13. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R; Barth, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. PMID:26617348

  14. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  15. Imaging resolution of AFM with probes modified with FIB.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, J; Rebis, J; Wejrzanowski, T; Rozniatowski, K; Pressard, K; Kurzydlowski, K J

    2014-11-01

    This study concerns imaging of the structure of materials using AFM tapping (TM) and phase imaging (PI) mode, using probes modified with focused ion beam (FIB). Three kinds of modifications were applied - thinning of the cantilever, sharpening of the tip and combination of these two modifications. Probes shaped in that way were used for AFM investigations with Bruker AFM Nanoscope 8. As a testing material, titanium roughness standard supplied by Bruker was used. The results show that performed modifications influence the oscillation of the probes. In particular thinning of the cantilever enables one to acquire higher self-resonant frequencies, which can be advantageous for improving the quality of imaging in PI mode. It was found that sharpening the tip improves imaging resolution in tapping mode, which is consistent with existing knowledge, but lowered the quality of high frequency topography images. In this paper the Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to explain the results obtained experimentally. PMID:25080273

  16. Improvement in metrology on new 3D-AFM platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Ingo; Osborn, Marc; Hand, Sean; Chen, Qi

    2008-10-01

    According to the 2007 edition of the ITRS roadmap, the requirement for CD uniformity of isolated lines on a binary or attenuated phase shift mask is 2.1nm (3σ) in 2008 and requires improvement to1.3 nm (3σ) in 2010. In order to meet the increasing demand for CD uniformity on photo masks, improved CD metrology is required. A next generation AFM, InSightTM 3DAFM, has been developed to meet these increased requirements for advanced photo mask metrology. The new system achieves 2X improvement in CD and depth precision on advanced photo masks features over the previous generation 3D-AFM. This paper provides measurement data including depth, CD, and sidewall angle metrology. In addition the unique capabilities of damage-free defect inspection and Nanoimprint characterization by 3D AFM are presented.

  17. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  18. Surface Morphological Studies on Nerve Cells by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkaya, Goksel; Zhong, Lei; Rehder, Vincent; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-03-01

    Surface morphological properties of fixed and living nerve cells removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis have been studied by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Identified, individual neurons were removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis and plated into poly-L-lysine coated glass cover-slips. The growth of the nerve cells was stopped and fixed with 0.1% Glutaraldehyde and 4% Formaldehyde solution after extension of growth cones at the tip of the axons. Topography and softness of growth cone filopodia and overlying lamellopodium (veil) were probed by AFM. Information obtained from AFM's amplitude and phase channels have been used for determination of softness of the region probed. The results of structural studies on the cells are linked to their mechanical properties and internal molecular density distribution.

  19. Cellular mechanoadaptation to substrate mechanical properties: contributions of substrate stiffness and thickness to cell stiffness measurements using AFM.

    PubMed

    Vichare, Shirish; Sen, Shamik; Inamdar, Mandar M

    2014-02-28

    Mechanosensing by adherent cells is usually studied by quantifying cell responses on hydrogels that are covalently linked to a rigid substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) represents a convenient way of characterizing the mechanoadaptation response of adherent cells on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Since AFM measurements reflect the effective cell stiffness, therefore, in addition to measuring real cytoskeletal alterations across different conditions, these measurements might also be influenced by the geometry and physical properties of the substrate itself. To better understand how the physical attributes of the gel influence AFM stiffness measurements of cells, we have used finite element analysis to simulate the indentation of cells of various spreads resting on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Consistent with experimental results, our simulation results indicate that for well spread cells, stiffness values are significantly over-estimated when experiments are performed on cells cultured on soft and thin gels. Using parametric studies, we have developed scaling relationships between the effective stiffness probed by AFM and the bulk cell stiffness, taking cell and tip geometry, hydrogel properties, nuclear stiffness and cell contractility into account. Finally, using simulated mechanoadaptation responses, we have demonstrated that a cell stiffening response may arise purely due to the substrate properties. Collectively, our results demonstrate the need to take hydrogel properties into account while estimating cell stiffness using AFM indentation. PMID:24651595

  20. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R.; Barth, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system.We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR04541J

  1. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  2. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  3. Surface morphology changes of lignin filled natural rubber latex films investigated using AFM in relation to tensile strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asrul, M.; Othman, M.; Zakaria, M.

    2015-07-01

    The paper describes the preparation of lignin filled natural rubber latex composite and the consequential changes in tensile strength observed with varying lignin loading. The changes in tensile strength were shown to be associated with the changes in surface morphology as investigated via AFM. From the AFM analysis it can be inferred that lignin filled rubber latex film which exhibited an increase in tensile strength also demonstrated better phase homogeneity with lowest surface roughness value in comparison to the rest of the lignin filled rubber latex films analysed.

  4. Cytochrome P450 genes in coronary artery diseases: Codon usage analysis reveals genomic GC adaptation.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Arup Kumar; Halder, Binata; Paul, Prosenjit; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2016-09-15

    Establishing codon usage biases are imperative for understanding the etiology of coronary artery diseases (CAD) as well as the genetic factors associated with these diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of 18 responsible cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes for the risk of CAD. Effective number of codon (Nc) showed a negative correlation with both GC3 and synonymous codon usage order (SCUO) suggesting an antagonistic relationship between codon usage and Nc of genes. The dinucleotide analysis revealed that CG and TA dinucleotides have the lowest odds ratio in these genes. Principal component analysis showed that GC composition has a profound effect in separating the genes along the first major axis. Our findings revealed that mutational pressure and natural selection could possibly be the major factors responsible for codon bias in these genes. The study not only offers an insight into the mechanisms of genomic GC adaptation, but also illustrates the complexity of CYP genes in CAD. PMID:27275533

  5. Autotriploid origin of Carassius auratus as revealed by chromosomal locus analysis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qinbo; Wang, Juan; Hu, Min; Huang, Shengnan; Liu, Shaojun

    2016-06-01

    In the Dongting water system, the Carassius auratus (Crucian carp) complex is characterized by the coexistence of diploid forms (2n=100, 2nCC) and polyploid forms. Chromosomal and karyotypic analyses have suggested that the polyploid C. auratus has a triploid (3n=150, 3nCC) and a tetraploid origin (4n=200), respectively. However, there is a lack of direct genetic evidence to support this conclusion. In this paper, analysis of the 5S rDNA chromosomal locus revealed that the 3nCC is of triploid origin. Analysis of the species-specific chromosomal centromere locus revealed that 3nCC individuals possess three sets of C. auratus-derived chromosomes. Our results provide direct cytogenetic evidence suggesting that individuals with 150 chromosomes are of autotriploid origin within the C. auratus complex. It marks an important contribution to the study of polyploidization and the evolution of vertebrates. PMID:27084707

  6. Whole Genome Expression Analysis Reveals Differential Effects of TiO2 Nanotubes on Vascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lily; Barczak, Andrea J.; Barbeau, Rebecca A.; Xiao, Yuanyuan; LaTempa, Thomas J.; Grimes, Craig A.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2010-01-01

    The response of primary human endothelial (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to TiO2 nanotube arrays is studied through gene expression analysis. Microarrays revealed that nanotubes enhanced EC proliferation and motility, decreased VSMC proliferation, and decreased expression of molecules involved in inflammation and coagulation in both cell types. Networks generated from significantly affected genes suggest that cells may be sensing nanotopographical cues via pathways previously implicated in sensing shear stress. PMID:20030358

  7. Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. Results In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 103 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed. Importantly, cellulases of some GH families are present in fungi that are not known to have cellulose-degrading ability. In addition, our results also showed that in general, plant pathogenic fungi have the highest number of CAZymes. Biotrophic fungi tend to have fewer CAZymes than necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi. Pathogens of dicots often contain more pectinases than fungi infecting monocots. Interestingly, besides yeasts, many saprophytic fungi that are highly active in degrading plant biomass contain fewer CAZymes than plant pathogenic fungi. Furthermore, analysis of the gene expression profile of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum revealed that most of the CAZyme genes related to cell wall degradation were up-regulated during plant infection. Phylogenetic analysis also

  8. High-Speed AFM Images of Thermal Motion Provide Stiffness Map of Interfacial Membrane Protein Moieties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The flexibilities of extracellular loops determine ligand binding and activation of membrane receptors. Arising from fluctuations in inter- and intraproteinaceous interactions, flexibility manifests in thermal motion. Here we demonstrate that quantitative flexibility values can be extracted from directly imaging the thermal motion of membrane protein moieties using high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM). Stiffness maps of the main periplasmic loops of single reconstituted water channels (AqpZ, GlpF) revealed the spatial and temporal organization of loop-stabilizing intraproteinaceous H-bonds and salt bridges. PMID:25516527

  9. Reticulate evolutionary history and extensive introgression in mosquito species revealed by phylogenetic network analysis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dingqiao; Yu, Yun; Hahn, Matthew W; Nakhleh, Luay

    2016-06-01

    The role of hybridization and subsequent introgression has been demonstrated in an increasing number of species. Recently, Fontaine et al. (Science, 347, 2015, 1258524) conducted a phylogenomic analysis of six members of the Anopheles gambiae species complex. Their analysis revealed a reticulate evolutionary history and pointed to extensive introgression on all four autosomal arms. The study further highlighted the complex evolutionary signals that the co-occurrence of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and introgression can give rise to in phylogenomic analyses. While tree-based methodologies were used in the study, phylogenetic networks provide a more natural model to capture reticulate evolutionary histories. In this work, we reanalyse the Anopheles data using a recently devised framework that combines the multispecies coalescent with phylogenetic networks. This framework allows us to capture ILS and introgression simultaneously, and forms the basis for statistical methods for inferring reticulate evolutionary histories. The new analysis reveals a phylogenetic network with multiple hybridization events, some of which differ from those reported in the original study. To elucidate the extent and patterns of introgression across the genome, we devise a new method that quantifies the use of reticulation branches in the phylogenetic network by each genomic region. Applying the method to the mosquito data set reveals the evolutionary history of all the chromosomes. This study highlights the utility of 'network thinking' and the new insights it can uncover, in particular in phylogenomic analyses of large data sets with extensive gene tree incongruence. PMID:26808290

  10. Structure and permeability of ion-channels by integrated AFM and waveguide TIRF microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Arce, Fernando Teran; Patel, Nirav R; Quist, Arjan P; Cohen, Daniel A; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Membrane ion channels regulate key cellular functions and their activity is dependent on their 3D structure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images 3D structure of membrane channels placed on a solid substrate. Solid substrate prevents molecular transport through ion channels thus hindering any direct structure-function relationship analysis. Here we designed a ~70 nm nanopore to suspend a membrane, allowing fluidic access to both sides. We used these nanopores with AFM and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) for high resolution imaging and molecular transport measurement. Significantly, membranes over the nanopore were stable for repeated AFM imaging. We studied structure-activity relationship of gap junction hemichannels reconstituted in lipid bilayers. Individual hemichannels in the membrane overlying the nanopore were resolved and transport of hemichannel-permeant LY dye was visualized when the hemichannel was opened by lowering calcium in the medium. This integrated technique will allow direct structure-permeability relationship of many ion channels and receptors. PMID:24651823

  11. EEMD based pitch evaluation method for accurate grating measurement by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Shuming; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-09-01

    The pitch measurement and AFM calibration precision are significantly influenced by the grating pitch evaluation method. This paper presents the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based pitch evaluation method to relieve the accuracy deterioration caused by high and low frequency components of scanning profile during pitch evaluation. The simulation analysis shows that the application of EEMD can improve the pitch accuracy of the FFT-FT algorithm. The pitch error is small when the iteration number of the FFT-FT algorithms was 8. The AFM measurement of the 500 nm-pitch one-dimensional grating shows that the EEMD based pitch evaluation method could improve the pitch precision, especially the grating line position precision, and greatly expand the applicability of the gravity center algorithm when particles and impression marks were distributed on the sample surface. The measurement indicates that the nonlinearity was stable, and the nonlinearity of x axis and forward scanning was much smaller than their counterpart. Finally, a detailed pitch measurement uncertainty evaluation model suitable for commercial AFMs was demonstrated and a pitch uncertainty in the sub-nanometer range was achieved. The pitch uncertainty was reduced about 10% by EEMD.

  12. A study of water droplet between an AFM tip and a substrate using dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Souvik; Lan, Chuanjin; Li, Zhen; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Ma, Yanbao

    2014-11-01

    Formation of a water droplet between a sharp AFM tip and a substrate due to capillary condensation affects the tip-substrate interaction. As a consequence, AFM measurements lose precision and often produce incorrect sample topology. Understanding the physics of liquid bridges is also important in the field of Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). Significant research is being carried out to understand the mechanics of the formation of the liquid bridge and its dependence of surface properties, ambient conditions etc. The in-between length scale, i.e., mesoscale (~100 nm) associated with this phenomenon presents a steep challenge for experimental measurements. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) can be computationally prohibitive to model the entire system, especially over microseconds to seconds. Theoretical analysis using Young Laplace equation has so far provided some qualitative insights only. We study this system using Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) which is a simulation technique suitable for describing mesoscopic hydrodynamic behavior of fluids. In this work, we carry out simulations to improve understanding of the process of formation of the meniscus, the mechanics of manipulation and control of its shape, and better estimation of capillary forces. The knowledge gained through our study will help in correcting the AFM measurements affected by capillary condensation. Moreover, it will improve understanding of more accurate droplet manipulation in DPN.

  13. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. Methods We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7) and mouse melanoma (B16F1) cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Results Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Conclusion Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 might be

  14. Period-Amplitude Analysis Reveals Wake-Dependent Changes in the Electroencephalogram during Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Ehlen, J. Christopher; Jefferson, Felicia; Brager, Allison J.; Benveniste, Morris; Paul, Ketema N.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Electroencephalographic slow wave activity (SWA) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep results from the synchronous oscillation of cortical neurons and is the standard measurement of sleep homeostasis. SWA is not a direct measure of sleep pressure accumulation, but rather a measure of the NREM-sleep response to accumulated sleep pressure. Currently, no practical standard for the direct measurement of sleep pressure accumulation exists. Recently, it was demonstrated that rat cortical neurons undergo oscillations during wake that are similar to the cortical oscillations responsible for SWA. Furthermore, these oscillations increase in number as time awake increases. Here we hypothesize that period-amplitude analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG), which treats the EEG as a series of discrete waves, can measure these cortical oscillations, and thus, is a measure of sleep-pressure accumulation during extended wake. Design: Mice were sleep deprived for 24 h by confinement to a slowly rotating wheel in order to assess wake-dependent changes in EEG wave incidence. Measurements and Results: Continuous period-amplitude analysis of the waking EEG across 24 h of sleep deprivation revealed that the incidence of 2 to 6 Hz waves increased exponentially over the deprivation period. This increase in wave incidence appeared to occur in two phases with exponential time constants of approximately 0.12 h and 3 h. Further analysis revealed that the changes in wave incidence were significantly correlated with two established markers of sleep pressure, SWA and NREM sleep latency. Conclusions: The data suggest that wave incidence is an effective method of measuring sleep homeostasis in the waking EEG that provides better temporal resolution than spectral power analysis. Citation: Ehlen JC; Jefferson F; Brager AJ; Benveniste M; Paul KN. Period-amplitude analysis reveals wake-dependent changes in the electroencephalogram during sleep deprivation. SLEEP 2013

  15. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  17. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  18. Conductive supports for combined AFM SECM on biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Bosshart, Patrick D.; Akiyama, Terunobu; Chami, Mohamed; Gullo, Maurizio R.; Blackstock, Jason J.; Dooleweerdt, Karin; de Rooij, Nico F.; Staufer, Urs; Engel, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    Four different conductive supports are analysed regarding their suitability for combined atomic force and scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) on biological membranes. Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), MoS2, template stripped gold, and template stripped platinum are compared as supports for high resolution imaging of reconstituted membrane proteins or native membranes, and as electrodes for transferring electrons from or to a redox molecule. We demonstrate that high resolution topographs of the bacterial outer membrane protein F can be recorded by contact mode AFM on all four supports. Electrochemical feedback experiments with conductive cantilevers that feature nanometre-scale electrodes showed fast re-oxidation of the redox couple Ru(NH3)63+/2+ with the two metal supports after prolonged immersion in electrolyte. In contrast, the re-oxidation rates decayed quickly to unpractical levels with HOPG or MoS2 under physiological conditions. On HOPG we observed heterogeneity in the re-oxidation rate of the redox molecules with higher feedback currents at step edges. The latter results demonstrate the capability of conductive cantilevers with small electrodes to measure minor variations in an SECM signal and to relate them to nanometre-scale features in a simultaneously recorded AFM topography. Rapid decay of re-oxidation rate and surface heterogeneity make HOPG or MoS2 less attractive for combined AFM-SECM experiments on biological membranes than template stripped gold or platinum supports.

  19. MOS-based nanocapacitor using C-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Daniel; Sadewasser, Sascha; Aymerich, Xavier

    2003-04-01

    This report details the attempts made to realise nanocapacitors for nanoscale MOS based integrated circuits by AFM anodic oxidation, and therefore isolation, of nano-sized squares of poly-silicon, titanium and aluminium on Si/SiO2. Conductive AFM (C-AFM) was used to perform topographical and electrical characterisation. The experiments were performed with contact mode C-AFM, in ambient air, using Pt-Ir, Co-Cr and Ti coated (20nm) n-type silicon cantilevers. Each sample consisted of a 3-5nm thick conductor deposited on 6nm of SiO2, which was thermally grown on Phosphorus doped (1019 cm-3) n-type Si(100) substrates. Standard cleaning and passivation processes were used. Poly-silicon was immediately found to be too rough to oxidise. Initial current-voltage measurements inside of the titanium-oxide squares suggest initial isolation followed by degradation through Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling. Measurement inconsistencies seen suggest charge storage on the surface or tip with the barrier height of the native titanium oxide thought to be responsible. Al has a thicker natural oxide. To overcome this we designed a series of structures consisting of a Ti finger on SiO2, that is connected to a Ti bond pad, allowing direct probing by a semiconductor parameter analyser. AFM anodic oxidation was performed upon these Ti fingers to reduce their in-plane dimensions towards the nanoscale. To confirm the existence of a nanocapacitor topographical and electrical measurements were then done on and around them.

  20. Analysis of the Transcriptional Differences between Indigenous and Invasive Whiteflies Reveals Possible Mechanisms of Whitefly Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Liang; Wang, Yu-Jun; Luan, Jun-Bo; Yan, Gen-Hong; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background The whitefly Bemisa tabaci is a species complex of more than 31 cryptic species which include some of the most destructive invasive pests of crops worldwide. Among them, Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) and Mediterranean have invaded many countries and displaced the native whitefly species. The successful invasion of the two species is largely due to their wide range of host plants, high resistance to insecticides and remarkable tolerance to environmental stresses. However, the molecular differences between invasive and indigenous whiteflies remain largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here the global transcriptional difference between the two invasive whitefly species (MEAM1, MED) and one indigenous whitefly species (Asia II 3) were analyzed using the Illumina sequencing. Our analysis indicated that 2,422 genes between MEAM1 and MED; 3,073 genes between MEAM1 and Asia II 3; and 3,644 genes between MED and Asia II 3 were differentially expressed. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis revealed that the differently expressed genes between the invasive and indigenous whiteflies were significantly enriched in the term of ‘oxidoreductase activity’. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that carbohydrate, amino acid and glycerolipid metabolisms were more active in MEAM1 and MED than in Asia II 3, which may contribute to their differences in biological characteristics. Our analysis also illustrated that the majority of genes involved in ‘drug metabolic pathway’ were expressed at a higher level in MEAM1 and MED than in Asia II 3. Taken together, these results revealed that the genes related to basic metabolism and detoxification were expressed at an elevated level in the invasive whiteflies, which might be responsible for their higher resistance to insecticides and environmental stresses. Conclusions/Significance The extensive comparison of MEAM1, MED and Asia II 3 gene expression may serve as an invaluable resource for revealing the molecular

  1. Local coexistence of VO2 phases revealed by deep data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Anton; Belianinov, Alex; Tselev, Alexander; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-01

    We report a synergistic approach of micro-Raman spectroscopic mapping and deep data analysis to study the distribution of crystallographic phases and ferroelastic domains in a defected Al-doped VO2 microcrystal. Bayesian linear unmixing revealed an uneven distribution of the T phase, which is stabilized by the surface defects and uneven local doping that went undetectable by other classical analysis techniques such as PCA and SIMPLISMA. This work demonstrates the impact of information recovery via statistical analysis and full mapping in spectroscopic studies of vanadium dioxide systems, which is commonly substituted by averaging or single point-probing approaches, both of which suffer from information misinterpretation due to low resolving power.

  2. A versatile multivariate image analysis pipeline reveals features of Xenopus extract spindles.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, Andrew W; Strzelecka, Magdalena; Crowder, Marina E; Helmke, Kara J; Schlaitz, Anne-Lore; Heald, Rebecca

    2016-04-11

    Imaging datasets are rich in quantitative information. However, few cell biologists possess the tools necessary to analyze them. Here, we present a large dataset ofXenopusextract spindle images together with an analysis pipeline designed to assess spindle morphology across a range of experimental conditions. Our analysis of different spindle types illustrates how kinetochore microtubules amplify spindle microtubule density. Extract mixing experiments reveal that some spindle features titrate, while others undergo switch-like transitions, and multivariate analysis shows the pleiotropic morphological effects of modulating the levels of TPX2, a key spindle assembly factor. We also apply our pipeline to analyze nuclear morphology in human cell culture, showing the general utility of the segmentation approach. Our analyses provide new insight into the diversity of spindle types and suggest areas for future study. The approaches outlined can be applied by other researchers studying spindle morphology and adapted with minimal modification to other experimental systems. PMID:27044897

  3. Local coexistence of VO2 phases revealed by deep data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Anton; Belianinov, Alex; Tselev, Alexander; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-01-01

    We report a synergistic approach of micro-Raman spectroscopic mapping and deep data analysis to study the distribution of crystallographic phases and ferroelastic domains in a defected Al-doped VO2 microcrystal. Bayesian linear unmixing revealed an uneven distribution of the T phase, which is stabilized by the surface defects and uneven local doping that went undetectable by other classical analysis techniques such as PCA and SIMPLISMA. This work demonstrates the impact of information recovery via statistical analysis and full mapping in spectroscopic studies of vanadium dioxide systems, which is commonly substituted by averaging or single point-probing approaches, both of which suffer from information misinterpretation due to low resolving power. PMID:27384473

  4. Local coexistence of VO2 phases revealed by deep data analysis.

    PubMed

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Anton; Belianinov, Alex; Tselev, Alexander; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-01-01

    We report a synergistic approach of micro-Raman spectroscopic mapping and deep data analysis to study the distribution of crystallographic phases and ferroelastic domains in a defected Al-doped VO2 microcrystal. Bayesian linear unmixing revealed an uneven distribution of the T phase, which is stabilized by the surface defects and uneven local doping that went undetectable by other classical analysis techniques such as PCA and SIMPLISMA. This work demonstrates the impact of information recovery via statistical analysis and full mapping in spectroscopic studies of vanadium dioxide systems, which is commonly substituted by averaging or single point-probing approaches, both of which suffer from information misinterpretation due to low resolving power. PMID:27384473

  5. Local coexistence of VO2 phases revealed by deep data analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Anton; Tselev, Alexander; Kolmakov, Andrei; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-07

    We report a synergistic approach of micro-Raman spectroscopic mapping and deep data analysis to study the distribution of crystallographic phases and ferroelastic domains in a defected Al-doped VO2 microcrystal. Bayesian linear unmixing revealed an uneven distribution of the T phase, which is stabilized by the surface defects and uneven local doping that went undetectable by other classical analysis techniques such as PCA and SIMPLISMA. This work demonstrates the impact of information recovery via statistical analysis and full mapping in spectroscopic studies of vanadium dioxide systems, which is commonly substituted by averaging or single point-probing approaches, both of which suffer frommore » information misinterpretation due to low resolving power.« less

  6. Nanotechnology for forensic sciences: analysis of PDMS replica of the case head of spent cartridges by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM for the ballistic identification of individual characteristic features of firearms.

    PubMed

    Valle, Francesco; Bianchi, Michele; Tortorella, Silvia; Pierini, Giovanni; Biscarini, Fabio; D'Elia, Marcello

    2012-10-10

    A novel application of replica molding to a forensic problem, viz. the accurate reproduction of the case head of gun and rifle cartridges, prior and after been shot, is presented. The fabrication of an arbitrary number of identical copies of the region hit by the firing pin and by the breech face is described. The replicas can be (i) handled without damaging the original evidence, (ii) distributed to different law enforcement agencies for comparison against other evidences found on crime scenes or ballistic tests of seized firearms, (iii) maintained on a file by the laboratories. A detailed analysis of the morphological features of the replicas has been carried out by standard microscopy techniques as well as by advanced microscopy such as scanning probe and scanning electron leading to a quantitative morphological characterization of the case heads down to the nanometer scale. The assignment of the cartridge replicas to the shooting weapon is demonstrated to hold below the micron scale, while it is hindered at the nanometer level both by the manufacturing differences and by eventual modifications occurring on the firing pin. PMID:22840283

  7. A tetravalent bispecific TandAb (CD19/CD3), AFM11, efficiently recruits T cells for the potent lysis of CD19+ tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Reusch, Uwe; Duell, Johannes; Ellwanger, Kristina; Herbrecht, Carmen; Knackmuss, Stefan HJ; Fucek, Ivica; Eser, Markus; McAleese, Fionnuala; Molkenthin, Vera; Le Gall, Fabrice; Topp, Max; Little, Melvyn; Zhukovsky, Eugene A

    2015-01-01

    To harness the potent tumor-killing capacity of T cells for the treatment of CD19+ malignancies, we constructed AFM11, a humanized tetravalent bispecific CD19/CD3 tandem diabody (TandAb) consisting solely of Fv domains. The molecule exhibits good manufacturability and stability properties. AFM11 has 2 binding sites for CD3 and 2 for CD19, an antigen that is expressed from early B cell development through differentiation into plasma cells, and is an attractive alternative to CD20 as a target for the development of therapeutic antibodies to treat B cell malignancies. Comparison of the binding and cytotoxicity of AFM11 with those of a tandem scFv bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) molecule targeting the same antigens revealed that AFM11 elicited more potent in vitro B cell lysis. Though possessing high affinity to CD3, the TandAb mediates serial-killing of CD19+ cells with little dependence of potency or efficacy upon effector:target ratio, unlike the BiTE. The advantage of the TandAb over the BiTE was most pronounced at lower effector:target ratios. AFM11 mediated strictly target-dependent T cell activation evidenced by CD25 and CD69 induction, proliferation, and cytokine release, notwithstanding bivalent CD3 engagement. In a NOD/scid xenograft model, AFM11 induced dose-dependent growth inhibition of Raji tumors in vivo, and radiolabeled TandAb exhibited excellent localization to tumor but not to normal tissue. After intravenous administration in mice, half-life ranged from 18.4 to 22.9 h. In a human ex vivo B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia study, AFM11 exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity in an autologous setting. Thus, AFM11 may represent a promising therapeutic for treatment of CD19+ malignancies with an advantageous safety risk profile and anticipated dosing regimen. PMID:25875246

  8. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  9. Multilocus sequence analysis of nectar pseudomonads reveals high genetic diversity and contrasting recombination patterns.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pérez, Sergio; de Vega, Clara; Herrera, Carlos M

    2013-01-01

    The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas 'sensu stricto' isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD). A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs) 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1); P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2); and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3). Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria. PMID:24116076

  10. Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Nectar Pseudomonads Reveals High Genetic Diversity and Contrasting Recombination Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; de Vega, Clara; Herrera, Carlos M.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas ‘sensu stricto’ isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD). A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs) 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1); P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2); and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3). Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria. PMID:24116076

  11. AFM study of the effects of laser surface remelting on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pariona, Moises Meza; Teleginski, Viviane; Santos, Kelly dos; Leandro Ribeiro dos Santos, Everton; Aparecida de Oliveira Camargo de Lima, Angela; Riva, Rudimar

    2012-12-15

    Laser beam welding has recently been incorporated into the fabrication process of aircraft and automobile structures. Surface roughness is an important parameter of product quality that strongly affects the performance of mechanical parts, as well as production costs. This parameter influences the mechanical properties such as fatigue behavior, corrosion resistance, creep life, etc., and other functional characteristics such as friction, wear, light reflection, heat transmission, lubrification, electrical conductivity, etc. The effects of laser surface remelting (LSR) on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys were examined before and after surface treatments, using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), low-angle X-ray diffraction (LA-XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness measurements (Vickers hardness), and cyclic voltammetry. This analysis was performed on both laser-treated and untreated sanded surfaces, revealing significant differences. The LA-XRD analysis revealed the presence of alumina, simple metals and metastable intermetallic phases, which considerably improved the microhardness of laser-remelted surfaces. The morphology produced by laser surface remelting enhanced the microstructure of the Al-Fe alloys by reducing their roughness and increasing their hardness. The treated surfaces showed passivity and stability characteristics in the electrolytic medium employed in this study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples laser-treated and untreated showed significant differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The La-XRD revealed the presence of alumina in Al-1.5 wt.% Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated reducing the roughness and increasing the hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated surfaces showed characteristic passive in the electrolytic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated is a promising technique for applications technological.

  12. The mosaicism of plasmids revealed by atypical genes detection and analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background From an evolutionary viewpoint, prokaryotic genomes are extremely plastic and dynamic, since large amounts of genetic material are continuously added and/or lost through promiscuous gene exchange. In this picture, plasmids play a key role, since they can be transferred between different cells and, through genetic rearrangement(s), undergo gene(s) load, leading, in turn, to the appearance of important metabolic innovations that might be relevant for cell life. Despite their central position in bacterial evolution, a massive analysis of newly acquired functional blocks [likely the result of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events] residing on plasmids is still missing. Results We have developed a computational, composition-based, pipeline to scan almost 2000 plasmids for genes that differ significantly from their hosting molecule. Plasmids atypical genes (PAGs) were about 6% of the total plasmids ORFs and, on average, each plasmid possessed 4.4 atypical genes. Nevertheless, conjugative plasmids were shown to possess an amount of atypical genes than that found in not mobilizable plasmids, providing strong support for the central role suggested for conjugative plasmids in the context of HGT. Part of the retrieved PAGs are organized into (mainly short) clusters and are involved in important biological processes (detoxification, antibiotic resistance, virulence), revealing the importance of HGT in the spreading of metabolic pathways within the whole microbial community. Lastly, our analysis revealed that PAGs mainly derive from other plasmid (rather than coming from phages and/or chromosomes), suggesting that plasmid-plasmid DNA exchange might be the primary source of metabolic innovations in this class of mobile genetic elements. Conclusions In this work we have performed the first large scale analysis of atypical genes that reside on plasmid molecules to date. Our findings on PAGs function, organization, distribution and spreading reveal the importance of

  13. Structure, cell wall elasticity and polysaccharide properties of living yeast cells, as probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsteens, David; Dupres, Vincent; McEvoy, Kevin; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2008-09-01

    Although the chemical composition of yeast cell walls is known, the organization, assembly, and interactions of the various macromolecules remain poorly understood. Here, we used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) in three different modes to probe the ultrastructure, cell wall elasticity and polymer properties of two brewing yeast strains, i.e. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and S. cerevisiae. Topographic images of the two strains revealed smooth and homogeneous cell surfaces, and the presence of circular bud scars on dividing cells. Nanomechanical measurements demonstrated that the cell wall elasticity of S. carlsbergensis is homogeneous. By contrast, the bud scar of S. cerevisiae was found to be stiffer than the cell wall, presumably due to the accumulation of chitin. Notably, single molecule force spectroscopy with lectin-modified tips revealed major differences in polysaccharide properties of the two strains. Polysaccharides were clearly more extended on S. cerevisiae, suggesting that not only oligosaccharides, but also polypeptide chains of the mannoproteins were stretched. Consistent with earlier cell surface analyses, these findings may explain the very different aggregation properties of the two organisms. This study demonstrates the power of using multiple complementary AFM modalities for probing the organization and interactions of the various macromolecules of microbial cell walls.

  14. Cluster analysis reveals risk factors for repeated suicide attempts in a multi-ethnic Asian population.

    PubMed

    Choo, Carol; Diederich, Joachim; Song, Insu; Ho, Roger

    2014-04-01

    This study explores underlying patterns in suicide risk factors using data mining techniques. Medical records of suicide attempters who were admitted to a teaching hospital in January 2004 - December 2006 were studied. Cluster analysis revealed hidden patterns for repeated and single attempters (n=418). Repeated attempters had a more complex clinical picture. Symptoms of psychotic illness, borderline personality disorder, and psychosomatic complaints of insomnia and headaches, reports of adverse life events such as unemployment, divorce and quarrels, experience of negative feelings, and usage of alcohol were associated with risk of repeated overdoses with benzodiazepines and paracetamol. The findings have implications for suicide assessments and interventions. PMID:24655624

  15. Correction: Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The version of this article published in BMC Genomics 2013, 14: 274, contains 9 unpublished genomes (Botryobasidium botryosum, Gymnopus luxurians, Hypholoma sublateritium, Jaapia argillacea, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Conidiobolus coronatus, Laccaria amethystina, Paxillus involutus, and P. rubicundulus) downloaded from JGI website. In this correction, we removed these genomes after discussion with editors and data producers whom we should have contacted before downloading these genomes. Removing these data did not alter the principle results and conclusions of our original work. The relevant Figures 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6; and Table 1 have been revised. Additional files 1, 3, 4, and 5 were also revised. We would like to apologize for any confusion or inconvenience this may have caused. Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. Results In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 94 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed

  16. The use of colloid probe microscopy to predict aerosolization performance in dry powder inhalers: AFM and in vitro correlation.

    PubMed

    Young, Paul M; Tobyn, Michael J; Price, Robert; Buttrum, Mark; Dey, Fiona

    2006-08-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) colloid probe technique was utilized to measure cohesion forces (separation energy) between three drug systems as a function of relative humidity (RH). The subsequent data was correlated with in vitro aerosolization data collected over the same RH range. Three drug-only systems were chosen for study; salbutamol sulphate (SS), triamcinolone acetonide (TAA), and di-sodium cromoglycate (DSCG). Analysis of the AFM and in vitro data suggested good correlations, with the separation energy being related inversely to the aerosolization performance (measured as fine particle fraction, FPF(LD)). In addition, the relationship between, cohesion, RH, and aerosolization performance was drug specific. For example, an increase in RH between 15% and 75% resulted in increased cohesion and decreased FPF(LD) for SS and DSCG. In comparison, for TAA, a decrease in cohesion and increased FPF(LD) was observed when RH was increased (15-75%). Linear regression analysis comparing AFM with in vitro data indicated R(2) values > 0.80, for all data sets, suggesting the AFM could be used to indicate in vitro aerosolization performance. PMID:16795018

  17. Single-cell analysis reveals a novel uncultivated magnetotactic bacterium within the candidate division OP3.

    PubMed

    Kolinko, Sebastian; Jogler, Christian; Katzmann, Emanuel; Wanner, Gerhard; Peplies, Jörg; Schüler, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a diverse group of prokaryotes that orient along magnetic fields using membrane-coated magnetic nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3) O(4) ) or greigite (Fe(3) S(4) ), the magnetosomes. Previous phylogenetic analysis of MTB has been limited to few cultivated species and most abundant members of natural populations, which were assigned to Proteobacteria and the Nitrospirae phyla. Here, we describe a single cell-based approach that allowed the targeted phylogenetic and ultrastructural analysis of the magnetotactic bacterium SKK-01, which was low abundant in sediments of Lake Chiemsee. Morphologically conspicuous single cells of SKK-01 were micromanipulated from magnetically collected multi-species MTB populations, which was followed by whole genome amplification and ultrastructural analysis of sorted cells. Besides intracellular sulphur inclusions, the large ovoid cells of SKK-01 harbour ∼175 bullet-shaped magnetosomes arranged in multiple chains that consist of magnetite as revealed by TEM and EDX analysis. Sequence analysis of 16 and 23S rRNA genes from amplified genomic DNA as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization assigned SKK-01 to the candidate division OP3, which so far lacks any cultivated representatives. SKK-01 represents the first morphotype that can be assigned to the OP3 group as well as the first magnetotactic member of the PVC superphylum. PMID:22003954

  18. Phylogenomic Analysis of Oenococcus oeni Reveals Specific Domestication of Strains to Cider and Wines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Sills, Hugo; El Khoury, Mariette; Favier, Marion; Romano, Andrea; Biasioli, Franco; Spano, Giuseppe; Sherman, David J.; Bouchez, Olivier; Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika; Okada, Sanae; Tanaka, Naoto; Dols-Lafargue, Marguerite; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is a lactic acid bacteria species encountered particularly in wine, where it achieves the malolactic fermentation. Molecular typing methods have previously revealed that the species is made of several genetic groups of strains, some being specific to certain types of wines, ciders or regions. Here, we describe 36 recently released O. oeni genomes and the phylogenomic analysis of these 36 plus 14 previously reported genomes. We also report three genome sequences of the sister species Oenococcus kitaharae that were used for phylogenomic reconstructions. Phylogenomic and population structure analyses performed revealed that the 50 O. oeni genomes delineate two major groups of 12 and 37 strains, respectively, named A and B, plus a putative group C, consisting of a single strain. A study on the orthologs and single nucleotide polymorphism contents of the genetic groups revealed that the domestication of some strains to products such as cider, wine, or champagne, is reflected at the genetic level. While group A strains proved to be predominant in wine and to form subgroups adapted to specific types of wine such as champagne, group B strains were found in wine and cider. The strain from putative group C was isolated from cider and genetically closer to group B strains. The results suggest that ancestral O. oeni strains were adapted to low-ethanol containing environments such as overripe fruits, and that they were domesticated to cider and wine, with group A strains being naturally selected in a process of further domestication to specific wines such as champagne. PMID:25977455

  19. Revealing Amphiphilic Nanodornains of Anti-Biofouling Polymer Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Amadei, CA; Yang, R; Chiesa, M; Gleason, KK; Santos, S

    2014-04-09

    Undesired bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on wetted surfaces leads to significant economic and environmental costs in various industries. Amphiphilic coatings with molecular hydrophilic and hydrophobic patches can mitigate such biofouling effectively in an environmentally friendly manner. The coatings are synthesized by copolymerizing (Hydroxyethyl)methacrylate and perfluorodecylacrylate via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). In previous studies, the size of the patches was estimated to be similar to 1.4-1.75 nm by fitting protein adsorption data to a theoretical model. However, no direct observations of the molecular heterogeneity exist and therefore the origin of the fouling resistance of amphiphilic coatings remains unclear. Here, the amphiphilic nature is investigated by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). High-resolution images obtained by penetrating and oscillating the AFM tip under the naturally present water layer with sub-nanometer amplitudes reveal, for the first time, the existence of amphiphilic nanodomains (1-2 nm(2)). Compositional heterogeneity at the nanoscale is further corroborated by a statistical analysis on the data obtained with dynamic AM-AFM force spectroscopy. Variations in the long range attractive forces, responsible for water affinity, are also identified. These nanoscopic results on the polymers wettability are also confirmed by contact angle measurements (i.e., static and dynamic). The unprecedented ability to visualize the amphiphilic nanodomains as well as sub-nanometer crystalline structures provides strong evidence for the existence of previously postulated nanostructures, and sheds light on the underlying antifouling mechanism of amphiphilic chemistry.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of MG132-Treated Germinating Pollen Reveals Expression Signatures Associated with Proteasome Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Candida; Bracale, Marcella; Crinelli, Rita; Marconi, Valerio; Campomenosi, Paola; Marsoni, Milena; Scoccianti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Chemical inhibition of the proteasome has been previously found to effectively impair pollen germination and tube growth in vitro. However, the mediators of these effects at the molecular level are unknown. By performing 2DE proteomic analysis, 24 differentially expressed protein spots, representing 14 unique candidate proteins, were identified in the pollen of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) germinated in the presence of the MG132 proteasome inhibitor. qPCR analysis revealed that 11 of these proteins are not up-regulated at the mRNA level, but are most likely stabilized by proteasome inhibition. These differentially expressed proteins are predicted to function in various pathways including energy and lipid metabolism, cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis/degradation and stress responses. In line with this evidence, the MG132-induced changes in the proteome were accompanied by an increase in ATP and ROS content and by an alteration in fatty acid composition. PMID:25265451

  1. Integrative analysis of RNA, translation, and protein levels reveals distinct regulatory variation across humans

    PubMed Central

    Cenik, Can; Cenik, Elif Sarinay; Byeon, Gun W.; Grubert, Fabian; Candille, Sophie I.; Spacek, Damek; Alsallakh, Bilal; Tilgner, Hagen; Araya, Carlos L.; Tang, Hua; Ricci, Emiliano; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the consequences of genetic differences between humans is essential for understanding phenotypic diversity and personalized medicine. Although variation in RNA levels, transcription factor binding, and chromatin have been explored, little is known about global variation in translation and its genetic determinants. We used ribosome profiling, RNA sequencing, and mass spectrometry to perform an integrated analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a diverse group of individuals. We find significant differences in RNA, translation, and protein levels suggesting diverse mechanisms of personalized gene expression control. Combined analysis of RNA expression and ribosome occupancy improves the identification of individual protein level differences. Finally, we identify genetic differences that specifically modulate ribosome occupancy—many of these differences lie close to start codons and upstream ORFs. Our results reveal a new level of gene expression variation among humans and indicate that genetic variants can cause changes in protein levels through effects on translation. PMID:26297486

  2. Comprehensive genome-wide analysis reveals different classes of enigmatic old yellow enzyme in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Nizam, Shadab; Verma, Sandhya; Borah, Nilam Nayan; Gazara, Rajesh Kumar; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we systematically identify Old Yellow Enzymes (OYEs) from a diverse range of economically important fungi representing different ecology and lifestyle. Using active site residues and sequence alignments, we present a classification for these proteins into three distinct classes including a novel class (Class III) and assign names to sequences. Our in-depth phylogenetic analysis suggests a complex history of lineage-specific expansion and contraction for the OYE gene family in fungi. Comparative analyses reveal remarkable diversity in the number and classes of OYE among fungi. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of Ascochyta rabiei OYEs indicates differential expression of OYE genes during oxidative stress and plant infection. This study shows relationship of OYE with fungal ecology and lifestyle, and provides a foundation for future functional analysis and characterization of OYE gene family. PMID:24500274

  3. Novel aspects of COP9 signalosome functions revealed through analysis of hypomorphic csn mutants

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jane E

    2009-01-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a conserved eukaryotic protein complex implicated in the regulation of cullin-RING type E3 ubiquitin ligases by cleaving the small peptide RUB/Nedd8 from cullins. However, detailed analysis of CSN physiological functions in Arabidopsis has been hampered by the early seedling-lethality of csn null mutants. We and others have now identified a number of viable hypomorphic csn mutants which start to reveal novel CSN-dependent activities in adult Arabidopsis plants.1 Here, we present a detailed comparative analysis of the csn5a-1 and csn2-5 mutants as a mean to improve understanding of CSN functions in plant cells. Our observations point to CSN-independent activities of CSN5 and suggest a role of the CSN in cytoskeleton assembly/organization. PMID:19847120

  4. Analysis of the Tyrosine Kinome in Melanoma Reveals Recurrent Mutations in ERBB4

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, Todd D.; Agrawal, Neena S.; Wei, Xiaomu; Yates, Kristin E.; Lin, Jimmy C.; Wunderlich, John; Cronin, Julia C.; Cruz, Pedro; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Samuels, Yardena

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is important in signaling pathways underlying tumorigenesis. A mutational analysis of the Protein Tyrosine Kinase (PTK) gene family in cutaneous metastatic melanoma identified 30 somatic mutations in the kinase domain of 19 PTKs. The whole of the coding region of these 19 PTKs was further evaluated for somatic mutations in a total of 79 melanoma samples. This analysis revealed novel ERBB4 mutations in 19% of melanoma patients and that an additional two kinases (FLT1 and PTK2B) are mutated in 10% of melanomas. Seven missense mutations in the most commonly altered PTK (ERBB4) were examined and found to increase kinase activity and transformation ability. Melanoma cells expressing mutant ERBB4 had reduced cell growth after shRNA–mediated knockdown of ERBB4 or treatment with the ERBB inhibitor lapatinib. These studies might lead to personalized therapeutics specifically targeting the kinases that are mutationally altered in individual melanomas. PMID:19718025

  5. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  6. Co-occurrence correlations of heavy metals in sediments revealed using network analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Wang, Zhiping; Ju, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the correlation-based study was used to identify the co-occurrence correlations among metals in marine sediment of Hong Kong, based on the long-term (from 1991 to 2011) temporal and spatial monitoring data. 14 stations out of the total 45 marine sediment monitoring stations were selected from three representative areas, including Deep Bay, Victoria Harbour and Mirs Bay. Firstly, Spearman's rank correlation-based network analysis was conducted as the first step to identify the co-occurrence correlations of metals from raw metadata, and then for further analysis using the normalized metadata. The correlations patterns obtained by network were consistent with those obtained by the other statistic normalization methods, including annual ratios, R-squared coefficient and Pearson correlation coefficient. Both Deep Bay and Victoria Harbour have been polluted by heavy metals, especially for Pb and Cu, which showed strong co-occurrence with other heavy metals (e.g. Cr, Ni, Zn and etc.) and little correlations with the reference parameters (Fe or Al). For Mirs Bay, which has better marine sediment quality compared with Deep Bay and Victoria Harbour, the co-occurrence patterns revealed by network analysis indicated that the metals in sediment dominantly followed the natural geography process. Besides the wide applications in biology, sociology and informatics, it is the first time to apply network analysis in the researches of environment pollutions. This study demonstrated its powerful application for revealing the co-occurrence correlations among heavy metals in marine sediments, which could be further applied for other pollutants in various environment systems. PMID:24559934

  7. Archetypal analysis of diverse Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcriptomes reveals adaptation in cystic fibrosis airways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Analysis of global gene expression by DNA microarrays is widely used in experimental molecular biology. However, the complexity of such high-dimensional data sets makes it difficult to fully understand the underlying biological features present in the data. The aim of this study is to introduce a method for DNA microarray analysis that provides an intuitive interpretation of data through dimension reduction and pattern recognition. We present the first “Archetypal Analysis” of global gene expression. The analysis is based on microarray data from five integrated studies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from the airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Results Our analysis clustered samples into distinct groups with comprehensible characteristics since the archetypes representing the individual groups are closely related to samples present in the data set. Significant changes in gene expression between different groups identified adaptive changes of the bacteria residing in the cystic fibrosis lung. The analysis suggests a similar gene expression pattern between isolates with a high mutation rate (hypermutators) despite accumulation of different mutations for these isolates. This suggests positive selection in the cystic fibrosis lung environment, and changes in gene expression for these isolates are therefore most likely related to adaptation of the bacteria. Conclusions Archetypal analysis succeeded in identifying adaptive changes of P. aeruginosa. The combination of clustering and matrix factorization made it possible to reveal minor similarities among different groups of data, which other analytical methods failed to identify. We suggest that this analysis could be used to supplement current methods used to analyze DNA microarray data. PMID:24059747

  8. Genome-wide analysis reveals gene expression and metabolic network dynamics during embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Daoquan; Venglat, Prakash; Tibiche, Chabane; Yang, Hui; Risseeuw, Eddy; Cao, Yongguo; Babic, Vivijan; Cloutier, Mathieu; Keller, Wilf; Wang, Edwin; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2011-05-01

    Embryogenesis is central to the life cycle of most plant species. Despite its importance, because of the difficulty associated with embryo isolation, global gene expression programs involved in plant embryogenesis, especially the early events following fertilization, are largely unknown. To address this gap, we have developed methods to isolate whole live Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) embryos as young as zygote and performed genome-wide profiling of gene expression. These studies revealed insights into patterns of gene expression relating to: maternal and paternal contributions to zygote development, chromosomal level clustering of temporal expression in embryogenesis, and embryo-specific functions. Functional analysis of some of the modulated transcription factor encoding genes from our data sets confirmed that they are critical for embryogenesis. Furthermore, we constructed stage-specific metabolic networks mapped with differentially regulated genes by combining the microarray data with the available Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes metabolic data sets. Comparative analysis of these networks revealed the network-associated structural and topological features, pathway interactions, and gene expression with reference to the metabolic activities during embryogenesis. Together, these studies have generated comprehensive gene expression data sets for embryo development in Arabidopsis and may serve as an important foundational resource for other seed plants. PMID:21402797

  9. Phenotypic Analysis Reveals that the 2010 Haiti Cholera Epidemic Is Linked to a Hypervirulent Strain.

    PubMed

    Satchell, Karla J F; Jones, Christopher J; Wong, Jennifer; Queen, Jessica; Agarwal, Shivani; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains have been responsible for pandemic cholera since 1961. These strains have evolved over time, spreading globally in three separate waves. Wave 3 is caused by altered El Tor (AET) variant strains, which include the strain with the signature ctxB7 allele that was introduced in 2010 into Haiti, where it caused a devastating epidemic. In this study, we used phenotypic analysis to compare an early isolate from the Haiti epidemic to wave 1 El Tor isolates commonly used for research. It is demonstrated that the Haiti isolate has increased production of cholera toxin (CT) and hemolysin, increased motility, and a reduced ability to form biofilms. This strain also outcompetes common wave 1 El Tor isolates for colonization of infant mice, indicating that it has increased virulence. Monitoring of CT production and motility in additional wave 3 isolates revealed that this phenotypic variation likely evolved over time rather than in a single genetic event. Analysis of available whole-genome sequences and phylogenetic analyses suggested that increased virulence arose from positive selection for mutations found in known and putative regulatory genes, including hns and vieA, diguanylate cyclase genes, and genes belonging to the lysR and gntR regulatory families. Overall, the studies presented here revealed that V. cholerae virulence potential can evolve and that the currently prevalent wave 3 AET strains are both phenotypically distinct from and more virulent than many El Tor isolates. PMID:27297393

  10. AFM-based mechanical characterization of single nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Neugirg, Benedikt R; Koebley, Sean R; Schniepp, Hannes C; Fery, Andreas

    2016-04-28

    Nanofibres are found in a broad variety of hierarchical biological systems as fundamental structural units, and nanofibrillar components are playing an increasing role in the development of advanced functional materials. Accurate determination of the mechanical properties of single nanofibres is thus of great interest, yet measurement of these properties is challenging due to the intricate specimen handling and the exceptional force and deformation resolution that is required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an effective, reliable tool in the investigation of nanofibrillar mechanics, with the three most popular approaches-AFM-based tensile testing, three-point deformation testing, and nanoindentation-proving preferable to conventional tensile testing in many (but not all) cases. Here, we review the capabilities and limitations of each of these methods and give a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in this field. PMID:27055900

  11. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation. PMID:26694687

  12. Nano-Bio-Mechanics of Neuroblastoma Cells Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastatas, Lyndon; Matthews, James; Kang, Min; Park, Soyeun

    2011-10-01

    We have conducted an in vitro study to determine the elastic moduli of neurobalstoma cell lines using atomic force microscopy. Using a panel of cell lines established from neuroblastoma patients at different stages of disease progress and treatment, we have investigated the differences in elastic moduli during a course of cancer progression and chemotherapy. The cells were grown on the hard substrates that are chemically functionalized to enhance adhesion. We have performed the AFM indentation experiments with different applied forces from the AFM probe. For the purpose of the comparison between cell lines, the indentations were performed only on cell centers. The obtained force-distance curves were analyzed using the Hertz model in order to extract the elastic moduli. We have found that the elastic moduli of human neuroblastoma cells significantly varied during the disease progression. We postulate that the observed difference might be affected by the treatment and chemotherapy.

  13. AFM-based mechanical characterization of single nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugirg, Benedikt R.; Koebley, Sean R.; Schniepp, Hannes C.; Fery, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Nanofibres are found in a broad variety of hierarchical biological systems as fundamental structural units, and nanofibrillar components are playing an increasing role in the development of advanced functional materials. Accurate determination of the mechanical properties of single nanofibres is thus of great interest, yet measurement of these properties is challenging due to the intricate specimen handling and the exceptional force and deformation resolution that is required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an effective, reliable tool in the investigation of nanofibrillar mechanics, with the three most popular approaches--AFM-based tensile testing, three-point deformation testing, and nanoindentation--proving preferable to conventional tensile testing in many (but not all) cases. Here, we review the capabilities and limitations of each of these methods and give a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in this field.

  14. Molecular modeling of enzyme attachment on AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Guedmiller S; Leite, Fabio L; Amarante, Adriano M; Franca, Eduardo F; Cunha, Richard A; Briggs, James M; Freitas, Luiz C G

    2013-09-01

    The immobilization of enzymes on atomic force microscope tip (AFM tip) surface is a crucial step in the development of nanobiosensors to be used in detection process. In this work, an atomistic modeling of the attachment of the acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC enzyme) on a functionalized AFM tip surface is proposed. Using electrostatic considerations, suitable enzyme-surface orientations with the active sites of the ACC enzyme available for interactions with bulk molecules were found. A 50 ns molecular dynamics trajectory in aqueous solution was obtained and surface contact area, hydrogen bonding and protein stability were analyzed. The enzyme-surface model proposed here with minor adjustment can be applied to study antigen-antibody interactions as well as enzyme immobilization on silica for chromatography applications. PMID:24029365

  15. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  16. Adhesion forces in AFM of redox responsive polymer grafts: Effects of tip hydrophilicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueling; Kieviet, Bernard D.; Song, Jing; Schön, Peter M.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-02-01

    The adherence between silicon nitride AFM tips and redox-active poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) grafts on gold was investigated by electrochemical AFM force spectroscopy. Before the adhesion measurements silicon nitride AFM probes were cleaned with organic solvents (acetone and ethanol) or piranha solution. Interestingly, these different AFM tip cleaning procedures drastically affected the observed adhesion forces. Water contact angle measurements on the corresponding AFM probe chips showed that piranha treatment resulted in a significant increase of AFM probe chip surface hydrophilicity compared to the organic solvent treatment. Obviously this hydrophilicity change caused drastic, even opposite changes in the tip-PFS adhesive force measurement upon electrode potential change to reversibly oxidize and reduce the PFS grafts. Our findings are of pivotal importance for AFM tip adhesion measurements utilizing standard silicon nitride AFM tips. Probe hydrophilicity must be carefully taken into consideration and controlled.

  17. AFM and SThM Characterization of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foy, Christopher; Sidorov, Anton; Chen, Xunchi; Ruan, Ming; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Jiang, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    We report on detailed characterization of epitaxial grown graphene on SiC and chemical vapor deposition grown graphene on Cu foil using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). We focus on the electronic and thermal properties of graphene grain boundaries, and thus providing valuable feedback to materials growth. Specifically, we perform thermal conductivity contrast mapping and surface potential mapping of graphene, and compare with that obtained on the Au electrodes and the substrate.

  18. Investigation of biopolymer networks by means of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Z.; Rigó, T.; Telegdi, J.; Kálmán, E.

    Natural hydrogel alginate was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain microscale information on the morphological and rheological properties of the biopolymer network cross-linked by various cations. Local rheological properties of the gels measured by force spectroscopy gave correlation between increasing ion selectivity and increasing polymer elasticity. Adhesive forces acting between the surface of the gel and the probe, and also the intrinsic rheological properties of bulk polymers affect the microscopical image formation.

  19. Network Analysis of a Comprehensive Knowledge Repository Reveals a Dual Role for Ceramide in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Satoshi; Ogishima, Soichi; Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Masataka; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Nakaya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of senile dementia. Many inflammatory factors such as amyloid-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines are known to contribute to the inflammatory response in the AD brain. Sphingolipids are widely known to have roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, where the precise roles for sphingolipids in inflammation-associated pathogenesis of AD are not well understood. Here we performed a network analysis to clarify the importance of sphingolipids and to model relationships among inflammatory factors and sphingolipids in AD. In this study, we have updated sphingolipid signaling and metabolic cascades in a map of AD signaling networks that we named "AlzPathway," a comprehensive knowledge repository of signaling pathways in AD. Our network analysis of the updated AlzPathway indicates that the pathways related to ceramide are one of the primary pathways and that ceramide is one of the important players in the pathogenesis of AD. The results of our analysis suggest the following two prospects about inflammation in AD: (1) ceramide could play important roles in both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways of AD, and (2) several factors such as Sphingomyelinase and Siglec-11 may be associated with ceramide related inflammation and anti-inflammation pathways in AD. In this study, network analysis of comprehensive knowledge repository reveals a dual role for ceramide in AD. This result provides a clue to clarify sphingolipids related inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways in AD. PMID:26849355

  20. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals MAPKKK Family Members Related to Drought Tolerance in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wen; Yang, Fengling; He, Hang; Zhao, Jiuran

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is an evolutionarily conserved signal transduction pathway that is involved in plant development and stress responses. As the first component of this phosphorelay cascade, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) act as adaptors linking upstream signaling steps to the core MAPK cascade to promote the appropriate cellular responses; however, the functions of MAPKKKs in maize are unclear. Here, we identified 71 MAPKKK genes, of which 14 were novel, based on a computational analysis of the maize (Zea mays L.) genome. Using an RNA-seq analysis in the leaf, stem and root of maize under well-watered and drought-stress conditions, we identified 5,866 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 8 MAPKKK genes responsive to drought stress. Many of the DEGs were enriched in processes such as drought stress, abiotic stimulus, oxidation-reduction, and metabolic processes. The other way round, DEGs involved in processes such as oxidation, photosynthesis, and starch, proline, ethylene, and salicylic acid metabolism were clearly co-expressed with the MAPKKK genes. Furthermore, a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis was performed to assess the relative expression levels of MAPKKKs. Correlation analysis revealed that there was a significant correlation between expression levels of two MAPKKKs and relative biomass responsive to drought in 8 inbred lines. Our results indicate that MAPKKKs may have important regulatory functions in drought tolerance in maize. PMID:26599013

  1. RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals MAPKKK Family Members Related to Drought Tolerance in Maize.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya; Zhou, Miaoyi; Gao, Zhaoxu; Ren, Wen; Yang, Fengling; He, Hang; Zhao, Jiuran

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is an evolutionarily conserved signal transduction pathway that is involved in plant development and stress responses. As the first component of this phosphorelay cascade, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) act as adaptors linking upstream signaling steps to the core MAPK cascade to promote the appropriate cellular responses; however, the functions of MAPKKKs in maize are unclear. Here, we identified 71 MAPKKK genes, of which 14 were novel, based on a computational analysis of the maize (Zea mays L.) genome. Using an RNA-seq analysis in the leaf, stem and root of maize under well-watered and drought-stress conditions, we identified 5,866 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 8 MAPKKK genes responsive to drought stress. Many of the DEGs were enriched in processes such as drought stress, abiotic stimulus, oxidation-reduction, and metabolic processes. The other way round, DEGs involved in processes such as oxidation, photosynthesis, and starch, proline, ethylene, and salicylic acid metabolism were clearly co-expressed with the MAPKKK genes. Furthermore, a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis was performed to assess the relative expression levels of MAPKKKs. Correlation analysis revealed that there was a significant correlation between expression levels of two MAPKKKs and relative biomass responsive to drought in 8 inbred lines. Our results indicate that MAPKKKs may have important regulatory functions in drought tolerance in maize. PMID:26599013

  2. Pretreatment and integrated analysis of spectral data reveal seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Ito, Kengo; Sakata, Kenji; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Extracting useful information from high dimensionality and large data sets is a major challenge for data-driven approaches. The present study was aimed at developing novel integrated analytical strategies for comprehensively characterizing seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity. The chemical compositions of 107 seaweed and 2 seagrass samples were analyzed using multiple techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), CHNS/O total elemental analysis, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS). The spectral data were preprocessed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and NMF combined with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods in order to separate individual component information from the overlapping and/or broad spectral peaks. Integrated analysis of the preprocessed chemical data demonstrated distinct discrimination of differential seaweed species. Further network analysis revealed a close correlation between the heavy metal elements and characteristic components of brown algae, such as cellulose, alginic acid, and sulfated mucopolysaccharides, providing a componential basis for its metal-sorbing potential. These results suggest that this integrated analytical strategy is useful for extracting and identifying the chemical characteristics of diverse seaweeds based on large chemical data sets, particularly complicated overlapping spectral data. PMID:25647718

  3. Cerebral Degeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Revealed by 3-Dimensional Texture Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maani, Rouzbeh; Yang, Yee-Hong; Emery, Derek; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Routine MR images do not consistently reveal pathological changes in the brain in ALS. Texture analysis, a method to quantitate voxel intensities and their patterns and interrelationships, can detect changes in images not apparent to the naked eye. Our objective was to evaluate cerebral degeneration in ALS using 3-dimensional texture analysis of MR images of the brain. Methods: In a case-control design, voxel-based texture analysis was performed on T1-weighted MR images of 20 healthy subjects and 19 patients with ALS. Four texture features, namely, autocorrelation, sum of squares variance, sum average, and sum variance were computed. Texture features were compared between the groups by statistical parametric mapping and correlated with clinical measures of disability and upper motor neuron dysfunction. Results: Texture features were different in ALS in motor regions including the precentral gyrus and corticospinal tracts. To a lesser extent, changes were also found in the thalamus, cingulate gyrus, and temporal lobe. Texture features in the precentral gyrus correlated with disease duration, and in the corticospinal tract they correlated with finger tapping speed. Conclusions: Changes in MR image textures are present in motor and non-motor regions in ALS and correlate with clinical features. Whole brain texture analysis has potential in providing biomarkers of cerebral degeneration in ALS. PMID:27064416

  4. Metaproteomics Analysis Reveals the Adaptation Process for the Chicken Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Anthony; Gielbert, Adriana; Woodward, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The animal gastrointestinal tract houses a large microbial community, the gut microbiota, that confers many benefits to its host, such as protection from pathogens and provision of essential metabolites. Metagenomic approaches have defined the chicken fecal microbiota in other studies, but here, we wished to assess the correlation between the metagenome and the bacterial proteome in order to better understand the healthy chicken gut microbiota. Here, we performed high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and metaproteomics analysis of fecal samples to determine microbial gut composition and protein expression. 16 rRNA gene sequencing analysis identified Clostridiales, Bacteroidaceae, and Lactobacillaceae species as the most abundant species in the gut. For metaproteomics analysis, peptides were generated by using the Fasp method and subsequently fractionated by strong anion exchanges. Metaproteomics analysis identified 3,673 proteins. Among the most frequently identified proteins, 380 proteins belonged to Lactobacillus spp., 155 belonged to Clostridium spp., and 66 belonged to Streptococcus spp. The most frequently identified proteins were heat shock chaperones, including 349 GroEL proteins, from many bacterial species, whereas the most abundant enzymes were pyruvate kinases, as judged by the number of peptides identified per protein (spectral counting). Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses revealed the functions and locations of the identified proteins. The findings of both metaproteomics and 16S rRNA sequencing analyses are discussed. PMID:24212578

  5. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  6. Tissue section AFM: In situ ultrastructural imaging of native biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Helen K.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Millward-Sadler, Sarah J.; Garrod, David; Scothern, Anthea; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional approaches for ultrastructural high-resolution imaging of biological specimens induce profound changes in bio-molecular structures. By combining tissue cryo-sectioning with non-destructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging we have developed a methodology that may be applied by the non-specialist to both preserve and visualize bio-molecular structures (in particular extracellular matrix assemblies) in situ. This tissue section AFM technique is capable of: i) resolving nm–µm scale features of intra- and extracellular structures in tissue cryo-sections; ii) imaging the same tissue region before and after experimental interventions; iii) combining ultrastructural imaging with complimentary microscopical and micromechanical methods. Here, we employ this technique to: i) visualize the macro-molecular structures of unstained and unfixed fibrillar collagens (in skin, cartilage and intervertebral disc), elastic fibres (in aorta and lung), desmosomes (in nasal epithelium) and mitochondria (in heart); ii) quantify the ultrastructural effects of sequential collagenase digestion on a single elastic fibre; iii) correlate optical (auto fluorescent) with ultrastructural (AFM) images of aortic elastic lamellae. PMID:20144712

  7. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  8. AFM imaging of functionalized carbon nanotubes on biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, C.; Liashkovich, I.; Neves, V.; Danzberger, J.; Heister, E.; Rangl, M.; Coley, H. M.; McFadden, J.; Flahaut, E.; Gruber, H. J.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Kienberger, F.; Ebner, A.

    2009-10-01

    Multifunctional carbon nanotubes are promising for biomedical applications as their nano-size, together with their physical stability, gives access into the cell and various cellular compartments including the nucleus. However, the direct and label-free detection of carbon nanotube uptake into cells is a challenging task. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of resolving details of cellular surfaces at the nanometer scale and thus allows following of the docking of carbon nanotubes to biological membranes. Here we present topographical AFM images of non-covalently functionalized single walled (SWNT) and double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) immobilized on different biological membranes, such as plasma membranes and nuclear envelopes, as well as on a monolayer of avidin molecules. We were able to visualize DWNT on the nuclear membrane while at the same time resolving individual nuclear pore complexes. Furthermore, we succeeded in localizing individual SWNT at the border of incubated cells and in identifying bundles of DWNT on cell surfaces by AFM imaging.

  9. Investigation of the Mechanoelectrical Transduction at Single Stereocilia by Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, M. G.; Fink, S.; Löffler, K.; Koitschev, A.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2003-02-01

    The transduction of sound into an electrical signal in the inner ear is closely related to the mechanical properties of the hair bundles cytoskeleton and cross-linkage. In this study the effect of lateral cross-links on hair bundle mechanics and the transduction current response is demonstrated on the level of individual stereocilia. For experiments stereocilia of outer hair cells of postnatal rats (P3 - P8) were scanned with a sharp AFM tip at nanometerscale. Transduction currents were simultaneously recorded in the whole-cell-recording mode with patch clamp. AFM was used as a nanotool for local mechanical stimulation and force measurement at stereocilia whereas patch clamp serves as a detector for the electrical response of the cell. In a first experiment force transmission between adjacent stereocilia of the V- and W- shaped hair bundles of outer hair cells was investigated. Results showed that a force exerted to a single stereocilium declined to 36 % at the nearest adjacent stereocilium of the same row. This result supposes AFM to be convenient for local displacement of single stereocilia. For control, the local response of transduction channels was measured at single stereocilia of the same hair bundle. Measured transduction current amplitudes ranged from 9 to 49 pA supposing an opening of one to five transduction channels. Both, weak force transmission by lateral cross-links and small transduction current amplitudes indicate a weak mechanical interaction between individual stereocilia of the tallest row of stereocilia of outer hair cells from postnatal rats.

  10. Oxide nanocrystal based nanocomposites for fabricating photoplastic AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Llobera, Andreu; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Voigt, Anja; Gruetzner, Gabi; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Curri, Maria Lucia

    2011-11-01

    We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe(2)O(3) nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe(2)O(3) NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the final material extremely interesting for manufacturing miniaturized polymer based mechanical devices and systems. In particular, the nanocomposite has been used as structural material for fabricating photoplastic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes with integrated tips showing outstanding mechanical response and high resolution imaging performance. The fabricated probes consist of straight cantilevers with low stress-gradient and high quality factors, incorporating sharp polymeric tips. They present considerably improved performance compared to pure epoxy based photoresist AFM probes, and to commercial silicon AFM probes. PMID:21858377

  11. Preparation, fluorescence spectroscopy, and AFM analysis of erbium oxide nanocolloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Darayas; Vance, Calvin; King, Newton; Jessup, Malcolm; Sarkisov, Sergey

    2009-02-01

    Nanocolloids of compounds containing fluorescent rare earth ions have recently attracted significant attention as agents for biolabeling, bioimaging, bio- and chemical sensing, and other applications. Erbium oxide nanocolloids have been prepared for the first time in water and gammabutyrolactone. Optical dynamic scatterometry and atomic force microscopy determined an average size (average mean height) of erbium oxide nanoparticles to be 10-11 nm. Prominent optical absorption peaks of the nanocolloids at 442.5 nm, 450.0 nm, 487.2 nm (strong), 492.0 nm, 523.0 nm (strong), 541.6 nm, 548.6 nm, 652.6 nm, and 665.7 nm (strong) can be attributed to erbium ions hosted within nanoparticles. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy of the nanocolloids was conducted using excitations with the lines of argon-ion laser (514 nm, 488 nm, 476 nm, and 458 nm) and 980-nm semiconductor laser. Strong green emission at 571 nm is more likely from transition between 4S3/2 and 4I15/2 levels and relatively weak red emissions from transition between 4I9/2 and 4I15/2 level of erbium was observed at excitation with visible laser radiation 488 nm and 476 nm. The reported nanocolloids thus showed to be good candidates for fluorescent biosensing applications and also as a new lasing filling medium in fiber lasers.

  12. Metagenomic and network analysis reveal wide distribution and co-occurrence of environmental antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Yang, Ying; Ma, Liping; Ju, Feng; Guo, Feng; Tiedje, James M; Zhang, Tong

    2015-11-01

    A metagenomic approach and network analysis was used to investigate the wide-spectrum profiles of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and their co-occurrence patterns in 50 samples from 10 typical environments. In total, 260 ARG subtypes belonging to 18 ARG types were detected with an abundance range of 5.4 × 10(-6)-2.2 × 10(-1) copy of ARG per copy of 16S-rRNA gene. The trend of the total ARG abundances in environments matched well with the levels of anthropogenic impacts on these environments. From the less impacted environments to the seriously impacted environments, the total ARG abundances increased up to three orders of magnitude, that is, from 3.2 × 10(-3) to 3.1 × 10(0) copy of ARG per copy of 16S-rRNA gene. The abundant ARGs were associated with aminoglycoside, bacitracin, β-lactam, chloramphenicol, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin, quinolone, sulphonamide and tetracycline, in agreement with the antibiotics extensively used in human medicine or veterinary medicine/promoters. The widespread occurrences and abundance variation trend of vancomycin resistance genes in different environments might imply the spread of vancomycin resistance genes because of the selective pressure resulting from vancomycin use. The simultaneous enrichment of 12 ARG types in adult chicken faeces suggests the coselection of multiple ARGs in this production system. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis revealed that samples belonging to the same environment generally possessed similar ARG compositions. Based on the co-occurrence pattern revealed by network analysis, tetM and aminoglycoside resistance protein, the hubs of the ARG network, are proposed to be indicators to quantitatively estimate the abundance of 23 other co-occurring ARG subtypes by power functions. PMID:25918831

  13. Association genetics and transcriptome analysis reveal a gibberellin-responsive pathway involved in regulating photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianbo; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Ying; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate a wide range of important processes in plant growth and development, including photosynthesis. However, the mechanism by which GAs regulate photosynthesis remains to be understood. Here, we used multi-gene association to investigate the effect of genes in the GA-responsive pathway, as constructed by RNA sequencing, on photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits, in a population of 435 Populus tomentosa By analyzing changes in the transcriptome following GA treatment, we identified many key photosynthetic genes, in agreement with the observed increase in measurements of photosynthesis. Regulatory motif enrichment analysis revealed that 37 differentially expressed genes related to photosynthesis shared two essential GA-related cis-regulatory elements, the GA response element and the pyrimidine box. Thus, we constructed a GA-responsive pathway consisting of 47 genes involved in regulating photosynthesis, including GID1, RGA, GID2, MYBGa, and 37 photosynthetic differentially expressed genes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 142 SNPs, representing 40 candidate genes in this pathway, were significantly associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits. Epistasis analysis uncovered interactions between 310 SNP-SNP pairs from 37 genes in this pathway, revealing possible genetic interactions. Moreover, a structural gene-gene matrix based on a time-course of transcript abundances provided a better understanding of the multi-gene pathway affecting photosynthesis. The results imply a functional role for these genes in mediating photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties, demonstrating the potential of combining transcriptome-based regulatory pathway construction and genetic association approaches to detect the complex genetic networks underlying quantitative traits. PMID:27091876

  14. Copy number and targeted mutational analysis reveals novel somatic events in metastatic prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Christiane M; Tembe, Waibov A; Baker, Angela; Sinari, Shripad; Moses, Tracy Y; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James; Barrett, Michael; Long, James; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Lowey, James; Suh, Edward; Pearson, John V; Craig, David W; Agus, David B; Pienta, Kenneth J; Carpten, John D

    2011-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer can progress to systemic metastatic tumors, which are generally androgen insensitive and ultimately lethal. Here, we report a comprehensive genomic survey for somatic events in systemic metastatic prostate tumors using both high-resolution copy number analysis and targeted mutational survey of 3508 exons from 577 cancer-related genes using next generation sequencing. Focal homozygous deletions were detected at 8p22, 10q23.31, 13q13.1, 13q14.11, and 13q14.12. Key genes mapping within these deleted regions include PTEN, BRCA2, C13ORF15, and SIAH3. Focal high-level amplifications were detected at 5p13.2-p12, 14q21.1, 7q22.1, and Xq12. Key amplified genes mapping within these regions include SKP2, FOXA1, and AR. Furthermore, targeted mutational analysis of normal-tumor pairs has identified somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with prostate cancer including AR and TP53, but has also revealed novel somatic point mutations in genes including MTOR, BRCA2, ARHGEF12, and CHD5. Finally, in one patient where multiple independent metastatic tumors were available, we show common and divergent somatic alterations that occur at both the copy number and point mutation level, supporting a model for a common clonal progenitor with metastatic tumor-specific divergence. Our study represents a deep genomic analysis of advanced metastatic prostate tumors and has revealed candidate somatic alterations, possibly contributing to lethal prostate cancer. PMID:21147910

  15. Copy number and targeted mutational analysis reveals novel somatic events in metastatic prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Christiane M.; Tembe, Waibov A.; Baker, Angela; Sinari, Shripad; Moses, Tracy Y.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen; Beckstrom-Sternberg, James; Barrett, Michael; Long, James; Chinnaiyan, Arul; Lowey, James; Suh, Edward; Pearson, John V.; Craig, David W.; Agus, David B.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Carpten, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced prostate cancer can progress to systemic metastatic tumors, which are generally androgen insensitive and ultimately lethal. Here, we report a comprehensive genomic survey for somatic events in systemic metastatic prostate tumors using both high-resolution copy number analysis and targeted mutational survey of 3508 exons from 577 cancer-related genes using next generation sequencing. Focal homozygous deletions were detected at 8p22, 10q23.31, 13q13.1, 13q14.11, and 13q14.12. Key genes mapping within these deleted regions include PTEN, BRCA2, C13ORF15, and SIAH3. Focal high-level amplifications were detected at 5p13.2-p12, 14q21.1, 7q22.1, and Xq12. Key amplified genes mapping within these regions include SKP2, FOXA1, and AR. Furthermore, targeted mutational analysis of normal-tumor pairs has identified somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with prostate cancer including AR and TP53, but has also revealed novel somatic point mutations in genes including MTOR, BRCA2, ARHGEF12, and CHD5. Finally, in one patient where multiple independent metastatic tumors were available, we show common and divergent somatic alterations that occur at both the copy number and point mutation level, supporting a model for a common clonal progenitor with metastatic tumor-specific divergence. Our study represents a deep genomic analysis of advanced metastatic prostate tumors and has revealed candidate somatic alterations, possibly contributing to lethal prostate cancer. PMID:21147910

  16. Nano-scale temperature dependent visco-elastic properties of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) using atomic force microscope (AFM).

    PubMed

    Grant, Colin A; Alfouzan, Abdulrahman; Gough, Tim; Twigg, Peter C; Coates, Phil D

    2013-01-01

    Visco-elastic behaviour at the nano-level of a commonly used polymer (PET) is characterised using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a range of temperatures. The modulus, indentation creep and relaxation time of the PET film (thickness=100 μm) is highly sensitive to temperature over an experimental temperature range of 22-175°C. The analysis showed a 40-fold increase in the amount of indentation creep on raising the temperature from 22°C to 100°C, with the most rapid rise occurring above the glass-to-rubber transition temperature (T(g)=77.1°C). At higher temperatures, close to the crystallisation temperature (T(c)=134.7°C), the indentation creep reduced to levels similar to those at temperatures below T(g). The calculated relaxation time showed a similar temperature dependence, rising from 0.6s below T(g) to 1.2s between T(g) and T(c) and falling back to 0.6s above T(c). Whereas, the recorded modulus of the thick polymer film decreases above T(g), subsequently increasing near T(c). These visco-elastic parameters are obtained via mechanical modelling of the creep curves and are correlated to the thermal phase changes that occur in PET, as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). PMID:22750040

  17. Resveratrol Protects Chondrocytes from Apoptosis via Altering the Ultrastructural and Biomechanical Properties: An AFM Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tongsheng; Wang, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint disease with high prevalence among older people, occurs from molecular or nanometer level and extends gradually to higher degrees of the ultrastructure of cartilage, finally resulting in irreversible structural and functional damages. This report aims to use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the protective effects of resveratrol (RV), a drug with good anti-inflammatory properties, on cellular morphology, membrane architecture, cytoskeleton, cell surface adhesion and stiffness at nanometer level in sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced apoptotic chondrocytes, a typical cellular OA model. CCK-8 assay showed that 100 μM RV significantly prevented SNP-induced cytotoxicity. AFM imaging and quantitative analysis showed that SNP potently induced chondrocytes changes including shrunk, round, lamellipodia contraction and decrease in adherent junctions among cells, as well as the destruction of biomechanics: 90% decrease in elasticity and 30% decrease in adhesion. In addition, confocal imaging analysis showed that SNP induced aggregation of the cytoskeleton and decrease in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins. More importantly, these SNP-induced damages to chondrocytes could be potently prevented by RV pretreatment. Interestingly, the biomechanical changes occurred before morphological changes could be clearly observed during SNP-induced apoptosis, indicating that the biomechanics of cellular membrane may be a more robust indicator of cell function. Collectively, our data demonstrate that RV prevents SNP-induced apoptosis of chondrocytes by regulating actin organization, and that AFM-based technology can be developed into a powerful and sensitive method to study the interaction mechanisms between chondrocytes and drugs. PMID:24632762

  18. Integrative Analysis of Transcriptomic and Epigenomic Data to Reveal Regulation Patterns for BMD Variation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-Gang; Tan, Li-Jun; Xu, Chao; He, Hao; Tian, Qing; Zhou, Yu; Qiu, Chuan; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Integration of multiple profiling data and construction of functional gene networks may provide additional insights into the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Osteoporosis is a worldwide public health problem, but the complex gene-gene interactions, post-transcriptional modifications and regulation of functional networks are still unclear. To gain a comprehensive understanding of osteoporosis etiology, transcriptome gene expression microarray, epigenomic miRNA microarray and methylome sequencing were performed simultaneously in 5 high hip BMD (Bone Mineral Density) subjects and 5 low hip BMD subjects. SPIA (Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis) and PCST (Prize Collecting Steiner Tree) algorithm were used to perform pathway-enrichment analysis and construct the interaction networks. Through integrating the transcriptomic and epigenomic data, firstly we identified 3 genes (FAM50A, ZNF473 and TMEM55B) and one miRNA (hsa-mir-4291) which showed the consistent association evidence from both gene expression and methylation data; secondly in network analysis we identified an interaction network module with 12 genes and 11 miRNAs including AKT1, STAT3, STAT5A, FLT3, hsa-mir-141 and hsa-mir-34a which have been associated with BMD in previous studies. This module revealed the crosstalk among miRNAs, mRNAs and DNA methylation and showed four potential regulatory patterns of gene expression to influence the BMD status. In conclusion, the integration of multiple layers of omics can yield in-depth results than analysis of individual omics data respectively. Integrative analysis from transcriptomics and epigenomic data improves our ability to identify causal genetic factors, and more importantly uncover functional regulation pattern of multi-omics for osteoporosis etiology. PMID:26390436

  19. Molecular analysis of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) subtypes reveals two distinct cell populations with different identities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The term endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is currently used to refer to cell populations which are quite dissimilar in terms of biological properties. This study provides a detailed molecular fingerprint for two EPC subtypes: early EPCs (eEPCs) and outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs). Methods Human blood-derived eEPCs and OECs were characterised by using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, 2D protein electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. Comparative analysis at the transcript and protein level included monocytes and mature endothelial cells as reference cell types. Results Our data show that eEPCs and OECs have strikingly different gene expression signatures. Many highly expressed transcripts in eEPCs are haematopoietic specific (RUNX1, WAS, LYN) with links to immunity and inflammation (TLRs, CD14, HLAs), whereas many transcripts involved in vascular development and angiogenesis-related signalling pathways (Tie2, eNOS, Ephrins) are highly expressed in OECs. Comparative analysis with monocytes and mature endothelial cells clusters eEPCs with monocytes, while OECs segment with endothelial cells. Similarly, proteomic analysis revealed that 90% of spots identified by 2-D gel analysis are common between OECs and endothelial cells while eEPCs share 77% with monocytes. In line with the expression pattern of caveolins and cadherins identified by microarray analysis, ultrastructural evaluation highlighted the presence of caveolae and adherens junctions only in OECs. Conclusions This study provides evidence that eEPCs are haematopoietic cells with a molecular phenotype linked to monocytes; whereas OECs exhibit commitment to the endothelial lineage. These findings indicate that OECs might be an attractive cell candidate for inducing therapeutic angiogenesis, while eEPC should be used with caution because of their monocytic nature. PMID:20465783

  20. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  1. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  2. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Evolutionary Complexity in Secondary Metabolism of Rauvolfia serpentina over Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Pathania, Shivalika; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir S

    2016-01-01

    Comparative co-expression analysis of multiple species using high-throughput data is an integrative approach to determine the uniformity as well as diversification in biological processes. Rauvolfia serpentina and Catharanthus roseus, both members of Apocyanacae family, are reported to have remedial properties against multiple diseases. Despite of sharing upstream of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway, there is significant diversity in tissue-specific synthesis and accumulation of specialized metabolites in these plants. This led us to implement comparative co-expression network analysis to investigate the modules and genes responsible for differential tissue-specific expression as well as species-specific synthesis of metabolites. Toward these goals differential network analysis was implemented to identify candidate genes responsible for diversification of metabolites profile. Three genes were identified with significant difference in connectivity leading to differential regulatory behavior between these plants. These genes may be responsible for diversification of secondary metabolism, and thereby for species-specific metabolite synthesis. The network robustness of R. serpentina, determined based on topological properties, was also complemented by comparison of gene-metabolite networks of both plants, and may have evolved to have complex metabolic mechanisms as compared to C. roseus under the influence of various stimuli. This study reveals evolution of complexity in secondary metabolism of R. serpentina, and key genes that contribute toward diversification of specific metabolites. PMID:27588023

  3. Genomic and physiological analysis reveals versatile metabolic capacity of deep-sea Photobacterium phosphoreum ANT-2200.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng-Da; Santini, Claire-Lise; Zhang, Wei-Jia; Barbe, Valérie; Mangenot, Sophie; Guyomar, Charlotte; Garel, Marc; Chen, Hai-Tao; Li, Xue-Gong; Yin, Qun-Jian; Zhao, Yuan; Armengaud, Jean; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Martini, Séverine; Pradel, Nathalie; Vidaud, Claude; Alberto, François; Médigue, Claudine; Tamburini, Christian; Wu, Long-Fei

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria of the genus Photobacterium thrive worldwide in oceans and show substantial eco-physiological diversity including free-living, symbiotic and piezophilic life styles. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are poorly understood. Here we carried out genomic and physiological analysis of Photobacterium phosphoreum strain ANT-2200, the first deep-sea luminous bacterium of which the genome has been sequenced. Using optical mapping we updated the genomic data and reassembled it into two chromosomes and a large plasmid. Genomic analysis revealed a versatile energy metabolic potential and physiological analysis confirmed its growth capacity by deriving energy from fermentation of glucose or maltose, by respiration with formate as electron donor and trimethlyamine N-oxide (TMAO), nitrate or fumarate as electron acceptors, or by chemo-organo-heterotrophic growth in rich media. Despite that it was isolated at a site with saturated dissolved oxygen, the ANT-2200 strain possesses four gene clusters coding for typical anaerobic enzymes, the TMAO reductases. Elevated hydrostatic pressure enhances the TMAO reductase activity, mainly due to the increase of isoenzyme TorA1. The high copy number of the TMAO reductase isoenzymes and pressure-enhanced activity might imply a strategy developed by bacteria to adapt to deep-sea habitats where the instant TMAO availability may increase with depth. PMID:27039108

  4. Meta-Analysis of EMT Datasets Reveals Different Types of EMT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Mengdan; Yang, Xiao; Kuang, Rui; Zheng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    As a critical process during embryonic development, cancer progression and cell fate conversions, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been extensively studied over the last several decades. To further understand the nature of EMT, we performed meta-analysis of multiple microarray datasets to identify the related generic signature. In this study, 24 human and 17 mouse microarray datasets were integrated to identify conserved gene expression changes in different types of EMT. Our integrative analysis revealed that there is low agreement among the list of the identified signature genes and three other lists in previous studies. Since removing the datasets with weakly-induced EMT from the analysis did not significantly improve the overlapping in the signature-gene lists, we hypothesized the existence of different types of EMT. This hypothesis was further supported by the grouping of 74 human EMT-induction samples into five distinct clusters, and the identification of distinct pathways in these different clusters of EMT samples. The five clusters of EMT-induction samples also improves the understanding of the characteristics of different EMT types. Therefore, we concluded the existence of different types of EMT was the possible reason for its complex role in multiple biological processes. PMID:27258544

  5. Network analysis reveals that bacteria and fungi form modules that correlate independently with soil parameters.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Alexandre B; Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T; Richardson, Alan E; Toscas, Peter; Farrell, Mark; Macdonald, Lynne M; Baker, Geoff; Wark, Tim; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-08-01

    Network and multivariate statistical analyses were performed to determine interactions between bacterial and fungal community terminal restriction length polymorphisms as well as soil properties in paired woodland and pasture sites. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that shifts in woodland community composition correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon, while changes in pasture community composition correlated with moisture, nitrogen and phosphorus. Weighted correlation network analysis detected two distinct microbial modules per land use. Bacterial and fungal ribotypes did not group separately, rather all modules comprised of both bacterial and fungal ribotypes. Woodland modules had a similar fungal : bacterial ribotype ratio, while in the pasture, one module was fungal dominated. There was no correspondence between pasture and woodland modules in their ribotype composition. The modules had different relationships to soil variables, and these contrasts were not detected without the use of network analysis. This study demonstrated that fungi and bacteria, components of the soil microbial communities usually treated as separate functional groups as in a CCA approach, were co-correlated and formed distinct associations in these adjacent habitats. Understanding these distinct modular associations may shed more light on their niche space in the soil environment, and allow a more realistic description of soil microbial ecology and function. PMID:25040229

  6. Meta-Analysis of EMT Datasets Reveals Different Types of EMT.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lining; Sun, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Mengdan; Yang, Xiao; Kuang, Rui; Zheng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    As a critical process during embryonic development, cancer progression and cell fate conversions, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been extensively studied over the last several decades. To further understand the nature of EMT, we performed meta-analysis of multiple microarray datasets to identify the related generic signature. In this study, 24 human and 17 mouse microarray datasets were integrated to identify conserved gene expression changes in different types of EMT. Our integrative analysis revealed that there is low agreement among the list of the identified signature genes and three other lists in previous studies. Since removing the datasets with weakly-induced EMT from the analysis did not significantly improve the overlapping in the signature-gene lists, we hypothesized the existence of different types of EMT. This hypothesis was further supported by the grouping of 74 human EMT-induction samples into five distinct clusters, and the identification of distinct pathways in these different clusters of EMT samples. The five clusters of EMT-induction samples also improves the understanding of the characteristics of different EMT types. Therefore, we concluded the existence of different types of EMT was the possible reason for its complex role in multiple biological processes. PMID:27258544

  7. Phototaxis of Haloarcula marismortui revealed through a novel microbial motion analysis algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Yang, Chii-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Haloarcula marismortui has been described to be nonmotile prior to the recent identification of flagellar filaments, suggesting the motile nature of H. marismortui. Here we observed the locomotion of freshly cultured H. marismortui cells and tracked the swimming trajectories via ImageJ. Trajectories of H. marismortui are intrinsically noisy, posing difficulties in motion analysis with previously established algorithms. By introducing the concept of "window vector," a Microsoft Excel-VBA-implemented microbial motion analysis algorithm reported here was able to (1) discriminate nonswimming objects from swimming cells without empirical customization by applying a power-law relationship and (2) reduce the noise caused by Brownian motion, thus enhancing the accuracy of swim reversal identification. Based on this motion analysis algorithm, two recently identified sensory rhodopsins, HmSRI and HmSRII, were shown to mediate photoattractant and photorepellent responses, respectively, revealing the phototactic activity of H. marismortui, the only archaeon showing such phenomenon other than Halobacterium salinarum. PMID:20553410

  8. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  9. Potential microRNA-mediated oncogenic intercellular communication revealed by pan-cancer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2014-11-01

    Carcinogenesis consists of oncogenesis and metastasis, and intriguingly microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in both processes. Although aberrant miRNA activities are prevalent in diverse tumor types, the exact mechanisms for how they regulate cancerous processes are not always clear. To this end, we performed a large-scale pan-cancer analysis via a novel probabilistic approach to infer recurrent miRNA-target interactions implicated in 12 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We discovered ~20,000 recurrent miRNA regulations, which are enriched for cancer-related miRNAs/genes. Notably, miRNA 200 family (miR-200/141/429) is among the most prominent miRNA regulators, which is known to be involved in metastasis. Importantly, the recurrent miRNA regulatory network is not only enriched for cancer pathways but also for extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and ECM-receptor interactions. The results suggest an intriguing cancer mechanism involving miRNA-mediated cell-to-cell communication, which possibly involves delivery of tumorigenic miRNA messengers to adjacent cells via exosomes. Finally, survival analysis revealed 414 recurrent-prognostic associations, where both gene and miRNA involved in each interaction conferred significant prognostic power in one or more cancer types. Together, our comprehensive pan-cancer analysis provided not only biological insights into metastasis but also brought to bear the clinical relevance of the proposed recurrent miRNA-gene associations.

  10. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Evolutionary Complexity in Secondary Metabolism of Rauvolfia serpentina over Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shivalika; Bagler, Ganesh; Ahuja, Paramvir S.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative co-expression analysis of multiple species using high-throughput data is an integrative approach to determine the uniformity as well as diversification in biological processes. Rauvolfia serpentina and Catharanthus roseus, both members of Apocyanacae family, are reported to have remedial properties against multiple diseases. Despite of sharing upstream of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway, there is significant diversity in tissue-specific synthesis and accumulation of specialized metabolites in these plants. This led us to implement comparative co-expression network analysis to investigate the modules and genes responsible for differential tissue-specific expression as well as species-specific synthesis of metabolites. Toward these goals differential network analysis was implemented to identify candidate genes responsible for diversification of metabolites profile. Three genes were identified with significant difference in connectivity leading to differential regulatory behavior between these plants. These genes may be responsible for diversification of secondary metabolism, and thereby for species-specific metabolite synthesis. The network robustness of R. serpentina, determined based on topological properties, was also complemented by comparison of gene-metabolite networks of both plants, and may have evolved to have complex metabolic mechanisms as compared to C. roseus under the influence of various stimuli. This study reveals evolution of complexity in secondary metabolism of R. serpentina, and key genes that contribute toward diversification of specific metabolites. PMID:27588023

  11. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance. PMID:26582089

  12. In vivo dynamics of skeletal muscle Dystrophin in zebrafish embryos revealed by improved FRAP analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bajanca, Fernanda; Gonzalez-Perez, Vinicio; Gillespie, Sean J; Beley, Cyriaque; Garcia, Luis; Theveneau, Eric; Sear, Richard P; Hughes, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophin forms an essential link between sarcolemma and cytoskeleton, perturbation of which causes muscular dystrophy. We analysed Dystrophin binding dynamics in vivo for the first time. Within maturing fibres of host zebrafish embryos, our analysis reveals a pool of diffusible Dystrophin and complexes bound at the fibre membrane. Combining modelling, an improved FRAP methodology and direct semi-quantitative analysis of bleaching suggests the existence of two membrane-bound Dystrophin populations with widely differing bound lifetimes: a stable, tightly bound pool, and a dynamic bound pool with high turnover rate that exchanges with the cytoplasmic pool. The three populations were found consistently in human and zebrafish Dystrophins overexpressed in wild-type or dmdta222a/ta222a zebrafish embryos, which lack Dystrophin, and in Gt(dmd-Citrine)ct90a that express endogenously-driven tagged zebrafish Dystrophin. These results lead to a new model for Dystrophin membrane association in developing muscle, and highlight our methodology as a valuable strategy for in vivo analysis of complex protein dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06541.001 PMID:26459831

  13. Comparative Analysis of 35 Basidiomycete Genomes Reveals Diversity and Uniqueness of the Phylum

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Otillar, Robert; Fagnan, Kirsten; Boussau, Bastien; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Held, Benjamin; Nagy, Laszlo; Floudas, Dimitris; Morin, Emmanuelle; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Martin, Francis; Blanchette, Robert; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprobes including wood decaying fungi. To better understand the diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycete fungi including 6 newly sequenced genomes. The genomes of basidiomycetes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. A phylogenetic tree of Basidiomycota was generated using the Phyldog software, which uses all available protein sequence data to simultaneously infer gene and species trees. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) comprising proteins found in only one organism. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay among the members of Agaricomycotina subphylum. There is a correlation of the profile of certain gene families to nutritional mode in Agaricomycotina. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of such profiles, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has liginolytic class II fungal peroxidases. Furthermore, we find that both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics in growth assays. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the high value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  14. Is synaesthesia one condition or many? A large-scale analysis reveals subgroups.

    PubMed

    Novich, Scott; Cheng, Sherry; Eagleman, David M

    2011-09-01

    Synaesthesia is a broadly defined neural phenomenon in which stimulation of a sense or concept triggers a second perception not normally associated with the stimulus. For example, letters or numbers may trigger a colour experience, sounds may trigger a taste sensation, or tastes may trigger a feeling of touch. Dozens of forms of synaesthesia have been reported, but the relationship between the different forms has not been studied: is someone with a particular form of synaesthesia likely to possess other types? If so, which ones? As an inroad to illuminating underlying mechanisms, we here examine which different synaesthesia types tend to co-occur. We analyzed reports of the forms of synaesthesia experienced by 19,133 participants who completed the Synaesthesia Battery (Eagleman, Kagan, Nelson, Sagaram, & Sarma, 2007), using correlation analysis, exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and multidimensional scaling (MDS). Our analyses converged on the finding of five distinct groupings of synaesthesia forms. We label these coloured sequence synaesthesias (CSSs), coloured music synaesthesias, non-visual sequela synaesthesias, spatial sequence synaesthesia (SSS), and coloured sensation synaesthesias. Collectively, our findings reveal that synaesthesia is an umbrella term that encompasses several distinct groups with independent probabilities of expression, and this may in turn suggest distinct underlying mechanisms and the possibility of different genetic bases. PMID:21923794

  15. Adaptations to a subterranean environment and longevity revealed by the analysis of mole rat genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaodong; Seim, Inge; Huang, Zhiyong; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Turanov, Anton A.; Zhu, Yabing; Lobanov, Alexei V.; Fan, Dingding; Yim, Sun Hee; Yao, Xiaoming; Ma, Siming; Yang, Lan; Lee, Sang-Goo; Kim, Eun Bae; Bronson, Roderick T.; Šumbera, Radim; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Zhou, Xin; Krogh, Anders; Park, Thomas J.; Zhang, Guojie; Wang, Jun; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Subterranean mammals spend their lives in dark, unventilated environments rich in carbon dioxide and ammonia, and low in oxygen. Many of these animals are also long-lived and exhibit reduced aging-associated diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders and cancer. We sequenced the genome of the Damaraland mole rat (DMR, Fukomys damarensis) and improved the genome assembly of the naked mole rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber). Comparative genome analysis, along with transcriptomes of related subterranean rodents, reveal candidate molecular adaptations for subterranean life and longevity, including a divergent insulin peptide, expression of oxygen-carrying globins in the brain, prevention of high CO2-induced pain perception, and enhanced ammonia detoxification. Juxtaposition of the genomes of DMR and other more conventional animals with the genome of NMR revealed several truly exceptional NMR features: unusual thermogenesis, aberrant melatonin system, pain insensitivity, and novel processing of 28S rRNA. Together, the new genomes and transcriptomes extend our understanding of subterranean adaptations, stress resistance and longevity. PMID:25176646

  16. Genetic analysis reveals candidate species in the Scinax catharinae clade (Amphibia: Anura) from Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Lídia; Solé, Mirco; Siqueira, Sérgio; Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello; Strüssmann, Christine; Sampaio, Iracilda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Scinax (Anura: Hylidae) is a species-rich genus of amphibians (113 spp.), divided into five species groups by morphological features. Cladistic analyses however revealed only two monophyletic clades in these groups: Scinax catharinae and Scinax ruber. Most species from the S. catharinae clade are found in Atlantic rainforest, except for Scinax canastrensis,S. centralis, S. luizotavioi, S. machadoi,S. pombali and S. skaios. In the present work, specimens of Scinax collected in Chapada dos Guimarães, central Brazil, were morphologically compatible with species from theS. catharinae group. On the other hand, genetic analysis based on mitochondrial (16S and 12S) and nuclear (rhodopsin) sequences revealed a nucleotide divergence of 6 to 20% between Scinax sp. and other congeners from the Brazilian savannah (Cerrado). Accordingly, Bayesian inference placed Scinax sp. in the S. catharinae clade with high support values. Hence, these findings strongly indicate the presence of a new species in the S. catharinae clade from the southwestern portion of the Brazilian savannah. To be properly validated as a novel species, detailed comparative morphological and bioacustic studies with other taxa from Brazil such asS. canastrensis, S. centralis, S. luizotavioi, S. machadoi, S. pombali and S. skaios are required. PMID:27007898

  17. Babesia canis: evidence for genetic diversity among isolates revealed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Citard, T; Mähl, P; Boulouis, H J; Chavigny, C; Druilhe, P

    1995-09-01

    The genetic diversity of B. canis was investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. For this purpose, we identified a Babesia canis specific DNA probe named pS8. This 1.2 kbp probe can detect as low as 20 pg of B. canis DNA. Results suggest that the pS8 probe is distributed in multiple copies throughout the genome though is probably not itself internally repetitious, i.e. not structured into blocks of tandem units. This probe reveals discrete hybridizing fragments in B. canis enzyme-digested genomic DNA. RFLP patterns obtained with the pS8 probe revealed a large genetic diversity between various isolates and led us to distinguish several clones derived from a single isolate. Results suggest that for a single isolate, the fingerprints obtained reflect those of a few quantitatively dominant clones. This technique can now be routinely applied and provides a convenient tool for the characterization and the identification of B. canis isolates, strains and clones. PMID:8533020

  18. Stochastic Subcellular Organization of Dense-Core Vesicles Revealed by Point Pattern Analysis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Benjamin J; Stanisavljevic, Bogdan; Silverman, Michael A; Scalettar, Bethe A

    2016-08-23

    Dense-core vesicles (DCVs) are regulated secretory organelles found in many types of neurons. In neurons of the hippocampus, their cargo includes proteins that mediate several pivotal processes, including differentiation and synaptic plasticity. Motivated by interest in DCV distribution and its impact on cargo action, we have used fluorescence microscopy and statistical analysis to develop a quantitative model of the subcellular organization of DCVs in hippocampal neurons that are spontaneously active (their most prevalent state). We also have tested the functionally motivated hypothesis that these organelles are synaptically enriched. Variance-to-mean ratio, frequency distribution, and Moran's autocorrelation analyses reveal that DCV distribution along shafts, and within synapses, follows Poisson statistics, establishing that stochastically dictated organization sustains cargo function. Occupancy in boutons exceeds that at nearby extrasynaptic axonal sites by approximately threefold, revealing significant local presynaptic enrichment. Widespread stochastic organization is consistent with the emerging functional importance of synaptically and extrasynaptically localized DCVs. Presynaptic enrichment is consistent with the established importance of protecting presynaptic sites from depletion of DCV cargo. These results enhance understanding of the link between DCV organization and mechanisms of cargo action, and they reinforce the emerging theme that randomness is a prevalent aspect of synaptic organization and composition. PMID:27558728

  19. Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA) Reveals Context Related Influence of Brain Network Nodes.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Yael; Winetraub, Yonatan; Raz, Gal; Ben-Simon, Eti; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Rosenberg-Katz, Keren; Hendler, Talma; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2016-01-01

    Communication between and within brain regions is essential for information processing within functional networks. The current methods to determine the influence of one region on another are either based on temporal resolution, or require a predefined model for the connectivity direction. However these requirements are not always achieved, especially in fMRI studies, which have poor temporal resolution. We thus propose a new graph theory approach that focuses on the correlation influence between selected brain regions, entitled Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA). Partial correlations are used to quantify the level of influence of each node during task performance. As a proof of concept, we conducted the DEPNA on simulated datasets and on two empirical motor and working memory fMRI tasks. The simulations revealed that the DEPNA correctly captures the network's hierarchy of influence. Applying DEPNA to the functional tasks reveals the dynamics between specific nodes as would be expected from prior knowledge. To conclude, we demonstrate that DEPNA can capture the most influencing nodes in the network, as they emerge during specific cognitive processes. This ability opens a new horizon for example in delineating critical nodes for specific clinical interventions. PMID:27271458

  20. Stable isotope analysis of vertebrae reveals ontogenetic changes in habitat in an endothermic pelagic shark.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Aaron B; Goldman, Kenneth J; Litvin, Steven Y; Madigan, Daniel J; Bigman, Jennifer S; Swithenbank, Alan M; Kline, Thomas C; Block, Barbara A

    2015-01-22

    Ontogenetic changes in habitat are driven by shifting life-history requirements and play an important role in population dynamics. However, large portions of the life history of many pelagic species are still poorly understood or unknown. We used a novel combination of stable isotope analysis of vertebral annuli, Bayesian mixing models, isoscapes and electronic tag data to reconstruct ontogenetic patterns of habitat and resource use in a pelagic apex predator, the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis). Results identified the North Pacific Transition Zone as the major nursery area for salmon sharks and revealed an ontogenetic shift around the age of maturity from oceanic to increased use of neritic habitats. The nursery habitat may reflect trade-offs between prey availability, predation pressure and thermal constraints on juvenile endothermic sharks. The ontogenetic shift in habitat coincided with a reduction of isotopic niche, possibly reflecting specialization upon particular prey or habitats. Using tagging data to inform Bayesian isotopic mixing models revealed that adult sharks primarily use neritic habitats of Alaska yet receive a trophic subsidy from oceanic habitats. Integrating the multiple methods used here provides a powerful approach to retrospectively study the ecology and life history of migratory species throughout their ontogeny. PMID:25621332

  1. Stable isotope analysis of vertebrae reveals ontogenetic changes in habitat in an endothermic pelagic shark

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, Aaron B.; Goldman, Kenneth J.; Litvin, Steven Y.; Madigan, Daniel J.; Bigman, Jennifer S.; Swithenbank, Alan M.; Kline, Thomas C.; Block, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Ontogenetic changes in habitat are driven by shifting life-history requirements and play an important role in population dynamics. However, large portions of the life history of many pelagic species are still poorly understood or unknown. We used a novel combination of stable isotope analysis of vertebral annuli, Bayesian mixing models, isoscapes and electronic tag data to reconstruct ontogenetic patterns of habitat and resource use in a pelagic apex predator, the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis). Results identified the North Pacific Transition Zone as the major nursery area for salmon sharks and revealed an ontogenetic shift around the age of maturity from oceanic to increased use of neritic habitats. The nursery habitat may reflect trade-offs between prey availability, predation pressure and thermal constraints on juvenile endothermic sharks. The ontogenetic shift in habitat coincided with a reduction of isotopic niche, possibly reflecting specialization upon particular prey or habitats. Using tagging data to inform Bayesian isotopic mixing models revealed that adult sharks primarily use neritic habitats of Alaska yet receive a trophic subsidy from oceanic habitats. Integrating the multiple methods used here provides a powerful approach to retrospectively study the ecology and life history of migratory species throughout their ontogeny. PMID:25621332

  2. Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA) Reveals Context Related Influence of Brain Network Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Yael; Winetraub, Yonatan; Raz, Gal; Ben-Simon, Eti; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Rosenberg-Katz, Keren; Hendler, Talma; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2016-01-01

    Communication between and within brain regions is essential for information processing within functional networks. The current methods to determine the influence of one region on another are either based on temporal resolution, or require a predefined model for the connectivity direction. However these requirements are not always achieved, especially in fMRI studies, which have poor temporal resolution. We thus propose a new graph theory approach that focuses on the correlation influence between selected brain regions, entitled Dependency Network Analysis (DEPNA). Partial correlations are used to quantify the level of influence of each node during task performance. As a proof of concept, we conducted the DEPNA on simulated datasets and on two empirical motor and working memory fMRI tasks. The simulations revealed that the DEPNA correctly captures the network’s hierarchy of influence. Applying DEPNA to the functional tasks reveals the dynamics between specific nodes as would be expected from prior knowledge. To conclude, we demonstrate that DEPNA can capture the most influencing nodes in the network, as they emerge during specific cognitive processes. This ability opens a new horizon for example in delineating critical nodes for specific clinical interventions. PMID:27271458

  3. Genetic analysis reveals candidate species in the Scinax catharinae clade (Amphibia: Anura) from Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Lídia; Solé, Mirco; Siqueira, Sérgio; Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello; Strüssmann, Christine; Sampaio, Iracilda

    2016-03-01

    Scinax (Anura: Hylidae) is a species-rich genus of amphibians (113 spp.), divided into five species groups by morphological features. Cladistic analyses however revealed only two monophyletic clades in these groups: Scinax catharinae and Scinax ruber. Most species from the S. catharinae clade are found in Atlantic rainforest, except for Scinax canastrensis,S. centralis, S. luizotavioi, S. machadoi,S. pombali and S. skaios. In the present work, specimens of Scinax collected in Chapada dos Guimarães, central Brazil, were morphologically compatible with species from theS. catharinae group. On the other hand, genetic analysis based on mitochondrial (16S and 12S) and nuclear (rhodopsin) sequences revealed a nucleotide divergence of 6 to 20% between Scinax sp. and other congeners from the Brazilian savannah (Cerrado). Accordingly, Bayesian inference placed Scinax sp. in the S. catharinae clade with high support values. Hence, these findings strongly indicate the presence of a new species in the S. catharinae clade from the southwestern portion of the Brazilian savannah. To be properly validated as a novel species, detailed comparative morphological and bioacustic studies with other taxa from Brazil such asS. canastrensis, S. centralis, S. luizotavioi, S. machadoi, S. pombali and S. skaios are required. PMID:27007898

  4. Transcriptome Analysis in Tardigrade Species Reveals Specific Molecular Pathways for Stress Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Frank; Beisser, Daniela; Grohme, Markus A.; Liang, Chunguang; Mali, Brahim; Siegl, Alexander Matthias; Engelmann, Julia C.; Shkumatov, Alexander V.; Schokraie, Elham; Müller, Tobias; Schnölzer, Martina; Schill, Ralph O.; Frohme, Marcus; Dandekar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades have unique stress-adaptations that allow them to survive extremes of cold, heat, radiation and vacuum. To study this, encoded protein clusters and pathways from an ongoing transcriptome study on the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Hypsibius dujardini, revealing major pathways involved in resistance against extreme environmental conditions. ESTs are available on the Tardigrade Workbench along with software and databank updates. Our analysis reveals that RNA stability motifs for M. tardigradum are different from typical motifs known from higher animals. M. tardigradum and H. dujardini protein clusters and conserved domains imply metabolic storage pathways for glycogen, glycolipids and specific secondary metabolism as well as stress response pathways (including heat shock proteins, bmh2, and specific repair pathways). Redox-, DNA-, stress- and protein protection pathways complement specific repair capabilities to achieve the strong robustness of M. tardigradum. These pathways are partly conserved in other animals and their manipulation could boost stress adaptation even in human cells. However, the unique combination of resistance and repair pathways make tardigrades and M. tardigradum in particular so highly stress resistant. PMID:22563243

  5. Transcriptome analysis reveals novel regulatory mechanisms in a genome-reduced bacterium.

    PubMed

    Mazin, Pavel V; Fisunov, Gleb Y; Gorbachev, Alexey Y; Kapitskaya, Kristina Y; Altukhov, Ilya A; Semashko, Tatiana A; Alexeev, Dmitry G; Govorun, Vadim M

    2014-12-01

    The avian bacterial pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a good model for systems studies due to small genome and simplicity of regulatory pathways. In this study, we used RNA-Seq and MS-based proteomics to accurately map coding sequences, transcription start sites (TSSs) and transcript 3'-ends (T3Es). We used obtained data to investigate roles of TSSs and T3Es in stress-induced transcriptional responses. We identified 1061 TSSs at a false discovery rate of 10% and showed that almost all transcription in M. gallisepticum is initiated from classic TATAAT promoters surrounded by A/T-rich sequences. Our analysis revealed the pronounced operon structure complexity: on average, each coding operon has one internal TSS and T3Es in addition to the primary ones. Our transcriptomic approach based on the intervals between the two nearest transcript ends allowed us to identify two classes of T3Es: strong, unregulated, hairpin-containing T3Es and weak, heat shock-regulated, hairpinless T3Es. Comparing gene expression levels under different conditions revealed widespread and divergent transcription regulation in M. gallisepticum. Modeling suggested that the core promoter structure plays an important role in gene expression regulation. We have shown that the heat stress activation of cryptic promoters combined with the hairpinless T3Es suppression leads to widespread, seemingly non-functional transcription. PMID:25361977

  6. Systematic Analysis of Essential Genes Reveals New Regulators of G protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cappell, Steven D.; Baker, Rachael; Skowyra, Dorota; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The yeast pheromone pathway consists of a canonical heterotrimeric G protein and MAP kinase cascade. To identify new signaling components we systematically evaluated 870 essential genes using a library of repressible-promoter strains. Quantitative transcription-reporter and MAPK activity assays were used to identify strains that exhibit altered pheromone sensitivity. Of the 92 newly identified essential genes required for proper G protein signaling, those involved with protein degradation were most highly-represented. Included in this group are members of the SCF (Skp-Cullin-F-Box) ubiquitin ligase complex. Further genetic and biochemical analysis reveals that SCFCdc4 acts together with the Cdc34 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme at the level of the G protein, promotes degradation of the G protein α subunit, Gpa1, in vivo and catalyzes Gpa1 ubiquitination in vitro. These new insights to the G protein signaling network reveal the essential-genome as an untapped resource for identifying new components and regulators of signal transduction pathways. PMID:20542006

  7. Transcriptome analysis reveals novel regulatory mechanisms in a genome-reduced bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Mazin, Pavel V.; Fisunov, Gleb Y.; Gorbachev, Alexey Y.; Kapitskaya, Kristina Y.; Altukhov, Ilya A.; Semashko, Tatiana A.; Alexeev, Dmitry G.; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2014-01-01

    The avian bacterial pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a good model for systems studies due to small genome and simplicity of regulatory pathways. In this study, we used RNA-Seq and MS-based proteomics to accurately map coding sequences, transcription start sites (TSSs) and transcript 3′-ends (T3Es). We used obtained data to investigate roles of TSSs and T3Es in stress-induced transcriptional responses. We identified 1061 TSSs at a false discovery rate of 10% and showed that almost all transcription in M. gallisepticum is initiated from classic TATAAT promoters surrounded by A/T-rich sequences. Our analysis revealed the pronounced operon structure complexity: on average, each coding operon has one internal TSS and T3Es in addition to the primary ones. Our transcriptomic approach based on the intervals between the two nearest transcript ends allowed us to identify two classes of T3Es: strong, unregulated, hairpin-containing T3Es and weak, heat shock-regulated, hairpinless T3Es. Comparing gene expression levels under different conditions revealed widespread and divergent transcription regulation in M. gallisepticum. Modeling suggested that the core promoter structure plays an important role in gene expression regulation. We have shown that the heat stress activation of cryptic promoters combined with the hairpinless T3Es suppression leads to widespread, seemingly non-functional transcription. PMID:25361977

  8. Neural responses to visual scenes reveals inconsistencies between fMRI adaptation and multivoxel pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Russell A; Morgan, Lindsay K

    2012-03-01

    Human observers can recognize real-world visual scenes with great efficiency. Cortical regions such as the parahippocampal place area (PPA) and retrosplenial complex (RSC) have been implicated in scene recognition, but the specific representations supported by these regions are largely unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation (fMRIa) and multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) to explore this issue, focusing on whether the PPA and RSC represent scenes in terms of general categories, or as specific scenic exemplars. Subjects were scanned while viewing images drawn from 10 outdoor scene categories in two scan runs and images of 10 familiar landmarks from their home college campus in two scan runs. Analyses of multi-voxel patterns revealed that the PPA and RSC encoded both category and landmark information, with a slight advantage for landmark coding in RSC. fMRIa, on the other hand, revealed a very different picture: both PPA and RSC adapted when landmark information was repeated, but category adaptation was only observed in a small subregion of the left PPA. These inconsistencies between the MVPA and fMRIa data suggests that these two techniques interrogate different aspects of the neuronal code. We propose three hypotheses about the mechanisms that might underlie adaptation and multi-voxel signals. PMID:22001314

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brown Adipose Tissue Reveals Utilization of Coupled and Uncoupled Energy Expenditure Pathways.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian; Balaz, Miroslav; Stefanicka, Patrik; Varga, Lukas; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ukropec, Jozef; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wolfrum, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become an attractive target to combat the current epidemical spread of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Currently, information on its functional role is primarily derived from rodent studies. Here, we present the first comparative proteotype analysis of primary human brown adipose tissue versus adjacent white adipose tissue, which reveals significant quantitative differences in protein abundances and in turn differential functional capabilities. The majority of the 318 proteins with increased abundance in BAT are associated with mitochondrial metabolism and confirm the increased oxidative capacity. In addition to uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), the main functional effector for uncoupled respiration, we also detected the mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1A/B, CKMT2), as effective modulators of ATP synthase coupled respiration, to be exclusively expressed in BAT. The abundant expression and utilization of both energy expenditure pathways in parallel highlights the complex functional involvement of BAT in human physiology. PMID:27418403

  10. Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011 Genome Analysis Reveals Clues for Colonization of the Insect Gut

    PubMed Central

    Bottacini, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca; Sánchez, Borja; Foroni, Elena; Duranti, Sabrina; Serafini, Fausta; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Ferrarini, Alberto; Delledonne, Massimo; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are known as anaerobic/microaerophilic and fermentative microorganisms, which commonly inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of various animals and insects. Analysis of the 2,167,301 bp genome of Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011, a strain isolated from the hindgut of Apis mellifera var. ligustica, commonly known as the honey bee, revealed its predicted capability for respiratory metabolism. Conservation of the latter gene clusters in various B. asteroides strains enforces the notion that respiration is a common metabolic feature of this ancient bifidobacterial species, which has been lost in currently known mammal-derived Bifidobacterium species. In fact, phylogenomic based analyses suggested an ancient origin of B. asteroides and indicates it as an ancestor of the genus Bifidobacterium. Furthermore, the B. asteroides PRL2011 genome encodes various enzymes for coping with toxic products that arise as a result of oxygen-mediated respiration. PMID:23028506

  11. Metagenomic analysis of the pinewood nematode microbiome reveals a symbiotic relationship critical for xenobiotics degradation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin-Yue; Tian, Xue-Liang; Wang, Yun-Sheng; Lin, Ren-Miao; Mao, Zhen-Chuan; Chen, Nansheng; Xie, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Our recent research revealed that pinewood nematode (PWN) possesses few genes encoding enzymes for degrading α-pinene, which is the main compound in pine resin. In this study, we examined the role of PWN microbiome in xenobiotics detoxification by metagenomic and bacteria culture analyses. Functional annotation of metagenomes illustrated that benzoate degradation and its related metabolisms may provide the main metabolic pathways for xenobiotics detoxification in the microbiome, which is obviously different from that in PWN that uses cytochrome P450 metabolism as the main pathway for detoxification. The metabolic pathway of degrading α-pinene is complete in microbiome, but incomplete in PWN genome. Experimental analysis demonstrated that most of tested cultivable bacteria can not only survive the stress of 0.4% α-pinene, but also utilize α-pinene as carbon source for their growth. Our results indicate that PWN and its microbiome have established a potentially mutualistic symbiotic relationship with complementary pathways in detoxification metabolism. PMID:23694939

  12. Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American turkey domestication.

    PubMed

    Speller, Camilla F; Kemp, Brian M; Wyatt, Scott D; Monroe, Cara; Lipe, William D; Arndt, Ursula M; Yang, Dongya Y

    2010-02-16

    Although the cultural and nutritive importance of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) to precontact Native Americans and contemporary people worldwide is clear, little is known about the domestication of this bird compared to other domesticates. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of 149 turkey bones and 29 coprolites from 38 archaeological sites (200 BC-AD 1800) reveals a unique domesticated breed in the precontact Southwestern United States. Phylogeographic analyses indicate that this domestic breed originated from outside the region, but rules out the South Mexican domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo) as a progenitor. A strong genetic bottleneck within the Southwest turkeys also reflects intensive human selection and breeding. This study points to at least two occurrences of turkey domestication in precontact North America and illuminates the intensity and sophistication of New World animal breeding practices. PMID:20133614

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brown Adipose Tissue Reveals Utilization of Coupled and Uncoupled Energy Expenditure Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sebastian; Balaz, Miroslav; Stefanicka, Patrik; Varga, Lukas; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ukropec, Jozef; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wolfrum, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become an attractive target to combat the current epidemical spread of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Currently, information on its functional role is primarily derived from rodent studies. Here, we present the first comparative proteotype analysis of primary human brown adipose tissue versus adjacent white adipose tissue, which reveals significant quantitative differences in protein abundances and in turn differential functional capabilities. The majority of the 318 proteins with increased abundance in BAT are associated with mitochondrial metabolism and confirm the increased oxidative capacity. In addition to uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), the main functional effector for uncoupled respiration, we also detected the mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1A/B, CKMT2), as effective modulators of ATP synthase coupled respiration, to be exclusively expressed in BAT. The abundant expression and utilization of both energy expenditure pathways in parallel highlights the complex functional involvement of BAT in human physiology. PMID:27418403

  14. Metagenomic analysis of the pinewood nematode microbiome reveals a symbiotic relationship critical for xenobiotics degradation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xin-Yue; Tian, Xue-Liang; Wang, Yun-Sheng; Lin, Ren-Miao; Mao, Zhen-Chuan; Chen, Nansheng; Xie, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Our recent research revealed that pinewood nematode (PWN) possesses few genes encoding enzymes for degrading α-pinene, which is the main compound in pine resin. In this study, we examined the role of PWN microbiome in xenobiotics detoxification by metagenomic and bacteria culture analyses. Functional annotation of metagenomes illustrated that benzoate degradation and its related metabolisms may provide the main metabolic pathways for xenobiotics detoxification in the microbiome, which is obviously different from that in PWN that uses cytochrome P450 metabolism as the main pathway for detoxification. The metabolic pathway of degrading α-pinene is complete in microbiome, but incomplete in PWN genome. Experimental analysis demonstrated that most of tested cultivable bacteria can not only survive the stress of 0.4% α-pinene, but also utilize α-pinene as carbon source for their growth. Our results indicate that PWN and its microbiome have established a potentially mutualistic symbiotic relationship with complementary pathways in detoxification metabolism. PMID:23694939

  15. Metagenomic analysis reveals significant changes of microbial compositions and protective functions during drinking water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yuanqing; Ma, Liping; Yang, Ying; Ju, Feng; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wu, Wei-Min; Zhang, Tong

    2013-12-01

    The metagenomic approach was applied to characterize variations of microbial structure and functions in raw (RW) and treated water (TW) in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) at Pearl River Delta, China. Microbial structure was significantly influenced by the treatment processes, shifting from Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria in RW to Alphaproteobacteria in TW. Further functional analysis indicated the basic metabolic functions of microorganisms in TW did not vary considerably. However, protective functions, i.e. glutathione synthesis genes in `oxidative stress' and `detoxification' subsystems, significantly increased, revealing the surviving bacteria may have higher chlorine resistance. Similar results were also found in glutathione metabolism pathway, which identified the major reaction for glutathione synthesis and supported more genes for glutathione metabolism existed in TW. This metagenomic study largely enhanced our knowledge about the influences of treatment processes, especially chlorination, on bacterial community structure and protective functions (e.g. glutathione metabolism) in ecosystems of DWTPs.

  16. Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Unexpected Subgenomic Diversity of Magnetotactic Bacteria within the Phylum Nitrospirae ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Jogler, Christian; Schüler, Dirk; Pan, Yongxin

    2011-01-01

    A targeted metagenomic approach was applied to investigate magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) within the phylum Nitrospirae in Lake Miyun near Beijing, China. Five fosmids containing rRNA operons were identified. Comparative sequence analysis of a total of 172 kb provided new insights into their genome organization and revealed unexpected subgenomic diversity of uncultivated MTB in the phylum Nitrospirae. In addition, affiliation of two novel MTB with the phylum Nitrospirae was verified by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One of them was morphologically similar to “Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum,” but the other differed substantially in cell shape and magnetosome organization from all previously described “Ca. Magnetobacterium bavaricum”-like bacteria. PMID:21057016

  17. Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American turkey domestication

    PubMed Central

    Speller, Camilla F.; Kemp, Brian M.; Wyatt, Scott D.; Monroe, Cara; Lipe, William D.; Arndt, Ursula M.; Yang, Dongya Y.

    2010-01-01

    Although the cultural and nutritive importance of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) to precontact Native Americans and contemporary people worldwide is clear, little is known about the domestication of this bird compared to other domesticates. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of 149 turkey bones and 29 coprolites from 38 archaeological sites (200 BC–AD 1800) reveals a unique domesticated breed in the precontact Southwestern United States. Phylogeographic analyses indicate that this domestic breed originated from outside the region, but rules out the South Mexican domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo) as a progenitor. A strong genetic bottleneck within the Southwest turkeys also reflects intensive human selection and breeding. This study points to at least two occurrences of turkey domestication in precontact North America and illuminates the intensity and sophistication of New World animal breeding practices. PMID:20133614

  18. Chemical analysis of constitutive pigmentation of human epidermis reveals constant eumelanin to pheomelanin ratio.

    PubMed

    Del Bino, Sandra; Ito, Shosuke; Sok, Juliette; Nakanishi, Yukiko; Bastien, Philippe; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Bernerd, Françoise

    2015-11-01

    The skin constitutive pigmentation is given by the amount of melanin pigment, its relative composition (eu/pheomelanin) and distribution within the epidermis, and is largely responsible for the sensitivity to UV exposure. Nevertheless, a precise knowledge of melanins in human skin is lacking. We characterized the melanin content of human breast skin samples with variable pigmentations rigorously classified through the Individual Typology Angle (ITA) by image analysis, spectrophotometry after solubilization with Soluene-350 and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after chemical degradation. ITA and total melanin content were found correlated, ITA and PTCA (degradation product of DHICA melanin), and TTCA (degradation product of benzothiazole-type pheomelanin) as well but not 4-AHP (degradation product of benzothiazine-type pheomelanin). Results revealed that human epidermis comprises approximately 74% of eumelanin and 26% pheomelanin, regardless of the degree of pigmentation. They also confirm the low content of photoprotective eumelanin among lighter skins thereby explaining the higher sensitivity toward UV exposure. PMID:26285058

  19. Hydrodynamics in nanoscale confinement: SFA and colloid probe AFM liquid drainage experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasowska, M.; Popescu, M. N.; Ralston, J.

    2012-12-01

    Flow and drainage of very thin liquid films play an important role in mineral recovery, drop coalescence and emulsion stability, as well as lubrication of micromechanical devices. Studies of liquid flow under strong confinement (i.e., film thickness below a few hundred of nanometers and down to a few nanometers) can reveal the limits of applicability of a classical hydrodynamics description, but are very challenging. The Surface Force Apparatus (SFA) technique has enabled studies of drainage at nanoscale separation between atomically smooth mica sheets. The development of the colloid probe Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) as an alternative technique has allowed a significantly wider variety of confining solid surfaces to be studied. Both the SFA and the colloid probe AFM have been adapted to permit the surfaces confining the film to be soft, e.g., the surface of a drop or bubble, and therefore deformable. We present a succinct review of the experimental and theoretical modeling challenges for such studies and critically discuss the outcomes of recent experiments.

  20. AFM Observation of Self-Assembled Monolayer Films on GaAs (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Hirotaka; Motomatsu, Makoto; Mizutani, Wataru; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    1995-02-01

    We have confirmed that a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) film of octadecanethiol (ODT), CH3(CH2)17SH, can be formed on a cleaved GaAs (110) surface, by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Circular depressions were observed on the surface after film formation. The area of the circular depressions increased with immersion time, indicating that the solution oxidized the interface between ODT molecules and the GaAs surface, resulting in removal of ODT molecules. The oxidation was considerably faster in pure ethanol solution than that in ODT solution, demonstrating that the SAM film protects the GaAs surface from oxidation. High-resolution lateral force microscope (LFM) images revealed a periodic structure that had two types of lines: periodic lines 0.57 nm apart and lines rotated 55° with respect to them. A structural model of the SAM successfully explained both the features in high-resolution LFM images and the depression depth observed in AFM images.

  1. Single Dimer E-Cadherin Interaction Forces Characterized Using Modified AFM Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitsky, Robert; Drees, Frauke; Nelson, W. James; Kenny, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    In tissue monolayers, adhesion between cells is accomplished chiefly through the action of [Ca++] dependent cadherin proteins. E-cadherin molecules coalesce into large plaques on contacting membranes of adjacent cells. Using specialized AFM cantilevers functionalized with tethered E-cadherin proteins, we studied the interaction forces of trans dimers from the single bond level through to the higher surface densities found in plaques, with pico-Newton force resolution. The measurements demonstrated the dependence of E-cadherin homoassociation on surface protein density. Previous in-vivo studies established the role of Ca++ in E-cadherin adhesion in whole cells. Advances in AFM force spectroscopy allowed us to characterize the unbinding process under force loads, and to differentiate single and multiple molecular binding events. The data correlates the dependence of E-cadherin adhesion at a molecular level to [Ca++], revealing interaction details that cannot be observed using whole-cell studies. This work is supported by NSF (XYZ on a Chip Program) CMS-9980838, NIH (GMB5227), and the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation.

  2. Surface characterization and AFM imaging of mixed fibrinogen-surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Gunning, A Patrick; Morris, Victor J; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-05-19

    This study describes the adsorption behavior of mixed protein/surfactant systems at the air-water interface: specifically fibrinogen and the fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)FONa, C(8)HONa, and C(12)HONa). Surface tension techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been combined to investigate the adsorption behavior of these mixed systems. Interfacial rheology showed that fibrinogen has a low dilatational modulus at the air-water interface when compared to other proteins, suggesting the formation of a weak surface network. Fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants severely decreased the dilatational modulus of the adsorbed fibrinogen film at the air-water interface. These measurements suggest the progressive displacement of fibrinogen from the air-water interface by both types of surfactants. However, in the case of fibrinogen/fluorinated surfactant systems, surface tension and dilatational rheology measurements suggest the formation of complexes with improved surface activity. AFM imaging of fibrinogen in the presence and absence of surfactants provided new information on the structure of mixed surface films, and revealed new features of the interaction of fibrinogen with hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants. These studies suggest complexes formed between fibrinogen and fluorinated surfactants which are more surface active than fibrinogen, while the absence of interaction between fibrinogen and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)HONa and C(12)HONa) results in compaction of the surface layer. PMID:21491854

  3. AFM Studies of Salt Concentration Effects on the (110) Surface Structure of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee; Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Konnert, John

    2002-01-01

    Previous high resolution AFM studies of the (110) surface of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals had shown that only one of two possible molecular surfaces is present, those constituting the completed 43 helices. These suggested that the crystal growth process was by the solution-phase assembly of the growth units, which then attach to the surface. However, the best fit for the imaged surfaces, vs. those predicted based upon the bulk crystallographic coordinates, were obtained when the packing about the 43 helices was "tightened up", while maintaining the underlying crystallographic unit cell spacing. This results in a widening of the gap between adjacent helices, and the top- most layer(s) may no longer be in contact. We postulated that the tightened packing about the helices is a result of the high salt concentrations in the bulk solution, used to crystallize the protein, driving hydrophobic interactions. Once the crystal surface is sufficiently buried by subsequent growth layers the ratio of salt to protein molecules decreases and the helices relax to their bulk crystallographic coordinates. The crystal surface helix structure is thus a reflection of the solution structure, and the tightness of the packing about the 43 helices would be a function of the bulk salt concentration. AFM images of the (110) surface of tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown under low (2%) and high (5%) NaCl concentrations reveal differences in the packing about the 43 helices consistent with the above proposal.

  4. Computational analysis reveals increased blood deposition following repeated mild traumatic brain injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Virginia; Bianchi, Anthony; Hartman, Richard; Bhanu, Bir; Carson, Monica J.; Obenaus, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has become an increasing public health concern as subsequent injuries can exacerbate existing neuropathology and result in neurological deficits. This study investigated the temporal development of cortical lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess two mTBIs delivered to opposite cortical hemispheres. The controlled cortical impact model was used to produce an initial mTBI on the right cortex followed by a second injury induced on the left cortex at 3 (rmTBI 3d) or 7 (rmTBI 7d) days later. Histogram analysis was combined with a novel semi-automated computational approach to perform a voxel-wise examination of extravascular blood and edema volumes within the lesion. Examination of lesion volume 1d post last injury revealed increased tissue abnormalities within rmTBI 7d animals compared to other groups, particularly at the site of the second impact. Histogram analysis of lesion T2 values suggested increased edematous tissue within the rmTBI 3d group and elevated blood deposition in the rm TBI 7d animals. Further quantification of lesion composition for blood and edema containing voxels supported our histogram findings, with increased edema at the site of second impact in rmTBI 3d animals and elevated blood deposition in the rmTBI 7d group at the site of the first injury. Histological measurements revealed spatial overlap of regions containing blood deposition and microglial activation within the cortices of all animals. In conclusion, our findings suggest that there is a window of tissue vulnerability where a second distant mTBI, induced 7d after an initial injury, exacerbates tissue abnormalities consistent with hemorrhagic progression. PMID:24179733

  5. Partial sequencing of the bottle gourd genome reveals markers useful for phylogenetic analysis and breeding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bottle gourd [Lagenaria siceraria (Mol.) Standl.] is an important cucurbit crop worldwide. Archaeological research indicates that bottle gourd was domesticated more than 10,000 years ago, making it one of the earliest plants cultivated by man. In spite of its widespread importance and long history of cultivation almost nothing has been known about the genome of this species thus far. Results We report here the partial sequencing of bottle gourd genome using the 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. A total of 150,253 sequence reads, which were assembled into 3,994 contigs and 82,522 singletons were generated. The total length of the non-redundant singletons/assemblies is 32 Mb, theoretically covering ~ 10% of the bottle gourd genome. Functional annotation of the sequences revealed a broad range of functional types, covering all the three top-level ontologies. Comparison of the gene sequences between bottle gourd and the model cucurbit cucumber (Cucumis sativus) revealed a 90% sequence similarity on average. Using the sequence information, 4395 microsatellite-containing sequences were identified and 400 SSR markers were developed, of which 94% amplified bands of anticipated sizes. Transferability of these markers to four other cucurbit species showed obvious decline with increasing phylogenetic distance. From analyzing polymorphisms of a subset of 14 SSR markers assayed on 44 representative China bottle gourd varieties/landraces, a principal coordinates (PCo) analysis output and a UPGMA-based dendrogram were constructed. Bottle gourd accessions tended to group by fruit shape rather than geographic origin, although in certain subclades the lines from the same or close origin did tend to cluster. Conclusions This work provides an initial basis for genome characterization, gene isolation and comparative genomics analysis in bottle gourd. The SSR markers developed would facilitate marker assisted breeding schemes for efficient introduction of desired

  6. Comparative Genomic Analysis of the Endosymbionts of Herbivorous Insects Reveals Eco-Environmental Adaptations: Biotechnology Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Weibing; Xie, Shangxian; Chen, Xueyan; Sun, Su; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Lantao; Gao, Peng; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; No, En-Gyu; Yuan, Joshua S.

    2013-01-01

    Metagenome analysis of the gut symbionts of three different insects was conducted as a means of comparing taxonomic and metabolic diversity of gut microbiomes to diet and life history of the insect hosts. A second goal was the discovery of novel biocatalysts for biorefinery applications. Grasshopper and cutworm gut symbionts were sequenced and compared with the previously identified metagenome of termite gut microbiota. These insect hosts represent three different insect orders and specialize on different food types. The comparative analysis revealed dramatic differences among the three insect species in the abundance and taxonomic composition of the symbiont populations present in the gut. The composition and abundance of symbionts was correlated with their previously identified capacity to degrade and utilize the different types of food consumed by their hosts. The metabolic reconstruction revealed that the gut metabolome of cutworms and grasshoppers was more enriched for genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and transport than wood-feeding termite, whereas the termite gut metabolome was enriched for glycosyl hydrolase (GH) enzymes relevant to lignocellulosic biomass degradation. Moreover, termite gut metabolome was more enriched with nitrogen fixation genes than those of grasshopper and cutworm gut, presumably due to the termite's adaptation to the high fiber and less nutritious food types. In order to evaluate and exploit the insect symbionts for biotechnology applications, we cloned and further characterized four biomass-degrading enzymes including one endoglucanase and one xylanase from both the grasshopper and cutworm gut symbionts. The results indicated that the grasshopper symbiont enzymes were generally more efficient in biomass degradation than the homologous enzymes from cutworm symbionts. Together, these results demonstrated a correlation between the composition and putative metabolic functionality of the gut microbiome and host diet, and suggested

  7. Spatial Intensity Distribution Analysis Reveals Abnormal Oligomerization of Proteins in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Godin, Antoine G; Rappaz, Benjamin; Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Kennedy, Timothy E; De Koninck, Yves; Wiseman, Paul W

    2015-08-18

    Knowledge of membrane receptor organization is essential for understanding the initial steps in cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms, but quantitative analysis of receptor interactions at the single-cell level and in different cellular compartments has remained highly challenging. To achieve this, we apply a quantitative image analysis technique-spatial intensity distribution analysis (SpIDA)-that can measure fluorescent particle concentrations and oligomerization states within different subcellular compartments in live cells. An important technical challenge faced by fluorescence microscopy-based measurement of oligomerization is the fidelity of receptor labeling. In practice, imperfect labeling biases the distribution of oligomeric states measured within an aggregated system. We extend SpIDA to enable analysis of high-order oligomers from fluorescence microscopy images, by including a probability weighted correction algorithm for nonemitting labels. We demonstrated that this fraction of nonemitting probes could be estimated in single cells using SpIDA measurements on model systems with known oligomerization state. Previously, this artifact was measured using single-step photobleaching. This approach was validated using computer-simulated data and the imperfect labeling was quantified in cells with ion channels of known oligomer subunit count. It was then applied to quantify the oligomerization states in different cell compartments of the proteolipid protein (PLP) expressed in COS-7 cells. Expression of a mutant PLP linked to impaired trafficking resulted in the detection of PLP tetramers that persist in the endoplasmic reticulum, while no difference was measured at the membrane between the distributions of wild-type and mutated PLPs. Our results demonstrate that SpIDA allows measurement of protein oligomerization in different compartments of intact cells, even when fractional mislabeling occurs as well as photobleaching during the imaging process, and

  8. Network-based gene expression analysis of intracranial aneurysm tissue reveals role of antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Krischek, B; Kasuya, H; Tajima, A; Akagawa, H; Sasaki, T; Yoneyama, T; Ujiie, H; Kubo, O; Bonin, M; Takakura, K; Hori, T; Inoue, I

    2008-07-17

    Little is known about the pathology and pathogenesis of the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. For a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in intracranial aneurysm (IA) formation we performed a gene expression analysis comparing ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue to a control artery. Tissue samples of six ruptured and four unruptured aneurysms, and four cerebral arteries serving as controls, were profiled using oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene ontology classification of the differentially expressed genes was analyzed and regulatory functional networks and canonical pathways were identified with a network-based computational pathway analysis tool. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining were performed as confirmation. Analysis of aneurysmal and control tissue revealed 521 differentially expressed genes. The most significantly associated gene ontology term was antigen processing (P=1.64E-16). Further network-based analysis showed the top scoring regulatory functional network to be built around overexpressed major histocompatibility class (MHC) I and II complex related genes and confirmed the canonical pathway "Antigen Presentation" to have the highest upregulation in IA tissue (P=7.3E-10). Real time RT-PCR showed significant overexpression of MHC class II genes. Immunohistochemical staining showed strong positivity for MHC II molecule specific antibody (HLA II), for CD68 (macrophages, monocytes), for CD45RO (T-cells) and HLA I antibody. Our results offer strong evidence for MHC class II gene overexpression in human IA tissue and that antigen presenting cells (macrophages, monocytes) play a key role in IA formation. PMID:18538937

  9. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Similarities and Dissimilarities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Strains Response to Nitrogen Availability

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Catarina; García-Martínez, José; Pérez-Ortín, José E.; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen levels in grape-juices are of major importance in winemaking ensuring adequate yeast growth and fermentation performance. Here we used a comparative transcriptome analysis to uncover wine yeasts responses to nitrogen availability during fermentation. Gene expression was assessed in three genetically and phenotypically divergent commercial wine strains (CEG, VL1 and QA23), under low (67 mg/L) and high nitrogen (670 mg/L) regimes, at three time points during fermentation (12h, 24h and 96h). Two-way ANOVA analysis of each fermentation condition led to the identification of genes whose expression was dependent on strain, fermentation stage and on the interaction of both factors. The high fermenter yeast strain QA23 was more clearly distinct from the other two strains, by differential expression of genes involved in flocculation, mitochondrial functions, energy generation and protein folding and stabilization. For all strains, higher transcriptional variability due to fermentation stage was seen in the high nitrogen fermentations. A positive correlation between maximum fermentation rate and the expression of genes involved in stress response was observed. The finding of common genes correlated with both fermentation activity and nitrogen up-take underlies the role of nitrogen on yeast fermentative fitness. The comparative analysis of genes differentially expressed between both fermentation conditions at 12h, where the main difference was the level of nitrogen available, showed the highest variability amongst strains revealing strain-specific responses. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a small set of genes whose expression profiles can quantitatively assess the common response of the yeast strains to varying nitrogen conditions. The use of three contrasting yeast strains in gene expression analysis prompts the identification of more reliable, accurate and reproducible biomarkers that will facilitate the diagnosis of deficiency of this nutrient in the grape

  10. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  11. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  12. Metabolite profiling and network analysis reveal coordinated changes in grapevine water stress response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Grapevine metabolism in response to water deficit was studied in two cultivars, Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon, which were shown to have different hydraulic behaviors (Hochberg et al. Physiol. Plant. 147:443–453, 2012). Results Progressive water deficit was found to effect changes in leaf water potentials accompanied by metabolic changes. In both cultivars, but more intensively in Shiraz than Cabernet Sauvignon, water deficit caused a shift to higher osmolality and lower C/N ratios, the latter of which was also reflected in marked increases in amino acids, e.g., Pro, Val, Leu, Thr and Trp, reductions of most organic acids, and changes in the phenylpropanoid pathway. PCA analysis showed that changes in primary metabolism were mostly associated with water stress, while diversification of specialized metabolism was mostly linked to the cultivars. In the phloem sap, drought was characterized by higher ABA concentration and major changes in benzoate levels coinciding with lower stomatal conductance and suberinization of vascular bundles. Enhanced suberin biosynthesis in Shiraz was reflected by the higher abundance of sap hydroxybenzoate derivatives. Correlation-based network analysis revealed that compared to Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz had considerably larger and highly coordinated stress-related changes, reflected in its increased metabolic network connectivity under stress. Network analysis also highlighted the structural role of major stress related metabolites, e.g., Pro, quercetin and ascorbate, which drastically altered their connectedness in the Shiraz network under water deficit. Conclusions Taken together, the results showed that Vitis vinifera cultivars possess a common metabolic response to water deficit. Central metabolism, and specifically N metabolism, plays a significant role in stress response in vine. At the cultivar level, Cabernet Sauvignon was characterized by milder metabolic perturbations, likely due to a tighter regulation of stomata

  13. Integrative analysis reveals disease-associated genes and biomarkers for prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the most common complex diseases with high leading cause of death in men. Identifications of prostate cancer associated genes and biomarkers are thus essential as they can gain insights into the mechanisms underlying disease progression and advancing for early diagnosis and developing effective therapies. Methods In this study, we presented an integrative analysis of gene expression profiling and protein interaction network at a systematic level to reveal candidate disease-associated genes and biomarkers for prostate cancer progression. At first, we reconstructed the human prostate cancer protein-protein interaction network (HPC-PPIN) and the network was then integrated with the prostate cancer gene expression data to identify modules related to different phases in prostate cancer. At last, the candidate module biomarkers were validated by its predictive ability of prostate cancer progression. Results Different phases-specific modules were identified for prostate cancer. Among these modules, transcription Androgen Receptor (AR) nuclear signaling and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signalling pathway were shown to be the pathway targets for prostate cancer progression. The identified candidate disease-associated genes showed better predictive ability of prostate cancer progression than those of published biomarkers. In context of functional enrichment analysis, interestingly candidate disease-associated genes were enriched in the nucleus and different functions were encoded for potential transcription factors, for examples key players as AR, Myc, ESR1 and hidden player as Sp1 which was considered as a potential novel biomarker for prostate cancer. Conclusions The successful results on prostate cancer samples demonstrated that the integrative analysis is powerful and useful approach to detect candidate disease-associate genes and modules which can be used as the potential biomarkers for prostate cancer progression. The

  14. The diversity of algal phospholipase D homologs revealed by biocomputational analysis.

    PubMed

    Beligni, María Verónica; Bagnato, Carolina; Prados, María Belén; Bondino, Hernán; Laxalt, Ana María; Munnik, Teun; Ten Have, Arjen

    2015-10-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) participates in the formation of phosphatidic acid, a precursor in glycerolipid biosynthesis and a second messenger. PLDs are part of a superfamily of proteins that hydrolyze phosphodiesters and share a catalytic motif, HxKxxxxD, and hence a mechanism of action. Although HKD-PLDs have been thoroughly characterized in plants, animals and bacteria, very little is known about these enzymes in algae. To fill this gap in knowledge, we performed a biocomputational analysis by means of HMMER iterative profiling, using most eukaryotic algae genomes available. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that algae exhibit very few eukaryotic-type PLDs but possess, instead, many bacteria-like PLDs. Among algae eukaryotic-type PLDs, we identified C2-PLDs and PXPH-like PLDs. In addition, the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense features several proteins phylogenetically related to oomycete PLDs. Our phylogenetic analysis also showed that algae bacteria-like PLDs (proteins with putative PLD activity) fall into five clades, three of which are novel lineages in eukaryotes, composed almost entirely of algae. Specifically, Clade II is almost exclusive to diatoms, whereas Clade I and IV are mainly represented by proteins from prasinophytes. The other two clades are composed of mitochondrial PLDs (Clade V or Mito-PLDs), previously found in mammals, and a subfamily of potentially secreted proteins (Clade III or SP-PLDs), which includes a homolog formerly characterized in rice. In addition, our phylogenetic analysis shows that algae have non-PLD members within the bacteria-like HKD superfamily with putative cardiolipin synthase and phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylglycerophosphate synthase activities. Altogether, our results show that eukaryotic algae possess a moderate number of PLDs that belong to very diverse phylogenetic groups. PMID:26986890

  15. In Silico analysis of Gastric carcinoma Serial Analysis of Gene Expression libraries reveals different profiles associated with ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Ossandon, Francisco J; Villarroel, Cynthia; Aguayo, Francisco; Santibanez, Eudocia; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Corvalan, Alejandro H

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide gastric carcinoma has marked geographical variations and worse outcome in patients from the West compared to the East. Although these differences has been explained by better diagnostic criteria, improved staging methods and more radical surgery, emerging evidence supports the concept that gene expression differences associated to ethnicity might contribute to this disparate outcome. Here, we collected datasets from 4 normal and 11 gastric carcinoma Serial Gene Expression Analysis (SAGE) libraries from two different ethnicities. All normal SAGE libraries as well as 7 tumor libraries were from the West and 4 tumor libraries were from the East. These datasets we compare by Correspondence Analysis and Support Tree analysis and specific differences in tags expression were identified by Significance Analysis for Microarray. Tags to gene assignments were performed by CGAP-SAGE Genie or TAGmapper. The analysis of global transcriptome shows a clear separation between normal and tumor libraries with 90 tags differentially expressed. A clear separation was also found between the West and the East tumor libraries with 54 tags differentially expressed. Tags to gene assignments identified 15 genes, 5 of them with significant higher expression in the West libraries in comparison to the East libraries. qRT-PCR in cell lines from west and east origin confirmed these differences. Interestingly, two of these genes have been associated to aggressiveness (COL1A1 and KLK10). In conclusion we found that in silico analysis of SAGE libraries from two different ethnicities reveal differences in gene expression profile. These expression differences might contribute to explain the disparate outcome between the West and the East. PMID:18302799

  16. Expression analysis of five zebrafish RXFP3 homologues reveals evolutionary conservation of gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Donizetti, Aldo; Fiengo, Marcella; Iazzetti, Giovanni; del Gaudio, Rosanna; Di Giaimo, Rossella; Pariante, Paolo; Minucci, Sergio; Aniello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptides exert different functions in reproduction and neuroendocrine processes via interaction with two evolutionarily unrelated groups of receptors: RXFP1 and RXFP2 on one hand, RXFP3 and RXFP4 on the other hand. Evolution of receptor genes after splitting of tetrapods and teleost lineage led to a different retention rate between mammals and fish, with the latter having more gene copies compared to the former. In order to improve our knowledge on the evolution of the relaxin ligands/receptors system and have insights on their function in early stages of life, in the present paper we analyzed the expression pattern of five zebrafish RXFP3 homologue genes during embryonic development. In our analysis, we show that only two of the five genes are expressed during embryogenesis and that their transcripts are present in all the developmental stages. Spatial localization analysis of these transcripts revealed that the gene expression is restricted in specific territories starting from early pharyngula stage. Both genes are expressed in the brain but in different cell clusters and in extra-neural territories, one gene in the interrenal gland and the other in the pancreas. These two genes share expression territories with the homologue mammalian counterpart, highlighting a general conservation of gene expression regulatory processes and their putative function during evolution that are established early in vertebrate embryogenesis. PMID:25384467

  17. Multifractal analysis of Barkhausen noise reveals the dynamic nature of criticality at hysteresis loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadić, Bosiljka

    2016-06-01

    The field-driven magnetisation reversal processes in disordered systems exhibit a collective behaviour that is manifested in the scale-invariance of avalanches, closely related to underlying dynamical mechanisms. Using the multifractal time series analysis, we study the structure of fluctuations at different scales in the accompanying Barkhausen noise. The stochastic signal represents the magnetisation discontinuities along the hysteresis loop of a three-dimensional random field Ising model simulated for varied disorder strength and driving rates. The analysis of the spectrum of the generalised Hurst exponents reveals that the dominant segments of the signal with large fluctuations represent two distinct classes of stochastic processes in weak and strong pinning regimes. Furthermore, in the weak pinning regime, the part of the signal originating from the beginning of the hysteresis loop has a different multifractal spectrum than the signal near the coercive field. The enhanced fluctuations (primarily in the central part of the hysteresis loop) for increased driving rate and larger system size, lead to a further broadening of the spectrum. The analysed Barkhausen signals are also shown to exhibit temporal correlations and power-law distributions of the magnetisation discontinuity and avalanche sizes, in agreement with previous studies. The multifractal properties of Barkhausen noise describe the dynamical state of domains and precisely discriminate the weak pinning, permitting the motion of individual walls, from the mechanisms occurring in strongly disordered systems.

  18. Meta-analysis of Dense Genecentric Association Studies Reveals Common and Uncommon Variants Associated with Height

    PubMed Central

    Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Yiran; Murtaza, Muhammed; Glessner, Joseph T.; Bailey, Swneke D.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Lettre, Guillaume; Ongen, Halit; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Johnson, Toby; Shen, Haiqing; Nelson, Christopher P.; Klopp, Norman; Baumert, Jens; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankratz, Nathan; Pankow, James S.; Shah, Sonia; Taylor, Kira; Barnard, John; Peters, Bas J.; M. Maloney, Cliona; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Stanton, Alice; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Mehta, Amar; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Gong, Yan; Price, Tom S.; Smith, Erin N.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Yun R.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bhatt, Deepak; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Bhangale, Tushar; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brown, Morris; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Carty, Cara; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Chen, Wei; Connell, John; Dalgeorgou, Chrysoula; Boer, Anthonius de; Drenos, Fotios; Elbers, Clara C.; Fang, James C.; Fox, Caroline S.; Frackelton, Edward C.; Fuchs, Barry; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Grobbee, Diederik E.; Hastie, Claire; Howard, Philip J.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Johnson, W. Craig; Li, Qing; Kleber, Marcus E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Kooperberg, Charles; Ky, Bonnie; LaCroix, Andrea; Lanken, Paul; Lathrop, Mark; Li, Mingyao; Marshall, Vanessa; Melander, Olle; Mentch, Frank D.; J. Meyer, Nuala; Monda, Keri L.; Montpetit, Alexandre; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Nakayama, Karen; Nondahl, Dave; Onipinla, Abiodun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Otieno, F. George; Patel, Sanjey R.; Putt, Mary E.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Safa, Radwan N.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Simpson, Claire; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Suver, Christine; Swergold, Gary; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Thorand, Barbara; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tischfield, Sam; Tobin, Martin; Tomaszweski, Maciej; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Wallace, Chris; Winkelmann, Bernhard; Zhang, Haitao; Zheng, Dongling; Zhang, Li; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Clarke, Robert; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Danesh, John; Day, Ian N.; Schork, Nicholas J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morrow, David A.; Palmen, Jutta; Redline, Susan; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Smith, George Davey; Farrall, Martin; Jamshidi, Yalda; Christiani, David C.; Casas, Juan P.; Hall, Alistair S.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; D. Christie, Jason; Berenson, Gerald S.; Murray, Sarah S.; Illig, Thomas; Dorn, Gerald W.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sever, Peter; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Caulfield, Mark; Talmud, Philippa J.; Topol, Eric; Engert, James C.; Wang, Kai; Dominiczak, Anna; Hamsten, Anders; Curtis, Sean P.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Trip, Mieke; Saleheen, Danish; Peden, John F.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; März, Winfried; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse; Schadt, Eric E.; Johnson, Julie A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Munroe, Patricia B.; North, Kari E.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Anand, Sonia S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Soranzo, Nicole; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Reiner, Alex; Hegele, Robert A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Keating, Brendan J.

    2011-01-01

    Height is a classic complex trait with common variants in a growing list of genes known to contribute to the phenotype. Using a genecentric genotyping array targeted toward cardiovascular-related loci, comprising 49,320 SNPs across approximately 2000 loci, we evaluated the association of common and uncommon SNPs with adult height in 114,223 individuals from 47 studies and six ethnicities. A total of 64 loci contained a SNP associated with height at array-wide significance (p < 2.4 × 10−6), with 42 loci surpassing the conventional genome-wide significance threshold (p < 5 × 10−8). Common variants with minor allele frequencies greater than 5% were observed to be associated with height in 37 previously reported loci. In individuals of European ancestry, uncommon SNPs in IL11 and SMAD3, which would not be genotyped with the use of standard genome-wide genotyping arrays, were strongly associated with height (p < 3 × 10−11). Conditional analysis within associated regions revealed five additional variants associated with height independent of lead SNPs within the locus, suggesting allelic heterogeneity. Although underpowered to replicate findings from individuals of European ancestry, the direction of effect of associated variants was largely consistent in African American, South Asian, and Hispanic populations. Overall, we show that dense coverage of genes for uncommon SNPs, coupled with large-scale meta-analysis, can successfully identify additional variants associated with a common complex trait. PMID:21194676

  19. Time-series analysis reveals genetic responses to intensive management of razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus)

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Thomas E; Turner, Thomas F; Carson, Evan W; Saltzgiver, Melody J; Adams, Deborah; Kesner, Brian; Marsh, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Time-series analysis is used widely in ecology to study complex phenomena and may have considerable potential to clarify relationships of genetic and demographic processes in natural and exploited populations. We explored the utility of this approach to evaluate population responses to management in razorback sucker, a long-lived and fecund, but declining freshwater fish species. A core population in Lake Mohave (Arizona-Nevada, USA) has experienced no natural recruitment for decades and is maintained by harvesting naturally produced larvae from the lake, rearing them in protective custody, and repatriating them at sizes less vulnerable to predation. Analyses of mtDNA and 15 microsatellites characterized for sequential larval cohorts collected over a 15-year time series revealed no changes in geographic structuring but indicated significant increase in mtDNA diversity for the entire population over time. Likewise, ratios of annual effective breeders to annual census size (Nb/Na) increased significantly despite sevenfold reduction of Na. These results indicated that conservation actions diminished near-term extinction risk due to genetic factors and should now focus on increasing numbers of fish in Lake Mohave to ameliorate longer-term risks. More generally, time-series analysis permitted robust testing of trends in genetic diversity, despite low precision of some metrics. PMID:24665337

  20. Comprehensive Proteomics Analysis of Laticifer Latex Reveals New Insights into Ethylene Stimulation of Natural Rubber Production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Wang, Dan; Sun, Yong; Yang, Qian; Chang, Lili; Wang, Limin; Meng, Xueru; Huang, Qixing; Jin, Xiang; Tong, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is a stimulant to increase natural rubber latex. After ethylene application, both fresh yield and dry matter of latex are substantially improved. Moreover, we found that ethylene improves the generation of small rubber particles. However, most genes involved in rubber biosynthesis are inhibited by exogenous ethylene. Therefore, we conducted a proteomics analysis of ethylene-stimulated rubber latex, and identified 287 abundant proteins as well as 143 ethylene responsive latex proteins (ERLPs) with mass spectrometry from the 2-DE and DIGE gels, respectively. In addition, more than 1,600 proteins, including 404 ERLPs, were identified by iTRAQ. Functional classification of ERLPs revealed that enzymes involved in post-translational modification, carbohydrate metabolism, hydrolase activity, and kinase activity were overrepresented. Some enzymes for rubber particle aggregation were inhibited to prolong latex flow, and thus finally improved latex production. Phosphoproteomics analysis identified 59 differential phosphoproteins; notably, specific isoforms of rubber elongation factor and small rubber particle protein that were phosphorylated mainly at serine residues. This post-translational modification and isoform-specific phosphorylation might be important for ethylene-stimulated latex production. These results not only deepen our understanding of the rubber latex proteome but also provide new insights into the use of ethylene to stimulate rubber latex production. PMID:26348427

  1. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM1 characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines. PMID:25389185

  2. Bach Is the Father of Harmony: Revealed by a 1/f Fluctuation Analysis across Musical Genres

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Kendrick, Keith M.; Levitin, Daniel J.; Li, Chaoyi; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Harmony is a fundamental attribute of music. Close connections exist between music and mathematics since both pursue harmony and unity. In music, the consonance of notes played simultaneously partly determines our perception of harmony; associates with aesthetic responses; and influences the emotion expression. The consonance could be considered as a window to understand and analyze harmony. Here for the first time we used a 1/f fluctuation analysis to investigate whether the consonance fluctuation structure in music with a wide range of composers and genres followed the scale free pattern that has been found for pitch, melody, rhythm, human body movements, brain activity, natural images and geographical features. We then used a network graph approach to investigate which composers were the most influential both within and across genres. Our results showed that patterns of consonance in music did follow scale-free characteristics, suggesting that this feature is a universally evolved one in both music and the living world. Furthermore, our network analysis revealed that Bach’s harmony patterns were having the most influence on those used by other composers, followed closely by Mozart. PMID:26545104

  3. Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Symbiotic Relationship among Bacteria in Microcystis-Dominated Community

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meili; Ren, Minglei; Yang, Chen; Yi, Haisi; Li, Zhe; Li, Tao; Zhao, Jindong

    2016-01-01

    Microcystis bloom, a cyanobacterial mass occurrence often found in eutrophicated water bodies, is one of the most serious threats to freshwater ecosystems worldwide. In nature, Microcystis forms aggregates or colonies that contain heterotrophic bacteria. The Microcystis-bacteria colonies were persistent even when they were maintained in lab culture for a long period. The relationship between Microcystis and the associated bacteria was investigated by a metagenomic approach in this study. We developed a visualization-guided method of binning for genome assembly after total colony DNA sequencing. We found that the method was effective in grouping sequences and it did not require reference genome sequence. Individual genomes of the colony bacteria were obtained and they provided valuable insights into microbial community structures. Analysis of metabolic pathways based on these genomes revealed that while all heterotrophic bacteria were dependent upon Microcystis for carbon and energy, Vitamin B12 biosynthesis, which is required for growth by Microcystis, was accomplished in a cooperative fashion among the bacteria. Our analysis also suggests that individual bacteria in the colony community contributed a complete pathway for degradation of benzoate, which is inhibitory to the cyanobacterial growth, and its ecological implication for Microcystis bloom is discussed. PMID:26870018

  4. Electrical Rhythms Revealed by Harmonic Analysis of a High-Resolution Cardiogram.

    PubMed

    Revenko, S V; Selector, L Ya; Gavrilov, I Yu; Nesterov, A V; Limonov, E V; Mudraya, I S; Kirpatovskii, V I

    2015-05-01

    The front-end low-noise electronic amplifiers and high-throughput computing systems made it possible to record ECG with a high resolution in the low-frequency range including the respiration and Mayer frequencies and to analyze ECG with digital filtering technique and harmonic analysis. These tools yielded ECG spectra of narcotized rats, which contained the characteristic pulsatile triplets and pentaplets with splitting constant equal to respiration rate, as well as the peaks at respiration and Mayer frequencies. The harmonic analysis of ECG determined the frequency parameters employed to tune the software bandpass filters, which revealed the respiratory (R) and Mayer (M) waves in the time domain with the amplitudes of 20-30 μV amounting to 5% ECG amplitude. The depolarizing myorelaxant succinylcholine chloride capable to trigger various types of arrhythmias, transiently increased R-wave, inhibited M-wave, and provoked a negative U-wave within a heartbeat ECG cycle synchronously with inspiration. It is hypothesized that M-, R-, and U-waves in ECG reflect cardiotropic activity of autonomic nervous system. The respective spectral peaks in ECG can be employed to assess intensity of sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiotropic influences, their balance, and the risk of arrhythmias. PMID:26033579

  5. Principal Component Analysis reveals correlation of cavities evolution and functional motions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, Nathan; Nilges, Michael; Blondel, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Protein conformation has been recognized as the key feature determining biological function, as it determines the position of the essential groups specifically interacting with substrates. Hence, the shape of the cavities or grooves at the protein surface appears to drive those functions. However, only a few studies describe the geometrical evolution of protein cavities during molecular dynamics simulations (MD), usually with a crude representation. To unveil the dynamics of cavity geometry evolution, we developed an approach combining cavity detection and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This approach was applied to four systems subjected to MD (lysozyme, sperm whale myoglobin, Dengue envelope protein and EF-CaM complex). PCA on cavities allows us to perform efficient analysis and classification of the geometry diversity explored by a cavity. Additionally, it reveals correlations between the evolutions of the cavities and structures, and can even suggest how to modify the protein conformation to induce a given cavity geometry. It also helps to perform fast and consensual clustering of conformations according to cavity geometry. Finally, using this approach, we show that both carbon monoxide (CO) location and transfer among the different xenon sites of myoglobin are correlated with few cavity evolution modes of high amplitude. This correlation illustrates the link between ligand diffusion and the dynamic network of internal cavities. PMID:25424655

  6. Independent component analysis of DTI data reveals white matter covariances in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xin; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guo, Ting; Sun, Qiaoyue; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wu, Xia; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with the clinical symptom of the continuous deterioration of cognitive and memory functions. Multiple diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) can successfully explain the white matter damages in AD patients. However, most studies focused on the univariate measures (voxel-based analysis) to examine the differences between AD patients and normal controls (NCs). In this investigation, we applied a multivariate independent component analysis (ICA) to investigate the white matter covariances based on FA measurement from DTI data in 35 AD patients and 45 NCs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. We found that six independent components (ICs) showed significant FA reductions in white matter covariances in AD compared with NC, including the genu and splenium of corpus callosum (IC-1 and IC-2), middle temporal gyral of temporal lobe (IC-3), sub-gyral of frontal lobe (IC-4 and IC-5) and sub-gyral of parietal lobe (IC-6). Our findings revealed covariant white matter loss in AD patients and suggest that the unsupervised data-driven ICA method is effective to explore the changes of FA in AD. This study assists us in understanding the mechanism of white matter covariant reductions in the development of AD.

  7. Proteogenomic analysis reveals unanticipated adaptations of colorectal tumor cells to deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Halvey, Patrick J.; Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Jing; Bhat, Ajaz A.; Dhawan, Punita; Li, Ming; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C.; Slebos, Robbert J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A growing body of genomic data on human cancers poses the critical question of how genomic variations translate to cancer phenotypes. We employed standardized shotgun proteomics and targeted protein quantitation platforms to analyze a panel of 10 colon cancer cell lines differing by mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. In addition, we performed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to enable detection of protein sequence variants from the proteomic data. Biological replicate cultures yielded highly consistent proteomic inventories with a cumulative total of 6,513 protein groups with a protein FDR of 3.17% across all cell lines. Networks of co-expressed proteins with differential expression based on MMR status revealed impact on protein folding, turnover and transport, on cellular metabolism and on DNA and RNA synthesis and repair. Analysis of variant amino acid sequences suggested higher stability of proteins affected by naturally occurring germline polymorphisms than of proteins affected by somatic protein sequence changes. The data provide evidence for multi-system adaptation to MMR deficiency with a stress response that targets misfolded proteins for degradation through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway. Enrichment analysis suggested epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in RKO cells, as evidenced by increased mobility and invasion properties compared to SW480. The observed proteomic profiles demonstrate previously unknown consequences of altered DNA repair and provide an expanded basis for mechanistic interpretation of MMR phenotypes. PMID:24247723

  8. Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of NDM-1 Klebsiella pneumoniae in spaceflight reveal mechanisms underlying environmental adaptability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Ge, Pupu; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yan, Jinghua; Zhao, Yanlin; Gao, George F.; Liu, Cui Hua; Liu, Changting

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains has caused a great concern worldwide. To better understand the mechanisms underlying environmental adaptation of those highly drug-resistant K. pneumoniae strains, we took advantage of the China's Shenzhou 10 spacecraft mission to conduct comparative genomic and transcriptomic analysis of a NDM-1 K. pneumoniae strain (ATCC BAA-2146) being cultivated under different conditions. The samples were recovered from semisolid medium placed on the ground (D strain), in simulated space condition (M strain), or in Shenzhou 10 spacecraft (T strain) for analysis. Our data revealed multiple variations underlying pathogen adaptation into different environments in terms of changes in morphology, H2O2 tolerance and biofilm formation ability, genomic stability and regulation of metabolic pathways. Additionally, we found a few non-coding RNAs to be differentially regulated. The results are helpful for better understanding the adaptive mechanisms of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:25163721

  9. Comparative transcriptome and proteome analysis to reveal the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Manish; Krishnamurthy, Sneha; Shukla, Devesh; Kiiskila, Jeffrey; Jain, Ajay; Datta, Rupali; Sharma, Nilesh; Sahi, Shivendra V.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of plants have been tested and exploited in search of a green chemistry approach for the fabrication of gold or other precious metal nanomaterials. Despite the potential of plant based methods, very little is known about the underlying biochemical reactions and genes involved in the biotransformation mechanism of AuCl4 into gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this research, we thus focused on studying the effect of Au on growth and nanoparticles formation by analyses of transcriptome, proteome and ionome shift in Arabidopsis. Au exposure favored the growth of Arabidopsis seedling and induced formation of nanoparticles in root and shoot, as indicated by optical and hyperspectral imaging. Root transcriptome analysis demonstrated the differential expression of the members of WRKY, MYB and BHLH gene families, which are involved in the Fe and other essential metals homeostasis. The proteome analysis revealed that Glutathione S-transferases were induced in the shoot and suggested its potential role in the biosynthesis AuNPs. This study also demonstrated the role of plant hormone auxin in determining the Au induced root system architecture. This is the first study using an integrated approach to understand the in planta biotransformation of KAuCl4 into AuNPs. PMID:26902325

  10. In vivo phosphoproteomics analysis reveals the cardiac targets of β-adrenergic receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Alicia; Andersen, Martin N; Steffensen, Annette B; Horn, Heiko; Kelstrup, Christian D; Francavilla, Chiara; Jensen, Lars J; Schmitt, Nicole; Thomsen, Morten B; Olsen, Jesper V

    2013-06-01

    β-Blockers are widely used to prevent cardiac arrhythmias and to treat hypertension by inhibiting β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) and thus decreasing contractility and heart rate. βARs initiate phosphorylation-dependent signaling cascades, but only a small number of the target proteins are known. We used quantitative in vivo phosphoproteomics to identify 670 site-specific phosphorylation changes in murine hearts in response to acute treatment with specific βAR agonists. The residues adjacent to the regulated phosphorylation sites exhibited a sequence-specific preference (R-X-X-pS/T), and integrative analysis of sequence motifs and interaction networks suggested that the kinases AMPK (adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase), Akt, and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) mediate βAR signaling, in addition to the well-established pathways mediated by PKA (cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase) and CaMKII (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II). We found specific regulation of phosphorylation sites on six ion channels and transporters that mediate increased ion fluxes at higher heart rates, and we showed that phosphorylation of one of these, Ser(92) of the potassium channel KV7.1, increased current amplitude. Our data set represents a quantitative analysis of phosphorylated proteins regulated in vivo upon stimulation of seven-transmembrane receptors, and our findings reveal previously unknown phosphorylation sites that regulate myocardial contractility, suggesting new potential targets for the treatment of heart disease and hypertension. PMID:23737553

  11. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Different Silk Yields of Two Silkworm Strains

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Qin, Sheng; Yu, Huanjun; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Na; Yu, Ye; Hou, Chengxiang; Li, Muwang

    2016-01-01

    Cocoon and silk yields are the most important characteristics of sericulture. However, few studies have examined the genes that modulate these features. Further studies of these genes will be useful for improving the products of sericulture. JingSong (JS) and Lan10 (L10) are two strains having significantly different cocoon and silk yields. In the current study, RNA-Seq and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were performed on both strains in order to determine divergence of the silk gland, which controls silk biosynthesis in silkworms. Compared with L10, JS had 1375 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; 738 up-regulated genes and 673 down-regulated genes). Nine enriched gene ontology (GO) terms were identified by GO enrichment analysis based on these DEGs. KEGG enrichment analysis results showed that the DEGs were enriched in three pathways, which were mainly associated with the processing and biosynthesis of proteins. The representative genes in the enrichment pathways and ten significant DEGs were further verified by qPCR, the results of which were consistent with the RNA-Seq data. Our study has revealed differences in silk glands between the two silkworm strains and provides a perspective for understanding the molecular mechanisms determining silk yield. PMID:27159277

  12. Time-series analysis reveals genetic responses to intensive management of razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus).

    PubMed

    Dowling, Thomas E; Turner, Thomas F; Carson, Evan W; Saltzgiver, Melody J; Adams, Deborah; Kesner, Brian; Marsh, Paul C

    2014-03-01

    Time-series analysis is used widely in ecology to study complex phenomena and may have considerable potential to clarify relationships of genetic and demographic processes in natural and exploited populations. We explored the utility of this approach to evaluate population responses to management in razorback sucker, a long-lived and fecund, but declining freshwater fish species. A core population in Lake Mohave (Arizona-Nevada, USA) has experienced no natural recruitment for decades and is maintained by harvesting naturally produced larvae from the lake, rearing them in protective custody, and repatriating them at sizes less vulnerable to predation. Analyses of mtDNA and 15 microsatellites characterized for sequential larval cohorts collected over a 15-year time series revealed no changes in geographic structuring but indicated significant increase in mtDNA diversity for the entire population over time. Likewise, ratios of annual effective breeders to annual census size (N b /N a) increased significantly despite sevenfold reduction of N a. These results indicated that conservation actions diminished near-term extinction risk due to genetic factors and should now focus on increasing numbers of fish in Lake Mohave to ameliorate longer-term risks. More generally, time-series analysis permitted robust testing of trends in genetic diversity, despite low precision of some metrics. PMID:24665337

  13. Proteomic Analysis of a Novel Bacillus Jumbo Phage Revealing Glycoside Hydrolase As Structural Component

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Tailed phages with genomes of larger than 200 kbp are classified as Jumbo phages and exhibited extremely high uncharted diversity. The genomic annotation of Jumbo phage is often disappointing because most of the predicted proteins, including structural proteins, failed to make good hits to the sequences in the databases. In this study, 23 proteins of a novel Bacillus Jumbo phage, vB_BpuM_BpSp, were identified as phage structural proteins by the structural proteome analysis, including 14 proteins of unknown function, 5 proteins with predicted function as structural proteins, a glycoside hydrolase, a Holliday junction resolvase, a RNA-polymerase β-subunit, and a host-coding portal protein, which might be hijacked from the host strain during phage virion assembly. The glycoside hydrolase (Gp255) was identified as phage virion component and was found to interact with the phage baseplate protein. Gp255 shows specific lytic activity against the phage host strain GR8 and has high temperature tolerance. In situ peptidoglycan-hydrolyzing activities analysis revealed that the expressed Gp255 and phage structural proteome exhibited glycoside hydrolysis activity against the tested GR8 cell extracts. This study identified the first functional individual structural glycoside hydrolase in phage virion. The presence of activated glycoside hydrolase in phage virions might facilitate the injection of the phage genome during infection by forming pores on the bacterial cell wall. PMID:27242758

  14. Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of NDM-1 Klebsiella pneumoniae in spaceflight reveal mechanisms underlying environmental adaptability.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Ge, Pupu; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yan, Jinghua; Zhao, Yanlin; Gao, George F; Liu, Cui Hua; Liu, Changting

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and rapid spread of New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strains has caused a great concern worldwide. To better understand the mechanisms underlying environmental adaptation of those highly drug-resistant K. pneumoniae strains, we took advantage of the China's Shenzhou 10 spacecraft mission to conduct comparative genomic and transcriptomic analysis of a NDM-1 K. pneumoniae strain (ATCC BAA-2146) being cultivated under different conditions. The samples were recovered from semisolid medium placed on the ground (D strain), in simulated space condition (M strain), or in Shenzhou 10 spacecraft (T strain) for analysis. Our data revealed multiple variations underlying pathogen adaptation into different environments in terms of changes in morphology, H2O2 tolerance and biofilm formation ability, genomic stability and regulation of metabolic pathways. Additionally, we found a few non-coding RNAs to be differentially regulated. The results are helpful for better understanding the adaptive mechanisms of drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:25163721

  15. Pre-2014 mudslides at Oso revealed by InSAR and multi-source DEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; QU, F.

    2014-12-01

    The landslide is a process that results in the downward and outward movement of slope-reshaping materials including rocks and soils and annually causes the loss of approximately $3.5 billion and tens of casualties in the United States. The 2014 Oso mudslide was an extreme event costing nearly 40 deaths and damaging civilian properties. Landslides are often unpredictable, but in many cases, catastrophic events are repetitive. Historic record in the Oso mudslide site indicates that there have been serial events in decades, though the extent of sliding events varied from time to time. In our study, the combination of multi-source DEMs, InSAR, and time-series InSAR analysis has enabled to characterize the Oso mudslide. InSAR results from ALOS PALSAR show that there was no significant deformation between mid-2006 and 2011. The combination of time-series InSAR analysis and old-dated DEM indicated revealed topographic changes associated the 2006 sliding event, which is confirmed by the difference of multiple LiDAR DEMs. Precipitation and discharge measurements before the 2006 and 2014 landslide events did not exhibit extremely anomalous records, suggesting the precipitation is not the controlling factor in determining the sliding events at Oso. The lack of surface deformation during 2006-2011 and weak correlation between the precipitation and the sliding event, suggest other factors (such as porosity) might play a critical role on the run-away events at this Oso and other similar landslides.

  16. Genetic analysis reveals the wild ancestors of the llama and the alpaca.

    PubMed Central

    Kadwell, M.; Fernandez, M.; Stanley, H. F.; Baldi, R.; Wheeler, J. C.; Rosadio, R.; Bruford, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    The origins of South America's domestic alpaca and llama remain controversial due to hybridization, near extirpation during the Spanish conquest and difficulties in archaeological interpretation. Traditionally, the ancestry of both forms is attributed to the guanaco, while the vicuña is assumed never to have been domesticated. Recent research has, however, linked the alpaca to the vicuña, dating domestication to 6000-7000 years before present in the Peruvian Andes. Here, we examine in detail the genetic relationships between the South American camelids in order to determine the origins of the domestic forms, using mitochondrial (mt) and microsatellite DNA. MtDNA analysis places 80% of llama and alpaca sequences in the guanaco lineage, with those possessing vicuña mtDNA being nearly all alpaca or alpaca-vicuña hybrids. We also examined four microsatellites in wild known-provenance vicuña and guanaco, including two loci with non-overlapping allele size ranges in the wild species. In contrast to the mtDNA, these markers show high genetic similarity between alpaca and vicuña, and between llama and guanaco, although bidirectional hybridization is also revealed. Finally, combined marker analysis on a subset of samples confirms the microsatellite interpretation and suggests that the alpaca is descended from the vicuña, and should be reclassified as Vicugna pacos. This result has major implications for the future management of wild and domestic camelids in South America. PMID:11749713

  17. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Domenico F.; Abuin, David S.; Tauber, Gabriel A.; Pham, Andrew T.; Pearson, Chad G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs. PMID:26700722

  18. Exome-wide association analysis reveals novel coding sequence variants associated with lipid traits in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Tang, Clara S; Zhang, He; Cheung, Chloe Y Y; Xu, Ming; Ho, Jenny C Y; Zhou, Wei; Cherny, Stacey S; Zhang, Yan; Holmen, Oddgeir; Au, Ka-Wing; Yu, Haiyi; Xu, Lin; Jia, Jia; Porsch, Robert M; Sun, Lijie; Xu, Weixian; Zheng, Huiping; Wong, Lai-Yung; Mu, Yiming; Dou, Jingtao; Fong, Carol H Y; Wang, Shuyu; Hong, Xueyu; Dong, Liguang; Liao, Yanhua; Wang, Jiansong; Lam, Levina S M; Su, Xi; Yan, Hua; Yang, Min-Lee; Chen, Jin; Siu, Chung-Wah; Xie, Gaoqiang; Woo, Yu-Cho; Wu, Yangfeng; Tan, Kathryn C B; Hveem, Kristian; Cheung, Bernard M Y; Zöllner, Sebastian; Xu, Aimin; Eugene Chen, Y; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Zhang, Youyi; Lam, Tai-Hing; Ganesh, Santhi K; Huo, Yong; Sham, Pak C; Lam, Karen S L; Willer, Cristen J; Tse, Hung-Fat; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Blood lipids are important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). Here we perform an exome-wide association study by genotyping 12,685 Chinese, using a custom Illumina HumanExome BeadChip, to identify additional loci influencing lipid levels. Single-variant association analysis on 65,671 single nucleotide polymorphisms reveals 19 loci associated with lipids at exome-wide significance (P<2.69 × 10(-7)), including three Asian-specific coding variants in known genes (CETP p.Asp459Gly, PCSK9 p.Arg93Cys and LDLR p.Arg257Trp). Furthermore, missense variants at two novel loci-PNPLA3 p.Ile148Met and PKD1L3 p.Thr429Ser-also influence levels of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, respectively. Another novel gene, TEAD2, is found to be associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol through gene-based association analysis. Most of these newly identified coding variants show suggestive association (P<0.05) with CAD. These findings demonstrate that exome-wide genotyping on samples of non-European ancestry can identify additional population-specific possible causal variants, shedding light on novel lipid biology and CAD. PMID:26690388

  19. mtDNA analysis reveals a major late Paleolithic population expansion from southwestern to northeastern Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A; Bandelt, H J; D'Urbano, L; Lahermo, P; Moral, P; Sellitto, D; Rengo, C; Forster, P; Savontaus, M L; Bonné-Tamir, B; Scozzari, R

    1998-01-01

    mtDNA sequence variation was studied in 419 individuals from nine Eurasian populations, by high-resolution RFLP analysis, and it was followed by sequencing of the control region of a subset of these mtDNAs and a detailed survey of previously published data from numerous other European populations. This analysis revealed that a major Paleolithic population expansion from the "Atlantic zone" (southwestern Europe) occurred 10,000-15,000 years ago, after the Last Glacial Maximum. As an mtDNA marker for this expansion we identified haplogroup V, an autochthonous European haplogroup, which most likely originated in the northern Iberian peninsula or southwestern France at about the time of the Younger Dryas. Its sister haplogroup, H, which is distributed throughout the entire range of Caucasoid populations and which originated in the Near East approximately 25,000-30,000 years ago, also took part in this expansion, thus rendering it by far the most frequent (40%-60%) haplogroup in western Europe. Subsequent migrations after the Younger Dryas eventually carried those "Atlantic" mtDNAs into central and northern Europe. This scenario, already implied by archaeological records, is given overwhelming support from both the distribution of the autochthonous European Y chromosome type 15, as detected by the probes 49a/f, and the synthetic maps of nuclear data. PMID:9545392

  20. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays.

    PubMed

    Galati, Domenico F; Abuin, David S; Tauber, Gabriel A; Pham, Andrew T; Pearson, Chad G

    2015-01-01

    Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs. PMID:26700722

  1. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B H

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions. PMID:27193869

  2. Bach Is the Father of Harmony: Revealed by a 1/f Fluctuation Analysis across Musical Genres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Kendrick, Keith M; Levitin, Daniel J; Li, Chaoyi; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Harmony is a fundamental attribute of music. Close connections exist between music and mathematics since both pursue harmony and unity. In music, the consonance of notes played simultaneously partly determines our perception of harmony; associates with aesthetic responses; and influences the emotion expression. The consonance could be considered as a window to understand and analyze harmony. Here for the first time we used a 1/f fluctuation analysis to investigate whether the consonance fluctuation structure in music with a wide range of composers and genres followed the scale free pattern that has been found for pitch, melody, rhythm, human body movements, brain activity, natural images and geographical features. We then used a network graph approach to investigate which composers were the most influential both within and across genres. Our results showed that patterns of consonance in music did follow scale-free characteristics, suggesting that this feature is a universally evolved one in both music and the living world. Furthermore, our network analysis revealed that Bach's harmony patterns were having the most influence on those used by other composers, followed closely by Mozart. PMID:26545104

  3. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1's role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  4. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions. PMID:27193869

  5. Exome-wide association analysis reveals novel coding sequence variants associated with lipid traits in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Clara S.; Zhang, He; Cheung, Chloe Y. Y.; Xu, Ming; Ho, Jenny C. Y.; Zhou, Wei; Cherny, Stacey S.; Zhang, Yan; Holmen, Oddgeir; Au, Ka-Wing; Yu, Haiyi; Xu, Lin; Jia, Jia; Porsch, Robert M.; Sun, Lijie; Xu, Weixian; Zheng, Huiping; Wong, Lai-Yung; Mu, Yiming; Dou, Jingtao; Fong, Carol H. Y.; Wang, Shuyu; Hong, Xueyu; Dong, Liguang; Liao, Yanhua; Wang, Jiansong; Lam, Levina S. M.; Su, Xi; Yan, Hua; Yang, Min-Lee; Chen, Jin; Siu, Chung-Wah; Xie, Gaoqiang; Woo, Yu-Cho; Wu, Yangfeng; Tan, Kathryn C. B.; Hveem, Kristian; Cheung, Bernard M. Y.; Zöllner, Sebastian; Xu, Aimin; Eugene Chen, Y; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Zhang, Youyi; Lam, Tai-Hing; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Huo, Yong; Sham, Pak C.; Lam, Karen S. L.; Willer, Cristen J.; Tse, Hung-Fat; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Blood lipids are important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). Here we perform an exome-wide association study by genotyping 12,685 Chinese, using a custom Illumina HumanExome BeadChip, to identify additional loci influencing lipid levels. Single-variant association analysis on 65,671 single nucleotide polymorphisms reveals 19 loci associated with lipids at exome-wide significance (P<2.69 × 10−7), including three Asian-specific coding variants in known genes (CETP p.Asp459Gly, PCSK9 p.Arg93Cys and LDLR p.Arg257Trp). Furthermore, missense variants at two novel loci—PNPLA3 p.Ile148Met and PKD1L3 p.Thr429Ser—also influence levels of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, respectively. Another novel gene, TEAD2, is found to be associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol through gene-based association analysis. Most of these newly identified coding variants show suggestive association (P<0.05) with CAD. These findings demonstrate that exome-wide genotyping on samples of non-European ancestry can identify additional population-specific possible causal variants, shedding light on novel lipid biology and CAD. PMID:26690388

  6. Metagenomic analysis reveals that bacteriophages are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Jéssica; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis; Simonet, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    A metagenomics approach was applied to explore the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in bacteriophages from hospital wastewater. Metagenomic analysis showed that most phage sequences affiliated to the order Caudovirales, comprising the tailed phage families Podoviridae, Siphoviridae and Myoviridae. Moreover, the relative abundance of ARGs in the phage DNA fraction (0.26%) was higher than in the bacterial DNA fraction (0.18%). These differences were particularly evident for genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) proteins, phosphotransferases, β-lactamases and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of assembled contigs also revealed that blaOXA-10, blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-24 genes belonging to class D β-lactamases as well as a novel blaTEM (98.9% sequence similarity to the blaTEM-1 gene) belonging to class A β-lactamases were detected in a higher proportion in phage DNA. Although preliminary, these findings corroborate the role of bacteriophages as reservoirs of resistance genes and thus highlight the necessity to include them in future studies on the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment. PMID:27312355

  7. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  8. Comprehensive Proteomics Analysis of Laticifer Latex Reveals New Insights into Ethylene Stimulation of Natural Rubber Production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuchu; Wang, Dan; Sun, Yong; Yang, Qian; Chang, Lili; Wang, Limin; Meng, Xueru; Huang, Qixing; Jin, Xiang; Tong, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is a stimulant to increase natural rubber latex. After ethylene application, both fresh yield and dry matter of latex are substantially improved. Moreover, we found that ethylene improves the generation of small rubber particles. However, most genes involved in rubber biosynthesis are inhibited by exogenous ethylene. Therefore, we conducted a proteomics analysis of ethylene-stimulated rubber latex, and identified 287 abundant proteins as well as 143 ethylene responsive latex proteins (ERLPs) with mass spectrometry from the 2-DE and DIGE gels, respectively. In addition, more than 1,600 proteins, including 404 ERLPs, were identified by iTRAQ. Functional classification of ERLPs revealed that enzymes involved in post-translational modification, carbohydrate metabolism, hydrolase activity, and kinase activity were overrepresented. Some enzymes for rubber particle aggregation were inhibited to prolong latex flow, and thus finally improved latex production. Phosphoproteomics analysis identified 59 differential phosphoproteins; notably, specific isoforms of rubber elongation factor and small rubber particle protein that were phosphorylated mainly at serine residues. This post-translational modification and isoform-specific phosphorylation might be important for ethylene-stimulated latex production. These results not only deepen our understanding of the rubber latex proteome but also provide new insights into the use of ethylene to stimulate rubber latex production. PMID:26348427

  9. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Different Silk Yields of Two Silkworm Strains.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Qin, Sheng; Yu, Huanjun; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Na; Yu, Ye; Hou, Chengxiang; Li, Muwang

    2016-01-01

    Cocoon and silk yields are the most important characteristics of sericulture. However, few studies have examined the genes that modulate these features. Further studies of these genes will be useful for improving the products of sericulture. JingSong (JS) and Lan10 (L10) are two strains having significantly different cocoon and silk yields. In the current study, RNA-Seq and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were performed on both strains in order to determine divergence of the silk gland, which controls silk biosynthesis in silkworms. Compared with L10, JS had 1375 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; 738 up-regulated genes and 673 down-regulated genes). Nine enriched gene ontology (GO) terms were identified by GO enrichment analysis based on these DEGs. KEGG enrichment analysis results showed that the DEGs were enriched in three pathways, which were mainly associated with the processing and biosynthesis of proteins. The representative genes in the enrichment pathways and ten significant DEGs were further verified by qPCR, the results of which were consistent with the RNA-Seq data. Our study has revealed differences in silk glands between the two silkworm strains and provides a perspective for understanding the molecular mechanisms determining silk yield. PMID:27159277

  10. Integrative microbial community analysis reveals full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal under tropical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Yingyu; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Cokro, Angel Anisa; Liu, Xianghui; Arumugam, Krithika; Xie, Chao; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Wuertz, Stefan; Williams, Rohan B. H.

    2016-05-01

    Management of phosphorus discharge from human waste is essential for the control of eutrophication in surface waters. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is a sustainable, efficient way of removing phosphorus from waste water without employing chemical precipitation, but is assumed unachievable in tropical temperatures due to conditions that favour glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) over polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Here, we show these assumptions are unfounded by studying comparative community dynamics in a full-scale plant following systematic perturbation of operational conditions, which modified community abundance, function and physicochemical state. A statistically significant increase in the relative abundance of the PAO Accumulibacter was associated with improved EBPR activity. GAO relative abundance also increased, challenging the assumption of competition. An Accumulibacter bin-genome was identified from a whole community metagenomic survey, and comparative analysis against extant Accumulibacter genomes suggests a close relationship to Type II. Analysis of the associated metatranscriptome data revealed that genes encoding proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis pathways were highly expressed, consistent with metabolic modelling results. Our findings show that tropical EBPR is indeed possible, highlight the translational potential of studying competition dynamics in full-scale waste water communities and carry implications for plant design in tropical regions.

  11. Singularity analysis of the AKT signaling pathway reveals connections between cancer and metabolic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2010-12-01

    Connections between cancer and metabolic diseases may consist in the complex network of interactions among a common set of biomolecules. By applying singularity and bifurcation analysis, the phenotypes constrained by the AKT signaling pathway are identified and mapped onto the parameter space, which include cancer and certain metabolic diseases. By considering physiologic properties (sensitivity, robustness and adaptivity) the AKT pathway must possess in order to efficiently sense growth factors and nutrients, the region of normal responses is located. To optimize these properties, the intracellular concentration of the AKT protein must be sufficiently high to saturate its enzymes; the strength of the positive feedback must be stronger than that of the negative feedback. The analysis illuminates the parameter space and reveals system-level mechanisms in regulating biological functions (cell growth, survival, proliferation and metabolism) and how their deregulation may lead to the development of diseases. The analytical expressions summarize the synergistic interactions among many molecules, which provides valuable insights into therapeutic interventions. In particular, a strategy for overcoming the limitations of mTOR inhibition is proposed for cancer therapy.

  12. Structure analysis reveals the flexibility of the ADAMTS-5 active site.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Huey-Sheng; Tomasselli, Alfredo G; Mathis, Karl J; Schnute, Mark E; Woodard, Scott S; Caspers, Nicole; Williams, Jennifer M; Kiefer, James R; Munie, Grace; Wittwer, Arthur; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Tortorella, Micky D

    2011-04-01

    A ((1S,2R)-2-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl) succinamide derivative (here referred to as Compound 12) shows significant activity toward many matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-13. Modeling studies had predicted that this compound would not bind to ADAMTS-5 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-5) due to its shallow S1' pocket. However, inhibition analysis revealed it to be a nanomolar inhibitor of both ADAMTS-4 and -5. The observed inconsistency was explained by analysis of crystallographic structures, which showed that Compound 12 in complex with the catalytic domain of ADAMTS-5 (cataTS5) exhibits an unusual conformation in the S1' pocket of the protein. This first demonstration that cataTS5 can undergo an induced conformational change in its active site pocket by a molecule like Compound 12 should enable the design of new aggrecanase inhibitors with better potency and selectivity profiles. PMID:21370305

  13. Proteomic Analysis of a Novel Bacillus Jumbo Phage Revealing Glycoside Hydrolase As Structural Component.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yihui; Gao, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Tailed phages with genomes of larger than 200 kbp are classified as Jumbo phages and exhibited extremely high uncharted diversity. The genomic annotation of Jumbo phage is often disappointing because most of the predicted proteins, including structural proteins, failed to make good hits to the sequences in the databases. In this study, 23 proteins of a novel Bacillus Jumbo phage, vB_BpuM_BpSp, were identified as phage structural proteins by the structural proteome analysis, including 14 proteins of unknown function, 5 proteins with predicted function as structural proteins, a glycoside hydrolase, a Holliday junction resolvase, a RNA-polymerase β-subunit, and a host-coding portal protein, which might be hijacked from the host strain during phage virion assembly. The glycoside hydrolase (Gp255) was identified as phage virion component and was found to interact with the phage baseplate protein. Gp255 shows specific lytic activity against the phage host strain GR8 and has high temperature tolerance. In situ peptidoglycan-hydrolyzing activities analysis revealed that the expressed Gp255 and phage structural proteome exhibited glycoside hydrolysis activity against the tested GR8 cell extracts. This study identified the first functional individual structural glycoside hydrolase in phage virion. The presence of activated glycoside hydrolase in phage virions might facilitate the injection of the phage genome during infection by forming pores on the bacterial cell wall. PMID:27242758

  14. Phylogeographic analysis of the green python, Morelia viridis, reveals cryptic diversity.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Lesley H; Donnellan, Stephen C

    2003-04-01

    Green pythons, which are regionally variable in colour patterns, are found throughout the lowland rainforest of New Guinea and adjacent far northeastern Australia. The species is popular in commercial trade and management of this trade and its impacts on natural populations could be assisted by molecular identification tools. We used mitochondrial nucleotide sequences and a limited allozyme data to test whether significantly differentiated populations occur within the species range. Phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA sequences revealed hierarchal phylogeographic structure both within New Guinea and between New Guinea and Australia. Strongly supported reciprocally monophyletic mitochondrial lineages, northern and southern, were found either side of the central mountain range that runs nearly the length of New Guinea. Limited allozyme data suggest that population differentiation is reflected in the nuclear as well as the mitochondrial genome. A previous morphological analysis did not find any phenotypic concordance with the pattern of differentiation observed in the molecular data. The southern mitochondrial lineage includes all of the Australian haplotypes, which form a single lineage, nested among the southern New Guinean haplotypes. PMID:12679069

  15. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1’s role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  16. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Mechanisms for Stress Response in Hypoliths from Extreme Hyperarid Deserts.

    PubMed

    Le, Phuong Thi; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Guerrero, Leandro D; Vikram, Surendra; Van de Peer, Yves; Cowan, Don A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding microbial adaptation to environmental stressors is crucial for interpreting broader ecological patterns. In the most extreme hot and cold deserts, cryptic niche communities are thought to play key roles in ecosystem processes and represent excellent model systems for investigating microbial responses to environmental stressors. However, relatively little is known about the genetic diversity underlying such functional processes in climatically extreme desert systems. This study presents the first comparative metagenome analysis of cyanobacteria-dominated hypolithic communities in hot (Namib Desert, Namibia) and cold (Miers Valley, Antarctica) hyperarid deserts. The most abundant phyla in both hypolith metagenomes were Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes with Cyanobacteria dominating in Antarctic hypoliths. However, no significant differences between the two metagenomes were identified. The Antarctic hypolithic metagenome displayed a high number of sequences assigned to sigma factors, replication, recombination and repair, translation, ribosomal structure, and biogenesis. In contrast, the Namib Desert metagenome showed a high abundance of sequences assigned to carbohydrate transport and metabolism. Metagenome data analysis also revealed significant divergence in the genetic determinants of amino acid and nucleotide metabolism between these two metagenomes and those of soil from other polar deserts, hot deserts, and non-desert soils. Our results suggest extensive niche differentiation in hypolithic microbial communities from these two extreme environments and a high genetic capacity for survival under environmental extremes. PMID:27503299

  17. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis of sperm tails reveals flagellar defects associated with persistent asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Wilton, L J; Temple-Smith, P D; de Kretser, D M

    1992-04-01

    Sperm tail morphology was examined in 10 infertile asthenozoospermic men to determine whether poor sperm motility was caused by ultrastructural defects of the flagellum. In this quantitative analysis, the numbers of outer doublet and central pair microtubules, outer and inner dynein arms and radial spokes were counted in transverse sections of 75 axonemes from each patient and compared with similar data previously collected from 10 men with normal semen characteristics. Four patients had axonemal defects: two had severe microtubule abnormalities and two had more subtle but statistically significant deficiencies of dynein arms. These abnormalities would not have been detected by more commonly used qualitative examination. Three patients had no detectable ultrastructural abnormalities of the sperm tail, possibly indicating a metabolic deficiency. A further three patients had mid-piece abnormalities. Two had few, if any, flagellar mitochondria and the third patient had irregular and disorganized mitochondria. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis has revealed axonemal abnormalities in seven of 10 patients with previously unexplained asthenozoospermia. PMID:1522195

  18. Spatial and temporal variation of total electron content as revealed by principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Talaat, E. R.

    2010-12-01

    Eleven years of global total electron content (TEC) data are analyzed using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition and the corresponding principal component analysis (PCA) technique. For the daily averaged TEC field, the first EOF explains more than 89% and the first four EOFs explain more than 98% of the total variance of the TEC field, indicating an effective data compression and clear separation of different physical processes. The effectiveness of the PCA technique to TEC is nearly insensitive to the horizontal resolution and the length of the data records. When the PCA is applied to global TEC including local time variations, the rich spatial and temporal variations of field can be represented by the first three EOFs that explain 88% of the total variance. The spectral analysis of the time series of reveals how different mechanisms such as solar flux variation, change of the orbital declination, nonlinear mode coupling and geomagnetic activity are separated and expressed in different EOFs. This work demonstrates the usefulness of using PCA technique to assimilate and monitor the global TEC field.

  19. Combining AFM and Acoustic Probes to Reveal Changes in the Elastic Stiffness Tensor of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nijenhuis, Nadja; Zhao, Xuegen; Carisey, Alex; Ballestrem, Christoph; Derby, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how the elastic stiffness of a cell affects its communication with its environment is of fundamental importance for the understanding of tissue integrity in health and disease. For stiffness measurements, it has been customary to quote a single parameter quantity, e.g., Young’s modulus, rather than the minimum of two terms of the stiffness tensor required by elasticity theory. In this study, we use two independent methods (acoustic microscopy and atomic force microscopy nanoindentation) to characterize the elastic properties of a cell and thus determine two independent elastic constants. This allows us to explore in detail how the mechanical properties of cells change in response to signaling pathways that are known to regulate the cell’s cytoskeleton. In particular, we demonstrate that altering the tensioning of actin filaments in NIH3T3 cells has a strong influence on the cell's shear modulus but leaves its bulk modulus unchanged. In contrast, altering the polymerization state of actin filaments influences bulk and shear modulus in a similar manner. In addition, we can use the data to directly determine the Poisson ratio of a cell and show that in all cases studied, it is less than, but very close to, 0.5 in value. PMID:25296302

  20. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  1. LF radio anomalies revealed in Italy by the wavelet analysis: Possible preseismic effects during 1997 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, P. F.; Castellana, L.; Maggipinto, T.; Piccolo, R.; Minafra, A.; Ermini, A.; Martellucci, S.; Bellecci, C.; Perna, G.; Capozzi, V.; Molchanov, O. A.; Hayakawa, M.

    Since 1996, the electric field strength of the broadcasting station CZE (Czech Republic, f = 270 kHz) has been sampled each ten minutes, by a receiver (AS) located in central Italy, 818 km far from the transmitter. Here, we present the results obtained by a detailed analysis applied on the data recorded from February 1996 up to September 2004. At first, we separated the day time data and the night time data in the radio signals; then, in the day time data we separated the data collected in winter from the data collected in summer. Finally, we applied the wavelet analysis on the previous trends. The first result was the appearance of a very clear anomaly during February-March 1998, at winter day time and at night time. This result confirms an anomaly revealed previously in the same data but analysed with a different approach. The anomaly was related to a strong ( M = 5.1-6.0) seismic sequence occurred in a zone (Slovenia) lying in the middle of the transmitter-receiver path. The present result reinforces the hypothesis of the occurrence of some disturbances in the ionosphere during the preparatory phase of the Slovenia seismic sequence. The second result came from the wavelet analysis applied to the summer day time data and it was the appearance of a very clear anomaly during August-September 1997. On September 26 the Umbria-Marche (central Italy) seismic sequence started with two earthquakes with magnitude M = 5.6 and M = 5.9 and the seismic activity lasted for more than six months. We consider the August-September 1997 radio anomaly as a precursor of the previous earthquakes and a possible explanation model is proposed.

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of Rod Photoreceptor Homeostasis Revealed by In Vivo NRL Targetome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hong; Kim, Douglas S.; Klocke, Bernward; Johnson, Kory R.; Cui, Kairong; Gotoh, Norimoto; Zang, Chongzhi; Gregorski, Janina; Gieser, Linn; Peng, Weiqun; Fann, Yang; Seifert, Martin; Zhao, Keji; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP–Seq) data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP–Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP–Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s) for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis. PMID:22511886

  3. Bulk Segregant Analysis Reveals the Genetic Basis of a Natural Trait Variation in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen; Suo, Fang; Du, Li-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Although the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a well-established model organism, studies of natural trait variations in this species remain limited. To assess the feasibility of segregant-pool-based mapping of phenotype-causing genes in natural strains of fission yeast, we investigated the cause of a maltose utilization defect (Mal-) of the S. pombe strain CBS5557 (originally known as Schizosaccharomyces malidevorans). Analyzing the genome sequence of CBS5557 revealed 955 nonconservative missense substitutions, and 61 potential loss-of-function variants including 47 frameshift indels, 13 early stop codons, and 1 splice site mutation. As a side benefit, our analysis confirmed 146 sequence errors in the reference genome and improved annotations of 27 genes. We applied bulk segregant analysis to map the causal locus of the Mal- phenotype. Through sequencing the segregant pools derived from a cross between CBS5557 and the laboratory strain, we located the locus to within a 2.23-Mb chromosome I inversion found in most S. pombe isolates including CBS5557. To map genes within the inversion region that occupies 18% of the genome, we created a laboratory strain containing the same inversion. Analyzing segregants from a cross between CBS5557 and the inversion-containing laboratory strain narrowed down the locus to a 200-kb interval and led us to identify agl1, which suffers a 5-bp deletion in CBS5557, as the causal gene. Interestingly, loss of agl1 through a 34-kb deletion underlies the Mal- phenotype of another S. pombe strain CGMCC2.1628. This work adapts and validates the bulk segregant analysis method for uncovering trait-gene relationship in natural fission yeast strains. PMID:26615217

  4. ALE meta-analysis reveals dissociable networks for affective and discriminative aspects of touch.

    PubMed

    Morrison, India

    2016-04-01

    Emotionally-laden tactile stimulation-such as a caress on the skin or the feel of velvet-may represent a functionally distinct domain of touch, underpinned by specific cortical pathways. In order to determine whether, and to what extent, cortical functional neuroanatomy supports a distinction between affective and discriminative touch, an activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis was performed. This meta-analysis statistically mapped reported functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activations from 17 published affective touch studies in which tactile stimulation was associated with positive subjective evaluation (n = 291, 34 experimental contrasts). A separate ALE meta-analysis mapped regions most likely to be activated by tactile stimulation during detection and discrimination tasks (n = 1,075, 91 experimental contrasts). These meta-analyses revealed dissociable regions for affective and discriminative touch, with posterior insula (PI) more likely to be activated for affective touch, and primary somatosensory cortices (SI) more likely to be activated for discriminative touch. Secondary somatosensory cortex had a high likelihood of engagement by both affective and discriminative touch. Further, meta-analytic connectivity (MCAM) analyses investigated network-level co-activation likelihoods independent of task or stimulus, across a range of domains and paradigms. Affective-related PI and discriminative-related SI regions co-activated with different networks, implicated in dissociable functions, but sharing somatosensory co-activations. Taken together, these meta-analytic findings suggest that affective and discriminative touch are dissociable both on the regional and network levels. However, their degree of shared activation likelihood in somatosensory cortices indicates that this dissociation reflects functional biases within tactile processing networks, rather than functionally and anatomically distinct pathways. PMID:26873519

  5. Time series analysis of satellite data reveals continuous deforestation of New England since the 1980s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, Pontus; Holden, Christopher E.; Bullock, Eric L.; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    2016-06-01

    Land cover and land change were monitored continuously between 1985 and 2011 at 30 m resolution across New England in the Northeastern United States in support of modeling the terrestrial carbon budget. It was found that the forest area has been decreasing throughout the study period in each state of the region since the 1980s. A total of 386 657 ± 98 137 ha (95% confidence interval) of forest has been converted to other land covers since 1985. Mainly driven by low density residential development, the deforestation accelerated in the mid-1990s until 2007 when it plateaued as a result of declining new residential construction and in turn, the financial crisis of 2007–08. The area of forest harvest, estimated at 226 519 ± 66 682 ha, was mapped separately and excluded from the deforestation estimate, while the area of forest expansion on non-forested lands was found to not be significantly different from zero. New England is often held as a principal example of a forest transition with historical widespread deforestation followed by recovery of forestlands as farming activities diminished, but the results of this study support the notion of a reversal of the forest transition as the region again is experiencing widespread deforestation. All available Landsat imagery acquired after 1985 for the study area were collected and used in the analysis. Areas of land cover and land change were estimated from a random sample of reference observations stratified by a twelve-class land change map encompassing the entire study area and period. The statistical analysis revealed that the net change in forest area and the associated modeled impact on the terrestrial carbon balance would have been considerably different if the results of the map were used without inferring the area of forest change by analysis of a reference sample.

  6. Gene expression profiling via bioinformatics analysis reveals biomarkers in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GUAN, GUO-FANG; ZHENG, YING; WEN, LIAN-JI; ZHANG, DE-JUN; YU, DUO-JIAO; LU, YAN-QING; ZHAO, YAN; ZHANG, HUI

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify key genes and relevant microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). The gene expression profiles of LSCC tissue samples were analyzed with various bioinformatics tools. A gene expression data set (GSE51985), including ten laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissue samples and ten adjacent non-neoplastic tissue samples, was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Differential analysis was performed using software package limma of R. Functional enrichment analysis was applied to the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks were constructed for the protein products using information from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins. Module analysis was performed using ClusterONE (a software plugin from Cytoscape). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulating the DEGs were predicted using WebGestalt. A total of 461 DEGs were identified in LSCC, 297 of which were upregulated and 164 of which were downregulated. Cell cycle, proteasome and DNA replication were significantly over-represented in the upregulated genes, while the ribosome was significantly over-represented in the downregulated genes. Two PPI networks were constructed for the up- and downregulated genes. One module from the upregulated gene network was associated with protein kinase. Numerous miRNAs associated with LSCC were predicted, including miRNA (miR)-25, miR-32, miR-92 and miR-29. In conclusion, numerous key genes and pathways involved in LSCC were revealed, which may aid the advancement of current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of LSCC. In addition, relevant miRNAs were also identified, which may represent potential biomarkers for use in the diagnosis or treatment of the disease. PMID:25936657

  7. Co-expression network analysis reveals transcription factors associated to cell wall biosynthesis in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Savio Siqueira; Hotta, Carlos Takeshi; Poelking, Viviane Guzzo de Carli; Leite, Debora Chaves Coelho; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Barbosa, Marcio Henrique Pereira; Carneiro, Monalisa Sampaio; Souza, Glaucia Mendes

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane is a hybrid of Saccharum officinarum and Saccharum spontaneum, with minor contributions from other species in Saccharum and other genera. Understanding the molecular basis of cell wall metabolism in sugarcane may allow for rational changes in fiber quality and content when designing new energy crops. This work describes a comparative expression profiling of sugarcane ancestral genotypes: S. officinarum, S. spontaneum and S. robustum and a commercial hybrid: RB867515, linking gene expression to phenotypes to identify genes for sugarcane improvement. Oligoarray experiments of leaves, immature and intermediate internodes, detected 12,621 sense and 995 antisense transcripts. Amino acid metabolism was particularly evident among pathways showing natural antisense transcripts expression. For all tissues sampled, expression analysis revealed 831, 674 and 648 differentially expressed genes in S. officinarum, S. robustum and S. spontaneum, respectively, using RB867515 as reference. Expression of sugar transporters might explain sucrose differences among genotypes, but an unexpected differential expression of histones were also identified between high and low Brix° genotypes. Lignin biosynthetic genes and bioenergetics-related genes were up-regulated in the high lignin genotype, suggesting that these genes are important for S. spontaneum to allocate carbon to lignin, while S. officinarum allocates it to sucrose storage. Co-expression network analysis identified 18 transcription factors possibly related to cell wall biosynthesis while in silico analysis detected cis-elements involved in cell wall biosynthesis in their promoters. Our results provide information to elucidate regulatory networks underlying traits of interest that will allow the improvement of sugarcane for biofuel and chemicals production. PMID:26820137

  8. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  9. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  10. Comparison of dynamic lever STM and noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggisberg, M.; Bammerlin, M.; Lüthi, R.; Loppacher, C.; Battiston, F.; Lü, J.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    We investigate interaction effects which occur in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) by performing local force spectroscopy with an oscillating tip while imaging Si(111)7×7 terraces in the dynamic lever STM mode (constant time-averaged current). It is found that true atomic resolution is achieved close to the minimum of the resonance frequency vs. distance curve and even closer to the sample. On the other hand true atomic resolution in noncontact AFM (constant frequency shift) is expected several nm away from this minimum, in the range where the frequency shift becomes more negative with decreasing distance.

  11. Analysis of SSH library of rice variety Aganni reveals candidate gall midge resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Divya, Dhanasekar; Singh, Y Tunginba; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, J S

    2016-03-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae, is a serious insect pest causing extensive yield loss. Interaction between the gall midge and rice genotypes is known to be on a gene-for-gene basis. Here, we report molecular basis of HR- (hypersensitive reaction-negative) type of resistance in Aganni (an indica rice variety possessing gall midge resistance gene Gm8) through the construction and analysis of a suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. In all, 2,800 positive clones were sequenced and analyzed. The high-quality ESTs were assembled into 448 non-redundant gene sequences. Homology search with the NCBI databases, using BlastX and BlastN, revealed that 73% of the clones showed homology to genes with known function and majority of ESTs belonged to the gene ontology category 'biological process'. Validation of 27 putative candidate gall midge resistance genes through real-time PCR, following gall midge infestation, in contrasting parents and their derived pre-NILs (near isogenic lines) revealed induction of specific genes related to defense and metabolism. Interestingly, four genes, belonging to families of leucine-rich repeat (LRR), heat shock protein (HSP), pathogenesis related protein (PR), and NAC domain-containing protein, implicated in conferring HR+ type of resistance, were found to be up-regulated in Aganni. Two of the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI)-scavenging-enzyme-coding genes Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase1, 2 (OsAPx1 and OsAPx2) were found up-regulated in Aganni in incompatible interaction possibly suppressing HR. We suggest that Aganni has a deviant form of inducible, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance but without HR. PMID:26801786

  12. Analysis of virus genomes from glacial environments reveals novel virus groups with unusual host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, Christopher M.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Barker, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in glacial ecosystems are diverse, active, and subjected to strong viral pressures and infection rates. In this study we analyse putative virus genomes assembled from three dsDNA viromes from cryoconite hole ecosystems of Svalbard and the Greenland Ice Sheet to assess the potential hosts and functional role viruses play in these habitats. We assembled 208 million reads from the virus-size fraction and developed a procedure to select genuine virus scaffolds from cellular contamination. Our curated virus library contained 546 scaffolds up to 230 Kb in length, 54 of which were circular virus consensus genomes. Analysis of virus marker genes revealed a wide range of viruses had been assembled, including bacteriophages, cyanophages, nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses and a virophage, with putative hosts identified as Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, eukaryotic algae and amoebae. Whole genome comparisons revealed the majority of circular genome scaffolds (CGS) formed 12 novel groups, two of which contained multiple phage members with plasmid-like properties, including a group of phage-plasmids possessing plasmid-like partition genes and toxin-antitoxin addiction modules to ensure their replication and a satellite phage-plasmid group. Surprisingly we also assembled a phage that not only encoded plasmid partition genes, but a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas adaptive bacterial immune system. One of the spacers was an exact match for another phage in our virome, indicating that in a novel use of the system, the lysogen was potentially capable of conferring immunity on its bacterial host against other phage. Together these results suggest that highly novel and diverse groups of viruses are present in glacial environments, some of which utilize very unusual life strategies and genes to control their replication and maintain a long-term relationship with their hosts

  13. Comparative Whole-Genome Analysis of Clinical Isolates Reveals Characteristic Architecture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pangenome

    PubMed Central

    Periwal, Vinita; Patowary, Ashok; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Gupta, Anju; Singh, Meghna; Mittal, Ashish; Jeyapaul, Shamini; Chauhan, Rajendra Kumar; Singh, Ajay Vir; Singh, Pravin Kumar; Garg, Parul; Katoch, Viswa Mohan; Katoch, Kiran; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    The tubercle complex consists of closely related mycobacterium species which appear to be variants of a single species. Comparative genome analysis of different strains could provide useful clues and insights into the genetic diversity of the species. We integrated genome assemblies of 96 strains from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), which included 8 Indian clinical isolates sequenced and assembled in this study, to understand its pangenome architecture. We predicted genes for all the 96 strains and clustered their respective CDSs into homologous gene clusters (HGCs) to reveal a hard-core, soft-core and accessory genome component of MTBC. The hard-core (HGCs shared amongst 100% of the strains) was comprised of 2,066 gene clusters whereas the soft-core (HGCs shared amongst at least 95% of the strains) comprised of 3,374 gene clusters. The change in the core and accessory genome components when observed as a function of their size revealed that MTBC has an open pangenome. We identified 74 HGCs that were absent from reference strains H37Rv and H37Ra but were present in most of clinical isolates. We report PCR validation on 9 candidate genes depicting 7 genes completely absent from H37Rv and H37Ra whereas 2 genes shared partial homology with them accounting to probable insertion and deletion events. The pangenome approach is a promising tool for studying strain specific genetic differences occurring within species. We also suggest that since selecting appropriate target genes for typing purposes requires the expected target gene be present in all isolates being typed, therefore estimating the core-component of the species becomes a subject of prime importance. PMID:25853708

  14. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas; Lyon, David; Mullari, Meeli; Madsen, Maria V; Daniel, Jeremy A; Jensen, Lars J; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins by arginine methylation is functionally important, yet the breadth of this modification is not well characterized. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 8030 arginine methylation sites within 3300 human proteins in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified by methylation. Through quantitative proteomics and RNA interference to examine arginine methylation stoichiometry, we unexpectedly found that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of arginine methyltransferases catalyzed methylation independently of arginine sequence context. In contrast to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially regulated the functions of the pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 (serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2) and the RNA transport ribonucleoprotein HNRNPUL1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1). Knocking down PRMT5 impaired the RNA binding function of SRSF2, whereas knocking down PRMT4 [also known as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human arginine methylome provides a missing piece in the global and integrative view of cellular physiology and protein regulation. PMID:27577262

  15. Structural and functional analysis of amphioxus HIFα reveals ancient features of the HIFα family.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Lu, Ling; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Peng; Song, Weibo; Duan, Cunming

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are master regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia. To gain insight into the structural and functional evolution of the HIF family, we characterized the HIFα gene from amphioxus, an invertebrate chordate, and identified several alternatively spliced HIFα isoforms. Whereas HIFα Ia, the full-length isoform, contained a complete oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain, the isoforms Ib, Ic, and Id had 1 or 2 deletions in the ODD domain. When tagged with GFP and tested in mammalian cells, the amphioxus HIFα Ia protein level increased in response to hypoxia or CoCl2 treatment, whereas HIFα Ib, Ic, and Id showed reduced or no hypoxia regulation. Deletion of the ODD sequence in HIFα Ia up-regulated the HIFα Ia levels under normoxia. Gene expression analysis revealed HIFα Ic to be the predominant isoform in embryos and larvae, whereas isoform Ia was the most abundant form in the adult stage. The expression levels of Ib and Id were very low. Hypoxia treatment of adults had no effect on the mRNA levels of these HIFα isoforms. Functional analyses in mammalian cells showed all 4 HIFα isoforms capable of entering the nucleus and activating hypoxia response element-dependent reporter gene expression. The functional nuclear location signal (NLS) mapped to 3 clusters of basic residues. (775)KKARL functioned as the primary NLS, but (737)KRK and (754)KK also contributed to the nuclear localization. All amphioxus HIFα isoforms had 2 functional transactivation domains (TADs). Its C-terminal transactivation (C-TAD) shared high sequence identity with the human HIF-1α and HIF-2α C-TAD. This domain contained a conserved asparagine, and its mutation resulted in an increase in transcriptional activity. These findings reveal many ancient features of the HIFα family and provide novel insights into the evolution of the HIFα family. PMID:24174425

  16. Analysis of Nearly One Thousand Mammalian Mirtrons Reveals Novel Features of Dicer Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, Sol; Mohammed, Jaaved; Lai, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Mirtrons are microRNA (miRNA) substrates that utilize the splicing machinery to bypass the necessity of Drosha cleavage for their biogenesis. Expanding our recent efforts for mammalian mirtron annotation, we use meta-analysis of aggregate datasets to identify ~500 novel mouse and human introns that confidently generate diced small RNA duplexes. These comprise nearly 1000 total loci distributed in four splicing-mediated biogenesis subclasses, with 5'-tailed mirtrons as, by far, the dominant subtype. Thus, mirtrons surprisingly comprise a substantial fraction of endogenous Dicer substrates in mammalian genomes. Although mirtron-derived small RNAs exhibit overall expression correlation with their host mRNAs, we observe a subset with substantial differences that suggest regulated processing or accumulation. We identify characteristic sequence, length, and structural features of mirtron loci that distinguish them from bulk introns, and find that mirtrons preferentially emerge from genes with larger numbers of introns. While mirtrons generate miRNA-class regulatory RNAs, we also find that mirtrons exhibit many features that distinguish them from canonical miRNAs. We observe that conventional mirtron hairpins are substantially longer than Drosha-generated pre-miRNAs, indicating that the characteristic length of canonical pre-miRNAs is not a general feature of Dicer substrate hairpins. In addition, mammalian mirtrons exhibit unique patterns of ordered 5' and 3' heterogeneity, which reveal hidden complexity in miRNA processing pathways. These include broad 3'-uridylation of mirtron hairpins, atypically heterogeneous 5' termini that may result from exonucleolytic processing, and occasionally robust decapitation of the 5' guanine (G) of mirtron-5p species defined by splicing. Altogether, this study reveals that this extensive class of non-canonical miRNA bears a multitude of characteristic properties, many of which raise general mechanistic questions regarding the processing

  17. Data-driven analysis of simultaneous EEG/fMRI reveals neurophysiological phenotypes of impulse control.

    PubMed

    Schmüser, Lena; Sebastian, Alexandra; Mobascher, Arian; Lieb, Klaus; Feige, Bernd; Tüscher, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Response inhibition is the ability to suppress inadequate but prepotent or ongoing response tendencies. A fronto-striatal network is involved in these processes. Between-subject differences in the intra-individual variability have been suggested to constitute a key to pathological processes underlying impulse control disorders. Single-trial EEG/fMRI analysis allows to increase sensitivity for inter-individual differences by incorporating intra-individual variability. Thirty-eight healthy subjects performed a visual Go/Nogo task during simultaneous EEG/fMRI. Of 38 healthy subjects, 21 subjects reliably showed Nogo-related ICs (Nogo-IC-positive) while 17 subjects (Nogo-IC-negative) did not. Comparing both groups revealed differences on various levels: On trait level, Nogo-IC-negative subjects scored higher on questionnaires regarding attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder; on a behavioral level, they displayed slower response times (RT) and higher intra-individual RT variability while both groups did not differ in their inhibitory performance. On the neurophysiological level, Nogo-IC-negative subjects showed a hyperactivation of left inferior frontal cortex/insula and left putamen as well as significantly reduced P3 amplitudes. Thus, a data-driven approach for IC classification and the resulting presence or absence of early Nogo-specific ICs as criterion for group selection revealed group differences at behavioral and neurophysiological levels. This may indicate electrophysiological phenotypes characterized by inter-individual variations of neural and behavioral correlates of impulse control. We demonstrated that the inter-individual difference in an electrophysiological correlate of response inhibition is correlated with distinct, potentially compensatory neural activity. This may suggest the existence of electrophysiologically dissociable phenotypes of behavioral and neural motor response inhibition with the Nogo-IC-positive phenotype possibly providing

  18. Genetic diversity and structure in Leishmania infantum populations from southeastern Europe revealed by microsatellite analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The dynamic re-emergence of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in south Europe and the northward shift to Leishmania-free European countries are well-documented. However, the epidemiology of VL due to Leishmania infantum in southeastern (SE) Europe and the Balkans is inadequately examined. Herein, we aim to re-evaluate and compare the population structure of L. infantum in SE and southwestern (SW) Europe. Methods Leishmania strains collected from humans and canines in Turkey, Cyprus, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania and Croatia, were characterized by the K26-PCR assay and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Genetic diversity was assessed by multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) and MLM Types were analyzed by model- and distance- based algorithms to infer the population structure of 128 L. infantum strains. Results L. infantum MON-1 was found predominant in SE Europe, whilst 16.8% of strains were MON-98. Distinct genetic populations revealed clear differentiation between SE and SW European strains. Interestingly, Cypriot canine isolates were genetically isolated and formed a monophyletic group, suggesting the constitution of a clonal MON-1 population circulating among dogs. In contrast, two highly heterogeneous populations enclosed all MON-1 and MON-98 strains from the other SE European countries. Structure sub-clustering, phylogenetic and Splitstree analysis also revealed two distinct Croatian subpopulations. A mosaic of evolutionary effects resulted in consecutive sub-structuring, which indicated substantial differentiation and gene flow among strains of both zymodemes. Conclusions This is the first population genetic study of L. infantum in SE Europe and the Balkans. Our findings demonstrate the differentiation between SE and SW European strains; revealing the partition of Croatian strains between these populations and the genetic isolation of Cypriot strains. This mirrors the geographic position of Croatia located in central Europe and the natural

  19. Conductive-probe AFM characterization of graphene sheets bonded to gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauquier, Fanny; Alamarguy, David; Viel, Pascal; Noël, Sophie; Filoramo, Arianna; Huc, Vincent; Houzé, Frédéric; Palacin, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) has been used to perform mechanical and electrical experiments on graphene layers bonded to polyaminophenylene (PAP) films grafted on gold substrates. This technique is a new approach for the characterization of graphene sheets and represents a complementary tool to Raman spectroscopy. The combination of friction and electrical imaging reveals that different stacked graphene sheets have been successfully distinguished from each other and from the underlying PAP films. Lateral force microscopy has shown that the friction is greatly reduced on graphene sheets in comparison with the organic coating. The electrical resistance images show very different local conduction properties which can be linked to the number of underlying graphene sheets. The resistance decreases very slowly when the normal load increases. Current-voltage curves display characteristics of metal-molecule-metal junctions.

  20. Systems Genetics Analysis of GWAS reveals Novel Associations between Key Biological Processes and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sujoy; Vivar, Juan; Nelson, Christopher P; Willenborg, Christina; Segrè, Ayellet V; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Nikpay, Majid; Erdmann, Jeannette; Blankenberg, Stefan; O'Donnell, Christopher; März, Winfried; Laaksonen, Reijo; Stewart, Alexandre FR; Epstein, Stephen E; Shah, Svati H; Granger, Christopher B; Hazen, Stanley L; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Yang, Xia; Quertermous, Thomas; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Assimes, Themistocles L; McPherson, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple genetic variants affecting the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, individually these explain only a small fraction of the heritability of CAD and for most, the causal biological mechanisms remain unclear. We sought to obtain further insights into potential causal processes of CAD by integrating large-scale GWA data with expertly curated databases of core human pathways and functional networks. Approaches and Results Employing pathways (gene sets) from Reactome, we carried out a two-stage gene set enrichment analysis strategy. From a meta-analyzed discovery cohort of 7 CADGWAS data sets (9,889 cases/11,089 controls), nominally significant gene-sets were tested for replication in a meta-analysis of 9 additional studies (15,502 cases/55,730 controls) from the CARDIoGRAM Consortium. A total of 32 of 639 Reactome pathways tested showed convincing association with CAD (replication p<0.05). These pathways resided in 9 of 21 core biological processes represented in Reactome, and included pathways relevant to extracellular matrix integrity, innate immunity, axon guidance, and signaling by PDRF, NOTCH, and the TGF-β/SMAD receptor complex. Many of these pathways had strengths of association comparable to those observed in lipid transport pathways. Network analysis of unique genes within the replicated pathways further revealed several interconnected functional and topologically interacting modules representing novel associations (e.g. semaphorin regulated axonal guidance pathway) besides confirming known processes (lipid metabolism). The connectivity in the observed networks was statistically significant compared to random networks (p<0.001). Network centrality analysis (‘degree’ and ‘betweenness’) further identified genes (e.g. NCAM1, FYN, FURIN etc.) likely to play critical roles in the maintenance and functioning of several of the replicated pathways. Conclusions These findings

  1. Physical properties of polyacrylamide gels probed by AFM and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidine, Yara; Laurent, Valérie M.; Michel, Richard; Duperray, Alain; Iulian Palade, Liviu; Verdier, Claude

    2015-02-01

    Polymer gels have been shown to behave as viscoelastic materials but only a small amount of data is usually provided in the glass transition. In this paper, the dynamic moduli G\\prime and G\\prime\\prime of polyacrylamide hydrogels are investigated using both an AFM in contact force modulation mode and a classical rheometer. The validity is shown by the matching of the two techniques. Measurements are carried out on gels of increasing polymer concentration in a wide frequency range. A model based on fractional derivatives is successfully used, covering the whole frequency range. G\\text{N}0 , the plateau modulus, as well as several other parameters are obtained at low frequencies. The model also predicts the slope a of both moduli in the glass transition, and a transition frequency f\\text{T} is introduced to separate the gel-like behavior with the glassy state. Its variation with polymer content c gives a dependence f\\text{T}∼ c1.6 , in good agreement with previous theories. Therefore, the AFM data provides new information on the physics of polymer gels.

  2. Dual AFM probes alignment based on vision guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua-kun; Gao, Si-tian; Lu, Ming-zhen; Wang, Long-long

    2013-10-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) with dual probes that operate together can measure both side walls excellently at the same time, which virtually eliminates the prevalent effect of probe width that contributes a large component of uncertainty in measurement results and finally obtains the critical dimension (CD)(e.g. the linewidth) through data synthesis. In calibration process, the dual probes must contact each other in advance, which realizes the alignment in the three dimensions, to establish a zero reference point and ensure the accuracy of measurement. Because nowadays the optical resolution of advanced lens have exceeded micrometer range, and the size of probes is within micro level, it is possible to acquire dual probes images in both horizontal and vertical directions, through which the movement of the probes can be controlled in time. In order to further enhance the alignment precision, sub-pixel edge detection method based on Zernike orthogonal moment is used to obtain relative position between these two probes, which helps the tips alignment attains sub-micron range. Piezoelectric nanopositioning stages calibrated by laser interferometer are used to implement fine movement of the probes to verify the accuracy of the experimental results. To simplify the system, novel self-sensing and self-actuating probe based on a quartz tuning fork combined with a micromachined cantilever is used for dynamic mode AFM. In this case, an external optical detection system is not needed, so the system is simple and small.

  3. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  4. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m‑1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  5. Comparison of particle sizes determined with impactor, AFM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwaze, Patience; Annegarn, Harold J.; Huth, Joachim; Helas, Günter

    2007-11-01

    Particles size comparisons were made between conventional aerodynamic and mobility sizing techniques and physical geometric sizes measured by high resolution microscopes. Atmospheric particles were collected during the wet and dry seasons in the Amazonian ecosystems. Individual particles deposited on four stages of the MOUDI (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor) were characterised for particle volumes, projected surface diameters and morphologies with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). AFM and SEM size distributions were verified against distributions derived from response functions of individual MOUDI stages as specified by Winklmayr et al. [Winklmayr, W., Wang, H.-C., John, W., 1990. Adaptation of the Twomey algorithm to the inversion of cascade impactor data. Aerosol Science and Technology 13, 322-331.]. Particles indicated inherent discrepancies in sizing techniques. Particle volumes were systematically lower than expected by factors of up to 3.6. Differences were attributed to loss of mass, presumably water adsorbed on particles. Losses were high and could not be accounted for by measured humidity growth factors suggesting significant losses of other volatile compounds as well, particularly on particles that were collected during the wet season. Microscopy results showed that for hygroscopic particles, microscopy sizes depend on the relative humidity history of particles before and after sampling. Changes in relative humidity significantly altered particle morphologies. Depending on when changes occur, such losses will bias not only microscopy particle sizes but also impactor mass distributions and number concentrations derived from collected particles.

  6. Comorbid Analysis of Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders Reveals Differential Evolutionary Constraints.

    PubMed

    David, Maude M; Enard, David; Ozturk, Alp; Daniels, Jena; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Diaz-Beltran, Leticia; Wall, Dennis P

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is substantial. The symptoms of autism overlap with many other human conditions, reflecting common molecular pathologies suggesting that cross-disorder analysis will help prioritize autism gene candidates. Genes in the intersection between autism and related conditions may represent nonspecific indicators of dysregulation while genes unique to autism may play a more causal role. Thorough literature review allowed us to extract 125 ICD-9 codes comorbid to ASD that we mapped to 30 specific human disorders. In the present work, we performed an automated extraction of genes associated with ASD and its comorbid disorders, and found 1031 genes involved in ASD, among which 262 are involved in ASD only, with the remaining 779 involved in ASD and at least one comorbid disorder. A pathway analysis revealed 13 pathways not involved in any other comorbid disorders and therefore unique to ASD, all associated with basal cellular functions. These pathways differ from the pathways associated with both ASD and its comorbid conditions, with the latter being more specific to neural function. To determine whether the sequence of these genes have been subjected to differential evolutionary constraints, we studied long term constraints by looking into Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling, and showed that genes involved in several comorbid disorders seem to have undergone more purifying selection than the genes involved in ASD only. This result was corroborated by a higher dN/dS ratio for genes unique to ASD as compare to those that are shared between ASD and its comorbid disorders. Short-term evolutionary constraints showed the same trend as the pN/pS ratio indicates that genes unique to ASD were under significantly less evolutionary constraint than the genes associated with all other disorders. PMID:27414027

  7. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Genetic Basis of Skin Color Variation in Common Carp

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanliang; Zhang, Songhao; Xu, Jian; Feng, Jianxin; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A.; Sun, Xiaowen; Xu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Background The common carp is an important aquaculture species that is widely distributed across the world. During the long history of carp domestication, numerous carp strains with diverse skin colors have been established. Skin color is used as a visual criterion to determine the market value of carp. However, the genetic basis of common carp skin color has not been extensively studied. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we performed Illumina sequencing on two common carp strains: the reddish Xingguo red carp and the brownish-black Yellow River carp. A total of 435,348,868 reads were generated, resulting in 198,781 assembled contigs that were used as reference sequences. Comparisons of skin transcriptome files revealed 2,012 unigenes with significantly different expression in the two common carp strains, including 874 genes that were up-regulated in Xingguo red carp and 1,138 genes that were up-regulated in Yellow River carp. The expression patterns of 20 randomly selected differentially expressed genes were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Gene pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that melanin biosynthesis, along with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways, is highly likely to affect the skin pigmentation process. Several key genes involved in the skin pigmentation process, including TYRP1, SILV, ASIP and xCT, showed significant differences in their expression patterns between the two strains. Conclusions In this study, we conducted a comparative transcriptome analysis of Xingguo red carp and Yellow River carp skins, and we detected key genes involved in the common carp skin pigmentation process. We propose that common carp skin pigmentation depends upon at least three pathways. Understanding fish skin color genetics will facilitate future molecular selection of the fish skin colors with high market values. PMID:25255374

  8. Proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six crop species reveals insights into chromoplast function and development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Yong; Fei, Zhangjun; Yuan, Hui; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Mazourek, Michael; Kochian, Leon V; Wang, Xiaowu; Li, Li

    2013-02-01

    Chromoplasts are unique plastids that accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids. To gain a general and comparative characterization of chromoplast proteins, this study performed proteomic analysis of chromoplasts from six carotenoid-rich crops: watermelon, tomato, carrot, orange cauliflower, red papaya, and red bell pepper. Stromal and membrane proteins of chromoplasts were separated by 1D gel electrophoresis and analysed using nLC-MS/MS. A total of 953-2262 proteins from chromoplasts of different crop species were identified. Approximately 60% of the identified proteins were predicted to be plastid localized. Functional classification using MapMan bins revealed large numbers of proteins involved in protein metabolism, transport, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, and redox in chromoplasts from all six species. Seventeen core carotenoid metabolic enzymes were identified. Phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, ζ-carotene desaturase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase, and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 were found in almost all crops, suggesting relative abundance of them among the carotenoid pathway enzymes. Chromoplasts from different crops contained abundant amounts of ATP synthase and adenine nucleotide translocator, which indicates an important role of ATP production and transport in chromoplast development. Distinctive abundant proteins were observed in chromoplast from different crops, including capsanthin/capsorubin synthase and fibrillins in pepper, superoxide dismutase in watermelon, carrot, and cauliflower, and glutathione-S-transferease in papaya. The comparative analysis of chromoplast proteins among six crop species offers new insights into the general metabolism and function of chromoplasts as well as the uniqueness of chromoplasts in specific crop species. This work provides reference datasets for future experimental study of chromoplast biogenesis, development, and regulation in plants. PMID:23314817

  9. Comparative genomic analysis of clinical and environmental Vibrio vulnificus isolates revealed biotype 3 evolutionary relationships

    PubMed Central

    Koton, Yael; Gordon, Michal; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Bisharat, Naiel

    2015-01-01

    In 1996 a common-source outbreak of severe soft tissue and bloodstream infections erupted among Israeli fish farmers and fish consumers due to changes in fish marketing policies. The causative pathogen was a new strain of Vibrio vulnificus, named biotype 3, which displayed a unique biochemical and genotypic profile. Initial observations suggested that the pathogen erupted as a result of genetic recombination between two distinct populations. We applied a whole genome shotgun sequencing approach using several V. vulnificus strains from Israel in order to study the pan genome of V. vulnificus and determine the phylogenetic relationship of biotype 3 with existing populations. The core genome of V. vulnificus based on 16 draft and complete genomes consisted of 3068 genes, representing between 59 and 78% of the whole genome of 16 strains. The accessory genome varied in size from 781 to 2044 kbp. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole, core, and accessory genomes displayed similar clustering patterns with two main clusters, clinical (C) and environmental (E), all biotype 3 strains formed a distinct group within the E cluster. Annotation of accessory genomic regions found in biotype 3 strains and absent from the core genome yielded 1732 genes, of which the vast majority encoded hypothetical proteins, phage-related proteins, and mobile element proteins. A total of 1916 proteins (including 713 hypothetical proteins) were present in all human pathogenic strains (both biotype 3 and non-biotype 3) and absent from the environmental strains. Clustering analysis of the non-hypothetical proteins revealed 148 protein clusters shared by all human pathogenic strains; these included transcriptional regulators, arylsulfatases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, acetyltransferases, GGDEF family proteins, transposases, type IV secretory system (T4SS) proteins, and integrases. Our study showed that V. vulnificus biotype 3 evolved from environmental populations and formed a genetically

  10. An evolutionary analysis of antigen processing and presentation across different timescales reveals pervasive selection.

    PubMed

    Forni, Diego; Cagliani, Rachele; Tresoldi, Claudia; Pozzoli, Uberto; De Gioia, Luca; Filippi, Giulia; Riva, Stefania; Menozzi, Giorgia; Colleoni, Marta; Biasin, Mara; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Mazzotta, Francesco; Comi, Giacomo P; Bresolin, Nereo; Clerici, Mario; Sironi, Manuela

    2014-03-01

    The antigenic repertoire presented by MHC molecules is generated by the antigen processing and presentation (APP) pathway. We analyzed the evolutionary history of 45 genes involved in APP at the inter- and intra-species level. Results showed that 11 genes evolved adaptively in mammals. Several positively selected sites involve positions of fundamental importance to the protein function (e.g. the TAP1 peptide-binding domains, the sugar binding interface of langerin, and the CD1D trafficking signal region). In CYBB, all selected sites cluster in two loops protruding into the endosomal lumen; analysis of missense mutations responsible for chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) showed the action of different selective forces on the very same gene region, as most CGD substitutions involve aminoacid positions that are conserved in all mammals. As for ERAP2, different computational methods indicated that positive selection has driven the recurrent appearance of protein-destabilizing variants during mammalian evolution. Application of a population-genetics phylogenetics approach showed that purifying selection represented a major force acting on some APP components (e.g. immunoproteasome subunits and chaperones) and allowed identification of positive selection events in the human lineage. We also investigated the evolutionary history of APP genes in human populations by developing a new approach that uses several different tests to identify the selection target, and that integrates low-coverage whole-genome sequencing data with Sanger sequencing. This analysis revealed that 9 APP genes underwent local adaptation in human populations. Most positive selection targets are located within noncoding regions with regulatory function in myeloid cells or act as expression quantitative trait loci. Conversely, balancing selection targeted nonsynonymous variants in TAP1 and CD207 (langerin). Finally, we suggest that selected variants in PSMB10 and CD207 contribute to human phenotypes

  11. Comorbid Analysis of Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders Reveals Differential Evolutionary Constraints

    PubMed Central

    David, Maude M.; Enard, David; Ozturk, Alp; Daniels, Jena; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Diaz-Beltran, Leticia; Wall, Dennis. P.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is substantial. The symptoms of autism overlap with many other human conditions, reflecting common molecular pathologies suggesting that cross-disorder analysis will help prioritize autism gene candidates. Genes in the intersection between autism and related conditions may represent nonspecific indicators of dysregulation while genes unique to autism may play a more causal role. Thorough literature review allowed us to extract 125 ICD-9 codes comorbid to ASD that we mapped to 30 specific human disorders. In the present work, we performed an automated extraction of genes associated with ASD and its comorbid disorders, and found 1031 genes involved in ASD, among which 262 are involved in ASD only, with the remaining 779 involved in ASD and at least one comorbid disorder. A pathway analysis revealed 13 pathways not involved in any other comorbid disorders and therefore unique to ASD, all associated with basal cellular functions. These pathways differ from the pathways associated with both ASD and its comorbid conditions, with the latter being more specific to neural function. To determine whether the sequence of these genes have been subjected to differential evolutionary constraints, we studied long term constraints by looking into Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling, and showed that genes involved in several comorbid disorders seem to have undergone more purifying selection than the genes involved in ASD only. This result was corroborated by a higher dN/dS ratio for genes unique to ASD as compare to those that are shared between ASD and its comorbid disorders. Short-term evolutionary constraints showed the same trend as the pN/pS ratio indicates that genes unique to ASD were under significantly less evolutionary constraint than the genes associated with all other disorders. PMID:27414027

  12. Revealing shared and distinct gene network organization in Arabidopsis immune responses by integrative analysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaobao; Jiang, Zhenhong; Peng, You-Liang; Zhang, Ziding

    2015-03-01

    Pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) are two main plant immune responses to counter pathogen invasion. Genome-wide gene network organizing principles leading to quantitative differences between PTI and ETI have remained elusive. We combined an advanced machine learning method and modular network analysis to systematically characterize the organizing principles of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PTI and ETI at three network resolutions. At the single network node/edge level, we ranked genes and gene interactions based on their ability to distinguish immune response from normal growth and successfully identified many immune-related genes associated with PTI and ETI. Topological analysis revealed that the top-ranked gene interactions tend to link network modules. At the subnetwork level, we identified a subnetwork shared by PTI and ETI encompassing 1,159 genes and 1,289 interactions. This subnetwork is enriched in interactions linking network modules and is also a hotspot of attack by pathogen effectors. The subnetwork likely represents a core component in the coordination of multiple biological processes to favor defense over development. Finally, we constructed modular network models for PTI and ETI to explain the quantitative differences in the global network architecture. Our results indicate that the defense modules in ETI are organized into relatively independent structures, explaining the robustness of ETI to genetic mutations and effector attacks. Taken together, the multiscale comparisons of PTI and ETI provide a systems biology perspective on plant immunity and emphasize coordination among network modules to establish a robust immune response. PMID:25614062

  13. RNA-Seq analysis reveals a six-gene SoxR regulon in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Nawar; Shapiro, Joshua A; Chander, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The redox-regulated transcription factor SoxR is conserved in diverse bacteria, but emerging studies suggest that this protein plays distinct physiological roles in different bacteria. SoxR regulates a global oxidative stress response (involving > 100 genes) against exogenous redox-cycling drugs in Escherichia coli and related enterics. In the antibiotic producers Streptomyces coelicolor and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, however, SoxR regulates a smaller number of genes that encode membrane transporters and proteins with homology to antibiotic-tailoring enzymes. In both S. coelicolor and P. aeruginosa, SoxR-regulated genes are expressed in stationary phase during the production of endogenously-produced redox-active antibiotics. These observations suggest that SoxR evolved to sense endogenous secondary metabolites and activate machinery to process and transport them in antibiotic-producing bacteria. Previous bioinformatics analysis that searched the genome for SoxR-binding sites in putative promoters defined a five-gene SoxR regulon in S. coelicolor including an ABC transporter, two oxidoreductases, a monooxygenase and an epimerase/dehydratase. Since this in silico screen may have missed potential SoxR-targets, we conducted a whole genome transcriptome comparison of wild type S. coelicolor and a soxR-deficient mutant in stationary phase using RNA-Seq. Our analysis revealed a sixth SoxR-regulated gene in S. coelicolor that encodes a putative quinone oxidoreductase. Knowledge of the full complement of genes regulated by SoxR will facilitate studies to elucidate the function of this regulatory molecule in antibiotic producers. PMID:25162599

  14. Revealing Shared and Distinct Gene Network Organization in Arabidopsis Immune Responses by Integrative Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaobao; Jiang, Zhenhong; Peng, You-Liang; Zhang, Ziding

    2015-01-01

    Pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) are two main plant immune responses to counter pathogen invasion. Genome-wide gene network organizing principles leading to quantitative differences between PTI and ETI have remained elusive. We combined an advanced machine learning method and modular network analysis to systematically characterize the organizing principles of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PTI and ETI at three network resolutions. At the single network node/edge level, we ranked genes and gene interactions based on their ability to distinguish immune response from normal growth and successfully identified many immune-related genes associated with PTI and ETI. Topological analysis revealed that the top-ranked gene interactions tend to link network modules. At the subnetwork level, we identified a subnetwork shared by PTI and ETI encompassing 1,159 genes and 1,289 interactions. This subnetwork is enriched in interactions linking network modules and is also a hotspot of attack by pathogen effectors. The subnetwork likely represents a core component in the coordination of multiple biological processes to favor defense over development. Finally, we constructed modular network models for PTI and ETI to explain the quantitative differences in the global network architecture. Our results indicate that the defense modules in ETI are organized into relatively independent structures, explaining the robustness of ETI to genetic mutations and effector attacks. Taken together, the multiscale comparisons of PTI and ETI provide a systems biology perspective on plant immunity and emphasize coordination among network modules to establish a robust immune response. PMID:25614062

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare under Glutathione Reveals High Demand for Thiamin Transport and Antioxidant Protection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qian; Zhang, Weiwen; Zhang, Lu; Qiao, Bin; Pan, Chensong; Yi, Hong; Wang, Lili; Yuan, Ying-jin

    2012-01-01

    Ketogulonicigenium vulgare, though grows poorly when mono-cultured, has been widely used in the industrial production of the precursor of vitamin C with the coculture of Bacillus megaterium. Various efforts have been made to clarify the synergic pattern of this artificial microbial community and to improve the growth and production ability of K. vulgare, but there is still no sound explanation. In previous research, we found that the addition of reduced glutathione into K. vulgare monoculture could significantly improve its growth and productivity. By performing SEM and TEM, we observed that after adding GSH into K. vulgare monoculture, cells became about 4–6 folds elongated, and formed intracytoplasmic membranes (ICM). To explore the molecular mechanism and provide insights into the investigation of the synergic pattern of the co-culture system, we conducted a comparative iTRAQ-2-D-LC-MS/MS-based proteomic analysis of K. vulgare grown under reduced glutathione. Principal component analysis of proteomic data showed that after the addition of glutathione, proteins for thiamin/thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) transport, glutathione transport and the maintenance of membrane integrity, together with several membrane-bound dehydrogenases had significant up-regulation. Besides, several proteins participating in the pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle were also up-regulated. Additionally, proteins combating intracellular reactive oxygen species were also up-regulated, which similarly occurred in K. vulgare when the co-cultured B. megaterium cells lysed from our former research results. This study reveals the demand for transmembrane transport of substrates, especially thiamin, and the demand for antioxidant protection of K. vulgare. PMID:22384164

  16. Analysis of lipids reveals differences between 'Mycobacterium habana' and Mycobacterium simiae.

    PubMed

    Mederos, L M; Valdivia, J A; Sempere, M A; Valero-Guillén, P L

    1998-05-01

    Fatty and mycolic acids and the pattern of glycolipids were studied in a collection of 34 strains of 'Mycobacterium habana' and in two strains of Mycobacterium simiae. Major glycolipids of these micro-organisms were assigned to the glycopeptidolipid (GPL) structural type, but both mycobacteria differed in the patterns obtained by TLC. The strains of 'M. habana' were separated into four groups (A-D), taking into account the presence or absence of several polar GPLs: group A contained GPL-I, GPL-II and GPL-III; group B contained GPL-I, GPL-II', GPL-II and GPL-III; group C contained GPL-II', GPL-II and GPL-III; group D did not contain any of these compounds. Fatty acids of both bacteria were similar, and ranged from 14 to 26 carbon atoms, hexadecanoic, octadecenoic and tuberculostearic acids being predominant. Mycolic acids were also similar by TLC and HPLC, and consisted of alpha-, alpha'- and ketomycolates. Partial structural analysis by MS carried out in strains 'M. habana' TMC 5135 and M. simiae ATCC 25275T revealed that alpha- and ketomycolates ranged, in general, from 79 to 87 carbon atoms, and alpha'-mycolates from 58 to 67 carbon atoms. The alpha- and ketomycolates belonged to several structural series, and minor variations were found between the two strain examined. The data obtained justified the synonymy between 'M. habana' and M. simiae but indicated, in turn, that the former can be distinguished on the basis of GPL analysis. Most strains of 'M. habana' can be defined by the presence of GPL-II and GPL-III, a finding that could be useful in the quality control of potential vaccine strains. PMID:9611792

  17. Adsorption Studies with AFM of Human Plasma Fibrinogen on Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gause, Sheena; Kong, Wendy; Rowe

    2007-11-01

    Fibrinogen (FGN) plays an important role in the clotting of blood. Human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) is a protein that readily adsorbs on biomaterial surfaces. The purpose of this experiment was to use the Atomic Force Microscope to study the adsorption of HPF molecules or FGN onto several silicon surfaces with different orientations and resistivities. The size of the FGN molecules found to be somewhat different of Si(111), (100) and (110) were compared to the size of the FGN molecules in solution (45 nm in length, the end dynodes measures to be 6.5 nm in diameter, and the middle dynode measures to be 5 nm in diameter. For this study, the CPR (Thermo-microscope) Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) was used to observe the amount of fibrinogen molecules adsorbed by Si (111) with a resistance of .0281-.0261 φ cm, Si (111) with a resistance of 1 φ cm, Si (100), and Si (110) surfaces. In finding any single fibrinogen molecules, the appropriate image scans and measurements were taken. After collection and analysis of the data, it was found from AFM that the fibrinogen molecules found on Si (110) mostly resembled fibrinogen molecules found in solution. The other images showed that the fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on Silicon substrates is significantly greater (˜10-20 %) than those in solution.

  18. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-10-15

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  19. Revealing spatio-spectral electroencephalographic dynamics of musical mode and tempo perception by independent component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Music conveys emotion by manipulating musical structures, particularly musical mode- and tempo-impact. The neural correlates of musical mode and tempo perception revealed by electroencephalography (EEG) have not been adequately addressed in the literature. Method This study used independent component analysis (ICA) to systematically assess spatio-spectral EEG dynamics associated with the changes of musical mode and tempo. Results Empirical results showed that music with major mode augmented delta-band activity over the right sensorimotor cortex, suppressed theta activity over the superior parietal cortex, and moderately suppressed beta activity over the medial frontal cortex, compared to minor-mode music, whereas fast-tempo music engaged significant alpha suppression over the right sensorimotor cortex. Conclusion The resultant EEG brain sources were comparable with previous studies obtained by other neuroimaging modalities, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). In conjunction with advanced dry and mobile EEG technology, the EEG results might facilitate the translation from laboratory-oriented research to real-life applications for music therapy, training and entertainment in naturalistic environments. PMID:24581119

  20. What does population structure analysis reveal about the Pterostylis longifolia complex (Orchidaceae)?

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Jasmine K; Steane, Dorothy A; Vaillancourt, René E

    2012-01-01

    Morphologically similar groups of species are common and pose significant challenges for taxonomists. Differences in approaches to classifying unique species can result in some species being overlooked, whereas others are wrongly conserved. The genetic diversity and population structure of the Pterostylis longifolia complex (Orchidaceae) in Tasmania was investigated to determine if four species, and potential hybrids, could be distinguished through genomic AFLP and chloroplast restriction-fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) results indicated that little genetic variation was present among taxa, whereas PCoA analyses revealed genetic variation at a regional scale irrespective of taxa. Population genetic structure analyses identified three clusters that correspond to regional genetic and single taxon-specific phenotypic variation. The results from this study suggest that “longifolia” species have persisted throughout the last glacial maximum in Tasmania and that the complex may be best treated as a single taxon with several morphotypes. These results could have serious evolutionary and conservation implications as taxonomic changes could result in the instatement of a single, widespread taxon in which rarer morphotypes are not protected. PMID:23170201

  1. Phosphoproteomic network analysis in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus reveals new candidates in egg activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongbo; Garcia-Vedrenne, Ana Elisa; Isserlin, Ruth; Lugowski, Andrew; Morada, Anthony; Sun, Alex; Miao, Yishen; Kuzmanov, Uros; Wan, Cuihong; Ma, Hongyue; Foltz, Kathy; Emili, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Fertilization triggers a dynamic symphony of molecular transformations induced by a rapid rise in intracellular calcium. Most prominent are surface alterations, metabolic activation, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell-cycle reentry. While the activation process appears to be broadly evolutionarily conserved, and protein phosphorylation is known to play a key role, the signaling networks mediating the response to fertilization are not well described. To address this gap, we performed a time course phosphoproteomic analysis of egg activation in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, a system that offers biochemical tractability coupled with exquisite synchronicity. By coupling large-scale phosphopeptide enrichment with unbiased quantitative MS, we identified striking changes in global phosphoprotein patterns at 2- and 5-min postfertilization as compared to unfertilized eggs. Overall, we mapped 8796 distinct phosphosite modifications on 2833 phosphoproteins, of which 15% were differentially regulated in early egg activation. Activated kinases were identified by phosphosite mapping, while enrichment analyses revealed conserved signaling cascades not previously associated with egg activation. This work represents the most comprehensive study of signaling associated with egg activation to date, suggesting novel mechanisms that can be experimentally tested and providing a valuable resource for the broader research community. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002239 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002239). PMID:26227301

  2. Genome-wide analysis reveals adaptation to high altitudes in Tibetan sheep.

    PubMed

    Wei, Caihong; Wang, Huihua; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Fuping; Kijas, James W; Ma, Youji; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Li; Cao, Jiaxue; Wu, Mingming; Wang, Guangkai; Liu, Ruizao; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Shuzhen; Liu, Chousheng; Du, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan sheep have lived on the Tibetan Plateau for thousands of years; however, the process and consequences of adaptation to this extreme environment have not been elucidated for important livestock such as sheep. Here, seven sheep breeds, representing both highland and lowland breeds from different areas of China, were genotyped for a genome-wide collection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The FST and XP-EHH approaches were used to identify regions harbouring local positive selection between these highland and lowland breeds, and 236 genes were identified. We detected selection events spanning genes involved in angiogenesis, energy production and erythropoiesis. In particular, several candidate genes were associated with high-altitude hypoxia, including EPAS1, CRYAA, LONP1, NF1, DPP4, SOD1, PPARG and SOCS2. EPAS1 plays a crucial role in hypoxia adaption; therefore, we investigated the exon sequences of EPAS1 and identified 12 mutations. Analysis of the relationship between blood-related phenotypes and EPAS1 genotypes in additional highland sheep revealed that a homozygous mutation at a relatively conserved site in the EPAS1 3' untranslated region was associated with increased mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular volume. Taken together, our results provide evidence of the genetic diversity of highland sheep and indicate potential high-altitude hypoxia adaptation mechanisms, including the role of EPAS1 in adaptation. PMID:27230812

  3. Dynamics of natural killer cell receptor revealed by quantitative analysis of photoswitchable protein.

    PubMed

    Pageon, Sophie V; Aquino, Gerardo; Lagrue, Kathryn; Köhler, Karsten; Endres, Robert G; Davis, Daniel M

    2013-11-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activation is dynamically regulated by numerous activating and inhibitory surface receptors that accumulate at the immune synapse. Quantitative analysis of receptor dynamics has been limited by methodologies that rely on indirect measurements such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Here, we report an apparently novel approach to study how proteins traffic to and from the immune synapse using NK cell receptors tagged with the photoswitchable fluorescent protein tdEosFP, which can be irreversibly photoswitched from a green to red fluorescent state by ultraviolet light. Thus, after a localized switching event, the movement of the photoswitched molecules can be temporally and spatially resolved by monitoring fluorescence in two regions of interest. By comparing images with mathematical models, we evaluated the diffusion coefficient of the receptor KIR2DL1 (0.23 ± 0.06 μm(2) s(-1)) and assessed how synapse formation affects receptor dynamics. Our data conclude that the inhibitory NK cell receptor KIR2DL1 is continually trafficked into the synapse, and remains surprisingly stable there. Unexpectedly, however, in NK cells forming synapses with multiple target cells simultaneously, KIR2DL1 at one synapse can relocate to another synapse. Thus, our results reveal a previously undetected intersynaptic exchange of protein. PMID:24209843

  4. Analysis of cancer genomes reveals basic features of human aging and its role in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Podolskiy, Dmitriy I; Lobanov, Alexei V; Kryukov, Gregory V; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations have long been implicated in aging and disease, but their impact on fitness and function is difficult to assess. Here by analysing human cancer genomes we identify mutational patterns associated with aging. Our analyses suggest that age-associated mutation load and burden double approximately every 8 years, similar to the all-cause mortality doubling time. This analysis further reveals variance in the rate of aging among different human tissues, for example, slightly accelerated aging of the reproductive system. Age-adjusted mutation load and burden correlate with the corresponding cancer incidence and precede it on average by 15 years, pointing to pre-clinical cancer development times. Behaviour of mutation load also exhibits gender differences and late-life reversals, explaining some gender-specific and late-life patterns in cancer incidence rates. Overall, this study characterizes some features of human aging and offers a mechanism for age being a risk factor for the onset of cancer. PMID:27515585

  5. A pangenomic analysis of the Nannochloropsis organellar genomes reveals novel genetic variations in key metabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae in the genus Nannochloropsis are photosynthetic marine Eustigmatophytes of significant interest to the bioenergy and aquaculture sectors due to their ability to efficiently accumulate biomass and lipids for utilization in renewable transportation fuels, aquaculture feed, and other useful bioproducts. To better understand the genetic complement that drives the metabolic processes of these organisms, we present the assembly and comparative pangenomic analysis of the chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes from Nannochloropsis salina CCMP1776. Results The chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of N. salina are 98.4% and 97% identical to their counterparts in Nannochloropsis gaditana. Comparison of the Nannochloropsis pangenome to other algae within and outside of the same phyla revealed regions of significant genetic divergence in key genes that encode proteins needed for regulation of branched chain amino synthesis (acetohydroxyacid synthase), carbon fixation (RuBisCO activase), energy conservation (ATP synthase), protein synthesis and homeostasis (Clp protease, ribosome). Conclusions Many organellar gene modifications in Nannochloropsis are unique and deviate from conserved orthologs found across the tree of life. Implementation of secondary and tertiary structure prediction was crucial to functionally characterize many proteins and therefore should be implemented in automated annotation pipelines. The exceptional similarity of the N. salina and N. gaditana organellar genomes suggests that N. gaditana be reclassified as a strain of N. salina. PMID:24646409

  6. Solutions to Peto's paradox revealed by mathematical modelling and cross-species cancer gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Caulin, Aleah F.; Graham, Trevor A.; Wang, Li-San; Maley, Carlo C.

    2015-01-01

    Whales have 1000-fold more cells than humans and mice have 1000-fold fewer; however, cancer risk across species does not increase with the number of somatic cells and the lifespan of the organism. This observation is known as Peto's paradox. How much would evolution have to change the parameters of somatic evolution in order to equalize the cancer risk between species that differ by orders of magnitude in size? Analysis of previously published models of colorectal cancer suggests that a two- to three-fold decrease in the mutation rate or stem cell division rate is enough to reduce a whale's cancer risk to that of a human. Similarly, the addition of one to two required tumour-suppressor gene mutations would also be sufficient. We surveyed mammalian genomes and did not find a positive correlation of tumour-suppressor genes with increasing body mass and longevity. However, we found evidence of the amplification of TP53 in elephants, MAL in horses and FBXO31 in microbats, which might explain Peto's paradox in those species. Exploring parameters that evolution may have fine-tuned in large, long-lived organisms will help guide future experiments to reveal the underlying biology responsible for Peto's paradox and guide cancer prevention in humans. PMID:26056366

  7. Microbial genomic analysis reveals the essential role of inflammation in bacteria-induced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Janelle C.; Gharaibeh, Raad Z.; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Uronis, Joshua M.; McCafferty, Jonathan; Fodor, Anthony A.; Jobin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteria, especially Escherichia coli, are abundant in patients with inflammatory bowel disease or colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it is unclear whether cancer is promoted by inflammation-induced expansion of E. coli and/or changes in expression of specific microbial genes. Here we use longitudinal (2, 12 and 20 weeks) 16S rRNA sequencing of luminal microbiota from ex-germ free mice to show that inflamed Il10−/− mice maintain a higher abundance of Enterobacteriaceae than healthy wild-type mice. Experiments with mono-colonized Il10−/− mice reveal that host inflammation is necessary for E. coli cancer-promoting activity. RNA-sequence analysis indicates significant changes in E. coli gene catalogue in Il10−/− mice, with changes mostly driven by adaptation to the intestinal environment. Expression of specific genes present in the tumor-promoting E. coli pks island are modulated by inflammation/CRC development. Thus, progression of inflammation in Il10−/− mice supports Enterobacteriaceae and alters a small subset of microbial genes important for tumor development. PMID:25182170

  8. A Simple Geotracer Compositional Correlation Analysis Reveals Oil Charge and Migration Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunlai; Arouri, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach, based on geotracer compositional correlation analysis is reported, which reveals the oil charge sequence and migration pathways for five oil fields in Saudi Arabia. The geotracers utilised are carbazoles, a family of neutral pyrrolic nitrogen compounds known to occur naturally in crude oils. The approach is based on the concept that closely related fields, with respect to filling sequence, will show a higher carbazole compositional correlation, than those fields that are less related. That is, carbazole compositional correlation coefficients can quantify the charge and filling relationships among different fields. Consequently, oil migration pathways can be defined based on the established filling relationships. The compositional correlation coefficients of isomers of C1 and C2 carbazoles, and benzo[a]carbazole for all different combination pairs of the five fields were found to vary extremely widely (0.28 to 0.94). A wide range of compositional correlation coefficients allows adequate differentiation of separate filling relationships. Based on the established filling relationships, three distinct migration pathways were inferred, with each apparently being charged from a different part of a common source kitchen. The recognition of these charge and migration pathways will greatly aid the search for new accumulations. PMID:26965479

  9. Quantitative Glycoproteomics Analysis Reveals Changes in N-Glycosylation Level Associated with Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation plays an important role in epithelial cancers, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However, little is known about the glycoproteome of the human pancreas or its alterations associated with pancreatic tumorigenesis. Using quantitative glycoproteomics approach, we investigated protein N-glycosylation in pancreatic tumor tissue in comparison with normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis tissue. The study lead to the discovery of a roster of glycoproteins with aberrant N-glycosylation level associated with pancreatic cancer, including mucin-5AC (MUC5AC), carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5), insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3), and galectin-3-binding protein (LGALS3BP). Pathway analysis of cancer-associated aberrant glycoproteins revealed an emerging phenomenon that increased activity of N-glycosylation was implicated in several pancreatic cancer pathways, including TGF-β, TNF, NF-kappa-B, and TFEB-related lysosomal changes. In addition, the study provided evidence that specific N-glycosylation sites within certain individual proteins can have significantly altered glycosylation occupancy in pancreatic cancer, reflecting the complexity of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer-associated glycosylation events. PMID:24471499

  10. Global analysis of transcriptionally engaged yeast RNA polymerase III reveals extended tRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Tomasz W.; Leśniewska, Ewa; Delan-Forino, Clementine; Sayou, Camille; Boguta, Magdalena; Tollervey, David

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) synthesizes a range of highly abundant small stable RNAs, principally pre-tRNAs. Here we report the genome-wide analysis of nascent transcripts attached to RNAPIII under permissive and restrictive growth conditions. This revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distributions across transcription units, generally with a predominant 5′ peak. This peak was higher for more heavily transcribed genes, suggesting that initiation site clearance is rate-limiting during RNAPIII transcription. Down-regulation of RNAPIII transcription under stress conditions was found to be uneven; a subset of tRNA genes showed low response to nutrient shift or loss of the major transcription regulator Maf1, suggesting potential “housekeeping” roles. Many tRNA genes were found to generate long, 3′-extended forms due to read-through of the canonical poly(U) terminators. The degree of read-through was anti-correlated with the density of U-residues in the nascent tRNA, and multiple, functional terminators can be located far downstream. The steady-state levels of 3′-extended pre-tRNA transcripts are low, apparently due to targeting by the nuclear surveillance machinery, especially the RNA binding protein Nab2, cofactors for the nuclear exosome, and the 5′-exonuclease Rat1. PMID:27206856

  11. Population-based 3D genome structure analysis reveals driving forces in spatial genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Kalhor, Reza; Dai, Chao; Hao, Shengli; Gong, Ke; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Haochen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Chen, Lin; Alber, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Conformation capture technologies (e.g., Hi-C) chart physical interactions between chromatin regions on a genome-wide scale. However, the structural variability of the genome between cells poses a great challenge to interpreting ensemble-averaged Hi-C data, particularly for long-range and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we present a probabilistic approach for deconvoluting Hi-C data into a model population of distinct diploid 3D genome structures, which facilitates the detection of chromatin interactions likely to co-occur in individual cells. Our approach incorporates the stochastic nature of chromosome conformations and allows a detailed analysis of alternative chromatin structure states. For example, we predict and experimentally confirm the presence of large centromere clusters with distinct chromosome compositions varying between individual cells. The stability of these clusters varies greatly with their chromosome identities. We show that these chromosome-specific clusters can play a key role in the overall chromosome positioning in the nucleus and stabilizing specific chromatin interactions. By explicitly considering genome structural variability, our population-based method provides an important tool for revealing novel insights into the key factors shaping the spatial genome organization. PMID:26951677

  12. Molecular systematic analysis reveals cryptic tertiary diversification of a widespread tropical rain forest tree.

    PubMed

    Dick, Christopher W; Abdul-Salim, Kobinah; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2003-12-01

    The broad geographic range of many Neotropical rain forest tree species implies excellent dispersal abilities or range establishment that preceded the formation of current dispersal barriers. In order to initiate historical analyses of such widespread Neotropical trees, we sequenced the nuclear ribosomal spacer (ITS) region of Symphonia globulifera L. f. (Clusiaceae) from populations spanning the Neotropics and western Africa. This rain forest tree has left unmistakable Miocene fossils in Mesoamerica (15.5-18.2 Ma) and in South America ( approximately 15 Ma). Although marine dispersal of S. globulifera is considered improbable, our study establishes three marine dispersal events leading to the colonization of Mesoamerica, the Amazon basin, and the West Indies, thus supporting the paleontological data. Our phylogeographic analysis revealed the spatial extent of the three Neotropical S. globulifera clades, which represent trans-Andes (Mesoamerica+west Ecuador), cis-Andes (Amazonia+Guiana), and the West Indies. Strong phylogeographic structure found among trans-Andean populations of S. globulifera stands in contrast to an absence of ITS nucleotide variation across the Amazon basin and indicates profound regional differences in the demographic history of this rain forest tree. Drawing from these results, we provide a historical biogeographic hypothesis to account for differences in the patterns of beta diversity within Mesoamerican and Amazonian forests. PMID:14737707

  13. Global analysis of transcriptionally engaged yeast RNA polymerase III reveals extended tRNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Turowski, Tomasz W; Leśniewska, Ewa; Delan-Forino, Clementine; Sayou, Camille; Boguta, Magdalena; Tollervey, David

    2016-07-01

    RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) synthesizes a range of highly abundant small stable RNAs, principally pre-tRNAs. Here we report the genome-wide analysis of nascent transcripts attached to RNAPIII under permissive and restrictive growth conditions. This revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distributions across transcription units, generally with a predominant 5' peak. This peak was higher for more heavily transcribed genes, suggesting that initiation site clearance is rate-limiting during RNAPIII transcription. Down-regulation of RNAPIII transcription under stress conditions was found to be uneven; a subset of tRNA genes showed low response to nutrient shift or loss of the major transcription regulator Maf1, suggesting potential "housekeeping" roles. Many tRNA genes were found to generate long, 3'-extended forms due to read-through of the canonical poly(U) terminators. The degree of read-through was anti-correlated with the density of U-residues in the nascent tRNA, and multiple, functional terminators can be located far downstream. The steady-state levels of 3'-extended pre-tRNA transcripts are low, apparently due to targeting by the nuclear surveillance machinery, especially the RNA binding protein Nab2, cofactors for the nuclear exosome, and the 5'-exonuclease Rat1. PMID:27206856

  14. Temporal analysis of mtDNA variation reveals decreased genetic diversity in least terns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draheim, Hope M.; Baird, Patricia; Haig, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Least Tern (Sternula antillarum) has undergone large population declines over the last century as a result of direct and indirect anthropogenic factors. The genetic implications of these declines are unknown. We used historical museum specimens (pre-1960) and contemporary (2001–2005) samples to examine range-wide phylogeographic patterns and investigate potential loss in the species' genetic variation. We obtained sequences (522 bp) of the mitochondrial gene for NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) from 268 individuals from across the species' range. Phylogeographic analysis revealed no association with geography or traditional subspecies designations. However, we detected potential reductions in genetic diversity in contemporary samples from California and the Atlantic coast Least Tern from that in historical samples, suggesting that current genetic diversity in Least Tern populations is lower than in their pre-1960 counterparts. Our results offer unique insights into changes in the Least Tern's genetic diversity over the past century and highlight the importance and utility of museum specimens in studies of conservation genetics.

  15. Analysis of natural variation reveals neurogenetic networks for Drosophila olfactory behavior.

    PubMed

    Swarup, Shilpa; Huang, Wen; Mackay, Trudy F C; Anholt, Robert R H

    2013-01-15

    Understanding the relationship between genetic variation and phenotypic variation for quantitative traits is necessary for predicting responses to natural and artificial selection and disease risk in human populations, but is challenging because of large sample sizes required to detect and validate loci with small effects. Here, we used the inbred, sequenced, wild-derived lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to perform three complementary genome-wide association (GWA) studies for natural variation in olfactory behavior. The first GWA focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with mean differences in olfactory behavior in the DGRP, the second was an extreme quantitative trait locus GWA on an outbred advanced intercross population derived from extreme DGRP lines, and the third was for SNPs affecting the variance among DGRP lines. No individual SNP in any analysis was associated with variation in olfactory behavior by using a strict threshold accounting for multiple tests, and no SNP overlapped among the analyses. However, combining the top SNPs from all three analyses revealed a statistically enriched network of genes involved in cellular signaling and neural development. We used mutational and gene expression analyses to validate both candidate genes and network connectivity at a high rate. The lack of replication between the GWA analyses, small marginal SNP effects, and convergence on common cellular networks were likely attributable to epistasis. These results suggest that fully understanding the genotype-phenotype relationship requires a paradigm shift from a focus on single SNPs to pathway associations. PMID:23277560

  16. Transcriptional analysis in high-anthocyanin tomatoes reveals synergistic effect of Aft and atv genes.

    PubMed

    Povero, Giovanni; Gonzali, Silvia; Bassolino, Laura; Mazzucato, Andrea; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2011-02-15

    Anthocyanins are high value plant antioxidants, which are not present in the fruits of the cultivated tomato. However, both the dominant gene Anthocyanin fruit (Aft) and the recessive gene atroviolacea (atv), when introgressed into the domesticated tomato from two different wild Solanum species, stimulate a limited anthocyanin pigmentation. Surprisingly, the double mutant Aft/Aft atv/atv gives rise to intensely purple pigmented tomatoes. A transcript profiling analysis was carried out using quantitative RT-PCR and GeneChip(®) Tomato Genome Arrays to identify differentially expressed genes when comparing Ailsa Craig, Aft/Aft, atv/atv, and Aft/Aft atv/atv fruits. Anthocyanin levels and the expression of the genes involved in anthocyanin production and compartmentalization were higher in the peel of Aft/Aft atv/atv fruits than in the individual parental lines. Moreover, a synergistic effect of the two alleles Aft and atv on the transcription of specific anthocyanin genes and the activation of the whole anthocyanin pathway was observed. Among the differentially expressed transcripts, genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway, biotic and abiotic stress responses, cell wall and hormone metabolism were over-represented in Aft/Aft atv/atv fruit peel. Transcriptomic analyses thus revealed that the activation of anthocyanin synthesis in the peel of tomato fruit was accompanied by a complex remodulation of gene expression. PMID:20888667

  17. Rapid Holocene coastal change revealed by high-resolution micropaleontological analysis, Pamlico Sound, North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grand, Pre C.; Culver, S.J.; Mallinson, D.J.; Farrell, K.M.; Corbett, D.R.; Horton, B.P.; Hillier, C.; Riggs, S.R.; Snyder, S.W.; Buzas, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Foraminiferal analyses of 404 contiguous samples, supported by diatom, lithologic, geochronologic and seismic data, reveal both rapid and gradual Holocene paleoenvironmental changes in an 8.21-m vibracore taken from southern Pamlico Sound, North Carolina. Data record initial flooding of a latest Pleistocene river drainage and the formation of an estuary 9000. yr ago. Estuarine conditions were punctuated by two intervals of marine influence from approximately 4100 to 3700 and 1150 to 500. cal. yr BP. Foraminiferal assemblages in the muddy sand facies that accumulated during these intervals contain many well-preserved benthic foraminiferal species, which occur today in open marine settings as deep as the mid shelf, and significant numbers of well-preserved planktonic foraminifera, some typical of Gulf Stream waters. We postulate that these marine-influenced units resulted from temporary destruction of the southern Outer Banks barrier islands by hurricanes. The second increase in marine influence is coeval with increased rate of sea-level rise and a peak in Atlantic tropical cyclone activity during the Medieval Climate Anomaly. This high-resolution analysis demonstrates the range of environmental variability and the rapidity of coastal change that can result from the interplay of changing climate, sea level and geomorphology in an estuarine setting. ?? 2011 University of Washington.

  18. Retrospective stable isotope analysis reveals ecosystem responses to river regulation over the last century.

    PubMed

    Turner, Thomas F; Krabbenhoft, Trevor I; Collyer, Michael L; Krabbenhoft, Corey A; Edwards, Melanie S; Sharp, Zachary D

    2015-12-01

    Disruption of natural flow regimes, nutrient pollution, and other consequences of human population growth and development have impacted most major rivers of the world. Alarming losses of aquatic biodiversity coincide with human-caused river alteration, but effects of biotic homogenization on aquatic ecosystem processes are not as well documented. This is because unaltered systems for comparison are scarce, and some ecosystem-wide effects may take decades to manifest. We evaluated aquatic ecosystem responses to extensive river- floodplain engineering and nutrient addition in the Rio Grande of southwestern North America as revealed by changes in trophic structure of, and resource availability to, the fish community. Stable Isotope Analysis (SIA) was conducted on museum-preserved fishes collected over a 70-year period of intensive river management and exponential human population growth. Trophic complexity and resource heterogeneity for fish consumers (measured as "isotopic niche breadth") decreased following sediment deprivation and channelization, and these effects persist into the present. Increased nutrient inputs led to δ15N enrichment in the entire fish community at all affected sites, and a shift to autochthonous sources of carbon at the most proximal site downstream of wastewater release, probably via bottom-up transfer. Overall, retrospective SIA of apex consumers suggests radical change and functional impairment of a floodplain river ecosystem already marked by significant biodiversity loss. PMID:26909427

  19. Metatranscriptome analysis reveals host-microbiome interactions in traps of carnivorous Genlisea species

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hieu X.; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Pecinka, Ales; Schubert, Ingo; Vu, Giang T. H.

    2015-01-01

    In the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea a unique lobster pot trapping mechanism supplements nutrition in nutrient-poor habitats. A wide spectrum of microbes frequently occurs in Genlisea's leaf-derived traps without clear relevance for Genlisea carnivory. We sequenced the metatranscriptomes of subterrestrial traps vs. the aerial chlorophyll-containing leaves of G. nigrocaulis and of G. hispidula. Ribosomal RNA assignment revealed soil-borne microbial diversity in Genlisea traps, with 92 genera of 19 phyla present in more than one sample. Microbes from 16 of these phyla including proteobacteria, green algae, amoebozoa, fungi, ciliates and metazoans, contributed additionally short-lived mRNA to the metatranscriptome. Furthermore, transcripts of 438 members of hydrolases (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, lipases), mainly resembling those of metazoans, ciliates and green algae, were found. Compared to aerial leaves, Genlisea traps displayed a transcriptional up-regulation of endogenous NADH oxidases generating reactive oxygen species as well as of acid phosphatases for prey digestion. A leaf-vs.-trap transcriptome comparison reflects that carnivory provides inorganic P- and different forms of N-compounds (ammonium, nitrate, amino acid, oligopeptides) and implies the need to protect trap cells against oxidative stress. The analysis elucidates a complex food web inside the Genlisea traps, and suggests ecological relationships between this plant genus and its entrapped microbiome. PMID:26236284

  20. Solutions to Peto's paradox revealed by mathematical modelling and cross-species cancer gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Caulin, Aleah F; Graham, Trevor A; Wang, Li-San; Maley, Carlo C

    2015-07-19

    Whales have 1000-fold more cells than humans and mice have 1000-fold fewer; however, cancer risk across species does not increase with the number of somatic cells and the lifespan of the organism. This observation is known as Peto's paradox. How much would evolution have to change the parameters of somatic evolution in order to equalize the cancer risk between species that differ by orders of magnitude in size? Analysis of previously published models of colorectal cancer suggests that a two- to three-fold decrease in the mutation rate or stem cell division rate is enough to reduce a whale's cancer risk to that of a human. Similarly, the addition of one to two required tumour-suppressor gene mutations would also be sufficient. We surveyed mammalian genomes and did not find a positive correlation of tumour-suppressor genes with increasing body mass and longevity. However, we found evidence of the amplification of TP53 in elephants, MAL in horses and FBXO31 in microbats, which might explain Peto's paradox in those species. Exploring parameters that evolution may have fine-tuned in large, long-lived organisms will help guide future experiments to reveal the underlying biology responsible for Peto's paradox and guide cancer prevention in humans. PMID:26056366

  1. Proteome analysis of Paenibacillus larvae reveals the existence of a putative S-layer protein.

    PubMed

    Fünfhaus, Anne; Genersch, Elke

    2012-04-01

    Honey bee pathology has attracted much interest recently due to the problems with honey bee declines in many regions of the world. American Foulbrood (AFB) caused by Paenibacillus larvae is the most devastating bacterial brood disease of the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera) causing considerable economic losses to beekeepers worldwide. AFB outbreaks are mainly caused by two differentially virulent genotypes of P. larvae, P. larvae ERIC I and ERIC II. To better understand AFB pathogenesis and to complement already existing data from the genetic level we aimed at obtaining expression data from the protein level. We successfully developed a protocol for two-dimensional proteome analysis of P. larvae with subsequent mass-spectrometry based protein sequencing. Based on the obtained master protein maps of P. larvae genotypes ERIC I and II we identified the dominantly expressed cytosolic proteins of both genotypes, some of them presumably linked to pathogenesis and virulence. Comparing the master maps of both genotypes revealed differentially expressed proteins, i.e. a putative S-layer protein which is expressed by P. larvae ERIC II but absent from the proteome of P. larvae ERIC I. The implications of our findings for pathogenesis of AFB and virulence of P. larvae will be discussed. PMID:23757273

  2. GC--MS analysis reveals production of 2--Phenylethanol from Aspergillus niger endophytic in rose.

    PubMed

    Wani, Masood Ahmed; Sanjana, Kaul; Kumar, Dhar Manoj; Lal, Dhar Kanahya

    2010-02-01

    Endophytes include all organisms that during a variable period of their life, colonize the living internal tissues of their hosts without causing detectable symptoms. Several fungal endophytes have been isolated from a variety of plant species which have proved themselves as a rich source of secondary metabolites. The reported natural products from endophytes include antibiotics, immunosuppresants, anticancer compounds, antioxidant agents, etc. For the first time Rosa damacaena (rose) has been explored for its endophytes. The rose oil industry is the major identified deligence for its application in perfumery, flavouring, ointments, and pharmaceuticals including various herbal products. During the present investigation fungal endophytes were isolated from Rosa damacaena. A total of fifty four isolates were isolated out of which sixteen isolates were screened for the production of secondary metabolites. GCMS analysis reveals the production of 2-phenylethanol by one of the isolates JUBT 3M which was identified as Aspergillus niger. This is the first report of production of 2-phenylethanol from endophytic A. niger. 2-phenylethanol is an important constituent of rose oil constituting about 4.06% of rose oil. Presence of 2-phenylethanol indicates that the endophyte of rose may duplicate the biosynthesis of phenyl propanoids by rose plant. Besides this, the other commercial applications of phenylethanol include its use in antiseptics, disinfectants, anti-microbials and preservative in pharmaceuticals. PMID:20082377

  3. Metatranscriptome analysis reveals host-microbiome interactions in traps of carnivorous Genlisea species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hieu X; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Pecinka, Ales; Schubert, Ingo; Vu, Giang T H

    2015-01-01

    In the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea a unique lobster pot trapping mechanism supplements nutrition in nutrient-poor habitats. A wide spectrum of microbes frequently occurs in Genlisea's leaf-derived traps without clear relevance for Genlisea carnivory. We sequenced the metatranscriptomes of subterrestrial traps vs. the aerial chlorophyll-containing leaves of G. nigrocaulis and of G. hispidula. Ribosomal RNA assignment revealed soil-borne microbial diversity in Genlisea traps, with 92 genera of 19 phyla present in more than one sample. Microbes from 16 of these phyla including proteobacteria, green algae, amoebozoa, fungi, ciliates and metazoans, contributed additionally short-lived mRNA to the metatranscriptome. Furthermore, transcripts of 438 members of hydrolases (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, lipases), mainly resembling those of metazoans, ciliates and green algae, were found. Compared to aerial leaves, Genlisea traps displayed a transcriptional up-regulation of endogenous NADH oxidases generating reactive oxygen species as well as of acid phosphatases for prey digestion. A leaf-vs.-trap transcriptome comparison reflects that carnivory provides inorganic P- and different forms of N-compounds (ammonium, nitrate, amino acid, oligopeptides) and implies the need to protect trap cells against oxidative stress. The analysis elucidates a complex food web inside the Genlisea traps, and suggests ecological relationships between this plant genus and its entrapped microbiome. PMID:26236284

  4. Analysis of cancer genomes reveals basic features of human aging and its role in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Podolskiy, Dmitriy I.; Lobanov, Alexei V.; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations have long been implicated in aging and disease, but their impact on fitness and function is difficult to assess. Here by analysing human cancer genomes we identify mutational patterns associated with aging. Our analyses suggest that age-associated mutation load and burden double approximately every 8 years, similar to the all-cause mortality doubling time. This analysis further reveals variance in the rate of aging among different human tissues, for example, slightly accelerated aging of the reproductive system. Age-adjusted mutation load and burden correlate with the corresponding cancer incidence and precede it on average by 15 years, pointing to pre-clinical cancer development times. Behaviour of mutation load also exhibits gender differences and late-life reversals, explaining some gender-specific and late-life patterns in cancer incidence rates. Overall, this study characterizes some features of human aging and offers a mechanism for age being a risk factor for the onset of cancer. PMID:27515585

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis reveals heterogeneity within a seedling tree population of a polyembryonic mango cultivar.

    PubMed

    Winterhagen, Patrick; Wünsche, Jens-Norbert

    2016-05-01

    Within a polyembryonic mango seedling tree population, the genetic background of individuals should be identical because vigorous plants for cultivation are expected to develop from nucellar embryos representing maternal clones. Due to the fact that the mango cultivar 'Hôi' is assigned to the polyembryonic ecotype, an intra-cultivar variability of ethylene receptor genes was unexpected. Ethylene receptors in plants are conserved, but the number of receptors or receptor isoforms is variable regarding different plant species. However, it is shown here that the ethylene receptor MiETR1 is present in various isoforms within the mango cultivar 'Hôi'. The investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms revealed that different MiETR1 isoforms can not be discriminated simply by individual single nucleotide exchanges but by the specific arrangement of single nucleotide polymorphisms at certain positions in the exons of MiETR1. Furthermore, an MiETR1 isoform devoid of introns in the genomic sequence was identified. The investigation demonstrates some limitations of high resolution melting and ScreenClust analysis and points out the necessity of sequencing to identify individual isoforms and to determine the variability within the tree population. PMID:27093244

  6. Genomewide analysis of Drosophila GAGA factor target genes reveals context-dependent DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    van Steensel, Bas; Delrow, Jeffrey; Bussemaker, Harmen J.

    2003-01-01

    The association of sequence-specific DNA-binding factors with their cognate target sequences in vivo depends on the local molecular context, yet this context is poorly understood. To address this issue, we have performed genomewide mapping of in vivo target genes of Drosophila GAGA factor (GAF). The resulting list of ≈250 target genes indicates that GAF regulates many cellular pathways. We applied unbiased motif-based regression analysis to identify the sequence context that determines GAF binding. Our results confirm that GAF selectively associates with (GA)n repeat elements in vivo. GAF binding occurs in upstream regulatory regions, but less in downstream regions. Surprisingly, GAF binds abundantly to introns but is virtually absent from exons, even though the density of (GA)n is roughly the same. Intron binding occurs equally frequently in last introns compared with first introns, suggesting that GAF may not only regulate transcription initiation, but possibly also elongation. We provide evidence for cooperative binding of GAF to closely spaced (GA)n elements and explain the lack of GAF binding to exons by the absence of such closely spaced GA repeats. Our approach for revealing determinants of context-dependent DNA binding will be applicable to many other transcription factors. PMID:12601174

  7. Multiplatform analysis of 12 cancer types reveals molecular classification within and across tissues of origin.

    PubMed

    Hoadley, Katherine A; Yau, Christina; Wolf, Denise M; Cherniack, Andrew D; Tamborero, David; Ng, Sam; Leiserson, Max D M; Niu, Beifang; McLellan, Michael D; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Zhang, Jiashan; Kandoth, Cyriac; Akbani, Rehan; Shen, Hui; Omberg, Larsson; Chu, Andy; Margolin, Adam A; Van't Veer, Laura J; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Laird, Peter W; Raphael, Benjamin J; Ding, Li; Robertson, A Gordon; Byers, Lauren A; Mills, Gordon B; Weinstein, John N; Van Waes, Carter; Chen, Zhong; Collisson, Eric A; Benz, Christopher C; Perou, Charles M; Stuart, Joshua M

    2014-08-14

    Recent genomic analyses of pathologically defined tumor types identify "within-a-tissue" disease subtypes. However, the extent to which genomic signatures are shared across tissues is still unclear. We performed an integrative analysis using five genome-wide platforms and one proteomic platform on 3,527 specimens from 12 cancer types, revealing a unified classification into 11 major subtypes. Five subtypes were nearly identical to their tissue-of-origin counterparts, but several distinct cancer types were found to converge into common subtypes. Lung squamous, head and neck, and a subset of bladder cancers coalesced into one subtype typified by TP53 alterations, TP63 amplifications, and high expression of immune and proliferation pathway genes. Of note, bladder cancers split into three pan-cancer subtypes. The multiplatform classification, while correlated with tissue-of-origin, provides independent information for predicting clinical outcomes. All data sets are available for data-mining from a unified resource to support further biological discoveries and insights into novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25109877

  8. Global Phospholipidomics Analysis Reveals Selective Pulmonary Peroxidation Profiles Upon Inhalation of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralova, Valentina I.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K.; Swedin, Linda; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Fadeel, Bengt; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly believed that nanomaterials cause non-specific oxidative damage. Our mass spectrometry-based oxidative lipidomics analysis of all major phospholipid classes revealed highly selective patterns of pulmonary peroxidation after inhalation exposure of mice to single-walled carbon nanotubes. No oxidized molecular species were found in two most abundant phospholipid classes – phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Peroxidation products were identified in three relatively minor classes of anionic phospholipids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol whereby oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues also showed unusual substrate specificity. This non-random peroxidation coincided with the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the lung. A similar selective phospholipid peroxidation profile was detected upon incubation of a mixture of total lung lipids with H2O2/cytochrome c known to catalyze cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation in apoptotic cells. The characterized specific phospholipid peroxidation signaling pathways indicate new approaches to the development of mitochondria targeted regulators of cardiolipin peroxidation to protect against deleterious effects of pro-apoptotic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the lung. PMID:21800898

  9. Principal component analysis of ensemble recordings reveals cell assemblies at high temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Benchenane, Karim; Khamassi, Mehdi; Wiener, Sidney I.; Battaglia, Francesco P.

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous recordings of many single neurons reveals unique insights into network processing spanning the timescale from single spikes to global oscillations. Neurons dynamically self-organize in subgroups of coactivated elements referred to as cell assemblies. Furthermore, these cell assemblies are reactivated, or replayed, preferentially during subsequent rest or sleep episodes, a proposed mechanism for memory trace consolidation. Here we employ Principal Component Analysis to isolate such patterns of neural activity. In addition, a measure is developed to quantify the similarity of instantaneous activity with a template pattern, and we derive theoretical distributions for the null hypothesis of no correlation between spike trains, allowing one to evaluate the statistical significance of instantaneous coactivations. Hence, when applied in an epoch different from the one where the patterns were identified, (e.g. subsequent sleep) this measure allows to identify times and intensities of reactivation. The distribution of this measure provides information on the dynamics of reactivation events: in sleep these occur as transients rather than as a continuous process. PMID:19529888

  10. A Simple Geotracer Compositional Correlation Analysis Reveals Oil Charge and Migration Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yunlai; Arouri, Khaled

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach, based on geotracer compositional correlation analysis is reported, which reveals the oil charge sequence and migration pathways for five oil fields in Saudi Arabia. The geotracers utilised are carbazoles, a family of neutral pyrrolic nitrogen compounds known to occur naturally in crude oils. The approach is based on the concept that closely related fields, with respect to filling sequence, will show a higher carbazole compositional correlation, than those fields that are less related. That is, carbazole compositional correlation coefficients can quantify the charge and filling relationships among different fields. Consequently, oil migration pathways can be defined based on the established filling relationships. The compositional correlation coefficients of isomers of C1 and C2 carbazoles, and benzo[a]carbazole for all different combination pairs of the five fields were found to vary extremely widely (0.28 to 0.94). A wide range of compositional correlation coefficients allows adequate differentiation of separate filling relationships. Based on the established filling relationships, three distinct migration pathways were inferred, with each apparently being charged from a different part of a common source kitchen. The recognition of these charge and migration pathways will greatly aid the search for new accumulations.

  11. A Simple Geotracer Compositional Correlation Analysis Reveals Oil Charge and Migration Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunlai; Arouri, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach, based on geotracer compositional correlation analysis is reported, which reveals the oil charge sequence and migration pathways for five oil fields in Saudi Arabia. The geotracers utilised are carbazoles, a family of neutral pyrrolic nitrogen compounds known to occur naturally in crude oils. The approach is based on the concept that closely related fields, with respect to filling sequence, will show a higher carbazole compositional correlation, than those fields that are less related. That is, carbazole compositional correlation coefficients can quantify the charge and filling relationships among different fields. Consequently, oil migration pathways can be defined based on the established filling relationships. The compositional correlation coefficients of isomers of C1 and C2 carbazoles, and benzo[a]carbazole for all different combination pairs of the five fields were found to vary extremely widely (0.28 to 0.94). A wide range of compositional correlation coefficients allows adequate differentiation of separate filling relationships. Based on the established filling relationships, three distinct migration pathways were inferred, with each apparently being charged from a different part of a common source kitchen. The recognition of these charge and migration pathways will greatly aid the search for new accumulations. PMID:26965479

  12. Global phospholipidomics analysis reveals selective pulmonary peroxidation profiles upon inhalation of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tyurina, Yulia Y; Kisin, Elena R; Murray, Ashley; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Kapralova, Valentina I; Sparvero, Louis J; Amoscato, Andrew A; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K; Swedin, Linda; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Fadeel, Bengt; Shvedova, Anna A; Kagan, Valerian E

    2011-09-27

    It is commonly believed that nanomaterials cause nonspecific oxidative damage. Our mass spectrometry-based oxidative lipidomics analysis of all major phospholipid classes revealed highly selective patterns of pulmonary peroxidation after inhalation exposure of mice to single-walled carbon nanotubes. No oxidized molecular species were found in the two most abundant phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Peroxidation products were identified in three relatively minor classes of anionic phospholipids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol, whereby oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues also showed unusual substrate specificity. This nonrandom peroxidation coincided with the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the lung. A similar selective phospholipid peroxidation profile was detected upon incubation of a mixture of total lung lipids with H(2)O(2)/cytochrome c known to catalyze cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation in apoptotic cells. The characterized specific phospholipid peroxidation signaling pathways indicate new approaches to the development of mitochondria-targeted regulators of cardiolipin peroxidation to protect against deleterious effects of pro-apoptotic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the lung. PMID:21800898

  13. Analysis of COX2 mutants reveals cytochrome oxidase subassemblies in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Cytochrome oxidase catalyses the reduction of oxygen to water. The mitochondrial enzyme contains up to 13 subunits, 11 in yeast, of which three, Cox1p, Cox2p and Cox3p, are mitochondrially encoded. The assembly pathway of this complex is still poorly understood. Its study in yeast has been so far impeded by the rapid turnover of unassembled subunits of the enzyme. In the present study, immunoblot analysis of blue native gels of yeast wild-type and Cox2p mutants revealed five cytochrome oxidase complexes or subcomplexes: a, b, c, d and f; a is likely to be the fully assembled enzyme; b lacks Cox6ap; d contains Cox7p and/or Cox7ap; f represents unassembled Cox1p; and c, observed only in the Cox2p mutants, contains Cox1p, Cox3p, Cox5p and Cox6p and lacks the other subunits. The identification of these novel cytochrome oxidase subcomplexes should encourage the reexamination of other yeast mutants. PMID:15921494

  14. Genome-sequence analysis of Acinetobacter johnsonii MB44 reveals potential nematode-virulent factors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shijing; Ali, Muhammad; Xie, Li; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii is generally recognized as a nonpathogenic bacterium although it is often found in hospital environments. However, a newly identified isolate of this species from a frost-plant-tissue sample, namely, A. johnsonii MB44, showed significant nematicidal activity against the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. To expand our understanding of this bacterial species, we generated a draft genome sequence of MB44 and analyzed its genomic features related to nematicidal attributes. The 3.36 Mb long genome contains 3636 predicted protein-coding genes and 95 RNA genes (including 14 rRNA genes), with a G + C content of 41.37 %. Genomic analysis of the prediction of nematicidal proteins using the software MP3 revealed a total of 108 potential virulence proteins. Some of these proteins were homologous to the known virulent proteins identified from Acinetobacter baumannii, a pathogenic species of the genus Acinetobacter. These virulent proteins included the outer membrane protein A, the phospholipase D, and penicillin-binding protein 7/8. Moreover, one siderophore biosynthesis gene cluster and one capsular polysaccharide gene cluster, which were predicted to be important virulence factors for C. elegans, were identified in the MB44 genome. The current study demonstrated that A. johnsonii MB44, with its nematicidal activity, could be an opportunistic pathogen to animals. PMID:27429894

  15. Comprehensive Tissue-Specific Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Regulatory Programs during Early Tomato Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Richard J; Csukasi, Fabiana; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; van der Knaap, Esther; Catalá, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Fruit formation and early development involve a range of physiological and morphological transformations of the various constituent tissues of the ovary. These developmental changes vary considerably according to tissue type, but molecular analyses at an organ-wide level inevitably obscure many tissue-specific phenomena. We used laser-capture microdissection coupled to high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze the transcriptome of ovaries and fruit tissues of the wild tomato species Solanum pimpinellifolium. This laser-capture microdissection-high-throughput RNA sequencing approach allowed quantitative global profiling of gene expression at previously unobtainable levels of spatial resolution, revealing numerous contrasting transcriptome profiles and uncovering rare and cell type-specific transcripts. Coexpressed gene clusters linked specific tissues and stages to major transcriptional changes underlying the ovary-to-fruit transition and provided evidence of regulatory modules related to cell division, photosynthesis, and auxin transport in internal fruit tissues, together with parallel specialization of the pericarp transcriptome in stress responses and secondary metabolism. Analysis of transcription factor expression and regulatory motifs indicated putative gene regulatory modules that may regulate the development of different tissues and hormonal processes. Major alterations in the expression of hormone metabolic and signaling components illustrate the complex hormonal control underpinning fruit formation, with intricate spatiotemporal variations suggesting separate regulatory programs. PMID:26099271

  16. AKAP Signaling in Reinstated Cocaine Seeking Revealed by iTRAQ Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reissner, Kathryn J.; Uys, Joachim D.; Schwacke, John H.; Comte-Walters, Susanna; Rutherford-Bethard, Jennifer L.; Dunn, Thomas E.; Blumer, Joe B.; Schey, Kevin L.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify candidate proteins in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as potential pharmacotherapeutic targets for treating cocaine addition, an 8-plex iTRAQ proteomic screen was performed using NAc tissue obtained from rats trained to self-administer cocaine followed by extinction training. Compared to yoked-saline controls, 42 proteins in a postsynaptic density (PSD)-enriched subfraction of the NAc from cocaine-trained animals were identified as significantly changed. Among proteins of interest whose levels were identified as increased was AKAP79/150, the rat ortholog of human AKAP5, a PSD scaffolding protein that localizes signaling molecules to the synapse. Functional down-regulation of AKAP79/150 by microinjecting a cell-permeable synthetic AKAP peptide into the NAc in order to disrupt AKAP-dependent signaling revealed that inhibition of AKAP signaling impaired the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. Reinstatement of cocaine-seeking is thought to require upregulated surface expression of AMPA glutamate receptors, and the inhibitory AKAP peptide reduced the PSD content of PKA as well as surface expression of GluR1 in NAc. However, reduced surface expression was not associated with changes in PKA phosphorylation of GluR1. This series of experiments demonstrates that proteomic analysis provides a useful tool for identifying proteins that can regulate cocaine relapse, and that AKAP proteins may contribute to relapse vulnerability by promoting increased surface expression of AMPA receptors in the NAc. PMID:21490206

  17. AKAP signaling in reinstated cocaine seeking revealed by iTRAQ proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Reissner, Kathryn J; Uys, Joachim D; Schwacke, John H; Comte-Walters, Susanna; Rutherford-Bethard, Jennifer L; Dunn, Thomas E; Blumer, Joe B; Schey, Kevin L; Kalivas, Peter W

    2011-04-13

    To identify candidate proteins in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as potential pharmacotherapeutic targets for treating cocaine addition, an 8-plex iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) proteomic screen was performed using NAc tissue obtained from rats trained to self-administer cocaine followed by extinction training. Compared with yoked-saline controls, 42 proteins in a postsynaptic density (PSD)-enriched subfraction of the NAc from cocaine-trained animals were identified as significantly changed. Among proteins of interest whose levels were identified as increased was AKAP79/150, the rat ortholog of human AKAP5, a PSD scaffolding protein that localizes signaling molecules to the synapse. Functional downregulation of AKAP79/150 by microinjecting a cell-permeable synthetic AKAP (A-kinase anchor protein) peptide into the NAc to disrupt AKAP-dependent signaling revealed that inhibition of AKAP signaling impaired the reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Reinstatement of cocaine seeking is thought to require upregulated surface expression of AMPA glutamate receptors, and the inhibitory AKAP peptide reduced the PSD content of protein kinase A (PKA) as well as surface expression of GluR1 in NAc. However, reduced surface expression was not associated with changes in PKA phosphorylation of GluR1. This series of experiments demonstrates that proteomic analysis provides a useful tool for identifying proteins that can regulate cocaine relapse and that AKAP proteins may contribute to relapse vulnerability by promoting increased surface expression of AMPA receptors in the NAc. PMID:21490206

  18. Population analysis of microsatellite genotypes reveals a signature associated with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fonville, Natalie C; Vaksman, Zalman; McIver, Lauren J; Garner, Harold R

    2015-05-10

    Ovarian cancer (OV) ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women, yet there remain few informative biomarkers for this disease. Microsatellites are repetitive genomic regions which we hypothesize could be a source of novel biomarkers for OV and have traditionally been under-appreciated relative to Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). In this study, we explore microsatellite variation as a potential novel source of genomic variation associated with OV. Exomes from 305 OV patient germline samples and 54 tumors, sequenced as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas, were analyzed for microsatellite variation and compared to healthy females sequenced as part of the 1,000 Genomes Project. We identified a subset of 60 microsatellite loci with genotypes that varied significantly between the OV and healthy female populations. Using these loci as a signature set, we classified germline genomes as 'at risk' for OV with a sensitivity of 90.1% and a specificity of 87.6%. Cross-analysis with a similar set of breast cancer associated loci identified individuals 'at risk' for both diseases. This study revealed a genotype-based microsatellite signature present in the germlines of individuals diagnosed with OV, and provides the basis for a potential novel risk assessment diagnostic for OV and new personal genomics targets in tumors. PMID:25779658

  19. Analysis of a transgenic Oct4 enhancer reveals high fidelity long-range chromosomal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Mingyang; Gao, Fan; Zhang, Peilin; An, Woojin; Shi, Jiandang; Wang, Kai; Lu, Wange

    2015-01-01

    Genome structure or nuclear organization has fascinated researchers investigating genome function. Recently, much effort has gone into defining relationships between specific genome structures and gene expression in pluripotent cells. We previously analyzed chromosomal interactions of the endogenous Oct4 distal enhancer in pluripotent cells. Here, we derive ES and iPS cells from a transgenic Oct4 distal enhancer reporter mouse. Using sonication-based Circularized Chromosome Conformation Capture (4C) coupled with next generation sequencing, we determined and compared the genome-wide interactome of the endogenous and transgenic Oct4 distal enhancers. Integrative genomic analysis indicated that the transgenic enhancer binds to a similar set of loci and shares similar key enrichment profiles with its endogenous counterpart. Both the endogenous and transgenic Oct4 enhancer interacting loci were enriched in the open nucleus compartment, which is associated with active histone marks (H3K4me1, H3K27ac, H3K4me3 and H3K9ac), active cis-regulatory sequences (DNA hypersensitivity sites (DHS)), 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmc), and early DNA replication domains. In addition, binding of some pluripotency-related transcription factors was consistently enriched in our 4C sites, and genes in those sites were generally more highly expressed. Overall, our work reveals critical features that may function in gene expression regulation in mouse pluripotent cells. PMID:26435056

  20. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies. PMID:26758200

  1. The complement system of elasmobranches revealed by liver transcriptome analysis of a hammerhead shark, Sphyrna zygaena.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Reo; Matsushita, Misao; Nonaka, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Comprehensive studies of the complement genes in basal vertebrates have revealed that cyclostomes have apparently primitive complement systems whereas bony fish have well-developed complement systems comparable to those of mammals. Here we have performed liver transcriptome analysis of a hammerhead shark, Sphyrna zygaeana, to elucidate the early history of vertebrate complement evolution. Identified genes were; one C1qB, one C1r, one C1s, one MASP-1/-3, one MASP-2, two factor B/C2, one C3, three C4, one C5, one C6, one C7, one C8A, three C8B, one C8G, one C9, two factor I and one S protein. No MBL, ficolin, C1qA or C1qC were found. These results indicate that the lectin, classical, alternative and lytic pathways were established in the common ancestor of jawed vertebrates. In addition to the absence of MBL and ficolin, the MASP transcripts lacked the serine protease domain, suggesting that the lectin pathway was lost in the hammerhead shark lineage. PMID:26987526

  2. Analysis of the community structure of abyssal kinetoplastids revealed similar communities at larger spatial scales

    PubMed Central

    Salani, Faezeh Shah; Arndt, Hartmut; Hausmann, Klaus; Nitsche, Frank; Scheckenbach, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial scales of diversity is necessary to evaluate the mechanisms driving biodiversity and biogeography in the vast but poorly understood deep sea. The community structure of kinetoplastids, an important group of microbial eukaryotes belonging to the Euglenozoa, from all abyssal plains of the South Atlantic and two areas of the eastern Mediterranean was studied using partial small subunit ribosomal DNA gene clone libraries. A total of 1364 clones from 10 different regions were retrieved. The analysis revealed statistically not distinguishable communities from both the South-East Atlantic (Angola and Guinea Basin) and the South-West Atlantic (Angola and Brazil Basin) at spatial scales of 1000–3000 km, whereas all other communities were significantly differentiated from one another. It seems likely that multiple processes operate at the same time to shape communities of deep-sea kinetoplastids. Nevertheless, constant and homogenous environmental conditions over large spatial scales at abyssal depths, together with high dispersal capabilities of microbial eukaryotes, maintain best the results of statistically indistinguishable communities at larger spatial scales. PMID:22071346

  3. Genome-wide analysis reveals adaptation to high altitudes in Tibetan sheep

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Caihong; Wang, Huihua; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Fuping; Kijas, James W.; Ma, Youji; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Li; Cao, Jiaxue; Wu, Mingming; Wang, Guangkai; Liu, Ruizao; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Shuzhen; Liu, Chousheng; Du, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Tibetan sheep have lived on the Tibetan Plateau for thousands of years; however, the process and consequences of adaptation to this extreme environment have not been elucidated for important livestock such as sheep. Here, seven sheep breeds, representing both highland and lowland breeds from different areas of China, were genotyped for a genome-wide collection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The FST and XP-EHH approaches were used to identify regions harbouring local positive selection between these highland and lowland breeds, and 236 genes were identified. We detected selection events spanning genes involved in angiogenesis, energy production and erythropoiesis. In particular, several candidate genes were associated with high-altitude hypoxia, including EPAS1, CRYAA, LONP1, NF1, DPP4, SOD1, PPARG and SOCS2. EPAS1 plays a crucial role in hypoxia adaption; therefore, we investigated the exon sequences of EPAS1 and identified 12 mutations. Analysis of the relationship between blood-related phenotypes and EPAS1 genotypes in additional highland sheep revealed that a homozygous mutation at a relatively conserved site in the EPAS1 3′ untranslated region was associated with increased mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular volume. Taken together, our results provide evidence of the genetic diversity of highland sheep and indicate potential high-altitude hypoxia adaptation mechanisms, including the role of EPAS1 in adaptation. PMID:27230812

  4. Differential proteomic analysis of STAT6 knockout mice reveals new regulatory function in liver lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Iff, Joël; Wang, Wei; Sajic, Tatjana; Oudry, Nathalie; Gueneau, Estelle; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel; Szanto, Ildiko

    2009-10-01

    Increased inflammatory signaling is a key feature of metabolic disorders. In this context, the role of increased pro-inflammatory signals has been extensively studied. By contrast, no efforts have been dedicated to study the contrasting scenario: the attenuation of anti-inflammatory signals and their role in metabolic homeostasis. IL-4 and IL-13 are anti-inflammatory cytokines signaling through the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 6 (STAT6). Our study was aimed at evaluating the lack of STAT6 signaling on liver homeostasis. To this end we analyzed the liver proteome of wild type and STAT6 knock-out mice using 2D nanoscale LC-MS/MS with iTRAQ labeling technique. The coordinated changes in proteins identified by this quantitative proteome analysis indicated disturbed lipid homeostasis and a state of hepatocellular stress. Most significantly, the expression of the liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1) was increased in the knock-out mice. In line with the elevated FABP1 expression we found latent liver lipid accumulation in the STAT6-deficient mice which was further aggravated when mice were challenged by a high fat diet. In conclusion, our study revealed a so far uncharacterized role for STAT6 in regulating liver lipid homeostasis and demonstrates the importance of anti-inflammatory signaling in the defense against the development of liver steatosis. PMID:19663508

  5. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis reveals the pattern and tempo of bony fish evolution

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Richard E.; Betancur-R., Ricardo; Li, Chenhong; Arratia, Gloria; Ortí, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Over half of all vertebrates are “fishes”, which exhibit enormous diversity in morphology, physiology, behavior, reproductive biology, and ecology. Investigation of fundamental areas of vertebrate biology depend critically on a robust phylogeny of fishes, yet evolutionary relationships among the major actinopterygian and sarcopterygian lineages have not been conclusively resolved. Although a consensus phylogeny of teleosts has been emerging recently, it has been based on analyses of various subsets of actinopterygian taxa, but not on a full sample of all bony fishes. Here we conducted a comprehensive phylogenetic study on a broad taxonomic sample of 61 actinopterygian and sarcopterygian lineages (with a chondrichthyan outgroup) using a molecular data set of 21 independent loci. These data yielded a resolved phylogenetic hypothesis for extant Osteichthyes, including 1) reciprocally monophyletic Sarcopterygii and Actinopterygii, as currently understood, with polypteriforms as the first diverging lineage within Actinopterygii; 2) a monophyletic group containing gars and bowfin (= Holostei) as sister group to teleosts; and 3) the earliest diverging lineage among teleosts being Elopomorpha, rather than Osteoglossomorpha. Relaxed-clock dating analysis employing a set of 24 newly applied fossil calibrations reveals divergence times that are more consistent with paleontological estimates than previous studies. Establishing a new phylogenetic pattern with accurate divergence dates for bony fishes illustrates several areas where the fossil record is incomplete and provides critical new insights on diversification of this important vertebrate group. PMID:23788273

  6. Genomic Analysis Reveals the Molecular Basis for Capsule Loss in the Group B Streptococcus Population

    PubMed Central

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B. Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl trasferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity. PMID:25946017

  7. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity. PMID:25946017

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of Lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 reveals its genetic adaptation and potential probiotic profiles* #

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Li, Xuan; Gu, Qing; Lou, Xiu-yu; Zhang, Xiao-mei; Song, Da-feng; Zhang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In previous studies, Lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 showed probiotic properties, such as antimicrobial activity against various pathogens and the capacity to significantly improve pig growth and pork quality. The purpose of this study was to reveal the genes potentially related to its genetic adaptation and probiotic profiles based on comparative genomic analysis. Methods: The genome sequence of L. plantarum ZJ316 was compared with those of eight L. plantarum strains deposited in GenBank. BLASTN, Mauve, and MUMmer programs were used for genome alignment and comparison. CRISPRFinder was applied for searching the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Results: We identified genes that encode proteins related to genetic adaptation and probiotic profiles, including carbohydrate transport and metabolism, proteolytic enzyme systems and amino acid biosynthesis, CRISPR adaptive immunity, stress responses, bile salt resistance, ability to adhere to the host intestinal wall, exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis, and bacteriocin biosynthesis. Conclusions: Comparative characterization of the L. plantarum ZJ316 genome provided the genetic basis for further elucidating the functional mechanisms of its probiotic properties. ZJ316 could be considered a potential probiotic candidate. PMID:27487802

  9. Comparative genome analysis reveals the molecular basis of nicotine degradation and survival capacities of Arthrobacter

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuxiang; Tang, Hongzhi; Su, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Arthrobacter is one of the most prevalent genera of nicotine-degrading bacteria; however, studies of nicotine degradation in Arthrobacter species remain at the plasmid level (plasmid pAO1). Here, we report the bioinformatic analysis of a nicotine-degrading Arthrobacter aurescens M2012083, and show that the moeB and mogA genes that are essential for nicotine degradation in Arthrobacter are absent from plasmid pAO1. Homologues of all the nicotine degradation-related genes of plasmid pAO1 were found to be located on a 68,622-bp DNA segment (nic segment-1) in the M2012083 genome, showing 98.1% nucleotide acid sequence identity to the 69,252-bp nic segment of plasmid pAO1. However, the rest sequence of plasmid pAO1 other than the nic segment shows no significant similarity to the genome sequence of strain M2012083. Taken together, our data suggest that the nicotine degradation-related genes of strain M2012083 are located on the chromosome or a plasmid other than pAO1. Based on the genomic sequence comparison of strain M2012083 and six other Arthrobacter strains, we have identified 17 σ70 transcription factors reported to be involved in stress responses and 109 genes involved in environmental adaptability of strain M2012083. These results reveal the molecular basis of nicotine degradation and survival capacities of Arthrobacter species. PMID:25721465

  10. Evolution and Functional Implications of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle as Revealed by Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, João Henrique Frota; Esteves-Ferreira, Alberto A.; Quinhones, Carla G.S.; Pereira-Lima, Italo A.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Araújo, Wagner L.

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a crucial component of respiratory metabolism, is composed of a set of eight enzymes present in the mitochondrial matrix. However, most of the TCA cycle enzymes are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes. In addition, evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. For this reason, we here analyzed the evolutionary history of all TCA cycle enzymes in attempt to better understand the origin of these nuclear-encoded proteins. Our results indicate that prior to endosymbiotic events the TCA cycle seemed to operate only as isolated steps in both the host (eubacterial cell) and mitochondria (alphaproteobacteria). The origin of isoforms present in different cell compartments might be associated either with gene-transfer events which did not result in proper targeting of the protein to mitochondrion or with duplication events. Further in silico analyses allow us to suggest new insights into the possible roles of TCA cycle enzymes in different tissues. Finally, we performed coexpression analysis using mitochondrial TCA cycle genes revealing close connections among these genes most likely related to the higher efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in this specialized organelle. Moreover, these analyses allowed us to identify further candidate genes which might be used for metabolic engineering purposes given the importance of the TCA cycle during development and/or stress situations. PMID:25274566

  11. The Immersive Virtual Reality Experience: A Typology of Users Revealed Through Multiple Correspondence Analysis Combined with Cluster Analysis Technique.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Pedro J; Morais, Diogo; Gamito, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Saraiva, Tomaz

    2016-03-01

    Immersive virtual reality is thought to be advantageous by leading to higher levels of presence. However, and despite users getting actively involved in immersive three-dimensional virtual environments that incorporate sound and motion, there are individual factors, such as age, video game knowledge, and the predisposition to immersion, that may be associated with the quality of virtual reality experience. Moreover, one particular concern for users engaged in immersive virtual reality environments (VREs) is the possibility of side effects, such as cybersickness. The literature suggests that at least 60% of virtual reality users report having felt symptoms of cybersickness, which reduces the quality of the virtual reality experience. The aim of this study was thus to profile the right user to be involved in a VRE through head-mounted display. To examine which user characteristics are associated with the most effective virtual reality experience (lower cybersickness), a multiple correspondence analysis combined with cluster analysis technique was performed. Results revealed three distinct profiles, showing that the PC gamer profile is more associated with higher levels of virtual reality effectiveness, that is, higher predisposition to be immersed and reduced cybersickness symptoms in the VRE than console gamer and nongamer. These findings can be a useful orientation in clinical practice and future research as they help identify which users are more predisposed to benefit from immersive VREs. PMID:26985781

  12. Functionalisation of gold surfaces with thiolate SAMs: Topography/bioactivity relationship A combined FT-RAIRS, AFM and QCM investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, E.; Gu, C.; Boujday, S.; Salmain, M.; Herry, J. M.; Pradier, C. M.

    2007-09-01

    Immobilisation of rabbit immunoglobulin G (rIgG) was performed by affinity binding to protein A (PrA) covalently bound to three different thiolate self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), (i) a mixed SAM of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and mercaptohexanol (C6OH) at a molar ratio of 1-3, (ii) a pure SAM of MUA and (iii) a pure SAM of cystamine (CA). A comparative study of anti-rIgG recognition process on these three surfaces was achieved in order to assess the influence of the attachment layer topography and composition upon the sensor quality. Functionalised gold-coated surfaces were charact