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Sample records for afm atomic force

  1. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical tweezers (AFM/OT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, F.; Zembrzycki, K.; Nakielski, P.; Pawłowska, S.; Kowalewski, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    The role of mechanical properties is essential to understand molecular, biological materials, and nanostructures dynamics and interaction processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the most commonly used method of direct force evaluation, but due to its technical limitations this single probe technique is unable to detect forces with femtonewton resolution. In this paper we present the development of a combined atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers (AFM/OT) instrument. The focused laser beam, on which optical tweezers are based, provides us with the ability to manipulate small dielectric objects and to use it as a high spatial and temporal resolution displacement and force sensor in the same AFM scanning zone. We demonstrate the possibility to develop a combined instrument with high potential in nanomechanics, molecules manipulation and biological studies. AFM/OT equipment is described and characterized by studying the ability to trap dielectric objects and quantifying the detectable and applicable forces. Finally, optical tweezers calibration methods and instrument applications are given.

  2. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  3. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  4. Strength by atomic force microscopy (AFM): Molecular dynamics of water layer squeezing on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, K.; Dhir, Aman; Yong, Chin W.

    2010-11-01

    Localised strength testing of materials is often carried out in an atomic force microscope (AFM), as foreseen by Kelly in his book Strong Solids (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1966). During AFM indentation experiments, contamination can strongly influence the observed strength and theoretical interpretation of the results is a major problem. Here, we use molecular dynamics computer modelling to describe the contact of NaCl and MgO crystal probes onto surfaces, comparable to an AFM experiment. Clean NaCl gave elastic, brittle behaviour in contact simulations at 300 K, whereas MgO was more plastic, leading to increased toughness. This paper also considers the strength of an oxide substrate contaminated by water molecules and tested by indentation with a pyramidal probe of oxide crystal. Recent theory on the effect of liquid contaminant layers on surface strength has been mainly focussed on Lennard Jones (LJ) molecules with some studies on alcohols and water, described by molecular dynamics, which allows the molecules to be squeezed out as the crystal lattice is deformed. In this work, we have focused on water by studying the forces between a magnesium oxide (MgO) atomic force microscope (AFM) probe and an MgO slab. Force versus separation has been plotted as the AFM probe was moved towards and away from the substrate. Simulation results showed that the water layers could be removed in steps, giving up to four force peaks. The last monolayer of water could not be squeezed out, even at pressures where MgO deformed plastically. Interestingly, with water present, strength was reduced, but more in tensile than compressive measurements. In conclusion, water contaminating the oxide surface in AFM strength testing is structured. Water layer squeezing removal can be predicted by molecular modelling, which may be verified by AFM experiments to show that water can influence the strength of perfect crystals at the nanometre scale.

  5. Radiation pressure excitation of Low Temperature Atomic Force & Magnetic Force Microscope (LT-AFM/MFM) for Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karci, Ozgur; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet; NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd. Team; Middle East Tech Univ Team

    2015-03-01

    We describe a novel method for excitation of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilevers by means of radiation pressure for imaging in an AFM for the first time. Piezo excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, but it may cause spurious resonance peaks. A fiber optic interferometer with 1310 nm laser was used both to measure the deflection of cantilever and apply a force to the cantilever in a LT-AFM/MFM from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever`s resonance frequency by a digital Phase Lock Loop (PLL). The force exerted by the radiation pressure on a perfectly reflecting surface by a laser beam of power P is F = 2P/c. We typically modulate the laser beam by ~ 800 μW and obtain 10nm oscillation amplitude with Q ~ 8,000 at 2.5x10-4 mbar. The cantilever's stiffness can be accurately calibrated by using the radiation pressure. We have demonstrated performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging a hard disk sample between 4-300K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO single crystal at 4K to for the first time.

  6. An AFM study of the chlorite-fluid interface. [Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vrdoljak, G.A.; Henderson, G.S.; Fawcett, J.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Chlorite is a ubiquitous mineral in many geologic environments and plays an important role in elemental adsorption and retention in soils. Chlorite has a 2:1 layer structure consisting of two tetrahedral sheets with an octahedral sheet between them (talc-like layer). The 2:1 layer is charge balanced and hydrogen-bonded by an interlayer of MgOH[sub 6] octahedra (brucite-like layer). The nature of chlorite's structure, its ease of imaging, and perfect 001 cleavage, make this mineral an ideal substrate for use in elemental adsorption studies in solution, with the AFM. The 001 cleavage plane of a 2b polytype with composition (Mg[sub 4.4]Fe[sub 0.6]Al[sub 1.0])[(Si[sub 2.9]Al[sub 1.1])]O[sub 10](OH)[sub g] has been imaged in air, water, and oil by atomic force microscopy. Dissolution features are observed in water, showing sub-micron features dissolving in real-time. Atomic resolution of both the talc-like and brucite-like layers has been obtained in air. However, only the tetrahedral sheet of the talc-like layer has been imaged at atomic resolution in oil and water, which may indicate a structural instability of the brucite-like surface in solution. Measurements of the unit-cell dimensions (a and b) for the talc-like layer in the three different media indicate a structural expansion of the mineral surface in solution. The a unit cell dimension expands by 7.4 [+-] 0.1% when in water; conversely, the b dimension varies greatly when in oil ([minus]10% to +20%), relative to air. The effects of these solution media on the structure of chlorite are revealed by characterization with the AFM. This information should prove useful in future studies of adsorption onto layer silicates.

  7. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  8. Simultaneous non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM)/STM imaging and force spectroscopy of Si(1 0 0)(2×1) with small oscillation amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özer, H. Özgür; Atabak, Mehrdad; Ellialtıoğlu, Recai M.; Oral, Ahmet

    2002-03-01

    Si(1 0 0)(2×1) surface is imaged using a new non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM)/STM with sub-Ångström oscillation amplitudes using stiff tungsten levers. Simultaneous force gradient and STM images of individual dimers and atomic scale defects are obtained. We measured force-distance ( f- d) curves with different tips. Some of the tips show long force interactions, whereas some others resolve short-range interatomic force interactions. We observed that the tips showing short-range force interaction give atomic resolution in force gradient scans. This result suggests that short-range force interactions are responsible for atomic resolution in nc-AFM.

  9. Sequential adaptation in latent tuberculosis bacilli: observation by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Zhavnerko, Gennady Konstantinovich; Merza, Muayad Aghali; Ghanavi, Jalladein; Tabarsi, Payam; Farnia, Poopak; Poleschuyk, Nikolai Nikolaevich; Ignatyev, George

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can persist within the human host for years without causing disease, in a syndrome known as latent tuberculosis. The mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis establishes a latent metabolic state is unknown, but it is hypothesized that reduced oxygen tension may trigger the bacillus to enter a state of latency. Therefore, we are studying anaerobic culture of M. tuberculosis (H37RV) as a model of latency. For the first time, the sequential adaptation of latent bacilli (every 90 days for 48 months) viewed under Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Two types of adaptation were observed and are described here. First, cells are undergoing temporary adaptation (from 1 to 18 months of latency) that includes; thickening of cell wall (20.5±1.8 nm versus 15.2±1.8 nm, P<0.05), formation of ovoid cells by "folding phenomena"(65-70%), size reduction (0.8±0.1 μm versus 2.5±0.5 μm), and budding type of cell division (20-25%).A second feature include changes that accompany development of specialized cells i.e., production of spore like cells (0.5±0.2 μm) and their progeny (filterable non -acid fast forms; 150 to 300 μm in size). Although, these cells were not real spore because they fail to form a heat resistant colony forming units, after incubation for 35-40 min at 65°C. The filterable non-acid fast forms of bacilli are metabolically active and increased their number by symmetrical type of cell-division. Therefore, survival strategies that developed by M. tuberculosis under oxygen limited condition are linked to its shape, size and conspicuous loss of acid fastness. PMID:21977232

  10. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2004: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2005-03-01

    With the ongoing miniaturization of devices and controlled nanostructuring of materials, the importance of atomic-scale information on surfaces and surface properties is growing continuously. The astonishing progress in nanoscience and nanotechnology that took place during the last two decades was in many ways related to recent progress in high-resolution imaging techniques such as scanning tunnelling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Since the mid-1990s, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) performed in ultrahigh vacuum has evolved as an alternative technique that achieves atomic resolution, but without the restriction to conducting surfaces of the previously established techniques. Advances of the rapidly developing field of NC-AFM are discussed at annual conferences as part of a series that started in 1998 in Osaka, Japan. This special issue of Nanotechnology is a compilation of original work presented at the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy that took place in Seattle, USA, 12-15 September 2004. Over the years, the conference grew in size and scope. Atomic resolution imaging of oxides and semiconductors remains an issue. Noticeable new developments have been presented in this regard such as, e.g., the demonstrated ability to manipulate individual atoms. Additionally, the investigation of individual molecules, clusters, and organic materials gains more and more attention. In this context, considerable effort is undertaken to transfer the NC-AFM principle based on frequency modulation to applications in air and liquids with the goal of enabling high-resolution surface studies of biological material in native environments, as well as to reduce the experimental complexity, which so far involves the availability of (costly) vacuum systems. Force spectroscopy methods continue to be improved and are applied to topics such as the imaging of the three-dimensional force field as a function of the distance with

  11. Charge Content In Nanometer Rings from Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) Traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zypman, F.; Eppell, S.; Feinstein, M.; Fried, Y.; Lazarev, D.; Metzger, C.

    The last few years have seen a growing interest in identifying charge content in small structures such as graphene ribbons and aromatic biorings. More generally it is believed that charge content in proteins holds the key to the ultimate understanding of biological self-assembly. Here we describe a model system, a charged ring inside liquid probed by an AFM tip, and show how the charge content and the relative size of the ring with respect to the tip affect the measured force. More importantly, we explain how to measure the charge from the AFM experimental data. The process involves the modeling of the dynamics of the tip-cantilever sensor under the influence of the charged sample, but also of ambient hydrodynamic forces, electrostatic interactions that appear due to charge induction in the tip and electrolytic screening. Of particular relevance is the possibility of our approach to treat analytically the size of ions. This is relevant when the tip-sample distance becomes sub-nanometric, and the more common description via Poisson-Boltzmann equation breaks down. Funding for this research ``Instrument Development: Charge Sensing In Fluids With Nanometer Precision'' is provided by Chemical Measurement & Imaging, National Science Foundation, Grant Number 1508085.

  12. Spatial dependence of polycrystalline FTO’s conductance analyzed by conductive atomic force microscope (C-AFM)

    SciTech Connect

    Peixoto, Alexandre Pessoa; Costa, J. C. da

    2014-05-15

    Fluorine-doped Tin oxide (FTO) is a highly transparent, electrically conductive polycrystalline material frequently used as an electrode in organic solar cells and optical-electronic devices [1–2]. In this work a spatial analysis of the conductive behavior of FTO was carried out by Conductive-mode Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM). Rare highly oriented grains sample give us an opportunity to analyze the top portion of polycrystalline FTO and compare with the border one. It is shown that the current flow essentially takes place through the polycrystalline edge at grain boundaries.

  13. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2005: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichling, M.; Mikosch, W.

    2006-04-01

    The 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy, held in Bad Essen, Germany, from 15 18th August 2005, attracted a record breaking number of participants presenting excellent contributions from a variety of scientific fields. This clearly demonstrated the high level of activity and innovation present in the community of NC-AFM researchers and the continuous growth of the field. The strongest ever participation of companies for a NC-AFM meeting is a sign for the emergence of new markets for the growing NC-AFM community; and the high standard of the products presented at the exhibition, many of them brand-new developments, reflected the unbroken progress in technology. The development of novel technologies and the sophistication of known techniques in research laboratories and their subsequent commercialization is still a major driving force for progress in this area of nanoscience. The conference was a perfect demonstration of how progress in the development of enabling technologies can readily be transcribed into basic research yielding fundamental insight with an impact across disciplines. The NC-AFM 2005 scientific programme was based on five cornerstones, each representing an area of vivid research and scientific progress. Atomic resolution imaging on oxide surfaces, which has long been a vision for the catalysis community, appears to be routine in several laboratories and after a period of demonstrative experiments NC-AFM now makes unique contributions to the understanding of processes in surface chemistry. These capabilities also open up new routes for the analysis of clusters and molecules deposited on dielectric surfaces where resolution limits are pushed towards the single atom level. Atomic precision manipulation with the dynamic AFM left the cradle of its infancy and flourishes in the family of bottom-up fabrication nanotechnologies. The systematic development of established and the introduction of new concepts of contrast

  14. Use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for microfabric study of cohesive soils.

    PubMed

    Sachan, A

    2008-12-01

    Microfabric reflects the imprints of the geologic and stress history of the soil deposit, the depositional environment and weathering history. Many investigators have been concerned with the fundamental problem of how the engineering properties of clay depend on the microfabric, which can be defined as geometric arrangement of particles within the soil mass. It is believed that scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are the only techniques that can reveal particle arrangements of clayey soils directly; however, current research introduces a novel and more advanced technique, atomic force microscopy, to evaluate the microfabric of cohesive materials. The atomic force microscopy has several advantages over SEM/TEM for characterizing cohesive particles at the sub-micrometre range by providing 3D images and 2D images with Z-information used in quantitative measurements of soil microfabric using SPIP software, and having the capability of obtaining images in all environments (ambient air, liquids and vacuums). This paper focuses on the use of atomic force microscopy technique to quantify the microfabric of clayey soils by developing the criteria for average and maximum values of angle of particle orientation within the soil mass using proposed empirical equations for intermediate and extreme microfabrics (dispersed, flocculated). PMID:19094019

  15. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2006: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The advent of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the 1980s has significantly promoted nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), one of the SPM family, has unique capabilities with high spatial resolution for nanoscale measurements in vacuum, air and liquids. In the last decade we have witnessed the rapid progress of NC-AFM with improved performance and increasing applications. A series of NC-AFM international conferences have greatly contributed to this field. Initiated in Osaka in 1998, the NC-AFM meeting has been followed by annual conferences at Pontresina, Hamburg, Kyoto, Montreal, Dingle, Seattle and Bad Essen. The 9th conference was held in Kobe, Japan, 16-20 July 2006. This special issue of Nanotechnology contains the outstanding contributions of the conference. During the meeting delegates learnt about a number of significant advances. Topics covered atomic resolution imaging of metals, semiconductors, insulators, ionic crystals, oxides, molecular systems, imaging of biological materials in various environments and novel instrumentation. Work also included the characterization of electronic and magnetic properties, tip and cantilever fabrication and characterization, atomic distinction based on analysis of tip-sample interaction, atomic scale manipulation, fabrication of nanostructures using NC-AFM, and related theories and simulations. We are greatly impressed by the increasing number of applications, and convinced that NC-AFM and related techniques are building a bridge to a future nano world, where quantum phenomena will dominate and nano devices will be realized. In addition, a special session on SPM road maps was held as a first trial in the field, where the future prospects of SPM were discussed enthusiastically. The overall success of the NC-AFM 2006 conference was due to the efforts of many individuals and groups with respect to scientific and technological progress, as well as the international

  16. Impedance Spectroscopic Investigation of Proton Conductivity in Nafion Using Transient Electrochemical Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    PubMed Central

    Hink, Steffen; Wagner, Norbert; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Roduner, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Spatially resolved impedance spectroscopy of a Nafion polyelectrolyte membrane is performed employing a conductive and Pt-coated tip of an atomic force microscope as a point-like contact and electrode. The experiment is conducted by perturbing the system by a rectangular voltage step and measuring the incurred current, followed by Fourier transformation and plotting the impedance against the frequency in a conventional Bode diagram. To test the potential and limitations of this novel method, we present a feasibility study using an identical hydrogen atmosphere at a well-defined relative humidity on both sides of the membrane. It is demonstrated that good quality impedance spectra are obtained in a frequency range of 0.2–1000 Hz. The extracted polarization curves exhibit a maximum current which cannot be explained by typical diffusion effects. Simulation based on equivalent circuits requires a Nernst element for restricted diffusion in the membrane which suggests that this effect is based on the potential dependence of the electrolyte resistance in the high overpotential region. PMID:24958175

  17. Nano-scale temperature dependent visco-elastic properties of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) using atomic force microscope (AFM).

    PubMed

    Grant, Colin A; Alfouzan, Abdulrahman; Gough, Tim; Twigg, Peter C; Coates, Phil D

    2013-01-01

    Visco-elastic behaviour at the nano-level of a commonly used polymer (PET) is characterised using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a range of temperatures. The modulus, indentation creep and relaxation time of the PET film (thickness=100 μm) is highly sensitive to temperature over an experimental temperature range of 22-175°C. The analysis showed a 40-fold increase in the amount of indentation creep on raising the temperature from 22°C to 100°C, with the most rapid rise occurring above the glass-to-rubber transition temperature (T(g)=77.1°C). At higher temperatures, close to the crystallisation temperature (T(c)=134.7°C), the indentation creep reduced to levels similar to those at temperatures below T(g). The calculated relaxation time showed a similar temperature dependence, rising from 0.6s below T(g) to 1.2s between T(g) and T(c) and falling back to 0.6s above T(c). Whereas, the recorded modulus of the thick polymer film decreases above T(g), subsequently increasing near T(c). These visco-elastic parameters are obtained via mechanical modelling of the creep curves and are correlated to the thermal phase changes that occur in PET, as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). PMID:22750040

  18. Application of Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to Determine Texture, Microtexture, and Grain Boundary Energies in Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Rohrer, G.S.; Saylor, D.M.; Vedula, V.R.

    1999-05-19

    Crystallographic orientations in alumina (Al203) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl204) were obtained using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) patterns. The texture and mesotexture (grain boundary misorientations) were random and no special boundaries were observed. The relative grain boundary energies were determined by thermal groove geometries using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify relationships between the grain boundary energies and misorientations.

  19. High-sensitivity noncontact atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope (nc AFM/STM) operating at subangstrom oscillation amplitudes for atomic resolution imaging and force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oral, A.; Grimble, R. A.; Özer, H. Ö.; Pethica, J. B.

    2003-08-01

    We describe a new, highly sensitive noncontact atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) with subangstrom oscillation amplitudes for atomic resolution imaging and force-distance spectroscopy. A novel fiber interferometer with ˜4×10-4 Å/√Hz noise level is employed to detect cantilever displacements. Subangstrom oscillation amplitude is applied to the lever at a frequency well below the resonance and changes in the oscillation amplitude due to tip-sample force interactions are measured with a lock-in amplifier. Quantitative force gradient images can be obtained simultaneously with the STM topography. Employment of subangstrom oscillation amplitudes lets us perform force-distance measurements, which reveal very short-range force interactions, consistent with the theory. Performance of the microscope is demonstrated with quantitative atomic resolution images of Si(111)(7×7) and force-distance curves showing short interaction range, all obtained with <0.25 Å lever oscillation amplitude. Our technique is not limited to UHV only and operation under liquids and air is feasible.

  20. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Onderwaater, W. G.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Koehler, R.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2015-03-15

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  1. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; van Spronsen, M. A.; Onderwaater, W. G.; van der Tuijn, P. C.; Koehler, R.; Ofitserov, A.; van Baarle, G. J. C.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2015-03-01

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  2. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  3. Charge injection in thin dielectric layers by atomic force microscopy: influence of geometry and material work function of the AFM tip on the injection process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Makasheva, K.; Boudou, L.; Teyssedre, G.

    2016-06-01

    Charge injection and retention in thin dielectric layers remain critical issues for the reliability of many electronic devices because of their association with a large number of failure mechanisms. To overcome this drawback, a deep understanding of the mechanisms leading to charge injection close to the injection area is needed. Even though the charge injection is extensively studied and reported in the literature to characterize the charge storage capability of dielectric materials, questions about charge injection mechanisms when using atomic force microscopy (AFM) remain open. In this paper, a thorough study of charge injection by using AFM in thin plasma-processed amorphous silicon oxynitride layers with properties close to that of thermal silica layers is presented. The study considers the impact of applied voltage polarity, work function of the AFM tip coating and tip curvature radius. A simple theoretical model was developed and used to analyze the obtained experimental results. The electric field distribution is computed as a function of tip geometry. The obtained experimental results highlight that after injection in the dielectric layer the charge lateral spreading is mainly controlled by the radial electric field component independently of the carrier polarity. The injected charge density is influenced by the nature of electrode metal coating (work function) and its geometry (tip curvature radius). The electron injection is mainly ruled by the Schottky injection barrier through the field electron emission mechanism enhanced by thermionic electron emission. The hole injection mechanism seems to differ from the electron one depending on the work function of the metal coating. Based on the performed analysis, it is suggested that for hole injection by AFM, pinning of the metal Fermi level with the metal-induced gap states in the studied silicon oxynitride layers starts playing a role in the injection mechanisms.

  4. Charge injection in thin dielectric layers by atomic force microscopy: influence of geometry and material work function of the AFM tip on the injection process.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve-Faure, C; Makasheva, K; Boudou, L; Teyssedre, G

    2016-06-17

    Charge injection and retention in thin dielectric layers remain critical issues for the reliability of many electronic devices because of their association with a large number of failure mechanisms. To overcome this drawback, a deep understanding of the mechanisms leading to charge injection close to the injection area is needed. Even though the charge injection is extensively studied and reported in the literature to characterize the charge storage capability of dielectric materials, questions about charge injection mechanisms when using atomic force microscopy (AFM) remain open. In this paper, a thorough study of charge injection by using AFM in thin plasma-processed amorphous silicon oxynitride layers with properties close to that of thermal silica layers is presented. The study considers the impact of applied voltage polarity, work function of the AFM tip coating and tip curvature radius. A simple theoretical model was developed and used to analyze the obtained experimental results. The electric field distribution is computed as a function of tip geometry. The obtained experimental results highlight that after injection in the dielectric layer the charge lateral spreading is mainly controlled by the radial electric field component independently of the carrier polarity. The injected charge density is influenced by the nature of electrode metal coating (work function) and its geometry (tip curvature radius). The electron injection is mainly ruled by the Schottky injection barrier through the field electron emission mechanism enhanced by thermionic electron emission. The hole injection mechanism seems to differ from the electron one depending on the work function of the metal coating. Based on the performed analysis, it is suggested that for hole injection by AFM, pinning of the metal Fermi level with the metal-induced gap states in the studied silicon oxynitride layers starts playing a role in the injection mechanisms. PMID:27158768

  5. Point of zero charge of a corundum-water interface probed with optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and atomic force microscopy (AFM): New approaches to oxide surface charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, Andrew G.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2001-09-01

    The pH and ionic strength dependence of light generated at a corundum-solution interface by the nonlinear optical process of second harmonic generation (SHG) is reported. A point of zero salt effect occurs in the pH range 5 to 6. The pH and ionic strength dependence of the SHG is qualitatively consistent with a model describing SHG from a charged mineral/water interface from Ong et al. (1992) and Zhao et al. (1993a, 1993b), but certain aspects of the model appear inadequate to describe the full range of our data. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements, though imprecise, were consistent with a point of zero charge (p.z.c.) for the interface also in the pH range 5 to 6. The SHG (and AFM) results are different from expectation; the observed p.z.s.e. (and presumably also the p.z.c.) is considerably lower than the accepted point of zero charge of clean alumina powders ( pH 8-9.4; Parks, 1965; Sverjenksy and Sahai, 1996). Although the reasons for this are unclear, SHG holds promise as a probe of oxide-water interfaces that is independent of interpretation of acid-base titration stoichiometry.

  6. Nanodimentional Aggregates In Organic Monolayers Studied With Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) And Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, George R.; Burov, Julian

    2007-04-01

    Organic monolayers from a fluorescently labeled phospholipid (DPPE-NBD) were deposited on solid supports under special conditions that form stable nanometer wide bilayers cylinders that protrude from the monolayer. This molecule was frequently used in sensor applications due to its sensitivity to environment changes. The proposed configuration should provide both fast response times (ultra thin film) and increased sensitivity (greatly increased surface area). AFM can clearly distinguish between the different phases. The height difference between the solid-expanded and the liquid-expanded phase was measured to be 1.4 nm while the bilayer thickness was 5.6 nm. The solid domains show a 20 % decrease in fluorescence lifetime in comparison to the monolayer as measured by FLIM. This difference in lifetimes is explained in the model of fluorescence self quenching in the solid phase due to the molecules being closer to each other.

  7. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  8. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  9. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  10. Coaxial atomic force microscope tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. A.; Aguilar, J. A.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate coaxial atomic force microscope (AFM) tweezers that can trap and place small objects using dielectrophoresis (DEP). An attractive force is generated at the tip of a coaxial AFM probe by applying a radio frequency voltage between the center conductor and a grounded shield; the origin of the force is found to be DEP by measuring the pull-off force versus applied voltage. We show that the coaxial AFM tweezers can perform three-dimensional assembly by picking up a specified silica microsphere, imaging with the microsphere at the end of the tip, and placing it at a target destination.

  11. Applications of AFM for atomic manipulation and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custance, Oscar

    2009-03-01

    Since the first demonstration of atom-by-atom assembly [1], atomic manipulation with scanning tunneling microscopy has yielded stunning realizations in nanoscience. A new exciting panorama has been recently opened with the possibility of manipulating atoms at surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [2-5]. In this talk, we will present two different approaches that enable patterning structures at semiconductor surfaces by manipulating individual atoms with AFM and at room temperature [2, 3]. We will discuss the physics behind each protocol through the analysis of the measured forces associated with these manipulations [3-5]. Another challenging issue in scanning probe microscopy is the ability to disclose the local chemical composition of a multi-element system at atomic level. Here, we will introduce a single-atom chemical identification method, which is based on detecting the forces between the outermost atom of the AFM tip and the atoms at a surface [6]. We demonstrate this identification procedure on a particularly challenging system, where any discrimination attempt based solely on topographic measurements would be impossible to achieve. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] D. M. Eigler and E. K. Schweizer, Nature 344, 524 (1990); [0pt] [2] Y. Sugimoto, M. Abe, S. Hirayama, N. Oyabu, O. Custance and S. Morita, Nature Materials 4, 156 (2005); [0pt] [3] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, O. Custance, P. Jelinek, M. Abe, R. Perez and S. Morita, Science 322, 413 (2008); [0pt] [4] Y. Sugimoto, P. Jelinek, P. Pou, M. Abe, S. Morita, R. Perez and O. Custance, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 106104 (2007); [0pt] [5] M. Ternes, C. P. Lutz, C. F. Hirjibehedin, F. J. Giessibl and A. J. Heinrich, Science 319, 1066 (2008); [0pt] [6] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, M. Abe, P. Jelinek, R. Perez, S. Morita, and O. Custance, Nature 446, 64 (2007)

  12. Adhesion forces between AFM tips and superficial dentin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pelin, I M; Piednoir, A; Machon, D; Farge, P; Pirat, C; Ramos, S M M

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we study the adhesion forces between atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and superficial dentin etched with phosphoric acid. Initially, we quantitatively analyze the effect of acid etching on the surface heterogeneity and the surface roughness, two parameters that play a key role in the adhesion phenomenon. From a statistical study of the force-distance curves, we determine the average adhesion forces on the processed substrates. Our results show that the average adhesion forces, measured in water, increase linearly with the acid exposure time. The highest values of such forces are ascribed to the high density of collagen fibers on the etched surfaces. The individual contribution of exposed collagen fibrils to the adhesion force is highlighted. We also discuss in this paper the influence of the environmental medium (water/air) in the adhesion measurements. We show that the weak forces involved require working in the aqueous medium. PMID:22472512

  13. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  14. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  15. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Charge Measurement of Atoms and Atomic Resolution of Molecules with Noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Leo

    2010-03-01

    Individual gold and silver adatoms [1] and pentacene molecules [2] on ultrathin NaCl films on Cu(111) were investigated using a qPlus tuning fork atomic force microscope (AFM) operated at 5 Kelvin with oscillation amplitudes in the sub-ångstrom regime. Charging a gold adatom by one electron charge increased the force on the AFM tip by a few piconewtons. Employing Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) we also measured the local contact potential difference (LCPD). We observed that the LCPD is shifted depending on the sign of the charge and allows the discrimination of positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged atoms. To image pentacene molecules we modified AFM tips by means of vertical manipulation techniques, i.e. deliberately picking up known atoms and molecules, such as Au, Ag, Cl, CO, and pentacene. Using a CO terminated tip we resolved all individual atoms and bonds within a pentacene molecule. Three dimensional force maps showing the site specific distance dependence above the molecule were extracted. We compared our experimental results with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to gain insight on the physical origin of AFM contrast formation. We found that atomic resolution is only obtained due to repulsive force contributions originating from the Pauli exclusion principle. [4pt] [1] L. Gross, F. Mohn, P. Liljeroth, J. Repp, F. J. Giessibl, G. Meyer, Science 324, 1428 (2009). [0pt] [2] L. Gross, F. Mohn, N. Moll, P. Liljeroth, G. Meyer, Science 325, 1110 (2009).

  17. Device level 3D characterization using PeakForce AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoney, Padraig; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Hand, Sean; Osborne, Jason; Milligan, Eric; Feinstein, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Traditional metrology solutions face a range of challenges at the 1X node such as three dimensional (3D) measurement capabilities, shrinking overlay and critical dimension (CD) error budgets driven by multi-patterning and via in trench CD measurements. With advent of advanced technology nodes and 3D processing, an increasing need is emerging for in-die metrology including across-structure and structure-to-structure characterization. A myriad of work has emerged in the past few years intending to address these challenges from various aspects; in-die OCD with reduced spot size and tilt beam on traditional critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CDSEM) for height measurements. This paper explores the latest capability offered by PeakForceTM Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy (PFT-AFM). The use of traditional harmonic tapping mode for scanning high aspect ratio, and complex "3D" wafer structures, results in limited depth probing capability as well as excessive tip wear. These limitations arise due to the large tip-sample interaction volume in such confined spaces. PeakForce Tapping eliminates these limitations through direct real time control of the tip-sample interaction contact force. The ability of PeakForce to measure, and respond directly to tip- sample interaction forces results in more detailed feature resolution, reduced tip wear, and improved depth capability. In this work, the PFT-AFM tool was applied for multiple applications, including the 14nm fin and replacement metal gate (RMG) applications outlined below. Results from DOE wafers, detailed measurement precision studies and correlation to reference metrology are presented for validation of this methodology. With the fin application, precision of 0.3nm is demonstrated by measuring 5 dies with 10 consecutive runs. Capability to resolve within-die and localized within-macro height variation is also demonstrated. Results obtained from the fin measurements support the increasing trend that measurements

  18. AFM-based force microsensor for a microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatikow, Sergej; Fahlbusch, Stephan

    2001-10-01

    Microrobots are the result of increasing research activities at the border between microsystem technology and robotics. Today already, robots with dimensions of a few cubic- centimeters can be developed. Like conventional robots, microrobots represent a complex system that usually contains several different types of actuators and sensors. The measurement of gripping forces is the most important sensor application in micromanipulation besides visual servoing to protect the parts from too high surface pressures and thereby damage during the assembly process. Very small forces in the range of 200 (mu) N down to 0.1 (mu) N or even less have to be sensed. Thus, the aim of our current research activities is the development of a high-resolution integrated force microsensor for measuring gripping forces in a microhandling robot. On the one hand, the sensor should be a device for teleoperated manipulation tasks in a flexible microhandling station. On the other hand, typical microhandling operations should to a large extend be automated with the aid of computer-based signal processing of sensor information. The user should be provided with an interface for teleoperated manipulation and an interface for partially automated manipulation of microobjects. In this paper, a concept for the measurement of gripping forces in microrobotics using piezoresistive AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers is introduced. Further on, the concept of a microrobot-based SEM station and its applications are presented.

  19. Frequency Modulation Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) using frequency modulation (FM) detection has been widely used for the atomic-scale investigations of various materials. However, high-resolution imaging in liquids by FM-AFM is severely deteriorated by the extreme reduction of the Q-factor due to the hydrodynamic interaction between the cantilever and the liquid. Recently, the use of the small amplitude mode and the large noise reduction in the cantilever deflection sensor brought great progress in FM-AFM imaging in liquids. In this chapter viscous damping of the cantilever and the electric double layer force are discussed in detail. Following the detailed analysis of the frequency noise in FM-AFM, instrumentation of the optical beam deflection sensor for FM-AFM in liquid environments is described. Finally high-resolution FM-AFM images of muscovite mica, purple membranes, and isolated protein molecules in liquids are presented.

  20. Dynamic atomic force microscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Ricardo; Pérez, Rubén

    2002-09-01

    In this report we review the fundamentals, applications and future tendencies of dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. Our focus is on understanding why the changes observed in the dynamic properties of a vibrating tip that interacts with a surface make possible to obtain molecular resolution images of membrane proteins in aqueous solutions or to resolve atomic-scale surface defects in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Our description of the two major dynamic AFM modes, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) emphasises their common points without ignoring the differences in experimental set-ups and operating conditions. Those differences are introduced by the different feedback parameters, oscillation amplitude in AM-AFM and frequency shift and excitation amplitude in FM-AFM, used to track the topography and composition of a surface. The theoretical analysis of AM-AFM (also known as tapping-mode) emphasises the coexistence, in many situations of interests, of two stable oscillation states, a low and high amplitude solution. The coexistence of those oscillation states is a consequence of the presence of attractive and repulsive components in the interaction force and their non-linear dependence on the tip-surface separation. We show that key relevant experimental properties such as the lateral resolution, image contrast and sample deformation are highly dependent on the oscillation state chosen to operate the instrument. AM-AFM allows to obtain simultaneous topographic and compositional contrast in heterogeneous samples by recording the phase angle difference between the external excitation and the tip motion (phase imaging). Significant applications of AM-AFM such as high-resolution imaging of biomolecules and polymers, large-scale patterning of silicon surfaces, manipulation of single nanoparticles or the fabrication of single electron devices are also reviewed. FM-AFM (also called non

  1. Membrane-based actuation for high-speed single molecule force spectroscopy studies using AFM.

    PubMed

    Sarangapani, Krishna; Torun, Hamdi; Finkler, Ofer; Zhu, Cheng; Degertekin, Levent

    2010-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based dynamic force spectroscopy of single molecular interactions involves characterizing unbinding/unfolding force distributions over a range of pulling speeds. Owing to their size and stiffness, AFM cantilevers are adversely affected by hydrodynamic forces, especially at pulling speeds >10 microm/s, when the viscous drag becomes comparable to the unbinding/unfolding forces. To circumvent these adverse effects, we have fabricated polymer-based membranes capable of actuating commercial AFM cantilevers at speeds >or=100 microm/s with minimal viscous drag effects. We have used FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to simulate high-speed pulling and fast actuation of AFM cantilevers and membranes in different experimental configurations. The simulation results support the experimental findings on a variety of commercial AFM cantilevers and predict significant reduction in drag forces when membrane actuators are used. Unbinding force experiments involving human antibodies using these membranes demonstrate that it is possible to achieve bond loading rates >or=10(6) pN/s, an order of magnitude greater than that reported with commercial AFM cantilevers and systems. PMID:20054686

  2. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Atsushi; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed. PMID:27250433

  3. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    PubMed

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-01

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets. PMID:26972765

  4. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  5. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-15

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  6. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. PMID:25554301

  7. Kinetics of degradation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers as a result of vipoxin phospholipase A2 activity: an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach.

    PubMed

    Balashev, Konstantin; Atanasov, Vasil; Mitewa, Mariana; Petrova, Svetla; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we used AFM as an analytical tool to visualize the degradation of a phospholipid bilayer undergoing hydrolysis of the vipoxin's PLA(2). We obtained time series images during the degradation process of supported 1, 2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers and evaluated the occurrence and the growth rate of the bilayer defects. The special resolution of the AFM images allowed us to measure the area and the perimeter length of these defects and to draw conclusions about the kinetics of the enzyme reaction. Moreover, we also report for some unique characteristics discovered during the vipoxin's PLA(2) action. Experimentally for the first time, we observed the appearance and the growth of three-dimensional (3D), crystal-like structures within the formed defects of the degraded bilayer. In an effort to explain their nature, we applied bearing image analysis to estimate the volume of these crystals and we found that their growth rate follows a similar kinetic pattern as the degradation rate of the supported bilayer. PMID:20959114

  8. Savinase action on bovine serum albumin (BSA) monolayers demonstrated with measurements at the air-water interface and liquid Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging.

    PubMed

    Balashev, Konstantin; Callisen, Thomas H; Svendsen, Allan; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    We studied the enzymatic action of Savinase on bovine serum albumin (BSA) organized in a monolayer spread at the air/water interface or adsorbed at the mica surface. We carried out two types of experiments. In the first one we followed the degradation of the protein monolayer by measuring the surface pressure and surface area decrease versus time. In the second approach we applied AFM imaging of the supported BSA monolayers adsorbed on mica solid supports and extracted information for the enzyme action by analyzing the obtained images of the surface topography in the course of enzyme action. In both cases we obtained an estimate for the turnover number (TON) of the enzyme reaction. PMID:21868205

  9. Condensed-phase thermal decomposition of TATB investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T.A.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Foltz, M.F.; Behrens, R. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    A combination of techniques has been used to investigate the condensed-phase thermal decomposition of TATB. STMBMS has been used to identify the thermal decomposition products and their temporal correlation`s. These experiments have shown that the condensed-phase decomposition proceeds through several autocatalytic pathways. Both low and high molecular weight decomposition products have been identified. Mono-, di- and tri-furazans products have been identified and, their temporal behaviors are consistent with a stepwise loss of water. AFM has been used to correlate the decomposition chemistry with morphological changes occurring as a function of heating. Patches of small 25-140 nm round holes were observed throughout the lattice of TATB crystals that were heated briefly to 300C. It is likely that these holes show where decomposition reactions have started. Evidence of decomposition products have been seen in TATB that has been held at 250C for one hour.

  10. MEMS piezoresistive ring resonator for AFM imaging with pico-Newton force resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Z.; Walter, B.; Mairiaux, E.; Faucher, M.; Buchaillot, L.; Legrand, B.

    2013-03-01

    A new concept of atomic force microscope (AFM) oscillating probes using electrostatic excitation and piezoresistive detection is presented. The probe is characterized by electrical methods in vacuum and by mechanical methods in air. A frequency-mixing measurement technique is developed to reduce the parasitic signal floor. The probe resonance frequencies are in the 1 MHz range and the quality factor is measured about 53 000 in vacuum and 3000 in air. The ring probe is mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up and topographic images of patterned sample surfaces are obtained. The force resolution deduced from the measurements is about 10 pN Hz-0.5.

  11. Multiparametric imaging of biological systems by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Dufrêne, Yves F; Martínez-Martín, David; Medalsy, Izhar; Alsteens, David; Müller, Daniel J

    2013-09-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how biological systems change their structural, biophysical and chemical properties to adjust functionality. Addressing this issue has been severely hampered by the lack of methods capable of imaging biosystems at high resolution while simultaneously mapping their multiple properties. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) now enable researchers to combine (sub)molecular imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological interactions. Here we discuss the principles and applications of advanced FD-based AFM tools for the quantitative multiparametric characterization of complex cellular and biomolecular systems under physiological conditions. PMID:23985731

  12. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Mingdong; Bruun Hovgaard, Mads; Mamdouh, Wael; Xu, Sailong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2008-09-01

    We report on the mechanical characterization of individual mature amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). These self-assembling materials, formed from the 29-residue amphiphatic peptide hormone glucagon, were found to display a reversible elastic behaviour. Based on AFM morphology and SMFS studies, we suggest that the observed elasticity is due to a force-induced conformational transition which is reversible due to the β-helical conformation of protofibrils, allowing a high degree of extension. The elastic properties of such mature fibrils contribute to their high stability, suggesting that the internal hydrophobic interactions of amyloid fibrils are likely to be of fundamental importance in the assembly of amyloid fibrils and therefore for the understanding of the progression of their associated pathogenic disorders. In addition, such biological amyloid fibril structures with highly stable mechanical properties can potentially be used to produce nanofibres (nanowires) that may be suitable for nanotechnological applications.

  13. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young’s modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins. PMID:25893163

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy on Its Way to Adolescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.

    2003-12-01

    When the atomic force microscope (AFM) was introduced in 1986, its potential to resolve surfaces with true atomic resolution was already proposed. However, substantial problems had to be overcome before atomic resolution became possible by AFM. Today, true atomic resolution by AFM is standard practice. This article discusses the influence of the cantilever stiffness and — amplitude on noise and short-range force sensitivity and introduces a sensor operating at near optimal conditions (qPlus sensor). The data achieved with this optimized sensing technology show substructures within single atom images, attributed to atomic orbitals.

  15. Atomic Force Microscopy for Soil Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gazze, andrea; doerr, stefan; dudley, ed; hallin, ingrid; matthews, peter; quinn, gerry; van keulen, geertje; francis, lewis

    2016-04-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a high-resolution surface-sensitive technique, which provides 3-dimensional topographical information and material properties of both stiff and soft samples in their natural environments. Traditionally AFM has been applied to samples with low roughness: hence its use for soil analysis has been very limited so far. Here we report the optimization settings required for a standardization of high-resolution and artefact-free analysis of natural soil with AFM: soil immobilization, AFM probe selection, artefact recognition and minimization. Beyond topography, AFM can be used in a spectroscopic mode to evaluate nanomechanical properties, such as soil viscosity, stiffness, and deformation. In this regards, Bruker PeakForce-Quantitative NanoMechanical (QNM) AFM provides a fast and convenient way to extract physical properties from AFM force curves in real-time to obtain soil nanomechanical properties. Here we show for the first time the ability of AFM to describe the topography of natural soil at nanometre resolution, with observation of micro-components, such as clays, and of nano-structures, possibly of biotic origin, the visualization of which would prove difficult with other instrumentations. Finally, nanomechanical profiling has been applied to different wettability states in soil and the respective physical patterns are discussed.

  16. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution. PMID:24743419

  17. Combined scanning electrochemical atomic force microscopy for tapping mode imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueng, A.; Kranz, C.; Mizaikoff, B.; Lugstein, A.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2003-03-01

    With the integration of submicro- and nanoelectrodes into atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips using microfabrication techniques, an elegant approach combining scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) with atomic force microscopy has recently been demonstrated. Simultaneous imaging of topography and electrochemistry at a sample surface in AFM tapping mode with integrated SECM-AFM cantilevers oscillated at or near their resonance frequency is shown. In contrast to contact mode AFM imaging frictional forces at the sample surface are minimized. Hence, topographical and electrochemical information of soft surfaces (e.g., biological species) can be obtained.

  18. Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Robert H.

    The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  19. Atomic Force Microscopy of Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushiki, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Susumu; Hitomi, Jiro; Ogura, Shigeaki; Umemoto, Takeshi; Shigeno, Masatsugu

    2000-06-01

    This paper is a review of our results of the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to the three-dimensional observation of living cells. First, we showed AFM images of living cultured cells in fluid. Contact mode AFM of living cells provided precise information on the shape of cellular processes (such as spike-like processes or lamellipodia) at the cellular margin. The contour of cytoskeletal elements just beneath the cell membrane was also clearly observable on the upper surface of the cells. Secondly, we showed the data on the discrepancy between the AFM images of living cells and fixed cells. These findings were useful for evaluating AFM images of living cells. Finally, we described the time-lapse AFM of living cells. A fluid chamber system enabled us to obtain AFM images of living cells for over 1 h at time intervals of 2-4 min. A series of these AFM images were useful for examining the movements of cellular processes in relation to subcellular cytoskeletal elements. Time-lapse movies produced by sequential AFM images also gave a realistic view of the cellular dynamics.

  20. Microfluidics, Chromatography, and Atomic-Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A Raman-and-atomic-force microscope (RAFM) has been shown to be capable of performing several liquid-transfer and sensory functions essential for the operation of a microfluidic laboratory on a chip that would be used to perform rapid, sensitive chromatographic and spectro-chemical analyses of unprecedentedly small quantities of liquids. The most novel aspect of this development lies in the exploitation of capillary and shear effects at the atomic-force-microscope (AFM) tip to produce shear-driven flow of liquids along open microchannels of a microfluidic device. The RAFM can also be used to perform such functions as imaging liquids in microchannels; removing liquid samples from channels for very sensitive, tip-localized spectrochemical analyses; measuring a quantity of liquid adhering to the tip; and dip-pen deposition from a chromatographic device. A commercial Raman-spectroscopy system and a commercial AFM were integrated to make the RAFM so as to be able to perform simultaneous topographical AFM imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) at the AFM tip. The Raman-spectroscopy system includes a Raman microprobe attached to an optical microscope, the translation stage of which is modified to accommodate the AFM head. The Raman laser excitation beam, which is aimed at the AFM tip, has a wavelength of 785 nm and a diameter of about 5 m, and its power is adjustable up to 10 mW. The AFM is coated with gold to enable tip-localized SERS.

  1. Imaging and force probing RNA by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schön, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In the past 30years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become a true enabling platform in the life sciences opening entire novel avenues for structural and dynamic studies of biological systems. It enables visualization, probing and manipulation across the length scales, from single molecules to living cells in buffer solution under physiological conditions without the need for labeling or staining of the specimen. In particular, for structural studies of nucleic acids and assemblies thereof, the AFM has matured into a routinely used tool providing nanometer spatial resolution. This includes ssRNA, dsRNA and nucleoprotein complexes thereof, as well as RNA aggregates and 2D RNA assemblies. By AFM unique information can be obtained on RNA based assemblies which are becoming increasingly important as novel unique building blocks in the emerging field of RNA nanotechnology. In addition, the AFM is of fundamental relevance to study biological relevant RNA interactions and dynamics. In this short review first the basic functioning principles of commonly used AFM modes including AFM based force spectroscopy will be briefly described. Next a brief overview will be given on structural studies that have been done related to AFM topographic imaging of RNA, RNA assemblies and aggregates. Finally, an overview on AFM beyond imaging will be provided. This includes force spectroscopy of RNA under physiological conditions in aqueous buffer to probe RNA interaction with proteins and ligands as well as other AFM tip based RNA probing. The main intention of this short review to give the reader a flavor of what AFM contributes to RNA research and engineering. PMID:27222101

  2. Conservative and dissipative tip-sample interaction forces probed with dynamic AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsmann, B.; Seidel, C.; Anczykowski, B.; Fuchs, H.

    1999-10-01

    The conservative and dissipative forces between tip and sample of a dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) were investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experimental AFM data obtained by the frequency modulation technique. In this way it became possible to reconstruct complete force versus distance curves and damping coefficient versus distance curves from experimental data without using fit parameters for the interaction force and without using analytical interaction models. A comparison with analytical approaches is given and a way to determine a damping coefficient curve from experimental data is proposed. The results include the determination of the first point of repulsive contact of a vibrating tip when approaching a sample. The capability of quantifying the tip-sample interaction is demonstrated using experimental data obtained with a silicon tip and a mica sample in UHV.

  3. Relationship between model bacterial peptidoglycan network structures and AFM force-distance curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Aidan; Wickham, Robert; Touhami, Ahmed; Dutcher, John

    2010-03-01

    Recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements have involved pulling on Gram-negative bacterial sacculi with the AFM tip as a means of distinguishing between different proposed structures of the peptidoglycan network. The goal of the present study is to provide the theoretical connection between a given network structure and its response to the pulling force. We model the glycan strands as hinged rods, and the peptide cross-links as wormlike chains. Using Monte Carlo simulation to equilibrate the three-dimensional network, subject to a fixed AFM tip-to-substrate distance, we can compute the force exerted by the network on the AFM tip. The effects of adhesion of the sacculi to the substrate and enzymatic action on the network are included. We have modeled both the layered and the scaffold model for the peptidoglycan network structure. We have compared our theoretical force-distance curves for each network structure with experimental curves to determine which structure provides the best agreement with experiment.

  4. Force-controlled manipulation of single cells: from AFM to FluidFM.

    PubMed

    Guillaume-Gentil, Orane; Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Franz, Clemens M; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A

    2014-07-01

    The ability to perturb individual cells and to obtain information at the single-cell level is of central importance for addressing numerous biological questions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers great potential for this prospering field. Traditionally used as an imaging tool, more recent developments have extended the variety of cell-manipulation protocols. Fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM) combines AFM with microfluidics via microchanneled cantilevers with nano-sized apertures. The crucial element of the technology is the connection of the hollow cantilevers to a pressure controller, allowing their operation in liquid as force-controlled nanopipettes under optical control. Proof-of-concept studies demonstrated a broad spectrum of single-cell applications including isolation, deposition, adhesion and injection in a range of biological systems. PMID:24856959

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy of Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Frederix, Patrick L.T.M.; Bosshart, Patrick D.; Engel, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an ideal method to study the surface topography of biological membranes. It allows membranes that are adsorbed to flat solid supports to be raster-scanned in physiological solutions with an atomically sharp tip. Therefore, AFM is capable of observing biological molecular machines at work. In addition, the tip can be tethered to the end of a single membrane protein, and forces acting on the tip upon its retraction indicate barriers that occur during the process of protein unfolding. Here we discuss the fundamental limitations of AFM determined by the properties of cantilevers, present aspects of sample preparation, and review results achieved on reconstituted and native biological membranes. PMID:19167286

  6. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  7. Submolecular Resolution Imaging of Molecules by Atomic Force Microscopy: The Influence of the Electrostatic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lit, Joost; Di Cicco, Francesca; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-03-01

    The forces governing the contrast in submolecular resolution imaging of molecules with atomic force microscopy (AFM) have recently become a topic of intense debate. Here, we show that the electrostatic force is essential to understand the contrast in atomically resolved AFM images of polar molecules. Specifically, we image strongly polarized molecules with negatively and positively charged tips. A contrast inversion is observed above the polar groups. By taking into account the electrostatic forces between tip and molecule, the observed contrast differences can be reproduced using a molecular mechanics model. In addition, we analyze the height dependence of the various force components contributing to the high-resolution AFM contrast.

  8. Microcantilevers with embedded accelerometers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shaik, Nurul Huda; Raman, Arvind; Reifenberger, Ronald G.

    2014-02-24

    The measurement of the intermittent interaction between an oscillating nanotip and the sample surface is a key challenge in dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Accelerometers integrated onto AFM cantilevers can directly measure this interaction with minimal cantilever modification but have been difficult to realize. Here, we design and fabricate high frequency bandwidth accelerometers on AFM cantilevers to directly measure the tip acceleration in commercial AFM systems. We demonstrate a simple way of calibrating such accelerometers and present experiments using amplitude modulated AFM on freshly cleaved mica samples in water to study the response of the accelerometer.

  9. High-speed atomic force microscopy coming of age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshio

    2012-02-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) is now materialized. It allows direct visualization of dynamic structural changes and dynamic processes of functioning biological molecules in physiological solutions, at high spatiotemporal resolution. Dynamic molecular events unselectively appear in detail in an AFM movie, facilitating our understanding of how biological molecules operate to function. This review describes a historical overview of technical development towards HS-AFM, summarizes elementary devices and techniques used in the current HS-AFM, and then highlights recent imaging studies. Finally, future challenges of HS-AFM studies are briefly discussed.

  10. High-speed atomic force microscopy coming of age.

    PubMed

    Ando, Toshio

    2012-02-17

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) is now materialized. It allows direct visualization of dynamic structural changes and dynamic processes of functioning biological molecules in physiological solutions, at high spatiotemporal resolution. Dynamic molecular events unselectively appear in detail in an AFM movie, facilitating our understanding of how biological molecules operate to function. This review describes a historical overview of technical development towards HS-AFM, summarizes elementary devices and techniques used in the current HS-AFM, and then highlights recent imaging studies. Finally, future challenges of HS-AFM studies are briefly discussed. PMID:22248867

  11. Nanoscopic polypyrrole AFM-SECM probes enabling force measurements under potential control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, P.; Higgins, M. J.; Kranz, C.

    2014-01-01

    Conductive polymers, and in particular polypyrrole, are frequently used as biomimetic interfaces facilitating growth and/or differentiation of cells and tissues. Hence, studying forces and local interactions between such polymer interfaces and cells at the nanoscale is of particular interest. Frequently, such force interactions are not directly accessible with high spatial resolution. Consequently, we have developed nanoscopic polypyrrole electrodes, which are integrated in AFM-SECM probes. Bifunctional AFM-SECM probes were modified via ion beam-induced deposition resulting in pyramidal conductive Pt-C composite electrodes. These nanoscopic electrodes then enabled localized polypyrrole deposition, thus resulting in polymer-modified AFM probes with a well-defined geometry. Furthermore, such probes may be reversibly switched from an insulating to a conductive state. In addition, the hydrophilicity of such polymer tips is dependent on the dopant, and hence, on the oxidation state. Force studies applying different tip potentials were performed at plasma-treated glass surfaces providing localized information on the associated force interactions, which are dependent on the applied potential and the dopant.Conductive polymers, and in particular polypyrrole, are frequently used as biomimetic interfaces facilitating growth and/or differentiation of cells and tissues. Hence, studying forces and local interactions between such polymer interfaces and cells at the nanoscale is of particular interest. Frequently, such force interactions are not directly accessible with high spatial resolution. Consequently, we have developed nanoscopic polypyrrole electrodes, which are integrated in AFM-SECM probes. Bifunctional AFM-SECM probes were modified via ion beam-induced deposition resulting in pyramidal conductive Pt-C composite electrodes. These nanoscopic electrodes then enabled localized polypyrrole deposition, thus resulting in polymer-modified AFM probes with a well

  12. A variable temperature ultrahigh vacuum atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Q.; Vollmer, R.; Carpick, R.W.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.

    1995-11-01

    A new atomic force microscope (AFM) that operates in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) is described. The sample is held fixed with spring clamps while the AMF cantilever and deflection sensor are scanned above it. Thus, the sample is easily coupled to a liquid nitrogen cooled thermal reservoir which allows AFM operation from {approx}100 K to room temperature. AFM operation above room temperature is also possible. The microscope head is capable of coarse {ital x}-{ital y} positioning over millimeter distances so that AFM images can be taken virtually anywhere upon a macroscopic sample. The optical beam deflection scheme is used for detection, allowing simultaneous normal and lateral force measurements. The sample can be transferred from the AFM stage to a low energy electron diffraction/Auger electron spectrometer stage for surface analysis. Atomic lattice resolution AFM images taken in UHV are presented at 110, 296, and 430 K. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  13. Atom probe, AFM, and STM studies on vacuum-fired stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Stupnik, A; Frank, P; Leisch, M

    2009-04-01

    The surface morphology of grades 304L and 316LN stainless steels, after low-temperature bake-out process and vacuum annealing, has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The local elemental composition on the surface before and after thermal treatment has been investigated by atom probe (AP) depth profiling measurements. After vacuum annealing, AFM and STM show significant changes in the surface structure and topology. Recrystallization and surface reconstruction is less pronounced on the 316LN stainless steel. AP depth profiling analyses result in noticeable nickel enrichment on the surface of grade 304L samples. Since hydrogen recombination is almost controlled by surface structure and composition, a strong influence on the outgassing behaviour by the particular surface microstructure can be deduced. PMID:19167824

  14. Combined scanning electrochemical-atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, J V; Unwin, P R

    2000-01-15

    A combined scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) is described. The instrument permits the first simultaneous topographical and electrochemical measurements at surfaces, under fluid, with high spatial resolution. Simple probe tips suitable for SECM-AFM, have been fabricated by coating flattened and etched Pt microwires with insulating, electrophoretically deposited paint. The flattened portion of the probe provides a flexible cantilever (force sensor), while the coating insulates the probe such that only the tip end (electrode) is exposed to the solution. The SECM-AFM technique is illustrated with simultaneous electrochemical-probe deflection approach curves, simultaneous topographical and electrochemical imaging studies of track-etched polycarbonate ultrafiltration membranes, and etching studies of crystal surfaces. PMID:10658320

  15. Adhesion forces in AFM of redox responsive polymer grafts: Effects of tip hydrophilicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueling; Kieviet, Bernard D.; Song, Jing; Schön, Peter M.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-02-01

    The adherence between silicon nitride AFM tips and redox-active poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) grafts on gold was investigated by electrochemical AFM force spectroscopy. Before the adhesion measurements silicon nitride AFM probes were cleaned with organic solvents (acetone and ethanol) or piranha solution. Interestingly, these different AFM tip cleaning procedures drastically affected the observed adhesion forces. Water contact angle measurements on the corresponding AFM probe chips showed that piranha treatment resulted in a significant increase of AFM probe chip surface hydrophilicity compared to the organic solvent treatment. Obviously this hydrophilicity change caused drastic, even opposite changes in the tip-PFS adhesive force measurement upon electrode potential change to reversibly oxidize and reduce the PFS grafts. Our findings are of pivotal importance for AFM tip adhesion measurements utilizing standard silicon nitride AFM tips. Probe hydrophilicity must be carefully taken into consideration and controlled.

  16. Time-dependent surface adhesive force and morphology of RBC measured by AFM.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yangzhe; Hu, Yi; Cai, Jiye; Ma, Shuyuan; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Yong; Pan, Yunlong

    2009-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a rapidly developing tool recently introduced into the evaluation of the age of bloodstains, potentially providing legal medical experts useful information for forensic investigation. In this study, the time-dependent, morphological changes of red blood cells (RBC) under three different conditions (including controlled, room-temperature condition, uncontrolled, outdoor-environmental condition, and controlled, low-temperature condition) were observed by AFM, as well as the cellular viscoelasticity via force-vs-distance curve measurements. Firstly, the data indicate that substrate types have different effects on cellular morphology of RBC. RBC presented the typical biconcave shape on mica, whereas either the biconcave shape or flattened shape was evident on glass. The mean volume of RBCs on mica was significantly larger than that of cells on glass. Surprisingly, the adhesive property of RBC membrane surfaces was substrate type-independent (the adhesive forces were statistically similar on glass and mica). With time lapse, the changes in cell volume and adhesive force of RBC under the controlled room-temperature condition were similar to those under the uncontrolled outdoor-environmental condition. Under the controlled low-temperature condition, however, the changes in cell volume occurred mainly due to the collapse of RBCs, and the curves of adhesive force showed the dramatic alternations in viscoelasticity of RBC. Taken together, the AFM detections on the time-dependent, substrate type-dependent, environment (temperature/humidity)-dependent changes in morphology and surface viscoelasticity of RBC imply a potential application of AFM in forensic medicine or investigations, e.g., estimating age of bloodstain or death time. PMID:19019689

  17. Periodicity in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chia-Yun; Santos, Sergio Chiesa, Matteo; Barcons, Victor

    2015-07-28

    Periodicity is fundamental for quantification and the application of conservation principles of many important systems. Here, we discuss periodicity in the context of bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM). The relationship between the excited frequencies is shown to affect and control both experimental observables and the main expressions quantified via these observables, i.e., virial and energy transfer expressions, which form the basis of the bimodal AFM theory. The presence of a fundamental frequency further simplifies the theory and leads to close form solutions. Predictions are verified via numerical integration of the equation of motion and experimentally on a mica surface.

  18. Hyperbaric Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2003-07-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  19. Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2002-01-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  20. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force-distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7-9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the 'footprint' of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6-9.7. PMID:27454881

  1. Neuron Biomechanics Probed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  2. Neuron biomechanics probed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  3. Measuring energies with an Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, J.; Díez-Pérez, I.; Sanz, F.; Fraxedas, J.

    2006-04-01

    The elastic and plastic response of ordered inorganic, organic and biological materials involving nanometer-scale volumes in the nano- and low micronewton force range can be characterized by means of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) using ultrasharp cantilever tips with radius R typically below 10 nm. Because the plastic onset can be easily identified, the maximal accumulated elastic energy can be directly determined from the force curves (force F vs. penetration δ curves), thus giving a realistic estimate of the characteristic energies of the materials. We illustrate the ability of AFMs to determine such energies with the case example of the molecular organic metal TTF-TCNQ (TTF = tetrathiafulvalene, TCNQ = tetracyanoquinodimethane), where the enthalpy of sublimation is obtained.

  4. Bacteria attachment to surfaces--AFM force spectroscopy and physicochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2011-12-01

    Understanding bacterial adhesion to surfaces requires knowledge of the forces that govern bacterial-surface interactions. Biofilm formation on stainless steel 316 (SS316) by three bacterial species was investigated by examining surface force interaction between the cells and metal surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Bacterial-metal adhesion force was quantified at different surface delay time from 0 to 60s using AFM tip coated with three different bacterial species: Gram-negative Massilia timonae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The results revealed that bacterial adhesion forces on SS316 surface by Gram-negative bacteria is higher (8.53±1.40 nN and 7.88±0.94 nN) when compared to Gram-positive bacteria (1.44±0.21 nN). Physicochemical analysis on bacterial surface properties also revealed that M. timonae and P. aeruginosa showed higher hydrophobicity and surface charges than B. subtilis along with the capability of producing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The higher hydrophobicity, surface charges, and greater propensity to form EPS by M. timonae and P. aeruginosa led to high adhesive force on the metal surface. PMID:21889162

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  6. AFM forces between mica and polystyrene surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solutions with and without gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Jorge H; Acuña, Sergio M; Toledo, Pedro G

    2013-11-15

    Force curves between a flat mica substrate and a polystyrene microsphere were measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM) in carefully degassed water and aqueous NaCl, CaCl2, and AlCl3 solutions. The pH of the water used does not change significantly with degassing treatment, and its value remains close to 6. Electrolyte concentration ranges from 10-4 to 10-2M and pH from 4.7 to 5.1. We have found that the repulsive long-range electrostatic force between mica and polystyrene is attenuated by the presence of electrolytes and counterbalanced by a long-range attractive force, which we referred to as a hydrophobic force, which is longer-ranged than the ever present attractive van der Waals force. This force, which includes the adhesive bridging of residual air bubbles and newborn vapor cavities, and any other unknown forces, is reasonably well represented by a unique exponential law. Prefactor and decaying length are not very sensitive to electrolyte type, concentration, and pH, suggesting that any new force included in the law, in addition to adhesive bridges, should obey a non-classical electrostatic mechanism. However, we also know that liquid/solid contact angle and liquid/vapor surface tension increase with electrolyte concentration and valence increasing the stability of bubbles and cavities which in turn increase the bridging force. Clearly, these effects are hidden in the empirical force law. PMID:23998373

  7. High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshio; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Kodera, Noriyuki

    2012-08-01

    The technology of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) has reached maturity. HS-AFM enables us to directly visualize the structure and dynamics of biological molecules in physiological solutions at subsecond to sub-100 ms temporal resolution. By this microscopy, dynamically acting molecules such as myosin V walking on an actin filament and bacteriorhodopsin in response to light are successfully visualized. High-resolution molecular movies reveal the dynamic behavior of molecules in action in great detail. Inferences no longer have to be made from static snapshots of molecular structures and from the dynamic behavior of optical markers attached to biomolecules. In this review, we first describe theoretical considerations for the highest possible imaging rate, then summarize techniques involved in HS-AFM and highlight recent imaging studies. Finally, we briefly discuss future challenges to explore.

  8. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  9. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  10. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength goldmore » disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.« less

  11. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I I; Chan, C T; Chan, H B; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  12. Automated AFM force curve analysis for determining elastic modulus of biomaterials and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yow-Ren; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Garland, Shaun P; Morgan, Joshua T; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J

    2014-09-01

    The analysis of atomic force microscopy (AFM) force data requires the selection of a contact point (CP) and is often time consuming and subjective due to influence from intermolecular forces and low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). In this report, we present an automated algorithm for the selection of CPs in AFM force data and the evaluation of elastic moduli. We propose that CP may be algorithmically easier to detect by identifying a linear elastic indentation region of data (high SNR) rather than the contact point itself (low SNR). Utilizing Hertzian mechanics, the data are fitted for the CP. We first detail the algorithm and then evaluate it on sample polymeric and biological materials. As a demonstration of automation, 64 × 64 force maps were analyzed to yield spatially varying topographical and mechanical information of cells. Finally, we compared manually selected CPs to automatically identified CPs and demonstrated that our automated approach is both accurate (< 10nm difference between manual and automatic) and precise for non-interacting polymeric materials. Our data show that the algorithm is useful for analysis of both biomaterials and biological samples. PMID:24951927

  13. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  14. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  15. Nanopuller-open data acquisition platform for AFM force spectroscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Konrad; Strzelecki, Janusz

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a widely used tool in force spectroscopy studies. Presently, this instrument is accessible from numerous vendors, albeit commercial solutions are expensive and almost always hardware and software closed. Approaches for open setups were published, as with modern low cost and readily available piezoelectric actuators, data acquisition interfaces and optoelectronic components building such force spectroscopy AFM is relatively easy. However, suitable software to control such laboratory made instrument was not released. Developing it in the lab requires significant time and effort. Our Nanopuller software described in this paper is intended to eliminate this obstacle. With only minimum adjustments this program can be used to control and acquire data with any suitable National Instruments universal digital/analog interface and piezoelectric actuator analog controller, giving significant freedom and flexibility in designing force spectroscopy experiment. Since the full code, written in a graphical LabVIEW environment is available, our Nanopuller can be easily customized. In this paper we describe the program and test its performance in controlling different setups. Successful and accurate force curve acquisition for standard samples (single molecules of I27O reference titin polyprotein and DNA as well as red blood cells) is shown. PMID:26994468

  16. Probing fibronectin–antibody interactions using AFM force spectroscopy and lateral force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, Andrzej J; Lee, Kyumin; Pyka-Fościak, Grazyna; Nowak, Wieslaw

    2015-01-01

    Summary The first experiment showing the effects of specific interaction forces using lateral force microscopy (LFM) was demonstrated for lectin–carbohydrate interactions some years ago. Such measurements are possible under the assumption that specific forces strongly dominate over the non-specific ones. However, obtaining quantitative results requires the complex and tedious calibration of a torsional force. Here, a new and relatively simple method for the calibration of the torsional force is presented. The proposed calibration method is validated through the measurement of the interaction forces between human fibronectin and its monoclonal antibody. The results obtained using LFM and AFM-based classical force spectroscopies showed similar unbinding forces recorded at similar loading rates. Our studies verify that the proposed lateral force calibration method can be applied to study single molecule interactions. PMID:26114080

  17. Atomic force microscopy to detect internal live processes in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokukin, M. E.; Guz, N. V.; Vasilyev, S.; Sokolov, I.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study surface oscillations coming from internal live processes of insects. With a specially designed AFM stage to keep an insect motion partially restricted, the AFM can record internal oscillations on different parts of the insect. We demonstrate the method for a fly, mosquito, and lady beetle. We show that AFM can provide information about the spectral behavior that has not been studied so far, 10-600 Hz range, detecting amplitudes down to subnanometer level.

  18. Interlaboratory comparison of traceable atomic force microscope pitch measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald; Chernoff, Donald A.; Wang, Shihua; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Tan, Siew Leng; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Advanced Surface Microscopy (ASM), and the National Metrology Centre (NMC) of the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR) in Singapore have completed a three-way interlaboratory comparison of traceable pitch measurements using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The specimen being used for this comparison is provided by ASM and consists of SiO2 lines having a 70 nm pitch patterned on a silicon substrate. NIST has a multifaceted program in atomic force microscope (AFM) dimensional metrology. One component of this effort is a custom in-house metrology AFM, called the calibrated AFM (C-AFM). The NIST C-AFM has displacement metrology for all three axes traceable to the 633 nm wavelength of the iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser - a recommended wavelength for realization of the SI (Système International d'Unités, or International System of Units) meter. NIST used the C-AFM to participate in this comparison. ASM used a commercially available AFM with an open-loop scanner, calibrated by a 144 nm pitch transfer standard. In a prior collaboration with Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German national metrology institute, ASM's transfer standard was calibrated using PTB's traceable optical diffractometry instrument. Thus, ASM's measurements are also traceable to the SI meter. NMC/A*STAR used a large scanning range metrological atomic force microscope (LRM-AFM). The LRM-AFM integrates an AFM scanning head into a nano-stage equipped with three built-in He-Ne laser interferometers so that its measurement related to the motion on all three axes is directly traceable to the SI meter. The measurements for this interlaboratory comparison have been completed and the results are in agreement within their expanded uncertainties and at the level of a few parts in 104.

  19. Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging and Force Spectroscopy of Supported Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Unsay, Joseph D; Cosentino, Katia; García-Sáez, Ana J

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile, high-resolution imaging technique that allows visualization of biological membranes. It has sufficient magnification to examine membrane substructures and even individual molecules. AFM can act as a force probe to measure interactions and mechanical properties of membranes. Supported lipid bilayers are conventionally used as membrane models in AFM studies. In this protocol, we demonstrate how to prepare supported bilayers and characterize their structure and mechanical properties using AFM. These include bilayer thickness and breakthrough force. The information provided by AFM imaging and force spectroscopy help define mechanical and chemical properties of membranes. These properties play an important role in cellular processes such as maintaining cell hemostasis from environmental stress, bringing membrane proteins together, and stabilizing protein complexes. PMID:26273958

  20. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Stack, Andrew G; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-02-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) and corundum (α-Al(2)O(3)) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3±0.7nN to 0.8±0.4nN as hematite NPs increased from 26nm to 98nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed. PMID:20932723

  1. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite ( -Fe2 O3 ) and corundum ( -Al2 O3 ) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3 0.7 nN to 0.8 0.4 nN as hematite NPs increased from 26 nm to 98 nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed.

  2. Stochastic noise in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Labuda, Aleksander; Lysy, Martin; Paul, William; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter; Bennewitz, Roland; Sutton, Mark

    2012-09-01

    Having reached the quantum and thermodynamic limits of detection, atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments are routinely being performed at the fundamental limit of signal to noise. A critical understanding of the statistical properties of noise leads to more accurate interpretation of data, optimization of experimental protocols, advancements in instrumentation, and new measurement techniques. Furthermore, accurate simulation of cantilever dynamics requires knowledge of stochastic behavior of the system, as stochastic noise may exceed the deterministic signals of interest, and even dominate the outcome of an experiment. In this article, the power spectral density (PSD), used to quantify stationary stochastic processes, is introduced in the context of a thorough noise analysis of the light source used to detect cantilever deflections. The statistical properties of PSDs are then outlined for various stationary, nonstationary, and deterministic noise sources in the context of AFM experiments. Following these developments, a method for integrating PSDs to provide an accurate standard deviation of linear measurements is described. Lastly, a method for simulating stochastic Gaussian noise from any arbitrary power spectral density is presented. The result demonstrates that mechanical vibrations of the AFM can cause a logarithmic velocity dependence of friction and induce multiple slip events in the atomic stick-slip process, as well as predicts an artifactual temperature dependence of friction measured by AFM. PMID:23030863

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy Application in Biological Research: A Review Study

    PubMed Central

    Vahabi, Surena; Nazemi Salman, Bahareh; Javanmard, Anahita

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a three-dimensional topographic technique with a high atomic resolution to measure surface roughness. AFM is a kind of scanning probe microscope, and its near-field technique is based on the interaction between a sharp tip and the atoms of the sample surface. There are several methods and many ways to modify the tip of the AFM to investigate surface properties, including measuring friction, adhesion forces and viscoelastic properties as well as determining the Young modulus and imaging magnetic or electrostatic properties. The AFM technique can analyze any kind of samples such as polymers, adsorbed molecules, films or fibers, and powders in the air whether in a controlled atmosphere or in a liquid medium. In the past decade, the AFM has emerged as a powerful tool to obtain the nanostructural details and biomechanical properties of biological samples, including biomolecules and cells. The AFM applications, techniques, and -in particular- its ability to measure forces, are not still familiar to most clinicians. This paper reviews the literature on the main principles of the AFM modality and highlights the advantages of this technique in biology, medicine, and- especially- dentistry. This literature review was performed through E-resources, including Science Direct, PubMed, Blackwell Synergy, Embase, Elsevier, and Scholar Google for the references published between 1985 and 2010. PMID:23825885

  4. Ultra-small oscillation amplitude nc-AFM/STM imaging, force and dissipation spectroscopy of Si(100)(2×1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgür Özer, H.; Atabak, Mehrdad; Oral, Ahmet

    2002-12-01

    Si(100)(2×1) surface is imaged using a new nc-AFM (non-contact atomic force microscopy)/STM with sub-Ångstrom oscillation amplitudes using stiff hand-made tungsten levers. Simultaneous force gradient and scanning tunneling microscopy images of individual dimers and atomic scale defects are obtained. We measured force-distance and dissipation-distance curves with different tips. Some of the tips show long-range force interactions, whereas some others resolve short-range interatomic force interactions. We observed that the tips showing short-range force interaction give atomic resolution in force gradient scans. This result suggests that short-range force interactions are responsible for atomic resolution in nc-AFM. We also observed an increase in the dissipation as the tip is approached closer to the surface, followed by an unexpected decrease as we pass the inflection point in the energy-distance curve.

  5. Oscillatory structural forces due to nonionic surfactant micelles: data by colloidal-probe AFM vs theory.

    PubMed

    Christov, Nikolay C; Danov, Krassimir D; Zeng, Yan; Kralchevsky, Peter A; von Klitzing, Regine

    2010-01-19

    Micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants Brij 35 and Tween 20 are confined between two surfaces in a colloidal-probe atomic-force microscope (CP-AFM). The experimentally detected oscillatory forces due to the layer-by-layer expulsion of the micelles agree very well with the theoretical predictions for hard-sphere fluids. While the experiment gives parts of the stable branches of the force curve, the theoretical model allows reconstruction of the full oscillatory curve. Therewith, the strength and range of the ordering could be determined. The resulting aggregation number from the fits of the force curves for Brij 35 is close to 70 and exhibits a slight tendency to increase with the surfactant concentration. The last layer of micelles cannot be pressed out. The measured force-vs-distance curve has nonequilibrium portions, which represent "jumps" from one to another branch of the respective equilibrium oscillatory curve. In the case of Brij 35, at concentrations <150 mM spherical micelles are present and the oscillation period is close to the micelle diameter, slightly decreasing with the rise of concentration. For elongated micelles (at concentration 200 mM), no harmonic oscillations are observed anymore; instead, the period increases with the decrease of film thickness. In the case of Tween 20, the force oscillations are almost suppressed, which implies that the micelles of this surfactant are labile and are demolished by the hydrodynamic shear stresses due to the colloidal-probe motion. The comparison of the results for the two surfactants demonstrates that in some cases the micelles can be destroyed by the CP-AFM, but in other cases they can be stable and behave as rigid particles. This behavior correlates with the characteristic times of the slow micellar relaxation process for these surfactants. PMID:20067306

  6. Ultrastable Atomic Force Microscopy for Biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churnside, Allison B.

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a multifunctional workhorse of nanoscience and molecular biophysics, but instrumental drift remains a critical issue that limits the precision and duration of experiments. We have significantly reduced the two most important types of drift: in position and in force. The first, position drift, is defined as uncontrolled motion between the tip and the sample, which occurs in all three dimensions. By scattering a laser off the apex of a commercial AFM tip, we locally measured and thereby actively controlled its three-dimensional position above a sample surface to <0.4 A (Deltaf = 0.01--10 Hz) in air at room temperature. With this enhanced stability, we demonstrated atomic-scale (˜1 A) tip-sample stability and registration over tens of minutes with a series of AFM images. The second type of drift is force drift. We found that the primary source of force drift for a popular class of soft cantilevers is their gold coating, even though they are coated on both sides to minimize drift. When the gold coating was removed through a simple chemical etch, this drift in deflection was reduced by more than an order of magnitude over the first 2 hours after wetting the tip. Removing the gold also led to ˜ 10-fold reduction in reflected light, yet short-term (0.1--10 s) force precision improved. With both position and force drift greatly reduced, the utility of the AFM is enhanced. These improvements led to several new AFM abilities, including a five-fold increase in the image signal-to-noise ratio; tip-registered, label-free optical imaging; registered tip return to a particular point on the sample; and dual-detection force spectroscopy, which enables a new extension clamp mode. We have applied these abilities to folding of both membrane and soluble proteins. In principle, the techniques we describe can be fully incorporated into many types of scanning probe microscopy, making this work a general improvement to scanning probe techniques.

  7. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplex. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. (2011) Journal of Organic Chemistry 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γMPPNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that γMPPNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ∼ 0.030 ± 0.01 sec-1 for γMPPNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs. 0.375 ± 0.18 sec-1 for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γMPPNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γMPPNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  8. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-03-15

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplexes. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γ(MP)PNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that the γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ≈ 0.030 ± 0.01 s⁻¹ for γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs 0.375 ± 0.18 s⁻¹ for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γ(MP)PNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γ(MP)PNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  9. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-03-01

    A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  10. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH).

  11. Investigating cell mechanics with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Haase, Kristina; Pelling, Andrew E

    2015-03-01

    Transmission of mechanical force is crucial for normal cell development and functioning. However, the process of mechanotransduction cannot be studied in isolation from cell mechanics. Thus, in order to understand how cells 'feel', we must first understand how they deform and recover from physical perturbations. Owing to its versatility, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a popular tool to study intrinsic cellular mechanical properties. Used to directly manipulate and examine whole and subcellular reactions, AFM allows for top-down and reconstitutive approaches to mechanical characterization. These studies show that the responses of cells and their components are complex, and largely depend on the magnitude and time scale of loading. In this review, we generally describe the mechanotransductive process through discussion of well-known mechanosensors. We then focus on discussion of recent examples where AFM is used to specifically probe the elastic and inelastic responses of single cells undergoing deformation. We present a brief overview of classical and current models often used to characterize observed cellular phenomena in response to force. Both simple mechanistic models and complex nonlinear models have been used to describe the observed cellular behaviours, however a unifying description of cell mechanics has not yet been resolved. PMID:25589563

  12. Investigating cell mechanics with atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Kristina; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of mechanical force is crucial for normal cell development and functioning. However, the process of mechanotransduction cannot be studied in isolation from cell mechanics. Thus, in order to understand how cells ‘feel’, we must first understand how they deform and recover from physical perturbations. Owing to its versatility, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a popular tool to study intrinsic cellular mechanical properties. Used to directly manipulate and examine whole and subcellular reactions, AFM allows for top-down and reconstitutive approaches to mechanical characterization. These studies show that the responses of cells and their components are complex, and largely depend on the magnitude and time scale of loading. In this review, we generally describe the mechanotransductive process through discussion of well-known mechanosensors. We then focus on discussion of recent examples where AFM is used to specifically probe the elastic and inelastic responses of single cells undergoing deformation. We present a brief overview of classical and current models often used to characterize observed cellular phenomena in response to force. Both simple mechanistic models and complex nonlinear models have been used to describe the observed cellular behaviours, however a unifying description of cell mechanics has not yet been resolved. PMID:25589563

  13. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Allison, David P; Mortensen, Ninell P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH). PMID:20672388

  14. Investigating bioconjugation by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnological applications increasingly exploit the selectivity and processivity of biological molecules. Integration of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA into nano-systems typically requires their conjugation to surfaces, for example of carbon-nanotubes or fluorescent quantum dots. The bioconjugated nanostructures exploit the unique strengths of both their biological and nanoparticle components and are used in diverse, future oriented research areas ranging from nanoelectronics to biosensing and nanomedicine. Atomic force microscopy imaging provides valuable, direct insight for the evaluation of different conjugation approaches at the level of the individual molecules. Recent technical advances have enabled high speed imaging by AFM supporting time resolutions sufficient to follow conformational changes of intricately assembled nanostructures in solution. In addition, integration of AFM with different spectroscopic and imaging approaches provides an enhanced level of information on the investigated sample. Furthermore, the AFM itself can serve as an active tool for the assembly of nanostructures based on bioconjugation. AFM is hence a major workhorse in nanotechnology; it is a powerful tool for the structural investigation of bioconjugation and bioconjugation-induced effects as well as the simultaneous active assembly and analysis of bioconjugation-based nanostructures. PMID:23855448

  15. Sharp Tips on the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows the eight sharp tips of the NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The microscope maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with one of the tips at the end of a beam. For the AFM image taken, the tip at the end of the upper right beam was used. The tip pointing up in the enlarged image is the size of a smoke particle at its base, or 2 microns. This image was taken with a scanning electron microscope before Phoenix launched on August 4, 2007.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium in collaboration with Imperial College London.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Tip characterizer for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki; Ichimura, Shingo

    2006-10-01

    A tip characterizer for atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed based on the fabrication of multilayer thin films. Comb-shaped line and space (LS) and wedge-shaped knife-edge structures were fabricated on a GaAs substrate. GaAs /InGaP superlattices were used to control the width of the structures precisely, and selective chemical etching was used to form sharp edges on the nanostructures. The minimum size of the LS structure was designed to be 10nm, and the radius of the knife edge was less than 5nm. These nanostructures were used as a well-defined tip characterizer to measure the shape of a tip on a cantilever from line profiles of AFM images.

  17. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  18. Advances in Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Thomas Robert

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and the more recently developed atomic force microscope (AFM) are high resolution scanning probe microscopes capable of three dimensional atomic-scale surface profiling. In the AFM, minute forces acting between the tip of a flexible cantilever stylus and the surface of the sample cause deflections of the cantilever which are detected by a tunneling or optical sensor with subangstrom sensitivity. The AFM work presented here involves surface profiling via repulsive contact forces between 10^{-6} and 10^{-9} N in magnitude. In this contact profiling (repulsive) mode the AFM is capable of atomic resolution on both electrically conducting and insulating surfaces (unlike the STM). AFM instrumentation for room temperature and low temperature operation is discussed. The critical component of the AFM is the cantilever stylus assembly, which should have a small mass. Several microfabrication processes have been developed to produce thin film SiO_2 and Si_3N_4 microcantilevers with integrated sharp tips. Atomic resolution has been achieved with the AFM in air on a number of samples, including graphite, MoS _2, TaSe_2, WTe_2, TaS_2, and BN (the first insulator imaged with atomic resolution by any means). Various organic and molecular samples have been imaged with nanometer resolution. The difference between STM and AFM response is shown in images of TaS _2 (a charge density wave material), and in simultaneous STM/AFM images of lattice defects and adsorbates on graphite and MoS_2. A number of artifacts make STM and AFM image interpretation subtle, such as tip shape effects, frictional effects, and tracking in atomic grooves. STM images of moire patterns near grain boundaries confirm the importance of tip shape effects. Various surface modification and lithography techniques have been demonstrated with the STM and AFM, including an STM voltage pulse technique which reproducibly creates 40 A diameter holes on the surface of graphite, and a

  19. Changes in collagen fibril pattern and adhesion force with collagenase-induced injury in rat Achilles tendon observed via AFM.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Choi, Samjin; Chon, Jinmann; Yoo, Seungdon; Cho, Ilsung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-01-01

    The Achilles tendon consists mainly of type I collagen fibers that contain collagen fibrils. When the Achilles tendon is injured, it is inflamed. The collagenase-induced model has been widely used to study tendinitis. The major advantages of atomic force microscopy (AFM) over conventional optical and electron microscopy for bio-imaging include its non-requirement of a special coating and vacuum, and its capability to perform imaging in all environments. AFM force-distance measurements have become a fundamental tool in the fields of surface chemistry, biochemistry and materials science. Therefore, the changes in the ultrastructure and adhesion force of the collagen fibrils on the Achilles tendons of rats with Achilles tendinitis were observed using AFM. The changes in the structure of the Achilles tendons were evaluated based on the diameter and D-banding of the collagen fibrils. Collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis was induced with the injection of 30 microl crude collagenase into 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were each sacrificed on the first, second, third, fifth and seventh day after the collagenase injection. The normal and injured Achilles tendons were fixed in 4% buffered formalin and dehydrated with increasing concentrations of ethanol. AFM was performed using the non-contact mode at the resolution of 512 x 512 pixels, with a scan speed of 0.8 line/sec. The adhesion force was measured via the force-distance curve that resulted from the interactions between the AFM tip and the collagen fibril sample using the contact mode. The diameter of the collagen fibrils in the Achilles tendons significantly decreased (p < 0.05) after the collagenase injection, and the pattern of the D-banding of the collagen fibrils was similar to that of the diameter changes. The adhesion force decreased until the fifth day after the collagenase injection, but increased on the seventh day after the collagenase injection (p < 0.0001). PMID:21446543

  20. Lateral force microscope calibration using a modified atomic force microscope cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, M. G.

    2007-10-15

    A proof-of-concept study is presented for a prototype atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and associated calibration procedure that provide a path for quantitative friction measurement using a lateral force microscope (LFM). The calibration procedure is based on the method proposed by Feiler et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 2746 (2000)] but allows for calibration and friction measurements to be carried out in situ and with greater precision. The modified AFM cantilever is equipped with lateral lever arms that facilitate the application of normal and lateral forces, comparable to those acting in a typical LFM friction experiment. The technique allows the user to select acceptable precision via a potentially unlimited number of calibration measurements across the full working range of the LFM photodetector. A microfabricated version of the cantilever would be compatible with typical commercial AFM instrumentation and allow for common AFM techniques such as topography imaging and other surface force measurements to be performed.

  1. Forced Unfolding of the Coiled-Coils of Fibrinogen by Single-Molecule AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andre; Litvinov, Rustem; Discher, Dennis; Weisel, John

    2007-03-01

    A blood clot needs to have the right degree of stiffness and plasticity for hemostasis, but the origin of these mechanical properties is unknown. Here we report the first measurements using single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the forced unfolding of fibrinogen to begin addressing this problem. To generate longer reproducible curves than are possible using monomer, factor XIIIa cross-linked, single chain fibrinogen oligomers were used. When extended under force, these oligomers showed sawtooth shaped force-extension patterns characteristic of unfolding proteins with a peak-to-peak separation of approximately 26 nm, consistent with the independent unfolding of the coiled-coils. These results were then reproduced using a Monte Carlo simulation with parameters in the same range as those previously used for unfolding globular domains. In particular, we found that the refolding time was negligible on experimental time and force scales in contrast to previous work on simpler coiled-coils. We suggest that this difference may be due to fibrinogen's structurally and topologically more complex coiled-coils and that an interaction between the alpha C and central domains may be involved. These results suggest a new functional property of fibrinogen and that the coiled-coil is more than a passive structural element of this molecule.

  2. Robust atomic force microscopy using multiple sensors.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Mayank; Gorugantu, Ram S; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2016-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy typically relies on high-resolution high-bandwidth cantilever deflection measurements based control for imaging and estimating sample topography and properties. More precisely, in amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM), the control effort that regulates deflection amplitude is used as an estimate of sample topography; similarly, contact-mode AFM uses regulation of deflection signal to generate sample topography. In this article, a control design scheme based on an additional feedback mechanism that uses vertical z-piezo motion sensor, which augments the deflection based control scheme, is proposed and evaluated. The proposed scheme exploits the fact that the piezo motion sensor, though inferior to the cantilever deflection signal in terms of resolution and bandwidth, provides information on piezo actuator dynamics that is not easily retrievable from the deflection signal. The augmented design results in significant improvements in imaging bandwidth and robustness, especially in AM-AFM, where the complicated underlying nonlinear dynamics inhibits estimating piezo motions from deflection signals. In AM-AFM experiments, the two-sensor based design demonstrates a substantial improvement in robustness to modeling uncertainties by practically eliminating the peak in the sensitivity plot without affecting the closed-loop bandwidth when compared to a design that does not use the piezo-position sensor based feedback. The contact-mode imaging results, which use proportional-integral controllers for cantilever-deflection regulation, demonstrate improvements in bandwidth and robustness to modeling uncertainties, respectively, by over 30% and 20%. The piezo-sensor based feedback is developed using H∞ control framework. PMID:27587128

  3. CO tip functionalization in subatomic resolution atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minjung; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2015-10-19

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) employing a CO-functionalized tip displays dramatically enhanced resolution wherein covalent bonds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon can be imaged. Employing real-space pseudopotential first-principles calculations, we examine the role of CO in functionalizing the nc-AFM tip. Our calculations allow us to simulate full AFM images and ascertain the enhancement mechanism of the CO molecule. We consider two approaches: one with an explicit inclusion of the CO molecule and one without. By comparing our simulations to existing experimental images, we ascribe the enhanced resolution of the CO functionalized tip to the special orbital characteristics of the CO molecule.

  4. Nanoscale resolution microchannel flow velocimetry by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piorek, Brian; Mechler, Ádám; Lal, Ratnesh; Freudenthal, Patrick; Meinhart, Carl; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2006-10-01

    The velocity of a microchannel flow was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a 50nm wide "whisker," which was partially submerged and scanned transverse to the flow while drag was recorded. A peaked, near parabolic, flow velocity profile was found. Particle image velocity (PIV) measurements using 70nm diameter quantum-dot-coated polystyrene spheres confirmed the shape of the AFM-measured velocity profile. AFM-based nanometer resolution velocimetry confirms that the drag-velocity relationship for the whisker remains consistent over a wide range of shear values and appears to successfully resolve submicron scale flows, which are beyond the limits of conventional PIV measurements.

  5. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, G. J.; Zalm, D. J. van der; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J.

    2015-03-15

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  6. Taking nanomedicine teaching into practice with atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C

    2015-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic force microscope by performing AFM scanning images of human blood cells and force spectroscopy measurements of the fibrinogen-platelet interaction. Since the beginning of this course, in 2008, the overall rating by the students was 4.7 (out of 5), meaning a good to excellent evaluation. Students were very enthusiastic and produced high-quality AFM images and force spectroscopy data. The implementation of the hands-on AFM course was a success, giving to the students the opportunity of contact with a technique that has a wide variety of applications on the nanomedicine field. In the near future, nanomedicine will have remarkable implications in medicine regarding the definition, diagnosis, and treatment of different diseases. AFM enables students to observe single molecule interactions, enabling the understanding of molecular mechanisms of different physiological and pathological processes at the nanoscale level. Therefore, the introduction of nanomedicine courses in bioscience and medical school curricula is essential. PMID:26628660

  7. Atomic force microscopy characterization of cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lahiji, Roya R; Xu, Xin; Reifenberger, Ronald; Raman, Arvind; Rudie, Alan; Moon, Robert J

    2010-03-16

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are gaining interest as a "green" nanomaterial with superior mechanical and chemical properties for high-performance nanocomposite materials; however, there is a lack of accurate material property characterization of individual CNCs. Here, a detailed study of the topography, elastic and adhesive properties of individual wood-derived CNCs is performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM experiments involving high-resolution dynamic mode imaging and jump-mode measurements were performed on individual CNCs under ambient conditions with 30% relative humidity (RH) and under a N(2) atmosphere with 0.1% RH. A procedure was also developed to calculate the CNC transverse elastic modulus (E(T)) by comparing the experimental force-distance curves measured on the CNCs with 3D finite element calculations of tip indentation on the CNC. The E(T) of an isolated CNC was estimated to be between 18 and 50 GPa at 0.1% RH; however, the associated crystallographic orientation of the CNC could not be determined. CNC properties were reasonably uniform along the entire CNC length, despite variations along the axis of 3-8 nm in CNC height. The range of RH used in this study was found to have a minimal effect on the CNC geometry, confirming the resistance of the cellulose crystals to water penetration. CNC flexibility was also investigated by using the AFM tip as a nanomanipulator. PMID:20055370

  8. The Analog Atomic Force Microscope: Measuring, Modeling, and Graphing for Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Valerie; Brandt, Sharon; Lieberman, Marya

    2013-01-01

    using an analog atomic force microscope (A-AFM) made from a cardboard box and mailing tubes. Varying numbers of ping pong balls inside the tubes mimic atoms on a surface. Students use a dowel to make macroscale measurements similar to those of a nanoscale AFM tip as it…

  9. Improvements in fundamental performance of liquid-environment atomic force microscopy with true atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazuki; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Recently, there have been significant advancements in liquid-environment atomic force microscopy (AFM) with true atomic resolution. The technical advancements are followed by a rapid expansion of its application area. Examples include subnanometer-scale imaging of biological systems and three-dimensional measurements of water distributions (i.e., hydration structures) and fluctuating surface structures. However, to continue this progress, we should improve the fundamental performance of liquid-environment dynamic-mode AFM. The present AFM technique does not allow real-time imaging of atomic-scale dynamic phenomena at a solid-liquid interface. This has hindered atomic-level understanding of crystal growth and dissolution, catalytic reactions and metal corrosion processes. Improvement in force sensitivity is required not only for such a high-speed imaging but also for various surface property measurements using a high-resolution AFM technique. In this review, we summarize recent works on the improvements in the force sensitivity and operation speed of atomic-resolution dynamic-mode AFM for liquid-environment applications.

  10. The physics of pulling polyproteins: a review of single molecule force spectroscopy using the AFM to study protein unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Megan L.; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of biological physics in recent years is the ability to manipulate single molecules and probe their properties and function. Since its emergence over two decades ago, single molecule force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to explore the response of biological molecules, including proteins, DNA, RNA and their complexes, to the application of an applied force. The force versus extension response of molecules can provide valuable insight into its mechanical stability, as well as details of the underlying energy landscape. In this review we will introduce the technique of single molecule force spectroscopy using the atomic force microscope (AFM), with particular focus on its application to study proteins. We will review the models which have been developed and employed to extract information from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we will end with a discussion of future directions in this field.

  11. Imaging biological structures with the cryo atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Sheng, S; Shao, Z

    1996-01-01

    It has long been recognized that one of the major limitations in biological atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the softness of most biological samples, which are easily deformed or damaged by the AFM tip, because of the high pressure in the contact area, especially from the very sharp tips required for high resolution. Another is the molecular motion present at room temperature due to thermal fluctuation. Using an AFM operated in liquid nitrogen vapor (cryo-AFM), we demonstrate that cryo-AFM can be applied to a large variety of biological samples, from immunoglobulins to DNA to cell surfaces. The resolution achieved with cryo-AFM is much improved when compared with AFM at room temperature with similar specimens, and is comparable to that of cryo-electron microscopy on randomly oriented macromolecules. We will also discuss the technical problems that remain to be solved for achieving even higher resolution with cryo-AFM and other possible applications of this novel technique. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:8889193

  12. Microbially influenced corrosion visualized by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telegdi, J.; Keresztes, Z.; Pálinkás, G.; Kálmán, E.; Sand, W.

    Corrosion, biofilm formation and the adsorption of different, corrosion-enhancing microbes (such as Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, Thiobacillus intermedius, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, and mixed cultures) to different surfaces (iron, copper, pyrite) have been studied in aqueous environment by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is one of the most effective on-line techniques for imaging surfaces (bacterial, metallic, etc.) with high resolution.

  13. Surface Biology of DNA by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, Helen G.

    2001-10-01

    The atomic force microscope operates on surfaces. Since surfaces occupy much of the space in living organisms, surface biology is a valid and valuable form of biology that has been difficult to investigate in the past owing to a lack of good technology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of DNA has been used to investigate DNA condensation for gene therapy, DNA mapping and sizing, and a few applications to cancer research and to nanotechnology. Some of the most exciting new applications for atomic force microscopy of DNA involve pulling on single DNA molecules to obtain measurements of single-molecule mechanics and thermodynamics.

  14. Quantitative metallography of structural materials with the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Goeken, M.; Vehoff, H.

    1996-10-15

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) is now a well-established technique for imaging surface topography with high resolution and can be used to study the microstructure of structural materials in a nanometer range. On multiphase materials a contrast in the topographic AFM images is obtained from small height differences between the different phases. Accordingly investigations of microstructures that are prepared to have small height differences between the phases can be done. The AFM needs no vacuum, large specimen areas compared to the small areas in thinned TEM foils can be analyzed. This reduces the costs of the measurements significantly. In addition it is advantageous that all measurements are stored as data files in the computer and therefore quantitative evaluations of the topographic data can be performed directly. The microstructures of different crystalline alloys were investigated with the atomic force microscope. The examples include superalloys (Waspaloy, CMSX-6), martensitic transformed surfaces (NiAlCo), and steels (microalloyed steel, perlitic carbon steel).

  15. Using AFM Force Curves to Explore Properties of Elastomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Megan A.; Kozlowski, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers. Force curves are used to quantify the stiffness of elastomers prepared with different base-to-curing agent ratios. Trends in observed spring constants of the…

  16. High Resolution Imaging by Atomic Force Microscopy: Contribution of short-range force to the imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Toyoaki; Kotone, Akiyama; Masanori, Ono; Toshio, Sakurai; Yukio, Hasegawa

    2003-03-01

    Recent developments in force detection technique have made us possible to obtain atomically resolved images of the Si(111)-(7x7) surface by AFM. Compared with STM, however, its spatial resolution remains limited. In this presentation, we demonstrate that with careful pretreatment and appropriate experimental parameters, the structure of the rest-atom layer can be imaged using AFM by detecting the short-range force due to the single chemical bonding. The detection of the short-range force is verified by analysis of the frequency-shift versus distance curve (force curve). This unprecedented high resolution is achieved by reducing background forces due to the long-range interactions with small oscillation amplitude of the cantilever and an atomically sharp tip. The high temperature annealing of the cantilever assists in obtaining a bare silicon tip on the cantilever without unwanted tip-blunting, and improving the Q-factor of the cantilever. This study implies that characterization of the AFM tip in nanometer scale, not only on the apex atoms but also its shape near the apex, is important and critical for AFM high resolution imaging.

  17. A new ion sensing deep atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Barney; Randall, Connor; Bridges, Daniel; Hansma, Paul K.

    2014-08-01

    Here we describe a new deep atomic force microscope (AFM) capable of ion sensing. A novel probe assembly incorporates a micropipette that can be used both for sensing ion currents and as the tip for AFM imaging. The key advance of this instrument over previous ion sensing AFMs is that it uses conventional micropipettes in a novel suspension system. This paper focuses on sensing the ion current passively while using force feedback for the operation of the AFM in contact mode. Two images are obtained simultaneously: (1) an AFM topography image and (2) an ion current image. As an example, two images of a MEMS device with a microchannel show peaks in the ion current as the pipette tip goes over the edges of the channel. This ion sensing AFM can also be used in other modes including tapping mode with force feedback as well as in non-contact mode by utilizing the ion current for feedback, as in scanning ion conductance microscopy. The instrument is gentle enough to be used on some biological samples such as plant leaves.

  18. A new ion sensing deep atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, Barney; Randall, Connor; Bridges, Daniel; Hansma, Paul K.

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new deep atomic force microscope (AFM) capable of ion sensing. A novel probe assembly incorporates a micropipette that can be used both for sensing ion currents and as the tip for AFM imaging. The key advance of this instrument over previous ion sensing AFMs is that it uses conventional micropipettes in a novel suspension system. This paper focuses on sensing the ion current passively while using force feedback for the operation of the AFM in contact mode. Two images are obtained simultaneously: (1) an AFM topography image and (2) an ion current image. As an example, two images of a MEMS device with a microchannel show peaks in the ion current as the pipette tip goes over the edges of the channel. This ion sensing AFM can also be used in other modes including tapping mode with force feedback as well as in non-contact mode by utilizing the ion current for feedback, as in scanning ion conductance microscopy. The instrument is gentle enough to be used on some biological samples such as plant leaves.

  19. A new ion sensing deep atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Barney; Randall, Connor; Bridges, Daniel; Hansma, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a new deep atomic force microscope (AFM) capable of ion sensing. A novel probe assembly incorporates a micropipette that can be used both for sensing ion currents and as the tip for AFM imaging. The key advance of this instrument over previous ion sensing AFMs is that it uses conventional micropipettes in a novel suspension system. This paper focuses on sensing the ion current passively while using force feedback for the operation of the AFM in contact mode. Two images are obtained simultaneously: (1) an AFM topography image and (2) an ion current image. As an example, two images of a MEMS device with a microchannel show peaks in the ion current as the pipette tip goes over the edges of the channel. This ion sensing AFM can also be used in other modes including tapping mode with force feedback as well as in non-contact mode by utilizing the ion current for feedback, as in scanning ion conductance microscopy. The instrument is gentle enough to be used on some biological samples such as plant leaves. PMID:25173275

  20. Atomic species identification at the (101) anatase surface by simultaneous scanning tunnelling and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Todorović, Milica; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Moreno, César; Ryan, James William; León, Carmen Pérez; Sagisaka, Keisuke; Palomares, Emilio; Matolín, Vladimír; Fujita, Daisuke; Perez, Ruben; Custance, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Anatase is a pivotal material in devices for energy-harvesting applications and catalysis. Methods for the accurate characterization of this reducible oxide at the atomic scale are critical in the exploration of outstanding properties for technological developments. Here we combine atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), supported by first-principles calculations, for the simultaneous imaging and unambiguous identification of atomic species at the (101) anatase surface. We demonstrate that dynamic AFM-STM operation allows atomic resolution imaging within the material's band gap. Based on key distinguishing features extracted from calculations and experiments, we identify candidates for the most common surface defects. Our results pave the way for the understanding of surface processes, like adsorption of metal dopants and photoactive molecules, that are fundamental for the catalytic and photovoltaic applications of anatase, and demonstrate the potential of dynamic AFM-STM for the characterization of wide band gap materials. PMID:26118408

  1. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-15

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this 'thermal noise method' is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities.

  2. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids.

    PubMed

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-01

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this "thermal noise method" is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities. PMID:19334955

  3. The Applications of Atomic Force Microscopy to Vision Science

    PubMed Central

    Last, Julie A.; Russell, Paul; Nealey, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in materials science and has found many applications in biological sciences but has been limited in use in vision science. The AFM can be used to image the topography of soft biological materials in their native environments. It can also be used to probe the mechanical properties of cells and extracellular matrices, including their intrinsic elastic modulus and receptor-ligand interactions. In this review, the operation of the AFM is described along with a review of how it has been thus far used in vision science. It is hoped that this review will serve to stimulate vision scientists to consider incorporating AFM as part of their research toolkit. PMID:21123767

  4. Experimental evidence of ultrathin polymer film stratification by AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Nicolas; Chebil, Mohamed Souheib; Vignaud, Guillaume; Le Houerou, Vincent; Bardeau, Jean-François; Busselez, Rémi; Gibaud, Alain; Grohens, Yves

    2015-06-01

    By performing Atomic Force Microscopy measurements of pull-off force as a function of the temperature, we were able to probe the dynamic of supported thin polystyrene (PS) films. Thermal transitions induce modifications in the surface energy, roughness and surface modulus that are clearly detected by AFM and related to PS chain relaxation mechanisms. We demonstrated the existence of three transition temperatures that can be associated to the relaxation of polymer chains located at different depth regions within the polymer film. Independently of the film thickness, we have confirmed the presence of a region of high mobility for the polymer chains at the free interface. The thickness of this region is estimated to be above 7nm. The detection of a transition only present for film thicker than the gyration radius Rg is linked to the dynamics of polymer chains in a bulk conformation (i.e. not in contact with the free interface). We claim here that our results demonstrate, in agreement with other techniques, the stratification of thin polymer film depth profile in terms of relaxation behavior. PMID:26087914

  5. Combined quantitative ultrasonic and time-resolved interaction force AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Parlak, Z.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-01-15

    The authors describe a method where quantitative ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM) is achieved during time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) imaging in intermittent contact mode. The method uses a calibration procedure for quantitative UAFM. It improves elasticity measurements of stiff regions of surfaces while retaining the capabilities of the TRIF mode for topography, adhesion, dissipation, and elasticity measurements on soft regions of sample surfaces. This combination is especially advantageous when measuring and imaging samples with broad stiffness range in a nondestructive manner. The experiments utilize an active AFM probe with high bandwidth and the UAFM calibration is performed by measuring the magnitude of the time-resolved UAFM signal at a judiciously chosen frequency for different contact stiffness values during individual taps. Improved sensitivity to stiff surface elasticity is demonstrated on a special sample. The results show that combining UAFM with TRIF provides 2.5 GPa (5%) standard deviation on the silicon surface reduced Young's modulus, representing 5x improvement over using only TRIF mode imaging.

  6. Past, present and future of atomic force microscopy in life sciences and medicine.

    PubMed

    Parot, Pierre; Dufrêne, Yves F; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Le Grimellec, Christian; Navajas, Daniel; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Scheuring, Simon

    2007-01-01

    To introduce this special issue of the Journal of Molecular Recognition dedicated to the applications of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in life sciences, this paper presents a short summary of the history of AFM in biology. Based on contributions from the first international conference of AFM in biological sciences and medicine (AFM BioMed Barcelona, 19-21 April 2007), we present and discuss recent progress made using AFM for studying cells and cellular interactions, probing single molecules, imaging biosurfaces at high resolution and investigating model membranes and their interactions. Future prospects in these different fields are also highlighted. PMID:18080995

  7. Unstable amplitude and noisy image induced by tip contamination in dynamic force mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, H.-Y.; McIntyre, N. S.

    2007-02-01

    Liquid 1-decanethiol was confined on an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip apex and the effect was investigated by measuring amplitude-distance curves in dynamic force mode. Within the working distance in the dynamic force mode AFM, the thiol showed strong interactions bridging between a gold-coated probe tip and a gold-coated Si substrate, resulting in unstable amplitude and noisy AFM images. We show that under such a situation, the amplitude change is dominated by the extra forces induced by the active material loaded on the tip apex, overwhelming the amplitude change caused by the geometry of the sample surface, thus resulting in noise in the image the tip collects. We also show that such a contaminant may be removed from the apex by pushing the tip into a material soft enough to avoid damage to the tip.

  8. Nanoscale imaging of Bacillus thuringiensis flagella using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Annika; Dupres, Vincent; Delestrait, Guillaume; Mahillon, Jacques; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2012-02-01

    Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in cell surface appendages.Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in

  9. The Effects of Orthophosphate in Drinking Water on the Initial Copper Corrosion Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corroding of copper piping used in household drinking water plumbing may potentially impacts consumer’s health and economics. Copper corrosion studies conducted on newly corroding material with atomic force microscopy (AFM) may be particularly useful in understanding the impact ...

  10. Evaluating interaction forces between BSA and rabbit anti-BSA in sulphathiazole sodium, tylosin and levofloxacin solution by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Congzhou; Wang, Jianhua; Deng, Linhong

    2011-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions play crucial roles in numerous biological processes. However, it is still challenging to evaluate the protein-protein interactions, such as antigen and antibody, in the presence of drug molecules in physiological liquid. In this study, the interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and rabbit anti-BSA was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the presence of various antimicrobial drugs (sulphathiazole sodium, tylosin and levofloxacin) under physiological condition. The results show that increasing the concentration of tylosin decreased the single-molecule-specific force between BSA and rabbit anti-BSA. As for sulphathiazole sodium, it dramatically decreased the specific force at a certain critical concentration, but increased the nonspecific force as its concentration increasing. In addition, the presence of levofloxacin did not greatly influence either the specific or nonspecific force. Collectively, these results suggest that these three drugs may adopt different mechanisms to affect the interaction force between BSA and rabbit anti-BSA. These findings may enhance our understanding of antigen/antibody binding processes in the presence of drug molecules, and hence indicate that AFM could be helpful in the design and screening of drugs-modulating protein-protein interaction processes.

  11. Terabit-per-square-inch data storage with the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, E. B.; Manalis, S. R.; Fang, H.; Dai, H.; Matsumoto, K.; Minne, S. C.; Hunt, T.; Quate, C. F.

    1999-11-01

    An areal density of 1.6 Tbits/in.2 has been achieved by anodically oxidizing titanium with the atomic force microscope (AFM). This density was made possible by (1) single-wall carbon nanotubes selectively grown on an AFM cantilever, (2) atomically flat titanium surfaces on α-Al2O3 (1012), and (3) atomic scale force and position control with the tapping-mode AFM. By combining these elements, 8 nm bits on 20 nm pitch are written at a rate of 5 kbit/s at room temperature in air.

  12. Lateral force calibration: accurate procedures for colloidal probe friction measurements in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Pratt, Jon R; Reitsma, Mark G

    2010-01-19

    The colloidal probe technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) has allowed the investigation of an extensive range of surface force phenomena, including the measurement of frictional (lateral) forces between numerous materials. The quantitative accuracy of such friction measurements is often debated, in part due to a lack of confidence in existing calibration strategies. Here we compare three in situ AFM lateral force calibration techniques using a single colloidal probe, seeking to establish a foundation for quantitative measurement by linking these techniques to accurate force references available at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. We introduce a procedure for calibrating the AFM lateral force response to known electrostatic forces applied directly to the conductive colloidal probe. In a second procedure, we apply known force directly to the colloidal probe using a precalibrated piezo-resistive reference cantilever. We found agreement between these direct methods on the order of 2% (within random uncertainty for both measurements). In a third procedure, we performed a displacement-based calibration using the piezo-resistive reference cantilever as a stiffness reference artifact. The method demonstrated agreement on the order of 7% with the direct force methods, with the difference attributed to an expected systematic uncertainty, caused by in-plane deflection in the cantilever during loading. The comparison establishes the existing limits of instrument accuracy and sets down a basis for selection criteria for materials and methods in colloidal probe friction (lateral) force measurements via atomic force microscopy. PMID:19827782

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy of Arrays of Asymmetrical DNA Motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, W.B.; Mudalige, T.K.

    2012-03-21

    DNA can easily be assembled into wide and relatively flat nanostructures that lend themselves to study via Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is often important to know which side of an assembly the AFM is imaging. This is particularly crucial for characterizing nanomachines, where the movement must be measured relative to fiducial features visible to the AFM. We have developed a cheap and simple technique for building DNA arrays with distinguishable sides, a technique requiring 10 or fewer strands - dozens or hundreds of strands fewer than used for these purposes previously. Our approach involves constructing arrays out of DNA tiles that have low apparent symmetry when imaged via AFM. We have surveyed the effects of varying degrees of motif asymmetry in AFM micrographs. Even at resolutions where the individual tiles cannot be resolved (either because of sub-optimal tip quality, or very gentle tapping by the AFM tip) the larger scale features of the arrays have predictable structures that allow the determination of which side of the array is facing up. We have used this information to verify that DNA hairpins attached to either the up- or down-facing side of an array on mica can be detected in AFM height scans. We have also characterized differences in appearance between hairpins attached to different sides of the arrays.

  14. Tracking Unfolding and Refolding Reactions of Single Proteins using Atomic Force Microscopy Methods

    PubMed Central

    Bujalowski, Paul J.; Oberhauser, Andres F.

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades single-molecule manipulation techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) has risen to prominence through their unique capacity to provide fundamental information on the structure and function of biomolecules. Here we describe the use of single-molecule AFM to track protein unfolding and refolding pathways, enzymatic catalysis and the effects of osmolytes and chaperones on protein stability and folding. We will outline the principles of operation for two different AFM pulling techniques: length clamp and force-clamp discuss prominent applications. We provide protocols for the construction of polyproteins which are amenable for AFM experiments, the preparation of different coverslips, choice and calibration of AFM cantilevers. We also discuss the selection criteria for AFM recordings, the calibration of AFM cantilevers, protein sample preparations and analysis of the obtained data. PMID:23523554

  15. Dissipation and oscillatory solvation forces in confined liquids studied by small-amplitude atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2010-08-13

    We determine conservative and dissipative tip-sample interaction forces from the amplitude and phase response of acoustically driven atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using a non-polar model fluid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, which displays strong molecular layering) and atomically flat surfaces of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. Taking into account the base motion and the frequency-dependent added mass and hydrodynamic damping on the AFM cantilever, we develop a reliable force inversion procedure that allows for extracting tip-sample interaction forces for a wide range of drive frequencies. We systematically eliminate the effect of finite drive amplitudes. Dissipative tip-sample forces are consistent with the bulk viscosity down to a thickness of 2-3 nm. Dissipation measurements far below resonance, which we argue to be the most reliable, indicate the presence of peaks in the damping, corresponding to an enhanced 'effective' viscosity, upon expelling the last and second-last molecular layer. PMID:20639584

  16. Characterization of deep nanoscale surface trenches with AFM using thin carbon nanotube probes in amplitude-modulation and frequency-force-modulation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of deep surface trenches with atomic force microscopy (AFM) presents significant challenges due to the sharp step edges that disturb the instrument and prevent it from faithfully reproducing the sample topography. Previous authors have developed AFM methodologies to successfully characterize semiconductor surface trenches with dimensions on the order of tens of nanometers. However, the study of imaging fidelity for features with dimensions smaller than 10 nm has not yet received sufficient attention. Such a study is necessary because small features in some cases lead to apparently high-quality images that are distorted due to tip and sample mechanical deformation. This paper presents multi-scale simulations, illustrating common artifacts affecting images of nanoscale trenches taken with fine carbon nanotube probes within amplitude-modulation and frequency-force-modulation AFM (AM-AFM and FFM-AFM, respectively). It also describes a methodology combining FFM-AFM with a step-in/step-out algorithm analogous to that developed by other groups for larger trenches, which can eliminate the observed artifacts. Finally, an overview of the AFM simulation methods is provided. These methods, based on atomistic and continuum simulation, have been previously used to study a variety of samples including silicon surfaces, carbon nanotubes and biomolecules.

  17. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever-tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip-surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years. PMID:25821676

  18. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever–tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip–surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years. PMID:25821676

  19. Native Escherichia coli OmpF Porin Surfaces Probed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schabert, Frank A.; Henn, Christian; Engel, Andreas

    1995-04-01

    Topographs of two dimensional porin OmpF crystals reconstituted in the presence of lipids were recorded in solution by atomic force microscopy (AFM) to a lateral resolution of 10 angstroms and a vertical resolution of 1 angstrom. Protein-protein interactions were demonstrated on the basis of the AFM results and earlier crystallographic findings. To assess protein-lipid interactions, the bilayer was modeled with kinked lipids by fitting the head groups to contours determined with AFM. Finally, two conformations of the extracellular porin surface were detected at forces of 0.1 nanonewton, demonstrating the potential of AFM to monitor conformational changes with high resolution.

  20. Detection of viruses: atomic force microscopy and surface enhanced raman spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper demonstrated the capability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to function effectively as ultra-sensitive readout tools for chip-scale platforms designed for pathogen detection in complex biological media. AFM allows direct (i.e. label-free) vi...

  1. Nano Goes to School: A Teaching Model of the Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Kovac, Janez

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes a teaching model of the atomic force microscope (AFM), which proved to be successful in the role of an introduction to nanoscience in high school. The model can demonstrate the two modes of operation of the AFM (contact mode and oscillating mode) as well as some basic principles that limit the resolution of the method. It can…

  2. Single cell adhesion force measurement for cell viability identification using an AFM cantilever-based micro putter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Kojima, Masaru; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-11-01

    Fast and sensitive cell viability identification is a key point for single cell analysis. To address this issue, this paper reports a novel single cell viability identification method based on the measurement of single cell shear adhesion force using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever-based micro putter. Viable and nonviable yeast cells are prepared and put onto three kinds of substrate surfaces, i.e. tungsten probe, gold and ITO substrate surfaces. A micro putter is fabricated from the AFM cantilever by focused ion beam etching technique. The spring constant of the micro putter is calibrated using the nanomanipulation approach. The shear adhesion force between the single viable or nonviable cell and each substrate is measured using the micro putter based on the nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. The adhesion force is calculated based on the deflection of the micro putter beam. The results show that the adhesion force of the viable cell to the substrate is much larger than that of the nonviable cell. This identification method is label free, fast, sensitive and can give quantitative results at the single cell level.

  3. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  4. Potential Role of Atomic Force Microscopy in Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Arce, Fernando Teran; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology is a quantitative approach for understanding a biological system at its global level through systematic perturbation and integrated analysis of all its components. Simultaneous acquisition of information datasets pertaining to the system components (e.g., genome, proteome) is essential to implement this approach. There are limitations to such an approach in measuring gene expression levels and accounting for all proteins in the system. The success of genomic studies is critically dependent on PCR for its amplification, but PCR is very uneven in amplifying the samples, ineffective in scarce samples and unreliable in low copy number transcripts. On the other hand, lack of amplifying techniques for proteins critically limits their identification to only a small fraction of high concentration proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM cantilever sensors and AFM force spectroscopy in particular, could address these issues directly. In this article, we reviewed and assessed their potential role in systems biology. PMID:21766465

  5. Potential role of atomic force microscopy in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Teran Arce, Fernando; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology is a quantitative approach for understanding a biological system at its global level through systematic perturbation and integrated analysis of all its components. Simultaneous acquisition of information data sets pertaining to the system components (e.g., genome, proteome) is essential to implement this approach. There are limitations to such an approach in measuring gene expression levels and accounting for all proteins in the system. The success of genomic studies is critically dependent on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for its amplification, but PCR is very uneven in amplifying the samples, ineffective in scarce samples and unreliable in low copy number transcripts. On the other hand, lack of amplifying techniques for proteins critically limits their identification to only a small fraction of high concentration proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM cantilever sensors, and AFM force spectroscopy in particular, could address these issues directly. In this article, we reviewed and assessed their potential role in systems biology. PMID:21766465

  6. Numerical study of the hydrodynamic drag force in atomic force microscopy measurements undertaken in fluids.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Méndez, J V; Alonso-Rasgado, M T; Faria, E Correia; Flores-Johnson, E A; Snook, R D

    2014-11-01

    When atomic force microscopy (AFM) is employed for in vivo study of immersed biological samples, the fluid medium presents additional complexities, not least of which is the hydrodynamic drag force due to viscous friction of the cantilever with the liquid. This force should be considered when interpreting experimental results and any calculated material properties. In this paper, a numerical model is presented to study the influence of the drag force on experimental data obtained from AFM measurements using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The model provides quantification of the drag force in AFM measurements of soft specimens in fluids. The numerical predictions were compared with experimental data obtained using AFM with a V-shaped cantilever fitted with a pyramidal tip. Tip velocities ranging from 1.05 to 105 μm/s were employed in water, polyethylene glycol and glycerol with the platform approaching from a distance of 6000 nm. The model was also compared with an existing analytical model. Good agreement was observed between numerical results, experiments and analytical predictions. Accurate predictions were obtained without the need for extrapolation of experimental data. In addition, the model can be employed over the range of tip geometries and velocities typically utilized in AFM measurements. PMID:25080275

  7. Image contrast reversals in contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang Wang, Tian

    2015-02-15

    Multiple image contrast inversions are observed along with the increase of modulation frequency for contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) imaging of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen. Analysis of the contact vibrational spectra indicates that the inversions can be attributed to structure-induced variations of tip-sample contact mechanics. Contact stiffness and damping at HOPG step edges exhibit significant increases relative to those in the flat regions. For quantitative evaluation of mechanical properties in CR-AFM, coupling effects of the surface geometry must be considered.

  8. Microstructural Characterization of Hierarchical Structured Surfaces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, A. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Suchaneck, G.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we evaluate the hierarchical surface topography of reactively sputtered nanocrystalline Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and TiO2 thin films as well as plasma-treated antireflective PET films by means of determining the fractal dimension and power spectral density (PSD) of surface topography recorded by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Local fractal dimension was obtained using the triangulation method. The PSDs of all samples were fitted to the k-correlation model (also called ABC model) valid for a self-affine surface topography. Fractal analysis of AFM images was shown to be an appropriate and easy to use tool for the characterization of hierarchical nanostructures.

  9. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  10. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  11. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature. PMID:12203646

  12. Mechanics of interaction and atomic-scale wear of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy probes.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Vahid; Grierson, David S; Turner, Kevin T; Carpick, Robert W

    2013-04-23

    Wear is one of the main factors that hinders the performance of probes for atomic force microscopy (AFM), including for the widely used amplitude modulation (AM-AFM) mode. Unfortunately, a comprehensive scientific understanding of nanoscale wear is lacking. We have developed a protocol for conducting consistent and quantitative AM-AFM wear experiments. The protocol involves controlling the tip-sample interaction regime during AM-AFM scanning, determining the tip-sample contact geometry, calculating the peak repulsive force and normal stress over the course of the wear test, and quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The peak repulsive tip-sample interaction force is estimated from a closed-form equation accompanied by an effective tip radius measurement procedure, which combines transmission electron microscopy and blind tip reconstruction. The contact stress is estimated by applying Derjaguin-Müller-Toporov contact mechanics model and also numerically solving a general contact mechanics model recently developed for the adhesive contact of arbitrary axisymmetric punch shapes. We discuss the important role that the assumed tip shape geometry plays in calculating both the interaction forces and the contact stresses. Contact stresses are significantly affected by the tip geometry while the peak repulsive force is mainly determined by experimentally controlled parameters, specifically, the free oscillation amplitude and amplitude ratio. The applicability of this protocol is demonstrated experimentally by assessing the performance of diamond-like carbon-coated and silicon-nitride-coated silicon probes scanned over ultrananocrystalline diamond substrates in repulsive mode AM-AFM. There is no sign of fracture or plastic deformation in the case of diamond-like carbon; wear could be characterized as a gradual atom-by-atom process. In contrast, silicon nitride wears through removal of the cluster of atoms and plastic

  13. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes for atomic force microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Adam T

    2004-01-01

    The study of biological processes relies increasingly on methods for probing structure and function of biochemical machinery (proteins, nucleic acids, and so on) with submolecular resolution. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently emerged as a promising approach for imaging biological structures with resolution approaching the nanometer scale. Two important limitations of AFM in biological imaging are (1) resolution is constrained by probe tip dimensions, and (2) typical probe tips lack chemical specificity to differentiate between functional groups in biological structures. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) offer an intriguing possibility for providing both high resolution and chemical selectivity in AFM imaging, thus overcoming the enumerated limitations. Procedures for generating SWNT tips for AFM will be described. Carboxylic acid functional groups at the SWNT ends can be functionalized using covalent coupling chemistry to attach biological moieties via primary amine groups. Herein, the focus will be on describing methods for attaching biotin to SWNT tips and probing streptavidin on surfaces; importantly, this same coupling chemistry can also be applied to other biomolecules possessing primary amine groups. Underivatized SWNT tips can also provide high-resolution AFM images of DNA. Biofunctionalization of SWNT AFM tips offers great potential to enable high-resolution, chemically selective imaging of biological structures. PMID:15197321

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip. PMID:27018633

  15. Hydrodynamic effects of the tip movement on surface nanobubbles: a combined tapping mode, lift mode and force volume mode AFM study.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Wiktoria; Hain, Nicole; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-08-28

    We report on an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) study of AFM tip-nanobubble interactions in experiments conducted on argon surface nanobubbles on HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) in water in tapping mode, lift mode and Force Volume (FV) mode AFM. By subsequent data acquisition on the same nanobubbles in these three different AFM modes, we could directly compare the effect of different tip-sample interactions. The tip-bubble interaction strength was found to depend on the vertical and horizontal position of the tip on the bubble with respect to the bubble center. The interaction forces measured experimentally were in good agreement with the forces calculated using the dynamic interaction model. The strength of the hydrodynamic effect was also found to depend on the direction of the tip movement. It was more pronounced in the FV mode, in which the tip approaches the bubble from the top, than in the lift mode, in which the tip approaches the bubble from the side. This result suggests that the direction of tip movement influences the bubble deformation. The effect should be taken into account when nanobubbles are analysed by AFM in various scanning modes. PMID:24988375

  16. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E.

    2014-09-01

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5-10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100-500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  17. Elastic modulus measurements at variable temperature: Validation of atomic force microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, Marco; Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    The development of polymer-based nanocomposites to be used in critical thermal environments requires the characterization of their mechanical properties, which are related to their chemical composition, size, morphology and operating temperature. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been proven to be a useful tool to develop techniques for the mechanical characterization of these materials, thanks to its nanometer lateral resolution and to the capability of exerting ultra-low loads, down to the piconewton range. In this work, we demonstrate two techniques, one quasi-static, i.e., AFM-based indentation (I-AFM), and one dynamic, i.e., contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM), for the mechanical characterization of compliant materials at variable temperature. A cross-validation of I-AFM and CR-AFM has been performed by comparing the results obtained on two reference materials, i.e., low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polycarbonate (PC), which demonstrated the accuracy of the techniques.

  18. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E.

    2014-09-15

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5–10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100–500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  19. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Arai, Toyoko; Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko

    2014-07-28

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  20. Synthesis of a Naphthodiazaborinine and Its Verification by Planarization with Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Majzik, Zsolt; Cuenca, Ana B; Pavliček, Niko; Miralles, Núria; Meyer, Gerhard; Gross, Leo; Fernández, Elena

    2016-05-24

    Aiming to study new motifs, potentially active as functional materials, we performed the synthesis of a naphthodiazaborinine (the BN isostere of the phenalenyl anion) that is bonded to a hindered di-ortho-substituted aryl system (9-anthracene). We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and succeeded in both the verification of the original nonplanar structure of the molecule and the planarization of the skeleton by removing H atoms that cause steric hindrance. This study demonstrated that planarization by atomic manipulation is a possible route for extending molecular identification by AFM to nonplanar molecular systems that are difficult to probe with AFM directly. PMID:27111055

  1. Characterization and Detection of Biological Weapons with Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; McPherson, A

    2006-09-25

    Critical gaps exist in our capabilities to rapidly characterize threat agents which could be used in attacks on facilities and military forces. DNA-based PCR and immunoassay-based techniques provide unique identification of species, strains and protein signatures of pathogens. However, differentiation between naturally occurring and weaponized bioagents and the identification of formulation signatures are beyond current technologies. One of the most effective and often the only definitive means to identify a threat agent is by its direct visualization. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a rapid imaging technique that covers the size range of most biothreat agents (several nanometers to tens of microns), is capable of resolving pathogen morphology and structure, and could be developed into a portable device for biological weapons (BW) field characterization. AFM can detect pathogens in aerosol, liquid, surface and soil samples while concomitantly acquiring their weaponization and threat agent digital signatures. BW morphological and structural signatures, including modifications to pathogen microstructural architecture and topology that occur during formulation and weaponization, provide the means for their differentiation from crude or purified unformulated agent, processing signatures, as well as assessment of their potential for dispersion, inhalation and environmental persistence. AFM visualization of pathogen morphology and architecture often provides valuable digital signatures and allows direct detection and identification of threat agents. We have demonstrated that pathogens, spanning the size range from several nanometers for small agricultural satellite viruses to almost half micron for pox viruses, and to several microns for bacteria and bacterial spores, can be visualized by AFM under physiological conditions to a resolution of {approx}20-30 {angstrom}. We have also demonstrated that viruses from closely related families could be differentiated by AFM on

  2. Nanoindentation of gold nanorods with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischl, B.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.

    2014-12-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to measure mechanical properties of nanoscale objects, which are too small to be studied using a conventional nanoindenter. The contact mechanics at such small scales, in proximity of free surfaces, deviate substantially from simple continuum models. We present results from atomistic computer simulations of the indentation of gold nanorods using a diamond AFM tip and give insight in the atomic scale processes, involving creation and migration of dislocations, leading to the plastic deformation of the sample under load, and explain the force-distance curves observed for different tip apex radii of curvature, as well as different crystallographic structure and orientation of the gold nanorod samples.

  3. Non-contact atomic-level interfacial force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Fleming, J.G.

    1997-02-01

    The scanning force microscopies (notably the Atomic Force Microscope--AFM), because of their applicability to nearly all materials, are presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM uses a deflection sensor to measure sample/probe forces which suffers from an inherent mechanical instability that occurs when the rate of change of the force with respect to the interfacial separation becomes equal to the spring constant of the deflecting member. This instability dramatically limits the breadth of applicability of AFM-type techniques to materials problems. In the course of implementing a DOE sponsored basic research program in interfacial adhesion, a self-balancing force sensor concept has been developed and incorporated into an Interfacial Force Microscopy (IFM) system by Sandia scientists. This sensor eliminates the instability problem and greatly enhances the applicability of the scanning force-probe technique to a broader range of materials and materials parameters. The impact of this Sandia development was recognized in 1993 by a Department of Energy award for potential impact on DOE programs and by an R and D 100 award for one of the most important new products of 1994. However, in its present stage of development, the IFM is strictly a research-level tool and a CRADA was initiated in order to bring this sensor technology into wide-spread availability by making it accessible in the form of a commercial instrument. The present report described the goals, approach and results of this CRADA effort.

  4. Getting Physical with Your Chemistry: Mechanically Investigating Local Structure and Properties of Surfaces with the Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, William F.; Hoh, Jan H.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) investigates mechanically the chemical properties of individual molecules, surfaces, and materials using suitably designed probes. The current state of the art of AFM in terms of imaging, force measurement, and sample manipulation and its application to physical chemistry is discussed.

  5. A Novel Atomic Force Microscope with Multi-Mode Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chun; Zhang, Haijun; Xu, Rui; Han, Xu; Wang, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    A new type of atomic force microscope (AFM) with multi-mode scanner is proposed. The AFM system provides more than four scanning modes using a specially designed scanner with three tube piezoelectric ceramics and three stack piezoelectric ceramics. Sample scanning of small range with high resolution can be realized by using tube piezos, meanwhile, large range scanning can be achieved by stack piezos. Furthermore, the combination with tube piezos and stack piezos not only realizes high-resolution scanning of small samples with large- scale fluctuation structure, but also achieves small range area-selecting scanning. Corresponding experiments are carried out in terms of four different scanning modes showing that the AFM is of reliable stability, high resolution and can be widely applied in the fields of micro/nano-technology.

  6. Nanolithography on thin layers of PMMA using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Cristina; Rius, Gemma; Borrisé, Xavier; Pérez-Murano, Francesc

    2005-08-01

    A new technique for producing nanometre scale patterns on thin layers (<30 nm thick) of PMMA on silicon is described. The method consists of inducing the local modification of the PMMA by applying a positive voltage between the silicon and an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. At voltages larger than 28 V, it is observed that a hole is directly produced on the PMMA. The silicon surface is simultaneously oxidized even in the case where a hole has not been created. Monitoring of the electrical current through the AFM tip during the application of the voltage allows elucidating the mechanism of the PMMA removal. The process is used to define nanometre scale electrodes by combining the AFM lithography with electron beam lithography, metal deposition and lift-off processes.

  7. The long range voice coil atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Randall, C.; Bridges, D.; Hansma, P. K.

    2012-02-15

    Most current atomic force microscopes (AFMs) use piezoelectric ceramics for scan actuation. Piezoelectric ceramics provide precision motion with fast response to applied voltage potential. A drawback to piezoelectric ceramics is their inherently limited ranges. For many samples this is a nonissue, as imaging the nanoscale details is the goal. However, a key advantage of AFM over other microscopy techniques is its ability to image biological samples in aqueous buffer. Many biological specimens have topography for which the range of piezoactuated stages is limiting, a notable example of which is bone. In this article, we present the use of voice coils in scan actuation for an actuation range in the Z-axis an order of magnitude larger than any AFM commercially available today. The increased scan size will allow for imaging an important new variety of samples, including bone fractures.

  8. Exploiting cantilever curvature for noise reduction in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Labuda, Aleksander; Grütter, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Optical beam deflection is a widely used method for detecting the deflection of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. This paper presents a first order derivation for the angular detection noise density which determines the lower limit for deflection sensing. Surprisingly, the cantilever radius of curvature, commonly not considered, plays a crucial role and can be exploited to decrease angular detection noise. We demonstrate a reduction in angular detection shot noise of more than an order of magnitude on a home-built AFM with a commercial 450 μm long cantilever by exploiting the optical properties of the cantilever curvature caused by the reflective gold coating. Lastly, we demonstrate how cantilever curvature can be responsible for up to 45% of the variability in the measured sensitivity of cantilevers on commercially available AFMs. PMID:21280834

  9. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  10. Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy: An Emerging Tool for Fundamental Catalysis Research.

    PubMed

    Altman, Eric I; Baykara, Mehmet Z; Schwarz, Udo D

    2015-09-15

    Although atomic force microscopy (AFM) was rapidly adopted as a routine surface imaging apparatus after its introduction in 1986, it has not been widely used in catalysis research. The reason is that common AFM operating modes do not provide the atomic resolution required to follow catalytic processes; rather the more complex noncontact (NC) mode is needed. Thus, scanning tunneling microscopy has been the principal tool for atomic scale catalysis research. In this Account, recent developments in NC-AFM will be presented that offer significant advantages for gaining a complete atomic level view of catalysis. The main advantage of NC-AFM is that the image contrast is due to the very short-range chemical forces that are of interest in catalysis. This motivated our development of 3D-AFM, a method that yields quantitative atomic resolution images of the potential energy surfaces that govern how molecules approach, stick, diffuse, and rebound from surfaces. A variation of 3D-AFM allows the determination of forces required to push atoms and molecules on surfaces, from which diffusion barriers and variations in adsorption strength may be obtained. Pushing molecules towards each other provides access to intermolecular interaction between reaction partners. Following reaction, NC-AFM with CO-terminated tips yields textbook images of intramolecular structure that can be used to identify reaction intermediates and products. Because NC-AFM and STM contrast mechanisms are distinct, combining the two methods can produce unique insight. It is demonstrated for surface-oxidized Cu(100) that simultaneous 3D-AFM/STM yields resolution of both the Cu and O atoms. Moreover, atomic defects in the Cu sublattice lead to variations in the reactivity of the neighboring O atoms. It is shown that NC-AFM also allows a straightforward imaging of work function variations which has been used to identify defect charge states on catalytic surfaces and to map charge transfer within an individual

  11. High viscosity environments: an unexpected route to obtain true atomic resolution with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefan A L; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Brosnan, Timothy M; Jarvis, Suzanne P; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2014-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in liquid environments, where true atomic resolution at the solid-liquid interface can now be routinely achieved. It is generally expected that AFM operation in more viscous environments results in an increased noise contribution from the thermal motion of the cantilever, thereby reducing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Thus, viscous fluids such as ionic and organic liquids have been generally avoided for high-resolution AFM studies despite their relevance to, e.g. energy applications. Here, we investigate the thermal noise limitations of dynamic AFM operation in both low and high viscosity environments theoretically, deriving expressions for the amplitude, phase and frequency noise resulting from the thermal motion of the cantilever, thereby defining the performance limits of amplitude modulation, phase modulation and frequency modulation AFM. We show that the assumption of a reduced SNR in viscous environments is not inherent to the technique and demonstrate that SNR values comparable to ultra-high vacuum systems can be obtained in high viscosity environments under certain conditions. Finally, we have obtained true atomic resolution images of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and mica surfaces, thus revealing the potential of high-resolution imaging in high viscosity environments. PMID:24717916

  12. High viscosity environments: an unexpected route to obtain true atomic resolution with atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Stefan A. L.; Kilpatrick, Jason I.; Brosnan, Timothy M.; Jarvis, Suzanne P.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2014-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in liquid environments, where true atomic resolution at the solid-liquid interface can now be routinely achieved. It is generally expected that AFM operation in more viscous environments results in an increased noise contribution from the thermal motion of the cantilever, thereby reducing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Thus, viscous fluids such as ionic and organic liquids have been generally avoided for high-resolution AFM studies despite their relevance to, e.g. energy applications. Here, we investigate the thermal noise limitations of dynamic AFM operation in both low and high viscosity environments theoretically, deriving expressions for the amplitude, phase and frequency noise resulting from the thermal motion of the cantilever, thereby defining the performance limits of amplitude modulation, phase modulation and frequency modulation AFM. We show that the assumption of a reduced SNR in viscous environments is not inherent to the technique and demonstrate that SNR values comparable to ultra-high vacuum systems can be obtained in high viscosity environments under certain conditions. Finally, we have obtained true atomic resolution images of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and mica surfaces, thus revealing the potential of high-resolution imaging in high viscosity environments.

  13. Advanced atomic force microscopy techniques for characterizing the properties of cellulosic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan Bradley

    The measurement of nanomechanical properties is of great interest to science and industry. Key to progress in this area is the development of new techniques and analysis methods to identify, measure, and quantify these properties. In this dissertation, new data analysis methods and experimental techniques for measuring nanomechanical properties with the atomic force microscope (AFM) are considered. These techniques are then applied to the study of cellulose nanoparticles, an abundant, plant derived nanomaterial. Quantifying uncertainty is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nano-engineered materials and products. However, rigorous uncertainty quantification is rarely applied for material property measurements with the AFM. A framework is presented to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. This method is demonstrated by quantifying uncertainty in force displacement AFM based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of tunicate cellulose nanocrystals. Next, a more comprehensive study of different types of cellulose nanoparticles is undertaken with contact resonance (CR) AFM. CR-AFM is a dynamic AFM technique that exploits the resonance frequency of the AFM cantilever while it is permanent contact with the sample surface to predict nanomechanical properties. This technique offers improved measurement sensitivity over static AFM methods for some material systems. The effects of cellulose source material and processing technique on the properties of cellulose nanoparticles are compared. Finally, dynamic AFM cantilever vibration shapes are studied. Many AFM modes exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in permanent contact with a sample to extract local material properties. A common challenge to these modes is that they assume a certain shape of cantilever vibration, which is not accessible in

  14. Note: Design and development of an integrated three-dimensional scanner for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashmi, T.; Dharsana, G.; Sriramshankar, R.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2013-11-01

    A compact scanning head for the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) greatly enhances the portability of AFM and facilitates easy integration with other tools. This paper reports the design and development of a three-dimensional (3D) scanner integrated into an AFM micro-probe. The scanner is realized by means of a novel design for the AFM probe along with a magnetic actuation system. The integrated scanner, the actuation system, and their associated mechanical mounts are fabricated and evaluated. The experimentally calibrated actuation ranges are shown to be over 1 μm along all the three axes.

  15. Note: Design and development of an integrated three-dimensional scanner for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rashmi, T.; Dharsana, G.; Sriramshankar, R.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2013-11-15

    A compact scanning head for the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) greatly enhances the portability of AFM and facilitates easy integration with other tools. This paper reports the design and development of a three-dimensional (3D) scanner integrated into an AFM micro-probe. The scanner is realized by means of a novel design for the AFM probe along with a magnetic actuation system. The integrated scanner, the actuation system, and their associated mechanical mounts are fabricated and evaluated. The experimentally calibrated actuation ranges are shown to be over 1 μm along all the three axes.

  16. Atomic force microscopy as a tool to study Xenopus laevis embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhlyakova, E. A.; Efremov, Yu M.; Bagrov, D. V.; Luchinskaya, N. N.; Kiryukhin, D. O.; Belousov, L. V.; Shaitan, K. V.

    2012-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a powerful tool for imaging biological structures (from single molecules to living cells) and carrying out measurements of their mechanical properties. AFM provides three-dimensional high-resolution images of the studied biological objects in physiological environment. However there are only few AFM investigations of fresh tissue explants and virtually no such research on a whole organism, since most researchers work with cell cultures. In the current work AFM was used to observe the surface of living and fixed embryos and to measure mechanical properties of naive embryos and embryos with overexpression of guanine nucleotide-binding protein G-alpha-13.

  17. Measuring the elastic properties of living cells with atomic force microscopy indentation.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Joanna L; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful and versatile tool for probing the mechanical properties of biological samples. This chapter describes the procedures for using AFM indentation to measure the elastic moduli of living cells. We include step-by-step instructions for cantilever calibration and data acquisition using a combined AFM/optical microscope system, as well as a detailed protocol for data analysis. Our protocol is written specifically for the BioScope™ Catalyst™ AFM system (Bruker AXS Inc.); however, most of the general concepts can be readily translated to other commercial systems. PMID:23027009

  18. Atomic force microscopy of atomic-scale ledges and etch pits formed during dissolution of quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, A. J.; Manne, S.; Hansma, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    The processes involved in the dissolution and growth of crystals are closely related. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of faceted pits (called negative crystals) formed during quartz dissolution reveals subtle details of these underlying physical mechanisms for silicates. In imaging these surfaces, the AFM detected ledges less than 1 nm high that were spaced 10 to 90 nm apart. A dislocation pit, invisible to optical and scanning electron microscopy measurements and serving as a ledge source, was also imaged. These observations confirm the applicability of ledge-motion models to dissolution and growth of silicates; coupled with measurements of dissolution rate on facets, these methods provide a powerful tool for probing mineral surface kinetics.

  19. Attractive forces between hydrophobic solid surfaces measured by AFM on the first approach in salt solutions and in the presence of dissolved gases.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Mehdi; Nguyen, Anh V; Yakubov, Gleb E

    2015-02-17

    Interfacial gas enrichment of dissolved gases (IGE) has been shown to cover hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) data has recently been supported by molecular dynamics simulation. It was demonstrated that IGE is responsible for the unexpected stability and large contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles at the hydrophobic solid-water interface. Here we provide further evidence of the significant effect of IGE on an attractive force between hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The force in the presence of dissolved gas, i.e., in aerated and nonaerated NaCl solutions (up to 4 M), was measured by the AFM colloidal probe technique. The effect of nanobubble bridging on the attractive force was minimized or eliminated by measuring forces on the first approach of the AFM probe toward the flat hydrophobic surface and by using high salt concentrations to reduce gas solubility. Our results confirm the presence of three types of forces, two of which are long-range attractive forces of capillary bridging origin as caused by either surface nanobubbles or gap-induced cavitation. The third type is a short-range attractive force observed in the absence of interfacial nanobubbles that is attributed to the IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) at hydrophobic surfaces. Such a force was found to increase with increasing gas saturation and to decrease with decreasing gas solubility. PMID:25627159

  20. Observation of Individual Fluorine Atom from Highly Oriented Poly (tetrafluoroethylene) Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.,; Paley, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    Direct observation of the film thickness, molecular structure and individual fluorine atoms from highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films were achieved using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A thin PTFE film is mechanically deposited onto a smooth glass substrate at specific temperatures by a friction transfer technique. Atomic resolution images of these films show that the chain-like helical structures of the PTFE macromolecules are aligned parallel to each other with an intermolecular spacing of 5.72 A, and individual fluorine atoms are clearly observed along these twisted molecular chains with an interatomic spacing of 2.75 A. Furthermore, the first direct AFM measurements for the radius of the fluorine-helix, and of the carbon-helix in sub-angstrom scale are reported as 1.70 A and 0.54 A respectively.

  1. Observation of Individual Fluorine Atoms from Highly Oriented Poly(Tetrafluoroethylene) Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Direct observation of the film thickness, molecular structure, and individual fluorine atoms from highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films were achieved using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A thin PTFE film is mechanically deposited onto a smooth glass substrate at specific temperatures by a friction-transfer technique. Atomic resolution images of these films show that the chain-like helical structures of the PTFE macromolecules are aligned parallel to each other with an intermolecular spacing of 5.72 A, and individual fluorine atoms are clearly observed along these twisted molecular chains with an interatomic spacing of 2.75 A. Furthermore, the first direct AFM measurements for the radius of the fluorine-helix, and of the carbon-helix in sub-angstrom scale are reported as 1.7 and 0.54 A respectively.

  2. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2014-07-01

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10-100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed. PMID:25085142

  3. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-07-01

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10-100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed.

  4. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-07-15

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed.

  5. Surface properties and interaction forces of biopolymer-doped conductive polypyrrole surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pelto, Jani M; Haimi, Suvi P; Siljander, Aliisa S; Miettinen, Susanna S; Tappura, Kirsi M; Higgins, Michael J; Wallace, Gordon G

    2013-05-21

    Surface properties and electrical charges are critical factors elucidating cell interactions on biomaterial surfaces. The surface potential distribution and the nanoscopic and microscopic surface elasticity of organic polypyrrole-hyaluronic acid (PPy-HA) were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in a fluid environment in order to explain the observed enhancement in the attachment of human adipose stem cells on positively charged PPy-HA films. The electrostatic force between the AFM tip and a charged PPy-HA surface, the tip-sample adhesion force, and elastic moduli were estimated from the AFM force curves, and the data were fitted to electrostatic double-layer and elastic contact models. The surface potential of the charged and dried PPy-HA films was assessed with Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), and the KPFM data were correlated to the fluid AFM data. The surface charge distribution and elasticity were both found to correlate well with the nodular morphology of PPy-HA and to be sensitive to the electrochemical charging conditions. Furthermore, a significant change in the adhesion was detected when the surface was electrochemically charged positive. The results highlight the potential of positively charged PPy-HA as a coating material to enhance the stem cell response in tissue-engineering scaffolds. PMID:23621360

  6. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  7. Localization and force analysis at the single virus particle level using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Horng, Jim-Tong; Chang, Jeng-Shian; Hsieh, Chung-Fan; Tseng, You-Chen; Lin, Shiming

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Localization of single virus particle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force mapping. -- Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a vital instrument in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we developed a method that enables AFM to simultaneously measure specific unbinding force and map the viral glycoprotein at the single virus particle level. The average diameter of virus particles from AFM images and the specificity between the viral surface antigen and antibody probe were integrated to design a three-stage method that sets the measuring area to a single virus particle before obtaining the force measurements, where the influenza virus was used as the object of measurements. Based on the purposed method and performed analysis, several findings can be derived from the results. The mean unbinding force of a single virus particle can be quantified, and no significant difference exists in this value among virus particles. Furthermore, the repeatability of the proposed method is demonstrated. The force mapping images reveal that the distributions of surface viral antigens recognized by antibody probe were dispersed on the whole surface of individual virus particles under the proposed method and experimental criteria; meanwhile, the binding probabilities are similar among particles. This approach can be easily applied to most AFM systems without specific components or configurations. These results help understand the force-based analysis at the single virus particle level, and therefore, can reinforce the capability of AFM to investigate a specific type of viral surface protein and its distributions.

  8. Biophysical measurements of cells, microtubules, and DNA with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devenica, Luka M.; Contee, Clay; Cabrejo, Raysa; Kurek, Matthew; Deveney, Edward F.; Carter, Ashley R.

    2016-04-01

    Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are ubiquitous in research laboratories and have recently been priced for use in teaching laboratories. Here, we review several AFM platforms and describe various biophysical experiments that could be done in the teaching laboratory using these instruments. In particular, we focus on experiments that image biological materials (cells, microtubules, and DNA) and quantify biophysical parameters including membrane tension, persistence length, contour length, and the drag force.

  9. Combined atomic force microscopy and voltage pulse technique to accurately measure electrostatic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new method of extracting electrostatic force. The technique is based on frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) combined with a voltage pulse. In this method, the work that the electrostatic field does on the oscillating tip is measured through the cantilever energy dissipation. This allows us to directly extract capacitive forces including the longer range part, to which the conventional FM-AFM is insensitive. The distance-dependent contact potential difference, which is modulated by local charges distributed on the surfaces of the tip and/or sample, could also be correctly obtained. In the absence of local charges, our method can perfectly reproduce the electrostatic force as a function of the distance and the bias voltage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the system serves as a sensitive sensor enabling us to check the existence of the local charges such as trapped charges and patch charges.

  10. Easy and direct method for calibrating atomic force microscopy lateral force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhua; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and tested a new, inexpensive, easy-to-make and easy-to-use calibration standard for atomic force microscopy (AFM) lateral force measurements. This new standard simply consists of a small glass fiber of known dimensions and Young’s modulus, which is fixed at one end to a substrate and which can be bent laterally with the AFM tip at the other end. This standard has equal or less error than the commonly used method of using beam mechanics to determine a cantilever’s lateral force constant. It is transferable, thus providing a universal tool for comparing the calibrations of different instruments. It does not require knowledge of the cantilever dimensions and composition or its tip height. This standard also allows direct conversion of the photodiode signal to force and, thus, circumvents the requirement for a sensor response (sensitivity) measurement. PMID:17614616

  11. Minimising the effect of nanoparticle deformation in intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Bakir; Lawn, Malcolm A.; Coleman, Victoria A.; Jämting, Åsa K.; Herrmann, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The results of systematic height measurements of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles using intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (IC-AM-AFM) are presented. The experimental findings demonstrate that PS nanoparticles deform during AFM imaging, as indicated by a reduction in the measured particle height. This deformation depends on the IC-AM-AFM imaging parameters, material composition, and dimensional properties of the nanoparticles. A model for nanoparticle deformation occurring during IC-AM-AFM imaging is developed as a function of the peak force which can be calculated for a particular set of experimental conditions. The undeformed nanoparticle height can be estimated from the model by extrapolation to zero peak force. A procedure is proposed to quantify and minimise nanoparticle deformation during IC-AM-AFM imaging, based on appropriate adjustments of the experimental control parameters.

  12. Atomic force microscopy-based shape analysis of heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become an important medical and biological tool for the noninvasive imaging of cells and biomaterials in medical, biological, and biophysical research. The major advantages of AFM over conventional optical and electron microscopes for bio-imaging include the facts that no special coating is required and that imaging can be done in all environments-air, vacuum, or aqueous conditions. In addition, it can also precisely determine pico-nano Newton force interactions between the probe tip and the sample surface from force-distance curve measurements.It is widely known that mitochondrial swelling is one of the most important indicators of the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. As mitochondrial swelling is an ultrastructural change, quantitative analysis of this change requires high-resolution microscopic methods such as AFM. Here, we describe the use of AFM-based shape analysis for the characterization of nanostructural changes in heart mitochondria resulting from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25634291

  13. Probing physical properties at the nanoscale using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditzler, Lindsay Rachel

    Techniques that measure physical properties at the nanoscale with high sensitivity are significantly limited considering the number of new nanomaterials being developed. The development of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has lead to significant advancements in the ability to characterize physical properties of materials in all areas of science: chemistry, physics, engineering, and biology have made great scientific strides do to the versatility of the AFM. AFM is used for quantification of many physical properties such as morphology, electrical, mechanical, magnetic, electrochemical, binding interactions, and protein folding. This work examines the electrical and mechanical properties of materials applicable to the field of nano-electronics. As electronic devices are miniaturized the demand for materials with unique electrical properties, which can be developed and exploited, has increased. For example, discussed in this work, a derivative of tetrathiafulvalene, which exhibits a unique loss of conductivity upon compression of the self-assembled monolayer could be developed into a molecular switch. This work also compares tunable organic (tetraphenylethylene tetracarboxylic acid and bis(pyridine)s assemblies) and metal-organic (Silver-stilbizole coordination compounds) crystals which show high electrical conductivity. The electrical properties of these materials vary depending on their composition allowing for the development of compositionally tunable functional materials. Additional work was done to investigate the effects of molecular environment on redox active 11-ferroceneyl-1 undecanethiol (Fc) molecules. The redox process of mixed monolayers of Fc and decanethiol was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy. As the concentration of Fc increased large, variations in the force were observed. Using these variations the number of oxidized molecules in the monolayer was determined. AFM is additionally capable of investigating

  14. Nanomechanical basis for imaging soft materials with tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.J.; Rye, R.R.; Houston, J.E.

    1996-02-01

    The surfaces of virgin and chemically etched poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both contact and tapping modes. Contact mode AFM images of this relatively soft polymeric material are dominated by tip-induced imaging artifacts. When subsequent, AFM imaging was performed in tapping mode these artifacts were eliminated, and comparable tapping mode AFM and SEM images were obtained for even the highly porous, unstable surface that results from sodium naphthalenide etching. Interfacial force microscopy force versus displacement, and creep experiments were performed to determine the nanomechanical nature of virgin PTFE. These experiments show that virgin PTFE is a viscoelastic material which is capable of supporting large forces on the millisecond time scale but creeps dramatically at longer times. Clearly, with scanning probe techniques which utilize constant probe force feedback, one should expect image distortions, as we observe, with soft materials such as virgin or etched PTFE. Conversely, with tapping mode AFM, rational images require contact times ({mu}s) that are much shorter than creep times (ms). Thus, viscoelastic material characteristics determine the need for tapping mode AFM over contact mode AFM. By comparing tapping mode AFM images of virgin and etched PTFE surfaces, we can understand the three-dimensional character of the etched surface necessary for mechanical interlocking and resultant strong metal adhesion.

  15. The mapping of yeast's G-protein coupled receptor with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Musashi; Miyachi, Yusuke; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-03-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) can measure the adhesion force between a sample and a cantilever while simultaneously applying a rupture force during the imaging of a sample. An AFM should be useful in targeting specific proteins on a cell surface. The present study proposes the use of an AFM to measure the adhesion force between targeting receptors and their ligands, and to map the targeting receptors. In this study, Ste2p, one of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), was chosen as the target receptor. The specific force between Ste2p on a yeast cell surface and a cantilever modified with its ligand, α-factor, was measured and found to be approximately 250 pN. In addition, through continuous measuring of the cell surface, a mapping of the receptors on the cell surface could be performed, which indicated the differences in the Ste2p expression levels. Therefore, the proposed AFM system is accurate for cell diagnosis.

  16. Simulation of the observability of atomic defects by atomic force microscopy in contact and non-contact modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. Yu.; Henderson, G. S.

    2002-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) scans of a crystal surface containing an atomic defect were simulated in both contact and non-contact regimes. When scanning in contact mode near a defect, the tip-sample force interaction experiences bifurcation of the lines of constant force. When the load force is small, the bifurcation causes the tip to be "pushed" out of the defect. However, if scan force is higher than some critical value (dependent upon the composition of the tip and sample) the AFM tip becomes "trapped" in the vicinity of defect. The trapped tip remains at the level of the vacancy and consequently crashes into the sample, as the scan continues. This results in either the tip apex being destroyed, or disruption of the crystal lattice around the defect. Both effects result in the "disappearance" of the defect from the scan images. The trap is intrinsic and cannot be avoided. For the case of non-contact mode, the tip position is driven by the scan force gradient rather than the force. Simulations show that for this case the trap does not exist and atomic defects will not be destroyed. This explains why atomic defects are generally not observed when using contact mode AFM, but are observed in non-contact AFM.

  17. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Omur E; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2016-02-12

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip's vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential's nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator's response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement. PMID:26754332

  18. Invited Article: VEDA: A web-based virtual environment for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, John; Hu, Shuiqing; Raman, Arvind

    2008-06-01

    We describe here the theory and applications of virtual environment dynamic atomic force microscopy (VEDA), a suite of state-of-the-art simulation tools deployed on nanoHUB (www.nanohub.org) for the accurate simulation of tip motion in dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) over organic and inorganic samples. VEDA takes advantage of nanoHUB's cyberinfrastructure to run high-fidelity dAFM tip dynamics computations on local clusters and the teragrid. Consequently, these tools are freely accessible and the dAFM simulations are run using standard web-based browsers without requiring additional software. A wide range of issues in dAFM ranging from optimal probe choice, probe stability, and tip-sample interaction forces, power dissipation, to material property extraction and scanning dynamics over hetereogeneous samples can be addressed.

  19. A metrological large range atomic force microscope with improved performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Wolff, Helmut; Pohlenz, Frank; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-04-01

    A metrological large range atomic force microscope (Met. LR-AFM) has been set up and improved over the past years at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Being designed as a scanning sample type instrument, the sample is moved in three dimensions by a mechanical ball bearing stage in combination with a compact z-piezostage. Its topography is detected by a position-stationary AFM head. The sample displacement is measured by three embedded miniature homodyne interferometers in the x, y, and z directions. The AFM head is aligned in such a way that its cantilever tip is positioned on the sample surface at the intersection point of the three interferometer measurement beams for satisfying the Abbe measurement principle. In this paper, further improvements of the Met. LR-AFM are reported. A new AFM head using the beam deflection principle has been developed to reduce the influence of parasitic optical interference phenomena. Furthermore, an off-line Heydemann correction method has been applied to reduce the inherent interferometer nonlinearities to less than 0.3 nm (p-v). Versatile scanning functions, for example, radial scanning or local AFM measurement functions, have been implemented to optimize the measurement process. The measurement software is also improved and allows comfortable operations of the instrument via graphical user interface or script-based command sets. The improved Met. LR-AFM is capable of measuring, for instance, the step height, lateral pitch, line width, nanoroughness, and other geometrical parameters of nanostructures. Calibration results of a one-dimensional grating and a set of film thickness standards are demonstrated, showing the excellent metrological performance of the instrument.

  20. A metrological large range atomic force microscope with improved performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Gaoliang; Wolff, Helmut; Pohlenz, Frank; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-04-15

    A metrological large range atomic force microscope (Met. LR-AFM) has been set up and improved over the past years at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Being designed as a scanning sample type instrument, the sample is moved in three dimensions by a mechanical ball bearing stage in combination with a compact z-piezostage. Its topography is detected by a position-stationary AFM head. The sample displacement is measured by three embedded miniature homodyne interferometers in the x, y, and z directions. The AFM head is aligned in such a way that its cantilever tip is positioned on the sample surface at the intersection point of the three interferometer measurement beams for satisfying the Abbe measurement principle. In this paper, further improvements of the Met. LR-AFM are reported. A new AFM head using the beam deflection principle has been developed to reduce the influence of parasitic optical interference phenomena. Furthermore, an off-line Heydemann correction method has been applied to reduce the inherent interferometer nonlinearities to less than 0.3 nm (p-v). Versatile scanning functions, for example, radial scanning or local AFM measurement functions, have been implemented to optimize the measurement process. The measurement software is also improved and allows comfortable operations of the instrument via graphical user interface or script-based command sets. The improved Met. LR-AFM is capable of measuring, for instance, the step height, lateral pitch, line width, nanoroughness, and other geometrical parameters of nanostructures. Calibration results of a one-dimensional grating and a set of film thickness standards are demonstrated, showing the excellent metrological performance of the instrument.

  1. A metrological large range atomic force microscope with improved performance.

    PubMed

    Dai, Gaoliang; Wolff, Helmut; Pohlenz, Frank; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-04-01

    A metrological large range atomic force microscope (Met. LR-AFM) has been set up and improved over the past years at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Being designed as a scanning sample type instrument, the sample is moved in three dimensions by a mechanical ball bearing stage in combination with a compact z-piezostage. Its topography is detected by a position-stationary AFM head. The sample displacement is measured by three embedded miniature homodyne interferometers in the x, y, and z directions. The AFM head is aligned in such a way that its cantilever tip is positioned on the sample surface at the intersection point of the three interferometer measurement beams for satisfying the Abbe measurement principle. In this paper, further improvements of the Met. LR-AFM are reported. A new AFM head using the beam deflection principle has been developed to reduce the influence of parasitic optical interference phenomena. Furthermore, an off-line Heydemann correction method has been applied to reduce the inherent interferometer nonlinearities to less than 0.3 nm (p-v). Versatile scanning functions, for example, radial scanning or local AFM measurement functions, have been implemented to optimize the measurement process. The measurement software is also improved and allows comfortable operations of the instrument via graphical user interface or script-based command sets. The improved Met. LR-AFM is capable of measuring, for instance, the step height, lateral pitch, line width, nanoroughness, and other geometrical parameters of nanostructures. Calibration results of a one-dimensional grating and a set of film thickness standards are demonstrated, showing the excellent metrological performance of the instrument. PMID:19405661

  2. Contact resonances of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent approaches used to characterize the elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution have focused on the contact resonances of atomic force microscope (CR-AFM) probes. The experiments for these CR-AFM methods involve measurement of several contact resonances from which the resonant frequency and peak width are found. The contact resonance values are then compared with the noncontact values in order for the sample properties to be evaluated. The data analysis requires vibration models associated with the probe during contact in order for the beam response to be deconvolved from the measured spectra. To date, the majority of CR-AFM research has used rectangular probes that have a relatively simple vibration response. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have created much interest because they allow local sample heating. However, the vibration response of these probes is much more complex such that CR-AFM is still in its infancy. In this article, a simplified analytical model of U-shaped probes is evaluated for contact resonance applications relative to a more complex finite element (FE) computational model. The tip-sample contact is modeled using three orthogonal Kelvin-Voigt elements such that the resonant frequency and peak width of each mode are functions of the contact conditions. For the purely elastic case, the frequency results of the simple model are within 8% of the FE model for the lowest six modes over a wide range of contact stiffness values. Results for the viscoelastic contact problem for which the quality factor of the lowest six modes is compared show agreement to within 13%. These results suggest that this simple model can be used effectively to evaluate CR-AFM experimental results during AFM scanning such that quantitative mapping of viscoelastic properties may be possible using U-shaped probes.

  3. Diagonal control design for atomic force microscope piezoelectric tube nanopositioners.

    PubMed

    Bhikkaji, B; Yong, Y K; Mahmood, I A; Moheimani, S O R

    2013-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are used for generating surface topography of samples at micro to atomic resolutions. Many commercial AFMs use piezoelectric tube nanopositioners for scanning. Scanning rates of these microscopes are hampered by the presence of low frequency resonant modes. When inadvertently excited, these modes lead to high amplitude mechanical vibrations causing the loss of accuracy, while scanning, and eventually to break down of the tube. Feedback control has been used to damp these resonant modes. Thereby, enabling higher scanning rates. Here, a multivariable controller is designed to damp the first resonant mode along both the x and y axis. Exploiting the inherent symmetry in the piezoelectric tube, the multivariable control design problem is recast as independent single-input single-output (SISO) designs. This in conjunction with integral resonant control is used for damping the first resonant mode. PMID:23464216

  4. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuliang Bi, Shusheng; Wang, Huimin

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  5. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  6. Single DNA molecule grafting and manipulation using a combined atomic force microscope and an optical tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.; Libchaber, A.

    1997-12-01

    In this letter, we report on spatially selecting and grafting a DNA-tethered bead to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, using an optical tweezer. To quantify this technique, we measure force versus extension of a single DNA molecule using AFM. For such studies, we have developed a micromanipulation approach by combining an AFM, an optical tweezer, and visualization setup. The ability to select a single DNA polymer and specifically graft it to a localized position on a substrate opens up new possibilities in biosensors and bioelectronic devices.

  7. An intercepted feedback mode for light sensitive spectroscopic measurements in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smoliner, J; Brezna, W

    2007-10-01

    In most atomic force microscopes (AFMs), the motion of the tip is detected by the deflection of a laser beam shining onto the cantilever. AFM applications such as scanning capacitance spectroscopy or photocurrent spectroscopy, however, are severely disturbed by the intense stray light of the AFM laser. For this reason, an intercepted feedback method was developed, which allows to switch off the laser temporarily while the feedback loop keeps running. The versatility of this feedback method is demonstrated by measuring tip-force dependent Schottky barrier heights on GaAs samples. PMID:17979460

  8. Single Dimer E-Cadherin Interaction Forces Characterized Using Modified AFM Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitsky, Robert; Drees, Frauke; Nelson, W. James; Kenny, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    In tissue monolayers, adhesion between cells is accomplished chiefly through the action of [Ca++] dependent cadherin proteins. E-cadherin molecules coalesce into large plaques on contacting membranes of adjacent cells. Using specialized AFM cantilevers functionalized with tethered E-cadherin proteins, we studied the interaction forces of trans dimers from the single bond level through to the higher surface densities found in plaques, with pico-Newton force resolution. The measurements demonstrated the dependence of E-cadherin homoassociation on surface protein density. Previous in-vivo studies established the role of Ca++ in E-cadherin adhesion in whole cells. Advances in AFM force spectroscopy allowed us to characterize the unbinding process under force loads, and to differentiate single and multiple molecular binding events. The data correlates the dependence of E-cadherin adhesion at a molecular level to [Ca++], revealing interaction details that cannot be observed using whole-cell studies. This work is supported by NSF (XYZ on a Chip Program) CMS-9980838, NIH (GMB5227), and the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation.

  9. Enhanced functionality of nanotube modified atomic force microscopy tips.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Amol; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2003-03-01

    Nanotube modified atomic force microscopy tips have demonstrated advantages in reduced tip wear, imaging with high resolution, and imaging of deep topographic features. We have further enhanced the utility and functionality of nanotube modified AFM tips by the application of a variety of coatings to these probes. Such coatings stabilize the nanotubes against Euler buckling and make the binding of the nanotubes to the AFM cantilevers extremely robust (even contact mode imaging becomes possible). In terms of new functionality, magnetic metal coating permits their use as improved resolution, magnetic force microscopy probes, while insulating coatings (with the coating removed from the very tip) should permit their use in scanning electrochemical microscopy (with anticipated applications in bio-electrochemistry). We will discuss the coating methods used and the tip exposure processes developed for the latter applications.

  10. Universal aspects of brittle fracture, adhesion, and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1989-01-01

    This universal relation between binding energy and interatomic separation was originally discovered for adhesion at bimetallic interfaces involving the simple metals Al, Zn, Mg, and Na. It is shown here that the same universal relation extends to adhesion at transition-metal interfaces. Adhesive energies have been computed for the low-index interfaces of Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Fe, and W, using the equivalent-crystal theory (ECT) and keeping the atoms in each semiinfinite slab fixed rigidly in their equilibrium positions. These adhesive energy curves can be scaled onto each other and onto the universal adhesion curve. The effect of tip shape on the adhesive forces in the atomic-force microscope (AFM) is studied by computing energies and forces using the ECT. While the details of the energy-distance and force-distance curves are sensitive to tip shape, all of these curves can be scaled onto the universal adhesion curve.

  11. Stochastic friction force mechanism of energy dissipation in noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantorovich, L. N.

    2001-12-01

    The tip-surface interaction in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) leads to energy dissipation, which has been used as another imaging mechanism of surface topography with atomic resolution. In this paper, using a rigorous approach based on the coarse graining method of (classical) nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, we derive the Fokker-Planck equation for the tip distribution function and then the Langevin equation (equation of motion) for the tip. We show that the latter equation contains a friction force leading to the energy dissipation. The friction force is related to the correlation function of the fluctuating tip-surface force in agreement with earlier treatments by other methods. Using a simple model of a plane surface in which only one surface atom interacts directly with the tip (it, however, interacts with other surface atoms), we calculate the friction coefficient and the corresponding dissipation energy as a function of the tip position. In our model all surface atoms are allowed to relax. Nevertheless, our calculations qualitatively agree with a previous much simpler treatment by Gauthier and Tsukada [Phys. Rev. B 60, 11 716 (1999)] that, at least for the plain terraces, the calculated dissipation energies appear to be much smaller than observed in experiments. We also demonstrate the validity of the Markovian approximation in studying the NC-AFM system.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of dextran extension by constant force in single molecule AFM.

    PubMed

    Neelov, Igor M; Adolf, David B; McLeish, Tom C B; Paci, Emanuele

    2006-11-15

    The extension of 1-6 polysaccharides has been studied in a series of recent single molecule AFM experiments. For dextran, a key finding was the existence of a plateau in the force-extension curve at forces between 700 and 1000 pN. We studied the extension of the dextran 10-mer under constant force using atomistic simulation with various force fields. All the force fields reproduce the experimental plateau on the force-extension curve. With AMBER94 and AMBER-GLYCAM04 force fields the plateau can be explained by a transition of the glucopyranose rings in the dextran monomers from the chair ((4)C(1)) to the inverted chair ((1)C(4)) conformation while other processes occur at smaller (rotation around C5-C6 bond) or higher (chairs to boat transitions) forces. The CHARMM force field provides a different picture which associates the occurrence of the plateau to chair-boat transitions of the glucopyranose rings. PMID:16950842

  13. Cross-talk compensation in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Cagdas D.; Suemer, Bilsay; Sitti, Metin

    2008-10-15

    In this work, calibration and correction of cross-talk in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. Several reasons and effects of this inherent problem on experimental results are discussed. We propose a general procedure that can be used on most AFM systems to compensate for cross-talk on the cantilever bending and twisting signals. The method utilizes two initial experiments on a flat surface to achieve an affine transformation between the measured signals and the actual signals. Using this transformation directly on the voltage signals allows us to remove the detrimental effects of cross-talk on AFM-based force measurement experiments. The achieved transformation matrix can be turned into a simple circuit and applied online, by users who have access to the raw signals in the AFM head. As a case study, a lateral deflection based mechanical characterization test for a poly(methyl methacrylate) microfiber that is suspended on a trench is investigated in terms of the effectiveness of the cross-talk compensation.

  14. Self-oscillating tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, L.; Rogers, B.; Jones, M.; Adams, J. D.; Fuste, J. L.; Minne, S. C.

    2003-09-01

    A piezoelectric microcantilever probe is demonstrated as a self-oscillator used for tapping mode atomic force microscopy. The integrated piezoelectric film on the cantilever serves as the frequency-determining component of an oscillator circuit; oscillation near the cantilever's resonant frequency is maintained by applying positive feedback to the film via this circuit. This new mode, which is a step towards more compact and parallel tapping mode AFM imaging, is demonstrated by imaging an evaporated gold film on a silicon substrate. A self-oscillating frequency spectrum and a force-distance curve are also presented.

  15. Modular apparatus for electrostatic actuation of common atomic force microscope cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Christian J.; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2015-07-15

    Piezoelectric actuation of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers often suffers from spurious mechanical resonances in the loop between the signal driving the cantilever and the actual tip motion. These spurious resonances can reduce the accuracy of AFM measurements and in some cases completely obscure the cantilever response. To address these limitations, we developed a specialized AFM cantilever holder for electrostatic actuation of AFM cantilevers. The holder contains electrical contacts for the AFM cantilever chip, as well as an electrode (or electrodes) that may be precisely positioned with respect to the back of the cantilever. By controlling the voltages on the AFM cantilever and the actuation electrode(s), an electrostatic force is applied directly to the cantilever, providing a near-ideal transfer function from drive signal to tip motion. We demonstrate both static and dynamic actuations, achieved through the application of direct current and alternating current voltage schemes, respectively. As an example application, we explore contact resonance atomic force microscopy, which is a technique for measuring the mechanical properties of surfaces on the sub-micron length scale. Using multiple electrodes, we also show that the torsional resonances of the AFM cantilever may be excited electrostatically, opening the door for advanced dynamic lateral force measurements with improved accuracy and precision.

  16. Surface conformations of anti-ricin aptamer and its affinity to ricin determined by atomic force microscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific interactions between ricin and anti-ricin aptamer were measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectrometry and the results were compared. In AFM, a single-molecule experiment with ricin functionalized AFM tip was used for scanning the aptamer mol...

  17. Atomic force microscope nanolithography: dip-pen, nanoshaving, nanografting, tapping mode, electrochemical and thermal nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luis G; Liang, Jian

    2009-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely employed as a nanoscopic lithography technique. In this review, we summarize the current state of research in this field. We introduce the various forms of the technique, such as nanoshaving, nanografting and dip-pen nanolithography, which we classify according to the different interactions between the AFM probe and the substrate during the nanolithography fabrication process. Mechanical force, applied by the tip to the substrate, is the variable that can be controlled with good precision in AFM and it has been utilized in patterning self-assembled monolayers. In such applications, the AFM tip can break some relatively weak chemical bonds inside the monolayer. In general, the state of the art for AFM nanolithography demonstrates the power, resolution and versatility of the technique. PMID:21832507

  18. Recent Progress in Molecular Recognition Imaging Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Subhadip; Lindsay, Stuart

    2016-03-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an extremely powerful tool in the field of bionanotechnology because of its ability to image single molecules and make measurements of molecular interaction forces with piconewton sensitivity. It works in aqueous media, enabling studies of molecular phenomenon taking place under physiological conditions. Samples can be imaged in their near-native state without any further modifications such as staining or tagging. The combination of AFM imaging with the force measurement added a new feature to the AFM technique, that is, molecular recognition imaging. Molecular recognition imaging enables mapping of specific interactions between two molecules (one attached to the AFM tip and the other to the imaging substrate) by generating simultaneous topography and recognition images (TREC). Since its discovery, the recognition imaging technique has been successfully applied to different systems such as antibody-protein, aptamer-protein, peptide-protein, chromatin, antigen-antibody, cells, and so forth. Because the technique is based on specific binding between the ligand and receptor, it has the ability to detect a particular protein in a mixture of proteins or monitor a biological phenomenon in the native physiological state. One key step for recognition imaging technique is the functionalization of the AFM tips (generally, silicon, silicon nitrides, gold, etc.). Several different functionalization methods have been reported in the literature depending on the molecules of interest and the material of the tip. Polyethylene glycol is routinely used to provide flexibility needed for proper binding as a part of the linker that carries the affinity molecule. Recently, a heterofunctional triarm linker has been synthesized and successfully attached with two different affinity molecules. This novel linker, when attached to AFM tip, helped to detect two different proteins simultaneously from a mixture of proteins using a so-called "two

  19. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F.

    2013-11-15

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  20. Stretching of Single Polymer Chains Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C.; van der Vegte, E. W.; van Swieten, E.; Robillard, G. T.; Hadziioannou, G.

    1998-03-01

    A variety of macroscopic phenomenon involve "nanoscale" polymer deformation including rubber elasticity, shear yielding, strain hardening, stress relaxation, fracture, and flow. With the advent of new and improved experimental techniques, such as the atomic force microscope (AFM), the probing of physical properties of polymers has reached finer and finer scales. The development of mixed self-assembling monolayer techniques and the chemical functionalization of AFM probe tips has allowed for mechanical experiments on single polymer chains of molecular dimensions. In our experiments, mixed monolayers are prepared in which end-functionalized, flexible polymer chains of thiol-terminated poly(methacrylic acid) are covalently bonded, isolated, and randomly distributed on gold substrates. The coils are then imaged, tethered to a gold-coated AFM tip, and stretched between the tip and the substrate in a conventional force / distance experiment. An increase in the attractive force due to entropic, elastic resistance to stretching, as well as fracture of the polymer chain is observed. The effect of chain stiffness, topological constraints, strain rate, mechanical hysteresis, and stress relaxation were investigated. Force modulation techniques were also employed in order to image the viscoelastic character of the polymer chains. Parallel work includes similar studies of biological systems such as wheat gluten proteins and polypeptides.

  1. Probing biofouling resistant polymer brush surfaces by atomic force microscopy based force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schön, Peter; Kutnyanszky, Edit; ten Donkelaar, Bas; Santonicola, M Gabriella; Tecim, Tugba; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-02-01

    The protein repellency and biofouling resistance of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA) brushes grafted via surface initiated polymerization (SIP) from silicon and glass substrata was assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) adherence experiments. Laboratory settlement assays were conducted with cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. AFM adherence includes the determination of contact rupture forces when AFM probe tips are withdrawn from the substratum. When the surface of the AFM tip is modified, adherence can be assessed with chemical specifity using a method known as chemical force microscopy (CFM). In this study, AFM tips were chemically functionalized with (a) fibronectin- here used as model for a nonspecifically adhering protein - and (b) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide motifs covalently attached to poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes as biomimics of cellular adhesion receptors. Fibronectin functionalized tips showed significantly reduced nonspecific adhesion to pSBMA-modified substrata compared to bare gold (2.3±0.75 nN) and octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (1.3±0.75 nN). PMAA and PMAA-RGD modified probes showed no significant adhesion to pSBMA modified silicon substrata. The results gathered through AFM protein adherence studies were complemented by laboratory fouling studies, which showed no adhesion of cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite on pSBMA. With regard to its unusually high non-specific adsorption to a wide variety of materials the behavior of fibronectin is analogous to the barnacle cyprid temporary adhesive that also binds well to surfaces differing in polarity, charge and free energy. The antifouling efficacy of pSBMA may, therefore, be directly related to the ability of this surface to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. PMID:23138001

  2. Simultaneous Nanomechanical and Electrochemical Mapping: Combining Peak Force Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy with Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Peter; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine

    2016-06-21

    Soft electronic devices play a crucial role in, e.g., neural implants as stimulating electrodes, transducers for biosensors, or selective drug-delivery. Because of their elasticity, they can easily adapt to their environment and prevent immunoreactions leading to an overall improved long-term performance. In addition, flexible electronic devices such as stretchable displays will be increasingly used in everyday life, e.g., for so-called electronic wearables. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile tool to characterize these micro- and nanostructured devices in terms of their topography. Using advanced imaging techniques such as peak force tapping (PFT), nanomechanical properties including adhesion, deformation, and Young's modulus can be simultaneously mapped along with surface features. However, conventional AFM provides limited laterally resolved information on electrical or electrochemical properties such as the activity of an electrode array. In this study, we present the first combination of AFM with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in PFT mode, thereby offering spatially correlated electrochemical and nanomechanical information paired with high-resolution topographical data under force control (QNM-AFM-SECM). The versatility of this combined scanning probe approach is demonstrated by mapping topographical, electrochemical, and nanomechanical properties of gold microelectrodes and of gold electrodes patterned onto polydimethylsiloxane. PMID:27203837

  3. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Frequency and force modulation atomic force microscopy: low-impact tapping-mode imaging without bistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2007-07-01

    Since the 1980s, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has rapidly developed into a versatile, high-resolution characterization technique, available in a variety of imaging modes. Within intermittent-contact tapping-mode, imaging bistability and sample mechanical damage continue to be two of the most important challenges faced daily by AFM users. Recently, a new double-control-loop tapping-mode imaging algorithm (frequency and amplitude modulation AFM, FAM-AFM) was proposed and evaluated within numerical simulations, demonstrating a reduction in the repulsive tip sample forces and the absence of bistability. This article presents a much simpler algorithm, frequency and force modulation AFM (FFM-AFM), which requires only a single control loop and offers the same benefits as FAM-AFM. The concept is applied to calculate the cross-sectional scan of a carbon nanotube sample resting on a silicon surface, which is then compared to a previously reported image obtained in conventional amplitude-modulation tapping-mode, shown to be in agreement with the experimental result.

  4. Atomically-resolved surface imaging by low temperature atomic force microscopy using a quartz resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio; An, Toshu; Nishio, Takahiro; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Ono, M.; Akiyama, Kotone

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) using a length-extension quartz resonator as a force sensor. Atomically-resolved images of the Si(111) 7x7 surface were obtained with the AFM in UHV both at room temperature [1] and 5 K. The high resonance frequency (˜1 MHz) of the resonator improves the sensitivity to its deflection. Its self-sensing property eliminates the cumbersome optical alignment, which is usually required in conventional AFMs, and thus it can be easily installed into a low temperature system. The high stiffness of the resonator enables us to operate with a very small oscillation amplitude; less than 0.1nm, and thus to detect a short-range force effectively, such as a covalent bonding force, which is crucial for the highly resolved imaging. For the probe tip, a tungsten wire was attached at the end of the resonator and sharpened by focused ion beam. The native oxide layer covering the tip was removed by in-situ field ion microscopy. [1] T. An, T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama and Y. Hasegawa, APL 87, 133114 (2005).

  5. Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Udo; Albers, Boris J.; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2008-02-27

    The authors present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1 pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15 pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

  6. Accurate noncontact calibration of colloidal probe sensitivities in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Shaw, Gordon A.; Pratt, Jon R.

    2009-06-15

    The absolute force sensitivities of colloidal probes comprised of atomic force microscope, or AFM, cantilevers with microspheres attached to their distal ends are measured. The force sensitivities are calibrated through reference to accurate electrostatic forces, the realizations of which are described in detail. Furthermore, the absolute accuracy of a common AFM force calibration scheme, known as the thermal noise method, is evaluated. It is demonstrated that the thermal noise method can be applied with great success to colloidal probe calibration in air and in liquid to yield force measurements with relative standard uncertainties below 5%. Techniques to combine the electrostatics-based determination of the AFM force sensitivity with measurements of the colloidal probe's thermal noise spectrum to compute noncontact estimates of the displacement sensitivity and spring constant are also developed.

  7. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, K; Izumi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2015-03-13

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. PMID:25697199

  8. AFM force measurements of the gp120-sCD4 and gp120 or CD4 antigen-antibody interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong; Zeng, Gucheng; Chen, Sherry Shiyi; Feng, Qian; Chen, Zheng Wei

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} The unbinding force of sCD4-gp120 interaction was 25.45 {+-} 20.46 pN. {yields} The unbinding force of CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was 51.22 {+-} 34.64 pN. {yields} The unbinding force of gp120 antigen-antibody interaction was 89.87 {+-} 44.63 pN. {yields} The interaction forces between various HIV inhibitors and the target molecules are significantly different. {yields} Functionalizing on AFM tip or substrate of an interaction pair caused different results. -- Abstract: Soluble CD4 (sCD4), anti-CD4 antibody, and anti-gp120 antibody have long been regarded as entry inhibitors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy. However, the interactions between these HIV entry inhibitors and corresponding target molecules are still poorly understood. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was utilized to investigate the interaction forces among them. We found that the unbinding forces of sCD4-gp120 interaction, CD4 antigen-antibody interaction, and gp120 antigen-antibody interaction were 25.45 {+-} 20.46, 51.22 {+-} 34.64, and 89.87 {+-} 44.63 pN, respectively, which may provide important mechanical information for understanding the effects of viral entry inhibitors on HIV infection. Moreover, we found that the functionalization of an interaction pair on AFM tip or substrate significantly influenced the results, implying that we must perform AFM force measurement and analyze the data with more caution.

  9. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  10. Quantitative assessment of sample stiffness and sliding friction from force curves in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Jon R.; Shaw, Gordon A.; Kumanchik, Lee; Burnham, Nancy A.

    2010-02-15

    It has long been recognized that the angular deflection of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever under ''normal'' loading conditions can be profoundly influenced by the friction between the tip and the surface. It is shown here that a remarkably quantifiable hysteresis occurs in the slope of loading curves whenever the normal flexural stiffness of the AFM cantilever is greater than that of the sample. This situation arises naturally in cantilever-on-cantilever calibration, but also when trying to measure the stiffness of nanomechanical devices or test structures, or when probing any type of surface or structure that is much more compliant along the surface normal than in transverse directions. Expressions and techniques for evaluating the coefficient of sliding friction between the cantilever tip and sample from normal force curves, as well as relations for determining the stiffness of a mechanically compliant specimen are presented. The model is experimentally supported by the results of cantilever-on-cantilever spring constant calibrations. The cantilever spring constants determined here agree with the values determined using the NIST electrostatic force balance within the limits of the largest uncertainty component, which had a relative value of less than 2.5%. This points the way for quantitative testing of micromechanical and nanomechanical components, more accurate calibration of AFM force, and provides nanotribologists access to information about contact friction from normal force curves.

  11. Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

  12. Methods and apparatus of spatially resolved electroluminescence of operating organic light-emitting diodes using conductive atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersam, Mark C. (Inventor); Pingree, Liam S. C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A conductive atomic force microscopy (cAFM) technique which can concurrently monitor topography, charge transport, and electroluminescence with nanometer spatial resolution. This cAFM approach is particularly well suited for probing the electroluminescent response characteristics of operating organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) over short length scales.

  13. A simple model of molecular imaging with noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Nikolaj; Gross, Leo; Mohn, Fabian; Curioni, Alessandro; Meyer, Gerhard

    2012-08-01

    Using functionalized tips, the atomic resolution of a single organic molecule can be achieved by noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) operating in the regime of short-ranged repulsive Pauli forces. To theoretically describe the atomic contrast in such AFM images, we propose a simple model in which the Pauli repulsion is assumed to follow a power law as a function of the probed charge density. As the exponent in this power law is found to be largely independent of the sample molecule, our model provides a general method for simulating atomically resolved AFM images of organic molecules. For a single perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule imaged with a CO-terminated tip, we find excellent agreement with the experimental data. Our model eliminates the need to take into account the full tip and sample system and therefore reduces computational cost by three orders of magnitude.

  14. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri

    2015-10-15

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  15. Autopilot for frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Schlesinger, Itai; Sivan, Uri

    2015-10-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of operating an atomic force microscope (AFM) is finding optimal feedback parameters. This statement applies particularly to frequency-modulation AFM (FM-AFM), which utilizes three feedback loops to control the cantilever excitation amplitude, cantilever excitation frequency, and z-piezo extension. These loops are regulated by a set of feedback parameters, tuned by the user to optimize stability, sensitivity, and noise in the imaging process. Optimization of these parameters is difficult due to the coupling between the frequency and z-piezo feedback loops by the non-linear tip-sample interaction. Four proportional-integral (PI) parameters and two lock-in parameters regulating these loops require simultaneous optimization in the presence of a varying unknown tip-sample coupling. Presently, this optimization is done manually in a tedious process of trial and error. Here, we report on the development and implementation of an algorithm that computes the control parameters automatically. The algorithm reads the unperturbed cantilever resonance frequency, its quality factor, and the z-piezo driving signal power spectral density. It analyzes the poles and zeros of the total closed loop transfer function, extracts the unknown tip-sample transfer function, and finds four PI parameters and two lock-in parameters for the frequency and z-piezo control loops that optimize the bandwidth and step response of the total system. Implementation of the algorithm in a home-built AFM shows that the calculated parameters are consistently excellent and rarely require further tweaking by the user. The new algorithm saves the precious time of experienced users, facilitates utilization of FM-AFM by casual users, and removes the main hurdle on the way to fully automated FM-AFM.

  16. Interactive forces between lignin and cellulase as determined by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignin is a complex polymer which inhibits the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose in lignocellulose biomass for biofuel production. Cellulase enzymes irreversibly bind to lignin, deactivating the enzyme and lowering the overall activity of the hydrolyzing reaction solution. Within this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to compare the adhesion forces between cellulase and lignin with the forces between cellulase and cellulose, and to study the moiety groups involved in binding of cellulase to lignin. Results Trichoderma reesei, ATCC 26921, a commercial cellulase system, was immobilized onto silicon wafers and used as a substrate to measure forces involved in cellulase non-productive binding to lignin. Attraction forces between cellulase and lignin, and between cellulase and cellulose were compared using kraft lignin- and hydroxypropyl cellulose-coated tips with the immobilized cellulase substrate. The measured adhesion forces between kraft lignin and cellulase were on average 45% higher than forces between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase. Specialized AFM tips with hydrophobic, -OH, and -COOH chemical characteristics were used with immobilized cellulase to represent hydrophobic, H-bonding, and charge-charge interactions, respectively. Forces between hydrophobic tips and cellulase were on average 43% and 13% higher than forces between cellulase with tips exhibiting OH and COOH groups, respectively. A strong attractive force during the AFM tip approach to the immobilized cellulase was observed with the hydrophobic tip. Conclusions This work shows that there is a greater overall attraction between kraft lignin and cellulase than between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase, which may have implications during the enzymatic reaction process. Furthermore, hydrophobic interactions appear to be the dominating attraction force in cellulase binding to lignin, while a number of other interactions may establish the irreversible binding

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  18. Combined strategies for optimal detection of the contact point in AFM force-indentation curves obtained on thin samples and adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a widely used tool to study cell mechanics. Current AFM setups perform high-throughput probing of living cells, generating large amounts of force-indentations curves that are subsequently analysed using a contact-mechanics model. Here we present several algorithms to detect the contact point in force-indentation curves, a crucial step to achieve fully-automated analysis of AFM-generated data. We quantify and rank the performance of our algorithms by analysing a thousand force-indentation curves obtained on thin soft homogeneous hydrogels, which mimic the stiffness and topographical profile of adherent cells. We take advantage of the fact that all the proposed algorithms are based on sequential search strategies, and show that a combination of them yields the most accurate and unbiased results. Finally, we also observe improved performance when force-indentation curves obtained on adherent cells are analysed using our combined strategy, as compared to the classical algorithm used in the majority of previous cell mechanics studies. PMID:26891762

  19. Combined strategies for optimal detection of the contact point in AFM force-indentation curves obtained on thin samples and adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Gavara, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a widely used tool to study cell mechanics. Current AFM setups perform high-throughput probing of living cells, generating large amounts of force-indentations curves that are subsequently analysed using a contact-mechanics model. Here we present several algorithms to detect the contact point in force-indentation curves, a crucial step to achieve fully-automated analysis of AFM-generated data. We quantify and rank the performance of our algorithms by analysing a thousand force-indentation curves obtained on thin soft homogeneous hydrogels, which mimic the stiffness and topographical profile of adherent cells. We take advantage of the fact that all the proposed algorithms are based on sequential search strategies, and show that a combination of them yields the most accurate and unbiased results. Finally, we also observe improved performance when force-indentation curves obtained on adherent cells are analysed using our combined strategy, as compared to the classical algorithm used in the majority of previous cell mechanics studies. PMID:26891762

  20. Combined strategies for optimal detection of the contact point in AFM force-indentation curves obtained on thin samples and adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavara, Núria

    2016-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a widely used tool to study cell mechanics. Current AFM setups perform high-throughput probing of living cells, generating large amounts of force-indentations curves that are subsequently analysed using a contact-mechanics model. Here we present several algorithms to detect the contact point in force-indentation curves, a crucial step to achieve fully-automated analysis of AFM-generated data. We quantify and rank the performance of our algorithms by analysing a thousand force-indentation curves obtained on thin soft homogeneous hydrogels, which mimic the stiffness and topographical profile of adherent cells. We take advantage of the fact that all the proposed algorithms are based on sequential search strategies, and show that a combination of them yields the most accurate and unbiased results. Finally, we also observe improved performance when force-indentation curves obtained on adherent cells are analysed using our combined strategy, as compared to the classical algorithm used in the majority of previous cell mechanics studies.

  1. Mapping of laser diode radiation intensity by atomic-force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, P. A.; Dunaevskii, M. S.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Podoskin, A. A.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of the intensity of laser diode radiation has been studied using an original method based on atomic-force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that the laser radiation intensity in both the near field and transition zone of a high-power semiconductor laser under room-temperature conditions can be mapped by AFM at a subwavelength resolution. The obtained patterns of radiation intensity distribution agree with the data of modeling and the results of near-field optical microscopy measurements.

  2. Atomic Force Microscopy in Microbiology: New Structural and Functional Insights into the Microbial Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial cells sense and respond to their environment using their surface constituents. Therefore, understanding the assembly and biophysical properties of cell surface molecules is an important research topic. With its ability to observe living microbial cells at nanometer resolution and to manipulate single-cell surface molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful tool in microbiology. Here, we survey major breakthroughs made in cell surface microbiology using AFM techniques, emphasizing the most recent structural and functional insights. PMID:25053785

  3. Direct visualization and identification of biofunctionalized nanoparticles using a magnetic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Block, Stephan; Glöckl, Gunnar; Weitschies, Werner; Helm, Christiane A

    2011-09-14

    Because of its outstanding ability to image and manipulate single molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) established itself as a fundamental technique in nanobiotechnology. (1) We present a new modality that distinguishes single nanoparticles by the surrounding magnetic field gradient. Diamagnetic gold and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles become discernible under ambient conditions. Images of proteins, magnetolabeled with nanoparticles, demonstrate the first steps toward a magnetic analogue to fluorescence microscopy, which combines nanoscale lateral resolution of AFM with unambiguous detection of magnetic markers. PMID:21819124

  4. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe—the key actuating element—has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices. PMID:27199165

  5. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-05-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe--the key actuating element--has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices.

  6. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex. PMID:26876486

  7. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe-the key actuating element-has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices. PMID:27199165

  8. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment. PMID:25867282

  9. Stochastic adhesion of hydroxylated atomic force microscopy tips to supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Apetrei, Aurelia; Sirghi, Lucel

    2013-12-31

    This work reports results of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of adhesion force between hydroxylated AFM tips and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) of phosphatidylcholine in phosphate buffer saline solution at neutral pH. Silicon nitride AFM probes were hydroxylated by treatment in water vapor plasma and used in force spectroscopy measurements of adhesion force on SLBs with control of contact loading force and residence time. The measurements showed a stochastic behavior of adhesion force that was attributed to stochastic formation of hydrogen bonds between the hydroxyl groups on the AFM tip and oxygen atoms from the phosphate groups of the phosphatidylcholine molecules. Analysis of a large number of force curves revealed a very low probability of hydrogen bond formation, a probability that increased with the increase of contact loading force and residence time. The variance and mean values of adhesion force showed a linear dependence on each other, which indicated that hydrogen bond formation obeyed the Poisson distribution of probability. This allowed for the quantitative determination of the rupture force per hydrogen bond of about 40 pN and showed the absence of other nonspecific interaction forces. PMID:24320829

  10. Characterizing atomic force microscopy tip shape in use.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmei; Itoh, Hiroshi; Sun, Jielin; Hu, Jun; Shen, Dianhong; Ichimura, Shingo

    2009-02-01

    A new tip characterizer based on the fabrication of multilayer thin films for atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to analyze the effective tip shape while in use. The precise structure of this tip characterizer was measured by transmission electron microscopy. Four different types of commercial tips with various radii were characterized by the tip characterizer and by conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results were compared to obtain a relationship between the actual and effective tip shapes. A quantitative analysis was performed of apex radii measured from line profiles of comb-shaped patterns and nanometer-scale knife-edges without the problem of edge uncertainty in the SEM image. Degradation of the AFM tip induced by electron-beam irradiation was studied by using SEM and the tip characterizer. A potential technique for fabricating symmetric AFM tips based on irradiation by an electron beam and a quantitative analysis of changing the tip apex in SEM were examined with AFM using the tip characterizer. PMID:19441396

  11. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Atherosclerosis Progression in Arterial Walls.

    PubMed

    Timashev, Peter S; Kotova, Svetlana L; Belkova, Galina V; Gubar'kova, Ekaterina V; Timofeeva, Lidia B; Gladkova, Natalia D; Solovieva, Anna B

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Here we suggest a novel approach for tracking atherosclerosis progression based on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using AFM, we studied cross-sections of coronary arteries with the following types of lesions: Type II-thickened intima; Type III-thickened intima with a lipid streak; Type IV-fibrotic layer over a lipid core; Type Va-unstable fibrotic layer over a lipid core; Type Vc-very thick fibrotic layer. AFM imaging revealed that the fibrotic layer of an atherosclerotic plaque is represented by a basket-weave network of collagen fibers and a subscale network of fibrils that become looser with atherosclerosis progression. In an unstable plaque (Type Va), packing of the collagen fibers and fibrils becomes even less uniform than that at the previous stages, while a stable fibrotic plaque (Vc) has significantly tighter packing. Such alterations of the collagen network morphology apparently, led to deterioration of the Type Va plaque mechanical properties, that, in turn, resulted in its instability and propensity to rupture. Thus, AFM may serve as a useful tool for tracking atherosclerosis progression in the arterial wall tissue. PMID:26843417

  12. Actuation of atomic force microscopy microcantilevers using contact acoustic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2013-11-15

    A new method of actuating atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers is proposed in which a high frequency (>5 MHz) wave modulated by a lower frequency (∼300 kHz) wave passes through a contact acoustic nonlinearity at the contact interface between the actuator and the cantilever chip. The nonlinearity converts the high frequency, modulated signal to a low frequency drive signal suitable for actuation of tapping-mode AFM probes. The higher harmonic content of this signal is filtered out mechanically by the cantilever transfer function, providing for clean output. A custom probe holder was designed and constructed using rapid prototyping technologies and off-the-shelf components and was interfaced with an Asylum Research MFP-3D AFM, which was then used to evaluate the performance characteristics with respect to standard hardware and linear actuation techniques. Using a carrier frequency of 14.19 MHz, it was observed that the cantilever output was cleaner with this actuation technique and added no significant noise to the system. This setup, without any optimization, was determined to have an actuation bandwidth on the order of 10 MHz, suitable for high speed imaging applications. Using this method, an image was taken that demonstrates the viability of the technique and is compared favorably to images taken with a standard AFM setup.

  13. Actuation of atomic force microscopy microcantilevers using contact acoustic nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Torello, D; Degertekin, F Levent

    2013-11-01

    A new method of actuating atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers is proposed in which a high frequency (>5 MHz) wave modulated by a lower frequency (~300 kHz) wave passes through a contact acoustic nonlinearity at the contact interface between the actuator and the cantilever chip. The nonlinearity converts the high frequency, modulated signal to a low frequency drive signal suitable for actuation of tapping-mode AFM probes. The higher harmonic content of this signal is filtered out mechanically by the cantilever transfer function, providing for clean output. A custom probe holder was designed and constructed using rapid prototyping technologies and off-the-shelf components and was interfaced with an Asylum Research MFP-3D AFM, which was then used to evaluate the performance characteristics with respect to standard hardware and linear actuation techniques. Using a carrier frequency of 14.19 MHz, it was observed that the cantilever output was cleaner with this actuation technique and added no significant noise to the system. This setup, without any optimization, was determined to have an actuation bandwidth on the order of 10 MHz, suitable for high speed imaging applications. Using this method, an image was taken that demonstrates the viability of the technique and is compared favorably to images taken with a standard AFM setup. PMID:24289402

  14. Structural evaluation of probucol nanoparticles in water by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moribe, Kunikazu; Limwikrant, Waree; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2012-05-10

    Structural evaluation of probucol nanoparticles coground with polyvinylpyrrolidone K17 and sodium dodecyl sulfate for 90 min was performed by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) with force-distance curve analysis. The results of solid-state NMR indicated that the cogrinding changed crystalline probucol to amorphous form. The number-averaged mean heights of probucol particles in the ground mixture (GM) suspension were determined by AFM to be 6 and 15 nm for freshly prepared and 24h-stored samples, respectively. Nucleation and the subsequent crystal growth might have occurred after the GM was dispersed in water. The presence of probucol nanocrystals and agglomeration of the primary probucol nanoparticles were recognized by AFM force-distance curve analysis. AFM could be a promising tool to evaluate the structure of nanoparticles as well as their agglomeration behavior in aqueous media. PMID:22370474

  15. Phase imaging of moving DNA molecules and DNA molecules replicated in the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Argaman, M; Golan, R; Thomson, N H; Hansma, H G

    1997-01-01

    Phase imaging with a tapping mode atomic force microscope (AFM) has many advantages for imaging moving DNA and DNA-enzyme complexes in aqueous buffers at molecular resolution. In phase images molecules can be resolved at higher scan rates and lower forces than in height images from the AFM. Higher scan rates make it possible to image faster processes. At lower forces the molecules are imaged more gently. Moving DNA molecules are also resolved more clearly in phase images than in height images. Phase images in tapping mode AFM show the phase difference between oscillation of the piezoelectric crystal that drives the cantilever and oscillation of the cantilever as it interacts with the sample surface. Phase images presented here show moving DNA molecules that have been replicated with Sequenase in the AFM and DNA molecules tethered in complexes with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. PMID:9336471

  16. Prediction of atomic force microscope probe dynamics through the receptance coupling method

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrpouya, M.; Park, S. S.

    2011-12-15

    The increased growth in the use of tip-based sensing, manipulations, and fabrication of devices in atomic force microscopy (AFM) necessitates the accurate prediction of the dynamic behavior of the AFM probe. The chip holder, to which the micro-sensing device is attached, and the rest of the AFM system can affect the overall dynamics of the probe. In order to consider these boundary effects, we propose a novel receptance coupling method to mathematically combine the dynamics of the AFM setup and probe, based on the equilibrium and compatibility conditions at the joint. Once the frequency response functions of displacement over force at the tool tip are obtained, the dynamic interaction forces between the tip and the sample in nanoscale can be determined by measuring the probe tip displacement.

  17. The study on the atomic force microscopy base nanoscale electrical discharge machining.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Ching; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes an innovative atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoscale electrical discharge machining (AFM-based nanoEDM) system which combines an AFM with a self-produced metallic probe and a high-voltage generator to create an atmospheric environment AFM-based nanoEDM system and a deionized water (DI water) environment AFM-based nanoEDM system. This study combines wire-cut processing and electrochemical tip sharpening techniques on a 40-µm thick stainless steel sheet to produce a high conductive AFM probes, the production can withstand high voltage and large current. The tip radius of these probes is approximately 40 nm. A probe test was executed on the AFM using probes to obtain nanoscales morphology of Si wafer surface. The silicon wafer was as a specimen to carry out AFM-base nanoEDM process in atmospheric and DI water environments by AFM-based nanoEDM system. After experiments, the results show that the atmospheric and DI water environment AFM-based nanoEDM systems operate smoothly. From experimental results, it can be found that the electric discharge depth of the silicon wafer at atmospheric environments is a mere 14.54 nm. In a DI water environment, the depth of electric discharge of the silicon wafer can reach 25.4 nm. This indicates that the EDM ability of DI water environment AFM-based nanoEDM system is higher than that of atmospheric environment AFM-based nanoEDM system. After multiple nanoEDM process, the tips become blunt. After applying electrochemical tip sharpening techniques, the tip radius can return to approximately 40 nm. Therefore, AFM probes produced in this study can be reused. PMID:21898457

  18. Measuring viscoelasticity of soft samples using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, S; Berger, E J

    2009-09-01

    Relaxation indentation experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to obtain viscoelastic material properties of soft samples. The quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model formulated by Fung (1972, "Stress Strain History Relations of Soft Tissues in Simple Elongation," in Biomechanics, Its Foundation and Objectives, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, pp. 181-207) for uniaxial compression data was modified for the indentation test data in this study. Hertz contact mechanics was used for the instantaneous deformation, and a reduced relaxation function based on continuous spectrum is used for the time-dependent part in the model. The modified QLV indentation model presents a novel method to obtain viscoelastic properties from indentation data independent of relaxation times of the test. The major objective of the present study is to develop the QLV indentation model and implement the model on AFM indentation data for 1% agarose gel and a viscoelastic polymer using spherical indenter. PMID:19725704

  19. Elastic modulus, oxidation depth and adhesion force of surface modified polystyrene studied by AFM and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarsky, G. V.; Davidson, M. R.; Bradley, R. H.

    2004-06-01

    AFM and XPS have been used to investigate the surface and near-surface properties of polystyrene (PS) substrates which have been subjected to one of three controlled surface modification processes performed in situ in a specially constructed cell. The cell was fitted to a Digital Instruments Nanoscope III AFM measuring head and allowed close control of the gaseous environment and made it possible to UV irradiate the sample during AFM measurements. Treatments were carried out using UV at 184.9 and 253.7 nm wavelengths, in oxygen (UV-ozone), and in nitrogen (UV-only). Polystyrene surfaces were also modified by an exposure to an atmosphere of ozone in the absence of UV (ozone-only). Data show that adhesion force is highest between tip and sample for the UV-ozone exposed surfaces and that the adhesion force increases with sample exposure time. Exposure to UV-only or ozone alone results in lower ultimate adhesion levels with a slower rate of increase with exposure time. Evaluation of Young's modulus for unmodified PS gave a value of 3.37 (±0.52) GPa which agrees well with the textbook value which ranges from 2 to 4 GPa depending on the measurement technique. A 60 s exposure to combined UV-ozone resulted in the formation of a surface layer with a modulus at the surface of 1.25 (±0.19) GPa which increased to 2.5 (±0.37) GPa at a depth of 3.5 nm. The sample exposed for 60 s to UV-only had a Young's modulus of 2.6 (±0.39) GPa but showed no reduced modulus layer at the surface. The modulus of the ozone-only treated material was the least affected with a decrease of around 0.75 GPa with some evidence for a surface layer with a modulus ranging from 2.6 (±0.39) GPa at the surface to 3.2 (±0.48) GPa at a depth of 2 nm. XPS analyses reveal that the oxygen content of the modified surfaces decreased in the order of UV-ozone > UV > ozone with approximate concentrations for a 60 s exposure of 5, 0.7 and 0.05 at.%, respectively. Friction force imaging of patterned surfaces

  20. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer M; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  1. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  2. Detection of magnetic-labeled antibody specific recognition events by combined atomic force and magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xia; Liu, Yanmei; Li, Jun; Guo, Wei; Bai, Yubai

    2009-09-01

    Atomic force (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were developed to detect biomolecular specific interaction. Goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (anti-IgG) was covalently attached onto gold substrate modified by a self-assembly monolayer of thioctic acid via 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl] carbodiimide (EDC) activation. Magnetic-labeled IgG then specifically adsorbed onto anti-IgG surface. The morphological variation was identified by AFM. MFM was proved to be a fine assistant tool to distinguish the immunorecognized nanocomposites from the impurities by detection of the magnetic signal from magnetic-labeled IgG. It would enhance the understanding of biomolecular recognition process.

  3. Analysis of dynamic cantilever behavior in tapping mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenqi; Zhang, Guang-Ming; Murphy, Mark F; Lilley, Francis; Harvey, David M; Burton, David R

    2015-10-01

    Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides phase images in addition to height and amplitude images. Although the behavior of tapping mode AFM has been investigated using mathematical modeling, comprehensive understanding of the behavior of tapping mode AFM still poses a significant challenge to the AFM community, involving issues such as the correct interpretation of the phase images. In this paper, the cantilever's dynamic behavior in tapping mode AFM is studied through a three dimensional finite element method. The cantilever's dynamic displacement responses are firstly obtained via simulation under different tip-sample separations, and for different tip-sample interaction forces, such as elastic force, adhesion force, viscosity force, and the van der Waals force, which correspond to the cantilever's action upon various different representative computer-generated test samples. Simulated results show that the dynamic cantilever displacement response can be divided into three zones: a free vibration zone, a transition zone, and a contact vibration zone. Phase trajectory, phase shift, transition time, pseudo stable amplitude, and frequency changes are then analyzed from the dynamic displacement responses that are obtained. Finally, experiments are carried out on a real AFM system to support the findings of the simulations. PMID:26303510

  4. Force profiles of protein pulling with or without cytoskeletal links studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi . E-mail: aikai@bio.titech.ac.jp

    2006-09-15

    To test the capability of the atomic force microscope for distinguishing membrane proteins with/without cytoskeletal associations, we studied the pull-out mechanics of lipid tethers from the red blood cell (RBC). When wheat germ agglutinin, a glycophorin A (GLA) specific lectin, was used to pull out tethers from RBC, characteristic force curves for tether elongation having a long plateau force were observed but without force peaks which are usually attributed to the forced unbinding of membrane components from the cytoskeleton. The result was in agreement with the reports that GLA is substantially free of cytoskeletal interactions. On the contrary, when the Band 3 specific lectin, concanavalin A, was used, the force peaks were indeed observed together with a plateau supporting its reported cytoskeletal association. Based on these observations, we postulate that the state of cytoskeletal association of particular membrane proteins can be identified from the force profiles of their pull-out mechanics.

  5. Nanosecond switching in GeSe phase change memory films by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bosse, James L.; Huey, Bryan D.; Grishin, Ilya; Kolosov, Oleg V.; Gyu Choi, Yong; Cheong, Byung-ki; Lee, Suyoun

    2014-02-03

    Nanosecond scale threshold switching is investigated with conducting atomic force microscopy (AFM) for an amorphous GeSe film. Switched bits exhibit 2–3 orders of magnitude variations in conductivity, as demonstrated in phase change based memory devices. Through the nm-scale AFM probe, this crystallization was achieved with pulse durations of as low as 15 ns, the fastest reported with scanning probe based methods. Conductance AFM imaging of the switched bits further reveals correlations between the switched volume, pulse amplitude, and pulse duration. The influence of film heterogeneities on switching is also directly detected, which is of tremendous importance for optimal device performance.

  6. Analysis of atomic force microscopic results of InAs islands formed by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Q.; Liang, J. B.; Xu, B.; Ding, D.; Li, H. X.; Jiang, C.; Zhou, W.; Liu, F. Q.; Wang, Z. G.; Qiu, X. H.; Shang, G. Y.; Bai, C. L.

    1998-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of nanometer-sized islands formed by 2 monolayers of InAs by molecular beam epitaxy have been carried out and the scan line of individual islands was extracted from raw AFM data for investigation. It is found that the base widths of nanometer-sized islands obtained by AFM are not reliable due to the finite size and shape of the contacting probe. A simple model is proposed to analyze the deviation of the measured value from the real value of the base width of InAs islands.

  7. Atomic force microscopy-coupled microcoils for cellular-scale nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousoulis, Charilaos; Maleki, Teimour; Ziaie, Babak; Neu, Corey P.

    2013-04-01

    We present the coupling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies to enable topographical, mechanical, and chemical profiling of biological samples. Here, we fabricate and perform proof-of-concept testing of radiofrequency planar microcoils on commercial AFM cantilevers. The sensitive region of the coil was estimated to cover an approximate volume of 19.4 × 103 μm3 (19.4 pl). Functionality of the spectroscopic module of the prototype device is illustrated through the detection of 1Η resonance in deionized water. The acquired spectra depict combined NMR capability with AFM that may ultimately enable biophysical and biochemical studies at the single cell level.

  8. System design and new applications for atomic force microscope based on tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Liu, A. P.; Yang, X. H.

    2015-09-01

    The design of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with high resolution is introduced in this paper. Mainly, we have developed the system design of the apparatus based on tunneling. AFM.IPC-208B, this kind of apparatus combines scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) and AFM availability, and its lens body with original frame enhances the capability of the machine. In order to analyze the performance of AFM.IPC-208B, as a new tool in the field of Life Science, we make use of the system to study natural mica and molecular protein structures of Cattle-insulin and human antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG) coupled with staphylococcus protein A (SPA). As the results of new applications, the resolution of AFM.IPC-208B is proved to be 0.1 nm, and these nanometer measurement results provide much valuable information for the study of small molecular proteins and HIV experiments.

  9. Label-free optical imaging of membrane patches for atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Churnside, Allison B.; King, Gavin M.; Perkins, Thomas T.

    2010-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), finding sparsely distributed regions of interest can be difficult and time-consuming. Typically, the tip is scanned until the desired object is located. This process can mechanically or chemically degrade the tip, as well as damage fragile biological samples. Protein assemblies can be detected using the back-scattered light from a focused laser beam. We previously used back-scattered light from a pair of laser foci to stabilize an AFM. In the present work, we integrate these techniques to optically image patches of purple membranes prior to AFM investigation. These rapidly acquired optical images were aligned to the subsequent AFM images to ~40 nm, since the tip position was aligned to the optical axis of the imaging laser. Thus, this label-free imaging efficiently locates sparsely distributed protein assemblies for subsequent AFM study while simultaneously minimizing degradation of the tip and the sample. PMID:21164738

  10. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  11. Surface science experiments involving the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Sean P.

    Three diverse first author surfaces science experiments conducted by Sean P. McBride1-3 will be discussed in detail and supplemented by secondary co-author projects by Sean P. McBride,4-7 all of which rely heavily on the use of an atomic force microscope (AFM). First, the slip length parameter, b of liquids is investigated using colloidal probe AFM. The slip length describes how easily a fluid flows over an interface. The slip length, with its exact origin unknown and dependencies not overwhelming decided upon by the scientific community, remains a controversial topic. Colloidal probe AFM uses a spherical probe attached to a standard AFM imaging tip driven through a liquid. With the force on this colloidal AFM probe known, and using the simplest homologous series of test liquids, many of the suspected causes and dependencies of the slip length demonstrated in the literature can be suppressed or eliminated. This leaves the measurable trends in the slip length attributed only to the systematically varying physical properties of the different liquids. When conducting these experiments, it was realized that the spring constant, k, of the system depends upon the cantilever geometry of the experiment and therefore should be measured in-situ. This means that the k calibration needs to be performed in the same viscous liquid in which the slip experiments are performed. Current in-situ calibrations in viscous fluids are very limited, thus a new in-situ k calibration method was developed for use in viscous fluids. This new method is based upon the residuals, namely, the difference between experimental force-distance data and Vinogradova slip theory. Next, the AFM's ability to acquire accurate sub nanometer height profiles of structures on interfaces was used to develop a novel experimental technique to measure the line tension parameter, tau, of isolated nanoparticles at the three phase interface in a solid-liquid-vapor system. The tau parameter is a result of excess energy

  12. Visualisation of xanthan conformation by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jonathan; Morris, Victor J; Al-Assaf, Saphwan; Gunning, A Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Direct visual evidence obtained by atomic force microscopy demonstrates that when xanthan is adsorbed from aqueous solution onto the heterogeneously charged substrate mica, its helical conformation is distorted. Following adsorption it requires annealing for several hours to restore its ordered helical state. Once the helix state reforms, the AFM images obtained showed clear resolution of the periodicity with a value of 4.7nm consistent with the previously predicted models. In addition, the images also reveal evidence that the helix is formed by a double strand, a clarification of an ambiguity of the xanthan ultrastructure that has been outstanding for many years. PMID:27185152

  13. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Gandee, Leah; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Zimmern, Philippe; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model.

  14. Understanding 2D atomic resolution imaging of the calcite surface in water by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tracey, John; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Spijker, Peter; Miyata, Kazuki; Reischl, Bernhard; Canova, Filippo Federici; Rohl, Andrew L; Fukuma, Takeshi; Foster, Adam S

    2016-10-14

    Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) experiments were performed on the calcite (10[Formula: see text]4) surface in pure water, and a detailed analysis was made of the 2D images at a variety of frequency setpoints. We observed eight different contrast patterns that reproducibly appeared in different experiments and with different measurement parameters. We then performed systematic free energy calculations of the same system using atomistic molecular dynamics to obtain an effective force field for the tip-surface interaction. By using this force field in a virtual AFM simulation we found that each experimental contrast could be reproduced in our simulations by changing the setpoint, regardless of the experimental parameters. This approach offers a generic method for understanding the wide variety of contrast patterns seen on the calcite surface in water, and is generally applicable to AFM imaging in liquids. PMID:27609045

  15. Subnanometer-Resolution Frequency Modulation Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquid for Biological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi

    2009-08-01

    The spatial resolution and force sensitivity of frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) in liquid have been dramatically improved in the last a few years. It is now possible to image individual atoms and molecules at a solid/liquid interface with a subnanometer-scale resolution and a piconewton-order loading force. This capability enabled the direct visualization of hydration layers and mobile ions on a lipid bilayer and β-strands constituting an amyloid fibril. These striking results highlighted the significant potential of FM-AFM in biological research. Here, I summarize the technological innovation that brought about this progress and review biological applications of FM-AFM in liquid.

  16. Characterization of new drug delivery nanosystems using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, Ellas; Mourelatou, Elena A.; Demetzos, C.; Makropoulou, Mersini; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes are the most attractive lipid vesicles for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine, behaving also as cell models in biophotonics research. The characterization of the micro-mechanical properties of drug carriers is an important issue and many analytical techniques are employed, as, for example, optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. In this work, polyol hyperbranched polymers (HBPs) have been employed along with liposomes for the preparation of new chimeric advanced drug delivery nanosystems (Chi-aDDnSs). Aliphatic polyester HBPs with three different pseudogenerations G2, G3 and G4 with 16, 32, and 64 peripheral hydroxyl groups, respectively, have been incorporated in liposomal formulation. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique was used for the comparative study of the morphology and the mechanical properties of Chi-aDDnSs and conventional DDnS. The effects of both the HBPs architecture and the polyesters pseudogeneration number in the stability and the stiffness of chi-aDDnSs were examined. From the force-distance curves of AFM spectroscopy, the Young's modulus was calculated.

  17. Single molecule force spectroscopy by AFM indicates helical structure of poly(ethylene-glycol) in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oesterhelt, F.; Rief, M.; Gaub, H. E.

    1999-03-01

    We elongated individual poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG) molecules tethered at one end to an AFM cantilever. We observed the resistive force as a function of elongation in different solvents. In all cases the molecular response was found to be fully reversible and thus in thermodynamic equilibrium. In hexadecane the stretched PEG acts like an ideal entropy spring and can be well described as a freely jointed chain. In water we observed marked deviations in the transition region from entropic to enthalpic elasticity, indicating the deformation of a supra-structure within the polymer. An analysis based on elastically coupled Markovian two-level systems agrees well with recent ab initio calculations predicting that PEG in water forms a non-planar supra-structure which is stabilized by water bridges. We obtained a binding free energy of 3.0+/-0.3 kT.

  18. Nanomechanical characterization of nanostructured bainitic steel: Peak Force Microscopy and Nanoindentation with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Rivas, Lucia; González-Orive, Alejandro; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Hernández-Creus, Alberto; Caballero, Francisca G.; Vázquez, Luis

    2015-11-01

    The full understanding of the deformation mechanisms in nanostructured bainite requires the local characterization of its mechanical properties, which are expected to change from one phase, bainitic ferrite, to another, austenite. This study becomes a challenging process due to the bainitic nanostructured nature and high Young’s modulus. In this work, we have carried out such study by means of the combination of AFM-based techniques, such as nanoindentation and Peak Force Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PF-QNM) measurements. We have addressed critically the limits and advantages of these techniques and been able to measure some elastoplastic parameters of both phases. Specifically, we have analyzed by PF-QNM two nanostructured bainitic steels, with a finer and a coarser structure, and found that both phases have a similar Young’s modulus.

  19. Nanomechanical characterization of nanostructured bainitic steel: Peak Force Microscopy and Nanoindentation with AFM

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Rivas, Lucia; González-Orive, Alejandro; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Hernández-Creus, Alberto; Caballero, Francisca G.; Vázquez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The full understanding of the deformation mechanisms in nanostructured bainite requires the local characterization of its mechanical properties, which are expected to change from one phase, bainitic ferrite, to another, austenite. This study becomes a challenging process due to the bainitic nanostructured nature and high Young’s modulus. In this work, we have carried out such study by means of the combination of AFM-based techniques, such as nanoindentation and Peak Force Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PF-QNM) measurements. We have addressed critically the limits and advantages of these techniques and been able to measure some elastoplastic parameters of both phases. Specifically, we have analyzed by PF-QNM two nanostructured bainitic steels, with a finer and a coarser structure, and found that both phases have a similar Young’s modulus. PMID:26602631

  20. Nanomechanical characterization of nanostructured bainitic steel: Peak Force Microscopy and Nanoindentation with AFM.

    PubMed

    Morales-Rivas, Lucia; González-Orive, Alejandro; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Hernández-Creus, Alberto; Caballero, Francisca G; Vázquez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The full understanding of the deformation mechanisms in nanostructured bainite requires the local characterization of its mechanical properties, which are expected to change from one phase, bainitic ferrite, to another, austenite. This study becomes a challenging process due to the bainitic nanostructured nature and high Young's modulus. In this work, we have carried out such study by means of the combination of AFM-based techniques, such as nanoindentation and Peak Force Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PF-QNM) measurements. We have addressed critically the limits and advantages of these techniques and been able to measure some elastoplastic parameters of both phases. Specifically, we have analyzed by PF-QNM two nanostructured bainitic steels, with a finer and a coarser structure, and found that both phases have a similar Young's modulus. PMID:26602631

  1. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  2. Mapping power-law rheology of living cells using multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Okajima, Takaharu

    2015-10-26

    We present multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy (AFM) for mapping the complex shear modulus G* of living cells as a function of frequency over the range of 50–500 Hz in the same measurement time as the single-frequency force modulation measurement. The AFM technique enables us to reconstruct image maps of rheological parameters, which exhibit a frequency-dependent power-law behavior with respect to G{sup *}. These quantitative rheological measurements reveal a large spatial variation in G* in this frequency range for single cells. Moreover, we find that the reconstructed images of the power-law rheological parameters are much different from those obtained in force-curve or single-frequency force modulation measurements. This indicates that the former provide information about intracellular mechanical structures of the cells that are usually not resolved with the conventional force measurement methods.

  3. Casimir-Polder forces on moving atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Scheel, Stefan; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2009-10-15

    Polarizable atoms and molecules experience the Casimir-Polder force near magnetoelectric bodies, a force that is induced by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field and the matter. Atoms and molecules in relative motion to a magnetoelectric surface experience an additional velocity-dependent force. We present a full quantum-mechanical treatment of this force and identify a generalized Doppler effect, the time delay between photon emission and reabsorption, and the Roentgen interaction as its three sources. For ground-state atoms, the force is very small and always decelerating, hence commonly known as quantum friction. For atoms and molecules in electronically excited states, on the contrary, both decelerating and accelerating forces can occur depending on the magnitude of the atomic transition frequency relative to the surface-plasmon frequency.

  4. Single ricin detection by AFM chemomechanical mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research reports a method of detecting ricin molecules immobilized on chemically modified gold (Au;111) surface by chemomechanically mapping the molecular interactions with a chemically modified Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tip. AFM images resolved the different fold-up conformations of single...

  5. High-resolution noncontact AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy investigations of self-assembled photovoltaic donor–acceptor dyads

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Pierre-Olivier; Biniek, Laure; Brinkmann, Martin; Leclerc, Nicolas; Zaborova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Summary Self-assembled donor–acceptor dyads are used as model nanostructured heterojunctions for local investigations by noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). With the aim to probe the photo-induced charge carrier generation, thin films deposited on transparent indium tin oxide substrates are investigated in dark conditions and upon illumination. The topographic and contact potential difference (CPD) images taken under dark conditions are analysed in view of the results of complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments. After in situ annealing, it is shown that the dyads with longer donor blocks essentially lead to standing acceptor–donor lamellae, where the acceptor and donor groups are π-stacked in an edge-on configuration. The existence of strong CPD and surface photo-voltage (SPV) contrasts shows that structural variations occur within the bulk of the edge-on stacks. SPV images with a very high lateral resolution are achieved, which allows for the resolution of local photo-charging contrasts at the scale of single edge-on lamella. This work paves the way for local investigations of the optoelectronic properties of donor–acceptor supramolecular architectures down to the elementary building block level. PMID:27335768

  6. High-resolution noncontact AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy investigations of self-assembled photovoltaic donor-acceptor dyads.

    PubMed

    Grévin, Benjamin; Schwartz, Pierre-Olivier; Biniek, Laure; Brinkmann, Martin; Leclerc, Nicolas; Zaborova, Elena; Méry, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled donor-acceptor dyads are used as model nanostructured heterojunctions for local investigations by noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). With the aim to probe the photo-induced charge carrier generation, thin films deposited on transparent indium tin oxide substrates are investigated in dark conditions and upon illumination. The topographic and contact potential difference (CPD) images taken under dark conditions are analysed in view of the results of complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments. After in situ annealing, it is shown that the dyads with longer donor blocks essentially lead to standing acceptor-donor lamellae, where the acceptor and donor groups are π-stacked in an edge-on configuration. The existence of strong CPD and surface photo-voltage (SPV) contrasts shows that structural variations occur within the bulk of the edge-on stacks. SPV images with a very high lateral resolution are achieved, which allows for the resolution of local photo-charging contrasts at the scale of single edge-on lamella. This work paves the way for local investigations of the optoelectronic properties of donor-acceptor supramolecular architectures down to the elementary building block level. PMID:27335768

  7. Measuring the Elasticity of Clathrin-Coated Vesicles via Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Albert J.; Prasad, Kondury; Smith, Paul D.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Nossal, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Using a new scheme based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigate mechanical properties of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). CCVs are multicomponent protein and lipid complexes of ∼100 nm diameter that are implicated in many essential cell-trafficking processes. Our AFM imaging resolves clathrin lattice polygons and provides height deformation in quantitative response to AFM-substrate compression force. We model CCVs as multilayered elastic spherical shells and, from AFM measurements, estimate their bending rigidity to be 285 ± 30 kBT, i.e., ∼20 times that of either the outer clathrin cage or inner vesicle membrane. Further analysis reveals a flexible coupling between the clathrin coat and the membrane, a structural property whose modulation may affect vesicle biogenesis and cellular function. PMID:16473913

  8. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-01

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  9. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  10. Elasticity measurement of breast cancer cells by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chaoxian; Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Yang, Hongqin; Lin, Juqiang; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical properties of living cells play an important role in understanding various cells' function and state. Therefore cell biomechanics is expected to become a useful tool for cancer diagnosis. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a square pyramid probe was performed to investigate cancerous (MCF-7) and benign (MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cells. The new QITM mode was used to acquire high-resolution topographic images and elasticity of living cells. Furthermore, individual force curves were recorded at maximum loads of 0.2, 0.5 and 1 nN, and the dependence of cell's elasticity with loading force was discussed. It was showed that the cancerous cells exhibited smaller elasticity modulus in comparison to non-cancerous counterparts. The elasticity modulus increased as the loading force increased from 0.2 nN to 1 nN. This observation indicates that loading force affects the cell's apparent elasticity and it is important to choose the appropriate force applied to cells in order to distinguish normal and cancer cells. The results reveal that the mechanical properties of living cells measured by atomic force microscopy may be a useful indicator of cell type and disease.

  11. Investigation of Oxidation Profile in PMR-15 Polyimide using Atomic Microscope (AFM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnson, Lili L.; Eby, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    Nanoindentation measurements are made on thermosetting materials using cantiever deflection vs. piezoelectric scanner position behavior determined by AFM. The spring model is used to determine mechanical properties of materials. The generalized Sneddon's equation is utilized to calculate Young's moduli for thermosetting materials at ambient conditions. Our investigations show that the force-penetration depth curves during unloading in these materials can be described accurately by a power law relationship. The results show that the accuracy of the measurements can be controlled within 7%. The above method is used to study oxidation profiles in Pl\\1R-15 polyimide. The thermo-mechanical profiles ofPNIR-15 indicate that the elastic modulus at the surface portion of the specimen is different from that at the interior of the material. It is also shown that there are two zones within the oxidized portion of the samples. Results confirm that the surface layer and the core material have substantially different properties.

  12. Distributed force probe bending model of critical dimension atomic force microscopy bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, Vladimir A.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Dixson, Ronald G.; Fu, Joseph; Silver, Rick M.

    2013-04-01

    Critical dimension atomic force microscopy (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology technique. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, small and flexible probes, often 15 to 20 nm in diameter, are used. Recent studies have reported uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements. To understand the source of these variations, tip-sample interactions between high aspect ratio features and small flexible probes, and their influence on measurement bias, should be carefully studied. Using theoretical and experimental procedures, one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) models of cylindrical probe bending relevant to carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM probes were developed and tested. An earlier 1-D bending model was refined, and a new 2-D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Contributions from several factors were considered, including: probe misalignment, CNT tip apex diameter variation, probe bending before snapping, and distributed van der Waals-London force. A method for extracting Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe-bending data was developed. Comparison of the new 2-D model with 1-D single point force (SPF) model revealed a difference of about 28% in probe bending. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1-D SPF and 2-D DF models was found. The results suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and can partially explain the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe variation. New 2-D and three-dimensional CD-AFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  13. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2016-09-21

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model. PMID:27420398

  14. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model.

  15. Characterizing the free and surface-coupled vibrations of heated-tip atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Killgore, Jason P; Tung, Ryan C; Hurley, Donna C

    2014-08-29

    Combining heated-tip atomic force microscopy (HT-AFM) with quantitative methods for determining surface mechanical properties, such as contact resonance force microscopy, creates an avenue for nanoscale thermomechanical property characterization. For nanomechanical methods that employ an atomic force microscope cantilever's vibrational modes, it is essential to understand how the vibrations of the U-shaped HT-AFM cantilever differ from those of a more traditional rectangular lever, for which analytical techniques are better developed. Here we show, with a combination of finite element analysis (FEA) and experiments, that the HT-AFM cantilever exhibits many more readily-excited vibrational modes over typical AFM frequencies compared to a rectangular cantilever. The arms of U-shaped HT-AFM cantilevers exhibit two distinct forms of flexural vibrations that differ depending on whether the two arms are vibrating in-phase or out-of-phase with one another. The in-phase vibrations are qualitatively similar to flexural vibrations in rectangular cantilevers and generally show larger sensitivity to surface stiffness changes than the out-of-phase vibrations. Vibration types can be identified from their frequency and by considering vibration amplitudes in the horizontal and vertical channels of the AFM at different laser spot positions on the cantilever. For identifying contact resonance vibrational modes, we also consider the sensitivity of the resonant frequencies to a change in applied force and hence to tip-sample contact stiffness. Finally, we assess how existing analytical models can be used to accurately predict contact stiffness from contact-resonance HT-AFM results. A simple two-parameter Euler-Bernoulli beam model provided good agreement with FEA for in-phase modes up to a contact stiffness 500 times the cantilever spring constant. By providing insight into cantilever vibrations and exploring the potential of current analysis techniques, our results lay the groundwork

  16. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials. This work is a partial contribution of the USDA Forest Service and NIST, agencies of the US government, and is not subject to copyright.

  17. Combination of Universal Mechanical Testing Machine with Atomic Force Microscope for Materials Research.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian; He, Dannong

    2015-01-01

    Surface deformation and fracture processes of materials under external force are important for understanding and developing materials. Here, a combined horizontal universal mechanical testing machine (HUMTM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) system is developed by modifying UMTM to combine with AFM and designing a height-adjustable stabilizing apparatus. Then the combined HUMTM-AFM system is evaluated. Finally, as initial demonstrations, it is applied to analyze the relationship among macroscopic mechanical properties, surface nanomorphological changes under external force, and fracture processes of two kinds of representative large scale thin film materials: polymer material with high strain rate (Parafilm) and metal material with low strain rate (aluminum foil). All the results demonstrate the combined HUMTM-AFM system overcomes several disadvantages of current AFM-combined tensile/compression devices including small load force, incapability for large scale specimens, disability for materials with high strain rate, and etc. Therefore, the combined HUMTM-AFM system is a promising tool for materials research in the future. PMID:26265357

  18. Combination of Universal Mechanical Testing Machine with Atomic Force Microscope for Materials Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jian; He, Dannong

    2015-01-01

    Surface deformation and fracture processes of materials under external force are important for understanding and developing materials. Here, a combined horizontal universal mechanical testing machine (HUMTM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) system is developed by modifying UMTM to combine with AFM and designing a height-adjustable stabilizing apparatus. Then the combined HUMTM-AFM system is evaluated. Finally, as initial demonstrations, it is applied to analyze the relationship among macroscopic mechanical properties, surface nanomorphological changes under external force, and fracture processes of two kinds of representative large scale thin film materials: polymer material with high strain rate (Parafilm) and metal material with low strain rate (aluminum foil). All the results demonstrate the combined HUMTM-AFM system overcomes several disadvantages of current AFM-combined tensile/compression devices including small load force, incapability for large scale specimens, disability for materials with high strain rate, and etc. Therefore, the combined HUMTM-AFM system is a promising tool for materials research in the future. PMID:26265357

  19. Combination of Universal Mechanical Testing Machine with Atomic Force Microscope for Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jian; He, Dannong

    2015-08-01

    Surface deformation and fracture processes of materials under external force are important for understanding and developing materials. Here, a combined horizontal universal mechanical testing machine (HUMTM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) system is developed by modifying UMTM to combine with AFM and designing a height-adjustable stabilizing apparatus. Then the combined HUMTM-AFM system is evaluated. Finally, as initial demonstrations, it is applied to analyze the relationship among macroscopic mechanical properties, surface nanomorphological changes under external force, and fracture processes of two kinds of representative large scale thin film materials: polymer material with high strain rate (Parafilm) and metal material with low strain rate (aluminum foil). All the results demonstrate the combined HUMTM-AFM system overcomes several disadvantages of current AFM-combined tensile/compression devices including small load force, incapability for large scale specimens, disability for materials with high strain rate, and etc. Therefore, the combined HUMTM-AFM system is a promising tool for materials research in the future.

  20. MIDAS: Lessons learned from the first spaceborne atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Mark Stephen; Arends, Herman; Butler, Bart; Gavira, Jose; Jeszenszky, Harald; Mannel, Thurid; Romstedt, Jens; Schmied, Roland; Torkar, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System (MIDAS) atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta orbiter was the first such instrument launched into space in 2004. Designed only a few years after the technique was invented, MIDAS is currently orbiting comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko and producing the highest resolution 3D images of cometary dust ever made in situ. After more than a year of continuous operation much experience has been gained with this novel instrument. Coupled with operations of the Flight Spare and advances in terrestrial AFM a set of "lessons learned" has been produced, cumulating in recommendations for future spaceborne atomic force microscopes. The majority of the design could be reused as-is, or with incremental upgrades to include more modern components (e.g. the processor). Key additional recommendations are to incorporate an optical microscope to aid the search for particles and image registration, to include a variety of cantilevers (with different spring constants) and a variety of tip geometries.

  1. Nanoscale Surface Characterization of Human Erythrocytes by Atomic Force Microscopy: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Rashmi; Saha, Monjoy; Routray, Aurobinda; Chakraborty, Chandan

    2015-09-01

    Erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBCs), the most common type of blood cells in humans are well known for their ability in transporting oxygen to the whole body through hemoglobin. Alterations in their membrane skeletal proteins modify shape and mechanical properties resulting in several diseases. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), a new emerging technique allows non-invasive imaging of cell, its membrane and characterization of surface roughness at micrometer/nanometer resolution with minimal sample preparation. AFM imaging provides direct measurement of single cell morphology, its alteration and quantitative data on surface properties. Hence, AFM studies of human RBCs have picked up pace in the last decade. The aim of this paper is to review the various applications of AFM for characterization of human RBCs topology. AFM has been used for studying surface characteristics like nanostructure of membranes, cytoskeleton, microstructure, fluidity, vascular endothelium, etc., of human RBCs. Various modes of AFM imaging has been used to measure surface properties like stiffness, roughness, and elasticity. Topological alterations of erythrocytes in response to different pathological conditions have also been investigated by AFM. Thus, AFM-based studies and application of image processing techniques can effectively provide detailed insights about the morphology and membrane properties of human erythrocytes at nanoscale. PMID:25935044

  2. Characterization of fiber-forming peptides and proteins by means of atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Creasey, Rhiannon G; Gibson, Christopher T; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2012-05-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in biological sciences due to its ability to perform imaging experiments at high resolution in a physiological environment, without special sample preparation such as fixation or staining. AFM is unique, in that it allows single molecule information of mechanical properties and molecular recognition to be gathered. This review sets out to identify methodological applications of AFM for characterization of fiber-forming proteins and peptides. The basics of AFM operation are detailed, with in-depth information for any life scientist to get a grasp on AFM capabilities. It also briefly describes antibody recognition imaging and mapping of nanomechanical properties on biological samples. Subsequently, examples of AFM application to fiber-forming natural proteins, and fiber-forming synthetic peptides are given. Here, AFM is used primarily for structural characterization of fibers in combination with other techniques, such as circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. More recent developments in antibody recognition imaging to identify constituents of protein fibers formed in human disease are explored. This review, as a whole, seeks to encourage the life scientists dealing with protein aggregation phenomena to consider AFM as a part of their research toolkit, by highlighting the manifold capabilities of this technique. PMID:22612782

  3. Improving an all-atom force field.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sandipan; Hansmann, U H E

    2007-07-01

    Experimentally well-characterized proteins that are small enough to be computationally tractable provide useful information for refining existing all-atom force fields. This is used by us for reparametrizing a recently developed all-atom force field. Relying on high statistics parallel tempering simulations of a designed 20 residue beta-sheet peptide, we propose incremental changes that improve the force field's range of applicability. PMID:17677516

  4. Characterization of novel sufraces by FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy for food pathogen detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single molecular detection of pathogens and toxins of interest to food safety is within grasp using technology such as Atomic Force Microscopy. Using antibodies or specific aptamers connected to the AFM tip make it possible to detect a pathogen molecule on a surface. However, it also becomes necess...

  5. A Computer-Controlled Classroom Model of an Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, Tyler A.; Johnson, Matthew M.; Eklund, Peter C.; Russin, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "seeing by feeling" as a way to circumvent limitations on sight is universal on the macroscopic scale--reading Braille, feeling one's way around a dark room, etc. The development of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986 extended this concept to imaging in the nanoscale. While there are classroom demonstrations that use…

  6. A Cost-Effective Atomic Force Microscope for Undergraduate Control Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. N.; Goncalves, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple, cost-effective and robust atomic force microscope (AFM), which has been purposely designed and built for use as a teaching aid in undergraduate controls labs. The guiding design principle is to have all components be open and visible to the students, so the inner functioning of the microscope has been made clear to…

  7. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  8. Noncontact atomic force and Kelvin probe force microscopy on MgO(100) and MgO(100)-supported Ba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Chi Lun; Sasahara, Akira; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Atomically-flat MgO(100) surfaces were prepared by sputtering and annealing. Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) were used to characterize the MgO(100) surfaces. The NC-AFM images revealed the presence of point defects on an atomically-resolved surface. The surface potential at these point defects, as well as features such as step edges and deposited Ba nanoparticles were mapped using KPFM. The Kelvin images show that the surface potential increases at the point defects and at the step edges. On the other hand, a decrease in the potential was found over Ba nanoparticles which can be explained by electron charge transfer from the Ba to the MgO.

  9. Calibration of the lateral spring constant of atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) is very useful in nano-scale force measurement. Lateral force is typically used in nanoscratch and surface friction measurement based on AFM. As one of the most important parameters to obtain lateral force, the lateral spring constant of AFM cantilever probe is of great significance and needs to be quantitative calibrated. Lateral torsion and lateral force of the cantilever are two parameters need to be measured in lateral spring constant calibration. In this article, we develop a calibration system and introduce a calibration method using an AFM head and an electromagnetic balance. An aluminium column with a known angel on top is placed on the weighing pan of the balance. The cantilever is precisely positioned in the AFM head, then approaches and bends on the aluminium column. During this procedure, the bending force and the lateral torsion of the cantilever are synchronously measured by the balance and an optical lever system, respectively. Then the lateral spring constant is calculated with a formula. By using this method, three kinds of rectangular cantilever are calibrated. The relative standard deviations of the calibration results are smaller than 2%.

  10. Lipid domains in supported lipid bilayer for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Chen; Blanchette, Craig D; Ratto, Timothy V; Longo, Marjorie L

    2007-01-01

    Phase-separated supported lipid bilayers have been widely used to study the phase behavior of multicomponent lipid mixtures. One of the primary advantages of using supported lipid bilayers is that the two-dimensional platform of this model membrane system readily allows lipid-phase separation to be characterized by high-resolution imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, when supported lipid bilayers have been functionalized with a specific ligand, protein-membrane interactions can also be imaged and characterized through AFM. It has been recently demonstrated that when the technique of vesicle fusion is used to prepare supported lipid bilayers, the thermal history of the vesicles before deposition and the supported lipid bilayers after formation will have significant effects on the final phase-separated domain structures. In this chapter, three methods of vesicle preparations as well as three deposition conditions will be presented. Also, the techniques and strategies of using AFM to image multicomponent phase-separated supported lipid bilayers and protein binding will be discussed. PMID:17951756

  11. Peering at Brain Polysomes with Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lunelli, Lorenzo; Bernabò, Paola; Bolner, Alice; Vaghi, Valentina; Marchioretto, Marta; Viero, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The translational machinery, i.e., the polysome or polyribosome, is one of the biggest and most complex cytoplasmic machineries in cells. Polysomes, formed by ribosomes, mRNAs, several proteins and non-coding RNAs, represent integrated platforms where translational controls take place. However, while the ribosome has been widely studied, the organization of polysomes is still lacking comprehensive understanding. Thus much effort is required in order to elucidate polysome organization and any novel mechanism of translational control that may be embedded. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a type of scanning probe microscopy that allows the acquisition of 3D images at nanoscale resolution. Compared to electron microscopy (EM) techniques, one of the main advantages of AFM is that it can acquire thousands of images both in air and in solution, enabling the sample to be maintained under near physiological conditions without any need for staining and fixing procedures. Here, a detailed protocol for the accurate purification of polysomes from mouse brain and their deposition on mica substrates is described. This protocol enables polysome imaging in air and liquid with AFM and their reconstruction as three-dimensional objects. Complementary to cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), the proposed method can be conveniently used for systematically analyzing polysomes and studying their organization. PMID:27023752

  12. Visualization of Cytoskeletal Elements by the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyyeva, Tamara; Woodworth, Craig; Sokolov, Igor

    2004-03-01

    We describe a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to directly visualize cytoskeletal fibers in human foreskin epithelial cells. The nonionic detergent Triton X-100 in a low concentration was used to remove the membrane, soluble proteins, and organelles from the cell. The remaining cytoskeleton can then be directly visualized in either liquid or air-dried ambient conditions. These two types of scanning provide complimentary information. Scanning in liquids visualizes the surface filaments of the cytoskeleton, whereas scanning in air shows both the surface filaments and the total volume of the cytoskeletal fibers. The smallest fibers observed were ca. 50 nm in diameter. The lateral resolution of this technique was ca.20 nm, which can be increased to a single nanometer level by choosing sharper AFM tips. Because the AFM is a true 3 dimensional technique, we are able to quantify the observed cytoskeleton by its density and volume. The types of fibers can be identified by their size, similar to electron microscopy.

  13. Simulating photoconductive atomic-force microscopy on disordered photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakesley, James C.; Castro, Fernando A.

    2015-04-01

    We present a tool for simulating photoconductive atomic-force microscopy (Pc-AFM) on bulk heterojunction (BHJ) materials with a minimal set of empirical parameters. The simulation is a master-equation solution of a three-dimensional hopping charge transport model which includes donor-acceptor domain morphology, energetic and spatial disorder, exciton transport and splitting, charge-pair generation and recombination, and tip-substrate electrostatics. A simplifying aspect of the model is that electron transport, hole transport, and electron-hole recombination are treated as the same electron-transfer process. The model recreates realistic bulk recombination rates, without requiring short-range Coulombic effects to be calculated. We demonstrate the tool by simulating line scans of a Pc-AFM tip passing over the surface of a buried or exposed acceptor cluster in a BHJ film. The simulations confirm experimental observations that such defects can be detected by open-circuit mode Pc-AFM imaging, even when the clusters are buried below the surface.

  14. Optical beam deflection noncontact atomic force microscope optimized with three-dimensional beam adjustment mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Kousuke; Ochi, Taketoshi; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ashino, Makoto; Sugawara, Yasuhiro; Suehira, Nobuhito; Morita, Seizo

    2000-01-01

    We present a design and performance of an optical beam deflection noncontact atomic force microscope (nc-AFM). The optical deflection detection system can be optimized by the three-dimensional beam position adjustment mechanism (the slider which mounts laser diode module, the spherical rotors with mirror and the cylinder which mounts quadrant photodiode) using inertial stepping motors in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The samples and cantilevers are easily exchanged in UHV. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated with the atomically resolved nc-AFM images for various surfaces such as Si(111)7×7, Cu(111), TiO2(110), and thymine/highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  15. Accuracy of AFM force distance curves via direct solution of the Euler-Bernoulli equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppell, Steven J.; Liu, Yehe; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2016-03-01

    In an effort to improve the accuracy of force-separation curves obtained from atomic force microscope data, we compare force-separation curves computed using two methods to solve the Euler-Bernoulli equation. A recently introduced method using a direct sequential forward solution, Causal Time-Domain Analysis, is compared against a previously introduced Tikhonov Regularization method. Using the direct solution as a benchmark, it is found that the regularization technique is unable to reproduce accurate curve shapes. Using L-curve analysis and adjusting the regularization parameter, λ, to match either the depth or the full width at half maximum of the force curves, the two techniques are contrasted. Matched depths result in full width at half maxima that are off by an average of 27% and matched full width at half maxima produce depths that are off by an average of 109%.

  16. Accurate force spectroscopy in tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    Existing force spectroscopy methods in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) such as higher harmonic inversion [M. Stark, R. W. Stark, W. M. Heckl, and R. Guckenberger, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 8473 (2002)] or scanning probe acceleration microscopy [J. Legleiter, M. Park, B. Cusick, and T. Kowalewski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 4813 (2006)] or integral relations [M. Lee and W. Jhe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 036104 (2006); S. Hu and A. Raman, Nanotechnology 19, 375704 (2008); H. Hölscher, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 123109 (2006); A. J. Katan, Nanotechnology 20, 165703 (2009)] require and assume as an observable the tip dynamics in a single eigenmode of the oscillating microcantilever. We demonstrate that this assumption can distort significantly the extracted tip-sample interaction forces when applied to tapping mode AFM with soft cantilevers in liquid environments. This exception is due to the fact that under these conditions the second eigenmode is momentarily excited and the observed tip dynamics clearly contains contributions from the fundamental and second eigenmodes. To alleviate this problem, a simple experimental method is proposed to screen the second eigenmode contributions in the observed tip deflection signal to allow accurate tip-sample force reconstruction in liquids. The method is implemented experimentally to reconstruct interaction forces on polymer, bacteriorhodopsin membrane, and mica samples in buffer solutions.

  17. Atomic Force Microscopy as a Tool for Applied Virology and Microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Boris

    2003-12-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) can be successfully used for simple and fast solution of many applied biological problems. In this paper the survey of the results of the application of atomic force microscope SolverP47BIO (NT-MDT, Russia) in State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology "Vector" is presented. The AFM has been used: - in applied virology for the counting of viral particles and examination of virus-cell interaction; - in microbiology for measurements and indication of bacterial spores and cells; - in biotechnology for control of biotechnological processes and evaluation of the distribution of particle dimension for viral and bacterial diagnostic assays. The main advantages of AFM in applied researches are simplicity of the processing of sample preparation and short time of the examination.

  18. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Zeno; Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds. PMID:26199849

  19. Precise atomic force microscope cantilever spring constant calibration using a reference cantilever array

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Richard S.; Reitsma, Mark G.

    2007-08-15

    A method for calibrating the stiffness of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is demonstrated using an array of uniform microfabricated reference cantilevers. A series of force-displacement curves was obtained using a commercial AFM test cantilever on the reference cantilever array, and the data were analyzed using an implied Euler-Bernoulli model to extract the test cantilever spring constant from linear regression fitting. The method offers a factor of 5 improvement over the precision of the usual reference cantilever calibration method and, when combined with the Systeme International traceability potential of the cantilever array, can provide very accurate spring constant calibrations.

  20. Nano Scale Mechanical Analysis of Biomaterials Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Diganta

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a probe-based microscope that uses nanoscale and structural imaging where high resolution is desired. AFM has also been used in mechanical, electrical, and thermal engineering applications. This unique technique provides vital local material properties like the modulus of elasticity, hardness, surface potential, Hamaker constant, and the surface charge density from force versus displacement curve. Therefore, AFM was used to measure both the diameter and mechanical properties of the collagen nanostraws in human costal cartilage. Human costal cartilage forms a bridge between the sternum and bony ribs. The chest wall of some humans is deformed due to defective costal cartilage. However, costal cartilage is less studied compared to load bearing cartilage. Results show that there is a difference between chemical fixation and non-chemical fixation treatments. Our findings imply that the patients' chest wall is mechanically weak and protein deposition is abnormal. This may impact the nanostraws' ability to facilitate fluid flow between the ribs and the sternum. At present, AFM is the only tool for imaging cells' ultra-structure at the nanometer scale because cells are not homogeneous. The first layer of the cell is called the cell membrane, and the layer under it is made of the cytoskeleton. Cancerous cells are different from normal cells in term of cell growth, mechanical properties, and ultra-structure. Here, force is measured with very high sensitivity and this is accomplished with highly sensitive probes such as a nano-probe. We performed experiments to determine ultra-structural differences that emerge when such cancerous cells are subject to treatments such as with drugs and electric pulses. Jurkat cells are cancerous cells. These cells were pulsed at different conditions. Pulsed and non-pulsed Jurkat cell ultra-structures were investigated at the nano meter scale using AFM. Jurkat cell mechanical properties were measured under

  1. Local Mechanical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy Nanoindentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranchida, Davide; Piccarolo, Stefano

    The analysis of mechanical properties on a nanometer scale is a useful tool for combining information concerning texture organization obtained by microscopy with the properties of individual components. Moreover, this technique promotes the understanding of the hierarchical arrangement in complex natural materials as well in the case of simpler morphologies arising from industrial processes. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can bridge morphological information, obtained with outstanding resolution, to local mechanical properties. When performing an AFM nanoindentation, the rough force curve, i.e., the plot of the voltage output from the photodiode vs. the voltage applied to the piezo-scanner, can be translated into a curve of the applied load vs. the penetration depth after a series of preliminary determinations and calibrations. However, the analysis of the unloading portion of the force curves collected for polymers does not lead to a correct evaluation of Young's modulus. The high slope of the unloading curves is not linked to an elastic behavior, as would be expected, but rather to a viscoelastic effect. This can be argued on the basis that the unloading curves are superimposed on the loading curves in the case of an ideal elastic behavior, as for rubbers, or generally in the case of materials with very short relaxation times. In contrast, when the relaxation time of the sample is close to or even much larger than the indentation time scale, very high slopes are recorded.

  2. Subharmonic Oscillations and Chaos in Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of dynamic atomic force microscopy (d-AFM) for nanoscale materials characterization calls for a deeper understanding of the cantilever dynamics influencing scan stability, predictability, and image quality. Model development is critical to such understanding. Renormalization of the equations governing d- AFM provides a simple interpretation of cantilever dynamics as a single spring and mass system with frequency dependent cantilever stiffness and damping parameters. The renormalized model is sufficiently robust to predict the experimentally observed splitting of the free-space cantilever resonance into multiple resonances upon cantilever-sample contact. Central to the model is the representation of the cantilever sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients F(sub ij) (i,j = 0, 1, 2) that account for the effective interaction stiffness parameter, the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Application of the Melnikov method to the model equation is shown to predict a homoclinic bifurcation of the Smale horseshoe type leading to a cascade of period doublings with increasing drive displacement amplitude culminating in chaos and loss of image quality. The threshold value of the drive displacement amplitude necessary to initiate subharmonic generation depends on the acoustic drive frequency, the effective damping coefficient, and the nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force. For parameter values leading to displacement amplitudes below threshold for homoclinic bifurcation other bifurcation scenarios can occur, some of which lead to chaos.

  3. Capillary and van der Waals interactions on CaF2 crystals from amplitude modulation AFM force reconstruction profiles under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Calò, Annalisa; Robles, Oriol Vidal; Santos, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been much interest in the past two decades to produce experimental force profiles characteristic of the interaction between nanoscale objects or a nanoscale object and a plane. Arguably, the advent of the atomic force microscope AFM was instrumental in driving such efforts because, in principle, force profiles could be recovered directly. Nevertheless, it has taken years before techniques have developed enough as to recover the attractive part of the force with relatively low noise and without missing information on critical ranges, particularly under ambient conditions where capillary interactions are believed to dominate. Thus a systematic study of the different profiles that may arise in such situations is still lacking. Here we employ the surfaces of CaF2, on which nanoscale water films form, to report on the range and force profiles that might originate by dynamic capillary interactions occurring between an AFM tip and nanoscale water patches. Three types of force profiles were observed under ambient conditions. One in which the force decay resembles the well-known inverse-square law typical of van der Waals interactions during the first 0.5–1 nm of decay, a second one in which the force decays almost linearly, in relatively good agreement with capillary force predicted by the constant chemical potential approximation, and a third one in which the attractive force is almost constant, i.e., forms a plateau, up to 3–4 nm above the surface when the formation of a capillary neck dominates the tip–sample interaction. PMID:25977852

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy Protocol for Measurement of Membrane Plasticity and Extracellular Interactions in Single Neurons in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin; Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-01-01

    Physiological interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and membrane integrin receptors play a crucial role in neuroplasticity in the hippocampus, a key region involved in epilepsy. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a cutting-edge technique to study structural and functional measurements at nanometer resolution between the AFM probe and cell surface under liquid. AFM has been incrementally employed in living cells including the nervous system. AFM is a unique technique that directly measures functional information at a nanoscale resolution. In addition to its ability to acquire detailed 3D imaging, the AFM probe permits quantitative measurements on the structure and function of the intracellular components such as cytoskeleton, adhesion force and binding probability between membrane receptors and ligands coated in the AFM probe, as well as the cell stiffness. Here we describe an optimized AFM protocol and its application for analysis of membrane plasticity and mechanical dynamics of individual hippocampus neurons in mice with chronic epilepsy. The unbinding force and binding probability between ECM, fibronectin-coated AFM probe and membrane integrin were strikingly lower in dentate gyrus granule cells in epilepsy. Cell elasticity, which represents changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, was significantly increased in epilepsy. The fibronectin-integrin binding probability was prevented by anti-α5β1 integrin. Thus, AFM is a unique nanotechnique that allows progressive functional changes in neuronal membrane plasticity and mechanotransduction in epilepsy and related brain disorders. PMID:27199735

  5. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  6. Comparative Surface Studies at Atomic Resolution with Ultrahigh Vacuum Variable-Temperature Atomic Force and Scanning Tunneling Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki; Suzuki; Kitamura; Kersker

    1999-05-01

    : With the ultrahigh vacuum variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-VT-STM), atomic-level observation has been achieved. An ultrahigh vacuum atomic force microscope (UHV-AFM) has also been developed, with success in obtaining atom images where observation in noncontact (NC) mode with a frequency modulation (FM) detection method was attempted. Using the FM detection method in the constant oscillation amplitude of the cantilever excitation mode, we have obtained atomic-resolution images of Si(111) 7 x 7 structures and Si(100) 2 x 1 structures and other structures together with STM images in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. Also shown here are contact potential difference (CPD) images using the NC-AFM method. PMID:10383993

  7. Comparative Surface Studies at Atomic Resolution with Ultrahigh Vacuum Variable-Temperature Atomic Force and Scanning Tunneling Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwatsuki, Masashi; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shin-Ich; Kersker, Mike

    1999-05-01

    With the ultrahigh vacuum variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-VT-STM), atomic-level observation has been achieved. An ultrahigh vacuum atomic force microscope (UHV-AFM) has also been developed, with success in obtaining atom images where observation in noncontact (NC) mode with a frequency modulation (FM) detection method was attempted. Using the FM detection method in the constant oscillation amplitude of the cantilever excitation mode, we have obtained atomic-resolution images of Si(111) 7 × 7 structures and Si(100) 2 × 1 structures and other structures together with STM images in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. Also shown here are contact potential difference (CPD) images using the NC-AFM method.

  8. Nanomechanical cutting of boron nitride nanotubes by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Meng; Chen, Xiaoming; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C.; Pugno, Nicola M.; Ke, Changhong

    2013-12-01

    The length of nanotubes is a critical structural parameter for the design and manufacture of nanotube-based material systems and devices. High-precision length control of nanotubes by means of mechanical cutting using a scriber has not materialized due to the lack of the knowledge of the appropriate cutting conditions and the tube failure mechanism. In this paper, we present a quantitative nanomechanical study of the cutting of individual boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes. In our nanotube cutting measurements, a nanotube standing still on a flat substrate was laterally scribed by an AFM tip. The tip-tube collision force deformed the tube, and eventually fractured the tube at the collision site by increasing the cutting load. The mechanical response of nanotubes during the tip-tube collision process and the roles of the scribing velocity and the frictional interaction on the tip-tube collision contact in cutting nanotubes were quantitatively investigated by cutting double-walled BNNTs of 2.26-4.28 nm in outer diameter. The fracture strength of BNNTs was also quantified based on the measured collision forces and their structural configurations using contact mechanics theories. Our analysis reports fracture strengths of 9.1-15.5 GPa for the tested BNNTs. The nanomechanical study presented in this paper demonstrates that the AFM-based nanomechanical cutting technique not only enables effective control of the length of nanotubes with high precision, but is also promising as a new nanomechanical testing technique for characterizing the mechanical properties of tubular nanostructures.

  9. Microtensile Tests Using In Situ Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Udo; Dual, Jurg

    In recent years a new field in the micromechanical characterization of materials has emerged. Researchers started to integrate atomic force microscopes (AFM) into microtensile tests. This allowed to investigate surface deformation of layers with thicknesses in the range of micrometers. In the first part of this article experiments on organic samples are presented followed by developments on anorganic specimens. In the second part of the paper latest developments at the Center of Mechanics of ETH Zurich are presented. The setup allows to monitor crack growth with micrometer resolution. At the same time forces can be measured in the millinewton range. Specimens are made from photodefinable polyimide. The stress-crack- length diagrams of two experiments are presented which enables to identify different stages of crack growth and therefore of fracture behaviour. Finally, possible extensions of the setup employing digital image correlation (DIC) are envisioned by analyzing the displacement field around the crack tip.

  10. Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Ryan C.; Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2014-06-01

    We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

  11. Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Ryan C. Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2014-06-14

    We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

  12. Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscope as a Relevant Tool for Studying Some Phenomena in MEMS Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschot, A.; Vincent, M.; Poulain, C.; Mariolle, D.; Houzé, F.; Delamare, J.

    2015-12-01

    As the reliability of electrical microcontacts has proved to be the main limitation to a fast-growing production of ultraminiaturized switches, a thorough understanding of their failure mechanisms is an all-important purpose. This paper aims at showing that conducting-probe Atomic Force Microscopy (cp-AFM) is an adequate tool to actuate and study electrical contacts. By choosing relevant cantilevers and operating mode of the cp-AFM, dimensions, gap and force level representative of existing microelectromechanical switches (MEMS switches) are obtained. With two examples, the advantages of using a cp-AFM in force mode for studying physical phenomena at very low scale are highlighted. The reported investigations concern material transfer between contact parts and contact bounces. Those two undesirable phenomena induce surface damages and impinge reliability of MEMS switches. In both cases an explanatory scenario of phenomena occurring at nanoscale is proposed and preventive recommendations for improving the lifetime of such devices are suggested.

  13. Force interactions between magnetite, silica, and bentonite studied with atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobryden, I.; Potapova, E.; Holmgren, A.; Weber, H.; Hedlund, J.; Almqvist, N.

    2015-04-01

    Iron ore pellets consist of variety of mineral particles and are an important refined product used in steel manufacturing. Production of high-quality pellets requires good understanding of interactions between different constituents, such as magnetite, gangue residues, bentonite, and additives. Much research has been reported on magnetite, silica, and bentonite surface properties and their effect on pellet strength but more scant with a focus on a fundamental particle-particle interaction. To probe such particle interaction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using colloidal probe technique has proven to be a suitable tool. In this work, the measurements were performed between magnetite-magnetite, bentonite-magnetite, silica-bentonite, and silica-magnetite particles in 1 mM CaCl2 solution at various pH values. The interaction character, i.e., repulsion or attraction, was determined by measuring and analyzing AFM force curves. The observed quantitative changes in interaction forces were in good agreement with the measured zeta-potentials for the particles at the same experimental conditions. Particle aggregation was studied by measuring the adhesion force. Absolute values of adhesion forces for different systems could not be compared due to the difference in particle size and contact geometry. Therefore, the relative change of adhesion force between pH 6 and 10 was used for comparison. The adhesion force decreased for the magnetite-magnetite and bentonite-silica systems and slightly increased for the magnetite-bentonite system at pH 10 as compared to pH 6, whereas a pronounced decrease in adhesion force was observed in the magnetite-silica system. Thus, the presence of silica particles on the magnetite surface could have a negative impact on the interaction between magnetite and bentonite in balling due to the reduction of the adhesion force.

  14. On averaging force curves over heterogeneous surfaces in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, I; Kalaparthi, V; Kreshchuk, M; Dokukin, M E

    2012-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. Biological surfaces and nanocomposites have typically heterogeneous surfaces, both mechanically and chemically. When studying such surfaces with AFM, one needs to collect a large amount of data to make statistically sound conclusions. It is time- and resource-consuming to process each force curve separately. The analysis of an averaged raw force data is a simple and time saving option, which also averages out the noise and measurement artifacts of the force curves being analyzed. Moreover, some biomedical applications require just an average number per biological cell. Here we investigate such averaging, study the possible artifacts due to the averaging, and demonstrate how to minimize or even to avoid them. We analyze two ways of doing the averaging: over the force data for each particular distance (method 1, the most commonly used way), and over the distances for each particular force (method 2). We derive the errors of the methods in finding to the true average rigidity modulus. We show that both methods are accurate (the error is <2%) when the heterogeneity of the surface rigidity is small (<50%). When the heterogeneity is large (>100×), method 2 underestimates the average rigidity modulus by a factor of 2, whereas the error of method 1 is only 15%. However, when analyzing the different surface chemistry, which reveals itself in the changing long-range forces, the accuracy of the methods behave oppositely: method 1 can produce a noticeable averaging artifact in the deriving of the long-range forces; whereas method 2 can be successfully used to derive the averaged long-range force parameters without artifacts. We exemplify our conclusions by the study of human cervical cancer and normal epithelial cells, which demonstrate different degrees of heterogeneity. PMID:22917859

  15. Influence of spurious resonances on the interaction force in dynamic AFM.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luca; Rodrigues, Mario S

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of the tip-sample interaction in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is challenging, especially when measuring in liquid media. Here, we derive formulas for the tip-sample interactions and investigate the effect of spurious resonances on the measured interaction. Highlighting the differences between measuring directly the tip position or the cantilever deflection, and considering both direct and acoustic excitation, we show that the cantilever behavior is insensitive to spurious resonances as long as the measured signal corresponds to the tip position, or if the excitation force is correctly considered. Since the effective excitation force may depend on the presence of such spurious resonances, only the case in which the frequency is kept constant during the measurement is considered. Finally, we show the advantages that result from the use of a calibration method based on the acquisition of approach-retract curves. PMID:25821682

  16. Electrical characterization of grain boundaries of CZTS thin films using conductive atomic force microscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Muhunthan, N.; Singh, Om Pal; Toutam, Vijaykumar; Singh, V.N.

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Experimental setup for conducting AFM (C-AFM). - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin film was grown by reactive co-sputtering. • The electronic properties were probed using conducting atomic force microscope, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. • C-AFM current flow mainly through grain boundaries rather than grain interiors. • SKPM indicated higher potential along the GBs compared to grain interiors. • The SCM explains that charge separation takes place at the interface of grain and grain boundary. - Abstract: Electrical characterization of grain boundaries (GB) of Cu-deficient CZTS (Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide) thin films was done using atomic force microscopic (AFM) techniques like Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM), Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). Absorbance spectroscopy was done for optical band gap calculations and Raman, XRD and EDS for structural and compositional characterization. Hall measurements were done for estimation of carrier mobility. CAFM and KPFM measurements showed that the currents flow mainly through grain boundaries (GB) rather than grain interiors. SCM results showed that charge separation mainly occurs at the interface of grain and grain boundaries and not all along the grain boundaries.

  17. Atomic force fluorescence microscopy in the characterization of amyloid fibril assembly and oligomeric intermediates.

    PubMed

    Ostapchenko, Valeriy; Gasset, Maria; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a conventional tool for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of protein aggregation and, specifically, for analysis of assembly pathways, architecture, aggregation state, and heterogeneity of oligomeric intermediates or mature fibrils. AFM imaging provides useful information about particle dimensions, shape, and substructure with nanometer resolution. Conventional AFM methods have been very helpful in the analysis of polymorphic assemblies formed in vitro from homogeneous proteins or peptides. However, AFM imaging on its own provides limited insight into conformation or composition of assemblies produced in the complex environment of a cell, or prepared from a mixture of proteins as a result of cross-seeding. In these cases, its combination with fluorescence microscopy (AFFM) increases its resolution. PMID:22528089

  18. First-Principles Atomic Force Microscopy Image Simulations with Density Embedding Theory.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuki; Lee, Alex J; Chelikowsky, James R

    2016-05-11

    We present an efficient first-principles method for simulating noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) images using a "frozen density" embedding theory. Frozen density embedding theory enables one to efficiently compute the tip-sample interaction by considering a sample as a frozen external field. This method reduces the extensive computational load of first-principles AFM simulations by avoiding consideration of the entire tip-sample system and focusing on the tip alone. We demonstrate that our simulation with frozen density embedding theory accurately reproduces full density functional theory simulations of freestanding hydrocarbon molecules while the computational time is significantly reduced. Our method also captures the electronic effect of a Cu(111) substrate on the AFM image of pentacene and reproduces the experimental AFM image of Cu2N on a Cu(100) surface. This approach is applicable for theoretical imaging applications on large molecules, two-dimensional materials, and materials surfaces. PMID:27050710

  19. Mode-synthesizing atomic force microscopy for volume characterization of mixed metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vitry, P; Bourillot, E; Tétard, L; Plassard, C; Lacroute, Y; Lesniewska, E

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other techniques derived from AFM have revolutionized the understanding of materials and biology at the nanoscale, but mostly provide surface properties. The observation of subsurface nanoscale features and properties remains a great challenge in nanometrology. The operating principle of the mode-synthesizing AFM (MSAFM) is based on the interaction of two ultrasonic waves, one launched by the AFM probe fp , a second launched by the sample fs , and their resulting nonlinear frequency mixing. Recent developments highlighted the need for quantitative correlation between the role of the frequency actuation of the probe fp and the sample fs . Here we present the great potential of MSAFM for advanced volume characterization of metallic nanoparticles presenting a multilayered structure composed of a nickel core surrounded by a gold envelope. PMID:27018572

  20. Assemblies of pore-forming toxins visualized by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Neval; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-03-01

    A number of pore-forming toxins (PFTs) can assemble on lipid membranes through their specific interactions with lipids. The oligomeric assemblies of some PFTs have been successfully revealed either by electron microscopy (EM) and/or atomic force microscopy (AFM). Unlike EM, AFM imaging can be performed under physiological conditions, enabling the real-time visualization of PFT assembly and the transition from the prepore state, in which the toxin does not span the membrane, to the pore state. In addition to characterizing PFT oligomers, AFM has also been used to examine toxin-induced alterations in membrane organization. In this review, we summarize the contributions of AFM to the understanding of both PFT assembly and PFT-induced membrane reorganization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale. PMID:26577274

  1. Indentation of poroviscoelastic vocal fold tissue using an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Heris, Hossein K; Miri, Amir K; Tripathy, Umakanta; Barthelat, Francois; Mongeau, Luc

    2013-12-01

    The elastic properties of the vocal folds (VFs) vary as a function of depth relative to the epithelial surface. The poroelastic anisotropic properties of porcine VFs, at various depths, were measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based indentation. The minimum tip diameter to effectively capture the local properties was found to be 25µm, based on nonlinear laser scanning microscopy data and image analysis. The effects of AFM tip dimensions and AFM cantilever stiffness were systematically investigated. The indentation tests were performed along the sagittal and coronal planes for an evaluation of the VF anisotropy. Hertzian contact theory was used along with the governing equations of linear poroelasticity to calculate the diffusivity coefficient of the tissue from AFM indentation creep testing. The permeability coefficient of the porcine VF was found to be 1.80±0.32×10(-15)m(4)/Ns. PMID:23829979

  2. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations. PMID:26684144

  3. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  4. Atomic Force Fluorescence Microscopy in the Characterization of Amyloid Fibril Assembly and Oligomeric Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Ostapchenko, Valeriy; Gasset, Maria; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a conventional tool for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of protein aggregation and, specifically, for analysis of assembly pathways, architecture, aggregation state, and heterogencity of oligomeric intermediates or mature fibrils. AFM imaging provides useful information about particle dimensions, shape, and substructure with nanometer resolution. Conventional AFM methods have been very helpful in the analysis of polymorphic assemblies formed in vitro from homogeneous proteins or peptides. However, AFM imaging on its own provides limited insight into conformation or composition of assemblies produced in the complex environment of a cell, or prepared from a mixture of proteins as a result of cross-seeding. In these cases, its combination with fluorescence microscopy (AFFM) increases its resolution. PMID:22528089

  5. Single-crystal diamond pyramids: synthesis and application for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuyakova, Feruza T.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the results of investigations aimed at the development and testing of robust, chemically inert single-crystal diamond probes for atomic force microscopy (AFM). The probes were prepared by assembling common silicon probes with micrometer-sized pyramid-shaped single-crystal diamonds (SCD). The SCD were obtained by the selective thermal oxidation of the polycrystalline films grown by chemical vapor deposition. Electrostatic spray of adhesive coating onto silicon probes was used to attach individual SCD. Geometrical parameters of produced AFM SCD probes were revealed with transmission electron microscopy: the apex angle of the pyramidal diamond crystallite was ˜10 deg, and the curvature radius at the apex was ˜2 to 10 nm. The diamond AFM probes were used for surface imaging of deoxyribonucleic acid deposited on graphite substrate. Obtained results demonstrate high efficiency of the diamond AFM probes, allowing improvement of the image quality compared to standard silicon probes.

  6. Nanoscale monitoring of drug actions on cell membrane using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lian-qing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yue-chao

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the nanoscale changes that take place in individual cells in response to a drug is useful for understanding the drug action. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques, such knowledge was scarce until the advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM), which is a multifunctional tool for investigating cellular behavior with nanometer resolution under near-physiological conditions. In the past decade, researchers have applied AFM to monitor the morphological and mechanical dynamics of individual cells following drug stimulation, yielding considerable novel insight into how the drug molecules affect an individual cell at the nanoscale. In this article we summarize the representative applications of AFM in characterization of drug actions on cell membrane, including topographic imaging, elasticity measurements, molecular interaction quantification, native membrane protein imaging and manipulation, etc. The challenges that are hampering the further development of AFM for studies of cellular activities are aslo discussed. PMID:26027658

  7. Atomic Force Microscopy as a Tool for Biophysical and Cellular Biology Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girasole, M.; Cricenti, A.

    2004-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a well established technique for high resolution morphological studies and, in fact, it has been applied to characterise surface useful for microelectronics, electrochemistry and other solid state physic's research field. However, it have been cleared since the first days of AFM that such a technique is very attractive for biological studies too. This is because AFM characteristics allow to observe conducting and non conducting sample, overcoming the limitation of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), with resolution well below the diffractive limit of the conventional optical microscopes. Other major advantages of AFM for biological studies is that the microscope can work in liquid environment, so that the soft and delicate biological samples can be imaged in nearly physiological conditions. In this paper we present some applications of Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and of lateral force microscopy (LFM) in the field of cellular biology, with particular emphasis on apoptosis, characterization of the effect of metal doping on cell, as well as a study of RBCs pathology and aging.

  8. Characterizing absolute piezoelectric microelectromechanical system displacement using an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J. Chapman, S.

    2014-08-14

    Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) is a popular tool for the study of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials at the nanometer level. Progress in the development of piezoelectric MEMS fabrication is highlighting the need to characterize absolute displacement at the nanometer and Ångstrom scales, something Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) might do but PFM cannot. Absolute displacement is measured by executing a polarization measurement of the ferroelectric or piezoelectric capacitor in question while monitoring the absolute vertical position of the sample surface with a stationary AFM cantilever. Two issues dominate the execution and precision of such a measurement: (1) the small amplitude of the electrical signal from the AFM at the Ångstrom level and (2) calibration of the AFM. The authors have developed a calibration routine and test technique for mitigating the two issues, making it possible to use an atomic force microscope to measure both the movement of a capacitor surface as well as the motion of a micro-machine structure actuated by that capacitor. The theory, procedures, pitfalls, and results of using an AFM for absolute piezoelectric measurement are provided.

  9. Atomic force microscopy on phase-control pulsed force mode in water: Imaging and force analysis on a rhodium-octaethylporphyrin layer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Kohyama, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    We developed phase-control pulsed force mode (p-PFM) as the operation mode for atomic force microscopy (AFM). The p-PFM allowed us to observe soft or weakly adsorbed materials in a liquid environment using a conventional AFM apparatus, and allowed for force curve mapping (FCM) after offline data processing. We applied the p-PFM to a rhodium-octaethylporphyrin (RhOEP) layer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is applicable to anode catalysts of fuel cells. The RhOEP/HOPG system was stably observed in water by this mode. In the p-PFM image, we found both large and small protrusions, which were not observed in the dynamic force mode, in air. The detailed force analysis suggested that these protrusions are nanobubbles located on the HOPG substrate exposed in holes or pits of the RhOEP layer.

  10. The origin of the "snap-in" in the force curve between AFM probe and the water/gas interface of nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zhao, Binyu; Zhang, Lijuan; Lü, Junhong; Wang, Shuo; Dong, Yaming; Hu, Jun

    2014-02-24

    The long-range attractive force or "snap-in" is an important phenomenon usually occurring when a solid particle interacts with a water/gas interface. By using PeakForce quantitative nanomechanics the origin of snap-in in the force curve between the atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe and the water/gas interface of nanobubbles has been investigated. The snap-in frequently happened when the probe was preserved for a certain time or after being used for imaging solid surfaces under atmospheric conditions. In contrast, imaging in liquids rarely induced a snap-in. After a series of control experiments, it was found that the snap-in can be attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the water/gas interface and the AFM probe, which was either modified or contaminated with hydrophobic material. The hydrophobic contamination could be efficiently removed by a conventional plasma-cleaning treatment, which prevents the occurring of the snap-in. In addition, the adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate onto the nanobubble surface changed the water/gas interface into hydrophilic, which also eliminated the snap-in phenomenon. PMID:24478257

  11. Chemical identification of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Pou, Pablo; Abe, Masayuki; Jelinek, Pavel; Pérez, Rubén; Morita, Seizo; Custance, Oscar

    2007-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopy is a versatile and powerful method that uses sharp tips to image, measure and manipulate matter at surfaces with atomic resolution. At cryogenic temperatures, scanning probe microscopy can even provide electron tunnelling spectra that serve as fingerprints of the vibrational properties of adsorbed molecules and of the electronic properties of magnetic impurity atoms, thereby allowing chemical identification. But in many instances, and particularly for insulating systems, determining the exact chemical composition of surfaces or nanostructures remains a considerable challenge. In principle, dynamic force microscopy should make it possible to overcome this problem: it can image insulator, semiconductor and metal surfaces with true atomic resolution, by detecting and precisely measuring the short-range forces that arise with the onset of chemical bonding between the tip and surface atoms and that depend sensitively on the chemical identity of the atoms involved. Here we report precise measurements of such short-range chemical forces, and show that their dependence on the force microscope tip used can be overcome through a normalization procedure. This allows us to use the chemical force measurements as the basis for atomic recognition, even at room temperature. We illustrate the performance of this approach by imaging the surface of a particularly challenging alloy system and successfully identifying the three constituent atomic species silicon, tin and lead, even though these exhibit very similar chemical properties and identical surface position preferences that render any discrimination attempt based on topographic measurements impossible. PMID:17330040

  12. Atom inlays performed at room temperature using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Hirayama, Shinji; Oyabu, Noriaki; Custance, Óscar; Morita, Seizo

    2005-02-01

    The ability to manipulate single atoms and molecules laterally for creating artificial structures on surfaces is driving us closer to the ultimate limit of two-dimensional nanoengineering. However, experiments involving this level of manipulation have been performed only at cryogenic temperatures. Scanning tunnelling microscopy has proved, so far, to be a unique tool with all the necessary capabilities for laterally pushing, pulling or sliding single atoms and molecules, and arranging them on a surface at will. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to perform well-controlled lateral manipulations of single atoms using near-contact atomic force microscopy even at room temperature. We report the creation of 'atom inlays', that is, artificial atomic patterns formed from a few embedded atoms in the plane of a surface. At room temperature, such atomic structures remain stable on the surface for relatively long periods of time.

  13. Optimization and calibration of atomic force microscopy sensitivity in terms of tip-sample interactions in high-order dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yu; Guo Qiuquan; Nie Hengyong; Lau, W. M.; Yang Jun

    2009-12-15

    The mechanism of dynamic force modes has been successfully applied to many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications, such as tapping mode and phase imaging. The high-order flexural vibration modes are recent advancement of AFM dynamic force modes. AFM optical lever detection sensitivity plays a major role in dynamic force modes because it determines the accuracy in mapping surface morphology, distinguishing various tip-surface interactions, and measuring the strength of the tip-surface interactions. In this work, we have analyzed optimization and calibration of the optical lever detection sensitivity for an AFM cantilever-tip ensemble vibrating in high-order flexural modes and simultaneously experiencing a wide range and variety of tip-sample interactions. It is found that the optimal detection sensitivity depends on the vibration mode, the ratio of the force constant of tip-sample interactions to the cantilever stiffness, as well as the incident laser spot size and its location on the cantilever. It is also found that the optimal detection sensitivity is less dependent on the strength of tip-sample interactions for high-order flexural modes relative to the fundamental mode, i.e., tapping mode. When the force constant of tip-sample interactions significantly exceeds the cantilever stiffness, the optimal detection sensitivity occurs only when the laser spot locates at a certain distance from the cantilever-tip end. Thus, in addition to the 'globally optimized detection sensitivity', the 'tip optimized detection sensitivity' is also determined. Finally, we have proposed a calibration method to determine the actual AFM detection sensitivity in high-order flexural vibration modes against the static end-load sensitivity that is obtained traditionally by measuring a force-distance curve on a hard substrate in the contact mode.

  14. Silicon Carbide Epitaxial Films Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) holds great potential as an electronic material because of its wide band gap energy, high breakdown electric field, thermal stability, and resistance to radiation damage. Possible aerospace applications of high-temperature, high-power, or high-radiation SiC electronic devices include sensors, control electronics, and power electronics that can operate at temperatures up to 600 C and beyond. Commercially available SiC devices now include blue light-emitting diodes (LED's) and high-voltage diodes for operation up to 350 C, with other devices under development. At present, morphological defects in epitaxially grown SiC films limit their use in device applications. Research geared toward reducing the number of structural inhomogeneities can benefit from an understanding of the type and nature of problems that cause defects. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has proven to be a useful tool in characterizing defects present on the surface of SiC epitaxial films. The in-house High-Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center not only extended the dopant concentration range achievable in epitaxial SiC films, but it reduced the concentration of some types of defects. Advanced structural characterization using the AFM was warranted to identify the type and structure of the remaining film defects and morphological inhomogeneities. The AFM can give quantitative information on surface topography down to molecular scales. Acquired, in part, in support of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP), the AFM had been used previously to detect partial fiber debonding in composite material cross sections. Atomic force microscopy examination of epitaxial SiC film surfaces revealed molecular-scale details of some unwanted surface features. Growth pits propagating from defects in the substrate, and hillocks due, presumably, to existing screw dislocations in the substrates, were

  15. AFM PeakForce QNM mode: Evidencing nanometre-scale mechanical properties of chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Smolyakov, G; Pruvost, S; Cardoso, L; Alonso, B; Belamie, E; Duchet-Rumeau, J

    2016-10-20

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (QNM) AFM mode was used to explore the mechanical properties of textured chitin-silica hybrid films at the nanoscale. The influence of the force applied by the tip on the sample surface was studied for standard homogeneous samples, for chitin nanorods and for chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites. Thick films of superimposed chitin nanorods showed a monotonous increase of DMT modulus (based on the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model) owing to an increase in modulus at the interface between nanorods due to geometrical constraints of the AFM acquisition. A similar variation of DMT modulus was obtained for chitin-silica hybrid thick films related to mechanical strengthening induced by the presence of silica. This work revealed the role of the organic-inorganic interface, at the nanoscale, in the mechanical behaviour of textured materials using PeakForce QNM mode, with optimized analysis conditions. PMID:27474579

  16. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip–sample contact are used; control of the tip’s vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential’s nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip–sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator’s response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip–sample interaction force measurement.

  17. Optimizing 1-μs-Resolution Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy on a Commercial Atomic Force Microscope.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Devin T; Faulk, Jaevyn K; Sanders, Aric W; Bull, Matthew S; Walder, Robert; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Sousa, Marcelo C; Perkins, Thomas T

    2015-10-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is widely used to mechanically measure the folding and unfolding of proteins. However, the temporal resolution of a standard commercial cantilever is 50-1000 μs, masking rapid transitions and short-lived intermediates. Recently, SMFS with 0.7-μs temporal resolution was achieved using an ultrashort (L = 9 μm) cantilever on a custom-built, high-speed AFM. By micromachining such cantilevers with a focused ion beam, we optimized them for SMFS rather than tapping-mode imaging. To enhance usability and throughput, we detected the modified cantilevers on a commercial AFM retrofitted with a detection laser system featuring a 3-μm circular spot size. Moreover, individual cantilevers were reused over multiple days. The improved capabilities of the modified cantilevers for SMFS were showcased by unfolding a polyprotein, a popular biophysical assay. Specifically, these cantilevers maintained a 1-μs response time while eliminating cantilever ringing (Q ≅ 0.5). We therefore expect such cantilevers, along with the instrumentational improvements to detect them on a commercial AFM, to accelerate high-precision AFM-based SMFS studies. PMID:26421945

  18. Theoretical and experimental investigation of force imaging at the atomic scale on alkali halide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shluger, A. L.; Wilson, R. Mark; Williams, R. T.

    1994-02-01

    Assuming a model tip (Si4O10H10) as a reasonable representation of the surface of a Si3N4 cantilever stylus having a hydrogen-terminated asperity and a broader load-bearing base, we investigate the interaction of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with an alkali halide crystal by quantum chemical methods. Structural relaxation of the sample during engagement is allowed, and defect formation is investigated. Force curves above cation and anion positions are calculated, determining maximum sustainable loads and indicating a basis for atomic contrast. Experiments using a Si3N4 cantilever for AFM imaging of 12 alkali halide and alkaline earth fluoride crystals in air and desiccated helium are reported, in the widest AFM survey of such materials to date. Adsorbed water is shown to significantly enhance the observation of atomic periodicity on ionic halide samples, and rapid surface diffusion on alkali halide crystals is illustrated as it affects prospects for defect investigations. Observations of step edges and point-defect candidates at atomic scale are reported. The theoretical and experimental results are discussed together in the effort to provide a quantum-mechanical model for observations of alkali halide samples at atomic resolution, and to examine a possible basis for atomic resolution in the presence of long-range attractive forces.

  19. Boosting the local anodic oxidation of silicon through carbon nanofiber atomic force microscopy probes

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni, Matteo; Matsui, Soichiro; Tanemura, Masaki; Perez-Murano, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many nanofabrication methods based on scanning probe microscopy have been developed during the last decades. Local anodic oxidation (LAO) is one of such methods: Upon application of an electric field between tip and surface under ambient conditions, oxide patterning with nanometer-scale resolution can be performed with good control of dimensions and placement. LAO through the non-contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to yield a better resolution and tip preservation than the contact mode and it can be effectively performed in the dynamic mode of AFM. The tip plays a crucial role for the LAO-AFM, because it regulates the minimum feature size and the electric field. For instance, the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT)-functionalized tips showed great promise for LAO-AFM, yet, the fabrication of CNT tips presents difficulties. Here, we explore the use of a carbon nanofiber (CNF) as the tip apex of AFM probes for the application of LAO on silicon substrates in the AFM amplitude modulation dynamic mode of operation. We show the good performance of CNF-AFM probes in terms of resolution and reproducibility, as well as demonstration that the CNF apex provides enhanced conditions in terms of field-induced, chemical process efficiency. PMID:25671165

  20. Development of a Hybrid Atomic Force Microscopic Measurement System Combined with White Light Scanning Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system’s dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system’s good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method. PMID:22368463

  1. Development of a hybrid atomic force microscopic measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system's dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system's good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method. PMID:22368463

  2. Cellular level nanomanipulation using atomic force microscope aided with superresolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Harke, Benjamin; Canale, Claudio; Diaspro, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopes (AFM) provide topographical and mechanical information of the sample with very good axial resolution, but are limited in terms of chemical specificity and operation time-scale. An optical microscope coupled to an AFM can recognize and target an area of interest using specific identification markers like fluorescence tags. A high resolution fluorescence microscope can visualize fluorescence structures or molecules below the classical optical diffraction limit and reach nanometer scale resolution. A stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy superresolution (SR) microscope coupled to an AFM is an example in which the AFM tip gains nanoscale manipulation capabilities. The SR targeting and visualization ability help in fast and specific identification of subdiffraction-sized cellular structures and manoeuvring the AFM tip onto the target. We demonstrate how to build a STED AFM and use it for biological nanomanipulation aided with fast visualization. The STED AFM based bionanomanipulation is presented for the first time in this article. This study points to future nanosurgeries performable at single-cell level and a physical targeted manipulation of cellular features as it is currently used in research domains like nanomedicine and nanorobotics.

  3. Experimental validation of atomic force microscopy-based cell elasticity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew R.; Charras, G. T.

    2011-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used for measuring the elasticity of living cells yielding values ranging from 100 Pa to 100 kPa, much larger than those obtained using bead-tracking microrheology or micropipette aspiration (100-500 Pa). AFM elasticity measurements appear dependent on tip geometry with pyramidal tips yielding elasticities 2-3 fold larger than spherical tips, an effect generally attributed to the larger contact area of spherical tips. In AFM elasticity measurements, experimental force-indentation curves are analyzed using contact mechanics models that infer the tip-cell contact area from the tip geometry and indentation depth. The validity of these assumptions has never been verified. Here we utilize combined AFM-confocal microscopy of epithelial cells expressing a GFP-tagged membrane marker to directly characterize the indentation geometry and measure the indentation depth. Comparison with data derived from AFM force-indentation curves showed that the experimentally measured contact area for spherical tips agrees well with predicted values, whereas for pyramidal tips, the contact area can be grossly underestimated at forces larger than ~ 0.2 nN leading to a greater than two-fold overestimation of elasticity. These data suggest that a re-examination of absolute cellular elasticities reported in the literature may be necessary and we suggest guidelines for avoiding elasticity measurement artefacts introduced by extraneous cantilever-cell contact.

  4. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  5. Comparison of Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for Live Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Novak, Pavel; Korchev, Yuri E; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2015-06-23

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) are excellent and commonly used techniques for imaging the topography of living cells with high resolution. We present a direct comparison of AFM and SICM for imaging microvilli, which are small features on the surface of living cells, and for imaging the shape of whole cells. The imaging quality on microvilli increased significantly after cell fixation for AFM, whereas for SICM it remained constant. The apparent shape of whole cells in the case of AFM depended on the imaging force, which deformed the cell. In the case of SICM, cell deformations were avoided, owing to the contact-free imaging mechanism. We estimated that the lateral resolution on living cells is limited by the cell's elastic modulus for AFM, while it is not for SICM. By long-term, time-lapse imaging of microvilli dynamics, we showed that the imaging quality decreased with time for AFM, while it remained constant for SICM. PMID:26011471

  6. Fast Stiffness Mapping of Cells Using High-Bandwidth Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew; Vijayraghavan, Karthik; Solgaard, Olav; Butte, Manish J

    2016-01-26

    The cytoskeleton controls cellular morphology and mediates the mechanical interactions between a cell and its environment. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has the unique capability to map cytoskeletal mechanics and structures with nanometer resolution. However, whole-cell cytomechanical imaging with conventional AFM techniques is limited by low imaging speed. Here, we present fast nanomechanical mapping of cells using high-bandwidth AFM (HB-AFM), where >10(6) nanoindentation measurements were acquired in ∼10 min-a task that would take weeks to finish using conventional AFM. High-bandwidth measurements enabled capture of the entire tip-sample interaction for each tap on cells, engendering a new measurement ("force phase") that exceeds the contrast of conventional tapping mode and enabling spectral visualization of >10 harmonics. The abundance of measurements allowed discovery of subtle cytomechanical features, including the stiffness of fibers of the cellular spectrin network in situ. This approach bridges HB-AFM and high-harmonic imaging and opens future opportunities for measuring the dynamic mechanical properties of living cells. PMID:26554581

  7. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves.

    PubMed

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-05-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  8. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves

    PubMed Central

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  9. NC-AFM identification of different aluminum atoms on Al2O3/NiAl(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, Ivan; Brndiar, Jan; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Ultrathin alumina film formed by oxidation of NiAl(110) is widely used as a system for technologically important oxide-supported catalysts. Using small amplitude NC-AFM we have obtained images of this system with unprecedented resolution, significantly surpassing the previous STM and NC-AFM images. In particular, we are able to resolve aluminum atoms with different coordination, such as five-, and four-fold coordinated Al atoms. Experiments are supported by extensive density functional theory modeling. Starting from the previous atomic model, we have been able to describe the gross image features such as the dark oxygen sites. We find that the system is strongly ionic with the oxygen sites strongly negatively charged and aluminum sites positively charged. Hence, the NC-AFM images can reliably be understood from electrostatic potentials. These finding also suggest an oxygen terminated apex. Resolving finer contrast features of the differently coordinated Al atoms required construction of better and more realistic approximants to the ultra-thin incommensurable alumina interface. Supported by APVV-0207-11 and VEGA (2/0007/12) projects.

  10. Imaging three-dimensional surface objects with submolecular resolution by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moreno, César; Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Shimizu, Tomoko K; Custance, Oscar

    2015-04-01

    Submolecular imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently been established as a stunning technique to reveal the chemical structure of unknown molecules, to characterize intramolecular charge distributions and bond ordering, as well as to study chemical transformations and intermolecular interactions. So far, most of these feats were achieved on planar molecular systems because high-resolution imaging of three-dimensional (3D) surface structures with AFM remains challenging. Here we present a method for high-resolution imaging of nonplanar molecules and 3D surface systems using AFM with silicon cantilevers as force sensors. We demonstrate this method by resolving the step-edges of the (101) anatase surface at the atomic scale by simultaneously visualizing the structure of a pentacene molecule together with the atomic positions of the substrate and by resolving the contour and probe-surface force field on a C60 molecule with intramolecular resolution. The method reported here holds substantial promise for the study of 3D surface systems such as nanotubes, clusters, nanoparticles, polymers, and biomolecules using AFM with high resolution. PMID:25756297

  11. High-resolution dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquids with different feedback architectures

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martín, David; Jaafar, Miriam; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Raman, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Summary The recent achievement of atomic resolution with dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) [Fukuma et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 2005, 87, 034101], where quality factors of the oscillating probe are inherently low, challenges some accepted beliefs concerning sensitivity and resolution in dAFM imaging modes. Through analysis and experiment we study the performance metrics for high-resolution imaging with dAFM in liquid media with amplitude modulation (AM), frequency modulation (FM) and drive-amplitude modulation (DAM) imaging modes. We find that while the quality factors of dAFM probes may deviate by several orders of magnitude between vacuum and liquid media, their sensitivity to tip–sample forces can be remarkable similar. Furthermore, the reduction in noncontact forces and quality factors in liquids diminishes the role of feedback control in achieving high-resolution images. The theoretical findings are supported by atomic-resolution images of mica in water acquired with AM, FM and DAM under similar operating conditions. PMID:23503468

  12. Modification of calcite crystal growth by abalone shell proteins: an atomic force microscope study.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, D A; Smith, B L; Belcher, A M; Paloczi, G T; Stucky, G D; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    1997-01-01

    A family of soluble proteins from the shell of Haliotis rufescens was introduced over a growing calcite crystal being scanned in situ by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Atomic step edges on the crystal surface were altered in shape and speed of growth by the proteins. Proteins attached nonuniformly to the surface, indicating different interactions with crystallographically different step edges. The observed changes were consistent with the habit modification induced by this family of proteins, as previously observed by optical microscopy. To facilitate further studies in this area, AFM techniques and certain AFM imaging artifacts are discussed in detail. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:9138588

  13. Enhanced quality factors and force sensitivity by attaching magnetic beads to cantilevers for atomic force microscopy in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoof, Sebastian; Nand Gosvami, Nitya; Hoogenboom, Bart W.

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid remains complicated due to the strong viscous damping of the cantilever resonance. Here, we show that a high-quality resonance (Q >20) can be achieved in aqueous solution by attaching a microgram-bead at the end of the nanogram-cantilever. The resulting increase in cantilever mass causes the resonance frequency to drop significantly. However, the force sensitivity—as expressed via the minimum detectable force gradient—is hardly affected, because of the enhanced quality factor. Through the enhancement of the quality factor, the attached bead also reduces the relative importance of noise in the deflection detector. It can thus yield an improved signal-to-noise ratio when this detector noise is significant. We describe and analyze these effects for a set-up that includes magnetic actuation of the cantilevers and that can be easily implemented in any AFM system that is compatible with an inverted optical microscope.

  14. Intermittent contact interaction between an atomic force microscope cantilever and a nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, I.; Ungewitter, L.; Hartmann, U.

    2012-05-01

    We investigate in theory and experiment the intermittent contact interaction between an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and a nanowire under ambient conditions. The nanowire is modeled as a spring reacting instantaneously to any change of the force between the wire and the cantilever. This implies that the cantilever is subject to an "effective" force-distance relation, containing not only the surface forces but also the deflection of the nanowire. Experimentally, CVD-grown tin oxide nanowires and lithographically structured silicon nanowire arrays were investigated by intermittent contact AFM. By comparison of experimental and simulated distance-dependent resonance curves it is found that the nanowires behave like "fast nanosprings" and that the adhesion force is one of the key factors determining distance-dependent resonance curves. The results are fully applicable to a scenario in which a cantilever equipped by a nanowire interacts with a surface.

  15. Fully Atomistic Simulations of Protein Unfolding in Low Speed Atomic Force Microscope and Force Clamp Experiments with the Help of Boxed Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Booth, Jonathan J; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V

    2016-02-01

    The results of boxed dynamics (BXD) fully atomistic simulations of protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both force clamp (FC) and velocity clamp (VC) modes are reported. In AFM experiments the unfolding occurs on a time scale which is too long for standard atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which are usually performed with the addition of forces which exceed those of experiment by many orders of magnitude. BXD can reach the time scale of slow unfolding and sample the very high free energy unfolding pathway, reproducing the experimental dependence of pulling force against extension and extension against time. Calculations show the presence of the pulling force "humps" previously observed in the VC AFM experiments and allow the identification of intermediate protein conformations responsible for them. Fully atomistic BXD simulations can estimate the rate of unfolding in the FC experiments up to the time scale of seconds. PMID:26760898

  16. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, and raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of near-isogenic soft and hard wheat kernels and corresponding flours

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used to investigate vitreous (hard) and non-vitreous (soft) wheat kernels and their corresponding wheat flours. AFM data reveal two different microstructures. The vitreous kernel reveals a granular text...

  17. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  18. Systematic Multidimensional Quantification of Nanoscale Systems From Bimodal Atomic Force Microscopy Data.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chia-Yun; Santos, Sergio; Chiesa, Matteo

    2016-06-28

    Here we explore the raw parameter space in air in bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to enhance resolution, provide multiparameter maps, and produce suitable transformations that lead to physically intuitive maps general enough to be recognized by the broader community, i.e., stiffness, Hamaker constant, and adhesion force. We further consider model free transforms to enhance the raw parameter space in the form of alternative and more intelligible contrast maps. We employ highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, calcite, polypropylene, and dsDNA on mica to demonstrate a systematic form of parameter expansion. The proposed methodology to enhance and interpret a larger parameter space introduces a methodology to tractable multidimensional AFM from raw bimodal AFM maps. PMID:27172380

  19. Imaging and manipulating molecules on a zeolite surface with an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenhorn, A.L.; MacDougall, J.E.; Gould, S.A.C.; Cox, S.D.; Wise, W.S.; Stucky, G.D.; Hansma, P.K. ); Massie, J.; Maivald, P.; Elings, V.B. )

    1990-03-16

    The adsorption of neutral molecules and ions on the surfaces of zeolites was observed in real time with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Direct imaging of the surface of the zeolite clinoptilolite was possible by using a diluted tert-butyl ammonium chloride solution as a medium. Images of the crystal in different liquids revealed that molecules could be bound to the surface in different ways; neutral molecules of tert-butanol formed an ordered array, whereas tert-butyl ammonium ions formed clusters. These absorbed molecules were not rearranged by the AFM tip when used in an imaging mode. However, when a sufficiently large force was applied, the tip of the AFM could rearrange the tert-butyl ammoniium ions on the zeolite surface. This demonstration of molecular manipulation suggests new applications, including biosensors and lithography. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Ab initio simulations of subatomic resolution images in noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjung; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2015-03-01

    Direct imaging of polycyclic aromatic molecules with a subatomic resolution has recently been achieved with noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM). Specifically, nc-AFM employing a CO functionalized tip has provided details of the chemical bond in aromatic molecules, including the discrimination of bond order. However, the underlying physics of such high resolution imaging remains problematic. By employing new, efficient algorithms based on real space pseudopotentials, we calculate the forces between the nc-AFM tip and specimen. We simulate images of planar organic molecules with two different approaches: 1) with a chemically inert tip and 2) with a CO functionalized tip. We find dramatic differences in the resulting images, which are consistent with recent experimental work. Our work is supported by the DOE under DOE/DE-FG02-06ER46286 and by the Welch Foundation under Grant F-1837. Computational resources were provided by NERSC and XSEDE.

  1. Imaging and Manipulating Molecules on a Zeolite Surface with an Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenhorn, A. L.; Mac Dougall, J. E.; Gould, S. A. C.; Cox, S. D.; Wise, W. S.; Massie, J.; Maivald, P.; Elings, V. B.; Stucky, G. D.; Hansma, P. K.

    1990-03-01

    The adsorption of neutral molecules and ions on the surfaces of zeolites was observed in real time with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Direct imaging of the surface of the zeolite clinoptilolite was possible by using a diluted tert-butyl ammonium chloride solution as a medium. Images of the crystal in different liquids revealed that molecules could be bound to the surface in different ways; neutral molecules of tert-butanol formed an ordered array, whereas tert-butyl ammonium ions formed clusters. These absorbed molecules were not rearranged by the AFM tip when used in an imaging mode. However, when a sufficiently large force was applied, the tip of the AFM could rearrange the tert-butyl ammonium ions on the zeolite surface. This demonstration of molecular manipulation suggests new applications, including biosensors and lithography.

  2. Integrated atomic force microscopy techniques for analysis of biomaterials: Study of membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Laura S.

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is the prominent techniques for structural studies of biological materials in physiological relevant fluidic environments. AFM has been used to resolve the three-dimensional (3D) surface structure of cells, membranes, and proteins structures. Ion channels, formed by membrane proteins, are the key structures that control the activity of all living systems. This dissertation focuses on the structural evaluation of membrane proteins through atomic force microscopy. In Part I, AFM is utilized to study one of the most prominent medical issues facing our society, Alzheimer's Disease (AD). AD is a misfolded protein disease characterized by the accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide as senile plaques, progressive neurodegeneration, and memory loss. Recent evidence suggests that AD pathology is linked to the destabilization of cellular ionic homeostasis mediated by toxic channel structures composed of Abeta peptides. Selectively engineered sequences of Abeta were examined by AFM to elucidate the substructures and thus activity Abeta channels. Key residues were evaluated with the intent better understand the exact nature by which these pores conduct electrical and molecular signals, which could aid in identifying potential therapeutic targets for the prevention/treatment of AD. Additionally, AFM was used to analyze brain derived Abeta and newly developed pharmacological agents to study membranes and Abeta. Part II, presents a novel technology that incorporates electrophysiology into the AFM interface, enabling simultaneous imaging and complementary conductance measurements. The activity of ion channels is studied by various techniques, including patch clamp, free standing lipid bilayers, droplet interface bilayers, and supported lipid bilayers. However, direct correlation with channel structures has remained a challenge. The integrated atomic force microscopy system presented offers a solution to this challenge. The functionality of the

  3. Surface microstructure of bitumen characterized by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaokong; Burnham, Nancy A; Tao, Mingjiang

    2015-04-01

    Bitumen, also called asphalt binder, plays important roles in many industrial applications. It is used as the primary binding agent in asphalt concrete, as a key component in damping systems such as rubber, and as an indispensable additive in paint and ink. Consisting of a large number of hydrocarbons of different sizes and polarities, together with heteroatoms and traces of metals, bitumen displays rich surface microstructures that affect its rheological properties. This paper reviews the current understanding of bitumen's surface microstructures characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microstructures of bitumen develop to different forms depending on crude oil source, thermal history, and sample preparation method. While some bitumens display surface microstructures with fine domains, flake-like domains, and dendrite structuring, 'bee-structures' with wavy patterns several micrometers in diameter and tens of nanometers in height are commonly seen in other binders. Controversy exists regarding the chemical origin of the 'bee-structures', which has been related to the asphaltene fraction, the metal content, or the crystallizing waxes in bitumen. The rich chemistry of bitumen can result in complicated intermolecular associations such as coprecipitation of wax and metalloporphyrins in asphaltenes. Therefore, it is the molecular interactions among the different chemical components in bitumen, rather than a single chemical fraction, that are responsible for the evolution of bitumen's diverse microstructures, including the 'bee-structures'. Mechanisms such as curvature elasticity and surface wrinkling that explain the rippled structures observed in polymer crystals might be responsible for the formation of 'bee-structures' in bitumen. Despite the progress made on morphological characterization of bitumen using AFM, the fundamental question whether the microstructures observed on bitumen surfaces represent its bulk structure remains to be addressed. In addition

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy Studies on DNA Structural Changes Induced by Vincristine Sulfate and Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Zeng, Hu; Xie, Jianming; Ba, Long; Gao, Xiang; Lu, Zuhong

    2004-04-01

    We report that atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on structural variations of a linear plasmid DNA interact with various concentrations of vincristine sulfate and aspirin. The different binding images show that vincrinstine sulfate binding DNA chains caused some loops and cleavages of the DNA fragments, whereas aspirin interaction caused the width changes and conformational transition of the DNA fragments. Two different DNA structural alternations could be explained by the different mechanisms of the interactions with these two components. Our work indicates that the AFM is a powerful tool in studying the interaction between DNA and small molecules.

  5. Multimode resistive switching in nanoscale hafnium oxide stack as studied by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Celano, U.; Goux, L.; Liu, L.; Degraeve, R.; Cheng, Y.; Kang, J.; Jurczak, M.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-07-01

    The nanoscale resistive switching in hafnium oxide stack is investigated by the conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). The initial oxide stack is insulating and electrical stress from the C-AFM tip induces nanometric conductive filaments. Multimode resistive switching can be observed in consecutive operation cycles at one spot. The different modes are interpreted in the framework of a low defect quantum point contact theory. The model implies that the optimization of the conductive filament active region is crucial for the future application of nanoscale resistive switching devices.

  6. Inorganic resist materials based on zirconium phosphonate for atomic force microscope lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mankyu; Kim, Seonae; Jung, JinHyuck; Kim, Heebom; Shin, Inkyun; Jeon, Chanuk; Lee, Haiwon

    2014-03-01

    New inorganic resist materials based on metal complexes were investigated for atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography. Phosphoric acids are good for self-assembly because of their strong binding energy. In this work, zirconium phosphonate system are newly synthesized for spin-coatable materials in aqueous solutions and leads to negative tone pattern for improving line edge roughness. Low electron exposure by AFM lithography could generate a pattern by electrochemical reaction and cross-linking of metal-oxo complexes. It has been reported that the minimum pattern results are affected by lithographic speed, and the applied voltage between a tip and a substrate.

  7. Co-axial Electrospun Polyacrylonitrile-Poly(methylmethacrylate) Nanofibers: Atomic Force Microscopy and Compositional Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Zander, N.E.; Strawhecker, K.E.; Orlicki, J.A.; Rawlett, A.M.; Beebe, T.P.

    2011-01-01

    Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA)- Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers were prepared using a conventional single-nozzle electrospinning technique. The as-spun fibers exhibited core-shell morphology as verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM-phase and modulus mapping images of the fiber cross-section and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated PAN formed the shell and PMMA the core material. XPS, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and elemental analysis were used to determine fiber compositional information. Soaking the fibers in solvent demonstrated removal of the core material, generating hollow PAN fibers. PMID:21928836

  8. Quantitative comparison of two independent lateral force calibration techniques for the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Barkley, Sarice S.; Cannara, Rachel J.; Deng Zhao; Gates, Richard S.; Reitsma, Mark G.

    2012-02-15

    Two independent lateral-force calibration methods for the atomic force microscope (AFM)--the hammerhead (HH) technique and the diamagnetic lateral force calibrator (D-LFC)--are systematically compared and found to agree to within 5% or less, but with precision limited to about 15%, using four different tee-shaped HH reference probes. The limitations of each method, both of which offer independent yet feasible paths toward traceable accuracy, are discussed and investigated. We find that stiff cantilevers may produce inconsistent D-LFC values through the application of excessively high normal loads. In addition, D-LFC results vary when the method is implemented using different modes of AFM feedback control, constant height and constant force modes, where the latter is more consistent with the HH method and closer to typical experimental conditions. Specifically, for the D-LFC apparatus used here, calibration in constant height mode introduced errors up to 14 %. In constant force mode using a relatively stiff cantilever, we observed an {approx_equal} 4 % systematic error per {mu}N of applied load for loads {<=} 1 {mu}N. The issue of excessive load typically emerges for cantilevers whose flexural spring constant is large compared with the normal spring constant of the D-LFC setup (such that relatively small cantilever flexural displacements produce relatively large loads). Overall, the HH method carries a larger uncertainty, which is dominated by uncertainty in measurement of the flexural spring constant of the HH cantilever as well as in the effective length dimension of the cantilever probe. The D-LFC method relies on fewer parameters and thus has fewer uncertainties associated with it. We thus show that it is the preferred method of the two, as long as care is taken to perform the calibration in constant force mode with low applied loads.

  9. Tracking mechanics and volume of globular cells with atomic force microscopy using a constant-height clamp.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Martin P; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hyman, Anthony A; Müller, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    To understand the role of physical forces at a cellular level, it is necessary to track mechanical properties during cellular processes. Here we present a protocol that uses flat atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers clamped at constant height, and light microscopy to measure the resistance force, mechanical stress and volume of globular animal cells under compression. We describe the AFM and cantilever setup, live cell culture in the AFM, how to ensure stability of AFM measurements during medium perfusion, integration of optical microscopy to measure parameters such as volume and track intracellular dynamics, and interpretation of the physical parameters measured. Although we use this protocol on trypsinized interphase and mitotic HeLa cells, it can also be applied to other cells with a relatively globular shape, especially animal cells in a low-adhesive environment. After a short setup phase, the protocol can be used to investigate approximately one cell per hour. PMID:22222789

  10. Gating mechanosensitive channels in bacteria with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, Renata; Miller, Samantha; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Third Institute of Physics Team; School of Medical Sciences Collaboration

    The regulation of growth and integrity of bacteria is critically linked to mechanical stress. Bacteria typically maintain a high difference of osmotic pressure (turgor pressure) with respect to the environment. This pressure difference (on the order of 1 atm) is supported by the cell envelope, a composite of lipid membranes and a rigid cell wall. Turgor pressure is controlled by the ratio of osmolytes inside and outside bacteria and thus, can abruptly increase upon osmotic downshock. For structural integrity bacteria rely on the mechanical stability of the cell wall and on the action of mechanosensitive (MS) channels: membrane proteins that release solutes in response to stress in the cell envelope. We here present experimental data on MS channels gating. We activate channels by indenting living bacteria with the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). We compare responses of wild-type and mutant bacteria in which some or all MS channels have been eliminated.

  11. High-resolution atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bippes, Christian A.; Muller, Daniel J.

    2011-08-01

    Membranes confining cells and cellular compartments are essential for life. Membrane proteins are molecular machines that equip cell membranes with highly sophisticated functionality. Examples of such functions are signaling, ion pumping, energy conversion, molecular transport, specific ligand binding, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. However, it is not well understood how most membrane proteins work and how the living cell regulates their function. We review how atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be applied for structural and functional investigations of native membrane proteins. High-resolution time-lapse AFM imaging records membrane proteins at work, their oligomeric state and their dynamic assembly. The AFM stylus resembles a multifunctional toolbox that allows the measurement of several chemical and physical parameters at the nanoscale. In the single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) mode, AFM quantifies and localizes interactions in membrane proteins that stabilize their folding and modulate their functional state. Dynamic SMFS discloses fascinating insights into the free energy landscape of membrane proteins. Single-cell force spectroscopy quantifies the interactions of live cells with their environment to single-receptor resolution. In the future, technological progress in AFM-based approaches will enable us to study the physical nature of biological interactions in more detail and decipher how cells control basic processes.

  12. Structure and stability of semiconductor tip apexes for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pou, P.; Ghasemi, S. A.; Jelinek, P.; Lenosky, T.; Goedecker, S.; Perez, R.

    2009-07-01

    The short range force between the tip and the surface atoms, that is responsible for atomic-scale contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM), is mainly controlled by the tip apex. Thus, the ability to image, manipulate and chemically identify single atoms in semiconductor surfaces is ultimately determined by the apex structure and its composition. Here we present a detailed and systematic study of the most common structures that can be expected at the apex of the Si tips used in experiments. We tackle the determination of the structure and stability of Si tips with three different approaches: (i) first principles simulations of small tip apexes; (ii) simulated annealing of a Si cluster; and (iii) a minima hopping study of large Si tips. We have probed the tip apexes by making atomic contacts between the tips and then compared force-distance curves with the experimental short range forces obtained with dynamic force spectroscopy. The main conclusion is that although there are multiple stable solutions for the atomically sharp tip apexes, they can be grouped into a few types with characteristic atomic structures and properties. We also show that the structure of the last atomic layers in a tip apex can be both crystalline and amorphous. We corroborate that the atomically sharp tips are thermodynamically stable and that the tip-surface interaction helps to produce the atomic protrusion needed to get atomic resolution.

  13. Imaging cells with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Butt, H J; Wolff, E K; Gould, S A; Dixon Northern, B; Peterson, C M; Hansma, P K

    1990-01-01

    Different types of cells have been imaged with the atomic force microscope. The morphology of the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium in its dry state was revealed. On a leaf of the small Indian tree Lagerstroemia subcostata a stoma was imaged. The lower side of a water lily leaf was imaged in water showing features down to 12 nm. Finally, fixed red and white blood cells were imaged in buffer showing features down to 8 nm. The images demonstrate that atomic force microscopy can provide high-resolution images of cell surfaces under physiological conditions. PMID:2100150

  14. Fidelity imaging for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Sayan Salapaka, Murti

    2015-01-05

    Atomic force microscopy is widely employed for imaging material at the nanoscale. However, real-time measures on image reliability are lacking in contemporary atomic force microscopy literature. In this article, we present a real-time technique that provides an image of fidelity for a high bandwidth dynamic mode imaging scheme. The fidelity images define channels that allow the user to have additional authority over the choice of decision threshold that facilitates where the emphasis is desired, on discovering most true features on the sample with the possible detection of high number of false features, or emphasizing minimizing instances of false detections. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of fidelity imaging.

  15. Conductive-probe atomic force microscopy characterization of silicon nanowire

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The electrical conduction properties of lateral and vertical silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were investigated using a conductive-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). Horizontal SiNWs, which were synthesized by the in-plane solid-liquid-solid technique, are randomly deployed into an undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer. Local current mapping shows that the wires have internal microstructures. The local current-voltage measurements on these horizontal wires reveal a power law behavior indicating several transport regimes based on space-charge limited conduction which can be assisted by traps in the high-bias regime (> 1 V). Vertical phosphorus-doped SiNWs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using a gold catalyst-driving vapor-liquid-solid process on higly n-type silicon substrates. The effect of phosphorus doping on the local contact resistance between the AFM tip and the SiNW was put in evidence, and the SiNWs resistivity was estimated. PMID:21711623

  16. Long range metrological atomic force microscope with versatile measuring head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mingzhen; Gao, Sitian; Li, Qi; Li, Wei; Shi, Yushu; Tao, Xingfu

    2013-01-01

    A long range metrological atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed at NIM. It aims to realize a maximum measurement volume of 50mm×50mm×2mm with an uncertainty of a few tens of nanometers in the whole range. In compliance with Abbe Principle, the instrument is designed as a sample-scanning type. The sample is moved by a 6-DOF piezostage in combination with a hybrid slide-air bearing stage for long scanning range. Homodyne interferometers with four passes attached to a metrological frame measure relative displacement between the probe and sample thus the instrument is directly traceable to the SI. An AFM head is developed as the measuring head for the instrument. Considering accuracy and dynamic performance of the instrument, it is designed to be capable of scanning perpendicularly in a range of 5μm×5μm×5μm with a 3-DOF piezostage. Optical beam deflection method is used and a minimum of components are mounted on the moving part. A novel design is devised so that the photodetector is only sensitive to the deflection of cantilever, but not the displacement of the head. Moving manner of the head varies with scanning range and mode of the instrument. Results of different measurements are demonstrated, showing the excellent performance of the instrument.

  17. An atomic force microscopy study of Eurofer-97 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Sandim, H. R. Z.; Pissas, M.

    2014-07-01

    In recent years the microstructure, mechanical and magnetic properties of Eurofer-97 steel are studied intensively due to its application in nuclear fusion power plants. Its microstructure is usually accessed by means of electron microscopy. Here we present an alternative approach utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study as-received Eurofer-97 steel. We recorded both the Height Signal (HS) and Phase Signal (PS) that provided information on the morphologic and inelastic topography, respectively. With the HS we detected spherical particles (SPs) of size 50-2000 nm. Interestingly, micrometer SPs (0.1-2.0 μm) are randomly distributed, while nanometer SPs (50-100 nm) are sometimes arranged in correlation to grain boundaries. The PS clearly revealed that the micrometer SPs exhibit inelastic properties. Though we cannot identify the elemental composition of the SPs with AFM, based on relevant electron microscopy data we ascribe the nanometer ones to the TaC, TiN and VN and the coarse micrometer ones to M23C6 (M=Cr, Fe). The latter class of SPs can probably be active sites that influence the mechanical properties of Eurofer-97 steel upon annealing as observed in relevant electron microscopy based studies.

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation of Vaccinia Virus Structure▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Y.; Gershon, P. D.; McPherson, A.

    2008-01-01

    Vaccinia virus was treated in a controlled manner with various combinations of nonionic detergents, reducing agents, and proteolytic enzymes, and successive products of the reactions were visualized using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Following removal of the outer lipid/protein membrane, a layer 20 to 40 nm in thickness was encountered that was composed of fibrous elements which, under reducing conditions, rapidly decomposed into individual monomers on the substrate. Beneath this layer was the virus core and its prominent lateral bodies, which could be dissociated or degraded with proteases. The core, in addition to the lateral bodies, was composed of a thick, multilayered shell of proteins of diverse sizes and shapes. The shell, which was readily etched with proteases, was thoroughly permeated with pores, or channels. Prolonged exposure to proteases and reductants produced disgorgement of the viral DNA from the remainders of the cores and also left residual, flattened, protease-resistant sacs on the imaging substrate. The DNA was readily visualized by AFM, which revealed some regions to be “soldered” by proteins, others to be heavily complexed with protein, and yet other parts to apparently exist as bundled, naked DNA. Prolonged exposure to proteases deproteinized the DNA, leaving masses of extended, free DNA. Estimates of the interior core volume suggest moderate but not extreme compaction of the genome. PMID:18508898

  19. Atomic force microscopy of differential weathering in real time

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, J.S.; Engstrom, R.C. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-04-01

    Differential weathering of a rock sample was observed in-situ using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The sample contained fayalite intergrown with veins of magnetite and serpentine. Analyses consisted of polishing the sample with alumina and recording AFM scans periodically during subsequent exposure to nitric acid. Immediately after polishing, serpentine areas were recessed compared to fayalite and magnetite, which were similar in height. As weathering proceeded, both serpentine and magnetite areas protruded from the fayalite surface, and no significant change in the relative heights of magnetite and serpentine features was observed. This suggests that serpentine is less resistant to mechanical weathering than fayalite or magnetite but that serpentine and magnetite are both more resistant to chemical weathering than fayalite. Differential weathering rates between fayalite and magnetite, on the order of a few unit cells per minute, were determined in various nitric acid concentrations by measuring the difference in height between the two minerals as a function of time. A dissolution rate law for fayalite was determined by comparing the rates for different concentrations of nitric acid and assuming the dissolution of magnetite was negligible compared to that of fayalite. The rate law from this study is Rate = 7.7* [HNO[sub 3

  20. Immobilization of different biomolecules by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Micrometer resolution placement and immobilization of probe molecules is an important step in the preparation of biochips and a wide range of lab-on-chip systems. Most known methods for such a deposition of several different substances are costly and only suitable for a limited number of probes. In this article we present a flexible procedure for simultaneous spatially controlled immobilization of functional biomolecules by molecular ink lithography. Results For the bottom-up fabrication of surface bound nanostructures a universal method is presented that allows the immobilization of different types of biomolecules with micrometer resolution. A supporting surface is biotinylated and streptavidin molecules are deposited with an AFM (atomic force microscope) tip at distinct positions. Subsequent incubation with a biotinylated molecule species leads to binding only at these positions. After washing streptavidin is deposited a second time with the same AFM tip and then a second biotinylated molecule species is coupled by incubation. This procedure can be repeated several times. Here we show how to immobilize different types of biomolecules in an arbitrary arrangement whereas most common methods can deposit only one type of molecules. The presented method works on transparent as well as on opaque substrates. The spatial resolution is better than 400 nm and is limited only by the AFM's positional accuracy after repeated z-cycles since all steps are performed in situ without moving the supporting surface. The principle is demonstrated by hybridization to different immobilized DNA oligomers and was validated by fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The immobilization of different types of biomolecules in high-density microarrays is a challenging task for biotechnology. The method presented here not only allows for the deposition of DNA at submicrometer resolution but also for proteins and other molecules of biological relevance that can be coupled to biotin. PMID

  1. Free vibrations of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2014-05-01

    Contact resonance atomic force microscope (AFM) methods have been used to quantify the elastic and viscoelastic properties of a variety of materials such as polymers, ceramics, biological materials, and metals with spatial resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. This approach involves measurement of the resonant frequencies of the AFM probe both for the free case and the case for which the tip is in contact with a sample. Vibration models of the probe and tip-sample contact models are then used to determine the sample properties from the frequency behavior and to create images of the sample properties. This work has been primarily focused on rectangular, single-beam probes for which the vibration models are relatively simple. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have been developed to allow local heating of samples and the resonances of these probes are much more complex. In this article, a simplified analytical model of these U-shaped probes is described. This three beam model includes two beams clamped at one end and connected with a perpendicular cross beam at the other end. The beams are assumed only to bend in flexure and twist but their coupling allows a wide range of possible dynamic behavior. Results are presented for the first ten modes and the mode shapes are shown to have complex coupling between the flexure and twisting of the beams, particularly for the higher modes. All resonant frequency results are in good agreement with finite element results for the three probe designs and two values of thickness considered (all wavenumbers are within 3.0%). This work is anticipated to allow U-shaped probes to be used eventually for quantitative measurements of sample material properties during heating using a contact resonance approach.

  2. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  3. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  4. Scratch direction and threshold force in nanoscale scratching using atomic force microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ampere A.; Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Jou, Shyankay; Nishimura, Shinya; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi

    2011-09-01

    The nanoscaled tip in an AFM (atomic force microscope) has become an effective scratching tool for material removing in nanofabrication. In this article, the characteristics of using a diamond-coated pyramidal tip to scratch Ni-Fe thin film surfaces was experimentally investigated with the focus on the evaluation of the influence of the scratch or scan direction on the final shape of the scratched geometry as well as the applied scratch force. Results indicated that both the scratched profile and the scratch force were greatly affected by the scratch direction. It has been found that, to minimize the formation of protuberances along the groove sides and to have a better control of the scratched geometry, the tip face should be perpendicular to the scratching direction, which is also known as orthogonal cutting condition. To demonstrate the present findings, three groove patterns have been scratched with the tip face perpendicular to the scratching direction and very little amount of protuberances was observed. The threshold scratch force was also predicted based on the Hertz contact theory. Without considering the surface friction and adhesive forces between the tip and substrate, the threshold force predicted was twice smaller than the measurement value. Finally, recommendations for technical improvement and research focuses are provided.

  5. Nanoscale mechanical probing of supported lipid bilayers with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Das, Chinmay; Sheikh, Khizar H; Olmsted, Peter D; Connell, Simon D

    2010-10-01

    We present theory and experiments for the force-distance curve F(z(0)) of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip (radius R) indenting a supported fluid bilayer (thickness 2d). For realistic conditions the force is dominated by the area compressibility modulus κ(A) of the bilayer and, to an excellent approximation, given by F=πκ(A)Rz(0)(2)/(2d-z(0))(2). The experimental AFM force curves from coexisting liquid ordered and liquid disordered domains in three-component lipid bilayers are well described by our model, which provides κ(A) in agreement with literature values. The liquid ordered phase has a yieldlike response that we model as due to the breaking of hydrogen bonds. PMID:21230326

  6. Force modulation atomic force microscopy: background, development and application to electrodeposited cerium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng-Bin; Thompson, G. E.; Newman, R. C.

    1998-04-01

    In force modulation atomic force microscopy (FMAFM), vertical oscillation of the scanning tip of the AFM is added purposely and the deflection of the tip, which is influenced by surface features of the sample, is used as the z dimension to construct images. FMAFM represents a powerful technique for scientific research, but its merit has not been realized adequately to date. In this paper, the basic principles and particular features, as well as potential drawbacks of the technique, are presented and demonstrated systematically, through its application to electrochemically deposited cerium oxide films. Comparisons are also made with the more familiar contact mode AFM (CMAFM) and tapping mode AFM (TMAFM). It is shown that FMAFM reveals the major topographic features of CMAFM, but affords (i) greater resolution for sample features that are difficult in CMAFM, and (ii) continuous two-dimensional mapping of local mechanical properties on a scale of nanometres that the CMAFM, TMAFM and any other techniques, are not capable of sensing. This information can be used to elucidate other properties of the investigated surface, such as crystallinity variation, phase separation and distribution, and mechanisms of formation of deposited films. Major artifacts associated with the technique include `wedge cavity effect' and `tip slip effect', for which a geometric model is proposed to elucidate their origins. The cerium oxide films are shown to be composed of relatively hard crystalline grains, of well-defined individual geometry and comparatively regular packing, alongside relatively soft amorphous patches, devoid of distinct geometry and assembled disorderly. These features are consistent with a nucleation and growth mechanism of the deposition, in which crystalline nuclei arise and grow from an intermediate cerium gel mass, produced in the interfacial region during deposition.

  7. Novel amplitude and frequency demodulation algorithm for a virtual dynamic atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokavecz, J.; Tóth, Z.; Horváth, Z. L.; Heszler, P.; Mechler, Á.

    2006-04-01

    Frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM; also called non-contact atomic force microscopy) is the prevailing operation mode in (sub-)atomic resolution vacuum applications. A major obstacle that prohibits a wider application range is the low frame capture rate. The speed of FM-AFM is limited by the low bandwidth of the automatic gain control (AGC) and frequency demodulation loops. In this work we describe a novel algorithm that can be used to overcome these weaknesses. We analysed the settling times of the proposed loops and that of the complete system, and we found that an approximately 70-fold improvement can be achieved over the existing real and virtual atomic force microscopes. We show that proportional-integral-differential controllers perform better in the frequency demodulation loop than conventional proportional-integral controllers. We demonstrate that the signal to noise ratio of the proposed system is 5.7 × 10-5, which agrees with that of the conventional systems; thus, the new algorithm would improve the performance of FM-AFMs without compromising the resolution.

  8. A monolithic MEMS position sensor for closed-loop high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, N; Nievergelt, A P; Adams, J D; Stavrov, V T; Fantner, G E

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy and repeatability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging significantly depend on the accuracy of the piezoactuator. However, nonlinear properties of piezoactuators can distort the image, necessitating sensor-based closed-loop actuators to achieve high accuracy AFM imaging. The advent of high-speed AFM has made the requirements on the position sensors in such a system even more stringent, requiring higher bandwidths and lower sensor mass than traditional sensors can provide. In this paper, we demonstrate a way for high-speed, high-precision closed-loop AFM nanopositioning using a novel, miniaturized micro-electro-mechanical system position sensor in conjunction with a simple PID controller. The sensor was developed to respond to the need for small, lightweight, high-bandwidth, long-range and sub-nm-resolution position measurements in high-speed AFM applications. We demonstrate the use of this sensor for closed-loop operation of conventional as well as high-speed AFM operation to provide distortion-free images. The presented implementation of this closed-loop approach allows for positioning precision down to 2.1 Å, reduces the integral nonlinearity to below 0.2%, and allows for accurate closed loop imaging at line rates up to 300 Hz. PMID:26894523

  9. Structural analysis and classification of human metaphase chromosomes by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Naoaki; Okada, Takao

    1999-06-01

    We applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to the analysis and classification of metaphase chromosomes. Human chromosomes were isolated from blood and spread over a glass substrate. We found that air-dried and Giemsa stained chromosomes had a granular surface and the height of approximately 250 nm; however unstained chromosomes had a smooth surface and the height was approximately 100 nm. Giemsa staining caused swelling of the chromosome structure. For the structural analysis, chromosomes were treated with hyaluronidase or a citric acid buffer. The effects of the treatments on chromosomal components, spiral structure and 30-nm solenoid fiber were observed. Each step of G-banding treatments of chromosomes was also visualized by AFM. The trypsin treatment collapsed the chromosomes and subsequent Giemsa staining caused dramatically reswelling of the chromosomes. The height of the G-positive region was approximately 200 nm but the unstained region was approximately 50 nm. The difference in thickness observed was produced by binding of the dye. The AFM image of the banding patterns of treated chromosomes was clearer than the image obtained with an optical microscope. These images made it possible to visualize the karyotyping of chromosomes using AFM. Detection of in situ hybridization using AFM and microdissection of chromosomes using AFM were also investigated.

  10. A monolithic MEMS position sensor for closed-loop high-speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, N.; Nievergelt, A. P.; Adams, J. D.; Stavrov, V. T.; Fantner, G. E.

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy and repeatability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging significantly depend on the accuracy of the piezoactuator. However, nonlinear properties of piezoactuators can distort the image, necessitating sensor-based closed-loop actuators to achieve high accuracy AFM imaging. The advent of high-speed AFM has made the requirements on the position sensors in such a system even more stringent, requiring higher bandwidths and lower sensor mass than traditional sensors can provide. In this paper, we demonstrate a way for high-speed, high-precision closed-loop AFM nanopositioning using a novel, miniaturized micro-electro-mechanical system position sensor in conjunction with a simple PID controller. The sensor was developed to respond to the need for small, lightweight, high-bandwidth, long-range and sub-nm-resolution position measurements in high-speed AFM applications. We demonstrate the use of this sensor for closed-loop operation of conventional as well as high-speed AFM operation to provide distortion-free images. The presented implementation of this closed-loop approach allows for positioning precision down to 2.1 Å, reduces the integral nonlinearity to below 0.2%, and allows for accurate closed loop imaging at line rates up to 300 Hz.

  11. Analysis of beam interference reflected from atomic force microscope tip and periodic silicon surface under various humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Hans P.; Weerasinghe, Asanka T.; Lyuksyutov, Sergei F.

    2012-10-01

    Dynamical sensing based on combination of classical optical effects and atomic force microscopy (AFM) presents challenge for analysis of the forces at the nanoscale and beyond. An interference effect between light reflected from an AFM cantilever and highly reflective silicon surface of the calibration grating was studied for relative humidity (RH) varied between 9 and 60%. Force-distance analysis indicates on separation of capillary, van der Waals, adhesion, and electrostatic forces. The measurements performed in contact AFM mode suggest that the period of interference pattern observed in displacement curves is a function of humidity and varies between 293 nm at RH = 9% and 335 nm at RH > 50% with standard deviation less than 8 nm. Clear change of the interference period suggests that other than hardwarerelated factors may be involved in the formation of the interference in force-distance curves.

  12. The structure and function of cell membranes examined by atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda

    2015-06-01

    The cell membrane is one of the most complicated biological complexes, and long-term fierce debates regarding the cell membrane persist because of technical hurdles. With the rapid development of nanotechnology and single-molecule techniques, our understanding of cell membranes has substantially increased. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has provided several unprecedented advances (e.g., high resolution, three-dimensional and in situ measurements) in the study of cell membranes and has been used to systematically dissect the membrane structure in situ from both sides of membranes; as a result, novel models of cell membranes have recently been proposed. This review summarizes the new progress regarding membrane structure using in situ AFM and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), which may shed light on the study of the structure and functions of cell membranes. PMID:25893228

  13. Frequency Modulation Atomic Force Microscopy in Ionic Liquid Using Quartz Tuning Fork Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichii, Takashi; Fujimura, Motohiko; Negami, Masahiro; Murase, Kuniaki; Sugimura, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-01

    Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) imaging in ionic liquids (ILs) were carried out. A quartz tuning fork sensor with a sharpened tungsten tip was used as a force sensor instead of a Si cantilever. Only the tip apex was immersed in ILs and the quality factor of the sensors was kept more than 100 in spite of the high viscosity of ILs. Atomic-resolution topographic imaging was successfully achieved in an IL as well as in an aqueous solution. In addition, frequency shift versus tip-to-sample distance curves were obtained and the structures of local solvation layers were studied.

  14. Calibration of frictional forces in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D.F.; Carpick, R.W.; Salmeron, M.

    1996-09-01

    The atomic force microscope can provide information on the atomic-level frictional properties of surfaces, but reproducible quantitative measurements are difficult to obtain. Parameters that are either unknown or difficult to precisely measure include the normal and lateral cantilever force constants (particularly with microfabricated cantilevers), the tip height, the deflection sensor response, and the tip structure and composition at the tip-surface contact. We present an {ital in} {ital situ} experimental procedure to determine the response of a cantilever to lateral forces in terms of its normal force response. This procedure is quite general. It will work with any type of deflection sensor and does not require the knowledge or direct measurement of the lever dimensions or the tip height. In addition, the shape of the tip apex can be determined. We also discuss a number of specific issues related to force and friction measurements using optical lever deflection sensing. We present experimental results on the lateral force response of commercially available V-shaped cantilevers. Our results are consistent with estimates of lever mechanical properties using continuum elasticity theory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Carbon Nanotube Atomic Force Microscopy for Proteomics and Biological Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A; De Yoreo, J J; Malkin, A J

    2002-01-01

    The Human Genome Project was focused on mapping the complete genome. Yet, understanding the structure and function of the proteins expressed by the genome is the real end game. But there are approximately 100,000 proteins in the human body and the atomic structure has been determined for less than 1% of them. Given the current rate at which structures are being solved, it will take more than one hundred years to complete this task. The rate-limiting step in protein structure determination is the growth of high-quality single crystals for X-ray diffraction. Synthesis of the protein stock solution as well as X-ray diffraction and analysis can now often be done in a matter of weeks, but developing a recipe for crystallization can take years and, especially in the case of membrane proteins, is often completely unsuccessful. Consequently, techniques that can either help to elucidate the factors controlling macromolecular crystallization, increase the amount of structural information obtained from crystallized macromolecules or eliminate the need for crystallization altogether are of enormous importance. In addition, potential applications for those techniques extend well beyond the challenges of proteomics. The global spread of modern technology has brought with it an increasing threat from biological agents such as viruses. As a result, developing techniques for identifying and understanding the operation of such agents is becoming a major area of forensic research for DOE. Previous to this project, we have shown that we can use in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image the surfaces of growing macromolecular crystals with molecular resolution (1-5) In addition to providing unprecedented information about macromolecular nucleation, growth and defect structure, these results allowed us to obtain low-resolution phase information for a number of macromolecules, providing structural information that was not obtainable from X-ray diffraction(3). For some virus systems

  16. Tip radius preservation for high resolution imaging in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Jorge R.

    2014-07-28

    The acquisition of high resolution images in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is correlated to the cantilever's tip shape, size, and imaging conditions. In this work, relative tip wear is quantified based on the evolution of a direct experimental observable in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, i.e., the critical amplitude. We further show that the scanning parameters required to guarantee a maximum compressive stress that is lower than the yield/fracture stress of the tip can be estimated via experimental observables. In both counts, the optimized parameters to acquire AFM images while preserving the tip are discussed. The results are validated experimentally by employing IgG antibodies as a model system.

  17. Atomic Force Microscopy of DNA-wrapped Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Takuya; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated hybrids of DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous solution and in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Although intensive AFM observations of these hybrids were previously carried out for samples in air, this is the first report on AFM observations of these hybrids in solution. As expected, diameters of DNA-SWNT hybrids dramatically increased in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TE) buffer solution. The data suggest that DNA molecules maintain their structures even on the SWNT surfaces. Furthermore, we simultaneously observed single DNA-SWNT hybrids using three different AFM modes in air and in the TE buffer solution. Height value of the hybrids was largest in the solution, and lowest for the mode that repulsive force is expected in air. For the bare SWNT molecules, height differences among the three AFM modes were much lower than those of the DNA-SWNT hybrids. DNA molecules adsorbed on SWNT surfaces flexibly changed their morphology as well as DNA molecules on flat surfaces such as mica. This is hopeful results for biological applications of DNA-SWNT hybrids. In addition, our results revealed the importance of the single-molecule approach to evaluate DNA structures on SWNT surfaces. PMID:27045980

  18. Probabilistic Estimation of Mechanical Properties of Biomaterials Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rajarshi; Chen, Wenjin; Cong, Lei; Goodell, Lauri A.; Foran, David J.; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoindentation using contact-mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful tool for effective material characterization of a wide variety of biomaterials across multiple length scales. However, interpretation of force-indentation experimental data from AFM is subject to some debate. Uncertainties in AFM data analysis stems from two primary sources: the exact point of contact between the AFM probe and the biological specimen and the variability in the spring constant of the AFM probe. While a lot of attention has been directed towards addressing the contact-point uncertainty, the effect of variability in the probe spring constant has not received sufficient attention. In this work, we report on an Error-In-Variables (EIV) based Bayesian Changepoint approach to quantify the elastic modulus of human breast tissue samples after accounting for variability in both contact point and the probe spring constant. We also discuss the efficacy of our approach to a wide range of hyperparameter values using a sensitivity analysis. PMID:24081838

  19. Detecting the magnetic response of iron oxide capped organosilane nanostructures using magnetic sample modulation and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Lewandowski, Brian R; Xu, Song; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-06-15

    A new imaging strategy using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated for mapping magnetic domains at size regimes below 100 nm. The AFM-based imaging mode is referred to as magnetic sample modulation (MSM), since the flux of an AC-generated electromagnetic field is used to induce physical movement of magnetic nanomaterials on surfaces during imaging. The AFM is operated in contact mode using a soft, nonmagnetic tip to detect the physical motion of the sample. By slowly scanning an AFM probe across a vibrating area of the sample, the frequency and amplitude of vibration induced by the magnetic field is tracked by changes in tip deflection. Thus, the AFM tip serves as a force and motion sensor for mapping the vibrational response of magnetic nanomaterials. Essentially, MSM is a hybrid of contact mode AFM combined with selective modulation of magnetic domains. The positional feedback loop for MSM imaging is the same as that used for force modulation and contact mode AFM; however, the vibration of the sample is analyzed using channels of a lock-in amplifier. The investigations are facilitated by nanofabrication methods combining particle lithography with organic vapor deposition and electroless deposition of iron oxide, to prepare designed test platforms of magnetic materials at nanometer length scales. Custom test platforms furnished suitable surfaces for MSM characterizations at the level of individual metal nanostructures. PMID:19453164

  20. Trapping atoms using nanoscale quantum vacuum forces

    PubMed Central

    Chang, D. E.; Sinha, K.; Taylor, J. M.; Kimble, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum vacuum forces dictate the interaction between individual atoms and dielectric surfaces at nanoscale distances. For example, their large strengths typically overwhelm externally applied forces, which makes it challenging to controllably interface cold atoms with nearby nanophotonic systems. Here we theoretically show that it is possible to tailor the vacuum forces themselves to provide strong trapping potentials. Our proposed trapping scheme takes advantage of the attractive ground-state potential and adiabatic dressing with an excited state whose potential is engineered to be resonantly enhanced and repulsive. This procedure yields a strong metastable trap, with the fraction of excited-state population scaling inversely with the quality factor of the resonance of the dielectric structure. We analyse realistic limitations to the trap lifetime and discuss possible applications that might emerge from the large trap depths and nanoscale confinement. PMID:25008119

  1. Characterization of mitochondria isolated from normal and ischemic hearts in rats utilizing atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Chae, Su-Jin; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, So-Ra; Ha, Sang-Jin; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Kim, Weon; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-04-01

    Mitochondria play critical roles in both the life and the death of cardiac myocytes. Various factors, such as the loss of ATP synthesis and increase of ATP hydrolysis, impairment in ionic homeostasis, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and release of proapoptotic proteins are related to the generation of irreversible damage. It has been proposed that the release of cytochrome c is caused by a swelling of the mitochondrial matrix triggered by the apoptotic stimuli. However, there is a controversy about whether or not the mitochondria, indeed, swell during apoptosis. The major advantages of atomic force microscopy (AFM) over conventional optical and electron microscopes for bio-imaging include the fact that no special coating and vacuum are required and imaging can be done in all environments--air, vacuum or aqueous conditions. In addition, AFM force-distance curve measurements have become a fundamental tool in the fields of surface chemistry, biochemistry, and material science. In this study, we used AFM to observe the morphological and property changes in heart mitochondria that were isolated from a rat myocardial infarction model. From the shape parameters of the mitochondria in the AFM topographic image, it seemed that myocardial infarction caused the mitochondrial swelling. Also, the results of force-distance measurements showed that the adhesion force of heart mitochondria was significantly decreased by myocardial in infarction. Therefore, we suggested that myocardial infarction might be the cause of mitochondrial swelling and the changes in outer membrane of heart mitochondria. PMID:21050769

  2. Fabrication of a new substrate for atomic force microscopic observation of DNA molecules from an ultrasmooth sapphire plate.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K; Yoshimoto, M; Sasaki, K; Ohnishi, T; Ushiki, T; Hitomi, J; Yamamoto, S; Sigeno, M

    1998-01-01

    A new stable substrate applicable to the observation of DNA molecules by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was fabricated from a ultrasmooth sapphire (alpha-Al2O3 single crystal) plate. The atomically ultrasmooth sapphire as obtained by high-temperature annealing has hydrophobic surfaces and could not be used for the AFM observation of DNA. However, sapphire treated with Na3PO4 aqueous solution exhibited a hydrophilic character while maintaining a smooth surface structure. The surface of the wet-treated sapphire was found by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and AFM to be approximately 0.3 nm. The hydrophilic surface character of the ultrasmooth sapphire plate made it easy for DNA molecules to adhere to the plate. Circular molecules of the plasmid DNA could be imaged by AFM on the hydrophilic ultrasmooth sapphire plate. PMID:9545030

  3. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniël; Calogero, Gaetano; Koster, Rik S.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; van Huis, Marijn A.; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-06-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Δ f (z ) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111). The results are corroborated by density functional theory calculations employing a van der Waals functional.

  4. Interaction forces between silica surfaces in cationic surfactant solutions: an atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Lüderitz, Liset A C; v Klitzing, Regine

    2013-07-15

    The interaction forces between silicon oxide surfaces in the presence of surfactant solutions were studied. Based on the qualitative and quantitative analysis of these interaction forces the correlation with the structure of the aggregates on the surfaces is analyzed. A colloidal probe atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to measure the forces between two colloidal silica particles and between a colloidal particle and a silicon wafer in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at concentrations between 0.005 mM and 1.2 mM. Different interaction forces were obtained for the silica particle-silica particle system when compared to those for the silica particle-silicon wafer system for the same studied concentration. This indicates that the silica particles and the silicon wafer have different aggregate morphologies on their surfaces. The point of zero charge (pzc) was obtained at 0.05 mM CTAB concentration for the silica particles and at 0.3mM for the silica particle-silicon wafer system. This indicates a higher charge at the silicon wafer than at the silica particles. The observed long range attractions are explained by nanobubbles present at the silicon oxide surfaces and/or by attractive electrostatic interactions between the surfaces, induced by oppositely charged patches at the opposing Si oxide surfaces. PMID:23647691

  5. Development of carbon electrodes for electrochemistry, solid-state electronics and multimodal atomic force microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Kirstin Claire

    Carbon is one of the most remarkable elements due to its wide abundance on Earth and its many allotropes, which include diamond and graphite. Many carbon allotropes are conductive and in recent decades scientists have discovered and synthesized many new forms of carbon, including graphene and carbon nanotubes. The work in this thesis specifically focuses on the fabrication and characterization of pyrolyzed parylene C (PPC), a conductive pyrocarbon, as an electrode material for diodes, as a conductive coating for atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes and as an ultramicroelectrode (UME) for the electrochemical interrogation of cellular systems in vitro. Herein, planar and three-dimensional (3D) PPC electrodes were microscopically, spectroscopically and electrochemically characterized. First, planar PPC films and PPC-coated nanopipettes were utilized to detect a model redox species, Ru(NH3) 6Cl3. Then, free-standing PPC thin films were chemically doped, with hydrazine and concentrated nitric acid, to yield p- and n-type carbon films. Doped PPC thin films were positioned in conjunction with doped silicon to create Schottky and p-n junction diodes for use in an alternating current half-wave rectifier circuit. Pyrolyzed parylene C has found particular merit as a 3D electrode coating of AFM probes. Current sensing-atomic force microscopy imaging in air of nanoscale metallic features was undertaken to demonstrate the electronic imaging applicability of PPC AFM probes. Upon further insulation with parylene C and modification with a focused ion beam, a PPC UME was microfabricated near the AFM probe apex and utilized for electrochemical imaging. Subsequently, scanning electrochemical microscopy-atomic force microscopy imaging was undertaken to electrochemically quantify and image the spatial location of dopamine exocytotic release, elicited mechanically via the AFM probe itself, from differentiated pheochromocytoma 12 cells in vitro.

  6. Number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate: a transform theory for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Amano, Ken-Ichi; Liang, Yunfeng; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Kota; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Onishi, Hiroshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-06-21

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquids can measure a force curve between a probe and a buried substrate. The shape of the measured force curve is related to hydration structure on the substrate. However, until now, there has been no practical theory that can transform the force curve into the hydration structure, because treatment of the liquid confined between the probe and the substrate is a difficult problem. Here, we propose a robust and practical transform theory, which can generate the number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate from the force curve. As an example, we analyzed a force curve measured by using our high-resolution AFM with a newly fabricated ultrashort cantilever. It is demonstrated that the hydration structure on muscovite mica (001) surface can be reproduced from the force curve by using the transform theory. The transform theory will enhance AFM's ability and support structural analyses of solid/liquid interfaces. By using the transform theory, the effective diameter of a real probe apex is also obtained. This result will be important for designing a model probe of molecular scale simulations. PMID:27080590

  7. Direct observation of defect structure in protein crystals by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Devaud, G; Furcinitti, P S; Fleming, J C; Lyon, M K; Douglas, K

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the structure of S-layers isolated from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From the AFM images, we were able to directly observe individual dimers of the crystal, defects in the crystal structure, and twin boundaries. We have identified two types of boundaries, one defined by a mirror plane and the other by a glide plane. This work shows that twin boundaries are highly structured regions that are directly related to the organization of units within each crystal domain. Projection maps from TEM images have shown that there are significant differences in the final average maps has allowed us to relate high magnification views obtained by AFM to the relatively high resolution information obtained by electron microscopy and image processing. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:1420904

  8. Self-sensing atomic force microscopy cantilevers based on tunnel magnetoresistance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Meier, Tobias; Rott, Karsten; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Hölscher, Hendrik; Meyners, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    Here, we introduce self-sensing cantilevers for atomic force microscopy (AFM) based on tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors. These TMR sensors are integrated into the AFM cantilevers and consist of a magnetically stable layer and a sensing magnetostrictive CoFeB layer separated by a MgO tunneling barrier and can be as small as 10 μm × 10 μm. Their TMR values and resistance-area products are about 121% and 61 kΩμm2, respectively. A comparison of AFM data simultaneously obtained with a self-sensing cantilever with a 37 μm × 37 μm large TMR sensor and the conventional optical beam deflection method revealed the same data quality.

  9. Soluble state high resolution atomic force microscopy study of Alzheimer’s β-amyloid oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Gajendra S.; Lambert, Mary P.; Sharma, Saurabh; Velasco, Pauline T.; Viola, Kirsten L.; Klein, William L.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2009-01-01

    We report here the direct observation of high resolution structures of assemblies of Alzheimer β-amyloid oligomers and monomers using liquid atomic force microscopy (AFM). Visualization of nanoscale features of Aβ oligomers (also known as ADDLs) was carried out in tapping mode AFM in F12 solution. Our results indicate that ADDL preparations exist in solution primarily as a mixture of monomeric peptides and higher molecular mass oligomers. Our study clearly reveals that the size and shape of these oligomer aggregates exhibit a pronounced dependence on concentration. These studies show that wet AFM enables direct assessment of oligomers in physiological fluids and suggests that this method may be developed to visualize Aβ oligomers from human fluids. PMID:19997583

  10. Soluble state high resolution atomic force microscopy study of Alzheimer's β-amyloid oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhawat, Gajendra S.; Lambert, Mary P.; Sharma, Saurabh; Velasco, Pauline T.; Viola, Kirsten L.; Klein, William L.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2009-11-01

    We report here the direct observation of high resolution structures of assemblies of Alzheimer β-amyloid oligomers and monomers using liquid atomic force microscopy (AFM). Visualization of nanoscale features of Aβ oligomers (also known as ADDLs) was carried out in tapping mode AFM in F12 solution. Our results indicate that ADDL preparations exist in solution primarily as a mixture of monomeric peptides and higher molecular mass oligomers. Our study clearly reveals that the size and shape of these oligomer aggregates exhibit a pronounced dependence on concentration. These studies show that wet AFM enables direct assessment of oligomers in physiological fluids and suggests that this method may be developed to visualize Aβ oligomers from human fluids.

  11. Potential applications of atomic force microscopy of DNA to the human genome project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, Helen G.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1993-06-01

    A simple calculation shows that the information contained in the base sequence of the human genome could be recorded onto less than two compact discs. To read amounts of information comparable in size to the human genome, scanning probes are used routinely in both biology (i.e., living systems) and technology. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a scanning probe that is now capable of imaging DNA routinely and reproducibly. The minimum size of structures seen reproducibly along DNA strands with the AFM is presently 2 to 3 nm, which is an order of magnitude less resolution than would be required to sequence DNA. At present, the AFM shows great potential for high-resolution mapping of DNA but is not capable of sequencing DNA without further improvements.

  12. Analysis of the coagulation of human blood cells on diamond surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranauskas, V.; Fontana, M.; Guo, Zhao Jing; Ceragioli, H. J.; Peterlevitz, A. C.

    2004-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology and coagulation of human blood cells in contact with solid surfaces. Blood was extracted from the veins of healthy adult donors and the samples were used immediately after extraction, deposited either on borosilicate glass or diamond substrates. Some blood samples were anti-coagulated by adding heparin for single cell AFM imaging. No chemicals were used for attaching or immobilizing the cells. The diamond substrates were produced by chemical vapour deposition (CVD diamond) using a hot-filament CVD system fed with ethanol highly diluted in hydrogen. AFM imaging of isolated cells (anti-coagulated by heparin) was only possible on the glass substrates due to the lack of adherence of the cells to the diamond surface. The coagulation results suggest that blood clotting on diamond produces a less rough surface than blood clotting on glass.

  13. Atomic force microscopy-coupled microcoils for cellular-scale nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mousoulis, Charilaos; Maleki, Teimour; Ziaie, Babak; Neu, Corey P.

    2013-01-01

    We present the coupling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies to enable topographical, mechanical, and chemical profiling of biological samples. Here, we fabricate and perform proof-of-concept testing of radiofrequency planar microcoils on commercial AFM cantilevers. The sensitive region of the coil was estimated to cover an approximate volume of 19.4 × 103 μm3 (19.4 pl). Functionality of the spectroscopic module of the prototype device is illustrated through the detection of 1Η resonance in deionized water. The acquired spectra depict combined NMR capability with AFM that may ultimately enable biophysical and biochemical studies at the single cell level. PMID:24719493

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Arrangement and Mechanical Properties of Astrocytic Cytoskeleton in Growth Medium

    PubMed Central

    Efremov, Yu.M.; Dzyubenko, E.V.; Bagrov, D.V.; Maksimov, G.V.; Shram, S.I.; Shaitan, K.V.

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes are quite interesting to study because of their role in the development of various neurodegenerative disorders. The present work describes an examination of the arrangement and mechanical properties of cytoskeleton of living astrocytes using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experiments were performed with an organotypic culture of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) obtained from a chicken embryo. The cells were cultivated on a gelatinous substrate and showed strong adhesion. AFM allows one to observe cytoskeleton fibers, which are interpreted as actin filaments and microtubules. This assumption is supported by confocal microscopy fluorescence imaging of α-tubulin and fibrillar actin. Mapping of the local Young’s modulus of a living astrocyte showed that the stiff areas correspond to the sites where the cytoskeleton fibers are located. Thus, the data obtained indicate that AFM is a promising method to study neural cells cytoskeleton integrity and arrangement inin vitromodels of neurodegeneration. PMID:22649699

  15. Analysis of Nanodomain Composition in High-Impact Polypropylene by Atomic Force Microscopy-Infrared.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fuguang; Bao, Peite; Su, Zhaohui

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, compositions of nanodomains in a commercial high-impact polypropylene (HIPP) were investigated by an atomic force microscopy-infrared (AFM-IR) technique. An AFM-IR quantitative analysis method was established for the first time, which was then employed to analyze the polyethylene content in the nanoscopic domains of the rubber particles dispersed in the polypropylene matrix. It was found that the polyethylene content in the matrix was close to zero and was high in the rubbery intermediate layers, both as expected. However, the major component of the rigid cores of the rubber particles was found to be polypropylene rather than polyethylene, contrary to what was previously believed. The finding provides new insight into the complicated structure of HIPPs, and the AFM-IR quantitative method reported here offers a useful tool for assessing compositions of nanoscopic domains in complex polymeric systems. PMID:27075757

  16. Nanolithography of Amyloid Precursor Protein Cleavage with β-Secretase by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung-Woong; Shin, Hoon-Kyu; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-03-01

    Cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases is critical in neural cell processes including the pathway for neural cell proliferation and that underlying the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Understanding the mechanism of APP cleavage and development of a convenient tool for the accurate evaluation of APP cleavage intensity by secretases are very important in the development of new AD therapeutic targets. In this study, we developed a sophisticated technology to evaluate the APP cleavage mechanism at the nano-molecular level by atomic force microscopic (AFM) nanolithography. APP was modified on a glass substrate; nanolithography of APP cleavage by β-secretase-modified AFM probe scanning was achieved. APP cleavage was verified by the AFM imaging and the fluorescent immunostaining. The present method will be very useful in understanding the molecular level of the APP cleavage mechanism by β-secretase in vitro; this method will facilitate inhibitor screening for the therapeutic target of AD. PMID:27280252

  17. Surface nanobubbles studied by atomic force microscopy techniques: Facts, fiction, and open questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönherr, Holger; Hain, Nicole; Walczyk, Wiktoria; Wesner, Daniel; Druzhinin, Sergey I.

    2016-08-01

    In this review surface nanobubbles, which are presumably gas-filled enclosures found at the solid–liquid interface, are introduced and discussed together with key experimental findings that suggest that these nanoscale features indeed exist and are filled with gas. The most prominent technique used thus far has been atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, due to its potentially invasive nature, AFM data must be interpreted with great care. Owing to their curved interface, the Laplace internal pressure of surface nanobubbles exceeds substantially the outside ambient pressure, and the experimentally observed long term stability is in conflict with estimates of gas transport rates and predicted surface nanobubble lifetimes. Despite recent explanations of both the stability and the unusual nanoscopic contact angles, the development of new co-localization approaches and the adequate analysis of AFM data of surface nanobubbles are important as a means to confirm the gaseous nature and correctly estimate the interfacial curvature.

  18. Fast atomic force microscopy with self-transduced, self-sensing cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Angelov, Tihomir; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2015-07-01

    The conventional optical lever detection technique involves optical components and their precise mechanical alignment. An additional technical limit is the weight of the optical system in cases where a top-scanner is used with high-speed and high-precision metrology. An alternative represents the application of self-actuated atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers with integrated two-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) piezoresistive deflection sensors. A significant improvement in the performance of such cantilevers with respect to deflection sensitivity and temperature stability has been achieved by using an integrated Wheatstone bridge configuration. Due to employing effective crosstalk isolation and temperature drift compensation, the performance of these cantilevers was significantly improved. In order to enhance the speed of AFM measurements, we present an adaptive scanning speed procedure. Examples of AFM measurements with a high scanning speed (up to 200 lines/s) committed to advanced lithography process development are shown.

  19. Imaging of DNA and Protein–DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of DNA structure and dynamics and protein–DNA complexes, including recent advances in the visualization of protein–DNA complexes with the use of cutting-edge, high-speed AFM. Special emphasis is given to direct nanoscale visualization of dynamics of protein–DNA complexes. In the area of DNA structure and dynamics, structural studies of local non-B conformations of DNA and the interplay of local and global DNA conformations are reviewed. The application of time-lapse AFM nanoscale imaging of DNA dynamics is illustrated by studies of Holliday junction branch migration. Structure and dynamics of protein–DNA interactions include problems related to site-specific DNA recombination, DNA replication, and DNA mismatch repair. Studies involving the structure and dynamics of chromatin are also described. PMID:27278886

  20. Simulation-based Extraction of Key Material Parameters from Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsafi, Huseen; Peninngton, Gray

    Models for the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and sample interaction contain numerous material parameters that are often poorly known. This is especially true when dealing with novel material systems or when imaging samples that are exposed to complicated interactions with the local environment. In this work we use Monte Carlo methods to extract sample material parameters from the experimental AFM analysis of a test sample. The parameterized theoretical model that we use is based on the Virtual Environment for Dynamic AFM (VEDA) [1]. The extracted material parameters are then compared with the accepted values for our test sample. Using this procedure, we suggest a method that can be used to successfully determine unknown material properties in novel and complicated material systems. We acknowledge Fisher Endowment Grant support from the Jess and Mildred Fisher College of Science and Mathematics,Towson University.

  1. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO/MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez-Torres, A.; Torres, R.; Lam, P.

    2011-07-15

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  2. ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, R.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Lam, P.

    2011-06-09

    The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

  3. Separating DNA with different topologies by atomic force microscopy in comparison with gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong; Rabbi, Mahir; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2010-09-23

    Atomic force microscopy, which is normally used for DNA imaging to gain qualitative results, can also be used for quantitative DNA research, at a single-molecular level. Here, we evaluate the performance of AFM imaging specifically for quantifying supercoiled and relaxed plasmid DNA fractions within a mixture, and compare the results with the bulk material analysis method, gel electrophoresis. The advantages and shortcomings of both methods are discussed in detail. Gel electrophoresis is a quick and well-established quantification method. However, it requires a large amount of DNA, and needs to be carefully calibrated for even slightly different experimental conditions for accurate quantification. AFM imaging is accurate, in that single DNA molecules in different conformations can be seen and counted. When used carefully with necessary correction, both methods provide consistent results. Thus, AFM imaging can be used for DNA quantification, as an alternative to gel electrophoresis. PMID:20799746

  4. High-throughput automatic defect review for 300mm blank wafers with atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2015-03-01

    While feature size in lithography process continuously becomes smaller, defect sizes on blank wafers become more comparable to device sizes. Defects with nm-scale characteristic size could be misclassified by automated optical inspection (AOI) and require post-processing for proper classification. Atomic force microscope (AFM) is known to provide high lateral and the highest vertical resolution by mechanical probing among all techniques. However, its low throughput and tip life in addition to the laborious efforts for finding the defects have been the major limitations of this technique. In this paper we introduce automatic defect review (ADR) AFM as a post-inspection metrology tool for defect study and classification for 300 mm blank wafers and to overcome the limitations stated above. The ADR AFM provides high throughput, high resolution, and non-destructive means for obtaining 3D information for nm-scale defect review and classification.

  5. Topography and friction properties of macromolecular thin films using atomic-force-microscopy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. W.; Gan, D. J.; Kreiling, S.; Song, C. S.; Lu, S. Q.; Wang, Z. J.

    The research work in this letter is on the microtribological properties of poly(ether ketone ketone) (PEKK) and sulfonated PEKK (S-PEKK) thin films. Polystyrene (PS) was used as a reference for the investigation. Atomic-force-microscopy (AFM) techniques were used for observing the topography and friction properties of the macromolecular thin films at the nanometer scale. The polymeric thin films were fabricated by spin coating at a speed of 4000 rotations per minute (rpm).

  6. Nanoplough-constrictions on thin YBCO films made with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Elkaseh, A A O; Büttner, U; Meincken, M; Hardie, G L; Srinivasu, V V; Perold, W J

    2007-09-01

    Utilizing atomic force microscope (AFM) with a diamond tip, we were able to successfully plough nano-constrictions on epitaxially grown YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films deposited on MgO substrates. The thickness, width, and length of the obtained constrictions were in the range of a few 100 nm. Furthermore, we managed to produce a new S-type constriction, of which the dimensions are easier to control than for conventional constrictions. PMID:18019174

  7. Concept for room temperature single-spin tunneling force microscopy with atomic spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Adam

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy (AFM) system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated defect states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  8. Activity investigation of pinostrobin towards herpes simplex virus-1 as determined by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nan; Kong, Yu; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie; Liu, Zhiguo; Meng, Ronghua; Liu, Xia; Efferth, Thomas

    2011-01-15

    In the present study, the antiviral activity of pinostrobin towards herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) was investigated by MTT assay and atomic force microscopy. Pinostrobin can inhibit HSV-1 replication with 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) of 22.71 ± 1.72 μg/ml. MTT assay showed HSV-1 was significantly inhibited when pretreated with pinostrobin, with the inhibition of 85.69 ± 2.59%. Significant changes in morphology and size of HSV-1 were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in response to pinostrobin treatment. AFM topography and phase images showed that with increasing time, the envelope was shedded and damaged, finally leading to virus inactivation. With increasing concentration, pinostrobin caused a gradual leakage, also contributing to breakage of the envelope and virus inactivation. Treatment effect of oral pinostrobin in vivo showed that pinostrobin (50mg/kg/dose) possesses definite therapeutical effect in the development of lesion score. In general, the results showed that AFM represents a powerful technique for the investigation of morphology and size of HSV-1 treated by antiviral agents. AFM is applicable to study chemically induced morphological changes at the nanometer level. PMID:20739162

  9. A Novel Graphene Oxide-Based Protein Interaction Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung-Woong; Morita, Kyohei; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising material for biological applications because of its excellent physical/chemical properties such as aqueous processability, amphiphilicity, and surface functionalizability. Here we introduce a new biological application of GO, a novel GO-based technique for probing protein interactions using atomic force microscopy (AFM). GO sheets were intercalated between the protein-modified AFM probe and the polymer substrate in order to reduce the non-specific adhesion force observed during single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). In this study, we used SMFS to probe the interaction of the actin filament and actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3), an actin-binding protein. Our results confirm that the GO sheet reduces nonspecific adhesion of the probe to the substrate. Using the GO-based technique, we succeeded in estimating the dissociation constant of the actin filament-binding protein interaction. PMID:26353630

  10. Finite element modeling of atomic force microscopy cantilever dynamics during video rate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Howard-Knight, J. P.; Hobbs, J. K.

    2011-04-01

    A dynamic finite element model has been constructed to simulate the behavior of low spring constant atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers used for imaging at high speed without active feedback as in VideoAFM. The model is tested against experimental data collected at 20 frame/s and good agreement is found. The complex dynamics of the cantilever, consisting of traveling waves coming from the tip sample interaction, reflecting off the cantilever-substrate junction, and interfering with new waves created at the tip, are revealed. The construction of the image from this resulting nonequilibrium cantilever deflection is also examined. Transient tip-sample forces are found to reach values up to 260 nN on a calibration grid sample, and the maximum forces do not always correspond to the position of steepest features as a result of energy stored in the cantilever.

  11. Noncontact microrheology at acoustic frequencies using frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S

    2010-08-01

    We report an atomic force microscopy (AFM) method for assessing elastic and viscous properties of soft samples at acoustic frequencies under non-contact conditions. The method can be used to measure material properties via frequency modulation and is based on hydrodynamics theory of thin gaps we developed here. A cantilever with an attached microsphere is forced to oscillate tens of nanometers above a sample. The elastic modulus and viscosity of the sample are estimated by measuring the frequency-dependence of the phase lag between the oscillating microsphere and the driving piezo at various heights above the sample. This method features an effective area of pyramidal tips used in contact AFM but with only piconewton applied forces. Using this method, we analyzed polyacrylamide gels of different stiffness and assessed graded mechanical properties of guinea pig tectorial membrane. The technique enables the study of microrheology of biological tissues that produce or detect sound. PMID:20562866

  12. Nanometer-scale free surface flow of molten polyethylene from a heated atomic force microscope tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewoldt, Randy; Felts, Jonathan; Somnath, Suhas; King, William

    2012-11-01

    We experimentally investigate nanometer-scale free surface flow of molten polyethylene from a heated atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever, a nanofabrication process known as thermal dip-pen nanolithography (tDPN). Fluid is deposited from the AFM tip onto non-porous substrates whether the tip is moving or fixed. We find that polymer flow depends on surface capillary forces and not on shear between tip and substrate. The polymer mass flow rate is sensitive to the temperature-dependent polymer viscosity. Additionally, the flow rate increases when a temperature gradient exists between the tip and substrate. We hypothesize that the polymer flow is governed by thermal Marangoni forces and non-equilibrium wetting dynamics caused by a solidification front within the feature.

  13. Selective nano-patterning of graphene using a heated atomic force microscope tip

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young-Soo; Wu, Xuan; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we introduce a selective thermochemical nano-patterning method of graphene on insulating substrates. A tiny heater formed at the end of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is optimized by a finite element method. The cantilever device is fabricated using conventional micromachining processes. After preliminary tests of the cantilever device, nano-patterning experiments are conducted with various conducting and insulating samples. The results indicate that faster scanning speed and higher contact force are desirable to reduce the sizes of nano-patterns. With the experimental condition of 1 μm/s and 24 mW, the heated AFM tip generates a graphene oxide layer of 3.6 nm height and 363 nm width, on a 300 nm thick SiO{sub 2} layer, with a tip contact force of 100 nN.

  14. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lange, Manfred; van Vörden, Dennis; Möller, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip-sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111) √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force-distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle. PMID:22496993

  15. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-01

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm. PMID:24651941

  16. Detection of hepatitis C virus core protein in serum by atomic force microscopy combined with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yuri D; Kaysheva, Anna L; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Pleshakova, Tatyana O; Krohin, Nikolay V; Izotov, Alexander A; Shumov, Ivan D; Uchaikin, Vasiliy F; Konev, Vladimir A; Ziborov, Vadim S; Archakov, Alexander I

    2015-01-01

    A method for detection and identification of core antigen of hepatitis C virus (HCVcoreAg)-containing particles in the serum was proposed, with due account taken of the interactions of proteotypic peptides with Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) ions. The method is based on a combination of reversible biospecific atomic force microscopy (AFM)-fishing and mass spectrometry (MS). AFM-fishing enables concentration, detection, and counting of protein complexes captured on the AFM chip surface, with their subsequent MS identification. Biospecific AFM-fishing of HCVcoreAg-containing particles from serum samples was carried out using AFM chips with immobilized antibodies against HCVcoreAg (HCVcoreAgim). Formation of complexes between anti-HCVcoreAgim and HCVcoreAg-containing particles on the AFM chip surface during the fishing process was demonstrated. These complexes were registered and counted by AFM. Further MS analysis allowed reliable identification of HCVcoreAg within the complexes formed on the AFM chip surface. It was shown that MS data processing, with account taken of the interactions between HCVcoreAg peptides and Na(+), K(+) cations, and Cl(-) anions, allows an increase in the number of peptides identified. PMID:25759582

  17. Atomic force microscopy applied to the quantification of nano-precipitates in thermo-mechanically treated microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Renteria-Borja, Luciano; Hurtado-Delgado, Eduardo; Garnica-Gonzalez, Pedro; Dominguez-Lopez, Ivan; Garcia-Garcia, Adrian Luis

    2012-07-15

    Quantification of nanometer-size precipitates in microalloyed steels has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in spite of its complicated sample preparation procedures, prone to preparation errors and sample perturbation. In contrast to TEM procedures, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is performed on the as-prepared specimen, with sample preparation requirements similar to those for optical microscopy (OM), rendering three-dimensional representations of the sample surface with vertical resolution of a fraction of a nanometer. In AFM, contrast mechanisms are directly related to surface properties such as topography, adhesion, and stiffness, among others. Chemical etching was performed using 0.5% nital, at time intervals between 4 and 20 s, in 4 s steps, until reaching the desired surface finish. For the present application, an average surface-roughness peak-height below 200 nm was sought. Quantification results of nanometric precipitates were obtained from the statistical analysis of AFM images of the microstructure developed by microalloyed Nb and V-Mo steels. Topography and phase contrast AFM images were used for quantification. The results obtained using AFM are consistent with similar TEM reports. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We quantified nanometric precipitates in Nb and V-Mo microalloyed steels using AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures of the thermo-mechanically treated microalloyed steels were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topography and phase contrast AFM images were used for quantification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AFM results are comparable with traditionally obtained TEM measurements.

  18. Geometric Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes by Atomic Force Microscopy in Conjunction with a Tip Characterizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunmei; Itoh, Hiroshi; Homma, Yoshikazu; Sun, Jielin; Hu, Jun; Ichimura, Shingo

    2008-07-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip characterizer with 14 line and space structures and two knife edges was fabricated by means of a superlattice technique. The shape of a probe tip both before and after AFM imaging was acquired by this tip characterizer with general variations <1.5 nm; depending on imaging conditions. The geometric structures of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a SiO2 substrate were studied by dynamic mode AFM in conjunction with this tip characterizer. Contact points between the tip and the CNTs were detected by observing changes in the AFM phase images. A modified CNT width correction model was established to calculate the estimated and upper-limit widths of two CNTs. The experimental results showed that imaging under a weak attractive force was suitable for obtaining accurate CNT height measurements, whereas a weak repulsive force provided the most accurate widths. Differing heights and widths between the two CNTs suggested that one CNT was double-walled, whereas the other had more than two walls; these results agree with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements of the CNTs.

  19. Application of atomic force microscopy for studying intracellular signalization in neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankudinov, A. V.; Khalisov, M. M.; Penniyainen, V. A.; Podzorova, S. A.; Krylov, B. V.

    2015-10-01

    The first attempt is made at applying the method of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for determining the molecular mechanisms of intracellular signalization with the participation of Na+, K+-ATPhase playing an important role of a signal transductor (amplifier). The AFM method combined with the organotypic cultivation makes it possible to obtain quantitative information on the Young moduli of living neurons and cells subjected to the action of very low concentrations of ouabain. This substance is known to trigger in this case the intracellular signalization processes by transferring a molecular signal to the genome of a cell. The cell response is manifested in a sharp intensification of protein synthesis accompanied by a rearrangement of the cytoskeleton and activation of enzyme signal pathways in a cytosol. AFM measurements of the images of the cell surface relief are performed using the PeakForce quantitative nanomechanical properties mapping PeakForce QNM mode. The Young moduli of control neurons and of sensory neurons under the action of ouabain are measured simultaneously. It is found that the activation of the signal-transducing function of Na+, K+-ATPhase triggers intracellular signal cascades, which increase the cell stiffness. The application of the AFM method in further studies of the mechanisms of intracellular molecular processes appears as promising. Its combination with inhibitory analysis will clarify the role of individual molecules (e.g., a number of ferments) in regulation of growth and development of living organisms.

  20. Atomic Scale Simulations of Silicon Nanotubes under Axial Compression: AFM Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Ki Ryang; Kang, Jeong Won; Song, Ki Oh; Hwang, Ho Jung

    2003-12-01

    This study showed the response of hypothetical silicon nanotubes under axial compression using an atomistic simulation based on the Tersoff potential. A pressure, proportional to the deformation within Hooke's law, eventually led to a collapse of silicon nanotube and an abrupt change in structure. Using the sum of the cross sections of atoms on the cross section of silicon nanotube and the pressure on silicon nanotube, we determined Young's modulus of silicon nanotubes that was constant irrespective of the diameter of silicon nanotubes. As the diameter of silicon nanotubes increased, the collapse pressure, that is to say the critical stress linearly decreased. However, net forces on silicon nanotubes at their collapses were almost constant irrespective of the diameter of silicon nanotubes. We calculated the variations of the volume of unit cell as a function of pressure that were not dealt within previous works that considered carbon nanotubes under compression. With properly chosen parameters of silicon nanotubes (Young's modulus, effective spring constant, diameter, lattice constant and cylindrical volume modulus), the critical strain, the collapse pressure, the elastic energy and the critical volume at which the buckling events of silicon nanotubes occur can be estimated by equations induced by this work.

  1. Energy dissipation in multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pukhova, Valentina; Banfi, Francesco; Ferrini, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The instantaneous displacement, velocity and acceleration of a cantilever tip impacting onto a graphite surface are reconstructed. The total dissipated energy and the dissipated energy per cycle of each excited flexural mode during the tip interaction is retrieved. The tip dynamics evolution is studied by wavelet analysis techniques that have general relevance for multi-mode atomic force microscopy, in a regime where few cantilever oscillation cycles characterize the tip-sample interaction. PMID:24778976

  2. Atomic Structures of Silicene Layers Grown on Ag(111): Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy Observations

    PubMed Central

    Resta, Andrea; Leoni, Thomas; Barth, Clemens; Ranguis, Alain; Becker, Conrad; Bruhn, Thomas; Vogt, Patrick; Le Lay, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Silicene, the considered equivalent of graphene for silicon, has been recently synthesized on Ag(111) surfaces. Following the tremendous success of graphene, silicene might further widen the horizon of two-dimensional materials with new allotropes artificially created. Due to stronger spin-orbit coupling, lower group symmetry and different chemistry compared to graphene, silicene presents many new interesting features. Here, we focus on very important aspects of silicene layers on Ag(111): First, we present scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM) observations of the major structures of single layer and bi-layer silicene in epitaxy with Ag(111). For the (3 × 3) reconstructed first silicene layer nc-AFM represents the same lateral arrangement of silicene atoms as STM and therefore provides a timely experimental confirmation of the current picture of the atomic silicene structure. Furthermore, both nc-AFM and STM give a unifying interpretation of the second layer (√3 × √3)R ± 30° structure. Finally, we give support to the conjectured possible existence of less stable, ~2% stressed, (√7 × √7)R ± 19.1° rotated silicene domains in the first layer. PMID:23928998

  3. Applications of atomic force microscopy to the studies of biomaterials in biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiang

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a unique tool for the studies of nanoscale structures and interactions. In this dissertation, I applied AFM to study transitions among multiple states of biomaterials in three different microscopic biomolecular systems: MukB-dependent DNA condensation, holdfast adhesion, and virus elasticity. To elucidate the mechanism of MukB-dependent DNA condensation, I have studied the conformational changes of MukB proteins as indicators for the strength of interactions between MukB, DNA and other molecular factors, such as magnesium and ParC proteins, using high-resolution AFM imaging. To determine the physical origins of holdfast adhesion, I have investigated the dynamics of adhesive force development of the holdfast, employing AFM force spectroscopy. By measuring rupture forces between the holdfast and the substrate, I showed that the holdfast adhesion is strongly time-dependent and involves transformations at multiple time scales. Understanding the mechanisms of adhesion force development of the holdfast will be critical for future engineering of holdfasts properties for various applications. Finally, I have examined the elasticity of self-assembled hepatitis B virus-like particles (HBV VLPs) and brome mosaic virus (BMV) in response to changes of pH and salinity, using AFM nanoindentation. The distributions of elasticity were mapped on a single particle level and compared between empty, RNA- and gold-filled HBV VLPs. I found that a single HBV VLP showed heterogeneous distribution of elasticity and a two-step buckling transition, suggesting a discrete property of HBV capsids. For BMV, I have showed that viruses containing different RNA molecules can be distinguished by mechanical measurements, while they are indistinguishable by morphology. I also studied the effect of pH on the elastic behaviors of three-particle BMV and R3/4 BMV. This study can yield insights into RNA presentation/release mechanisms, and could help us to design novel drug

  4. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation.

    PubMed

    Coceano, G; Yousafzai, M S; Ma, W; Ndoye, F; Venturelli, L; Hussain, I; Bonin, S; Niemela, J; Scoles, G; Cojoc, D; Ferrari, E

    2016-02-12

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young's modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines' elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM. PMID:26683826

  5. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coceano, G.; Yousafzai, M. S.; Ma, W.; Ndoye, F.; Venturelli, L.; Hussain, I.; Bonin, S.; Niemela, J.; Scoles, G.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.

    2016-02-01

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young’s modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines’ elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM.

  6. Repulsive tip tilting as the dominant mechanism for hydrogen bond-like features in atomic force microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alex J.; Sakai, Yuki; Kim, Minjung; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies have reported distinct features in regions with little electron density for various organic systems. These unexpected features have been proposed to be a direct visualization of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Here, we apply a computational method using ab initio real-space pseudopotentials along with a scheme to account for tip tilting to simulate AFM images of the 8-hydroxyquinoline dimer and related systems to develop an understanding of the imaging mechanism for hydrogen bonds. We find that contrast for the observed "hydrogen bond" feature comes not from the electrostatic character of the bonds themselves but rather from repulsive tip tilting induced by neighboring electron-rich atoms.

  7. Modeling of adhesion in tablet compression - I. atomic force microscopy and molecular simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. J.; Li, T.; Bateman, S. D.; Erck, R.; Morris, K. R.; Energy Technology; Purdue Univ.; Novartis Pharmaceutical Corp.

    2003-04-01

    Adhesion problems during tablet manufacturing have been observed to be dependent on many formulation and process factors including the run time on the tablet press. Consequently, problems due to sticking may only become apparent towards the end of the development process when a prolonged run on the tablet press is attempted for the first time. It would be beneficial to predict in a relative sense if a formulation or new chemical entity has the potential for adhesion problems early in the development process. It was hypothesized that favorable intermolecular interaction between the drug molecules and the punch face is the first step or criterion in the adhesion process. Therefore, the rank order of adhesion during tablet compression should follow the rank order of these energies of interaction. The adhesion phenomenon was investigated using molecular simulations and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three model compounds were chosen from a family of profen compounds. Silicon nitride AFM tips were modified by coating a 20-nm iron layer on the surfaces by sputter coating. Profen flat surfaces were made by melting and recrystallization. The modified AFM probe and each profen surface were immersed in the corresponding profen saturated water during force measurements using AFM. The work of adhesion between iron and ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and flurbiprofen in vacuum were determined to be -184.1, -2469.3, -17.3 mJ {center_dot} m-2, respectively. The rank order of the work of adhesion between iron and profen compounds decreased in the order: ketoprofen > ibuprofen > flurbiprofen. The rank order of interaction between the drug molecules and the iron superlattice as predicted by molecular simulation using Cerius2 is in agreement with the AFM measurements. It has been demonstrated that Atomic Force Microscopy is a powerful tool in studying the adhesion phenomena between organic drug compounds and metal surface. The study has provided insight into the adhesion problems

  8. Pressure solution observed with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombani, J.; Pachon-Rodriguez, E. A.; Piednoir, A.

    2012-04-01

    Dissolution of minerals is involved in many geological and environmental processes, often with large human consequences. One can cite the durability of mineral materials, the management of nuclear wastes, the sequestration of atmospheric CO2 or the pollution of drinking water. Progresses have been made during the last decade in our understanding of the basic mechanisms of dissolution, particularly concerning the nature of the reactive surface, the role of etch pits, the influence of the mineral history, the mineral replacement processes, ... One of the remaining problems is the influence of an elastic stress on the nature and rate of dissolution. For instance a large discrepancy still exists between experimental results and modelling of pressure solution creep, a plastic strain mechanism of minerals based on the dissolution enhancement by an external stress. We present here an experimental evidence of the influence of a local stress on a molecular elementary mechanism of dissolution. This was performed by atomic force microscopy observation of the migration of a molecular step on the surface of a single crystal of gypsum during dissolution, where the AFM tip is used alternatively to apply a stress and probe the surface. The kinetics of this atomic mechanism is seen to obey the same law of pressure solution as the corresponding macroscopic phenomenon.

  9. Direct visualization of triplex DNA molecular dynamics by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and atomic force microscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Lin, Po-Yen; Chen, Yen-Fu; Chang, Chia-Seng; Kan, Lou-Sing

    2007-11-01

    We have detected the dynamics of 17-mer DNA triplex dissociation mechanism at the molecular level. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used as an indicator of intermolecular interaction in nanometer range, whereas atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to address single molecule with sub-angstrom precision. The maximum rupture force of DNA triplex was found at pH 4.65, consistent with macroscopic observations. These results indicated that the FRET together with an AFM detection system could be used to reveal the DNA triplex interaction in nanometer scale unambiguously.

  10. Probing three-dimensional surface force fields with atomic resolution: Measurement strategies, limitations, and artifact reduction

    PubMed Central

    Dagdeviren, Omur E; Schwendemann, Todd C; Mönig, Harry; Altman, Eric I

    2012-01-01

    Summary Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) is being increasingly used to measure the interaction force between an atomically sharp probe tip and surfaces of interest, as a function of the three spatial dimensions, with picometer and piconewton accuracy. Since the results of such measurements may be affected by piezo nonlinearities, thermal and electronic drift, tip asymmetries, and elastic deformation of the tip apex, these effects need to be considered during image interpretation. In this paper, we analyze their impact on the acquired data, compare different methods to record atomic-resolution surface force fields, and determine the approaches that suffer the least from the associated artifacts. The related discussion underscores the idea that since force fields recorded by using NC-AFM always reflect the properties of both the sample and the probe tip, efforts to reduce unwanted effects of the tip on recorded data are indispensable for the extraction of detailed information about the atomic-scale properties of the surface. PMID:23019560

  11. Continuous electrospinning of polymer nanofibers of Nylon-6 using an atomic force microscope tip.

    PubMed

    Gururajan, Giriprasath; Sullivan, S P; Beebe, T P; Chase, D B; Rabolt, J F

    2011-08-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe is successfully utilized as an electrospinning tip for fabricating Nylon-6 nanofibers. The nanometre-size tip enabled controlled deposition of uniform polymeric nanofibers within a 1 cm diameter area. Nylon-6 nanofibers were continuously electrospun at a solution concentration as low as 1 wt% Nylon-6 in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP). Wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results of the AFM electrospun fibers indicated that the nanofibers predominantly display the meta-stable γ crystalline form suggesting rapid crystallization rate during the process. In addition to precise control over fiber deposition and diameter, some of the drawbacks of conventional electrospinning such as large volume of solutions and clogging of needles can be overcome using this AFM based electrospinning technique. Lastly, a comparison of electrospun fibers from syringe-needle based electrospinning and AFM probe-tip based electrospinning indicated significant morphological and microstructural differences in the case of AFM based electrospinning. PMID:21713288

  12. Fast, multi-frequency, and quantitative nanomechanical mapping of live cells using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X; Wang, Wen-Horng; Geahlen, Robert L; Raman, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding goal in cellular mechanobiology has been to link dynamic biomolecular processes underpinning disease or morphogenesis to spatio-temporal changes in nanoscale mechanical properties such as viscoelasticity, surface tension, and adhesion. This requires the development of quantitative mechanical microscopy methods with high spatio-temporal resolution within a single cell. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can map the heterogeneous mechanical properties of cells with high spatial resolution, however, the image acquisition time is 1-2 orders of magnitude longer than that required to study dynamic cellular processes. We present a technique that allows commercial AFM systems to map quantitatively the dynamically changing viscoelastic properties of live eukaryotic cells at widely separated frequencies over large areas (several 10's of microns) with spatial resolution equal to amplitude-modulation (AM-AFM) and with image acquisition times (tens of seconds) approaching those of speckle fluorescence methods. This represents a ~20 fold improvement in nanomechanical imaging throughput compared to AM-AFM and is fully compatible with emerging high speed AFM systems. This method is used to study the spatio-temporal mechanical response of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells to the inhibition of Syk protein tyrosine kinase giving insight into the signaling pathways by which Syk negatively regulates motility of highly invasive cancer cells. PMID:26118423

  13. Fast, multi-frequency, and quantitative nanomechanical mapping of live cells using the atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.; Wang, Wen-Horng; Geahlen, Robert L.; Raman, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding goal in cellular mechanobiology has been to link dynamic biomolecular processes underpinning disease or morphogenesis to spatio-temporal changes in nanoscale mechanical properties such as viscoelasticity, surface tension, and adhesion. This requires the development of quantitative mechanical microscopy methods with high spatio-temporal resolution within a single cell. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can map the heterogeneous mechanical properties of cells with high spatial resolution, however, the image acquisition time is 1–2 orders of magnitude longer than that required to study dynamic cellular processes. We present a technique that allows commercial AFM systems to map quantitatively the dynamically changing viscoelastic properties of live eukaryotic cells at widely separated frequencies over large areas (several 10’s of microns) with spatial resolution equal to amplitude-modulation (AM-AFM) and with image acquisition times (tens of seconds) approaching those of speckle fluorescence methods. This represents a ~20 fold improvement in nanomechanical imaging throughput compared to AM-AFM and is fully compatible with emerging high speed AFM systems. This method is used to study the spatio-temporal mechanical response of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells to the inhibition of Syk protein tyrosine kinase giving insight into the signaling pathways by which Syk negatively regulates motility of highly invasive cancer cells. PMID:26118423

  14. Fast, multi-frequency, and quantitative nanomechanical mapping of live cells using the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.; Wang, Wen-Horng; Geahlen, Robert L.; Raman, Arvind

    2015-06-01

    A longstanding goal in cellular mechanobiology has been to link dynamic biomolecular processes underpinning disease or morphogenesis to spatio-temporal changes in nanoscale mechanical properties such as viscoelasticity, surface tension, and adhesion. This requires the development of quantitative mechanical microscopy methods with high spatio-temporal resolution within a single cell. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can map the heterogeneous mechanical properties of cells with high spatial resolution, however, the image acquisition time is 1-2 orders of magnitude longer than that required to study dynamic cellular processes. We present a technique that allows commercial AFM systems to map quantitatively the dynamically changing viscoelastic properties of live eukaryotic cells at widely separated frequencies over large areas (several 10’s of microns) with spatial resolution equal to amplitude-modulation (AM-AFM) and with image acquisition times (tens of seconds) approaching those of speckle fluorescence methods. This represents a ~20 fold improvement in nanomechanical imaging throughput compared to AM-AFM and is fully compatible with emerging high speed AFM systems. This method is used to study the spatio-temporal mechanical response of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells to the inhibition of Syk protein tyrosine kinase giving insight into the signaling pathways by which Syk negatively regulates motility of highly invasive cancer cells.

  15. Utilizing intentional internal resonance to achieve multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bongwon; Pettit, Chris; Dharmasena, Sajith; Keum, Hohyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Seok; McFarland, D Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A; Vakakis, Alexander F; Cho, Hanna

    2016-03-29

    During dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM), the deflection of a scanning cantilever generates multiple frequency terms due to the nonlinear nature of AFM tip-sample interactions. Even though each frequency term is reasonably expected to encode information about the sample, only the fundamental frequency term is typically decoded to provide topographic mapping of the measured surface. One of main reasons for discarding higher harmonic signals is their low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we introduce a new design concept for multi-harmonic AFM, exploiting intentional nonlinear internal resonance for the enhancement of higher harmonics. The nonlinear internal resonance, triggered by the non-smooth tip-sample dynamic interactions, results in nonlinear energy transfers from the directly excited fundamental bending mode to the higher-frequency mode and, hence, enhancement of the higher harmonic of the measured response. It is verified through detailed theoretical and experimental study that this AFM design can robustly incorporate the required internal resonance and enable high-frequency AFM measurements. Measurements on an inhomogeneous polymer specimen demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed design, namely that the higher harmonic of the measured response is capable of enhanced simultaneous topography imaging and compositional mapping, exhibiting less crosstalk with an abrupt height change. PMID:26883303

  16. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    van Vörden, Dennis; Möller, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Summary Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111) √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force–distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle. PMID:22496993

  17. Real-time atomic-resolution imaging of crystal growth process in water by phase modulation atomic force microscopy at one frame per second

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2013-11-11

    Recent advancement in dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled its operation in liquid with atomic-scale resolution. However, its imaging speed has often been too slow to visualize atomic-scale dynamic processes. Here, we propose a method for making a significant improvement in the operation speed of dynamic-mode AFM. In this method, we use a wideband and low-latency phase detector with an improved algorithm for the signal complexification. We demonstrate atomic-scale imaging of a calcite crystal growth process in water at one frame per second. The significant improvement in the imaging speed should enable various studies on unexplored atomic-scale interfacial processes.

  18. Real-Time Nanoparticle–Cell Interactions in Physiological Media by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Particle–cell interactions in physiological media are important in determining the fate and transport of nanoparticles and biological responses to them. In this work, these interactions are assessed in real time using a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based platform. Industry-relevant CeO2 and Fe2O3 engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) of two primary particle sizes were synthesized by the flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) based Harvard Versatile Engineering Nanomaterials Generation System (Harvard VENGES) and used in this study. The ENPs were attached on AFM tips, and the atomic force between the tip and lung epithelia cells (A549), adhered on a substrate, was measured in biological media, with and without the presence of serum proteins. Two metrics were used to assess the nanoparticle cell: the detachment force required to separate the ENP from the cell and the number of bonds formed between the cell and the ENPs. The results indicate that these atomic level ENP–cell interaction forces strongly depend on the physiological media. The presence of serum proteins reduced both the detachment force and the number of bonds by approximately 50% indicating the important role of the protein corona on the particle cell interactions. Additionally, it was shown that particle to cell interactions were size and material dependent. PMID:25068097

  19. Real-Time Nanoparticle-Cell Interactions in Physiological Media by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Blattmann, Christoph O; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-07-01

    Particle-cell interactions in physiological media are important in determining the fate and transport of nanoparticles and biological responses to them. In this work, these interactions are assessed in real time using a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based platform. Industry-relevant CeO2 and Fe2O3 engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) of two primary particle sizes were synthesized by the flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) based Harvard Versatile Engineering Nanomaterials Generation System (Harvard VENGES) and used in this study. The ENPs were attached on AFM tips, and the atomic force between the tip and lung epithelia cells (A549), adhered on a substrate, was measured in biological media, with and without the presence of serum proteins. Two metrics were used to assess the nanoparticle cell: the detachment force required to separate the ENP from the cell and the number of bonds formed between the cell and the ENPs. The results indicate that these atomic level ENP-cell interaction forces strongly depend on the physiological media. The presence of serum proteins reduced both the detachment force and the number of bonds by approximately 50% indicating the important role of the protein corona on the particle cell interactions. Additionally, it was shown that particle to cell interactions were size and material dependent. PMID:25068097

  20. Analysis of various sequence-specific triplexes by electron and atomic force microscopies.

    PubMed Central

    Cherny, D I; Fourcade, A; Svinarchuk, F; Nielsen, P E; Malvy, C; Delain, E

    1998-01-01

    Sequence-specific interactions of 20-mer G,A-containing triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and bis-PNAs (peptide nucleic acids) with double-stranded DNA was visualized by electron (EM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopies. Triplexes formed by biotinylated TFOs are easily detected by both EM and AFM in which streptavidin is a marker. AFM images of the unlabeled triplex within a long plasmid DNA show a approximately 0.4-nm height increment of the double helix within the target site position. TFOs conjugated to a 74-nt-long oligonucleotide forming a 33-bp-long hairpin form extremely stable triplexes with the target site that are readily imaged by both EM and AFM as protruding DNA. The short duplex protrudes in a perpendicular direction relative to the double helix axis, either in the plane of the support or out of it. In the latter case, the apparent height of the protrusion is approximately 1.5 nm, when that of the triplex site is increased by 0.3-0.4 nm. Triplex formation by bis-PNA, in which two decamers of PNA are connected via a flexible linker, causes deformations of the double helix at the target site, which is readily detected as kinks by both EM and AFM. Moreover, AFM shows that these kinks are often accompanied by an increase in the DNA apparent height of approximately 35%. This work shows the first direct visualization of sequence-specific interaction of TFOs and PNAs, with their target sequences within long plasmid DNAs, through the measurements of the apparent height of the DNA double helix by AFM. PMID:9533714